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It may not be quite as unified as The Narrative makes it seem:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TynqK1TX4zI

 
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  1. Oh, it’s fragile as all hell. The GOP currently just lacks anybody politically competent-and frankly, who has enough of a pair, too-to take advantage of it.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @nebulafox

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies. The Never-Trumpers view that the Democratic Party’s neoliberal economic transformation under Bill Clinton must be preserved at all costs. The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @nebulafox, @Mr. Anon

  2. My goodness.

    I hope no one shows this to Biden.

    VP material, right there.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • LOL: Mr McKenna, bomag, trelane
  3. Well, she’s strong on immigration.

  4. This is a joke right ?

    • Replies: @fish
    @AKAHorace


    This is a joke right ?
     
    Yeah......all ten minutes of it!

    You have to give her props though for doing so much with perhaps what....eight words!
  5. Diversity is our greatest strength. Only a bigot would believe otherwise. Israel, Japan, South Korea, China, Iceland, Finland etc need more diversity if they are ever to become great countries.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @Ad70titusrevenge

    Actually diversity can be a strength. Roof-Top Koreans in the Nineties, Turks in the London riots 10 years ago, Arabs now. Without these surrendering would be universal.

    Replies: @bigdicknick

  6. That’s a lot of repetition. It seems to be pretty common among black YouTubers. 10 minutes of vid with 1 minute of actual message.

    Ok, who wants to go on a multi day road trip with this woman in the back seat? Any takers?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anon


    Ok, who wants to go on a multi day road trip with this woman in the back seat? Any takers?
     
    The money for the ball gag is coming out of your pocket, I assume?
  7. Arabs are right about blacks.

    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Imagine that woman's rant if she knew the history of the Arab slave trade, or the reasons there are so few Afro-Arabs (and Afro-Turks) descended from slaves!

    Replies: @anon

  8. Complete and total disgrace to the Corps:

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    "Conduct Unbecoming" is a good catch-all offence, but I doubt this Marine will catch any heat.

    Although I'm sure if his tape said "It's Okay to Be White" he'd do a stretch in the brig before a dishonorable discharge.

    It's all so tiresome.

    , @The Alarmist
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Rotten to the Corps.

    , @68W58
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    He apparently was medically retired over 10 years ago.

  9. My new favorite video — can’t stop watching or laughing! Does she have a channel I can subscribe to?

  10. I’m no expert on the Koran, but I’m fairly confident that muslim/ayrabs havE some sort of religious prohibition against having carnal knowledge with ones mother. She may be mistaken with her universal adjective she used to describe them, among other things.

  11. I heard “citizenship.” Must be a Sailer reader.

  12. Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @danand

    They more likely had to bus in the black people (although not from Walnut Creek).

    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @JimB
    @danand


    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?
     
    Mostly they are 20- to 30-something college grads with crappy service or non-profit jobs in San Francisco who are one back injury or drug conviction away from an urban camping adventure on Bryant Street.
    , @Michelle
    @danand

    I thought the same, the lady knows her guns. The result of having relatives with law enforcement backgrounds, no doubt.

    , @Single malt
    @danand

    IMHO 90% of wypipo in the SF Bay Area are down with BLM. In mostly white Los Altos on Friday there was a BLM “protest” march thru town on Friday that was mostly young, white but had its share of middle-aged and geezer whites, and, of course, a fair number of Asians and a handful of young black kids (one of whom was leading the chants with a bullhorn).

    , @Pericles
    @danand

    Frisco needs a lot more black people. A lot more. Oakland too, by the way.

  13. Coalition seems strong here. White leftists and some black guys come together to boo Minneapolis mayor in unison.

    Mayor Jacob Frey Says He Won’t Defund Police, Mob Turns On Him Immediately

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOFKk76M3jY

    • LOL: Sean
  14. Samuel Jackson has really let himself go.

    • LOL: black sea, Ron Mexico
  15. https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1266129167776546816

    Don’t say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

    • Replies: @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    , @dr kill
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Automatic? Talk about tiresome.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Black people CAN'T be poor. The guy on the right is holding a Kriss Vector SDP pistol that retails for $1,349. Kind of like that Black Militiaman who showed where Ahmaud Arbery was killed with an FN- SCAR 17 ($3,569).

    https://kriss-usa.com/item/vector-sdp/

  16. Illinois does have concealed carry, Madame.

  17. So. Gun control is merely a means of blacks to disarm potential victims. Got it.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  18. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1266129167776546816

    Don't say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

    Replies: @Ed, @dr kill, @Joe Stalin

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ed



    Don’t say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

     

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

     

    It said "St Paul", not Minneapolis. Where Dale St meets I-94, near the Capitol and Cathedral, there is a black-owned business that, among other things, helps the community get their concealed-carry licenses.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Ed


    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.
     
    Maybe they're Somalis. Some of them are probably familiar with an AK-47............from the Old Country.
  19. This is hilarious.

    She is angry at not being able to loot “cheap ass Chinese” stuff, and not only posts a video but actually complains to the cops about Ay-rabs stopping her looting.

    It looks like the Black underclass have assumed this is the new normal.

    I guess it is only a matter of time before the cops will actually start responding to such complaints.

    “Hey, Ay-rab, did you stop this lady looting? You have insurance!”

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @jimmyriddle

    Sobering because increasingly accurate.

    Insanity Reigns.

  20. Late last year an elderly Somali man asked a group of AA kids to quiet down on a bus, they killed him.

    https://spokesman-recorder.com/2019/11/20/senseless-killing-of-somali-elder-raises-sensitive-issues/

    • Replies: @danand
    @Ed

    Ed from your linked article:

    “...both the Somali and the AADOS (African American Descendants of Slaves) communities to suspect that the constant news coverage was projecting an internecine conflict between the two groups.”

    “I believe the mainstream media wants to create a divide between Native African Americans and Africans.”

    “There are tensions that exist between Somali and the African American community, and this is due to U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”

    New to me - AADOS

    My mind associated this acronym instantly with adios, which also may be good in practice; just stay away.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Anonymous

    , @Charlotte
    @Ed

    I love the bit where Trump’s manners are blamed for young black men not respecting their elders.

  21. More evidence that Mexicans like to live dangerously: theirs is the only country in the world that has not introduced any travel restrictions due to Covid-19.

    According to Timatic, whatever that is:

    Interactive Coronavirus (Covid-19) Travel Regulations Map (powered by Timatic)

  22. If Trump has the courage to be accused of racism, a series of campaign ads showing the looters looting and cops kneeling contrasted with Trump doing his tarmac photo ops with cops standing strong should be hard to beat. You could throw in one Antifa incident in each ad for cosmetic reasons, but make it clear to non-blacks that voting for Biden means more of this.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Dave Pinsen

    Almost all non-Whites would vote even more heavily for Biden. Only a tiny fraction own business that would get looted. Meanwhile, they would be delighted to see their White rivals fired, or killed, or their houses burnt down. Easier and cheaper pickings for them.

    Meanwhile every White woman and girl below menopause (and some above it) would get lady tingles just thinking about how ... keeping it real all that looting, beatings, and riots are.

    Pretty much every White woman has let her Kardashian out to play -- degeneracy and the fantasy of being a rapper's whore being pushed 24/7 on first TV then social media has played a heavy role in all of this.

    Lock up young woman and they don't get hit on constantly by Alpha A-holes who give them lady tingles so they know they are alive? Bad. Put up a gonzo amateur porn dude and ex con thug who dies and they likely all knew from his videos and as soon as you can Dhokar Tsarnaev you have female celebrities shaving their heads like Vichy whore collaborators, going Bald for BLM. And the like. OF COURSE young women after being cooped up with beta males want White men abolished or at least put in work camps, and their very own aspiring rapper.

    We have a White woman problem and White guy problem. Almost all White guys ESPECIALLY the smart ones are not thuggish and dangerous enough to create lady tingles and thus at least neutrality among White women. And White women only care about tingles uber alles.

    , @wren
    @Dave Pinsen

    A family member was listening to Abba's Waterloo today.

    In my mind I could see someone making a video of Biden kneeling, juxtaposed with all the looters and rioters.

    , @Alden
    @Dave Pinsen

    There’s already a Trump re election AD on TV. It’s about the economy. He walks around smiling through backgrounds of people working different jobs Trump made the economy thrive. Is the message. It’s an excellent AD

    In contrast to the democrats we will fight for blacks illegal immigrants gays and weirdos. ADs

  23. I wonder if her cousin is good at his work.

  24. @danand
    Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    https://youtu.be/dwF0Ip2l2no

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @JimB, @Michelle, @Single malt, @Pericles

    They more likely had to bus in the black people (although not from Walnut Creek).

    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.
     
    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens. Frisco has drunk deeply of the Corona-Koolaid.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @The Wild Geese Howard

  25. Ed says:

    The media was predicting one million protestors in DC. During the day they described them as one of the largest protests DC has ever seen. By tonight they’re reduced to saying that more than 10,000 folks protested in DC.

    For perspective March for Life conducted in January is described as having “hundreds of thousands“ attendees.

    “In massive day of rallies, more than 10,000 people pour into nation’s capital to protest racism, police brutality“

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/protesters-gather-for-massive-day-of-rallies-in-dc/2020/06/06/92cd6838-a6cb-11ea-bb20-ebf0921f3bbd_story.html

    • Thanks: Charon, Goatweed
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Ed

    Good God you're right. It's almost as though no one showed up.
    This being the Tass, I mean the NYT, one must read between the lines.



    One of the largest protests was in the nation’s capital, where new fences, concrete barriers and a force of unidentifiable guards have shrouded the White House, projecting a new symbolism of militarized defensiveness rather than openness and democracy.
     
    This is what passes for reportage in the New NYT. This is not (officially) an editorial.

    A multiethnic, multigenerational crowd of thousands of protesters converged there, at the mouth of Lafayette Square. Demonstrators on foot and bicycle headed to the freshly painted Black Lives Matter mural on the main thoroughfare, passing cars with “BLM” and “Stop Killing Us” written on their rear windows. Later, they also passed people sipping cocktails at a few upscale restaurants open for outdoor dining.
     
    Huh what?

    At times, it felt as if the entire city had emptied into downtown Washington as the numbers swelled to high for the two weeks. Lines of protesters — often but not always masked against the virus — snaked their way through side streets, while others converged in nearby parks.
     
    Sounds like a blow-out. And yes, the grammar of that sentence is as written.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/06/us/protests-today-police-george-floyd.html
     

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Ed

    A protest two orders of magnitude smaller than the hyperbolic media prediction is a good thing.

    It means they're running out of stream. It could also mean that some of the agitator networks and busing operations have quietly been rolled up in the background.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Alden

  26. According to Twitter, these Arabs are Yemenis and maybe some Palestinians too.

    By the way, this is Bellingham, near the U.S.-Canada border. It’s a Whitopia that’s around 1% Black.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I think that's near a place called Abbottsford? I remember going to an airshow there in the '70s

    The Thunderbirds display team were there.

    That seemed like a pretty rural redneck kind of place back then (compared to Vancouver). Hard to believe this hysteria has spread to places like that.

    Maybe it's been gentrified?

    Replies: @CJ

    , @Black-hole creator
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is what really pisses me off - all these white youths protesting against something they have no idea about while living in sheltered communities. I'd propose a reparations tax - if you live in a >90% non-NAM community, you need to give 10% of your income to PoC; >95% - 25% of your income; <50% you get some of that gibs regardless of your skin color. Something like that, Raj Chetty can do the math, just make sure Indians do not count as NAM. Oh and by community, I mean like a city block not the whole city. Make use of that fine census data.

  27. @nebulafox
    Oh, it's fragile as all hell. The GOP currently just lacks anybody politically competent-and frankly, who has enough of a pair, too-to take advantage of it.

    Replies: @Kronos

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies. The Never-Trumpers view that the Democratic Party’s neoliberal economic transformation under Bill Clinton must be preserved at all costs. The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos


    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies.
     
    The stinky truth is that free-market economics lets people behave as they will. Your argument is really with the people, then.

    If the guy at the drive-thru spits in your taco, which actually happened in my old neighborhood, should the boss be allowed to fire him? Or should the fellow's job be protected, at least during a drawn-out investigation?

    The victim in this case was a police officer in his cruiser. Was his filing a complaint against the guy "police brutality"?

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    , @nebulafox
    @Kronos

    With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last? If one makes the case for "making the market work" in the service of ordinary American citizens, it'd be a different story, but nobody in the leadership of either major party doing that. We instead have socialism for massive corporations. And why would they? They wouldn't want to lose their cushy lobbyist jobs when they lose.

    I've repeatedly stated in previous comments that treating the free market and free trade as holy writ is going to be a no-sell with a generation of Americans that knows they'll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents. Even on the Right: guys like Hawley and Carlson clearly get the effect of free market fundamentalism on social norms and stability, even if our gerontocracy holdout elites don't (or don't care). This is going to be the most salient political shift out there in these coming decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying, @Alice in Wonderland

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Kronos


    The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.
     
    They got a Ross Perot - his name is Donald Trump. He's no danger to any neoliberals.

    The fact is, evern if Bernie were elected, the Democratic Party establishment would find a way of co-opting him and his administration.

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @Gabe Ruth

  28. @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Don’t say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    It said “St Paul”, not Minneapolis. Where Dale St meets I-94, near the Capitol and Cathedral, there is a black-owned business that, among other things, helps the community get their concealed-carry licenses.

  29. I like Steve’s phase the “Coalition of the Fringes,” but the Democratic Party was at its most successful when it was made up of southern whites, Catholics, Jews, and northern Blacks – none of whom had anything in common with any other group in the party. That New Deal coalition ruled America for three decades.

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
    @Pincher Martin

    Maybe because, beyond the pageantry, these groups did, for a time, have recognized common interests? Once these interests stopped being recognized as common, or were replaced by divisive "wedge" issues considered more important, the coalition dissolved.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Pincher Martin

    Because that coalition provided the conditions for jobs, decent educational systems, public beautification and drastic infrastructure improvements.

    Someone ought to try recreating it. Most inherently like law and order and solid jobs.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  30. Those are likely modified semi-automatic AKMs.

  31. @Kronos
    @nebulafox

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies. The Never-Trumpers view that the Democratic Party’s neoliberal economic transformation under Bill Clinton must be preserved at all costs. The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @nebulafox, @Mr. Anon

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies.

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics lets people behave as they will. Your argument is really with the people, then.

    If the guy at the drive-thru spits in your taco, which actually happened in my old neighborhood, should the boss be allowed to fire him? Or should the fellow’s job be protected, at least during a drawn-out investigation?

    The victim in this case was a police officer in his cruiser. Was his filing a complaint against the guy “police brutality”?

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @Reg Cæsar

    Heaven forbid anyone in the land of the free and the home of the brave ever be "incentivized" to do anything they didn't really want to (aside from economically, of course).

  32. @Kronos
    @nebulafox

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies. The Never-Trumpers view that the Democratic Party’s neoliberal economic transformation under Bill Clinton must be preserved at all costs. The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @nebulafox, @Mr. Anon

    With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last? If one makes the case for “making the market work” in the service of ordinary American citizens, it’d be a different story, but nobody in the leadership of either major party doing that. We instead have socialism for massive corporations. And why would they? They wouldn’t want to lose their cushy lobbyist jobs when they lose.

    I’ve repeatedly stated in previous comments that treating the free market and free trade as holy writ is going to be a no-sell with a generation of Americans that knows they’ll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents. Even on the Right: guys like Hawley and Carlson clearly get the effect of free market fundamentalism on social norms and stability, even if our gerontocracy holdout elites don’t (or don’t care). This is going to be the most salient political shift out there in these coming decades.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Lot
    @nebulafox

    “ With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last?”

    The Americans whose opinions count have never wavered in their support of globocapitalism.

    The only question is how woke and diverse the boards of directors will be.

    Did you know that Microsoft’s 97% Indian H1B coolieforce features 117 different castes and other backward tribes?

    https://inc42.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/codess.jpg

    , @notsaying
    @nebulafox

    I think most people are surprised to see how this George Floyd protest movement sprung up so suddenly into such a big thing. It's overseas too. All three elements -- the peaceful protesters, the looters and the troublemakers -- seem to be organized with great communications and organization. I am hoping it becomes clear how they managed to pull this all off so quickly across America.

    It makes me wonder: if so many people are out on the street over something that probably won't happen to them personally, isn't it possible we could get far more people out over the economic survival issues that are crushing so many Americans on a daily basis? More to the point: could we get people making political demands that the politicians would have to respond to? People are fed up. The question is, are they ready to fight for themselves? I would love to see a lot more of America's wealth going to the workers.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @TomSchmidt

    , @Alice in Wonderland
    @nebulafox


    a generation of Americans that knows they’ll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents.
     
    This is not exactly true.

    Far more young people are immigrants or children of immigrants than boomers or Xers. So, the whole generation is poorer than native born boomers and Xers, but not poorer than their own individual parents. Now, they are far more jealous because of the wealth around them, but they are not poorer than their actual parents.
  33. JimB says:
    @danand
    Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    https://youtu.be/dwF0Ip2l2no

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @JimB, @Michelle, @Single malt, @Pericles

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Mostly they are 20- to 30-something college grads with crappy service or non-profit jobs in San Francisco who are one back injury or drug conviction away from an urban camping adventure on Bryant Street.

  34. @Ed
    Late last year an elderly Somali man asked a group of AA kids to quiet down on a bus, they killed him.

    https://spokesman-recorder.com/2019/11/20/senseless-killing-of-somali-elder-raises-sensitive-issues/

    Replies: @danand, @Charlotte

    Ed from your linked article:

    “…both the Somali and the AADOS (African American Descendants of Slaves) communities to suspect that the constant news coverage was projecting an internecine conflict between the two groups.”

    “I believe the mainstream media wants to create a divide between Native African Americans and Africans.”

    “There are tensions that exist between Somali and the African American community, and this is due to U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”

    New to me – AADOS

    My mind associated this acronym instantly with adios, which also may be good in practice; just stay away.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @danand


    "U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”
     
    Hmm, I'm torn. On the one hand, it's universally sound advice; on the other, Customs officers just might be exceeding their remit a tad.
    , @Anonymous
    @danand

    The next Democrat administration will probably implement some form of slavery reparations. It's understandable that American blacks who were actual slaves don't want this money going to FOB Africans who have no connection to this.

  35. After watching that video, who can argue with that girl?

    • Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Paul

    Now, imagine being a street cop with Chicago PD sent to take care of something like a traffic accident. Like one car T-bones another in an intersection and the wreckers are going to have to come to clear it up. She's one of the drivers, and you have to get her information & testimony. Or maybe she's a witness who 'saw it all" and you have to get her testimony.

    Really big fun, eh?

    Now for the bonus round, imagine answering a domestic disturbance call and meeting both her and her male counterpart on the front stoop. Don't screw up or the feminist organizations will be on your agency with a vengeance!

    Anyone ready to be a city cop on a beat, yet?

    Those COPS shows aren't made up...

  36. If stores such as that were not there, what would be available to loot?

  37. Off Topic

    Has anyone seen the video of the white Irish kid being stabbed by Africans in Ireland? They’re trying to remove and hide the video. If this was an African being stabbed by white kids while he was lying helpless on the ground it would be being broadcast by every media outlet around the clock.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Emblematic

    Is it from this week? It looked kind of low resolution for 2020.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  38. @danand
    Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    https://youtu.be/dwF0Ip2l2no

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @JimB, @Michelle, @Single malt, @Pericles

    I thought the same, the lady knows her guns. The result of having relatives with law enforcement backgrounds, no doubt.

  39. Lot says:
    @nebulafox
    @Kronos

    With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last? If one makes the case for "making the market work" in the service of ordinary American citizens, it'd be a different story, but nobody in the leadership of either major party doing that. We instead have socialism for massive corporations. And why would they? They wouldn't want to lose their cushy lobbyist jobs when they lose.

    I've repeatedly stated in previous comments that treating the free market and free trade as holy writ is going to be a no-sell with a generation of Americans that knows they'll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents. Even on the Right: guys like Hawley and Carlson clearly get the effect of free market fundamentalism on social norms and stability, even if our gerontocracy holdout elites don't (or don't care). This is going to be the most salient political shift out there in these coming decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying, @Alice in Wonderland

    “ With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last?”

    The Americans whose opinions count have never wavered in their support of globocapitalism.

    The only question is how woke and diverse the boards of directors will be.

    Did you know that Microsoft’s 97% Indian H1B coolieforce features 117 different castes and other backward tribes?

  40. Well, that was quite a performance.

    I could see her point if I thought she was afraid that some trigger happy business owners with guns might end up killing some innocent black people.

    But her real concern seems to be that insured business owners are using guns to discourage looters from breaking into their stores. She doesn’t want any black looters to get hurt. I wonder if she would have been ticked off if black store owners had guns too.

    I bet her cousin the policeman is very relieved that she didn’t mention his name and the city he works for.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @notsaying

    I believe she did mention her cousin's name, but I'm not going to subject myself to her rant again to find out.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @notsaying

    "I bet her cousin the policeman is very relieved that she didn’t mention his name and the city he works for."

    She mentioned "75Th & Stony Island."

    That means she is just a few blocks from 76Th & Constance - South Shore High School in CHICAGO.

    Where Nobel Prize winner James Watson attended, Larry Ellison, Suze Orman, Mandy Patinkin, Robert Conrad, even Mayor Jane Byrne's hair dresser Ernest Collins as well.

    I caught a clip on the television this morning of some ninny anti-gun Black Rep. saying how she didn't think much of people having 'military-style guns.'

    So the Black women are unified in their opposition to the Masses being able to resist the Black Supremacists.

    It's time to get rid of Chicago and Cook County's assault weapon and large capacity magazine ban and Black woman Preckwinkle's gun and ammo tax. And the judges that uphold these anti-gun statutes.

    Pronto.

  41. @Paul
    After watching that video, who can argue with that girl?

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read

    Now, imagine being a street cop with Chicago PD sent to take care of something like a traffic accident. Like one car T-bones another in an intersection and the wreckers are going to have to come to clear it up. She’s one of the drivers, and you have to get her information & testimony. Or maybe she’s a witness who ‘saw it all” and you have to get her testimony.

    Really big fun, eh?

    Now for the bonus round, imagine answering a domestic disturbance call and meeting both her and her male counterpart on the front stoop. Don’t screw up or the feminist organizations will be on your agency with a vengeance!

    Anyone ready to be a city cop on a beat, yet?

    Those COPS shows aren’t made up…

  42. @Dave Pinsen
    If Trump has the courage to be accused of racism, a series of campaign ads showing the looters looting and cops kneeling contrasted with Trump doing his tarmac photo ops with cops standing strong should be hard to beat. You could throw in one Antifa incident in each ad for cosmetic reasons, but make it clear to non-blacks that voting for Biden means more of this.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @wren, @Alden

    Almost all non-Whites would vote even more heavily for Biden. Only a tiny fraction own business that would get looted. Meanwhile, they would be delighted to see their White rivals fired, or killed, or their houses burnt down. Easier and cheaper pickings for them.

    Meanwhile every White woman and girl below menopause (and some above it) would get lady tingles just thinking about how … keeping it real all that looting, beatings, and riots are.

    Pretty much every White woman has let her Kardashian out to play — degeneracy and the fantasy of being a rapper’s whore being pushed 24/7 on first TV then social media has played a heavy role in all of this.

    Lock up young woman and they don’t get hit on constantly by Alpha A-holes who give them lady tingles so they know they are alive? Bad. Put up a gonzo amateur porn dude and ex con thug who dies and they likely all knew from his videos and as soon as you can Dhokar Tsarnaev you have female celebrities shaving their heads like Vichy whore collaborators, going Bald for BLM. And the like. OF COURSE young women after being cooped up with beta males want White men abolished or at least put in work camps, and their very own aspiring rapper.

    We have a White woman problem and White guy problem. Almost all White guys ESPECIALLY the smart ones are not thuggish and dangerous enough to create lady tingles and thus at least neutrality among White women. And White women only care about tingles uber alles.

  43. @notsaying
    Well, that was quite a performance.

    I could see her point if I thought she was afraid that some trigger happy business owners with guns might end up killing some innocent black people.

    But her real concern seems to be that insured business owners are using guns to discourage looters from breaking into their stores. She doesn't want any black looters to get hurt. I wonder if she would have been ticked off if black store owners had guns too.

    I bet her cousin the policeman is very relieved that she didn't mention his name and the city he works for.

    Replies: @black sea, @Joe Stalin

    I believe she did mention her cousin’s name, but I’m not going to subject myself to her rant again to find out.

  44. I think a better case of coalition breakdown is our new favorite Hispanic man of the hour, Chainsaw Man Daniel Pena of Mcallen Texas. He looked pumped up and truly angry about all this nonsense going on.

  45. @jimmyriddle
    This is hilarious.

    She is angry at not being able to loot "cheap ass Chinese" stuff, and not only posts a video but actually complains to the cops about Ay-rabs stopping her looting.

    It looks like the Black underclass have assumed this is the new normal.

    I guess it is only a matter of time before the cops will actually start responding to such complaints.

    "Hey, Ay-rab, did you stop this lady looting? You have insurance!"

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Sobering because increasingly accurate.

    Insanity Reigns.

    • Agree: Alan Mercer
  46. Black people are allowed to loot and steal because of slavery, Jim Crow, etc etc. Rules and following the law is for white people. This is obvious to all.

  47. @danand
    @Ed

    Ed from your linked article:

    “...both the Somali and the AADOS (African American Descendants of Slaves) communities to suspect that the constant news coverage was projecting an internecine conflict between the two groups.”

    “I believe the mainstream media wants to create a divide between Native African Americans and Africans.”

    “There are tensions that exist between Somali and the African American community, and this is due to U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”

    New to me - AADOS

    My mind associated this acronym instantly with adios, which also may be good in practice; just stay away.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Anonymous

    “U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”

    Hmm, I’m torn. On the one hand, it’s universally sound advice; on the other, Customs officers just might be exceeding their remit a tad.

  48. I can’t help liking her.

    She has good physiognomy for a black and is articulate in her own way.

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    @Father Coughlin

    This lady deserves a spot on The View. She's a natural.

  49. @nebulafox
    @Kronos

    With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last? If one makes the case for "making the market work" in the service of ordinary American citizens, it'd be a different story, but nobody in the leadership of either major party doing that. We instead have socialism for massive corporations. And why would they? They wouldn't want to lose their cushy lobbyist jobs when they lose.

    I've repeatedly stated in previous comments that treating the free market and free trade as holy writ is going to be a no-sell with a generation of Americans that knows they'll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents. Even on the Right: guys like Hawley and Carlson clearly get the effect of free market fundamentalism on social norms and stability, even if our gerontocracy holdout elites don't (or don't care). This is going to be the most salient political shift out there in these coming decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying, @Alice in Wonderland

    I think most people are surprised to see how this George Floyd protest movement sprung up so suddenly into such a big thing. It’s overseas too. All three elements — the peaceful protesters, the looters and the troublemakers — seem to be organized with great communications and organization. I am hoping it becomes clear how they managed to pull this all off so quickly across America.

    It makes me wonder: if so many people are out on the street over something that probably won’t happen to them personally, isn’t it possible we could get far more people out over the economic survival issues that are crushing so many Americans on a daily basis? More to the point: could we get people making political demands that the politicians would have to respond to? People are fed up. The question is, are they ready to fight for themselves? I would love to see a lot more of America’s wealth going to the workers.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @notsaying


    I would love to see a lot more of America’s wealth going to the workers.
     
    Lol. I would love to win the lottery.

    The elites are planning to replace the unruly masses with robots or their equivalent. After watching the great unwashed in action these past couple of weeks, who can blame them?

    If you call a robot racist, it will just stomp your face in....

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @TomSchmidt
    @notsaying

    "How can we turn justified anger against crony capitalist exploitation away from us? Thank you, Derek Chauvin."

    Flare out all that outrage against cops and "racism" and you never have to undo crony capitalism.

    Look up subchapter T if you want workers to have the "carried interest" tax rates the wealthy get.

  50. She’s tough on immigration and trade with China. #Maga

    • Replies: @wren
    @JohnnyD

    She seems more neocon bomb, bomb, bomb eye-ran and bomb, bomb, bomb eye-raq to me.

  51. @Ed
    Late last year an elderly Somali man asked a group of AA kids to quiet down on a bus, they killed him.

    https://spokesman-recorder.com/2019/11/20/senseless-killing-of-somali-elder-raises-sensitive-issues/

    Replies: @danand, @Charlotte

    I love the bit where Trump’s manners are blamed for young black men not respecting their elders.

  52. @danand
    Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    https://youtu.be/dwF0Ip2l2no

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @JimB, @Michelle, @Single malt, @Pericles

    IMHO 90% of wypipo in the SF Bay Area are down with BLM. In mostly white Los Altos on Friday there was a BLM “protest” march thru town on Friday that was mostly young, white but had its share of middle-aged and geezer whites, and, of course, a fair number of Asians and a handful of young black kids (one of whom was leading the chants with a bullhorn).

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  53. @Ed
    The media was predicting one million protestors in DC. During the day they described them as one of the largest protests DC has ever seen. By tonight they’re reduced to saying that more than 10,000 folks protested in DC.

    For perspective March for Life conducted in January is described as having “hundreds of thousands“ attendees.


    “In massive day of rallies, more than 10,000 people pour into nation’s capital to protest racism, police brutality“

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/protesters-gather-for-massive-day-of-rallies-in-dc/2020/06/06/92cd6838-a6cb-11ea-bb20-ebf0921f3bbd_story.html
     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Good God you’re right. It’s almost as though no one showed up.
    This being the Tass, I mean the NYT, one must read between the lines.

    One of the largest protests was in the nation’s capital, where new fences, concrete barriers and a force of unidentifiable guards have shrouded the White House, projecting a new symbolism of militarized defensiveness rather than openness and democracy.

    This is what passes for reportage in the New NYT. This is not (officially) an editorial.

    A multiethnic, multigenerational crowd of thousands of protesters converged there, at the mouth of Lafayette Square. Demonstrators on foot and bicycle headed to the freshly painted Black Lives Matter mural on the main thoroughfare, passing cars with “BLM” and “Stop Killing Us” written on their rear windows. Later, they also passed people sipping cocktails at a few upscale restaurants open for outdoor dining.

    Huh what?

    At times, it felt as if the entire city had emptied into downtown Washington as the numbers swelled to high for the two weeks. Lines of protesters — often but not always masked against the virus — snaked their way through side streets, while others converged in nearby parks.

    Sounds like a blow-out. And yes, the grammar of that sentence is as written.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/06/us/protests-today-police-george-floyd.html

  54. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Complete and total disgrace to the Corps:

    https://twitter.com/RobertMaguire_/status/1269474911145394176

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @The Alarmist, @68W58

    “Conduct Unbecoming” is a good catch-all offence, but I doubt this Marine will catch any heat.

    Although I’m sure if his tape said “It’s Okay to Be White” he’d do a stretch in the brig before a dishonorable discharge.

    It’s all so tiresome.

  55. @Dave Pinsen
    If Trump has the courage to be accused of racism, a series of campaign ads showing the looters looting and cops kneeling contrasted with Trump doing his tarmac photo ops with cops standing strong should be hard to beat. You could throw in one Antifa incident in each ad for cosmetic reasons, but make it clear to non-blacks that voting for Biden means more of this.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @wren, @Alden

    A family member was listening to Abba’s Waterloo today.

    In my mind I could see someone making a video of Biden kneeling, juxtaposed with all the looters and rioters.

  56. @Emblematic
    Off Topic

    Has anyone seen the video of the white Irish kid being stabbed by Africans in Ireland? They're trying to remove and hide the video. If this was an African being stabbed by white kids while he was lying helpless on the ground it would be being broadcast by every media outlet around the clock.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Is it from this week? It looked kind of low resolution for 2020.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Steve Sailer

    According to Reddit, yes.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/PublicFreakout/comments/gy7cn8/nsfl_irish_boy_stabbed_by_group_of_african_youths/

    https://www.rte.ie/news/munster/2020/0607/1145926-cork-stabbing/

  57. @JohnnyD
    She's tough on immigration and trade with China. #Maga

    Replies: @wren

    She seems more neocon bomb, bomb, bomb eye-ran and bomb, bomb, bomb eye-raq to me.

  58. @Ad70titusrevenge
    Diversity is our greatest strength. Only a bigot would believe otherwise. Israel, Japan, South Korea, China, Iceland, Finland etc need more diversity if they are ever to become great countries.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    Actually diversity can be a strength. Roof-Top Koreans in the Nineties, Turks in the London riots 10 years ago, Arabs now. Without these surrendering would be universal.

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
    @Erik Sieven

    model minorities who refuse to cower show whites that resistance is possible.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  59. Slightly off topic, but Steve has talked about the importance of examining of the effect of behaviour on COVID infection. Would this work as a research proposal ?

    Recent intersectional activism has provided access to COVID transmission events. Unlike earlier transmission events, PCR and antibody testing has been scaled up to levels that can track later infection. Initial transmission events range across a spectrum from pacifist demonstration to near insurrection, Interesting as the results of this study will be to the field of viral epidemiology there are a number of disturbing off site effects in the larger human population that makes it prudent for funding and research organizations to distance themselves from the execution phase of this project while maintaining enough institutional links to ensure full access to data.

  60. @Kronos
    @nebulafox

    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies. The Never-Trumpers view that the Democratic Party’s neoliberal economic transformation under Bill Clinton must be preserved at all costs. The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @nebulafox, @Mr. Anon

    The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.

    They got a Ross Perot – his name is Donald Trump. He’s no danger to any neoliberals.

    The fact is, evern if Bernie were elected, the Democratic Party establishment would find a way of co-opting him and his administration.

    • Replies: @Tlotsi
    @Mr. Anon

    They've already co-opted him.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Gabe Ruth
    @Mr. Anon

    Guess we should pack it all up and go home then.

    Trump campaigned against the giant sucking sound, hasn't governed like he cares to do much about it though. That would entail a willingness to see big line go down. Who knows what Perot would have done, he was probably about as nuts as Trump, but the duopoly wasn't about to find out.

  61. It’s a stereotype but how do black people have such good comedic timing and a way with words? This lady is genuinely hilarious.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @joe_mama

    Lots of practice talking. Ethnicities who talk more- blacks, Jews, Irish, etc- are funnier than those who don't.

  62. @JohnnyWalker123
    According to Twitter, these Arabs are Yemenis and maybe some Palestinians too.

    By the way, this is Bellingham, near the U.S.-Canada border. It's a Whitopia that's around 1% Black.

    https://twitter.com/Bill_Maxwell_/status/1269442221763248129

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Black-hole creator

    I think that’s near a place called Abbottsford? I remember going to an airshow there in the ’70s

    The Thunderbirds display team were there.

    That seemed like a pretty rural redneck kind of place back then (compared to Vancouver). Hard to believe this hysteria has spread to places like that.

    Maybe it’s been gentrified?

    • Replies: @CJ
    @jimmyriddle

    Bellingham has Western Washington University, which has long been a northern mini-Berkeley.

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    According to Twitter, these Arabs are Yemenis and maybe some Palestinians too.

    By the way, this is Bellingham, near the U.S.-Canada border. It's a Whitopia that's around 1% Black.

    https://twitter.com/Bill_Maxwell_/status/1269442221763248129

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Black-hole creator

    This is what really pisses me off – all these white youths protesting against something they have no idea about while living in sheltered communities. I’d propose a reparations tax – if you live in a >90% non-NAM community, you need to give 10% of your income to PoC; >95% – 25% of your income; <50% you get some of that gibs regardless of your skin color. Something like that, Raj Chetty can do the math, just make sure Indians do not count as NAM. Oh and by community, I mean like a city block not the whole city. Make use of that fine census data.

  64. @Pincher Martin
    @danand

    They more likely had to bus in the black people (although not from Walnut Creek).

    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.

    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens. Frisco has drunk deeply of the Corona-Koolaid.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, but they've successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.

    But that's over now. Small businesses in SF can't stay afloat if they aren't allowed to open.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Mr. Anon


    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens.
     
    Indeed.

    There is already at least one reddit hivemind post for my city raging about bars with open patios that are violating social distancing and asking how they can be reported to the authorities.

    The patrons are monsters that should be damned to the blackest pits of hell.

    Rioting for a degenerate criminal? That's A-OK.

    According to the hivemind it's the only valid reason for exiting lockdown.

  65. @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Skeptical. Very few black (American black) businesses in Minneapolis.

    Maybe they’re Somalis. Some of them are probably familiar with an AK-47…………from the Old Country.

  66. Meanwhile, in Scotland…..

    Campaigners rename Glasgow streets linked to slave owners

    In several streets, signs with a black background and white font have appeared alongside the originals

    Activists replaced the names of tobacco merchants and slave trade owners in favour of black campaigners, slaves and those killed in police custody.

    More than 11,500 people have previously signed an online petition to rename streets linked with slave owners.

    Glasgow’s slave trade past is all around us
    Glasgow University’s ‘bold’ move to pay back slave trade profits
    The petition, set up last September, has gained several thousand more supporters in the wake of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

    Cochrane Street – named after 18- Century tobacco lord Andrew Cochrane, was alternatively named “Sheku Bayoh Street”.

    Sheku Bayoh died in 2015 in police custody in Scotland, aged 32 after he was restrained by officers responding to a call in Kirkcaldy, Fife.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-52950006

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Alden
    @syonredux

    Good I’d like to see that happen in Bristol and Liverpool England. It’s time the English acknowledged that evil racist America was an English colony when the Africans arrived in America.

    Replies: @GoRedWings!

  67. anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:

    If you can’t empathize with this woman’s complaints then you haven’t been paying attention. Black people are genuinely confused by organized resistance to chaos.

    • LOL: Bert
  68. @danand
    Most impressed with her driving backwards while both filming and screaming. Sounds like she knows her guns too. Wish there were a Google translator app for whatever dialect she’s speaking, I’m lost.

    Compared to that, this seems heavenly:

    https://youtu.be/dwF0Ip2l2no

    Today’s San Francisco protest, not sure where all the White folks were bussed in from, Walnut Creek? What’s in the heads of those so interested in supporting people who would burn it all down?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @JimB, @Michelle, @Single malt, @Pericles

    Frisco needs a lot more black people. A lot more. Oakland too, by the way.

  69. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.
     
    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens. Frisco has drunk deeply of the Corona-Koolaid.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Yes, but they’ve successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.

    But that’s over now. Small businesses in SF can’t stay afloat if they aren’t allowed to open.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Yes, but they’ve successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.
     
    The lockdown probably had about zero to do with that.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  70. This should be used as part of a public service announcement focused on encouraging vocabulary development.

  71. @Ed
    The media was predicting one million protestors in DC. During the day they described them as one of the largest protests DC has ever seen. By tonight they’re reduced to saying that more than 10,000 folks protested in DC.

    For perspective March for Life conducted in January is described as having “hundreds of thousands“ attendees.


    “In massive day of rallies, more than 10,000 people pour into nation’s capital to protest racism, police brutality“

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/protesters-gather-for-massive-day-of-rallies-in-dc/2020/06/06/92cd6838-a6cb-11ea-bb20-ebf0921f3bbd_story.html
     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @The Wild Geese Howard

    A protest two orders of magnitude smaller than the hyperbolic media prediction is a good thing.

    It means they’re running out of stream. It could also mean that some of the agitator networks and busing operations have quietly been rolled up in the background.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    There was some Internet chatter this morning that a bunch of Antifa types were seen getting on a plane heading out of MN.

    Their destination (home turf, apparently)--Chicago.

    There is big money behind these "movements".

    This is the battle of the elites--behind all the smoke and mirrors...

    , @Alden
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    maybe they’re consolidating their gains. Maybe the TV viewership of the royal funerals for Felony Floyd has dropped off. But for sure they’re preparing for the next riot. Schedule is one week of riot three weeks of peace till November. And a massive outbreak of covid hoax in October forcing the election boards in every state to close the polling places and substitute mail in voting.

    If you have any anti abortion friends tell them he beat that pregnant woman whose home he invaded She was pregnant black and miscarried. 5 big black thugs to rob one woman.

    Instead of endless mourning the death of Felony Floyd tell liberals to google the death of Eric Chang the same year Mike Brown was killed in righteous self defense.

  72. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1266129167776546816

    Don't say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

    Replies: @Ed, @dr kill, @Joe Stalin

    Automatic? Talk about tiresome.

  73. @Pincher Martin
    I like Steve's phase the "Coalition of the Fringes," but the Democratic Party was at its most successful when it was made up of southern whites, Catholics, Jews, and northern Blacks - none of whom had anything in common with any other group in the party. That New Deal coalition ruled America for three decades.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @S. Anonyia

    Maybe because, beyond the pageantry, these groups did, for a time, have recognized common interests? Once these interests stopped being recognized as common, or were replaced by divisive “wedge” issues considered more important, the coalition dissolved.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Fluesterwitz


    Maybe because, beyond the pageantry, these groups did, for a time, have recognized common interests?
     
    Yes, all the groups in the New Deal coalition had a common interest in redistributing wealth through the levers of government power. But how is that much different from today?

    Once these interests stopped being recognized as common, or were replaced by divisive “wedge” issues considered more important, the coalition dissolved.
     
    All political coalitions eventually dissolve, but the New Deal coalition was perhaps the most powerful and influential coalition in American political history (and certainly the most powerful and influential coalition in the 20th century), and the changes it made to American life endured even after the coalition fractured in the late nineteen-sixties.

    Yet the New Deal coalition was very much a coalition of the fringes.

  74. It only needs someone suitably qualified to give Whites their permission slip and it’s all over for the coalition of the fringes.

    More and more it looks like Mister Trump is a gatekeeper.

  75. Was that not Maxine Waters? Impeach 47, impeach 47…

  76. The coalition of the fringes is unsustainable, it will implode, the Karen’s vs Birdman’s, Latisha’s vs Becky’s in the feminist camp to name a few. I have not heard anything about where Hispanics stand in all this new black worshipping hysteria. They have slightly edged out blacks as a percentage of the poulation. Why aren’t they out there screaming “what about us”?

  77. @Father Coughlin
    I can't help liking her.

    She has good physiognomy for a black and is articulate in her own way.

    Replies: @Buck Ransom

    This lady deserves a spot on The View. She’s a natural.

  78. @Mr. Anon
    @Kronos


    The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.
     
    They got a Ross Perot - his name is Donald Trump. He's no danger to any neoliberals.

    The fact is, evern if Bernie were elected, the Democratic Party establishment would find a way of co-opting him and his administration.

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @Gabe Ruth

    They’ve already co-opted him.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Tlotsi

    I doubt it. The trouble is an economic dead man’s switch that developed when pensions were replaced with 401ks/Roth’s starting in 1980.

    https://youtu.be/6pDf09JgVmw

    Older and middle aged Americans are financially chained to US free trade policy. Their retirement funds and overpriced assets (real estate) are higher due to said policies. A major economic shift of higher wages and lower costs would negatively impact them. It’ll be a slow 20 year economic process to revert back to a 1950s industrial economy with gutting most Civil Rights legislation. (I expect Asians and Hispanics will be strongly on board with this.)

    I’d argue that the 1964 Civil Rights Act combined with Black low-IQ have created policies that indirectly induce economic starvation to curtail black crime. That high wages + blacks is akin to highly diabetic people consuming sugar.

    In a Tom Wolfe interview on “The Bonfire of the Vanities” he stated that poverty doesn’t cause crime. (I cant find the video.) But when things were good for middle/upper class people the (black) underclass felt loathing for them and tried murdering and stealing to imitate a wealthy status.

    Imagine a 1890s hospital (pre-insulin) where everyone had to follow the slow starvation diet (the only diabetic treatment available) despite only 1/10 of patients are diabetic. Due to civil rights legislation if non-diabetics get to eat/have sugar than the diabetics must have sugar as well. But the diabetics actually turn into werewolves and kill 25% of all staff and patients. So everyone agrees to the starvation diet unless they have the money to move to another distant hospital. Starvation is agony for everyone (except the medical staff which is exempted due to a grandfather clause.)

    https://youtu.be/10a5cflZzBg

    (It’s a crazy example but I’ve just had two Bloody Mary’s so whatever.)

    US elites understand this dilemma very well. If everyone gets a $5000 stimulus check that means blacks must receive one as well. They’ll buy drugs and guns leading to a massive crime wave we haven’t seen since ever.)

  79. @Erik Sieven
    @Ad70titusrevenge

    Actually diversity can be a strength. Roof-Top Koreans in the Nineties, Turks in the London riots 10 years ago, Arabs now. Without these surrendering would be universal.

    Replies: @bigdicknick

    model minorities who refuse to cower show whites that resistance is possible.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @bigdicknick

    Any group of whites who tried that 'roof Korean' thing would soon find themselves dealing with much worse thugs than black looters (see: Waco 1995)

  80. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Complete and total disgrace to the Corps:

    https://twitter.com/RobertMaguire_/status/1269474911145394176

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @The Alarmist, @68W58

    Rotten to the Corps.

  81. @notsaying
    @nebulafox

    I think most people are surprised to see how this George Floyd protest movement sprung up so suddenly into such a big thing. It's overseas too. All three elements -- the peaceful protesters, the looters and the troublemakers -- seem to be organized with great communications and organization. I am hoping it becomes clear how they managed to pull this all off so quickly across America.

    It makes me wonder: if so many people are out on the street over something that probably won't happen to them personally, isn't it possible we could get far more people out over the economic survival issues that are crushing so many Americans on a daily basis? More to the point: could we get people making political demands that the politicians would have to respond to? People are fed up. The question is, are they ready to fight for themselves? I would love to see a lot more of America's wealth going to the workers.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @TomSchmidt

    I would love to see a lot more of America’s wealth going to the workers.

    Lol. I would love to win the lottery.

    The elites are planning to replace the unruly masses with robots or their equivalent. After watching the great unwashed in action these past couple of weeks, who can blame them?

    If you call a robot racist, it will just stomp your face in….

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Justvisiting

    Robots don't buy things

    No one has solved the problem of the robot takeover. Technology can substitute for human workers but not for human consumers.

    I think recent events cut both ways: yes there were looters and troublemakers but also many passionate rational people out there because they were thoroughly disgusted. It turns out there's a huge army of people willing to turn out if they get riled up enough. The elite has been counting on our continued passivity.

    How many millions would come out if they thought they could get something done about income inequality?

  82. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Ed

    A protest two orders of magnitude smaller than the hyperbolic media prediction is a good thing.

    It means they're running out of stream. It could also mean that some of the agitator networks and busing operations have quietly been rolled up in the background.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Alden

    There was some Internet chatter this morning that a bunch of Antifa types were seen getting on a plane heading out of MN.

    Their destination (home turf, apparently)–Chicago.

    There is big money behind these “movements”.

    This is the battle of the elites–behind all the smoke and mirrors…

  83. @Fluesterwitz
    @Pincher Martin

    Maybe because, beyond the pageantry, these groups did, for a time, have recognized common interests? Once these interests stopped being recognized as common, or were replaced by divisive "wedge" issues considered more important, the coalition dissolved.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Maybe because, beyond the pageantry, these groups did, for a time, have recognized common interests?

    Yes, all the groups in the New Deal coalition had a common interest in redistributing wealth through the levers of government power. But how is that much different from today?

    Once these interests stopped being recognized as common, or were replaced by divisive “wedge” issues considered more important, the coalition dissolved.

    All political coalitions eventually dissolve, but the New Deal coalition was perhaps the most powerful and influential coalition in American political history (and certainly the most powerful and influential coalition in the 20th century), and the changes it made to American life endured even after the coalition fractured in the late nineteen-sixties.

    Yet the New Deal coalition was very much a coalition of the fringes.

  84. @notsaying
    Well, that was quite a performance.

    I could see her point if I thought she was afraid that some trigger happy business owners with guns might end up killing some innocent black people.

    But her real concern seems to be that insured business owners are using guns to discourage looters from breaking into their stores. She doesn't want any black looters to get hurt. I wonder if she would have been ticked off if black store owners had guns too.

    I bet her cousin the policeman is very relieved that she didn't mention his name and the city he works for.

    Replies: @black sea, @Joe Stalin

    “I bet her cousin the policeman is very relieved that she didn’t mention his name and the city he works for.”

    She mentioned “75Th & Stony Island.”

    That means she is just a few blocks from 76Th & Constance – South Shore High School in CHICAGO.

    Where Nobel Prize winner James Watson attended, Larry Ellison, Suze Orman, Mandy Patinkin, Robert Conrad, even Mayor Jane Byrne’s hair dresser Ernest Collins as well.

    I caught a clip on the television this morning of some ninny anti-gun Black Rep. saying how she didn’t think much of people having ‘military-style guns.’

    So the Black women are unified in their opposition to the Masses being able to resist the Black Supremacists.

    It’s time to get rid of Chicago and Cook County’s assault weapon and large capacity magazine ban and Black woman Preckwinkle’s gun and ammo tax. And the judges that uphold these anti-gun statutes.

    Pronto.

  85. @Pincher Martin
    I like Steve's phase the "Coalition of the Fringes," but the Democratic Party was at its most successful when it was made up of southern whites, Catholics, Jews, and northern Blacks - none of whom had anything in common with any other group in the party. That New Deal coalition ruled America for three decades.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @S. Anonyia

    Because that coalition provided the conditions for jobs, decent educational systems, public beautification and drastic infrastructure improvements.

    Someone ought to try recreating it. Most inherently like law and order and solid jobs.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @S. Anonyia

    I don't disagree with any of that, but the greatest political coalition in modern U.S. history still brought together people from the fringes who not only had little in common, but a lot to fight about.

    I mean, if it was as easy as focusing on "law and order and solid jobs," then Trump would have been cruising to re-election before COVID-19 hit. He wasn't.

  86. @joe_mama
    It's a stereotype but how do black people have such good comedic timing and a way with words? This lady is genuinely hilarious.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    Lots of practice talking. Ethnicities who talk more- blacks, Jews, Irish, etc- are funnier than those who don’t.

  87. Aaaaannnnnd, I believe we have a winner for Biden’s VP. One rarely sees such unscripted eloquence these days.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @captflee

    She’s attractive too and has only one chin so she can’t be too fat. And she has great breath control for making long speeches. Maybe she sang in a church choir. I loved it.


    I sent it out to a lot of people and I’m already getting messages back about it. Everybody lives it.

    She did mention the cousin is a Chicago detective. Respectable affirmation action blacks have relatives like her.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  88. @AKAHorace
    This is a joke right ?

    Replies: @fish

    This is a joke right ?

    Yeah……all ten minutes of it!

    You have to give her props though for doing so much with perhaps what….eight words!

  89. “If Trump has the courage to be accused of racism, a series of campaign ads showing the looters looting and cops kneeling contrasted with Trump doing his tarmac photo ops with cops standing strong should be hard to beat.”

    Most whites are now itching for another chance to publicly absolve themselves of the sin of racism.

    They voted in large numbers for Obama in 2008 and 2012 and told themselves it meant they couldn’t be too racist.

    I’m betting 2020 will be viewed by 50%+ of white folk as their next best opportunity to Make America Non-Racist again.

  90. @Reg Cæsar
    @Kronos


    The stinky truth is that free-market economics is still (but wobbly) in control of both political party ideologies.
     
    The stinky truth is that free-market economics lets people behave as they will. Your argument is really with the people, then.

    If the guy at the drive-thru spits in your taco, which actually happened in my old neighborhood, should the boss be allowed to fire him? Or should the fellow's job be protected, at least during a drawn-out investigation?

    The victim in this case was a police officer in his cruiser. Was his filing a complaint against the guy "police brutality"?

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    Heaven forbid anyone in the land of the free and the home of the brave ever be “incentivized” to do anything they didn’t really want to (aside from economically, of course).

  91. The fact that Biden hasn’t announced a VP, shows how weak the KKKrazy glue is now.

    He cannot find anyone that can square his multipolar fringe lunatic party.

    No one can fill the wishes of Mos Eisley now.

    He’ll go black, and lose a lot of shop owner voters, I’d expect.

  92. @Dave Pinsen
    If Trump has the courage to be accused of racism, a series of campaign ads showing the looters looting and cops kneeling contrasted with Trump doing his tarmac photo ops with cops standing strong should be hard to beat. You could throw in one Antifa incident in each ad for cosmetic reasons, but make it clear to non-blacks that voting for Biden means more of this.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @wren, @Alden

    There’s already a Trump re election AD on TV. It’s about the economy. He walks around smiling through backgrounds of people working different jobs Trump made the economy thrive. Is the message. It’s an excellent AD

    In contrast to the democrats we will fight for blacks illegal immigrants gays and weirdos. ADs

  93. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, but they've successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.

    But that's over now. Small businesses in SF can't stay afloat if they aren't allowed to open.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Yes, but they’ve successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.

    The lockdown probably had about zero to do with that.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    It had almost everything to do with it. The Bay Area moved earlier than the big East Coast cities.

    Like NYC and Boston, SF is crowded and its labor force is reliant on mass transit (BART, ferries, buses, muni system, etc.). The virus showed up in the Bay Area early and had until the middle of March to spread with little to prevent it other than official warnings for residents to be careful.

    Yet Boston had more people die of COVID-19 in a single day (53 on May 1st) than have died in three months in SF. At its worse, NYC saw more people die of COVID-19 in an hour than have died in SF since March 1st.

    The effort is almost certainly to be wasted now because while the Bay Area did fairly well in reducing the spread of the virus to a manageable level, the rest of the country did not.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  94. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Ed

    A protest two orders of magnitude smaller than the hyperbolic media prediction is a good thing.

    It means they're running out of stream. It could also mean that some of the agitator networks and busing operations have quietly been rolled up in the background.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Alden

    maybe they’re consolidating their gains. Maybe the TV viewership of the royal funerals for Felony Floyd has dropped off. But for sure they’re preparing for the next riot. Schedule is one week of riot three weeks of peace till November. And a massive outbreak of covid hoax in October forcing the election boards in every state to close the polling places and substitute mail in voting.

    If you have any anti abortion friends tell them he beat that pregnant woman whose home he invaded She was pregnant black and miscarried. 5 big black thugs to rob one woman.

    Instead of endless mourning the death of Felony Floyd tell liberals to google the death of Eric Chang the same year Mike Brown was killed in righteous self defense.

  95. @syonredux
    Meanwhile, in Scotland.....



    Campaigners rename Glasgow streets linked to slave owners

    In several streets, signs with a black background and white font have appeared alongside the originals

    Activists replaced the names of tobacco merchants and slave trade owners in favour of black campaigners, slaves and those killed in police custody.

    More than 11,500 people have previously signed an online petition to rename streets linked with slave owners.

    Glasgow's slave trade past is all around us
    Glasgow University's 'bold' move to pay back slave trade profits
    The petition, set up last September, has gained several thousand more supporters in the wake of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
     

    Cochrane Street - named after 18- Century tobacco lord Andrew Cochrane, was alternatively named "Sheku Bayoh Street".

     


    Sheku Bayoh died in 2015 in police custody in Scotland, aged 32 after he was restrained by officers responding to a call in Kirkcaldy, Fife.
     
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-52950006

    Replies: @Alden

    Good I’d like to see that happen in Bristol and Liverpool England. It’s time the English acknowledged that evil racist America was an English colony when the Africans arrived in America.

    • Replies: @GoRedWings!
    @Alden


    I’d like to see that happen in Bristol and Liverpool England
     
    Seems like your wish was granted. Just an hour ago, the news showed a mob tossing a 'slaver's statue' off the quay in Bristol, England.
  96. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    A lot of young single liberal white people live in San Francisco. The city is nearly half white.
     
    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens. Frisco has drunk deeply of the Corona-Koolaid.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @The Wild Geese Howard

    And it gives them a chance to get out of the house and be around people without getting a severe reprimand from all the lockdown-Karens.

    Indeed.

    There is already at least one reddit hivemind post for my city raging about bars with open patios that are violating social distancing and asking how they can be reported to the authorities.

    The patrons are monsters that should be damned to the blackest pits of hell.

    Rioting for a degenerate criminal? That’s A-OK.

    According to the hivemind it’s the only valid reason for exiting lockdown.

  97. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Arabs are right about blacks.

    Replies: @AnotherGuessModel

    Imagine that woman’s rant if she knew the history of the Arab slave trade, or the reasons there are so few Afro-Arabs (and Afro-Turks) descended from slaves!

    • Replies: @anon
    @AnotherGuessModel

    Imagine that woman’s rant if she knew the history of the Arab slave trade, or the reasons there are so few Afro-Arabs (and Afro-Turks) descended from slaves!

    Imagine teaching anything to that ratchet. This is what an IQ of 85 - 90 sounds like.

    If you like, imagine supervising her in any job. Cashier? Nah. Waitress? Nah. Receptionist? Lol! Even fry cook in the fast food driveup? Just imagine trying to get her to do something useful and not piss of everyone around her.

    wilkey
    Funny that this lady assumes the Ayrabs with “M-16s” and “AK-47s” are going to be killing black people.

    Why funny? It's tribal.

    Why does she assume it’s black people who will be looting the stores?

    Dude, she's not smart enough to be disingenuous, she's just frothing mad at AYrabs and whatever pops up in her head is gonna come out of her mouth. This is how some people are. Take her at her word.

    To me the funniest cog-dis is when she ratchets on about "cheap-ass Chinese crap" one minute and then swears that the AYrabs gotta carry them guns forever, because "we gonna come and clean it out and burn it down" or words to that effect.

    Yeah, it's full of cheap Chinese goods nobody wants, and we're going to take them by force then burn the building. No contradiction there!

  98. @Mr. Anon
    @Kronos


    The Neocons don’t want a Bernie Sanders and Neoliberals don’t want a Ross Perot.
     
    They got a Ross Perot - his name is Donald Trump. He's no danger to any neoliberals.

    The fact is, evern if Bernie were elected, the Democratic Party establishment would find a way of co-opting him and his administration.

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @Gabe Ruth

    Guess we should pack it all up and go home then.

    Trump campaigned against the giant sucking sound, hasn’t governed like he cares to do much about it though. That would entail a willingness to see big line go down. Who knows what Perot would have done, he was probably about as nuts as Trump, but the duopoly wasn’t about to find out.

  99. Funny that this lady assumes the Ayrabs with “M-16s” and “AK-47s” are going to be killing black people. Isn’t that prejudiced? Why does she assume it’s black people who will be looting the stores? I thought it was all Neo-Nazi, Trump-supporting white supremacists masquerading as black people who were rioting. I mean if it really is Trump voters doing the looting shouldn’t the Left want them to be killed?

  100. anon[833] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherGuessModel
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Imagine that woman's rant if she knew the history of the Arab slave trade, or the reasons there are so few Afro-Arabs (and Afro-Turks) descended from slaves!

    Replies: @anon

    Imagine that woman’s rant if she knew the history of the Arab slave trade, or the reasons there are so few Afro-Arabs (and Afro-Turks) descended from slaves!

    Imagine teaching anything to that ratchet. This is what an IQ of 85 – 90 sounds like.

    If you like, imagine supervising her in any job. Cashier? Nah. Waitress? Nah. Receptionist? Lol! Even fry cook in the fast food driveup? Just imagine trying to get her to do something useful and not piss of everyone around her.

    wilkey
    Funny that this lady assumes the Ayrabs with “M-16s” and “AK-47s” are going to be killing black people.

    Why funny? It’s tribal.

    Why does she assume it’s black people who will be looting the stores?

    Dude, she’s not smart enough to be disingenuous, she’s just frothing mad at AYrabs and whatever pops up in her head is gonna come out of her mouth. This is how some people are. Take her at her word.

    To me the funniest cog-dis is when she ratchets on about “cheap-ass Chinese crap” one minute and then swears that the AYrabs gotta carry them guns forever, because “we gonna come and clean it out and burn it down” or words to that effect.

    Yeah, it’s full of cheap Chinese goods nobody wants, and we’re going to take them by force then burn the building. No contradiction there!

  101. @Tlotsi
    @Mr. Anon

    They've already co-opted him.

    Replies: @Kronos

    I doubt it. The trouble is an economic dead man’s switch that developed when pensions were replaced with 401ks/Roth’s starting in 1980.

    Older and middle aged Americans are financially chained to US free trade policy. Their retirement funds and overpriced assets (real estate) are higher due to said policies. A major economic shift of higher wages and lower costs would negatively impact them. It’ll be a slow 20 year economic process to revert back to a 1950s industrial economy with gutting most Civil Rights legislation. (I expect Asians and Hispanics will be strongly on board with this.)

    I’d argue that the 1964 Civil Rights Act combined with Black low-IQ have created policies that indirectly induce economic starvation to curtail black crime. That high wages + blacks is akin to highly diabetic people consuming sugar.

    In a Tom Wolfe interview on “The Bonfire of the Vanities” he stated that poverty doesn’t cause crime. (I cant find the video.) But when things were good for middle/upper class people the (black) underclass felt loathing for them and tried murdering and stealing to imitate a wealthy status.

    Imagine a 1890s hospital (pre-insulin) where everyone had to follow the slow starvation diet (the only diabetic treatment available) despite only 1/10 of patients are diabetic. Due to civil rights legislation if non-diabetics get to eat/have sugar than the diabetics must have sugar as well. But the diabetics actually turn into werewolves and kill 25% of all staff and patients. So everyone agrees to the starvation diet unless they have the money to move to another distant hospital. Starvation is agony for everyone (except the medical staff which is exempted due to a grandfather clause.)

    (It’s a crazy example but I’ve just had two Bloody Mary’s so whatever.)

    US elites understand this dilemma very well. If everyone gets a $5000 stimulus check that means blacks must receive one as well. They’ll buy drugs and guns leading to a massive crime wave we haven’t seen since ever.)

  102. @jimmyriddle
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I think that's near a place called Abbottsford? I remember going to an airshow there in the '70s

    The Thunderbirds display team were there.

    That seemed like a pretty rural redneck kind of place back then (compared to Vancouver). Hard to believe this hysteria has spread to places like that.

    Maybe it's been gentrified?

    Replies: @CJ

    Bellingham has Western Washington University, which has long been a northern mini-Berkeley.

  103. @nebulafox
    @Kronos

    With a decreasing amount of Americans buying into Reagan/Clinton-era ideology about the free market, though, how long is that going to last? If one makes the case for "making the market work" in the service of ordinary American citizens, it'd be a different story, but nobody in the leadership of either major party doing that. We instead have socialism for massive corporations. And why would they? They wouldn't want to lose their cushy lobbyist jobs when they lose.

    I've repeatedly stated in previous comments that treating the free market and free trade as holy writ is going to be a no-sell with a generation of Americans that knows they'll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents. Even on the Right: guys like Hawley and Carlson clearly get the effect of free market fundamentalism on social norms and stability, even if our gerontocracy holdout elites don't (or don't care). This is going to be the most salient political shift out there in these coming decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying, @Alice in Wonderland

    a generation of Americans that knows they’ll likely be poorer and have relative worse lives than their parents.

    This is not exactly true.

    Far more young people are immigrants or children of immigrants than boomers or Xers. So, the whole generation is poorer than native born boomers and Xers, but not poorer than their own individual parents. Now, they are far more jealous because of the wealth around them, but they are not poorer than their actual parents.

  104. @Justvisiting
    @notsaying


    I would love to see a lot more of America’s wealth going to the workers.
     
    Lol. I would love to win the lottery.

    The elites are planning to replace the unruly masses with robots or their equivalent. After watching the great unwashed in action these past couple of weeks, who can blame them?

    If you call a robot racist, it will just stomp your face in....

    Replies: @notsaying

    Robots don’t buy things

    No one has solved the problem of the robot takeover. Technology can substitute for human workers but not for human consumers.

    I think recent events cut both ways: yes there were looters and troublemakers but also many passionate rational people out there because they were thoroughly disgusted. It turns out there’s a huge army of people willing to turn out if they get riled up enough. The elite has been counting on our continued passivity.

    How many millions would come out if they thought they could get something done about income inequality?

  105. If we wait, in many places the Ayrabs, Chicanos, and Blacks will fight the race war themselves and whitey can just sit tighty.

  106. @notsaying
    @nebulafox

    I think most people are surprised to see how this George Floyd protest movement sprung up so suddenly into such a big thing. It's overseas too. All three elements -- the peaceful protesters, the looters and the troublemakers -- seem to be organized with great communications and organization. I am hoping it becomes clear how they managed to pull this all off so quickly across America.

    It makes me wonder: if so many people are out on the street over something that probably won't happen to them personally, isn't it possible we could get far more people out over the economic survival issues that are crushing so many Americans on a daily basis? More to the point: could we get people making political demands that the politicians would have to respond to? People are fed up. The question is, are they ready to fight for themselves? I would love to see a lot more of America's wealth going to the workers.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @TomSchmidt

    “How can we turn justified anger against crony capitalist exploitation away from us? Thank you, Derek Chauvin.”

    Flare out all that outrage against cops and “racism” and you never have to undo crony capitalism.

    Look up subchapter T if you want workers to have the “carried interest” tax rates the wealthy get.

  107. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1266129167776546816

    Don't say Blacks are unwilling to take on looters.

    Replies: @Ed, @dr kill, @Joe Stalin

    Black people CAN’T be poor. The guy on the right is holding a Kriss Vector SDP pistol that retails for $1,349. Kind of like that Black Militiaman who showed where Ahmaud Arbery was killed with an FN- SCAR 17 ($3,569).

    https://kriss-usa.com/item/vector-sdp/

  108. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Yes, but they’ve successfully battled the virus. Only 43 people dead. Compare that to cities like New York and Boston.
     
    The lockdown probably had about zero to do with that.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    It had almost everything to do with it. The Bay Area moved earlier than the big East Coast cities.

    Like NYC and Boston, SF is crowded and its labor force is reliant on mass transit (BART, ferries, buses, muni system, etc.). The virus showed up in the Bay Area early and had until the middle of March to spread with little to prevent it other than official warnings for residents to be careful.

    Yet Boston had more people die of COVID-19 in a single day (53 on May 1st) than have died in three months in SF. At its worse, NYC saw more people die of COVID-19 in an hour than have died in SF since March 1st.

    The effort is almost certainly to be wasted now because while the Bay Area did fairly well in reducing the spread of the virus to a manageable level, the rest of the country did not.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin

    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier. Japan is even more reliant on mass transit (BART is a crappy mass-transit system - not that many people even use it), and is much more densely populated than the bay area. Japan had no real lockdown. Japan has had less than 1,000 CoV deaths.

    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn't have as many black people, 2.) it doesn't have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn't shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better - it's warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.

    The lockdown is and was bullshit.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  109. @S. Anonyia
    @Pincher Martin

    Because that coalition provided the conditions for jobs, decent educational systems, public beautification and drastic infrastructure improvements.

    Someone ought to try recreating it. Most inherently like law and order and solid jobs.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I don’t disagree with any of that, but the greatest political coalition in modern U.S. history still brought together people from the fringes who not only had little in common, but a lot to fight about.

    I mean, if it was as easy as focusing on “law and order and solid jobs,” then Trump would have been cruising to re-election before COVID-19 hit. He wasn’t.

  110. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    It had almost everything to do with it. The Bay Area moved earlier than the big East Coast cities.

    Like NYC and Boston, SF is crowded and its labor force is reliant on mass transit (BART, ferries, buses, muni system, etc.). The virus showed up in the Bay Area early and had until the middle of March to spread with little to prevent it other than official warnings for residents to be careful.

    Yet Boston had more people die of COVID-19 in a single day (53 on May 1st) than have died in three months in SF. At its worse, NYC saw more people die of COVID-19 in an hour than have died in SF since March 1st.

    The effort is almost certainly to be wasted now because while the Bay Area did fairly well in reducing the spread of the virus to a manageable level, the rest of the country did not.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier. Japan is even more reliant on mass transit (BART is a crappy mass-transit system – not that many people even use it), and is much more densely populated than the bay area. Japan had no real lockdown. Japan has had less than 1,000 CoV deaths.

    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn’t have as many black people, 2.) it doesn’t have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn’t shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better – it’s warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.

    The lockdown is and was bullshit.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier.
     
    It also showed up in Hong Kong and Taiwan earlier. Two places which are even more dense than Japan. And it got stopped in its tracks.

    The East Asian countries which had to deal with SARS-1 fifteen years ago were institutionally much more up to the task of stopping SARS-2 than were the U.S. and Western Europe, which did not have to deal with SARS-1 to any serious degree. China's East Asian neighbors were thus more wary of China and the diseases which might come out of that country.

    They were prepared. We weren't.


    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn’t have as many black people, 2.) it doesn’t have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn’t shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better – it’s warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.
     
    Points #1, #2, and #3 are true for the most part, but #4 is not. But while those first three points might have some effect on death rates, they shouldn't have a significant effect on the number of cases. Especially since SF is older than Boston and NYC on average. (Fewer kids are in SF than any other American city.)

    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain't the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That's not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it's a difference in degree, not kind.

    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

  111. @captflee
    Aaaaannnnnd, I believe we have a winner for Biden's VP. One rarely sees such unscripted eloquence these days.

    Replies: @Alden

    She’s attractive too and has only one chin so she can’t be too fat. And she has great breath control for making long speeches. Maybe she sang in a church choir. I loved it.

    I sent it out to a lot of people and I’m already getting messages back about it. Everybody lives it.

    She did mention the cousin is a Chicago detective. Respectable affirmation action blacks have relatives like her.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alden


    She’s attractive too and has only one chin so she can’t be too fat. And she has great breath control for making long speeches. Maybe she sang in a church choir. I loved it.
     
    So who is this woman?

    If a white person posted a video like this, how long would it be before they were identified? Five minutes, maybe? Certainly no more than an hour.

    I thought someone would have posted her name by now, yet no name has been mentioned in this thread. Is she still unidentified as of 6/8?
  112. I take Stony Island out of and into the city on the way to Ann Arbor a couple times a year. The area has improved a bit economically over the past few years. I don’t feel any serious concern just passing through, but I wouldn’t want to break down there.

  113. To paraphrase Sam Elliott in The Big Lebowski, why does she have to use so much profanity?

  114. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    That's a lot of repetition. It seems to be pretty common among black YouTubers. 10 minutes of vid with 1 minute of actual message.

    Ok, who wants to go on a multi day road trip with this woman in the back seat? Any takers?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Ok, who wants to go on a multi day road trip with this woman in the back seat? Any takers?

    The money for the ball gag is coming out of your pocket, I assume?

  115. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin

    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier. Japan is even more reliant on mass transit (BART is a crappy mass-transit system - not that many people even use it), and is much more densely populated than the bay area. Japan had no real lockdown. Japan has had less than 1,000 CoV deaths.

    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn't have as many black people, 2.) it doesn't have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn't shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better - it's warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.

    The lockdown is and was bullshit.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier.

    It also showed up in Hong Kong and Taiwan earlier. Two places which are even more dense than Japan. And it got stopped in its tracks.

    The East Asian countries which had to deal with SARS-1 fifteen years ago were institutionally much more up to the task of stopping SARS-2 than were the U.S. and Western Europe, which did not have to deal with SARS-1 to any serious degree. China’s East Asian neighbors were thus more wary of China and the diseases which might come out of that country.

    They were prepared. We weren’t.

    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn’t have as many black people, 2.) it doesn’t have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn’t shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better – it’s warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.

    Points #1, #2, and #3 are true for the most part, but #4 is not. But while those first three points might have some effect on death rates, they shouldn’t have a significant effect on the number of cases. Especially since SF is older than Boston and NYC on average. (Fewer kids are in SF than any other American city.)

    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain’t the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That’s not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it’s a difference in degree, not kind.

    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain’t the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That’s not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it’s a difference in degree, not kind.
     
    I've lived in the Bay Area. It ain't ever cold. And the sun does shine there - even in San Francisco. And much of the rest of the BA is very different anyway, especially the Central Peninsula and South Bay. There's a reason people moved to California - even Northern California - for their health. Because it's a healthier climate.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.
     
    More blacks and/or hispanics, perhaps. Or maybe its got an older demographic.

    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong. This is not the Andromeda Strain. This is a viral respiratory disease that mainly kills the old, the infirm, and - especially - the old and infirm. It's the Asian Flu, not the Black Death.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  116. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier.
     
    It also showed up in Hong Kong and Taiwan earlier. Two places which are even more dense than Japan. And it got stopped in its tracks.

    The East Asian countries which had to deal with SARS-1 fifteen years ago were institutionally much more up to the task of stopping SARS-2 than were the U.S. and Western Europe, which did not have to deal with SARS-1 to any serious degree. China's East Asian neighbors were thus more wary of China and the diseases which might come out of that country.

    They were prepared. We weren't.


    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn’t have as many black people, 2.) it doesn’t have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn’t shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better – it’s warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.
     
    Points #1, #2, and #3 are true for the most part, but #4 is not. But while those first three points might have some effect on death rates, they shouldn't have a significant effect on the number of cases. Especially since SF is older than Boston and NYC on average. (Fewer kids are in SF than any other American city.)

    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain't the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That's not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it's a difference in degree, not kind.

    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain’t the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That’s not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it’s a difference in degree, not kind.

    I’ve lived in the Bay Area. It ain’t ever cold. And the sun does shine there – even in San Francisco. And much of the rest of the BA is very different anyway, especially the Central Peninsula and South Bay. There’s a reason people moved to California – even Northern California – for their health. Because it’s a healthier climate.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    I lived in San Francisco for five years. It's never cold in the city, but March and April ain't cold in NYC and Boston, either, and that is when COVID-19 spread through all of them.

    Average high temperature in March:

    - San Francisco - 62

    - NYC - 50

    - Boston - 45

    Average high temperature in April:

    - San Francisco - 63

    - NYC - 60

    - Boston - 56

    There's just not a significant enough difference in the temperature for it to explain such a large disparity in the case numbers.

    People enjoy SF's climate if they are the kind of people who want to wear sweaters in the summer, but not shovel snow in winter.

    In my entire time there, I think I can remember only three or four days where the temperature was over 80, and it felt oppressive.

  117. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain’t the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That’s not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it’s a difference in degree, not kind.
     
    I've lived in the Bay Area. It ain't ever cold. And the sun does shine there - even in San Francisco. And much of the rest of the BA is very different anyway, especially the Central Peninsula and South Bay. There's a reason people moved to California - even Northern California - for their health. Because it's a healthier climate.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I lived in San Francisco for five years. It’s never cold in the city, but March and April ain’t cold in NYC and Boston, either, and that is when COVID-19 spread through all of them.

    Average high temperature in March:

    – San Francisco – 62

    – NYC – 50

    – Boston – 45

    Average high temperature in April:

    – San Francisco – 63

    – NYC – 60

    – Boston – 56

    There’s just not a significant enough difference in the temperature for it to explain such a large disparity in the case numbers.

    People enjoy SF’s climate if they are the kind of people who want to wear sweaters in the summer, but not shovel snow in winter.

    In my entire time there, I think I can remember only three or four days where the temperature was over 80, and it felt oppressive.

  118. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Complete and total disgrace to the Corps:

    https://twitter.com/RobertMaguire_/status/1269474911145394176

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @The Alarmist, @68W58

    He apparently was medically retired over 10 years ago.

  119. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    @captflee

    She’s attractive too and has only one chin so she can’t be too fat. And she has great breath control for making long speeches. Maybe she sang in a church choir. I loved it.


    I sent it out to a lot of people and I’m already getting messages back about it. Everybody lives it.

    She did mention the cousin is a Chicago detective. Respectable affirmation action blacks have relatives like her.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    She’s attractive too and has only one chin so she can’t be too fat. And she has great breath control for making long speeches. Maybe she sang in a church choir. I loved it.

    So who is this woman?

    If a white person posted a video like this, how long would it be before they were identified? Five minutes, maybe? Certainly no more than an hour.

    I thought someone would have posted her name by now, yet no name has been mentioned in this thread. Is she still unidentified as of 6/8?

  120. Anonymous[614] • Disclaimer says:
    @danand
    @Ed

    Ed from your linked article:

    “...both the Somali and the AADOS (African American Descendants of Slaves) communities to suspect that the constant news coverage was projecting an internecine conflict between the two groups.”

    “I believe the mainstream media wants to create a divide between Native African Americans and Africans.”

    “There are tensions that exist between Somali and the African American community, and this is due to U.S. customs people telling Somalis and other Africans to stay away from African Americans.”

    New to me - AADOS

    My mind associated this acronym instantly with adios, which also may be good in practice; just stay away.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Anonymous

    The next Democrat administration will probably implement some form of slavery reparations. It’s understandable that American blacks who were actual slaves don’t want this money going to FOB Africans who have no connection to this.

  121. Anonymous[614] • Disclaimer says:
    @bigdicknick
    @Erik Sieven

    model minorities who refuse to cower show whites that resistance is possible.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Any group of whites who tried that ‘roof Korean’ thing would soon find themselves dealing with much worse thugs than black looters (see: Waco 1995)

  122. Yes – like I said – warmer. The temp in SF varies alot across town – the Mission is warmer than the Sunset and the Aves. And those averages you quote mask alot of variation. Boston and New York can actually have snow in March and April – San Francisco, never. Based on the video I was seeing this spring, it was pretty cold in New York – everybody seemed to be bundled up. And of course – as I said – SF is not the whole Bay Area – most of it is warmer than the City.

  123. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    CoV showed up in Japan even earlier.
     
    It also showed up in Hong Kong and Taiwan earlier. Two places which are even more dense than Japan. And it got stopped in its tracks.

    The East Asian countries which had to deal with SARS-1 fifteen years ago were institutionally much more up to the task of stopping SARS-2 than were the U.S. and Western Europe, which did not have to deal with SARS-1 to any serious degree. China's East Asian neighbors were thus more wary of China and the diseases which might come out of that country.

    They were prepared. We weren't.


    San Francisco is different from the east coast cities because: 1.) It doesn’t have as many black people, 2.) it doesn’t have as many obese people, 3.) the state didn’t shove a whole bunch of infected people into nursing homes, 4.) the weather is better – it’s warmer and sunnier, people get more vitamin D.
     
    Points #1, #2, and #3 are true for the most part, but #4 is not. But while those first three points might have some effect on death rates, they shouldn't have a significant effect on the number of cases. Especially since SF is older than Boston and NYC on average. (Fewer kids are in SF than any other American city.)

    As for #4, SF is often foggy and has average temperatures in the low-60s for March and April. It ain't the Beach Boys and California cruising this far north. That's not significantly different from NYC and Boston. Those two cities might have lower temperatures in March and slightly more precipitation, but it's a difference in degree, not kind.

    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.

    More blacks and/or hispanics, perhaps. Or maybe its got an older demographic.

    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong. This is not the Andromeda Strain. This is a viral respiratory disease that mainly kills the old, the infirm, and – especially – the old and infirm. It’s the Asian Flu, not the Black Death.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong.
     
    There's no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.

    I think what has happened is that some people in your camp (maybe not you in particular) said, "Well, it looks like the virus is a threat to kill really, really old people and really, really fat people - and I'm okay with that. I can live with that. I can't live with a long shutdown."

    In any case, your side has won the political battle for now. I don't see any political will to continue a shutdown, even in SF, unless it gets as bad as NYC got in April.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  124. @Alden
    @syonredux

    Good I’d like to see that happen in Bristol and Liverpool England. It’s time the English acknowledged that evil racist America was an English colony when the Africans arrived in America.

    Replies: @GoRedWings!

    I’d like to see that happen in Bristol and Liverpool England

    Seems like your wish was granted. Just an hour ago, the news showed a mob tossing a ‘slaver’s statue’ off the quay in Bristol, England.

  125. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Besides, southern California is getting hit harder by COVID-19 than is northern California right now.
     
    More blacks and/or hispanics, perhaps. Or maybe its got an older demographic.

    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong. This is not the Andromeda Strain. This is a viral respiratory disease that mainly kills the old, the infirm, and - especially - the old and infirm. It's the Asian Flu, not the Black Death.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong.

    There’s no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.

    I think what has happened is that some people in your camp (maybe not you in particular) said, “Well, it looks like the virus is a threat to kill really, really old people and really, really fat people – and I’m okay with that. I can live with that. I can’t live with a long shutdown.”

    In any case, your side has won the political battle for now. I don’t see any political will to continue a shutdown, even in SF, unless it gets as bad as NYC got in April.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    There’s no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.
     
    Sure they can. What happend to NYC? The idiot governor (based on idiot guidelines from the CDC) sent infected recovering COVID patients back to the nursing homes they came from. A lot of people died because the "Health Care Heroes" mindlessly stuck people on vents instead of thinking about what they really needed. Perhaps a lot of people died from the shutdown itself (there are things that won't come out about this for some time, if ever). Bodies were stacking up in reefer trucks because........there were a lot of them and because morgue capacity has been cut and because bodies had to be tested before being released to funeral homes. Some hospitals were impacted because hostpital beds in NYC have been drastically cut over the last couple decades. And - as always happens with viral pandemics - a lot of old and sickly people died. That isn't nice, but it happens.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  126. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    Look, you guys will eventually have to come to terms with the fact that you were just wrong.
     
    There's no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.

    I think what has happened is that some people in your camp (maybe not you in particular) said, "Well, it looks like the virus is a threat to kill really, really old people and really, really fat people - and I'm okay with that. I can live with that. I can't live with a long shutdown."

    In any case, your side has won the political battle for now. I don't see any political will to continue a shutdown, even in SF, unless it gets as bad as NYC got in April.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There’s no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.

    Sure they can. What happend to NYC? The idiot governor (based on idiot guidelines from the CDC) sent infected recovering COVID patients back to the nursing homes they came from. A lot of people died because the “Health Care Heroes” mindlessly stuck people on vents instead of thinking about what they really needed. Perhaps a lot of people died from the shutdown itself (there are things that won’t come out about this for some time, if ever). Bodies were stacking up in reefer trucks because……..there were a lot of them and because morgue capacity has been cut and because bodies had to be tested before being released to funeral homes. Some hospitals were impacted because hostpital beds in NYC have been drastically cut over the last couple decades. And – as always happens with viral pandemics – a lot of old and sickly people died. That isn’t nice, but it happens.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    The numbers don't support you.

    There have been 21,000 COVID-19 deaths in NYC. (17K confirmed; 4K presumed). I repeat, that is the city, not the state.

    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let's add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren't underestimating it.

    That still leaves 17,000 dead New Yorkers in the city who were NOT in nursing homes at the time they died of COVID-19. That figure almost certainly underestimates the death toll, but I'll use it to illustrate a point.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).

    So more than 5 times the number of New York City residents have died this year outside of nursing homes from the coronavirus than the average annual number of people in the entire state of New York have died from the flu.

    Obviously, this was not just bad policy on Cuomo's part. He messed up in a criminal way, but even if he hadn't, New York City was going to be devastated by the coronavirus in the early spring.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  127. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    There’s no way someone can look objectively at happened to NYC and say my side was wrong.
     
    Sure they can. What happend to NYC? The idiot governor (based on idiot guidelines from the CDC) sent infected recovering COVID patients back to the nursing homes they came from. A lot of people died because the "Health Care Heroes" mindlessly stuck people on vents instead of thinking about what they really needed. Perhaps a lot of people died from the shutdown itself (there are things that won't come out about this for some time, if ever). Bodies were stacking up in reefer trucks because........there were a lot of them and because morgue capacity has been cut and because bodies had to be tested before being released to funeral homes. Some hospitals were impacted because hostpital beds in NYC have been drastically cut over the last couple decades. And - as always happens with viral pandemics - a lot of old and sickly people died. That isn't nice, but it happens.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    The numbers don’t support you.

    There have been 21,000 COVID-19 deaths in NYC. (17K confirmed; 4K presumed). I repeat, that is the city, not the state.

    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let’s add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren’t underestimating it.

    That still leaves 17,000 dead New Yorkers in the city who were NOT in nursing homes at the time they died of COVID-19. That figure almost certainly underestimates the death toll, but I’ll use it to illustrate a point.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).

    So more than 5 times the number of New York City residents have died this year outside of nursing homes from the coronavirus than the average annual number of people in the entire state of New York have died from the flu.

    Obviously, this was not just bad policy on Cuomo’s part. He messed up in a criminal way, but even if he hadn’t, New York City was going to be devastated by the coronavirus in the early spring.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let’s add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren’t underestimating it.
     
    It hardly matters where they died - it's where they acquired the infection. Lots of people probably got infected in the nursing home (because of the aforementioned policy), got sick, were sent to the hospital, and then died there. So it might be well more than 20%. Other states show even bigger fractions of victims in nursing homes:

    https://buffalonews.com/2020/05/26/20-of-nys-covid-19-deaths-in-long-term-care-nationwide-its-40/

    And those might actually be bigger still for the same reason.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).
     
    Nobody is saying it's an average flu-year event. It isn't. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58? I don't know - good luck finding break downs of that by state or city. But according to the CDC, that pandemic killed 116,000 Americans - 0.064% of the population at that time. That means COVID could kill off 211,000 Americans today and not be any worse on a per-capita basis.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  128. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon

    The numbers don't support you.

    There have been 21,000 COVID-19 deaths in NYC. (17K confirmed; 4K presumed). I repeat, that is the city, not the state.

    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let's add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren't underestimating it.

    That still leaves 17,000 dead New Yorkers in the city who were NOT in nursing homes at the time they died of COVID-19. That figure almost certainly underestimates the death toll, but I'll use it to illustrate a point.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).

    So more than 5 times the number of New York City residents have died this year outside of nursing homes from the coronavirus than the average annual number of people in the entire state of New York have died from the flu.

    Obviously, this was not just bad policy on Cuomo's part. He messed up in a criminal way, but even if he hadn't, New York City was going to be devastated by the coronavirus in the early spring.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let’s add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren’t underestimating it.

    It hardly matters where they died – it’s where they acquired the infection. Lots of people probably got infected in the nursing home (because of the aforementioned policy), got sick, were sent to the hospital, and then died there. So it might be well more than 20%. Other states show even bigger fractions of victims in nursing homes:

    https://buffalonews.com/2020/05/26/20-of-nys-covid-19-deaths-in-long-term-care-nationwide-its-40/

    And those might actually be bigger still for the same reason.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).

    Nobody is saying it’s an average flu-year event. It isn’t. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58? I don’t know – good luck finding break downs of that by state or city. But according to the CDC, that pandemic killed 116,000 Americans – 0.064% of the population at that time. That means COVID could kill off 211,000 Americans today and not be any worse on a per-capita basis.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    It hardly matters where they died
     
    I don't think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:

    Cuomo’s startling admission came days after the state revealed last week that at least 3,316 people in nursing homes and adult care facilities had died of coronavirus at their residences or in hospitals across the state.
     
    So when we see nursing homes deaths, it doesn't mean they died in the nursing home.

    As for the data in other states, they don't matter right now. We're focused on New York City because it was the worst hit place in the U.S. NYC shows us the worst case in America. And the rich set of data the city gives us proves it's not just old people who are at risk from this disease.

    Nobody is saying it’s an average flu-year event. It isn’t. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58?
     
    I don't know the exact figure, but it's easy enough to see the Asian Flu of '57 wasn't nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn't take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren't finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  129. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    Some 2,000 of those dead were reported on April 20th to have been in nursing homes, so let’s add another 2,000 to that number, just to make sure we aren’t underestimating it.
     
    It hardly matters where they died - it's where they acquired the infection. Lots of people probably got infected in the nursing home (because of the aforementioned policy), got sick, were sent to the hospital, and then died there. So it might be well more than 20%. Other states show even bigger fractions of victims in nursing homes:

    https://buffalonews.com/2020/05/26/20-of-nys-covid-19-deaths-in-long-term-care-nationwide-its-40/

    And those might actually be bigger still for the same reason.

    To put that 17K number in perspective, only 3,400 New Yorkers have died of the flu every year, on average, over the last ten years, but that figure is for the entire state and not just the city (and it includes nursing homes).
     
    Nobody is saying it's an average flu-year event. It isn't. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58? I don't know - good luck finding break downs of that by state or city. But according to the CDC, that pandemic killed 116,000 Americans - 0.064% of the population at that time. That means COVID could kill off 211,000 Americans today and not be any worse on a per-capita basis.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    It hardly matters where they died

    I don’t think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:

    Cuomo’s startling admission came days after the state revealed last week that at least 3,316 people in nursing homes and adult care facilities had died of coronavirus at their residences or in hospitals across the state.

    So when we see nursing homes deaths, it doesn’t mean they died in the nursing home.

    As for the data in other states, they don’t matter right now. We’re focused on New York City because it was the worst hit place in the U.S. NYC shows us the worst case in America. And the rich set of data the city gives us proves it’s not just old people who are at risk from this disease.

    Nobody is saying it’s an average flu-year event. It isn’t. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58?

    I don’t know the exact figure, but it’s easy enough to see the Asian Flu of ’57 wasn’t nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn’t take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren’t finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    I don’t think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:
     
    I don't know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:

    Cases and deaths in long-term care facilities, by state

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/05/09/us/coronavirus-cases-nursing-homes-us.html

    I don’t know the exact figure, but it’s easy enough to see the Asian Flu of ’57 wasn’t nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn’t take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren’t finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.
     
    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument: imagine how bad it would have been if we hadn't freaked out. People did take steps to mitigate the spread of the Asian Flu - the sort of normal, reasonable steps that public health authorities used to recommend in times of pandemic, before there was the internet, 24/7 news coverage, and pandemic dashboards with daily death counts.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  130. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    It hardly matters where they died
     
    I don't think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:

    Cuomo’s startling admission came days after the state revealed last week that at least 3,316 people in nursing homes and adult care facilities had died of coronavirus at their residences or in hospitals across the state.
     
    So when we see nursing homes deaths, it doesn't mean they died in the nursing home.

    As for the data in other states, they don't matter right now. We're focused on New York City because it was the worst hit place in the U.S. NYC shows us the worst case in America. And the rich set of data the city gives us proves it's not just old people who are at risk from this disease.

    Nobody is saying it’s an average flu-year event. It isn’t. Again, how many New Yorkers died during the Asian Flu of 57/58?
     
    I don't know the exact figure, but it's easy enough to see the Asian Flu of '57 wasn't nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn't take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren't finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I don’t think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:

    I don’t know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:

    Cases and deaths in long-term care facilities, by state

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/05/09/us/coronavirus-cases-nursing-homes-us.html

    I don’t know the exact figure, but it’s easy enough to see the Asian Flu of ’57 wasn’t nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn’t take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren’t finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.

    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument: imagine how bad it would have been if we hadn’t freaked out. People did take steps to mitigate the spread of the Asian Flu – the sort of normal, reasonable steps that public health authorities used to recommend in times of pandemic, before there was the internet, 24/7 news coverage, and pandemic dashboards with daily death counts.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:
     
    I don't subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.

    In any case, make sure the numbers match up with what we see elsewhere for nursing home deaths in New York state or, preferably, New York City. If they don't, then the authors of the article are counting it a different way.


    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument:
     
    There's nothing unfalsifiable about it.

    The Asian Flu of 1957/58 spread for about a year in the U.S. It killed between 70,000 and 110,000 Americans, with more dying in the second wave that peaked in 1958.

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.

    COVID-19 has been here for about three-and-a-half months and killed at least 110,000 people (and more likely 130,000) during a period where lockdowns were the norm in almost all places that showed much evidence the virus was spreading.

    We have no vaccine, and we aren't likely to have one any time soon.

    We also haven't been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.

    So we aren't even at halftime yet and you're already making declarations about how it ain't all that.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  131. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    I don’t think the figure given for nursing home deaths is for the exact location where they died, but for the residency they held when they died. Presumably, someone in a nursing home who got sick with COVID-19 and was rushed to the hospital to an ICU, where they died, would still be classified as a nursing home death. This article supports that reasonable assumption:
     
    I don't know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:

    Cases and deaths in long-term care facilities, by state

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/05/09/us/coronavirus-cases-nursing-homes-us.html

    I don’t know the exact figure, but it’s easy enough to see the Asian Flu of ’57 wasn’t nearly as lethal as COVID-19. Not anywhere close. Comparing their overall death figures is a mistake because 1) we didn’t take any steps to curb the spread of the 1957 Asian Flu, allowing it to spread, and 2) we aren’t finished with COVID-19 yet. 500 to 1,000 Americans are still dying every day from it, and I guarantee that number will go up when all the lockdowns are ended.
     
    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument: imagine how bad it would have been if we hadn't freaked out. People did take steps to mitigate the spread of the Asian Flu - the sort of normal, reasonable steps that public health authorities used to recommend in times of pandemic, before there was the internet, 24/7 news coverage, and pandemic dashboards with daily death counts.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I don’t know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:

    I don’t subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.

    In any case, make sure the numbers match up with what we see elsewhere for nursing home deaths in New York state or, preferably, New York City. If they don’t, then the authors of the article are counting it a different way.

    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument:

    There’s nothing unfalsifiable about it.

    The Asian Flu of 1957/58 spread for about a year in the U.S. It killed between 70,000 and 110,000 Americans, with more dying in the second wave that peaked in 1958.

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.

    COVID-19 has been here for about three-and-a-half months and killed at least 110,000 people (and more likely 130,000) during a period where lockdowns were the norm in almost all places that showed much evidence the virus was spreading.

    We have no vaccine, and we aren’t likely to have one any time soon.

    We also haven’t been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.

    So we aren’t even at halftime yet and you’re already making declarations about how it ain’t all that.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    I don’t subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.
     
    Well, that's a cop-out. I don't either. I included a link.

    For NY, then number of deaths is almost the same as the number of cases, alone among all the states. That in itself indicates something fishy going on. Almost everybody who gets it dies?

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.
     
    Right, and everybody took it - sure.

    We also haven’t been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.
     
    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You're comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different - it's not killing off young fit people.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  132. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t know about that. Notice anything odd about the list in this article:
     
    I don't subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.

    In any case, make sure the numbers match up with what we see elsewhere for nursing home deaths in New York state or, preferably, New York City. If they don't, then the authors of the article are counting it a different way.


    Ah, the old unfalsifiable argument:
     
    There's nothing unfalsifiable about it.

    The Asian Flu of 1957/58 spread for about a year in the U.S. It killed between 70,000 and 110,000 Americans, with more dying in the second wave that peaked in 1958.

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.

    COVID-19 has been here for about three-and-a-half months and killed at least 110,000 people (and more likely 130,000) during a period where lockdowns were the norm in almost all places that showed much evidence the virus was spreading.

    We have no vaccine, and we aren't likely to have one any time soon.

    We also haven't been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.

    So we aren't even at halftime yet and you're already making declarations about how it ain't all that.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I don’t subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.

    Well, that’s a cop-out. I don’t either. I included a link.

    For NY, then number of deaths is almost the same as the number of cases, alone among all the states. That in itself indicates something fishy going on. Almost everybody who gets it dies?

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.

    Right, and everybody took it – sure.

    We also haven’t been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.

    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You’re comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different – it’s not killing off young fit people.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    Well, that’s a cop-out. I don’t either. I included a link.
     
    I'm sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn't realize I could get in for free.

    You originally asked if I noticed "anything odd about this list," and what immediately stands out is exactly what you have pointed out: New York state is almost certainly vastly undercounting the cases in its nursing homes and long care facilities.

    But assuming they are counting the deaths at least somewhat accurately, I'm not sure how that matters to our debate. Adding to the number of cases will lower the fatality rate of the disease, but it won't add more nursing home deaths compared to deaths outside nursing homes.

    So while it's interesting to note, it doesn't change anything about our debate.


    Right, and everybody took it – sure.
     
    No, of course not, but the main point would be that you don't need to lockdown if you have a vaccine.

    If you don't take the vaccine, then you have only yourself to blame if you catch it.


    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You’re comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different – it’s not killing off young fit people.
     
    You're forgetting the Asian flu, which mainly killed old people in its more deadly second wave.

    Viruses can make subtle but important changes. In Italy, younger people below 60 almost never died from the COVID-19 virus. But when the virus got to NYC, suddenly a lot more people below the age of 60 were dying along with the older victims.

    As you pointed out earlier, this had to do with the higher population of unhealthy minorities in the U.S. than are found in northern Italy. But it shows how you can't make assumptions about the first wave or one country's experience. There are plenty more people in the country for this virus to kill, and if you allow this virus to run free, it will do just that.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Peter Shaw

  133. @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    I don’t subscribe to the NYT, so you will have to explain to me what it says.
     
    Well, that's a cop-out. I don't either. I included a link.

    For NY, then number of deaths is almost the same as the number of cases, alone among all the states. That in itself indicates something fishy going on. Almost everybody who gets it dies?

    But because of the efforts of a brilliant American microbiologist (Hilleman) who predicted the pandemic would hit the U.S., a vaccine was ready and many lives were saved.
     
    Right, and everybody took it - sure.

    We also haven’t been hit by our second COVID-19 wave yet, which, if the pattern follows the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Asian Flu of 1957, could kill many more people than did the first wave.
     
    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You're comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different - it's not killing off young fit people.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Well, that’s a cop-out. I don’t either. I included a link.

    I’m sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn’t realize I could get in for free.

    You originally asked if I noticed “anything odd about this list,” and what immediately stands out is exactly what you have pointed out: New York state is almost certainly vastly undercounting the cases in its nursing homes and long care facilities.

    But assuming they are counting the deaths at least somewhat accurately, I’m not sure how that matters to our debate. Adding to the number of cases will lower the fatality rate of the disease, but it won’t add more nursing home deaths compared to deaths outside nursing homes.

    So while it’s interesting to note, it doesn’t change anything about our debate.

    Right, and everybody took it – sure.

    No, of course not, but the main point would be that you don’t need to lockdown if you have a vaccine.

    If you don’t take the vaccine, then you have only yourself to blame if you catch it.

    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You’re comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different – it’s not killing off young fit people.

    You’re forgetting the Asian flu, which mainly killed old people in its more deadly second wave.

    Viruses can make subtle but important changes. In Italy, younger people below 60 almost never died from the COVID-19 virus. But when the virus got to NYC, suddenly a lot more people below the age of 60 were dying along with the older victims.

    As you pointed out earlier, this had to do with the higher population of unhealthy minorities in the U.S. than are found in northern Italy. But it shows how you can’t make assumptions about the first wave or one country’s experience. There are plenty more people in the country for this virus to kill, and if you allow this virus to run free, it will do just that.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Pincher Martin


    I’m sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn’t realize I could get in for free.
     
    No, you need not apologize. "Cop out" was a strong term, uncalled for, and I shouldn't have used it. You have been very civil in this debate, and I should be too.
    , @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA, Sweden, Spain, etc etc etc despite lockdowns ending and massive protests your (and that muppet Cochran’s) models are looking stupid.

    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  134. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    Well, that’s a cop-out. I don’t either. I included a link.
     
    I'm sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn't realize I could get in for free.

    You originally asked if I noticed "anything odd about this list," and what immediately stands out is exactly what you have pointed out: New York state is almost certainly vastly undercounting the cases in its nursing homes and long care facilities.

    But assuming they are counting the deaths at least somewhat accurately, I'm not sure how that matters to our debate. Adding to the number of cases will lower the fatality rate of the disease, but it won't add more nursing home deaths compared to deaths outside nursing homes.

    So while it's interesting to note, it doesn't change anything about our debate.


    Right, and everybody took it – sure.
     
    No, of course not, but the main point would be that you don't need to lockdown if you have a vaccine.

    If you don't take the vaccine, then you have only yourself to blame if you catch it.


    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You’re comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different – it’s not killing off young fit people.
     
    You're forgetting the Asian flu, which mainly killed old people in its more deadly second wave.

    Viruses can make subtle but important changes. In Italy, younger people below 60 almost never died from the COVID-19 virus. But when the virus got to NYC, suddenly a lot more people below the age of 60 were dying along with the older victims.

    As you pointed out earlier, this had to do with the higher population of unhealthy minorities in the U.S. than are found in northern Italy. But it shows how you can't make assumptions about the first wave or one country's experience. There are plenty more people in the country for this virus to kill, and if you allow this virus to run free, it will do just that.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Peter Shaw

    I’m sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn’t realize I could get in for free.

    No, you need not apologize. “Cop out” was a strong term, uncalled for, and I shouldn’t have used it. You have been very civil in this debate, and I should be too.

    • Thanks: Pincher Martin
  135. @Pincher Martin
    @Mr. Anon


    Well, that’s a cop-out. I don’t either. I included a link.
     
    I'm sorry. I thought it was a firewall that only allowed in readers who were paid subscribers. I didn't realize I could get in for free.

    You originally asked if I noticed "anything odd about this list," and what immediately stands out is exactly what you have pointed out: New York state is almost certainly vastly undercounting the cases in its nursing homes and long care facilities.

    But assuming they are counting the deaths at least somewhat accurately, I'm not sure how that matters to our debate. Adding to the number of cases will lower the fatality rate of the disease, but it won't add more nursing home deaths compared to deaths outside nursing homes.

    So while it's interesting to note, it doesn't change anything about our debate.


    Right, and everybody took it – sure.
     
    No, of course not, but the main point would be that you don't need to lockdown if you have a vaccine.

    If you don't take the vaccine, then you have only yourself to blame if you catch it.


    Or, just about everybody who would have died from it already has. You’re comparing this to the Spanish Flu, but everybody admits this is very different – it’s not killing off young fit people.
     
    You're forgetting the Asian flu, which mainly killed old people in its more deadly second wave.

    Viruses can make subtle but important changes. In Italy, younger people below 60 almost never died from the COVID-19 virus. But when the virus got to NYC, suddenly a lot more people below the age of 60 were dying along with the older victims.

    As you pointed out earlier, this had to do with the higher population of unhealthy minorities in the U.S. than are found in northern Italy. But it shows how you can't make assumptions about the first wave or one country's experience. There are plenty more people in the country for this virus to kill, and if you allow this virus to run free, it will do just that.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Peter Shaw

    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA, Sweden, Spain, etc etc etc despite lockdowns ending and massive protests your (and that muppet Cochran’s) models are looking stupid.

    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw


    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.
     
    The apology should be coming from you to us - and especially from you to him.

    You've been using Sweden's response as a model for the world, and now even Sweden is unhappy with it and looking to fire their chief epidemiologist. I'm surprised you can even show your face around here after the last week.

    The Australian public, meanwhile, is ecstatic about how their government has handed COVID-19. Australia's government has some of the highest polling in the world with a net approval rating of 78%.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/06/08/18/29370840-0-image-a-55_1591637004580.jpg

    Meanwhile Sweden is at 19 (below Italy!) and the US is at -12.

    You appear to be an outlier in Australia. Most Aussies are content with their government's response.

    Notice also that Finland, Denmark and Norway's publics are all happier with their government's responses than is Sweden's public with Stockholm's approach.


    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA...
     
    I have no idea what you're talking about. The death rate has been pretty stable in the U.S. over the last couple weeks with around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. If anything it's starting to go up in several states along with their case loads.

    Replies: @Peter Shaw

  136. @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA, Sweden, Spain, etc etc etc despite lockdowns ending and massive protests your (and that muppet Cochran’s) models are looking stupid.

    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.

    The apology should be coming from you to us – and especially from you to him.

    You’ve been using Sweden’s response as a model for the world, and now even Sweden is unhappy with it and looking to fire their chief epidemiologist. I’m surprised you can even show your face around here after the last week.

    The Australian public, meanwhile, is ecstatic about how their government has handed COVID-19. Australia’s government has some of the highest polling in the world with a net approval rating of 78%.

    Meanwhile Sweden is at 19 (below Italy!) and the US is at -12.

    You appear to be an outlier in Australia. Most Aussies are content with their government’s response.

    Notice also that Finland, Denmark and Norway’s publics are all happier with their government’s responses than is Sweden’s public with Stockholm’s approach.

    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA…

    I have no idea what you’re talking about. The death rate has been pretty stable in the U.S. over the last couple weeks with around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. If anything it’s starting to go up in several states along with their case loads.

    • Replies: @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    Now you are really clutching at straws. Public opinion is irrelevant to the fact that

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

  137. @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw


    Time for him to apologise or give up blogging and for you to admit you are wrong.
     
    The apology should be coming from you to us - and especially from you to him.

    You've been using Sweden's response as a model for the world, and now even Sweden is unhappy with it and looking to fire their chief epidemiologist. I'm surprised you can even show your face around here after the last week.

    The Australian public, meanwhile, is ecstatic about how their government has handed COVID-19. Australia's government has some of the highest polling in the world with a net approval rating of 78%.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/06/08/18/29370840-0-image-a-55_1591637004580.jpg

    Meanwhile Sweden is at 19 (below Italy!) and the US is at -12.

    You appear to be an outlier in Australia. Most Aussies are content with their government's response.

    Notice also that Finland, Denmark and Norway's publics are all happier with their government's responses than is Sweden's public with Stockholm's approach.


    As death rates continue to trend down in the USA...
     
    I have no idea what you're talking about. The death rate has been pretty stable in the U.S. over the last couple weeks with around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. If anything it's starting to go up in several states along with their case loads.

    Replies: @Peter Shaw

    Now you are really clutching at straws. Public opinion is irrelevant to the fact that

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw

    Peter,

    If the people in Australia and Denmark and Finland and Norway are far happier with their governments' approaches to COVID-19 than are the people in Sweden are with their government's approach, how is that irrelevant?


    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran
     
    You've misinterpreted Cochran's figure. That number was always the maximum death toll if 1) we did nothing and 2) COVID-19 was allowed to run to herd immunity.

    No one, not even Sweden, has done nothing, and no one is close to herd immunity.


    2. Coronavirus has peaked.
     
    No, it has not. In the states, we've implemented enough measures to prevent it from rising, but we are still seeing around 20,000 new cases and around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. At that rate it's still the third leading cause of death in America, behind only cancer and heart disease. We've also seen the number of cases creep up in states which have dropped their social distancing protocols. It's only a matter of time before the death rate starts back up again.

    Obviously, the virus also hasn't peaked in Australia, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Taiwan, or Hong Kong. It was stopped dead in its tracks. By the way, the combined COVID-19 death total in those six countries with a combined population of over 200 million is only 1,338 deaths, which is just 27% of Sweden's death total (4,891).


    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)
     
    Germany shows that's not true. The German states which implemented measures such as social distancing and wearing masks did much better than those states which did not. Germany is a far more densely-populated place than the United States, which has some states that did well because they were far from the populated areas and the virus was more easily contained by their lack of density.

    But in the end even those states won't escape getting hit if they drop all measures to prevent the spread of the virus. It will just take longer.


    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic
     
    Well, someone here should clearly apologize. But I guess it won't be the person who made the most mistakes. So I guess I should apologize for assuming you're the kind of standup guy who apologies when he's clearly wrong.

    Replies: @Peter Shaw

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw


    Heading for 200kish as I predicted.
     
    Do you have proof you were making this prediction in late March or even early April?
  138. @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    Now you are really clutching at straws. Public opinion is irrelevant to the fact that

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

    Peter,

    If the people in Australia and Denmark and Finland and Norway are far happier with their governments’ approaches to COVID-19 than are the people in Sweden are with their government’s approach, how is that irrelevant?

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    You’ve misinterpreted Cochran’s figure. That number was always the maximum death toll if 1) we did nothing and 2) COVID-19 was allowed to run to herd immunity.

    No one, not even Sweden, has done nothing, and no one is close to herd immunity.

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    No, it has not. In the states, we’ve implemented enough measures to prevent it from rising, but we are still seeing around 20,000 new cases and around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. At that rate it’s still the third leading cause of death in America, behind only cancer and heart disease. We’ve also seen the number of cases creep up in states which have dropped their social distancing protocols. It’s only a matter of time before the death rate starts back up again.

    Obviously, the virus also hasn’t peaked in Australia, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Taiwan, or Hong Kong. It was stopped dead in its tracks. By the way, the combined COVID-19 death total in those six countries with a combined population of over 200 million is only 1,338 deaths, which is just 27% of Sweden’s death total (4,891).

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    Germany shows that’s not true. The German states which implemented measures such as social distancing and wearing masks did much better than those states which did not. Germany is a far more densely-populated place than the United States, which has some states that did well because they were far from the populated areas and the virus was more easily contained by their lack of density.

    But in the end even those states won’t escape getting hit if they drop all measures to prevent the spread of the virus. It will just take longer.

    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic

    Well, someone here should clearly apologize. But I guess it won’t be the person who made the most mistakes. So I guess I should apologize for assuming you’re the kind of standup guy who apologies when he’s clearly wrong.

    • Replies: @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    last I checked being in agreement with the majority did not make anyone right.

    Anyway to combat your lies here are the facts


    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    This is true. I said 200k at the beginning of May. He called me a mendacious idiot.

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    Anyone can find some place where it is rising. But worldwide (and USA wide) this is true. Check Worldometer

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    Cherry picking your sample is pathetic. At a country level, USA state level lockdown is weakly correlated with higher deaths. The correlation is stronger if you include late lockdowns.

    You are being a pathetic liar but there is still time to apologise.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  139. @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    Now you are really clutching at straws. Public opinion is irrelevant to the fact that

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

    Heading for 200kish as I predicted.

    Do you have proof you were making this prediction in late March or even early April?

  140. @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw

    Peter,

    If the people in Australia and Denmark and Finland and Norway are far happier with their governments' approaches to COVID-19 than are the people in Sweden are with their government's approach, how is that irrelevant?


    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran
     
    You've misinterpreted Cochran's figure. That number was always the maximum death toll if 1) we did nothing and 2) COVID-19 was allowed to run to herd immunity.

    No one, not even Sweden, has done nothing, and no one is close to herd immunity.


    2. Coronavirus has peaked.
     
    No, it has not. In the states, we've implemented enough measures to prevent it from rising, but we are still seeing around 20,000 new cases and around 500 to 1,000 deaths a day. At that rate it's still the third leading cause of death in America, behind only cancer and heart disease. We've also seen the number of cases creep up in states which have dropped their social distancing protocols. It's only a matter of time before the death rate starts back up again.

    Obviously, the virus also hasn't peaked in Australia, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Taiwan, or Hong Kong. It was stopped dead in its tracks. By the way, the combined COVID-19 death total in those six countries with a combined population of over 200 million is only 1,338 deaths, which is just 27% of Sweden's death total (4,891).


    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)
     
    Germany shows that's not true. The German states which implemented measures such as social distancing and wearing masks did much better than those states which did not. Germany is a far more densely-populated place than the United States, which has some states that did well because they were far from the populated areas and the virus was more easily contained by their lack of density.

    But in the end even those states won't escape getting hit if they drop all measures to prevent the spread of the virus. It will just take longer.


    You have been clearly wrong on all three. Most people apologise when they get it wrong. Instead you try to change the topic
     
    Well, someone here should clearly apologize. But I guess it won't be the person who made the most mistakes. So I guess I should apologize for assuming you're the kind of standup guy who apologies when he's clearly wrong.

    Replies: @Peter Shaw

    last I checked being in agreement with the majority did not make anyone right.

    Anyway to combat your lies here are the facts

    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    This is true. I said 200k at the beginning of May. He called me a mendacious idiot.

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    Anyone can find some place where it is rising. But worldwide (and USA wide) this is true. Check Worldometer

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    Cherry picking your sample is pathetic. At a country level, USA state level lockdown is weakly correlated with higher deaths. The correlation is stronger if you include late lockdowns.

    You are being a pathetic liar but there is still time to apologise.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Peter Shaw


    last I checked being in agreement with the majority did not make anyone right.
     
    Since a major part of your running argument has been that the government forces people to do things which are not in their interest to do, and that, if they were free, they would gladly prefer an alternative that is closer to what Sweden has been doing, the polls show you are wrong.

    People are happier in Norway, Finland, Denmark, and especially in your native Australia where the governments came down hard on the virus early and effectively.

    The Swedes, however, are far less happy with how their government has handled COVID-19.

    And yet you still maintain that the Swedes have provided us with the ideal response. That's just crazy.


    Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran
     
    This is non-responsive to my point. I've explained that the figure of two million dead is the worst case scenario if we allow the virus to run toward herd immunity. Cochran surely understands this even if you did not understand it when he tried to explain it to you.

    This is true. I said 200k at the beginning of May. He called me a mendacious idiot.
     
    I'd like to see that exchange. From what I've seen you play fast and loose with the truth.

    Cherry picking your sample is pathetic. At a country level, USA state level lockdown is weakly correlated with higher deaths.
     
    You're the one who is cherry-picking. The states which locked down the most were reacting to being hit by the virus either 1) the earliest (like California and Washington) or 2) the hardest (like NY and NJ).

    The state policies were thus reactive, not pre-emptive, and therefore they tell us nothing about the effectiveness and value of lockdowns. A state like Idaho, which is very low density and far from the large urban conglomerations where the virus first hit, doesn't need to lockdown as early or as severely as, say northern New Jersey. And initially Idaho's less restrictive policies will still look effective even if in the long run they are not.


    Anyone can find some place where it is rising.
     
    The point is that it stopped rising because so many countries and people implemented numerous tough restrictions to prevent its spread. It didn't hit a natural cap, like herd immunity, in Australia or Vietnam. Nor did it stop rising in America because it has topped off its natural end. Policy has slowed it in the U.S. and killed it in other places, not some natural rise and fall.
  141. @Peter Shaw
    @Pincher Martin

    last I checked being in agreement with the majority did not make anyone right.

    Anyway to combat your lies here are the facts


    1. Nothing like 2 million people will die of coronavirus in the USA. Heading for 200kish as I predicted. Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    This is true. I said 200k at the beginning of May. He called me a mendacious idiot.

    2. Coronavirus has peaked.

    Anyone can find some place where it is rising. But worldwide (and USA wide) this is true. Check Worldometer

    3. There is no evidence that the lockdowns are effective (once the virus has taken hold)

    Cherry picking your sample is pathetic. At a country level, USA state level lockdown is weakly correlated with higher deaths. The correlation is stronger if you include late lockdowns.

    You are being a pathetic liar but there is still time to apologise.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    last I checked being in agreement with the majority did not make anyone right.

    Since a major part of your running argument has been that the government forces people to do things which are not in their interest to do, and that, if they were free, they would gladly prefer an alternative that is closer to what Sweden has been doing, the polls show you are wrong.

    People are happier in Norway, Finland, Denmark, and especially in your native Australia where the governments came down hard on the virus early and effectively.

    The Swedes, however, are far less happy with how their government has handled COVID-19.

    And yet you still maintain that the Swedes have provided us with the ideal response. That’s just crazy.

    Nothing like the 2 million predicted by Cochran

    This is non-responsive to my point. I’ve explained that the figure of two million dead is the worst case scenario if we allow the virus to run toward herd immunity. Cochran surely understands this even if you did not understand it when he tried to explain it to you.

    This is true. I said 200k at the beginning of May. He called me a mendacious idiot.

    I’d like to see that exchange. From what I’ve seen you play fast and loose with the truth.

    Cherry picking your sample is pathetic. At a country level, USA state level lockdown is weakly correlated with higher deaths.

    You’re the one who is cherry-picking. The states which locked down the most were reacting to being hit by the virus either 1) the earliest (like California and Washington) or 2) the hardest (like NY and NJ).

    The state policies were thus reactive, not pre-emptive, and therefore they tell us nothing about the effectiveness and value of lockdowns. A state like Idaho, which is very low density and far from the large urban conglomerations where the virus first hit, doesn’t need to lockdown as early or as severely as, say northern New Jersey. And initially Idaho’s less restrictive policies will still look effective even if in the long run they are not.

    Anyone can find some place where it is rising.

    The point is that it stopped rising because so many countries and people implemented numerous tough restrictions to prevent its spread. It didn’t hit a natural cap, like herd immunity, in Australia or Vietnam. Nor did it stop rising in America because it has topped off its natural end. Policy has slowed it in the U.S. and killed it in other places, not some natural rise and fall.

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