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The Crown is a superior royal soap opera from Peter Morgan on Netflix. The TV series is a prequel to his 2006 movie The Queen, which starred Helen Mirren as Elizabeth II riding out the storm of Princess Di’s death. The Crown follows Elizabeth from her 1947 wedding to Prince Philip onward, with cameos from many historical figures, such as an extremely tall Winston Churchill played by John Lithgow.

The fourth season features two women the Queen has a hard time getting along with, Princess Di and Margaret Thatcher, with Gillian Anderson of The X-Files as the prime minister. (Unfortunately, Anderson’s voice has gotten old-sounding compared to the real Thatcher). The series portrays the Prime Minister as cooking up a lot of hearty food for her guests in 10 Downing Streets rather compact kitchen. This seemed curious: isn’t the prime minister provided with a cook?

A reader graciously provided a clip from my old NR editor John O’Sullivan explaining why he was often served bacon and eggs cooked up by the prime minister:

Presumably, a cook would be provided for official dinners, such as hosting generals and admirals planning the Falklands War and perhaps for the cabinet, depending on whether they were dealing with official or party business.

In general, as a mere head of government, the living arrangements of the prime ministers are less luxurious than one might expect. From Tony Blair onward, prime ministers with children have often chosen to live in 11 Downing Street, officially the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s residence, due to its less cramped private quarters.

 
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  1. AKAHorace says:

    The best thing about a constitutional monarchy; the people who really run things are expected to know their place.

  2. Really enjoyed the first season then the Gosling Armstrong movie ruined the whole thing.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Aardvark
  3. Art Deco says:

    Samantha Cameron appeared as a contestant on The Great British Baking Show.

    My wager would be there’s a domestic staff at no. 10; it’s just that Mrs. T hadn’t forgotten how to use the equipment. IIRC, Carol Thatcher had to make an appointment to talk to her mother, so her mother’s day was likely quite tightly scheduled.

    Another guess: the cost of taking care of the President in this country is badly inflated for a reason Michael Kinsley identified 35 years ago: the PR machine will not stop broadcasting the President’s movements in advance. Kinsley described a visit by the VP of the time (George Bush) to a restaurant within eyeshot of his office. He said all the protective paraphenalia following him around made it plain he was there, that he Kinsley had sufficient time on noticing it to go to a nearby bakery and get a cream pie, and that he’d have had a decent shot at Bush even though there was all that security around.

    • Replies: @Ed
  4. Art Deco says:

    The fourth season features two women the Queen has a hard time getting along with, Princess Di and Margaret Thatcher,

    There’s known documentary and testimonial evidence that Diana had wretched issues with a considerable menu of people, so it wouldn’t be surprising if she was a trial to the Queen as well. Is there any real evidence she had problems with Mrs. T? Mrs. T had bust ups with sharp-elbowed politicians like Michael Heseltine (and left Edward Heath in a 25 year long snit), but her family problems – some mild alienation from her mother and from her daughter, were quite normal range.

  5. I’ve only seen the first season. Hands down, the best episode was stand-alone #7, “Scientia Potentia Est”, which nicely juxtaposes the majesty and the impotence of the British monarch, status and education, the peculiarities of the British class system, the strength of the royal brand and weakness of the British Empire. It is intelligently written, perfectly acted, beautifully photographed and sprinkled with little bits of sly humor. (Look for the Queen Mother reading the Daily Mirror while telling her monarch daughter that she has all the education that anyone thought proper, while the Queen protests that she can’t just turn all the conversation at state dinners to “dogs and horses”.)

    As far as I know, the action is entirely fictional.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Cortes
    , @Hypnotoad666
    , @pyrrhus
  6. syonredux says:

    I’ve watched two eps, the one where the Apollo 11 moon Landing makes Prince Philip feel inadequate and the one where Elizabeth finds out that Anthony Blunt (Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures) is a traitor.

    I thought that they were OK.

    In general, as a mere head of government, the living arrangements of the prime ministers are less luxurious than one might expect. From Tony Blair onward, prime ministers with children have often chosen to live in 11 Downing Street, officially the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s residence, due to its less cramped private quarters.

    Something to be said for the British system, where all the pomp and ceremony revolves around a powerless figurehead…..

    • Replies: @Ben Kurtz
    , @Mike Tre
    , @AndrewR
  7. Ben Kurtz says:
    @syonredux

    Something to be said for the British system, where all the pomp and ceremony revolves around a powerless figurehead…

    I dare say, if Joe Biden is installed in the White House this coming January, we might just live to see such a state of affairs prevail here in the U.S.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • LOL: Lurker
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Verymuchalive
  8. Mike Tre says:
    @syonredux

    I found the episode with the Apollo 11 crew to be insulting to the men who flew the mission. Philip is as giddy as a school boy in anticipation of meeting the crew, but then finds them to be rather dull and robotic. This is clearly the perception being pushed at the audience: Those astronauts weren’t the apex of male ingenuity, creativity and stamina, they were just a bunch of dull and mindless white guys. Didn’t they know about the black women toiling away in the basement, making sure the math was right?

    It was a clear “fuck you” to the men who represented the absolute best in human potential.

  9. I thought that the portrayal of Prince Charles looked and sounded like a Martin Short character from SCTV.

  10. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve, I see that even after all these years you’re still fixated on your one brief, real-life encounter with Mrs T. So out of character (or so I would like to believe!).

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Anon
  11. prosa123 says:

    Food is a major expense item for US presidents. While the food served at official functions is at the government’s expense, the president has to pay for the food at everyday meals, and the prices are very, very high.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jack D
  12. Cortes says:
    @Almost Missouri

    The Queen’s intellectual pursuits are set out in the amusing

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Uncommon_Reader

  13. Bugg says:

    2 most compelling scenes; Thatcher reading Elizabeth the riot act.Anderson is a often a cartoon version of Thatcher but she gets that scene in spades.

    And the meeting between Diana, Charles and Elizabeth and Philip about trying to salvage the marriage. Diana acknowledges her mistakes but rededicates herself to their marriage whereupon her in laws agree, and Charles gets deeply disappointed because he has a list of his issues which nobody cares about. Laughed out loud for a bit. As my father in law often said, he got the last word in every argument with his wife; “Yes, dear”.

  14. I don’t have it at hand but near the beginning of her autobiography (The Downing Street Years) she mentions something about learning every possible way to cook eggs (point being that eggs are fast and thus appropriate for a busy person.)

    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
  15. Curle says:

    Reading this I tried to remember Boris Johnson’s predecessor but struggled then it came to me: Teresa May!

    Five years on and no Brexit docudrama yet? Why am I not surprised? I doubt we’ll ever see one though there’s plenty to glamorize, somehow I doubt it’ll come to be. For example who can forget how Jo Cox’s death was politicized to smear Brexit supporters in the waning days of the campaign? Anyone think the BLM folks remembered when they weaponized George Floyd’s death?

    Here’s Cox’s widower spewing nonsense:

    “Speaking to BBC1’s Andrew Marr Show, Cox cited the rise of US presidential hopeful Donald Trump and prominent far-right French politician Marine Le Pen as he suggested there had been an increased focus in recent months on “what divides us rather than what brings us together”.”

    Because mass immigration ‘brings us together’?

    “He said: “There is something which is stirring that I think at the moment the political centre is too complacent about. I think part of it is about re-seizing a patriotic narrative. Britain has a long tradition of tolerance, of diversity, of being an outward-looking nation – it’s many of the things that made us a great country.”

    Long tradition? Compared to long tradition of being an insular race?

  16. Alden says:

    There’s a much better British Royal family show on Netflix, The Windsors I recommend it highly. Much better than The Crown.

    There was an Anthony Blunt episode. Would have been nice if The Crown revealed why the royal family protected traitor and soviet spy Anthony Blunt decades after his treason was discovered. Blunt was a royal bastard, ER 2s uncle, son of king George 5 and one of Queen Mary’s lifelong friends, Hilda Master Blunt.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    , @Crawfurdmuir
  17. dearieme says:

    “My wager would be there’s a domestic staff at no. 10;”: have a read.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/upstairs-downstairs-1260433.html?amp

  18. Mr. Anon says:

    The Crown follows Elizabeth from her 1947 wedding to Prince Philip onward, with cameos from many historical figures, such as an extremely tall Winston Churchill played by John Lithgow.

    John Lithgow is a good actor. Like every other Hollywood playactor, he oozes with contempt for middle America. He even took part in some Broadway dramatic reading of the Mueller Investigation report. So screw these people – all of them – the whole Hollywood crowd. They are loathesome creeps. I just watch old movies on DVD now, so my hard-earned money goes to a faceless Japanese corporation instead of a bunch of still living Hollywood douchebags.

  19. @Ben Kurtz

    It was the state of affairs in the years preceding Trump, which goes a long way to explain the offense taken by the system that grew up around that state when Trump attempted (and attempts!) to execute his constitutional role.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  20. @Curle

    Um, let’s see, all those centuries of war in France. When that was lost, centuries of expansion elsewhere, with the occasional Continental expeditions, until the 1950s, when the Empire began to break up. That tradition?

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    , @Curle
  21. Kronos says:

    Presumably, a cook would be provided for official dinners, such as hosting generals and admirals planning the Falklands War and perhaps for the cabinet, depending on whether they were dealing with official or party business.

    There was a great “Yes Prime Minister” clip that touched on that.

  22. Twinkie says:

    The Crown is a superior royal soap opera from Peter Morgan on Netflix.

    It’s a soap opera all right, but it is well-written and well-acted, and is historical (more or less), so the wife and I watch it. Sure beats legions of superhero and Woke garbage that is Netflix these days.

    My favorite episodes are two. First, S2E9 Paterfamilias, which is about the contrasting experiences of the two princes, Philip and Charles, at Gordonstoun School. It reminded me of my father, who was an Anglophile, but who would rant against Prince Charles, saying that he was his mother’s son, not his father’s (I gather that was an insult). And I am a sucker for anything resembling Agoge.

    The other is S3E3 Aberfan – about the mining disaster and its aftermath, which powerfully contrasted the genuine grief of those afflicted (especially the parents of the dead children) and the cold, calculating responses of the would-be rulers and social superiors of their grief-struck subjects.

    These two episodes (as well as the rest of the series) also show what’s wrong with a hereditary and privileged caste – whatever noblesse oblige once existed, it seems to degenerate into self-serving, self-unaware entitlement. It’s a warning to this country and its future.

  23. Rob McX says:
    @Curle

    “He said: “…I think part of it is about re-seizing a patriotic narrative. Britain has a long tradition of tolerance, of diversity, of being an outward-looking nation – it’s many of the things that made us a great country.”

    Long tradition? Compared to long tradition of being an insular race?

    I hear that same impossible paradox being trotted out again and again to justify immigration: being “tolerant of diversity” is an indispensable part of being British, American, French or whatever. It’s obvious this tolerance is going to be the end of white nations as we know them. We’re being told that the essence of our identity is to erase our identity.

  24. Rob McX says:

    …such as an extremely tall Winston Churchill played by John Lithgow.

    Must be the biggest gap ever between actor and real life counterpart, around 10 inches. How do they get away with that?

  25. AndrewR says:
    @Desiderius

    I have no idea what you’re referring to. I have loved all four seasons.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  26. AndrewR says:
    @syonredux

    The astronaut episode is actually my least favorite of the whole series. When Philip is talking to the astronauts, they start bombarding him with stupid questions in a rapid, childish manner. I thought the episode is inexcusably poorly written. It didn’t stop me from watching the rest of the series, though. And I plan to watch the final two seasons too.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @Philip Neal
  27. Kronos says:
    @Rob McX

    I guess they considered Churchill a “larger than life” character so a tall actor would fit the bill if not his actual physical build. Sorta like how dog owners that owned a small dog in the distant past recall it actually being bigger in memory then actual reality. The barking of little dogs leaves more of a mental imprint in owners than big silent ones.

  28. AndrewR says:
    @Rob McX

    Because most people in our day have no idea how tall Churchill was, especially non-Brits. I imagine even most elderly Brits couldn’t tell you how tall he was.

    For me, the casting is more problematic due to ages. Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies were both born in early 1974. They’re only two months apart in age, in fact. When the third season starts, Philip is about 44 and Liz is about 39. Yet by the end of the fourth season, they’re playing a 64 year old Elizabeth and a 69 year old Philip.

    The producers might as well have done a new cast for each season. It would make their jobs a bit more difficult, but it would also have given more actors a shot to be on one of the most popular and well-made productions ever, and we wouldn’t have to see silliness like what I described before.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Hibernian
  29. @Twinkie

    These two episodes (as well as the rest of the series) also show what’s wrong with a hereditary and privileged caste – whatever noblesse oblige once existed, it seems to degenerate into self-serving, self-unaware entitlement. It’s a warning to this country and its future.

    The ‘hereditary and privileged caste’ which currently rules our country skipped that noblesse oblige phase entirely. They simply looked at the WASP establishment they had replaced several decades ago and said, “Well it didn’t work out too well for them, did it.”

  30. Anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:

    This is another reason why marriage is to be avoided.

    Steve’s wife not only made him watch that show, she made him honestly believe he wanted to.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  31. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Twinkie

    One of the things that Curtis Yarvin aka Mencius Moldbug noted was that hereditary rulers were in effect, owners not managers.

    Managers don’t really care about a company. They don’t share much in the profits, that is the owners, and so you have the classic agency problem. The managers throw themselves great big parties at the expense of the owners. This is the case of big corporations where even powerful hedge fund investors are often powerless against managers such as say, Jack Welch at GE or Jeffrey Immelt.

    Or ordinary citizens who are the “owners” of a nation, but the managers have control and run it for their benefit no matter the long-term ruin of the nation. They don’t care — they are managers and figure they will just jet about to some other country like true corporate weasels.

    As far as the widower of the late Jo Cox, the only possible response is to note that his words are that of a corporate weasel, parroting the latest corporate diversity statement and his wife was murdered because she too was a corporate weasel and cared more about distant foreigners and foreign immigrants than the mentally ill natives and if she’d spent a fraction of her corporate weasel efforts on getting goodies for immigrant foreigners towards mental health treatment and institutionalization of mentally ill homeless natives, she’d still be alive. But in true corporate weasel fashion she seemed to enjoy the misery of the mentally ill homeless natives while lavishing resources on foreigners and seemed surprise when that turned fatal.

    Corporate weasel is a good term for these people. It stings because it is who they are, instead of their image of themselves as heroic moral crusaders. When they are just corporate weasel quislings.

    • Agree: Jack Armstrong
    • Replies: @dfordoom
  32. Waiting for the Obama bio review ):

  33. I remember back in the day, there was a piece on Mrs Thatcher in Vanity Fair or some such. One thing mentioned was some weekend something at one of the Queen’s residences (I can’t remember which and was surprised such a ‘pleasure moment’ was even devised.) She had quite a reaction to what the writer called “the luxury of the Queen”, couldn’t bear servants waiting on her down to fine details. Then there’s segue to 10 Downing Street, where she is still somewhat ‘angry’ about this (telling, it seems, I would have thought she’d take that in stride–after all, her ‘great love of Britain’ that she proclaimed to Barbara Walters was going to have to include all that royal luxury too, and she should have been able to see that–but it had to have had something to do with being unable to identify with that class…but still, since it was so briefly…) and is said to have in something of a rage gone to the fridge and ‘defrosted Shepherd’s Pie’.

    Over the years of her reign, I thought she herself suddenly started to become very luxury-loving and wore lots of jewels and sometimes even looked glamorous, but she probably saw that a thousand years descended from William the Conqueror was still sort of hard to fit into comfortably, and certainly not compete with.

    It also didn’t really make sense because the PM meets with the Queen once a week at Buckingham Palace, such meetings which make the Queen know more state secrets than any living human due to longevity and that whole line of prime ministers. The person told me that the Queen did not particularly enjoy these meetings with Mrs. T., and that it reminded her of ‘going to the dentist’. Just before Major took over, there was much talk about comparing the two, and Thatcher did take on a much glossier look. So she got used to a lot of it.

    In any case, her funeral at St. Paul’s was among the most elaborate ever given a prime minister, and only the second one the Queen attended (Churchill being the other.) I’m sure they respected her, at least the Queen did, and she often seems the only one with much sense; she certainly didn’t have to go to the funeral. I always thought she was very charismatic, and she always stood out in photos of world leaders at summits.

    Glad you’re enjoying the series. I am not a royal-watcher, and never cared about the Charles-Di scandals, although that Royal Wedding was spectacular with Kiri Tekanawa singing Handel’s “Let the Bright Seraphim” stealing the show. But I also just never have wanted to see these living monarchs in fictionalized form. It would seem bizarre to me, for example, to see Helen Mirren do the original movie The Queen and a few months later seeing the real queen meeting with George W. Bush. I do like her Christmas Message and watch it every year. I saw her and Philip at Lincoln Center at the 1976 anniversary of the bicentennial. Quite beautiful when in her 40s–I was surprised, because she’s weirdly not photogenic. I think there was a B’way thing with Mirren continuing her role as the Queen, and maybe it was called that as well. Didn’t interest me at all. But neither did Meryl Streep mimicking Mrs. T. , but I’m in a minority who find Streep boring. I know she has a fine ear, but so did Joanne Woodward, and Streep is so un-sexy.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anonymouse
  34. Mr. Anon says:

    It is an oft-repeated truism that the Queen is a figurehead and the royal family is of ceremonial importance only.

    But………………..they are loaded. According to Forbes, the royal family is worth as much as 88 billion:

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/ceciliarodriguez/2017/11/23/the-british-royal-family-is-worth-88-billion/?sh=70173274629c

    That’s not exactly liquid wealth, and a lot of it is just “good will” and brand-value – ficticious really. But still, they have a lot of dough. Why do we assume that they have no power? Do very rich people usually have no power? They seem to be able to arrange things so that, for example, Prince Andrew skates on pretty obvious statutory rape charges.

    The Dutch royal family is also quite wealthy; they still own a lot of stock in Shell Oil, for which they provided a lot of the initial investment (it was formerly known as Royal Dutch Shell – they being the “Royal Dutch” part of that name). Queen Beatrix’s father was Prince Bernhard (who was actually a Kraut), a co-founder of the Bilderberg Group.

    Are these people really just “figureheads”? Or should they be viewed in the same light as Gates, Bezos, Bloomberg, Soros, Singer, Koch, etc.?

  35. anonymous[129] • Disclaimer says:

    You’re carrying on as normal and I think even outright ignoring the large scale election fraud that happened.

    • Agree: Jack Armstrong
    • LOL: Kronos
    • Troll: Corvinus
  36. AndrewR says:
    @Rob McX

    Lol

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights”

    What did you think that means?

    As for France, the whole Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité thing should have tipped you off.

    • Replies: @Curle
  37. Kylie says:
    @Rob McX

    Peter O’Toole, 6’2″ tall, played T.E. Lawrence, 5’5″ tall.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Lurker
  38. @Mr. Anon

    Judging from the sets on which “The Crown” was filmed, (which are, presumably, houses that once belonged to aristocracy rather than palaces that currently belong to royalty), the Windsors enjoy a remarkably high standard of living.

    To take a somewhat off-topic example from the recent movie “Darkest Hour” with Gary Oldman as Churchill, here’s a scene where Winston is visiting King George VI in Buckingham Palace:

    https://www.rotherhamadvertiser.co.uk/leisure/view,double-oscar-winner-darkest-hours-wentworth-connection_25874.htm

    I said, “Wow, I didn’t know that royalty owns George Stubb’s “Whistlejacket,” which is the all-time greatest horse painting ever.”

    But of course the movie wasn’t filmed in Buckingham Palace. It was filmed in Wentworth outside of Rotherham, the colossal house owned by the 18th century prime minister Lord Rockingham, leader of Edmund Burke’s faction in favor of making peace with the American rebels.

    My point is that the English aristocracy was incredibly rich, so what does that say about English royalty?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  39. Rob McX says:
    @Kylie

    Also Michael Caine played Stalin, same ratio, 6’2″-5’5″.

  40. @Almost Missouri

    Agreed, the first season was very good. In addition to being a fine actress, it doesn’t hurt that Claire Foy is quite easy on the eyes.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  41. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I saw the back of Queen Elizabeth’s head in San Francisco in 1983 as she was driven by on her way to a state dinner with President Reagan. The IRA protesters standing next to me had jumped up and down with excitement.

    I had, rather grandly, told my cab driver at the Hyatt Regency, “Take me to the see the Queen.”

    He had replied, “Which one? This town is full of them.”

  42. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Most of the palaces and other properties are owned by the Crown Estate, which is sort of a government-run trust, rather than the royals themselves. But I think the queen owns Balmoral personally.

  43. @AndrewR

    They are doing a new cast ever two seasons.

  44. @anonymous

    It’s hard to get too excited at the moment about our fraudulent election. The facts are fishy as hell, especially just the timing and magnitude of the after-hours vote dumps. The machines are fishy too, but it seems like that could be detected and corrected with a manual recount.

    It’s just too may “offers of proof” coming too fast. I hope they can prove something. But there is just no hard evidence yet. Which is probably understandable, as the election was just two weeks ago.

    One real story though, is how our lying press has closed ranks, as usual, to coordinate their “nothing to see here” message. The MSM is clearly dead as a credible source of anything going forward. We mostly knew it already. But now everybody knows it. That will be big change.

  45. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    Technically, the queen isn’t just a figurehead. Legally, she retains a lot of power, though it’s delegated. Presumably, a future sovereign could decide to exercise more of it.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @AndrewR
  46. @Mr. Anon

    But Gates, Bezos, Bloomberg, Soros, Singer, Koch etc. are extremely intelligent and energetic individuals, while, say, Prince Charles is kind of an emo boy mope, if “The Crown” can be believed.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  47. Tyrade says:
    @Twinkie

    “It’s a warning to this country and its future”. Well, I suppose…wouldn’t want the void where noblesse oblige used to be filled by higher castes like: The Kennedys, Obama, Trump, Biden, the Kardashians, Lady Gaga, Oprah… would we?! Maybe there’s a clause hidden in the Declaration of Independence to forgive all and come back to the Mother country?

  48. AndrewR says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Well I know that, although I could have made that fact more explicit for the unfortunate souls who have not seen The Crown.

    My point is they should be doing a new cast every season, or at least cast the actors better. Nothing against Mr Menzies, but why did they have a 44/45 year old playing a 69 year old? Seasons three and four run from about 1965 to 1990. The producers should have cast actors that were the same age as the IRL characters around 1978 or so. In Philip’s case, that would be about 57.

  49. AndrewR says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Well, the fates of Charles I and James II have served as cautionary tales to British monarchs for over three centuries. And if The Crown is to be believed, the present queen thinks her duty is to defend democracy or something gay like that. It will be interesting to see how Charles reigns. And thank God that William was born before his moron brother.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Hugo Silva
  50. BB753 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Actually, the queen is part of the inner circle of power of globalist elites, like the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, etc.
    And, as a queen, the worst in the story of England. Like a good globalist, she’s destroyed her country as a nation, the Church of England which she leads too and the Crown itself.
    Good job! Luckily, all her heirs are morons.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Jack D
  51. @anonymous

    Trump’s numerous lawyers are not using the word fraud in any of their court cases since they can’t present any evidence and aren’t going to risk getting disbarred for perjury. It’s helpful to yell the election was stolen since it keeps the angry base more inclined to give donations. The same thing would have been done by the Democrats I’d there was a narrow Trump victory.

    • Replies: @Curle
  52. AndrewR says:
    @Mike Tre

    As I mentioned in another comment, I think that scene is the worst scene in the entire series. They bombard him with the stupidest questions and don’t even give him a chance to respond.

    It’s hard to say what the intent of the writers was. Your theory is plausible, although perhaps they just wanted to point out that the privileges enjoyed by the royals (like being able to get a private audience with pretty much anyone on earth) aren’t necessarily as great as an average person might think.

    • Replies: @Simon
    , @Busby
  53. Lurker says:
    @Kylie

    I’m still reeling from the shock of Angus Young (out of AC/DC) being a mere 5’2″, which I only discovered in the last week. (His brother Malcolm was apparently only 5’3″)

    Got to hand it to the guy, he’s not made it by his looks or physical presence.

  54. theMann says:

    I realize several hundred years of Irish history flow through me, but why would anybody who isn’t a particularly dim teenage girl give the furry crack of a rat’s behind about British Royalty?

  55. @Curle

    Because mass immigration ‘brings us together’?

    They are telling such outrageous lies because it has been a total disaster.

    Take ‘Sarah’. At 14 she was abducted by Pakistanis outside a supermarket in 2005. She was kept as a sex slave for 12 years and had 8 abortions. As usual police did nothing even after she was tracked down by family members.

    Thatcher is partly to blame. Like the Jewish-Turkish jester and ‘Get Brexit Done’ she used rhetoric to weaken the National Front (UK variant) because it was getting popular among plebs over immigration.

    • Agree: Gordo
  56. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    i shamed him for it a while back and got tons of agreement and he seemed to back off for a while.

    but i guess we just have to accept this is one of steve’s bizarre and unsettling quirks: his obsession with a meeting with margaret thatcher that is literally never relevant to anything ever yet is somehow referenced in dozens of his published (!) writings.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • LOL: AndrewR
  57. Rob McX says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    No wonder the Wars of the Roses were so violent.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  58. @Anonymous

    When my wife started watching The Crown, I initially avoided it, assuming it was one of those estrogen-laden series like The Outlander that I can’t stand. However, I happened to overhear about five minutes of dialog while I was in the room where she was watching it and I was hooked. It’s a very intelligently written show and the dialog is great. I also like that each episode tells a self-contained story, somewhat like The Sopranos. I liked the episode in which Charles gives a public speech in Wales, comparing himself to the Welsh, both feeling marginalized and having their opinions ignored. He’s quite proud of that. The Queen set him straight upon his return. Also great was the episode about Princess Margaret bing sent on a diplomatic mission to charm LBJ.

  59. @Hypnotoad666

    But now everybody knows it. That will be big change.

    No, not everyone knows it. Half the population does, but not the other half. I know a lot of progressives, and the NYT, WaPo, and NPR are still gospel to them. Try arguing with them about their sources.

    • Agree: Polistra, Hangnail Hans
  60. @Curle

    Brendan Cox, her widower, had to resign from 2 charities set up in her name due to allegations of sexual assault.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/18/brendan-cox-resigns-from-charities-amid-sexual-assault-claims

    Brendan Cox has stepped down from his posts at More in Common and the Jo Cox Foundation after allegations, printed in the Mail on Sunday, that he had assaulted a woman in her 30s at Harvard University in 2015. Police filed her complaint as assault and battery but action against him was dropped.
    Cox denied the claims in a statement issued on Saturday but admitted making mistakes in a previous role with the charity Save the Children.

    Julian Assange was threatened with extradition to Sweden on completely spurious charges which the women themselves wanted dropped. But if you are a member of the globalist elite, sexual assault and battery only means a little bit of bad publicity for a limited period and then it is all forgotten.
    Less than a year later, he was back at the Guardian as a columnist peddling his pernicious rubbish.
    https://www.theguardian.com/profile/brendan-cox

  61. @Mike Tre

    “Those astronauts weren’t the apex of male ingenuity, creativity and stamina, they were just a bunch of dull and mindless white guys.”

    Wasn’t that also the conceit of Sailer favorite (and no liberal) Tom Wolfe? The Right Stuff contrasts the individuality and daringness of test pilot Chuck Yeager vs. the fairly stolid personality of Armstrong. NASA wanted reliable white guys who wouldn’t screw things up to fly in their ships, not the best and bravest. It was the engineers who were the apex of male creativity and best in human potential, the astronauts were mostly there for PR purposes.

  62. @Hypnotoad666

    Except there is no evidence of fraud and the so-called “after hours vote dumps” are just the result of mail and drop off ballots being counted later, which is exactly what everyone expected to happen who was paying the slightest bit of attention. The whole fraud nonsense story was carefully orchestrated by Trump beforehand because he knew he was in serious danger of losing. There was no reason other than Republican obstruction not to count those Pennsylvania votes beforehand, in which case it would have been obvious election night Trump was losing.

    After watching Tucker Carlson trying to explain the facts to the Trumpists and then getting wildly attacked, my new conspiracy theory is that Trump is playing up the whole fraud story partly to undermine Tucker, the number one contender for the populist throne. If Trump fights the fraud story he’s an “enemy of the right”. If he goes along with it, he looks like a toady. Tough position for him, and clears the way for Ivanka in 2024.

  63. @Steve Sailer

    I was in a cab in London one night, and as it was about to pass Buckingham Palace, the cabbie stopped, then turned to me and said, “Sorry for the delay, sir … they’re bringing out the Queen.” Sure enough, out comes the Queen’s limo and Her Majesty herself.

    The first thing I thought was that I’d never get that close to the American President unless invited and we’ll screened, the second thought was how many people waited hours for just a glimpse from a planned location while I got a front-row seat by chance, and the third thought was that it was perhaps the only time I was not upset being stuck in traffic with a cab meter running, which can bankrupt one in London.

    As for Gillian Anderson’s portrayal of Mrs. Thatcher, she gets the breathiness OK, but she plays the early Thatcher as if she had already had a stroke.

  64. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I heard Elizabeth II speak from the steps of the Texas Capitol in Austin once. I was way back in the crowd but the sound system was adequate. To my ear, she modulated her usual stick up the ass accent for a more mid-Atlantic accent.

    I thought the movie about the queen with Helen Mirren playing the lead was a well-done movie in the sense that the plot and Mirren’s acting represented a plausible sensibility that the queen might possess. Whether the represented sensibility is true to life to that of the real queen doesn’t matter. It’s a movie after all. The queen’s memory of her glory days as a lowly auto mechanic in the army during WW II, like all WW II moments, was very touching.

  65. sb says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The Queen and the Royal Family have great wealth in theory but they cannot really liquidate it in practice
    Remember the Duke of Windsor ? Well he was legally King for a time and then he abdicated . Afterwards his finances were , by royal standards , reasonably limited – more millionaire than billionaire as it were

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @AndrewR
  66. Steve might be interested in Yes, Prime Minister, S01E01

    Edit: Kronos beat me to it!

  67. @Peter Akuleyev

    If you think Wolfe said that the Mercury 7 astronauts and Armstrong lacked daring and individuality, and weren’t among the best and bravest, then you misunderstood him.

  68. We may yet find out with whom The Crowns sympathies lie,

    It is now undeniable that 2020 was the “pick your side” year between the deplorable and the Corporations.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/john-kerry-says-great-reset-needed-stop-rise-populism

    John Kerry has nailed his flag (had to go back and insert the “L”, why include Lindsey?) to the mast.

    Choosing to name the dissident “Populism” may well come back to bite them if people begin to realize who the populis is.

    Brenda may have little institutional power but a few words on the appropriate use of “Her” military in quelling domestic unrest could be interesting.

    This interview with the great Antony C Sutton is a useful reminder of just how long and how deeply the State has worked against the people.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  69. Anon[218] • Disclaimer says:

    Hey steve, there was an episode of Yes, Prime Minester about the PM not having a cook except for state.dinners and such He has the idea to schedule the ambassador from each country for a state sponsored lunch each day in alphabetical order. You are welcome for the deep historical research.

  70. @Rob McX

    We Lancashire natives distrust York to this day.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  71. Ed says:
    @Art Deco

    Some what related, Biden took off unannounced yesterday without informing the press and the press had a fit on Twitter.

    I don’t think the press has to know where the president or president-elect is at every second of the day.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Stan Adams
  72. Ed says:
    @Twinkie

    I agree, Season 3.3 is my favorite too. I didn’t even know Aberfan ever occurred and had to Google it to learn more. My second favorite was 1.2. The transition from princess to Queen, how she found out and everyone adjusting to their new roles was fascinating. At the end her grandmother, Queen Mary, curtseyed to her. Imagine your elderly grandmother on bender knee to you, it’s so out of the norm but a powerful statement on the importance of the Crown.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    , @AndrewR
  73. Gordo says:
    @Alden

    Link please.

    • Replies: @Alden
  74. Ed says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The Queen dissolved the Australian parliament 45 years ago, so in theory she still has considerable powers if she chooses to exercise them.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/10/01/australia-had-a-government-shutdown-once-it-ended-with-the-queen-firing-everyone-in-parliament/

  75. That is Princess Charles not Princess Diana in The Crown.

  76. @Ed

    The Queen dissolved the Australian parliament 45 years ago….

    Wrong. The Dismissal was a purely Aussie affair. The Governor General, Sir John Kerr, represented the Crown in Parliament, but was acting within his reserve powers under §64 of the Australian Constitution and not in furtherance of an agenda of the Crown.

  77. @Ed

    Private Eye

    succinctly covers key moments in the Life of Brenda, such as :

    https://www.private-eye.co.uk/covers/cover-1130

  78. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Even if this is true, so what? She was one of the greatest figures of the 20th century.

  79. Art Deco says:
    @Ed

    I think it was the Governor-General. Some years later a professor-fantasist in the US published a book claiming the Governor-General was doing the CIA’s bidding.

    • Replies: @Ed
  80. Art Deco says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    the astronauts were mostly there for PR purposes.

    Yeah, didn’t have any real skills at all. Thanks for your wisdom.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Peter Akuleyev
  81. Bitfu says:

    After giving the first season an honest go of it, all I can say is:

    Heavy are the eyelids that watch The Crown.

    • LOL: Bill Jones, Rob McX
    • Replies: @Alden
  82. Graham says:

    I’ve watched the whole of The Crown up to the first three episodes of series 4. I’m getting increasingly annoyed with it, although it’s beautifully and lavishly made, and very well acted. I didn’t mind the obviously fictional nature of it at first – nearly every scene is invented from whole cloth, and the only factual matters are publicly known events like marriages and elections – but I draw the line at the vicious caricatures now being foisted on us, particularly that of Margaret Thatcher. The political viewpoint is obvious: republican, socialist, and anti-British in a manner peculiar to our cultural caste. The dialogue has been rather ineptly tailored for an American audience, but that is the least of my worries, although it is irritating to hear words like ‘refurbish’ used by English people in the 1950s.

  83. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, but why would you believe them? Commentary on Prince Charles generally reveals one thing: that high school never ends for some people, and a disproportionate share of such people work in the media. Prince Charles (who is 72) has in his portfolio profitable business enterprises, his own avocational projects (e.g. the restoration of Dumfries House), philanthropic projects his trust finances, and a round of promotional visits every month to the philanthropies he patronizes. If he’s an emo mope, he’s a mope who keeps moving.

    He failed at being married to a very difficult woman, as would most of us.

    • Agree: Ali Choudhury
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  84. Bill says:
    @Curle

    For example who can forget how Jo Cox’s death was politicized to smear Brexit supporters in the waning days of the campaign? Anyone think the BLM folks remembered when they weaponized George Floyd’s death?

    No. BLM has a long line of their own faux martyrs: St Skittles and The Gentle Giant of the 2012 campaign being recent examples, and St Emmett Till of the Noose being a well-established cult. “Waving the bloody shirt” is a cliche because waving the bloody shirt is, err, a cliche.

  85. Currahee says:

    “…extremely tall Winston Churchill played by John Lithgow.’
    C’mon, Steve, he does crouch to overcome this. Other than his height, Lithgow is the best “warts and all” portrayal of Winnie I have seen.

  86. Bill says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Tough position for him, and clears the way for Ivanka in 2024.

    That would be so awesome.

  87. @Curle

    Wouldn’t it be awful if NP Cox came to the same end as his (AA YPD @ Cambridge) wife!

  88. @Redneck farmer

    So you think that when Jo Cox’s cultural-Marxist husband says-

    “Britain has a long tradition of tolerance, of diversity, of being an outward-looking nation…”

    he is actually referring to the British Empire?

  89. Corvinus says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “But there is just no hard evidence yet.”

    Exactly.

    “The MSM is clearly dead as a credible source of anything going forward.”

    Read carefully the advice of Ron Unz…

    I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying?”

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @vinteuil
  90. pyrrhus says:

    The latest episode reveals through Princess Margaret’s investigations that the Royal Family un-personed some nieces who were mentally impaired and dumped them in a horrific institution, while Burke’s Peerage covered it up by listing them as deceased…A shocking example of their ruthlessness.

    • Replies: @Alden
  91. @Peter Akuleyev

    I heard of him then and hear of him now that Dr. Aldrin has a bristly personality, but he has a doctorate in Engineering from MIT.

    His thesis, by the way, was on manual procedures for spacecraft rendezvous, which in a way, was an enabling technology for Apollo to happen at all. I had heard that in recent years, he had published a scholarly paper on “cyclers”, which are a way for spacecraft to shuttle between Earth and Mars in support of a Mars mission or a Mars colony.

    I am seriously impressed that as a celebrated former astronaut, that he was still publishing in the area of his thesis research.

    Michael Collins has authored multiple books. I would think he would be great to engage in conversation if a person had the least bit of technical knowledge.

    Neil Armstrong, however, I will believe the Tom Wolfe characterization that he was introverted and parsimonious with his words.

  92. Hibernian says:
    @AndrewR

    …most people in our day have no idea how tall Churchill was…

    Most people in our day have no idea who Churchill was.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Alden
  93. Hibernian says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The monarch has a real role when a coalition government needs to be formed. When, as usual, one party gets a majority of the House of Commons, that role is a formality.

  94. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Before the Mercury astronauts, NASA sent up chimps and the missions went fine. TBH, the capsules were flown mostly by the computer and by remote control by a room full of men in Houston. NASA wanted trained test pilots who could take over in case something went wrong and on rare occasions (but not so rare that they wouldn’t have lost a couple of missions if they didn’t give the astronauts some control capability) something did go wrong and the astronauts got to show their stuff, but most of the time they really weren’t needed. To satisfy their pride and so they wouldn’t be bored out of their minds and start making mischief, they gave the astronauts more stuff to do than was really necessary.

    PR was a big element because the public likes to see humans on the ground – it’s hard to identify with a robot. The unmanned Mars missions do pretty much everything that the humans did on the moon with vastly less cost and risk but still there is a desire to send humans there.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Anon
  95. Hibernian says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    There was no reason other than Republican obstruction not to count those Pennsylvania votes beforehand, in which case it would have been obvious election night Trump was losing.

    Pennsylvania law prohibited any counting before in-person voting ended.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  96. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    You know Jack D, I have occasion to see you opining on subjects I know a wee bit about; not a confidence builder.

  97. Jack D says:
    @Mike Tre

    They did make the astronauts look dull but the astronauts weren’t really the point – they were just NPCs as far as the show was concerned. The real point of the episode was to illustrate Prince Philip’s spiritual awakening.

    Peter Morgan is a wooden story teller. Each episode illustrates one and only 1 main point. They are like 1 hour long SNL skits where the whole skit is set up to pay off 1 punch line.

    Upper class Brits always think that Americans are dull anyway because Americans don’t really value witty repartee.

  98. Curle says:
    @Redneck farmer

    You are referring to activities outside of Britain. Before the ‘60s immigration to Britain, even from the colonies, was slight. Certainly no mass immigration. And in the instance of blacks brought back after the American Revolution, those folks were removed to Sierra Leone.

    As late as the 80s, Morrissey could get away with a popular lyric about an immigrant: “life is hard enough when you belong here.” That hardly sounds like the words of a people steeped in mass immigration.

  99. Lot says:

    Strangest mass shooting:

    Comically obese Hispanic man in Omaha uses a Sonic App with stolen credit card entered to purchase 6 double quarter pounders at a time, plus corn dogs.

    The owner of the credit card reports this to local police. In most of the USA, $57 of defrauded fast food would get ignored, but in Omaha they tracked the car from the drive thru camera footage, and Silva was arrested. He returned a few days later and murdered two people at the Sonic and wounded two more.

    He looks like 1990s sitcom star David Anthony Higgins.

    https://omaha.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/man-held-in-sonic-drive-in-shooting-had-been-accused-of-using-someone-elses-app/article_d34a2f10-a9c0-5206-b91e-ed7e06ae4983.html

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @Alden
  100. J.Ross says:

    Is Thatcher cooking a callback to the gentle mockery at the end of For Your Eyes Only? By depicting her as a conventional homemaker they’re seeking to defuse her public image and obvious successes?

  101. J.Ross says:
    @Hibernian

    Sure they do. He was that evil racist who mass murdered people for not belonging to his race during WWII. That’s why they’re removing his evil racist statues.

  102. J.Ross says:
    @Ed

    But now, you see, it is the press and not, say, the electoral college or the congress, which certifies and “calls” our elections. In the Gomshurutin that is. The people clamor to know the ice cream flavor.

  103. @Mike Tre

    The whole point of that scene is to portray the 3 astronauts as American airheads. The Brits love this kind of stuff. It gives them a warm feeling inside. They got years of mileage out of a random clip of an American beauty pageant winner saying dumb things on TV.

    In my view, Philip in that scene comes across as a weird sperg looking for Deep Thoughts about God and extraterrestrial life, but comes away disappointed. He displays an almost pedophilic urge to be in control and an inability to just have a friendly chat. What could be more British?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  104. Curle says:
    @AndrewR

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal” . . . What did you think that means?”

    That Kings don’t have a Devine right to rule, you know the immediate point of dispute between the Crown/Royalists and the Republicans? The battleground philosophical issue motivating the Glorious Revolution and the English Civil War? The issue that made Thomas Jefferson’s favorite philosopher John Locke famous?

    What do you think they meant? That all people world wide were sufficiently equal in talents, habits and proclivities to be considered British or American citizens or potential citizens? If so, your understanding of Revolution era history is very deficient.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  105. @Mike Zwick

    I thought that the portrayal of Prince Charles looked and sounded like a Martin Short character from SCTV.

    Anyone ever seen them in the same room?

  106. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I’ve spent a while researching some of the fraud claims circulating on conservative social media. In each case I’ve examined, the seemingly suspicious events turn benign when you drill down into the data and study the local vote counting procedures.

    The huge numbers of absentee votes have thrown conservatives for a loop, because they’ve made the vote counting process much less intuitive than it was in previous elections. The procedures for counting the absentee votes vary substantially between states, between counties in the same state, and even between municipalities in the same county. So the timing and granularity of vote count reports was different from one place to the next, generating suspicion and confusion.

    The confusion was exacerbated because it just took way longer to count the vastly larger numbers of these ballots. Laws that absentee ballots could not be counted before election day suddenly were much more relevant and resulted in delayed reporting. Some of these “late night vote dumps” were in fact reports of votes counted by large numbers of people working continuously from the moment they were legally allowed to start counting. It just took them a long time to finish.

    The real story may turn out to be that mass absentee balloting is just inherently better for the Democrats. A portion of their constituency is too lazy, disconnected, or dysfunctional to show up to the polls on election day, but if you bend over backwards to make it as easy as possible for them to vote over a period of months, and send out squads of activists to basically hold their hands while they vote, you can increase turnout quite a bit. It will be hard to put that genie back into the bottle.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anon
    , @Corn
  107. @Telemachos

    she mentions something about learning every possible way to cook eggs (point being that eggs are fast and thus appropriate for a busy person.)

    I agree. Crack three or four eggs into a hot greased pan, whisk them right there. Three or four minutes later, salt and pepper, cup of black coffee, and you’re well-fed and and ready to work, no nonsense.

  108. @AndrewR

    Claire Foy (over-)played Armstrong’s wife as a harridan in First Man and I could never watch her portrayal of the queen the same way again.

    As with Downton The Crown makes too many compromises to ingratiate itself with the temporal chauvinists who make up too much of its audience.

    Unlike Downton it has no Maggie Smith to subvert the whole cloyingly turgid business.

  109. syonredux says:
    @AndrewR

    What did you think of the Blunt ep?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  110. @Ed

    People with dementia are known to wander off from time to time. It happens. As Biden’s mental condition continues to deteriorate, we can expect such episodes to become more frequent.

    Does DC have a Silver Alert system? In Florida, we receive emergency notifications on our cell phones every time an old person escapes from the pen.

    When my grandmother reached a certain level of cognitive dysfunction, I had to keep all of the doors locked at all times. I hid the house keys on a high shelf where she couldn’t reach them. One time she got so frustrated that she tried to break a window.

    Presumably the White House has a sophisticated procedure for dealing with such eventualities.

    • LOL: AndrewR, Jack D
    • Replies: @Rob McX
  111. El Dato says:

    OT: Criminal Trumpian fuck-up in the foreign policy section:

    Open Skies no more: US pulls out of Cold War-era deal that provided global security in diplomatic row with Russia

    That’s exactly why Trump is halfway between the gutter and the stars.

    Worst part is he was alive during the Cold War. Probably too busy banging starlets and running a casino.

  112. AndrewR says:
    @syonredux

    I know I watched it but I don’t recall anything that memorable.

  113. El Dato says:
    @Art Deco

    But he’s basically right.

    https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/digital-apollo

    Then again, it was a “Man on the Moon mission”, not a “bunch of automatics on the Moon mission”

    Reminds me that I still have to watch.

  114. @Twinkie

    These two episodes (as well as the rest of the series) also show what’s wrong with a hereditary and privileged caste – whatever noblesse oblige once existed, it seems to degenerate into self-serving, self-unaware entitlement. It’s a warning to this country and its future.

    It’s actually worse than that now in the United States.

    With the rise of the Jews, we have a considerable fraction of our elite, who are not from the nation’s founding and settling ethnic group(s) and worse have a long historical hostility/friction with–broadly speaking–those same people–white gentiles and especially the farming and laboring classes. Jews brought a snarky hostility toward precisely the very people and sort of work–pioneering, fighting, settling, farming–that craved out and built America. And unfortunately with their dominance of talky narrative, whether academic or news or entertainment, the Jews have encouraged the worst impulses in non-Jewish elites and made their snark, dismissiveness and contempt toward flyover country Americans–and with them the core American narrative of pioneering, independence and settlement–the general elite attitude.

    I do not see an escape from this. We have an dominant anti-nationalist elite and elite ideology, that even when throwing out nominal red, white and blue puffery is “not who we are” anti-American.

    What actual Americans need to survive is separation.

    ~~

    Bottom line for me:

    To maintain a civilization there is no alternative to republicanism–government of the nation controlled by the nation’s responsible and productive men, committed to the nation’s future, its posterity.

    Everything else leads off into the weeds … and eventually over a cliff.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @sb
  115. @Mr. Anon

    John Lithgow is a good actor.

    I just watch old movies on DVD now, so my hard-earned money goes to a faceless Japanese corporation instead of a bunch of still living Hollywood douchebags.

    I watch old movies on OK.ru. It doesn’t cost me a penny.

  116. kihowi says:
    @Mike Tre

    Have you ever listened to Neil Armstrong talk? What a bore. I think astronauts were selected to be problem solvers who never ever panicked, not interesting geniuses.

    • Replies: @epebble
  117. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Since we are doing crazy conspiracy theories, here’s one of my own: look at the price of Bitcoin.

    Around March, Trump or his associates realize he runs the risk of losing the election, especially after corona. They invest heavily in BTC as a hedge. Trump loses, but decides to go for maximum chaos, as planned. Pump.

    Scared investors see crypto as a safe haven, forcing the price up. At some point, Trump concedes, but not before he or his associates sell their Bitcoin. Dump.

    If this is the game, expect to see more, not less, extreme behavior from Trump over the next few weeks. They’ll probably pull the plug before Biden is inaugurated to avoid detection, unless they’ve gone all-in, in which case there are really dark days ahead.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  118. Not Raul says:
    @Twinkie

    These two episodes (as well as the rest of the series) also show what’s wrong with a hereditary and privileged caste – whatever noblesse oblige once existed, it seems to degenerate into self-serving, self-unaware entitlement. It’s a warning to this country and its future.

    Perhaps you’ve heard about the mansion near Santa Barbara that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex bought recently. They bought it from a Russian criminal for half what it was worth.

  119. @Mike Zwick

    I thought that the portrayal of Prince Charles looked and sounded like a Martin Short character from SCTV.

    Don’t know Prince Charles. But he’s struck me as a ho-hum mediocrity, who–given a very comfortable life in return for some standards of behavior and responsibilities to his people–has basically failed his duty.

    The social changes in British–and wider Western–life made success more “fraught” than perhaps it would have been for some previous generations. Perhaps demanded higher character or a stronger personality? But he’s failed to be a champion of British culture and tradition and certainly failed to be a champion of the British people.

    A weak man who has failed his nation.

    ~~

    It’s interesting how mediocre the British royals are.

    The Queen seems like a modestly above average person in intellect and certainly character. And Prince Phillip seems like a fairly high caliber individual. But their children are a mess. Andrew seemed the best of the lot–a brave and competent naval officer. But three of the four had messy personal lives and were unable to maintain marriages and the fourth, Edward, seems to be a mediocrity.

    Nature and nurture–neither seems to have been impressive here.

  120. Thoughts says:

    I got to see the Queen in a complete surprise once, not at an official event….she was just…there.

    I freaked out and was super annoying screaming ‘The Queen the Queen’

    It was awesome. The Queen walks with her back at a 45 degree angle which you don’t notice in the photos.

    • Replies: @Philip Neal
  121. Anon[334] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Yes, a rare few occasions, like literally every spaceflight Armstrong made in his career, one where he saved Gemini from spinning out of control while in a total radio blackout and another when he landed the Eagle on joker fuel after the landing zone turned out to be a minefield of boulders, the RADALT shit the bed, and the main computer was generating a new master caution alarm every ten seconds.

    But he was a real milquetoast beside that, only flew eighty combat missions before he graduated college and was only shot down and had to escape back to friendly lines once. What a pussy.

    Reading about how he managed to save the X-15 after bouncing off the atmosphere (and made a no-shit emergency landing in the wilderness) or managing a double engine explosion and total loss of cabin pressure while carrying an X-1, or surviving assymetrical fuel starvation in the “flying bedstand” by ejecting at less than 200′ really supports your smooth brained impressions of this T levels.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @The Alarmist
  122. syonredux says:
    @Mr. Anon

    But………………..they are loaded. According to Forbes, the royal family is worth as much as 88 billion:

    How much of that is part of the Crown Estate?

    The Crown Estate is a collection of lands and holdings in the territories of England, Wales and Northern Ireland within the United Kingdom belonging to the British monarch as a corporation sole, making it “the sovereign’s public estate”, which is neither government property nor part of the monarch’s private estate.[2][3][4][5] The sovereign is not involved with the management or administration of the estate, and exercises only very limited control of its affairs.[6] Instead, the estate’s extensive portfolio is overseen by a semi-independent, incorporated public body headed by the Crown Estate Commissioners, who exercise “the powers of ownership” of the estate, although they are not “owners in their own right”.[2] The revenues from these hereditary possessions have been placed by the monarch at the disposition of Her Majesty’s Government in exchange for relief from the responsibility to fund the Civil Government.[7] These revenues thus proceed directly to Her Majesty’s Treasury, for the benefit of the British nation.[2][8][9] The Crown Estate is formally accountable to the Parliament of the United Kingdom,[10] where it is legally mandated to make an annual report to the sovereign, a copy of which is forwarded to the House of Commons.[6]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_Estate

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  123. Dan Hayes says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Ivanka in 2024! Does the egomania of this quintessential East Side Liberal and
    her consort from the Kushner Crime Family know no bounds!

  124. anonymous[342] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Trump is supporting the theory that Venezuela directly interfered with the election. Trump re-tweeted:

    • Replies: @Hugo Silva
  125. Art Deco says:
    @AndrewR

    His brother has adequate intellect; he’s just less academically inclined than his brother and his cousins. It’s regrettable he did not remain in the military.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  126. @Mike Tre

    “Philip”

    Friend of Jimmy Savile Philip finding American astronauts “rather dull and robotic” illustrates the vacancy required to serve the Rothschild bloodline. The lives of Philip and his kin is a ritualized orgy of Gilbert and Sullivan uniforms, chats with bankers, and boy-buggery. This ancient reptile would urinate his panties at the mere thought of undergoing the training necessary to face the hostile environment of space.

  127. Art Deco says:
    @BB753

    Actually, the queen is part of the inner circle of power of globalist elites, like the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, etc.

    [eyeroll]

    The Rockefeller’s haven’t controlled anything of institutional importance in about 35 years, barring perhaps some philanthropies. There are two sets of Rothschild cousins. They’re in charge of a set of financial firms whose assets are on the order of a good-sized regional bank in this country.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
  128. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    Trump knew that the mail in votes favored the Dems so even before the election he started sowing FUD about them, knowing that in the swing states he would “win” on election night and then lose later on once the absentee ballots were counted. And everything has proceeded according to that plan.

    Dem OTOH were expecting to win anyway based on the polling data so they had no reason to do a massive fraud. Arguably, once the election became closer than they thought it would be, they would have had a big incentive to gin up a whole bunch of fake absentee ballots in a hurry to tip the election.

    The problem with this is that, despite all the hand waving, no one has any real proof that this actually happened on a large scale. Franklin said that two may keep a secret if one of them be dead. If there was some kind of vast conspiracy, someone would have talked by now. All the “evidence” offered by Trump and by conspiracy theorists here and elsewhere has not really panned out or was just blowing smoke to begin with.

    I agree with you on your last point – mail in voting has ample potential for abuse in harvesting ballots (in a way that may or may not be legal depending on each state’s laws) from Dem constituencies who are often difficult to get to the polls for in person voting. But your “get out the vote” operation can be much more effective if you can convert almost every visit into a real life absentee ballot.

    And it is difficult for R’s to argue with lawful voters actually voting without sounding “racist”. Even if Dems are doing “ballot harvesting” which is illegal under that state’s laws, as long as the people who are voting are real living humans (even if they are homeless or living in nursing homes) it’s hard to get the legal system (esp. Dem controlled legal systems) excited about such “crimes”.

    Now that Covid has normalized mail voting it’s going to be hard to get rid of it in the future. Now I have never seen a line in my local voting place in the past. I would be in and out in 5 minutes and it was a pleasant little ritual to go behind the curtain and punch the buttons on the voting machine and hear the ca-ching sound when my vote was registered. For me, voting by mail was actually a little MORE inconvenient.

    BUT, I alway see pictures of city polling places where the line was hours long. TBH, if I had to wait in line for hours, I wouldn’t vote. I’d just leave. Any more than a 5 minute wait and I would switch to mail voting if it was available.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  129. Jack D says:
    @BB753

    Actually, the queen is part of the inner circle of power of globalist elites, like the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, etc.

    Not to mention George Soros and the Elders of Zion…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  130. epebble says:
    @kihowi

    You think Armstrong was a bore? I would any day prefer a bore above a crazy. I heard James Irwin give a speech at my school. Went with lot of excitement but was disappointed to see he had become insane.

    Beginning in 1973, Irwin led several expeditions to Mount Ararat, Turkey, in search of the remains of Noah’s Ark. In 1982, he was injured during the descent and had to be transported down the mountain on horseback. In More Than Earthlings, Irwin wrote expressing his view that the Genesis creation narrative was real, literal history

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Irwin#Post-NASA_career

  131. Art Deco says:
    @theMann

    Because they’re heirs to umpteen generations of history, because they’re curators of fantastic treasures, and because they’re involved in some interesting projects.

    Looking at what comes over my Facebook wall (or what’s said here), I come across people who are obsessive rankers. One shirt-tail recently blasts out to his bros to name a band whose x ‘best albums’ are better than ‘REM’s” x ‘best albums’. I cannot imagine sitting in my den making competitive rankings of record albums. The whole operation seems bizarre unless you’re Robert Christgau or something. He actually expected a response. (I was directly ordered not to respond with ‘Shut up you wanker’). Other people invest a great deal of time in watching sports on television – games they’ve never played or could play given their advanced age and conditioning. Baseball aficionadoes take it a step further by taking a shine to statistics about sport rather than sport.

  132. @Anonymouse

    I thought the movie about the queen with Helen Mirren playing the lead was a well-done movie in the sense that the plot and Mirren’s acting represented a plausible sensibility that the queen might possess. Whether the represented sensibility is true to life to that of the real queen doesn’t matter. It’s a movie after all.

    Most thought it was good, and I know Mirren is a fine actress, not one that has ever interested me that much, but liked the miniseries Prime Inspector. I think I don’t like any fictional treatments of presidents, monarchs, etc., while they’re still living and functioning. And even if dead, I usually would rather see something on Louis XIV or Marcus Aurelius–somebody dead a long time–and I won’t care if there’s all sorts of ‘creative pageantry’, as in Cleopatra. And I want it to be as close to 100% factual, insofar as is possible. I prefer documentaries and real footage of people like the royals or still-living U.S. presidents, and don’t read historical fiction. I got much more turned on by Gibbon than I do any fiction about Roman emperors, etc. If it’s, say, about Queen Elizabeth I, that can interest me as with the old one with Glenda Jackson. Even movies about movie stars, like Frances I don’t like if they don’t stick to the facts strictly, although Jessica Lange was good, as always. I have to admit I did like Mommie Dearest, but that’s probably because I could never stand Joan Crawford and thought Faye Dunaway was brilliant.

    I did see one of the TV mniniseries about Diana when she was still alive, based on the Morton book, but that was pretty pathetic for enough other reasons.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  133. Not Raul says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    After watching Tucker Carlson trying to explain the facts to the Trumpists and then getting wildly attacked, my new conspiracy theory is that Trump is playing up the whole fraud story partly to undermine Tucker, the number one contender for the populist throne. If Trump fights the fraud story he’s an “enemy of the right”. If he goes along with it, he looks like a toady. Tough position for him, and clears the way for Ivanka in 2024.

    That theory makes a lot of sense. If Trump is good at anything, it’s stabbing his friends in the back.

  134. Mr. Anon says:
    @syonredux

    Reportedly, Queen Bess’s personal fortune is valued at north of half a billion dollars. The Crown Estate is governed by commissioners named by the government. Does the Queen have any input on who is chosen. I’d be surprised if she didn’t. In any event, it seems to act as some kind of sovereign wealth fund – a pot of money in the government’s hands that does not rely on taxation of the people.
    I don’t pretend to know how it all works, but given that it’s the British government were talking about, I’m sure it’s dirty. Britain has a long and storied history of corruption, which their playwrights and script-writers have white-washed into a fable of fair-play and straight-dealing.

  135. @Art Deco

    “not a confidence builder”

    Despite his distaste for Jack Chiclets I’m a big Art Deco fan. He’s my favorite Steve Sailer character. When casting around for a visual John Houseman pops up. A droll, terrifying figure for any student summoned to his office. If anybody here has naked pix of John Houseman please send them to Jerry Brown’s sweat lodge in Colusa County. That’s where I’ll be wintering.

  136. Have so far seen just the first two seasons of The Crown, and their only egregious feature was the miscasting of a skinny girl to portray Princess Margaret whose frame carried quite a lot more flesh.

    Lithgow did a surprisingly good job at playing Winston Churchill.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Jack D
  137. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    Read “Digital Apollo”. Armstrong (and all of the other early astronauts) were bona fide right stuff test pilots and/or combat pilots and he actually had all of those hair raising adventures that you list.

    The problem is that a space capsule could not possibly be fully piloted by a human pilot, even the best ones (and Armstrong was one of the best). By its very nature, it needs to be a human-computer collaboration (not to mention a whole roomful of humans on the ground each one who is watching a different set of instruments and controlling different things remotely – it’s way too much for 1 or 2 human pilots to keep track of and control). Fire the main engines 1 second too long and you miss your orbit (that was carefully calculated by black lady genius mathematicians in advance) by hundreds of miles.

    Now these pilots were rightly proud of their piloting skills so they lobbied NASA to give them as many responsibilities (or at least back up ability to take over manual control) as possible. Their friends who were still in the test pilot community ribbed them about being chimps or “Spam in a can” and they (and the NASA publicity machine) tried to counter this as much as possible. And as I said before, there were a few times when this paid off. But a lot of those tales are exaggerated (and for each one of those, there are other stories about how astronauts put missions in jeopardy by pressing the wrong button).

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    , @Dan Hayes
  138. Anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill Jones

    We Lancashire natives distrust York to this day.

    Yup, classic Bantu-Pygmy rivalry.

    (Lancs are the Pygmies.)

  139. Mr. Anon says:
    @sb

    The Queen and the Royal Family have great wealth in theory but they cannot really liquidate it in practice

    Neither can any other billionaire, in practice. It’s not like Bill Gates or Jeff Bezos can sell off a large share of stock in the enterprises they founded and convert into ready cash.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @prosa123
  140. Not Raul says:
    @Art Deco

    There are two sets of Rothschild cousins. They’re in charge of a set of financial firms whose assets are on the order of a good-sized regional bank in this country.

    How would you know what their assets are?

    A lot of their assets could be hidden behind trusts, shell companies, etc.

  141. @Art Deco

    “sitting in my den”

    Art, please send pix of your den to Jerry Brown’s sweat lodge in Colusa County. I’ll be there starting December 3 through February 21. The ranch does have wifi (despite Jerry’s denials). If you have any naked John Houseman pix please send those too.

  142. @The Alarmist

    Never have cared for Gillian Anderson and am surprised she’s still working in important projects. She was all wrong, I thought, for Terence Davies’s The House of Mirth, because her previous courtesan persona doesn’t come across as being within her abilities–hardly like Marguerite Gautier even several steps down, a roles which was done by innumerable actresses onstage and film, and in th opera La Traviata. But many of these could really carry across the intensity of the character, and there were already so many legends and myths around her–but Garbo, Bernhardt, Duse.

    Mainly, there was a TV miniseries from the late 70s with Geraldine Chaplin in the part, and she also had that otherworldly charisma. She was a thousand times better, but she’s also so beautiful and Anderson is attractive, but not that outstanding IMO. Anderson should just be in commoner roles (and maybe she has been, I haven’t kept up with her.)

  143. @Curle

    Maybe not so recently, but there were big Irish immigrations to Britain, where there was more opportunity. You can see it very obviously in Liverpool, where I went in 1987, and is considered the ‘most Irish of British cities’. It’s also a fantastic, unique and beautiful city, by the way.

    • Replies: @John Up North
  144. Alden says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    The actress who plays Margaret isn’t skinny. She’s as chubby as the real middleaged Margaret. And Margaret, like most people was slim till she hit 40.

    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
  145. Dan Hayes says:
    @Jack D

    I hope that “black lady genius mathematicians” was tongue in cheek!

  146. Dan Hayes says:
    @Jack D

    I hope that “black lady genius mathematicians” was tongue in cheek!!

    • Replies: @bomag
  147. AndrewR says:
    @sb

    I believe his brother had to buy Sandringham and Balmoral from him after the abdication, because they were privately owned. He had inherited them from his dad as a private citizen not as the king. I don’t think Edward ever wanted for money.

  148. AndrewR says:
    @theMann

    Besides being the heirs to centuries of history and customs, and the real power and influence they still exercise, I find them to be interesting because you can read more about them than any family in history. You can see habits and traits passed down from generation to generation. For instance, Harry seems to be very much like his great-great-uncle Edward: a weak man with a deep need to be controlled by a domineering wife. How many people can even name any of their great-great-uncles? Yet Harry can read hundreds of books about him or watch dozens of films. And if Harry doesn’t want to, then I can. I love studying them as a living case study of familial dysfunction.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Art Deco
  149. Rob McX says:
    @Bill Jones

    Thanks. There’s also a great article here about the covert role of American capitalism in supporting the Soviet Union, while publicly disavowing all things communist.

    Had the West not subsidized the USSR, Communism would likely not have survived. Stalin himself admitted that two-thirds of early Soviet industrial products and development were of American origin.

  150. Rob McX says:
    @Stan Adams

    When my grandmother reached a certain level of cognitive dysfunction, I had to keep all of the doors locked at all times. I hid the house keys on a high shelf where she couldn’t reach them. One time she got so frustrated that she tried to break a window.

    It’s sad about your grandmother. But at least she didn’t have access to the nuclear codes.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  151. Jack D says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    I don’t know what you are talking about. Margaret was never fat, especially not as a young woman as portrayed in the 1st two seasons.

    Later in life she became a bit more fleshy as most women do, but not fat by modern standards. Smoking 3 packs a day helps to keep your weight down (one reason why modern women are so much fatter). Maybe after they made her quit in her later years (it’s amazing that she made it to 70 but she still probably took 30 years off of her life by her bad habits) she puffed up and looked like Queen Victoria a bit (not surprising I suppose) or maybe that was from the steroids that they were giving her .

    The thing that distinguishes her appearance the most (and which is not evident from solo photos) is that she was really really petite (short) – maybe half a head shorter than her sister the Queen (who is not very tall to begin with). Sources claim 5’1″ but I’ll bet she was shy of 5′ in her bare feet.

    One of the reasons why royalty wear crowns on their head is to make them appear taller. Animals do the same thing with feathers and such.

  152. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    About the “ difficulty “ of minorities and other oppressed groups getting to the polls. They live in the big cities where there’s a polling place in every neighborhood within easy walking distance of even disabled people. I’ve been hearing about those poor oppressed non White city dwellers unable to walk 2-8 blocks to their neighborhood polling place all my life. And I know it’s just another lie.

    My evil privileged White Los Angeles neighborhood polling place is either 2 blocks to the community center or 4 blocks to the grade school. The school has big condo buildings on all 4 sides of the school. Hundreds of voters who just have to walk across the street.

    It’s rural and suburban mostly White, not oppressed minorities voters who have to make the effort to drive to the polling place. Most people do it on the way to and from work.

    Like supermarkets, post offices swimming pool kids sports, polling places are neighborhood institutions where people see their friends and neighbors and enjoy chatting.

    And if you can endure a getting into a courthouse , DMV or building permit line, you can endure a line to keep whoever is behind Kamala Harris out of the Oval Office.

    Mail in ballots are just an invitation to fraud.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  153. @Art Deco

    Good point about ‘the rankers’, and now I know the word for this low habit I despise. It’s often the province of *Extreme Fans* who have to have all their ‘The Greatest’, and it’s so fucking retarded. The less the ‘ranker’ does himself, the more Extreme Fan he is.

  154. @Alden

    Los Angeles and/or California recently reduced the number of polling places in favor of fewer but bigger ones with the new high tech voting machines. There are some advantages, but they are no longer in walking distance for most people in, say, the San Fernando Valley, which is probably a little above average for population density for California as measured by person not by place.

    • Replies: @Alden
  155. @Anon

    At the center of all of Armstrong’s great saves was Armstrong the Pilot in Command … hmmm?!?

  156. @Mr. Anon

    Larry Ellison of Oracle was spending about $1 billion per year on himself in the early 2000s (e.g., buying himself a MiG-29) causing his accountants to worry. But he seems to have done fine.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  157. @Steve Sailer

    The IRA protesters standing next to me had jumped up and down with excitement.

    You mean the IRA protesters were enthusiastic and excited about the British queen, top representative of their mortal enemy? Some one of them held a gun at her while horseback riding in a parade (I think in the 70s), but there were no bullets. So she didn’t do any more public appearances of that sort. And there was another attempt on her life when she visited Northern Ireland once.

    Off-topic–the best true story of the Queen is that harmless but crazy *goblin* as I call him–I think maybe a junkie–who got into her bedroom after first stealing a bottle of wine through some Buckingham Palace tunnel. And she fooled him by saying that she’d go get him a cigarette. He said she was, lying asleep in bed, “a young girl in curlers”, which is hilarious. Especially since Diana was winning all the Beauty Contests by then (1982, I’m pretty sure.) He wasn’t prosecuted because trespassing is (or was) not against the law in the UK. I didn’t know till then how little security they thought they needed. The Queen herself was always driving a car, even in London, up till the early 70s. Then they put up the razor wire.

    I remember a big nail bomb attack by the IRA in the late 70s or early 80s. Fair amount of footage of Thatcher visiting the children seriously injured by this.

    I would have thought they’d be throwing a whole host of epithets at her. In the 1994 film London, a wonderful film narrated by Paul Scofield, you see her doing one of those ceremonial duties–turning on the electricity at some new shopping mall or something, and one of the bystanders yells “Pay your taxes, you scum!” Although I don’t think he was IRA. But I never thought of IRA as exactly timid.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Jim Don Bob
  158. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Perhaps when the dust settles we’ll learn more about what happened in the metro areas of the swing states. I suspect the answer will turn out to be what you describe: a labor-intensive GOTV campaign made much more effective by the mass use of absentee voting. That would explain why turnout was apparently higher in the swing state cities than it was in other cities with similar demographic profiles. The effort required to boost the vote was concentrated in the areas where it was most needed.

    And yes, this may be the beginning of a secular shift in voting practices that hurts Republicans.

    • Agree: utu
  159. Alden says:
    @Hibernian

    Churchill? You mean the alcoholic compulsive gambler who gave half Europe and all of China to the communists after WW2?

    The man always on the verge of bankruptcy due to his gambling; whose political career was guided by whoever bailed him out of his gambling debts?

    The man whose toddler daughter Marigold was left with a teenage baby sitter and died of tuberculosis while Churchill and wife were on a multi millionaire’s Rivera palace vacation? .

    That Churchill.

    Note TB isn’t sudden like diphtheria. Marigold had TB for more than a year and was in advanced stage when the parents left her with the teen baby sitter and went off to the Rivera palace.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  160. Alden says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Mine was still 2 blocks away. And when I went to vote, there were 15 instead of 4 poll workers and just 2 voters, me and a woman just finishing. Place was open 4 days Saturday through Tuesday. Which makes it convenient for the MF work week. Open 4 days for the June primary too.

    Mystery Mail voting is the future

  161. J.Ross says:
    @Mr. Anon

    This plus older movies are objectively superior, it’s not just ideology.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, dfordoom
  162. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    “You mean the IRA protesters were enthusiastic and excited about the British queen, top representative of their mortal enemy?”

    Yes. They were holding protest signs, but they got excited when the royal motorcade into San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park went by and jumped up and down and cheered. Afterwards, they looked pretty ashamed of their behavior. It was amusing.

  163. Rob McX says:

    Maybe this is the last historical drama where all the white characters are played by white actors without anyone protesting. I can see a Crown sequel with Idris Elba as Prince Charles.

  164. Alden says:
    @AndrewR

    If you’re interested in English royal history and have access to a university library, do some research about Queen Victoria’s real father.

    At the time, it was well known among court, political and aristocratic circles that her father was not her mother’s husband, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, son of George 3.

  165. Curle says:
    @Ali Choudhury

    First, the claim you use in court documents to challenge an election reflects the nature of the action requested of the court as spelled out in statutes. Do you have any reason to believe the relief sought is ‘relief from fraud’ as opposed to some more direct relief, say to invalidate the election or direct a new election?

    On its face your inferences seem unsound.

    • Replies: @Ali Choudhury
  166. Daniel H says:

    I encourage all to boycott Netflix and an it’s productions. Netflix presented Cuties, prurient child porn feigning social concern and couldn’t give one flip about those offended (which should include 99.9999% of the population). If we don’t fight back how can we even hope to defend ourselves, leave aside win?

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  167. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Maybe the Revolution was a mistake. But for the Revolution we could have been ruled by a class of hereditary imbeciles and been save from the Joos.

    Didn’t the nation’s “responsible and productive men” come close to driving America over a cliff a number of times? A Civil War, two World Wars, a loss in Vietnam, a Great Depression and several panics, etc.

    Your nation of pioneering, fighting, settling, farming men never really ran the country – if they were lucky they didn’t get sent off as cannon fodder or squeezed off their land by the WASP bigwigs who really did.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @AnotherDad
  168. @Art Deco

    Mostly. Obviously the Apollo 11 crew were exceptional but none of them was a Chuck Yeager, nor the sort of barnstorming fighter aces that Prince Phillip was expecting to meet. I‘m sorry your home life is so unhappy but do try to leave the unpleasantness outside the forum.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  169. 11 Downing Street, officially the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s residence

    I apologize if I am stating the obvious, but 10 and 11 Downing Street are located next to each other, not across the street from each other.

  170. @Mr. Anon

    I just watch old movies on DVD now…

    This is becoming my policy by default. Last night I watched 1955’s KISS ME DEADLY on Turner Classics. I’m pretty sure it was a lot better than some fagiola wokefest starring Shyla LeBoof, or whomever the Hell.

    Also, I’m going to purchase a reel-to-reel telephone answering machine. Preferably, one about the size of a refrigerator.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  171. @Alden

    Would have been nice if The Crown revealed why the royal family protected traitor and soviet spy Anthony Blunt decades after his treason was discovered. Blunt was a royal bastard, ER 2s uncle, son of king George 5 and one of Queen Mary’s lifelong friends, Hilda Master Blunt.

    Blunt certainly had the face of a Windsor. Compare his portrait with one of the Duke of Windsor or of Prince Charles.

    It is interesting to contrast the fate of Blunt with that of another traitorous royal bastard, James Scott.

    Charles II acknowledged Scott as his natural son and created him Duke of Monmouth, Earl of Doncaster, and Baron Scott of Tynedale in the Peerage of England, and made him a knight of the Garter. Yet when Monmouth later rebelled against his uncle James II and VII, he was decapitated.

    Blunt’s royal parentage was apparently never acknowledged. The only title he received was a KCVO, relatively junior in the order of precedence, and when his treason became known to the British government, it was covered up. Much later when it was exposed the only consequence he suffered was the loss of his knighthood.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  172. @Bragadocious

    The Brits love this kind of stuff. It gives them a warm feeling inside. They got years of mileage out of a random clip of an American beauty pageant winner saying dumb things on TV.

  173. @Curle

    That Kings don’t have a Devine right to rule…

  174. @Alden

    It’s always nice to see that fat bastard get what he deserves. Especially the part about giving half of Europe to Stalin.

    The 20th Century was one, big, bad joke (kind of like the year 2020) and Churchill has gotten off as some kind of hero, when in fact he was a disaster.

  175. Dan Hayes says:
    @Steve Sailer

    These IRA protesters were precursors of what later occurred in modern-day reorganized and reconstituted Modern Ireland!😎

    • Agree: Daniel H
  176. Curle says:
    @Alden

    OT – I don’t get the gambling thrill, never have much less the compulsion. Steve must not be a gambler cause he never discusses it. I guess it might be fun if you are skilled, know you are playing dupes and find it fun to harm them for profit but aside from that questionable outlet, where’s the pleasure?

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Steve Sailer
  177. Hibernian says:
    @theMann

    Because they still have some influence and power left.

  178. @Rob McX

    Brad Garrett (6′ 8½”) played Jackie Gleason (5′ 10″) in the 2002 CBS television movie Gleason

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  179. Simon says:
    @AndrewR

    For what it’s worth, I thought the point of the scene was to remind us that — as Philip discovers to his disappointment — the astronauts weren’t poets or visionaries (though we might have liked them to be); they were test pilot/engineer types.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  180. @theMann

    I’m fully Irish. I Watch the Crown because it’s good television. As does my dad who was a singer of pub rebel songs in his day. (Not a day job but he was locally famous for it).

    Why? Great acting, story, cinematography. Mostly accurate history.

    You don’t have to like the Mafia to enjoy goodfellas. Or the crown to like the Crown.

    Also the British press, those sympathetic to the Queen, are annoyed by this season. It’s not always sympathetic to the Queen or the family, particularly in how they handle Diana.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  181. prosa123 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    (I think) Paul Fussell once wrote that there’s a test to determine if you’re extremely wealthy: if you decide that you want roast elephant for dinner tomorrow, you can actually have it.

  182. @Hibernian

    Pennsylvania law prohibited any counting before in-person voting ended.

    Yes, but most states took their heads out of their asses and allowed counting to start early. The Pennsylvania Republicans were obstinate, so now they reap what they sow.

  183. @Lot

    By the standards of the internet in general, and this blog in particular, he is of average weight.

  184. prosa123 says:
    @Alden

    The man whose toddler daughter Marigold was left with a teenage baby sitter and died of tuberculosis while Churchill and wife were on a multi millionaire’s Rivera palace vacation?

    Although Churchill himself lived to 90, of his four children other than Marigold only his daughter Mary lived until old age. None of the other three made it to 70.

  185. @Alden

    Thank you for your kind remarks about my hometown. True about the Irish, a lot of Welsh too.

  186. Ed says:
    @Art Deco

    It was the governor-general but he is appointed by the Queen and it was suggested that she was consulted before the move.

  187. Philip Neal says: • Website
    @AndrewR

    The episode is presumably fictional. A man I know knew Prince Philip, and for the Apollo 11 anniversary I heard a talk by a man who knew an Apollo astronaut (not Armstrong or Aldrin). By “know” I mean in a professional capacity, speaking freely and easily on numerous occasions in the way of work, not personal friendship. By their accounts, both the prince and the astronaut are intelligent and interesting to talk to if you have something worthwhile to say yourself.

  188. @Thoughts

    It happens once in a while. One day, I think in the past ten years, I was nearing the entrance of the Science Museum in London. A policewoman barred my way, “Stop. Just stop.” Me: “What is it? Has something happened?” She: “Stop, just stop.” A large black car drew up and out got Prince Charles and a bodyguard. A man appeared from a side door and welcomed him inside. I was possibly ten yards away and it lasted ten seconds. Nobody took any notice because nobody was expecting it. I went into the museum through the main entrance and found that some galleries were closed, no reason given.

  189. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I think I don’t like any fictional treatments of presidents, monarchs, etc., while they’re still living and functioning. And even if dead, I usually would rather see something on Louis XIV or Marcus Aurelius–somebody dead a long time

    Agreed.

    [MORE]

    One of my professional hobbies is watching old television newscasts. It’s given me enough exposure to actual footage of every president since Eisenhower to ruin my enjoyment of any fictional production featuring any of them.

    Lately, YouTube has been flashing an ad for a Cold War-era video game featuring a virtual Ronald Reagan. The designers came close to capturing his essence, but not close enough. It’s a one-way ticket to the uncanny valley.

    I have to admit I did like Mommie Dearest, but that’s probably because I could never stand Joan Crawford and thought Faye Dunaway was brilliant.

    Yes, she was. Pauline Kael, among others, raved about her performance. Sadly, Dunaway has disowned the role.

    One of the more memorable aspects of the sucky 1990 movie adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale was the fact that they got Dunaway to play Serena Joy. (Ironically, it was Margaret Atwood herself who convinced Faye to take the role.)

    Mommie Dearest wants a baby, stat!

    Crawford had a narrow range, but she could produce on occasion. This scene in The Damned Don’t Cry is among the highlights of her career:

  190. @anonymous

    You’re carrying on as normal and I think even outright ignoring the large scale election fraud that happened.

    🇪🇺 > 🇬🇦 European Parliament resolution on Gabon, repression of the opposition (2017/2830(RSP))

    🇦🇺 > 🇺🇦 Invisible ink: how they rigged the vote

    🇧🇪, 🇫🇷 > 🇨🇩 France, Belgium cast doubt on DR Congo election result

    🇺🇸, 🇲🇽, 🇬🇹, 🇸🇻, 🇳🇮, 🇨🇷, 🇵🇦, 🇨🇴, 🇻🇪, 🇵🇷, et al., > 🇭🇳 Call for fresh Honduras election after President Juan Orlando Hernández wins

    If the 2020 Election Was Held in a Foreign Country, the State Department and Western Media Would Declare it “Fraudulent”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_electoral_intervention

    7 Iranian election (by United States, 1952)
    8 Israeli elections
    8.1 2016 election (by United States)
    8.2 1996 election (by United States)
    9 Italian election (by United States, Soviet Union, and Vatican, 1948)
    10 Japanese elections (by United States, 1950s–60s)
    11 Korean election (by United Nations, Soviet Union, 1948)
    12 Palestinian election (by United States, Israel, 2006)
    13 Philippines election (by United States, 1953)
    14 Russian election (by United States, 1996)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_electoral_intervention#United_States_elections

  191. @AnotherDad

    A weak man and unable to deal with women. Charles had the unfortunate luck of having a mother that won’t die and would never abrogate power leaving him waiting till well into his 70s to gain the thrown. He also had the unfortunate luck of marrying badly. He would have been far better off if his trophy wife was his second, or better yet, his mistress or one of many. Some royal bastards would really liven up things a bit.

  192. Alden says:
    @Bitfu

    I watched some of it when my sister comes to visit. The series is very slow paced I agree. I really dislike the whole Downton Abbey Victoria & Albert Er 1 genre.

    The Borgias and Medici Netflix series I love. Real struggles real problems.

    The bank is totally out of money. Juan Borgia murdered by parties unknown. Cardinal Della Rovere brings a little monkey everywhere he goes as a food taster. The bank is once more out of money. Medicis sponsor Botticelli Da Vinci and Michelangelo. The American continents are named for Vespucci’s cousin. Savoronala burns thousands of precious books and art. The French army occupies half Italy. How much money can the Borgias steal before Pope Borgia dies? Pope Borgia improves Roman infrastructure. Real problems.

    The Crown is slow paced and boring. One problem with movies about celebrities is we see their faces every time we go past the supermarket magazine rack and hear about them every day on the news. So we already know the story .

    OT, this months editions of both Vogue and Bazaar have black models on the cover. Gag.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  193. @Steve Sailer

    Dolores Umbridge (aka Imelda Staunton) will be taking over as the Queen in Season 5. I really don’t know how well that is going to work out.

    Claire Foy was great as the Queen in Seasons 1 and 2. She’s a good actress, and she had the advantage of having some breathing space in the role provided by the temporal distance from the young Elizabeth.

    I haven’t watched Season 4 yet, but in Season 3 Olivia Coleman was not very good as the Queen. She never seemed comfortable in the role, and she’s got a sour look that doesn’t resemble Elizabeth at all. It’s also very jarring seeing an actress who’s significantly less attractive than the person she’s playing. It doesn’t happen very often, and although there’s nothing really wrong with it, and I feel like I shouldn’t mind, I find that I do.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  194. Alden says:
    @Lot

    Supposedly he was driving a U Haul full of fireworks and maybe other explosives. He parked and the truck exploded. He looks as though he can’t fit into a drivers seat.

  195. @anonymous

    LOL!!! How the mighty have fallen, Maduro has a greater ability to overthrow Trump, than Trump to overthrow Maduro!

  196. @Jack D

    Agree with all this Jack.

    My guess is Trump was not within the margin of “fraud”. But i’d bet he was within the margin of the Democrats’ ballot harvesting.

    Once again–as with immigration–the Republican politicians have utterly failed to protect the interests of actual Americans and their voters. They’ve let the Democrats lie and lie and lie–poor minorities who don’t have ID, “voter suppression”, blah, blah–and now under the guise of “pandemic!” let them put in a fraud and vote harvesting friendly system.

    There’s no reason America can’t have a system where every actual American has a real ID, every vote requires verified presentation of the ID, no voter can vote twice, the number of people who voted and the results are more or less immediately available and every voter can look up their vote and insure it was recorded properly. And that all the software for the same is open and transparent to all. In fact, this is–as people point out–trivial. Oh, and that the penalties for any vote harvesting or fiddling are severe.

    Republican should have fought for this. And have–say Mitch McConnell–a golden opportunity to push for this now in the spirit of putting “insuring the integrity of American elections” and “quashing doubt about the outcome” that we have now. “Voting Rights Act 202o”. And continue to campaign on this–making it an election issue every time–until it’s law.

    ~~

    Trump. Talk about a guy who did it to himself. Even with all the media bias, lying and outright suppression this was Trump’s election to lose. But he refused to “do the work”–in implementing his own policies and most of all in coherent communication. He’s in the rearview now.

    Conservatives, traditionalists, nationalists, heck simply people who want to live in “America” not Rainbow globoslum, must demand and work for politicians who can clearly communicate the serious evil being done and fight relentlessly against it.

    If not … we slump ever more quickly toward Brazil. And you can cue up Karlin’s China 2050 post for hint about the world our children will have to live in.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Jack D
    , @Reg Cæsar
  197. Alden says:
    @Curle

    Lots of people love it. Supposedly it’s the thrill of not knowing what will happen. Excitement in a humdrum life. Supposedly legal gambling makes more money than the music movie TV DVD streaming and entire entertainment industry. Not my thing either.

  198. @AndrewR

    The present Queen thinks her duty is to preserve the family gig and that requires not to displease the forces who control the public opinion.

    • Replies: @BB753
  199. @Jack D

    Thanks for the photos.

    I thought Vanessa Kirby, the actress who played Margaret in Seasons 1 and 2, was fantastic. She was ill-tempered and constantly acting out, yet still very human and, well, smoking hot.

    I was sad to see her get turfed out after S2 and replaced by the fading and unpleasant Helena Bellatrix-Carter. But then I suppose ‘fading and unpleasant’ was what she was hired to play, so maybe she’s a success.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  200. @Ed

    I think the Governor-General had to leave the country after that, so it’s an experience not to be repeated.

  201. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I haven’t watched Season 4 yet, but in Season 3 Olivia Coleman was not very good as the Queen. She never seemed comfortable in the role, and she’s got a sour look that doesn’t resemble Elizabeth at all. It’s also very jarring seeing an actress who’s significantly less attractive than the person she’s playing.

    Agree Calvinist.

    Claire Foy is prettier than a young Elizabeth, but within the margin of “movies”.

    I saw Olivia Coleman in the thing with the dead kid–“Broadchurch”. I thought she carried that role well.

    I haven’t seen any of Seasons 3 or 4. But Netflix pushes their trailer at me. Coleman is too old already to be a 40ish Elizabeth–easiest to “age” an actress than “youth” her. And Coleman looks scowlingly unpleasant. They should have aged Foy for the 60s/70s stuff or found someone else–40ish.

    ~~

    BTW: The biggest appearance bump is Margaret. That actress is a serious babe. And the most ridiculous Churchill. I’d tower over Churchill and Lithgow–also an American–would absolutely tower over me. it was distracting to see Lithgow stooping trying to make himself less physically ridiculous as Churchill.

  202. Rob McX says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Thanks. IMDb says Gleason was 5’9.5″, so that 11″ record probably won’t be beaten, unless Tim Robbins plays Danny DeVito.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  203. @Art Deco

    Charles is clearly not an incapable man. But his projects philanthropic and otherwise are not exactly rocket science for a very rich man who is a Crown Prince.

    He failed at being married to a very difficult woman, as would most of us.

    Totally agree on this. Diana–BPD piece of work.

    But he was a 32 year old–having an affair with a married woman–when he decided to marry an immature BPD 19 year old, whom he barely knew. As far as i know no one held a gun to his head. And no one made him waste his time mooning over and shagging a woman who was some other guy’s wife.

    One of the “jobs” of being a Crown Prince is to marry appropriately, knock her up and get her to pop out some heirs.

    He’s got the heirs, but overall he messed up this very doable job.

    • Replies: @Ed
  204. Rob McX says:
    @AnotherDad

    There’s no reason America can’t have a system where every actual American has a real ID, every vote requires verified presentation of the ID, no voter can vote twice, the number of people who voted and the results are more or less immediately available and every voter can look up their vote and insure it was recorded properly.

    Right. They’re spending more money hassling people getting on domestic flights than they’d need to set up a fraudproof voting system. Fingerprinting and iris recognition could detect fake or duplicate voters instantly.

  205. Jack D says:
    @Rob McX

    The other way ’round , 5’10” (supposedly – maybe when he was younger) DeNiro played 6’4″ Frank Sheeran in platform shoes (of course you don’t see them on screen):

    It doesn’t really work because the real Sheeran wasn’t just tall, he was “Big ‘n Tall” – a proportional giant in all dimensions.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  206. @Corvinus

    The MSM isn’t 100% lies. They tell the truth when the truth supports the official narrative. But they lie, suppress, and spin everything else.

    So when the media are absolutely forced to admit to something that contradicts the narrative, you know for certain that it is true. They are useful in that respect.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  207. Aardvark says:
    @Desiderius

    I found the Armstrong movie to be an abomination in that it was about a famous American that was portrayed by a Canadian actor? There was no American that could portray another American?

  208. @Crawfurdmuir

    Blunt certainly had the face of a Windsor. Compare his portrait with one of the Duke of Windsor or of Prince Charles.

    You may well be right.

    Windsor on the left.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    , @Alden
  209. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    There’s no reason America can’t have a system where every actual American has a real ID,

    Or even better, a microchip implanted at birth! They could just scan you like a lost dog.

    There are these pesky civil libertarians who are against this but what do they know?

    Seriously, you should at least be required to show the same amount of ID needed to get on an airplane. They were going to up this with “Real ID” but because of COVID they have delayed that requirement.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Alden
  210. @AnotherDad

    There’s no reason [the United States] can’t have a system where every actual American has a real ID, every vote requires verified presentation of the ID

  211. Dan Hayes says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Just two examples of quintessential scarecrow Englishmen!

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
  212. Michelle says:

    Charles wanted to be Camilla’s tampon! Nuff said. Diana was used and abused. Who cares about the horse faced British Royals, other than lower class Kanuks?http://www.capilanocourier.com/2018/10/30/royal-obsession/

  213. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Robert Wright on his latest video podcast with Mickey Kaus went into some detail about some claims about the vote counts by Republicans that when looked at more closely would seem more likely to be incidents that benefited Republicans, in Republilcan-led jurisdictions. Obviously, Wright hates Trump, but from long viewership I have come to trust him, in part because he doesn’t exaggerate and seems to be remarkably emotionally stabile, qualities that are in short supply. Kaus is the same, but from a Trump-friendly moderate perspective, although he had not looked into the voting issues.

  214. @Jack D

    The problem with this is that, despite all the hand waving, no one has any real proof that this actually happened on a large scale.

    It’s hard to gather “real proof” in 14 days without access to the actual ballots and envelopes and records. Trump will fail in his legal challenges. But the election needs to be seriously investigated regardless, not swept under the rug as “bad for democracy” to ask too many questions.

    The Democrats/Media never gave up recounting Florida until April 2001, when they finally had to admit that Bush got the most votes. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/media-jan-june01-recount_04-03

    I’d especially like to hear from the Dominion voting machine executives, who have apparently all fled the country and are in hiding.

    • Replies: @Corn
  215. Dan Hayes says:
    @Anon

    Thatcher was effective in destroying rampant unionism but did nothing to impede the Gramsian takeover of the culture. So in the long run she proved to an abject failure!

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Rob McX
  216. Rob McX says:
    @Jack D

    He makes Hoffa look like a midget. But it didn’t matter so much in the movie, because most viewers had probably never heard of Sheeran until they saw it. Somehow it seems wrong to have a guy of Lithgow’s size in the role of the pug-like Churchill.

  217. Art Deco says:
    @AndrewR

    For instance, Harry seems to be very much like his great-great-uncle Edward: a weak man with a deep need to be controlled by a domineering wife.

    Harry’s a combat veteran. There’s no particular reason to fancy he needs to be controlled by anyone. What he and his wife have sought is a situation that’s more like his cousins have. His wife’s a strange choice: she’s been married before, she’s worked in Hollywood, her parents are divorced, and there are several clowns / head cases among her proximate relatives. The only things she has going for her is that she’s moderately handsome and she isn’t fazed by paparazzi.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @AndrewR
  218. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    How long till we see Winston Churchill played by a negro in a British series? After all, his mother was American and, you know, somewhere along the line she must have acquired her one drop …

  219. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    Churchill? You mean the alcoholic compulsive gambler who gave half Europe and all of China to the communists after WW2?

    Alcoholics don’t continue working at demanding jobs until they’re 80 years old and don’t live to be 90 years old. He didn’t give anything to anyone during or after the war. Soviet Russia was able to break Eastern Europe because they were occupying it, and they were occupying it because that’s how the battles went. The Communists took China because the Nationalists were a mess on the battlefield in 1947-49.

    • Agree: hhsiii
    • Replies: @Patrick in SC
    , @Alden
  220. Art Deco says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    The seven Mercury astronauts were all test pilots. Four were combat veterans and four were trained engineers. You deserve a good deal worse than mere unpleasantness.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  221. Rob McX says:
    @Jack D

    At the start of the 20th century, you could travel almost anywhere in Europe (I think Russia was the exception) without a passport. But this libertarian dream has long gone, especially for international travel. For hundreds of millions of people, securing residence in Europe or America could be worth a million dollars over a lifetime in terms of state handouts, education, healthcare, etc. not to mention the intangible benefit of living in a safer country. Likewise, there’s too much at stake in elections not to have an absolutely secure method of identification to prevent fraud.

    According to this article, the country that probably has the securest passport in the world is Nicaragua. It has 89 separate security features, including “bidimensional barcodes”. There goes my chance of illegally emigrating to Nicaragua.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  222. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I believe all The Smiths parents were Irish immigrants to Manchester.

  223. Hibernian says:
    @Rob McX

    Fingerprinting and iris recognition could detect fake or duplicate voters instantly.

    Precisely why it will never be implemented.

  224. Rob McX says:
    @Dan Hayes

    A lot of these conservative politicians seem very myopic in retrospect. They spent trillions arming themselves against the Soviet Union, while under their noses their own leftist termites were pulverising the whole edifice of Western civilisation. Back in the 1980s, British Marxists like Ken Livingstone were mostly an object of ridicule, with their war against racism, sexism, homophobia, etc. But Thatcher’s successors will now expel from the Tory party anyone who doesn’t accept the dogmas of the erstwhile “loony left”.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Thea
  225. OT, some might find this interesting:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Ashley
    Maurice Ashley (born March 6, 1966) is a Jamaican-American chess grandmaster, author, and commentator.[1][2] In 1999 he earned the grandmaster title (GM),[3] making him the first black person to attain the title of grandmaster.[4] …

    Maurice’s sister is world boxing champion Alicia Ashley and his brother is former world kickboxing champion Devon Ashley.[20][21]

    Funny video:

    Grandmaster Maurice Ashley plays NYC trash talker

  226. @Art Deco

    Alcoholics don’t continue working at demanding jobs until they’re 80 years old and don’t live to be 90 years old.

    They can. Functioning drug and alcohol addicts can lead normal lives provided they have access to their fix. Without it, they can become irritable (best case) or in worse cases have seizures or serious withdrawal symptoms. Churchill got a doctor to write him a prescription for the stuff when he visited the United States during prohibition. I remember reading that one of the leading research physicians at Johns Hopkins in the early 20th century was actually a cocaine addict and used to administer doses to himself throughout the day.

    The problem is that most addicts develop a tolerance and have to keep upping the dosage to keep functioning.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  227. Queen Elizabeth and Claire Foy are blue-eyed. Olivia Colman’s eyes are brown.

  228. Twinkie says:
    @AnotherDad

    Prince Phillip seems like a fairly high caliber individual.

    Perhaps being “orphaned” in a strange country and being treated as the poor cousin – which he was – strengthened his character. On the other hand, he also seemed to have been too weak to resist temptations.

  229. Busby says:
    @AndrewR

    Phillip, who is a pilot, thinks he’s going to meet those magnificent men in their flying machines. Dauntless aviators with silk scarves and lots of pluck. After all, these guys just did what no human had ever done, boldly going forth etc. He’s disappointed to learn they are low key pilots with degrees in engineering and mathematics. Then add in the fact that they are more interested in what it’s like to be a prince.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @Art Deco
  230. Twinkie says:
    @Jack D

    Maybe the Revolution was a mistake. But for the Revolution we could have been ruled by a class of hereditary imbeciles and been save from the Joos.

    Didn’t the nation’s “responsible and productive men” come close to driving America over a cliff a number of times? A Civil War, two World Wars, a loss in Vietnam, a Great Depression and several panics, etc.

    Your nation of pioneering, fighting, settling, farming men never really ran the country – if they were lucky they didn’t get sent off as cannon fodder or squeezed off their land by the WASP bigwigs who really did.

    “There – so shut up and be ruled by us and be grateful.”

  231. @Rob McX

    Voter ID is impossible yet pretty soon you may not be able to live a normal live without COVID “vaccine” verification.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  232. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    It’s well known Churchill was an alcoholic. Everyone who knew him mentioned the alcoholism in their memoirs. Plenty of alcoholics live to 90. And plenty work at demanding jobs. He lived splendidly on borrowed money and bribes.

    Stalin and Churchill even planned to divide Iran and its oil and strategic location between Russia and Britain after the war. Stalin didn’t order the Soviet occupation troops to remain in Central Europe until Churchill okayed it. That agreement, like the Iran agreement was made years before the war ended.

    No one in England all economic social regional groups wanted WW2. Too many Englishmen died in WW1. There was a bad depression in Britain right after WW1. Plus lots of unrest. Some respectable labor unions and some soviet front groups. At the same time, Europe was flooded with refugees and reports about the horrors of the Russian revolution.

    Churchill was a Great War monger against Germany all during the 1930s. He was despised by everyone from the coal miners union big medium and small business right up to parliament for his anti German war mongering.

    There was also the question of the enormous debt Britain owed to America borrowed to pay for WW1. Everyone knew Britain would have to borrow again for another war.

    Churchill was a lot like the Kennedys and Obamas. Great PR and propaganda, no accomplishments.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Art Deco
  233. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    How about the same ID needed to get a library card, beach parking sticker, public school admission, student and senior citizen bus, train and plane fare, and numerous other very mundane things ?

  234. Alden says:
    @PiltdownMan

    They look more like each other than my sons who are fraternal twins.

  235. rebunga says:

    Yes I watcht too.

    The the depravity of the royal family was remarkable. Except for the queen of course.

    Prince Charles is portrayed as a particularly craven individual. As an American one can only imagine how crippled his reign will be.

  236. AndrewR says:
    @Art Deco

    Well I think she reminds him a lot of Diana. Not only is Meghan older, difficult and mentally ill, when Harry fell for her, she was also pretty much the same age that Diana was at death.

    As for his cousins, my understanding is that Beatrice and Eugenie want more royal duties (and royal $$$) but Charles wants to keep “the firm” “slimmed down”

  237. @Busby

    I only watched that episode once, but what I got from it was that for some reason Philip expected the astronauts to have drawn some deep insights from their extraordinary experience and they had not. What did he really expect them to say? They were pilots, practical, unflappable men trained to do a dangerous job. They weren’t philosophers or poets. To me, that was the point.

  238. @Art Deco

    His brother has adequate intellect; he’s just less academically inclined than his brother and his cousins. It’s regrettable he did not remain in the military.

    Art, i agree with your statement at face value.

    But–as with Charles–you underplay the responsibility–and duty in their cases–of these men’s choice of whom to marry.

    Prince Harry was the most eligible bachelor in Britain, could have found any number of gorgeous, pleasant 20-something young women of intelligence and good character willing to be a devoted wife and mother of his children … and he has chosen to wake up in decade or two, roll over and see Michelle Obama.

    So yeah, “moron”.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes, Bugg
  239. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack D

    Rockefeller and Rothschild money is still influencing more people and events than you or I are.

  240. Jack D says:
    @prosa123

    Modern Presidents (at least Democrats) have an opportunity to cash in big time after their term is over (if not sooner). Obama is getting $65 million for his book (although that only comes out to a penny a word). That pays for a lot of chicken salad sandwiches, even at US gov. prices.

  241. @Jack D

    Maybe the Revolution was a mistake. But for the Revolution we could have been ruled by a class of hereditary imbeciles and been save from the Joos.

    People from this ethnic group–your group i believe–are referred to as “Jews”. Saying “Joos” just sounds stupid.

    No one likes criticism. But with maturity should come the ability to more objectively handle criticism of both yourself and your ethnic/religious/national/racial group. I have no problem understanding criticisms of Catholics or the Irish or Germans or Anglos.

    American Jews have had an extremely negative–from my perspective as a republican and nationalist (which is the inherent “American” perspective)–impact on American politics and our future. Basically pushing minoritarianism, anti-nationalistm, immigrationism and elite control. This is pretty boneheadedly obvious. How much this accounts for the current crisis and the various other strands weaving into the crisis–for example the Puritan tradition, or Irish pols or blacks or the birth control pill and sexual liberation–is an interesting area for debate and dispute.

    But the “Joos” and “tiny minority must have magic mind control” stuff is not. It’s just stupid. Especially from Jews who otherwise brag about how wonderful they are; what a pathetic backwater America would be without them and how they are just naturally over-represented 10X because of superior IQ. I mean which is it? Are your people kicking ass and taking names … or not? Get you story straight.

    Didn’t the nation’s “responsible and productive men” come close to driving America over a cliff a number of times? A Civil War, two World Wars, a loss in Vietnam, a Great Depression and several panics, etc.

    Yes. Republican governance by the responsible and productive men of a community or nation is the *best* possible governance. It certainly does not erase all political–ethnic, regional or class–conflict, much less erase human fallibility.

    The key conservative insight is in fact that humans are inherently fallible and our traditional norms and institutions are evolved to mitigate that fallibility and steer us in the right direction. But that in fact we are human and fallible and attempts by the elite “experts” to engineer perfection will always fall short and more likely create unforeseen consequences or outright misery.

    • Agree: Twinkie
  242. Dan Hayes says:
    @AnotherDad

    Maybe after all this time it’s payback accountability time for the Royal Family – a weak ex-Royal led around by an ebonized Lady MacBeth. How Droll!

  243. Mr. Anon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Sure, a billion here or there, but could they cash out 25% of thier holdings without tanking the value of their assets?

  244. Mr. Anon says:
    @AnotherDad

    Jack D’s contempt for us really shines through sometimes, doesn’t it?

    And he wonders why we might not trust him.

  245. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Meghan is no Michelle Obama. More like Kamala Harris. She is a quadroon and her son, who is an octoroon, can “pass” for white. Octoroon is usually the level at which all visible traces of Negritude disappear, especially if the white parent is a blond or a ginger.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/meghan-markle-archie-1599834255.jpg?resize=768:*

    If Kamala and Emhoff had had children, they would have looked fully white too. It would have been hilarious to see them at Howard U. pretending to be black like their momma. Kamala was just BARELY able to pull off that act (having a brownish Indian mother helped).

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  246. @Jack D

    She’s still a washed-up attention whore. (Strike the word attention and the previous sentence is still accurate.)

    Like they say, she must be absolutely amazing in bed.

  247. clyde says:

    I kind of like the presently miserable British Monarchy. The racial tension with Meghan adds some pizzazz. I have not viewed one second of this so called “Crown”____Ain’t no body got time fo that shit

    Which is very snaggle-a-bil — https://thepiratebay.asia/s/?q=THE++CROWN&page=0&orderby=99

  248. clyde says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I love to go a-wandering,
    Along the mountain track,
    And as I go, I love to sing,
    My knapsack on my back!
    Valderi, Valdera!
    Valderi, Valdera-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
    Valdera!
    My knapsack on my back!

    I love to wander by the stream
    That dances in the sun,
    So joyously it calls to me,
    “Come! Join my happy song!”

    Valderi, Valdera!
    Valderi, Valdera-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
    Valdera!
    Come join my happy song!

  249. Mr. Anon says:
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    This is becoming my policy by default. Last night I watched 1955’s KISS ME DEADLY on Turner Classics.

    Good movie. Ralph Meeker was highly underrated.

  250. @Curle

    The only bets I can vividly remember placing are ignominious memories of suckering schoolfriends into backing their favorite sports teams when they were sure to lose. Halfway through the 1968 World Series, I bet a friend who liked the Detroit Tigers because I knew the Cardinals were up 3-1 and even if they lost the next 2 games, they had the unbeatable Bob Gibson going in the 7th game. Then in late 1974, I ingeniously bet a friend who liked the Pittsburgh Steelers that they wouldn’t win their next 5 NFL games. See, if they won their next 2, they’d qualify for the playoffs, and then if they won the 3 games, they’d win the Super Bowl, and who ever heard of the Steelers winning the Super Bowl?

    I lost both bets to famous sports miracles.

    The only time I ever made an accurate prediction was during the 8th inning of the first game of the 1988 World Series. My wife asked, “What’s going to happen?” I explained that that with two outs in the bottom of the 9th and the tying run on base for the Dodgers, Kirk Gibson would limp up to pinch hit, and hit a 3-2 pitch from Oakland’s Dennis Eckersley for the game-winning home run.

    But she believed me. So when it happened, exactly as I had predicted, she asked if all baseball games were this exciting.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  251. @Curle

    Well, normally to invalidate an election you would need to present evidence as to why it should be invalidated such as widespread fraud. No such evidence has been presented hence why Team Trump has not had any court wins.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  252. @Ben Kurtz

    First, the Madness of King Joe.
    Then Prince Regent Hunter.
    Great amusement for foreigners, but not for you hapless Yanks.

  253. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  254. @Ali Choudhury

    No such evidence has been presented

    Really? Even Biden himself admitted large-scale fraud with his own words.

    I wonder what would constitute “evidence” to you.

    And I also wonder if your principles would hold if the numbers were reversed and Trump had a putative “victory” with all those red flags.

  255. Ed says:
    @AnotherDad

    You’re completely right and he may have one point thought this, his previous serious girlfriends were white from respectable backgrounds.

    It’s just that his brother had 2 kids before meeting Meghan and now 3, so the pressure for him to marry well dropped considerably. By all accounts his mother’s death hit him the hardest, if he thinks following Meghan to Hollywood will make him happy, more power to him.

  256. Ed says:
    @AnotherDad

    Evidently Diana was a big hit with the royal family and there was pressure for him to seal the deal with her.

    Ditching his old lover probably could have made things work and most real accounts suggest that the two were genuinely in love so there was stuff to work with in the marriage.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  257. Gillian Anderson has the remarkable quality of becoming more beautiful as she ages.

  258. MEH 0910 says:
    @Ed

    and most real accounts suggest that the two were genuinely in love so there was stuff to work with in the marriage.

    A lot of failed marriages begin as enviable love stories, gradually breaking down despite everything the couple has going for them and stunning friends and family in the process. And then there are marriages like that of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, where the red flags are glaringly obvious from day one. Exhibit A? That excruciating engagement interview, as recreated in The Crown season 4.

    [MORE]

    Charles proposed to Diana in February of 1981 after less than a year of dating. He’d been under pressure to find a suitable wife for some time, and having finally achieved that goal, he didn’t want to waste any time locking it down. Are you swooning yet? The engagement was officially announced on February 24, 1981, and per royal tradition, the newly betrothed couple gave a TV interview shortly after the news became public.

    The overall vibe is pretty awkward—32-year-old Charles and 19-year-old Diana both look like different varieties of deer in headlights as the interviewer prods them for details on their hasty engagement. But the worst moment by far comes right at the end of the above clip. The interviewer asks if they can find the words to sum up how they’re feeling.

    “Just delighted, and happy,” Charles says, looking over at Diana. “I’m amazed that she’s been brave enough to take me on!” So far, so endearingly self-deprecating. The interviewer, clearly hoping for something a little more effusive, prompts him: “And, I suppose, in love?”

    “Of course!” Diana responds quickly, after which Charles says, “Whatever ‘in love’ means.”

  259. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Elvis Costello & The Attractions – Everyday I Write The Book (Official Music Video)

    Costello shattering the Ten Commandments (of Love) is deadpan hilarious.

  260. @Jack D

    As you have done here before, you are conflating Project Mercury with what came later.

    Mercury consisted of ballistic capsules that indeed were just as good with chimpanzees inside as with humans. As missions and spacecraft became more complex, pilots became more a part of things, out of necessity. By Apollo, control was a three-part loop: mission controllers, computers and astronauts.

    If you bother to read deeper than The Right Stuff, you will understand this.

    Yes, much of the time during an Apollo flight the pilots had little to do that could not have been done without them (though remote technology then was not nearly what it is now.) However, things like close-in rendezvous, docking, and the final phase of landing required in those days a human being to do the flying.

    The two guidance systems on the Lunar Module could, in theory, bring the craft down to the surface, but only if luck prevailed and there were no obstacles underneath. Today, sure, there are ways around this.

    If not for Armstrong taking control, Eagle would have crashed into a field of boulders next to a large crater.

    Similarly, Lunar Orbit Rendezvous (LOR) was a risky and untried plan when it was reluctantly adopted in the planning phase for Apollo. Though guidance systems could, if everything worked correctly, bring the lander into the same orbit as the command spacecraft, only a pilot could then perform the close, final stage of rendezvous and docking. Furthermore, they were trained and prepared to seek each other out if the orbits did not align or if the lander did not climb completely to proper orbit.

    Since the whole point of Apollo was to get someone to the Moon and back, humans were going along no matter what. In those days, nobody was yet capable of building the equivalent of our Mars rovers. Furthermore, we have yet to do a sample-return mission from Mars, and less than half a kilogram has been returned from the Moon by unmanned means.

    Apollo astronauts catalogued and brought home 382 kilograms, and a geologist was the copilot on the last landing.

    Armstrong was indeed a man of few words, a man who had completed high school at age 16 (in the old days when high school actually was something.) He turned down MIT to go to Perdue; apparently that decision did not hurt his career.

  261. Corn says:
    @The Alarmist

    she plays the early Thatcher as if she had already had a stroke.

    I agree. Her portrayal of Thatcher was way too hammy and overwrought.

    • Agree: Twinkie
  262. Corn says:
    @Anon

    A portion of their constituency is too lazy, disconnected, or dysfunctional to show up to the polls on election day

    Then such people shouldn’t vote.

  263. Hibernian says:
    @Eugene Norman

    You don’t have to like the Mafia to enjoy goodfellas.

    Isn’t a good part of the appeal of Mob movies that many people secretly, or not so secretly, admire them?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @J.Ross
  264. Hibernian says:
    @Alden

    Suez and Aberfan seem like real problems to me

  265. @Hibernian

    Isn’t a good part of the appeal of Mob movies that many people secretly, or not so secretly, admire them?

    There are those of us who do not admire them and do not enjoy movies about them. Maybe because we have seen enough violence and ugliness in our own lives. I know, for example, that Coppola’s Godfather films are enjoyed by millions and are considered masterpieces, but I have only gotten through parts of the first one. I just don’t like bad guys, especially creepy ones.

  266. Corn says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I’d especially like to hear from the Dominion voting machine executives, who have apparently all fled the country and are in hiding.

    Heh. For an election that wasn’t stolen a lot of people are acting like they have something to hide.

  267. Jack D says:
    @Rob McX

    At the start of the 20th century, you could travel almost anywhere in Europe (I think Russia was the exception) without a passport.

    That’s pretty much the situation now because of the Schengen Agreement. There are no longer border checks between Schengen countries. If you come in from a non-Schengen country they check your passport at the point of entry but nowadays going from one Schengen country to another is similar to traveling between US states. You can drive from Portugal all the way to Estonia without showing a passport (and the Euro is the common currency along your route so no need to change money either).

  268. Art Deco says:
    @Patrick in SC

    They can.

    Yes, if you define ‘alcoholic’ in such a way that no normal human being could identify from ordinary observation a person so labeled. I’ve run into mental health tradesman who do this. It expands the market for their services.

  269. Art Deco says:
    @Busby

    I think you mean ‘Philip’ the character, not ‘Philip’ the actual person. It really beggars belief that a career naval officer with a history of pragmatic adaptation to disagreeable circumstances, a man who insisted all three of his sons attend a tough boarding school and put in their time in the military, is going to expect Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to think, act, and behave like anything other than test pilots.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  270. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    It’s well known Churchill was an alcoholic. Everyone who knew him mentioned the alcoholism in their memoirs. Plenty of alcoholics live to 90. And plenty work at demanding jobs. He lived splendidly on borrowed money and bribes.

    Absurdly false statements don’t get to be true statements just because you have the shamelessness to utter them.

    Even in our own time, < 20% of the male population lives past their 90th birthday. In and among the 1875 cohort, the share would have been in the low single digits.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Hibernian
  271. @AnotherDad

    It’s interesting how mediocre the British royals are.

    AD, the vast majority of royals from any house/dynasty across the planet are, generally speaking, mediocrities. If you keep the pumps running in times of plenty/peace/general contentment, you get no points; you’re essentially the engineer at the power/water plant. Historians tend to overemphasize the extremes, i.e. the violent psychopaths/sociopaths (Ivan the Terrible, Caligula, Clovis, Vlad the Impaler, etc.) or the happy sociopaths (Frederick the Great, Charlemagne, Peter the Great, Gustavus Adolphus, QEI, etc.), because people love compelling stories, especially if they contain a certain amount of violence and gore (the endless profitability of the horror literature/film genre). The great majority of our own 44 Presidents fall into the “just-so” category. The exceptions being the ones remembered for (generally successful) leadership during an existential crisis (Washington, Lincoln, Roosevelt) that affected most of the country in many ways. The current Windsor has been the monarch during a period of (relative) peace and stability. So, we get “entertained” peering in to the usual familial function/dysfunction that is part and parcel of ALL families (I could tell you stories of my own paternal and maternal lines…).

  272. Anonymous[407] • Disclaimer says:

    As an Englishman I find it mildly embarrassing that series like this create the impression that English people are fixated on the royals, when really it’s a production aimed almost entirely at Americans/foreigners in general.

    The typical opinion in England these days is that they are 1. parasites, and 2. of non-English origin (mainly German) and that the whole system of royalty/aristocracy is a foreign system that has been imposed on us.

    Even the most royal obsessed news site in the UK, the Daily Mail, writes most of its articles for an American/foreign audience.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Alden
    , @Hibernian
  273. @Inquiring Mind

    The space program’s astronaut class morphed from the “fighter pilot-stick jockey” types to the academic and technocratic by the time Apollo came around. You had to know some physics to get inside a command or lunar module.

    Neil Armstrong straddled both worlds. He tried to make a go of college teaching, and apparently was pretty good at it, but left because he found the mindless bureaucracy highly annoying.

  274. @AnotherDad

    Back in 2018, our poet laureate, “the one they call Desanex,” penned an excellent limerick on the subject of Harry’s marriage.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/free-advice-for-starbucks-howard-schultz-on-how-to-stay-rich/#comment-2338682

  275. @Rob McX

    Neither will President Biden.

    Viceroy Harris, on the other hand…

  276. Art Deco says:
    @Anonymous

    The typical opinion in England these days is that they are 1. parasites, and 2. of non-English origin (mainly German) and that the whole system of royalty/aristocracy is a foreign system that has been imposed on us.

    1. Last time I checked, republican sentiment in Britain accounted for 19% of the surveyed public (but about 90% of those in the comboxes of certain newspapers). The last attempt to abolish the monarchy in Australia went down to defeat in a referendum. (The only monarchies in Europe ever disestablished by popular vote were those in Italy and Greece; the rest disappeared consequent to a political class coup).

    2. The Queen’s German ancestry is on her father’s side. Her mother came out of the Scottish peerage. The last several generations of Germans in her family grew up in England and spoke English as their first language.

    3. Can you tell us just when the British isles did not have royalty and aristocracy (apart from the misbegotten regime set up by Oliver Cromwell?).

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Alden
  277. @AnotherDad

    Don’t mind Jack, he’s just trying to heal the world and enlighten us, the benighted masses.

  278. My youngest sister was a serious Anglophile for some time. I used to tease her mercilessly about it. I have always thought of the concept of a royal family to be enormously silly. Don’t care whether it’s the UK, Monaco, or Saudi Arabia, the whole idea just seems stupid.

    Even so, I watched The Crown with my wife when each season dropped. I get why it’s quite popular. It’s just a soap opera inhabited by real life characters. I did enjoy the first season which covered time before I was born. And the cult of Princess Di still lives. The succeeding seasons have been of decreasing interest to me from a historical perspective since I was aware of many of the events during those times.

    Maybe the value of the series is that is depicts the “Royals” as venal, petty, and immoral and not some class of people who are somehow above the unwashed masses. The thought that runs through my mind while watching the episodes is, “How in the Sam Hill did that country ever take possession of so many territories around the world?”

  279. Thea says:
    @Rob McX

    Irony is the iron law of history as they say.

    If only the Hart Cellar signatories realized they were wiping our representative rule for Americans.

    The real problem with voter fraud is the newcomers who have no connection to and often despise America, her culture and people. Now they’ve been drafted to vote.

  280. bomag says:
    @Dan Hayes

    I believe it is Woke rule #17 that every Black accomplishment gets the “genius” appendage.

  281. Alden says:
    @Anonymous

    MP Tony Benn was leader of the Republicans for a while. When Princess Anne had her first child he announced in parliament, “ another lifelong benefits baby”.

    From an American perspective, the royals are just publicity hounds. I never paid much attention until Dianna was on the cover of every supermarket magazine. So every week I read the covers while waiting in the checkout line.

    Those were the days of the big book stores. Soon they had entire sections devoted to Dianna books. And the Queen and the Queen mother. Gag.

    If you can find a copy of The Queen and I read it. It’s set in the mid 80s. A republican government is elected. Because the royals have no job skills they are entitled to all benefits; from council housing to their own social workers Hilarity ensues.

    I do enjoy the Royal fashion show. When I see the pictures of the royals surrounded by little African kids I think of what those little boys will be doing in 10 years. Worst thing about the royals is the Common wealth. Or the Commonwealth of Cannibals and Cleptomanics as many call it. Look at the pictures. The Queen and Prime Minister surrounded by the most bloodthirsty corrupt black dictators on earth.

    Somebody other than American tourists must like the royals.

  282. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Start reading the WW2 and other memoirs that mention Churchill. It’s as well known as the fact Roosevelt was handicapped because of polio. Or that pres Kennedy was in the navy or Regean was an actor or Trump’s married 3 times. Churchill’s even on a list of very successful alcoholics 3 of his 4 children were also alcoholics. Like longevity, alcoholism is genetic.

    My grandmother and her sisters were born around 1880. The sisters lived to be over 100. Grandma had her 2 children in her 40s. So it’s not unknown for people of Churchill’s era to live long lives.

    When I was a very young probation officer half the state and county judges were alcoholics. Usually drunk after lunch. That didn’t end till women became judges and didn’t get drunk at lunch. Judge us an important demanding job no?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  283. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Anonymous is right about many English people. Like my English relatives and all their friends. They are abolish the monarchy Republicans. The Republican thing is very prevalent amongst the university graduates and big business.

    • Replies: @Ed
    , @Art Deco
  284. Ed says:
    @Alden

    Staying in the EU was very prevalent among the university graduate and global business class. Still went down to defeat.

    • Replies: @Alden
  285. pyrrhus says:
    @Almost Missouri

    No, best was episode 9 about Churchill

  286. J.Ross says:
    @Hibernian

    The only mafia movie I know which is not hagiography is Gomorrah.

  287. Hibernian says:
    @Art Deco

    Three words: Mid Life Crisis.

  288. Hibernian says:
    @Art Deco

    Absurdly false statements don’t get to be true statements just because you have the shamelessness to utter them.

    Pot, meet kettle.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  289. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous

    …the whole system of royalty/aristocracy is a foreign system that has been imposed on us.

    Unless you mean either the current dynasty or possibly all Post-Stuart royalty, along with the aristocracy, this makes no sense, unless it’s based on the fact that the Normans were Frenchmen of a sort.

  290. @Steve Sailer

    That’s pretty cool to anticipate probably the most famous baseball moment in the last 40 years (with maybe the exception of Buckner’s ’86 Game 6 misplay…).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  291. @Enemy of Earth

    The old fashioned way: at the point of a bayonet, aided by the Royal Navy.

  292. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    It’s as well known as the fact

    No, it isn’t, and you’re being stupid. Actual alcoholics have signature medical problems which commonly kill them and kill them young. They also are unreliable workers. Churchill was a productive dynamo who produced 10 volumes of history when he was past 70 in addition to his duties in parliament and as prime minister.

    • Replies: @Alden
  293. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    Anonymous is right about many English people.

    If you re-read his statement, he wasn’t saying the opinion was common in certain circles but that it was the mode in the populace at large. That’s demonstrably untrue.

    • Replies: @Alden
  294. vinteuil says:
    @Corvinus

    Wow, Corvinus – 12,298 comments!

  295. Corvinus says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “The MSM isn’t 100% lies”.

    It isn’t even 50 percent lies. As Mr. Unz stated, it contains factual information and analysis that can be employed in one’s argument.

    “They tell the truth when the truth supports the official narrative.”

    You’ve got yourself all wrapped up in your own truth bubble and confirmation bias routine you don’t know if you are coming or going.

    “But they lie, suppress, and spin everything else.”

    Now that would be Fake News.

    “So when the media are absolutely forced to admit to something that contradicts the narrative…”

    There’s no narrative, just reporting.

  296. Lloyd1927 says:

    I don’t know about Margaret Thatcher’s cooking habits, but she was portrayed cooking in the kitchen with Dennis in the James Bond film, “For Your Eyes Only.”

  297. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    I just watch old movies on DVD now,

    Yep, same here. I have zero interest in contemporary movies or TV.

  298. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Whiskey

    One of the things that Curtis Yarvin aka Mencius Moldbug noted was that hereditary rulers were in effect, owners not managers.

    Yep. An extremely good point. Also if you’re a hereditary monarch the one thing that matters is having something to pass on to your successor. Which means you have a huge incentive not to trash the country.

  299. @AnotherDad

    To maintain a civilization there is no alternative to republicanism…

    PRI: There are 28 other monarchies in the world



  300. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Churchill has many ghostwriters and researchers who wrote his English history books. His books were voluminous it’s true.

    But they were English history. Pick an era or subject. Make an outline following a standard encyclopedia or middle school text book entry. A few trips to the local university library. Find a few things not in a standard text. You’ve got a book.

    Dumas father and son, Zola, Hugo, Flaubert, Anthony Trollope Colette and her husband even Agatha Christie cranked out a book a year using Churchill’s researchers, ghosts writers and 3 shorthand typist method But It was easier for Churchill because the history was already written.

    The Dumases , Phillipa Gregory , Jean Plaidy Thomas Costain, historical fiction books are based on real people and real events. For instance, D’Artagnan and his 3 Musketeer friends were all real people. Everything was found in libraries and re arranged. It’s even easier with real history. Just rewrite the events.

    Here’s the method used. 3 shorthand typists. 1,2, and 3. Writer dictates to # 1 for a certain time. # 1 takes her notes to another room to type them. # 2 comes in takes notes and goes off to type then. # 3 comes in to take notes

    Soon # 1 has finished typing and comes in to take notes. # 3 goes to the typing room. That’s how it was done. And the shorthand typists learned correct grammar in elementary school so they typed correct sentences paragraphs etc.

    That’s how it was done by fiction and history writers alike. Do you really think the soldiers really wrote the endless war memoirs themselves? . Do you think the Clintons wrote those endless memoirs? The movie stars write their autobiographies?

    Anyone of the UNZ authors and commenters could crank out a standard 300 page book about some aspect of American history with a laptop, printer and 5-10 reference books in about a month’s full time effort. The publishers editors would edit it for grammar and readability. Getting rid of long run on sentences shorter paragraphs whatever was needed,

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Art Deco
  301. Alden says:
    @Ed

    I heard all about it for years. “ We won’t be able to get jobs in Europe”. Of course, if British businesses and government agencies would hire native Britons, instead of Indians Africans Arabs Pakistanis for every job, the native British uni grads wouldn’t have to go to Europe for work.

  302. @Captain Tripps

    I was just being facetious, making up the most boyish heroics imaginable.

    But I take the lesson from it that when I tried to be cunning and outsmart my friends on sports bets, I wound up losing.

  303. Rob McX says:
    @Alden

    I know Churchill’s articles for the cheaper papers were completely ghost-written, with the actual writer being paid a fraction of what WC himself got. He being the son of Randolph Churchill and the grandson of the Duke of Marlborough, his name on a book or article ensured increased sales. The Churchill brand he exploited to the full.

  304. dfordoom says: • Website
    @AnotherDad

    It’s interesting how mediocre the British royals are.

    You mean the German royals? The Saxe-Coburg-Gothas were horrifically mediocre right from the start. Bring back the Stuarts.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Art Deco
  305. NickG says:
    @Rob McX

    There was Tom Selleck as General Eisenhower in the surprisingly rather good low budget TV movie ‘Ike — countdown to D-Day’, apparently shot in under 3 weeks in New Zealand, about the preparation for Overlord – the 6th June 1944 Allied invasion of France. Eisenhower was 1.79 m, which is actually above average but Tom Selleck is a towering 1.93 m. That’s about a 6 inch difference in old money.

  306. Twinkie says:
    @Enemy of Earth

    “How in the Sam Hill did that country ever take possession of so many territories around the world?”

    Certainly not because of the royals, but because of daring and enterprising men such as Clive and Raffles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Clive

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamford_Raffles

    And such men are not without controversy:

    Clive has become one of the most controversial figures in British colonial history, being labelled an “unstable sociopath” by renowned historian William Dalrymple for his brutal atrocities against native populations and his policies during his management of the EIC that contributed to the Great Bengal famine of 1770.

    • Agree: Alden
  307. Twinkie says:
    @dfordoom

    The Saxe-Coburg-Gothas were horrifically mediocre right from the start. Bring back the Stuarts.

    Why stop there? Why not the Plantagenets? Ooops, they were Angevines. Since when have the British royals been “pure-English” since the Norman Conquest of 1066?

    And even the so-called English are a superstrate layer on top of real Britons/Brythonics.

    I had a Welsh friend in grad school who had a bumper sticker that read “Anglo-Saxons go home, Britain for Britons!”

  308. sb says:
    @AnotherDad

    Didn’t de Toqueville consider that constitutional monarchy was the least worse political system ?

    One could do a list of countries where life is fairly agreeable . Amazing how a high proportion of them are constitutional monarchies .
    Of course the US is just too diverse , multiracial, multicultural etc etc for it to be an issue but for more homogenous societies it may be different

  309. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    Churchill has many ghostwriters and researchers who wrote his English history books. His books were voluminous it’s true.

    Who?

    • Replies: @Alden
  310. Art Deco says:
    @dfordoom

    You mean the German royals? The Saxe-Coburg-Gothas were horrifically mediocre right from the start. Bring back the Stuarts.

    The Stuart pretenders haven’t had any history of residence in the British isles for three centuries. The current Stuart pretender is also the pretender to the throne of Bavaria and lives there.

    After the German monarchies went under in 1918, the descendants of George V usually married British. The Queen herself and her uncle George were exceptions.

    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir
  311. BB753 says:
    @Hugo Silva

    When monarchies become hijacked by freemasonry, it’s only a matter of time before they dump the crown. Pump and dump. William will never reign.

  312. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Have you ever spoken to an English person in your entire life other than a hotel clerk?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  313. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Brendan Bracken was one. You’re just being an argumentative moron brainwashed worshipper of one of the worst war criminals in 20 th century history.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  314. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    And you’re a Nazi admirer pulling sh!t out of your ass and fancying it’s knowledge.

    • Replies: @Alden
  315. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    I don’t admire Nazis or Germany or Germans at all. I just know the truth about Churchill and a few other exalted saints. Like Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and the Kennedy clan.

    If you believe Churchill was so wonderful, you probably believe the media hype that Clinton and Harris would make the bestest mostest US presidents ever.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  316. Alden says:
    @pyrrhus

    Then there was Prince John, son of George 5 and Queen Mary. They actually had 5, not 4 sons. John supposedly had epilepsy. He and a nurse were confined to a small cottage at Sandringham. Lucky for the family, he died at 12; very suddenly.

  317. Alden says:
    @Enemy of Earth

    The English government didn’t have that much to do with colonizing half the world.

    Portugal and Spain was mostly government directed With royalty like Ferdinand and Isabella and Prince Henry of Portugal. Subsequent Spanish and Portuguese governments continued to lead the colonizing effort.

    France and Netherlands were joint efforts by government, business and private settlers.

    But there wasn’t much government involvement by the British government until well into the 19th century. Virginia, East India West Indies companies and private settlers led the way.

    17th century Britain saw severe crackdowns on religious dissenters, then a civil war, then Cromwell deportation of several hundred thousands Irish Scots and English rebels and dissenters, then the expulsion of the Stuart’s.
    Early 18th century 2 Stuart rebellions and more deported. That 150 years of problems sent millions of Britons all over the world from Canada to India. Plus the vast profits made by the shipping companies, sugar, tea, tobacco plantations, timber, spices , Indian textiles

    The British government didn’t really support the colonists till the 19th century. The royals never had much to do with establishing the empire. Except for James 1 who sent Protestants Puritans Catholics Quakers and others fleeing to America where they could persecute each other.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  318. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    I just know the truth about Churchill and a few other exalted saints.

    You have your conceits, which are indubitably a petty trial to others.

  319. Alden says:

    Here’s a book about Churchill’s money problems his gambling debts and other debts caused by his extremely extravagant lifestyle.
    David Lagough No more champagne; Churchill
    and his money problems.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  320. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    The IRA and the Black Panthers are both gangsters dressed up as revolutionaries.

  321. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I thought Vanessa Kirby, the actress who played Margaret in Seasons 1 and 2, was fantastic. She was ill-tempered and constantly acting out, yet still very human and, well, smoking hot.

    I have only just watched the first three episodes, but yes, Vanessa Kirby is smoking hot. From time to time, she gives Townsend that “come **** me look”. Yowza!

  322. @Art Deco

    The Stuart pretenders haven’t had any history of residence in the British isles for three centuries. The current Stuart pretender is also the pretender to the throne of Bavaria and lives there.

    The current pretender is Franz, Duke of Bavaria, born in 1933 and never married, so without heirs in the direct line.

    By at least one reckoning, the third in line to the Jacobite succession is Prince Joseph Wenzel of Liechtenstein, the grandson of Hans Adam II, the reigning Prince of Liechtenstein. Joseph Wenzel was born in London in 1995 and was educated at Malvern College in Worcestershire.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Joseph_Wenzel_of_Liechtenstein

    • Replies: @Alden
  323. Malla says:
    @AnotherDad

    But he’s failed to be a champion of British culture and tradition and certainly failed to be a champion of the British people.

    If Prince Charles did that, the commie press would get at him as “Nazi” and “colonial” and “racist”. And millions of brainwashed leftard Whites would join in the chorus while we non Whites look at the leftard Whitey idiots from the sides, we laugh at them, make fun of them and see these idiots as prey. These White leftards try to suck darkie cock to show to the world that they are cool and progressive and “simple people of the soil’ or whatever bullshit while non Whites cheat them, look down upon them, rape them, make loads of money and snottily look town at those “dirty hippies” while the idiots keep fighting their race and culture. I have been a non White in Europe, I know our attitudes towards these leftard White idiots.

    • Agree: Alden, Almost Missouri
  324. Alden says:
    @Crawfurdmuir

    Not that it matters, but William and Harry and their children are direct descendants of Charles 2 Stuart through Dianna Spencer. So are Prince Andrew’s daughters through their mother Sarah Ferguson.

    Again, I recommend the Netflix series The Windsors. It’s like an extremely well done old SNL skit.

  325. Alden says:
    @AnotherDad

    Never heard of Meghan Markle till she got engaged to Harry. I watched some episodes of suits. She’s really very pretty and pass for White. She’s not the Michelle Obama type at all.

    One perspective in their leaving England is that Harry wanted to get out of the whole royal life. Marrying her gave him the incentive and a supportive wife to help him leave.

    Many people don’t make major life altering decisions until they have a supportive spouse.

    We all should be grateful to the British royals for providing us all with such enjoyable entertainment.

    • Troll: Dan Hayes
  326. Alden says:
    @Gordo

    Read Anthony Blunt’s own memoirs.

    Another book revealing the reason Blunt was protected from charges of treason because he was the son of George 5 and Hilda Blunt is
    “ War of the Windsor’s” by former British intelligence officers Stephen Prior, Clive Prince and Robert Bryson.

    It’s mentioned in other books about the Soviet spies working in the British government.

    Not all knowledge is handy dandy on Wikipedia

  327. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  328. Dan Hayes says:
    @MEH 0910

    Once an actress, always an actress!👌

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, MEH 0910
  329. @Hypnotoad666

    Agree. The nice thing about Claire Foy is that her beauty doesn’t distract from her acting, and her “look” slots well into a variety of roles. As compared to, say, Margot Robbie, whose appearance, while not more beautiful, is more striking and therefore overshadows the role. Of course, she’s a less nuanced actress too.

  330. Alden says:
    @AnotherDad

    Any British royal who advocates for the British people and culture will swiftly get the James 2 treatment, swift exile, confiscation of all assets.

    Plus, there’s the commonwealth thing. Most common wealth nations are black and brown. It’s the one organization the sovereign has any influence in. It’s really a big deal for the Queen and royal family.

    Everybody else in Britain refers to it as the Commonwealth of Cannibals and Kleptomaniacs.

  331. @Alden

    The guy’s name is David Lough. He didn’t mention gambling IIRC, just detailed that WC lived very well.

    Here are some YT videos of DL: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=no+more+champagne+david+lough

    • Replies: @Alden
  332. Alden says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    You didn’t read the book did you? I did read the book and the gambling losses were stressed and given as the reason Churchill had lifelong money troubles. 40,000 pound losses a year in the 1920s when 300 pounds a year was a comfortable middle class income.

    • Replies: @BB753
  333. BB753 says:
    @Alden

    Which is why he sold himself out to the warmongerer side. A politician isn’t useful unless he’s in some way compromised.

  334. @Art Deco

    The seven Mercury astronauts were all test pilots. Four were combat veterans and four were trained engineers.

    Which is not relevant to either the Tom Wolfe story or the way they are portrayed in The Crown. I realize you like to spit venom and start unpleasantness here (because you are a sad person I suppose), but it is not denigrating their courage or skills to say that a) the Apollo missions were designed not to need seat-of-your-pants flying skills and b) the pilots chosen were the ones best capable of following orders. That sort of personality was not the personality Phillip was expecting (in the TV show). He wanted to meet a Chuck Yeager type.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  335. Art Deco says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Which is not relevant t

    You say stupid things, and you can’t let go. Not my problem, but yours.

  336. MEH 0910 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Rescue Puppy Gets Adopted By Joe Biden | The Dodo

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  337. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  338. Just got through binge watching the first two seasons. The actors who played Elizabeth, Philip, and Margaret were excellent, but the guy who played Tommy Lascelles stole the show.

    The babe who plays the queen in season three looks like she is about 62, even though Elizabeth was just 38 in 1964. They should have kept Claire Foy.

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