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From the New York Times Opinion Page:

The Coronavirus Is Killing Too Many Nursing Home Residents
Here’s one idea for protecting them.

By Tyson Belanger
Dr. Belanger owns an assisted living center in Connecticut.

May 3, 2020

… With adequate funding from government and charitable sources, we could pay caregivers to live on-site at the nursing homes and assisted living centers where they work. This would ensure that they do not interact with infected people and then bring the virus into our centers. I instituted this policy on March 22.

The result has been promising; we have yet to have a confirmed case of Covid-19 among our residents or staff. But I cannot afford it for much longer, and many other senior care centers could not afford to even start such a program. …

I am paying $15,000 monthly to on-site aides and $20,000 to nurses.

So that is $180,000 per year for aides and $240,000 per year for nurses, plus the cost of trailers, and probably food.

But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.

Here’s the story of 43 men who worked at the Braskem factory in Pennsylvania making raw material for face masks who locked themselves in for 28 days straight so they wouldn’t be distracted by the chance of infections. Working 84 hours per week for four weeks, they made enough raw material for 500 million N95 facemasks.

This was an all male crew. My guess is that you can get men to sign up for these kind of locked-in jobs more easily than you can women, who usually have more family responsibilities. How long you can get female care workers to lock themselves in, I don’t know.

My business cannot afford this. Altogether, I have drawn loans from my personal savings of about half a million dollars. We have also been approved for $343,243 from the Payroll Protection Program.

He rented trailers to sit in the parking lot for his locked-in staff to live in.

We should view on-site caregiving as an essential public good and invest funds so more senior homes can do it. If Connecticut pays $25,000 per week in matching payroll funds to all of its roughly 365 nursing homes and assisted living centers for six weeks, this would cost taxpayers nearly $55 million. Not every home or caregiver will agree to do it, but we should provide the financial support to make it financially viable for all.

Hard to figure out what that would cost nationally, but it sounds like it could significantly bring down the death rate.

 
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  1. Or, maybe they could just stop REQUIRING nursing homes to take Beer Flu patients:

    https://www.newsday.com/news/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-nursing-homes-1.43491608

    • Agree: The Alarmist
  2. Get the economy going, but keep the old and the sick under current conditions–only more so? Great idea!

    • Agree: ben tillman
  3. All I can say is that it’s a very good thing that money is free nowadays.

    At these prices? Get all you can. Everyone else is.

  4. “He rented trailers to sit in the parking lot for his locked-in staff to live in.”

    This is definitely one instance of trailers NOT rotting in the parking lots.

  5. Surely these places can just build the housing for den mothers for the elderly. Free room and board is a nice perk for some.

  6. International Jew [AKA "Hebrew National"] says:

    Live-in nursing home aides could be a new guest worker category. It would be an above-board version of the way a lot of seamstresses and prostitutes already come here. We could call it H1-I — I for indentured.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    There's already a business model for this in parts of Europe:

    https://img.welt.de/img/vermischtes/mobile119142385/1452505447-ci102l-w1024/Love-Mobile.jpg
  7. If the policy is to succeed the live-in staff would need to be kept on-site. Otherwise on days off, there’s no way to prevent someone attending the local rave or house party. They will have a day off occasionally, won’t they?

    Perhaps Project 1619 should be invited to express their opinion.

  8. This guy self-quarantined at sea. Sort of like an aquatic Dick Proenneke. And I’d bet that even with his advanced age he won’t make more than a passing acquaintance with Miss Corona-Chan.

    For some reason I find these stories captivating. These two guys can really tell you about solitude. As it happens, I made the same trip as his first, only in reverse from Africa to Brazil, and (naturally) in a very different kind of vessel. I think he’s lucky to have had sharks and turtles for company. The entire time crossing the ocean, flying fish were the only sea life I witnessed. That saddened me.

    He kept no schedule. “I am not German — always 9 a.m. paddle,” he explained. “I am Polish. I paddle when I would like.”

    Although I love life at sea, this Polish guy’s feats are totally unreal to me.

    Ocean kayaking is catastrophically monotonous. The primary challenge is not physical.

    [MORE]

    Doba rotated through three kinds of freeze-dried porridge for breakfast, four kinds of freeze-dried soup for lunch and an assortment of a dozen freeze-dried entrees. (He ate all the meat options first.) He also snacked on dried fruit and his wife’s plum jam, but he ran out of that halfway across the ocean. Every time he closed his eyes, Doba told me, “I dreamed I was paddling in the winter in Poland.” He lost 45 pounds. Still, the trip was perfect. Ninety-nine days after leaving Senegal, Doba arrived in Brazil. He was greeted by one journalist and the Polish ambassador. Nobody cares if you cross the Atlantic in a kayak. The fact that Doba knows this is clear in his eyes.

    BWTM!

    “The devil, a German man, a Frenchman and a Polish man are all in a hot-air balloon,” Wojciechowska said. “They are falling, falling — a catastrophe is about to happen. So the devil says to the German man: ‘You must jump. This is an order.’ And the German man jumps.

    “Then the devil says to the Frenchman, ‘You must jump.’ The Frenchman says, ‘What does this mean?’

    “The devil says, ‘It means that life is meaningless but when you jump you will look very chic, very modern.’ So the Frenchman jumps.

    “Then the devil gets to the Polish man.” He tries the reasons he used on the German and French men, without success. “ ‘Shoot,’ the devil says. ‘I know you will not jump.’ And the Polish man jumps.”

    The ultimate Polish joke. Although I haven’t a drop of Polish blood in me, I like the Poles almost as much as I like the Russians.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/22/magazine/voyages-kayaking-across-ocean-at-70.html

    It’s a long article. Do your calisthenics first.

    • Thanks: J.Ross, Corvinus, Meretricious
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    Solo crossing at 70? Pah!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-52441823


    "A 72-year-old man is set to claim the title of oldest person to row solo across the Atlantic after a 13-week adventure in a handmade boat.

    Graham Walters, from Thurmaston in Leicestershire, is raising money for Help for Heroes by rowing from Gran Canaria to Antigua.

    This is his fifth Atlantic crossing, the fourth in the boat hand-built in his garden 22 years ago.

    Mr Walters has to time his landing to fit in with a coronavirus curfew."
     

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/adventure/outdoors/a27396168/frenchman-crosses-atlantic-ocean-in-barrel/

    When presented with the idea of traveling across the Atlantic in a giant orange barrel, most people might have a few questions. Like, for example, "Why?"

    But for Jean-Jacques Savin, a 72-year-old former military parachutist and pilot who just completed the voyage from the Canary Islands (off the coast of Morocco) to an island in the Caribbean, the question is an easy one to answer: to prove that man could survive the trip.

    Savin was inspired by fellow countryman Alain Bombard, who in 1952 showed it was possible to travel across the Atlantic living only off plankton, saltwater, and raw fish in a lifeboat for the sake of the challenge. Savin read Bombard's book about his trip, Naufragé volontaire (Voluntary Castaway), and then decided to make his own voyage, departing the day after Christmas 2018 and arriving on the Dutch Caribbean island of St. Eustatius last week.
     

  9. I am paying $15,000 monthly to on-site aides and $20,000 to nurses.

    That seems a lot. Am I missing something?

    • Replies: @Pericles
    There's a reason for all those videos of nurses dancing.
    , @Ancient Briton
    A lot like Jim Rockford's "200 a-day plus expenses" (allowing for inflation).
  10. The Cost of Locked-Down vs. Locked-In

    Meanwhile, as Californians and Floridians were huddling on beaches, we stayed in to enjoy a new flavor of pizza. Chicken cordon sanitaire.

  11. But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.

    It’s a lot more than a soldier would make on a tour of duty. “Frontline workers” indeed.

    • Agree: Coemgen, ben tillman
    • Replies: @Meretricious
    It's that male/female wage gap you've heard so much about.
    , @Bill Jones
    But the nurses aids do something useful.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Ben, twice I went to Columbia,SA to rebuild a blast furnace. Twelve hour days from start to finish, which is the 84 hour week in this story. Contractor paid our expenses, but in truth it was the same pay as any our rush steel mill job that worked seven twelve hour days, without expenses. The problem is you live with guys you wouldn't want to have lunch with, let alone live with 24/7.
  12. As late as 2013 or so we were burning thru 2 BILLION PER WEEK in Afghanistan….to prop up heroin mobsters and racketeers and Bachu Bazi Afghan child molesters….that’s $104 billion a year so the CIA could pump heroin out of Afghanistan…..

    They have money for that and the Karzai mob syndicate but not senior citizens? Come on now….

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    104 Billion is child's play these days. We just shelled out a few Trillion dollars. And there's more on the way!

    Yes, had everyone kept their collective minds we could've spent a fraction of that money to protect the vulnerable while allowing everyone else to go about their way for the most part. The economy would have still suffered as things like tourism, sports, and concerts (anything with thousands of people indoors for hours at a time would still seem like a sensible thing, to me, to restrict initially) dramatically scaled back for a few months. But the bulk of economic activity could have carried. And we could have saved ourselves the embarrassment of readily submitting ourselves to authoritariansim-style governance in a panic-laced stupor of insanity.
  13. Don’t know about the US, but in the UK there are several grades of elderly care

    a) “sheltered housing” or “retirement living” – I imagine this is like those elderly complexes in Florida. You pretty much live your life in your own home (bought, but usually leasehold with high ongoing charges), but there are people on call if you need them, maybe a dedicated doctors surgery, hairdresser, gym etc.

    b) “care home” communal living with own rooms, full time and night staff. The staff are not medical professionals in any way, shape or form, although working there can kickstart an interest. Some elderly people without complex heath needs can live happy lives there, helps if you’re the sociable type. Others are sad places where there’s little interaction and people are parked in front of the TV all day, a good way to rot the brain.

    c) “Nursing home” – qualified medical staff (not all of them), people tend to have shorter life expectancy here.

    BenKenobi – 180,000 dollars for a year out of life could be very attractive to young single people. Had the offer been around when I was young and poor, I’d have gone for it like a shot. Remember you’d be locked down with other young single carers too, so a monastic existence is not inevitable.

    • Replies: @Anon242
    Yes similar here in the US to what you describe: the names I have seen for each of the categories you mention are a) Independent Living- retirement housing with minimal care 2) Assisted Living- full time on site care (level varies by resident) but usually not medically trained. There is some training certification requirements to hand out medicine and there is usually a Nurse on staff or on call but the majority of caretakers are not professionally trained and c) “skilled nursing”, “nursing home” or “memory care” have the highest level of medical involvement and nurses and also more expensive for private pay care (Medicaid have fewer and lower quality options). Also it is worth noting that “skilled nursing” care can be temporary, for instance post surgery. The 4th option is in home care which can be occasional visits to 24 hr care in the person’s home- also quite expensive. It should be noted that when the elder runs out of money and has to rely on the state the options are much more limited and not always good choices. This is all based on my personal experience with an older relative with a neurological disorder, so it may vary little across the US.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    yet, the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week. That is POW or slave labor type numbers. I have done that for six weeks, bone aching, mind numbing.
  14. @Mr McKenna
    This guy self-quarantined at sea. Sort of like an aquatic Dick Proenneke. And I'd bet that even with his advanced age he won't make more than a passing acquaintance with Miss Corona-Chan.

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/03/25/magazine/25mag-kayaker2/25mag-25kayaker-t_CA2-jumbo.jpg

    For some reason I find these stories captivating. These two guys can really tell you about solitude. As it happens, I made the same trip as his first, only in reverse from Africa to Brazil, and (naturally) in a very different kind of vessel. I think he's lucky to have had sharks and turtles for company. The entire time crossing the ocean, flying fish were the only sea life I witnessed. That saddened me.

    He kept no schedule. “I am not German — always 9 a.m. paddle,” he explained. “I am Polish. I paddle when I would like.”
     
    Although I love life at sea, this Polish guy's feats are totally unreal to me.

    Ocean kayaking is catastrophically monotonous. The primary challenge is not physical.
     


    Doba rotated through three kinds of freeze-dried porridge for breakfast, four kinds of freeze-dried soup for lunch and an assortment of a dozen freeze-dried entrees. (He ate all the meat options first.) He also snacked on dried fruit and his wife’s plum jam, but he ran out of that halfway across the ocean. Every time he closed his eyes, Doba told me, “I dreamed I was paddling in the winter in Poland.” He lost 45 pounds. Still, the trip was perfect. Ninety-nine days after leaving Senegal, Doba arrived in Brazil. He was greeted by one journalist and the Polish ambassador. Nobody cares if you cross the Atlantic in a kayak. The fact that Doba knows this is clear in his eyes.
     
    BWTM!

    “The devil, a German man, a Frenchman and a Polish man are all in a hot-air balloon,” Wojciechowska said. “They are falling, falling — a catastrophe is about to happen. So the devil says to the German man: ‘You must jump. This is an order.’ And the German man jumps.

    “Then the devil says to the Frenchman, ‘You must jump.’ The Frenchman says, ‘What does this mean?’

    “The devil says, ‘It means that life is meaningless but when you jump you will look very chic, very modern.’ So the Frenchman jumps.

    “Then the devil gets to the Polish man.” He tries the reasons he used on the German and French men, without success. “ ‘Shoot,’ the devil says. ‘I know you will not jump.’ And the Polish man jumps.”
     
    The ultimate Polish joke. Although I haven't a drop of Polish blood in me, I like the Poles almost as much as I like the Russians.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/22/magazine/voyages-kayaking-across-ocean-at-70.html

    It's a long article. Do your calisthenics first.

    Solo crossing at 70? Pah!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-52441823

    “A 72-year-old man is set to claim the title of oldest person to row solo across the Atlantic after a 13-week adventure in a handmade boat.

    Graham Walters, from Thurmaston in Leicestershire, is raising money for Help for Heroes by rowing from Gran Canaria to Antigua.

    This is his fifth Atlantic crossing, the fourth in the boat hand-built in his garden 22 years ago.

    Mr Walters has to time his landing to fit in with a coronavirus curfew.”

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/adventure/outdoors/a27396168/frenchman-crosses-atlantic-ocean-in-barrel/

    When presented with the idea of traveling across the Atlantic in a giant orange barrel, most people might have a few questions. Like, for example, “Why?”

    But for Jean-Jacques Savin, a 72-year-old former military parachutist and pilot who just completed the voyage from the Canary Islands (off the coast of Morocco) to an island in the Caribbean, the question is an easy one to answer: to prove that man could survive the trip.

    Savin was inspired by fellow countryman Alain Bombard, who in 1952 showed it was possible to travel across the Atlantic living only off plankton, saltwater, and raw fish in a lifeboat for the sake of the challenge. Savin read Bombard’s book about his trip, Naufragé volontaire (Voluntary Castaway), and then decided to make his own voyage, departing the day after Christmas 2018 and arriving on the Dutch Caribbean island of St. Eustatius last week.

  15. @Bill B.

    I am paying $15,000 monthly to on-site aides and $20,000 to nurses.
     
    That seems a lot. Am I missing something?

    There’s a reason for all those videos of nurses dancing.

    • LOL: Meretricious
  16. 1 month on, 2 weeks off, 2 weeks in quarantine, rinse and repeat….

  17. OT, but the BBC says one suggested way back to work involves reducing (or I would hope abolishing) hot-desking, a pernicious money-saving custom of large businesses.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52525127

    “Reduced hot-desking and alternatives to social distancing where it is not possible are among measures being considered to let workplaces reopen.

    A draft government plan to ease anti-coronavirus restrictions, seen by the BBC, also urges employers to minimise numbers using equipment, stagger shift times and maximise home-working.”

    Is there anything Corona-Chan can’t do?

  18. OT, but a practical question I hadn’t thought of before… What is going on with juries during all these shenanigans? Is the court system still even operating?

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    I got a jury duty letter in March for the Apr 1-Jun 24 term. Postponed 3 times (Michigan). Cancelled last Friday. My 3rd career jury duty notice, my 3rd time avoiding! Three for three, baby! I think I'll head to the casino, oh wait...
  19. @International Jew
    Live-in nursing home aides could be a new guest worker category. It would be an above-board version of the way a lot of seamstresses and prostitutes already come here. We could call it H1-I — I for indentured.

    There’s already a business model for this in parts of Europe:

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Classy.
  20. @BenKenobi

    But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.
     
    It's a lot more than a soldier would make on a tour of duty. "Frontline workers" indeed.

    It’s that male/female wage gap you’ve heard so much about.

  21. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    OT, but a practical question I hadn't thought of before... What is going on with juries during all these shenanigans? Is the court system still even operating?

    I got a jury duty letter in March for the Apr 1-Jun 24 term. Postponed 3 times (Michigan). Cancelled last Friday. My 3rd career jury duty notice, my 3rd time avoiding! Three for three, baby! I think I’ll head to the casino, oh wait…

  22. “Here’s the story of 43 men who worked at the Braskem factory in Pennsylvania making raw material for face masks who locked themselves in for 28 days straight so they wouldn’t be distracted by the chance of infections. Working 84 hours per week for four weeks, they made enough raw material for 500 million N95 facemasks.”

    And the contest continues to see who can waste the most time, energy, and resources towards a fake solution for an overstated crisis.

  23. So that is $180,000 per year for aides and $240,000 per year for nurses, plus the cost of trailers, and probably food.

    But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.

    A solid and generous immigration program would take care of those problems.

    • Replies: @Gordo

    A solid and generous immigration program would take care of those problems.
     
    And cause far worse problems in the future.

    Cynical and suicidal would be better adjectives.
  24. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Clearly its time for @Isteve to come out of the closet and return to sailer strategics inc….

    This bougainvillea wont trim itself or end #mass immigration.

    Towards stable sustainable societies.

  25. Let’s make schoolteachers do this too

  26. International Jew [AKA "Hebrew National"] says:
    @The Alarmist
    There's already a business model for this in parts of Europe:

    https://img.welt.de/img/vermischtes/mobile119142385/1452505447-ci102l-w1024/Love-Mobile.jpg

    Classy.

  27. @Neoconned
    As late as 2013 or so we were burning thru 2 BILLION PER WEEK in Afghanistan....to prop up heroin mobsters and racketeers and Bachu Bazi Afghan child molesters....that's $104 billion a year so the CIA could pump heroin out of Afghanistan.....

    They have money for that and the Karzai mob syndicate but not senior citizens? Come on now....

    104 Billion is child’s play these days. We just shelled out a few Trillion dollars. And there’s more on the way!

    Yes, had everyone kept their collective minds we could’ve spent a fraction of that money to protect the vulnerable while allowing everyone else to go about their way for the most part. The economy would have still suffered as things like tourism, sports, and concerts (anything with thousands of people indoors for hours at a time would still seem like a sensible thing, to me, to restrict initially) dramatically scaled back for a few months. But the bulk of economic activity could have carried. And we could have saved ourselves the embarrassment of readily submitting ourselves to authoritariansim-style governance in a panic-laced stupor of insanity.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    But, but, we would have missed out on Great Game III!!
  28. @Brás Cubas

    So that is $180,000 per year for aides and $240,000 per year for nurses, plus the cost of trailers, and probably food.

    But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.
     
    A solid and generous immigration program would take care of those problems.

    A solid and generous immigration program would take care of those problems.

    And cause far worse problems in the future.

    Cynical and suicidal would be better adjectives.

    • Replies: @David
    He meant a solid wall generously paid for by Mexico. And he's right.
  29. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:

    The smallest practical unit of quarantine is the household, since it’s based on existing infrastructure, the house or apartment. You cannot get smaller than that because of shared kitchens, bathrooms, and hallways. That means an average quarantine size of three or so people.

    But homes for the elderly, student and employee dormitories, “share houses,” and hospital wings are effectively giant households, and when staff are members of other households, you got trouble. Normally, household quarantine cheating takes the form of play dates, visiting family, lovers’ trysts, and so on, which do in fact exponentially screw up and lengthen quarantines.

  30. @BenKenobi

    But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.
     
    It's a lot more than a soldier would make on a tour of duty. "Frontline workers" indeed.

    But the nurses aids do something useful.

  31. Sure, the whole Coronavirus response is rational and proportionate:

    Coronavirus: Outcry as Spanish beach sprayed with bleach

    Zahara de los Atunes, near Cadiz, used tractors to spray more than 2km (1.2 miles) of beach with a bleach solution a day before Spain allowed children out of lockdown for the first time.

    Environmentalists say the move caused “brutal damage” to the local ecosystem.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-52471208

    It’s a good thing that we have wise people in government to “Keep Us Safe” in this time of plague. The Lockdown and all the associated measures are undoubtedly “Best Practices” recommended by sage and experienced public health professionals. Did I say professionals? Sorry. I meant heroes. Nothing less than the word “Heroes” will do.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Mr. Anon, I may get jumped on but the term "heroes" is used too often now. You knew what you were in for when you signed on, and really, how often does a doctor or nurse really put their life on the line?
    , @vhrm

    Local official Agustín Conejo admitted it was "a wrong move".

    "I admit that it was a mistake, it was done with the best intention," he said.
     
    Heh, if only Newsom, Cuomo, Fauci et al would come out tomorrow and say this about the lockdown.
  32. • Replies: @Louis Renault
    I'm looking forward to the NYT article describing all the good works the LGBTQ+ charities provided over the course of the Panda Plague.
  33. @Gordo

    A solid and generous immigration program would take care of those problems.
     
    And cause far worse problems in the future.

    Cynical and suicidal would be better adjectives.

    He meant a solid wall generously paid for by Mexico. And he’s right.

  34. @Bill B.

    I am paying $15,000 monthly to on-site aides and $20,000 to nurses.
     
    That seems a lot. Am I missing something?

    A lot like Jim Rockford’s “200 a-day plus expenses” (allowing for inflation).

  35. @BenKenobi

    But would somebody who takes $15,000 to be isolated from their home and loved ones for one month take $180,000 for 12 months? One month sounds like a way to make some money, one year sounds like a way to get divorced.
     
    It's a lot more than a soldier would make on a tour of duty. "Frontline workers" indeed.

    Ben, twice I went to Columbia,SA to rebuild a blast furnace. Twelve hour days from start to finish, which is the 84 hour week in this story. Contractor paid our expenses, but in truth it was the same pay as any our rush steel mill job that worked seven twelve hour days, without expenses. The problem is you live with guys you wouldn’t want to have lunch with, let alone live with 24/7.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    It sounds like you earned every bit of your retirement, Joe.
    , @Mr McKenna
    Sort of intrigued here. Why didn't you like the guys you worked with in Colombia? They weren't the same (kind of) guys you worked with normally, or what?
  36. @Buffalo Joe
    Ben, twice I went to Columbia,SA to rebuild a blast furnace. Twelve hour days from start to finish, which is the 84 hour week in this story. Contractor paid our expenses, but in truth it was the same pay as any our rush steel mill job that worked seven twelve hour days, without expenses. The problem is you live with guys you wouldn't want to have lunch with, let alone live with 24/7.

    It sounds like you earned every bit of your retirement, Joe.

  37. @YetAnotherAnon
    Don't know about the US, but in the UK there are several grades of elderly care

    a) "sheltered housing" or "retirement living" - I imagine this is like those elderly complexes in Florida. You pretty much live your life in your own home (bought, but usually leasehold with high ongoing charges), but there are people on call if you need them, maybe a dedicated doctors surgery, hairdresser, gym etc.

    b) "care home" communal living with own rooms, full time and night staff. The staff are not medical professionals in any way, shape or form, although working there can kickstart an interest. Some elderly people without complex heath needs can live happy lives there, helps if you're the sociable type. Others are sad places where there's little interaction and people are parked in front of the TV all day, a good way to rot the brain.

    c) "Nursing home" - qualified medical staff (not all of them), people tend to have shorter life expectancy here.




    BenKenobi - 180,000 dollars for a year out of life could be very attractive to young single people. Had the offer been around when I was young and poor, I'd have gone for it like a shot. Remember you'd be locked down with other young single carers too, so a monastic existence is not inevitable.

    Yes similar here in the US to what you describe: the names I have seen for each of the categories you mention are a) Independent Living- retirement housing with minimal care 2) Assisted Living- full time on site care (level varies by resident) but usually not medically trained. There is some training certification requirements to hand out medicine and there is usually a Nurse on staff or on call but the majority of caretakers are not professionally trained and c) “skilled nursing”, “nursing home” or “memory care” have the highest level of medical involvement and nurses and also more expensive for private pay care (Medicaid have fewer and lower quality options). Also it is worth noting that “skilled nursing” care can be temporary, for instance post surgery. The 4th option is in home care which can be occasional visits to 24 hr care in the person’s home- also quite expensive. It should be noted that when the elder runs out of money and has to rely on the state the options are much more limited and not always good choices. This is all based on my personal experience with an older relative with a neurological disorder, so it may vary little across the US.

  38. @YetAnotherAnon
    Don't know about the US, but in the UK there are several grades of elderly care

    a) "sheltered housing" or "retirement living" - I imagine this is like those elderly complexes in Florida. You pretty much live your life in your own home (bought, but usually leasehold with high ongoing charges), but there are people on call if you need them, maybe a dedicated doctors surgery, hairdresser, gym etc.

    b) "care home" communal living with own rooms, full time and night staff. The staff are not medical professionals in any way, shape or form, although working there can kickstart an interest. Some elderly people without complex heath needs can live happy lives there, helps if you're the sociable type. Others are sad places where there's little interaction and people are parked in front of the TV all day, a good way to rot the brain.

    c) "Nursing home" - qualified medical staff (not all of them), people tend to have shorter life expectancy here.




    BenKenobi - 180,000 dollars for a year out of life could be very attractive to young single people. Had the offer been around when I was young and poor, I'd have gone for it like a shot. Remember you'd be locked down with other young single carers too, so a monastic existence is not inevitable.

    yet, the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week. That is POW or slave labor type numbers. I have done that for six weeks, bone aching, mind numbing.

    • Replies: @Brian Reilly
    Buff, There are expats all over world who work 12/7 for years on end. Not a lot more than 100years ago, it was that way for many, many Americans. It seems impossible to us easy-livers how long and hard everyone used to work, and how most still do. Work like that, or remain desperately impoverished. Take your choice.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week"

    Is that really correct? I'd have thought that would be very hard on the mental health and would have a lot of unwanted and dangerous secondary effects, like a carer snapping and hitting a patient - which happens sometimes even with a 40 hour week.

    Even the Victorian Brits mandated the whole of Sunday as a day of rest, following the orders of a higher authority than government. OK, it's a rest day in lockdown, but I don't see why carers couldn't drive to the hills for a walk on days off, as long as they avoided others.


    (Maybe for a 6 week job like relining a furnace, where you can see the point and there's a start and an end, but not for a year where the work is essentially the same every day)

  39. Masks dangle from rearview mirrors like testicles as American males detach their manhood to prominently signal their virtue.

    This will get them NO SEX.

    ‘Hail’ is correct: CoronaHoax is a religion.

  40. @Mr. Anon
    Sure, the whole Coronavirus response is rational and proportionate:

    Coronavirus: Outcry as Spanish beach sprayed with bleach

    Zahara de los Atunes, near Cadiz, used tractors to spray more than 2km (1.2 miles) of beach with a bleach solution a day before Spain allowed children out of lockdown for the first time.

    Environmentalists say the move caused "brutal damage" to the local ecosystem.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-52471208
     
    It's a good thing that we have wise people in government to "Keep Us Safe" in this time of plague. The Lockdown and all the associated measures are undoubtedly "Best Practices" recommended by sage and experienced public health professionals. Did I say professionals? Sorry. I meant heroes. Nothing less than the word "Heroes" will do.

    Mr. Anon, I may get jumped on but the term “heroes” is used too often now. You knew what you were in for when you signed on, and really, how often does a doctor or nurse really put their life on the line?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I may get jumped on but the term “heroes” is used too often now.
     
    Agree completely. Heroes now include school teachers and McDonalds' workers. Please.
  41. @Buffalo Joe
    Mr. Anon, I may get jumped on but the term "heroes" is used too often now. You knew what you were in for when you signed on, and really, how often does a doctor or nurse really put their life on the line?

    I may get jumped on but the term “heroes” is used too often now.

    Agree completely. Heroes now include school teachers and McDonalds’ workers. Please.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  42. I’ve suggested a modification to Ann Coulter’s proposal to “have the National Guard surround the old folks’s homes”:

    For the duration of the pandemic have the National Guard take the place of the facility staff (and of course if necessary living in the facility).

    Yes, divorce is a possibility anytime you deploy military away from home for extended periods of time.

    I’ve also proposed a number of more modest measures to protect my wife who is housed in such a facility, but until the CDC recommends measures, “corporate” will not implement them and the CDC has not been, shall way say, quite as motivated as the loved ones of those endangered by CDC’s recommendations: Can’t sue the CDC and can’t withhold funds lest you find yourself sold for a pack of cigarettes in a pen.

    Of course, there are the residual “old folks” and other vulnerable members of the population, but they can be better cared for by a population that is freed from house arrest. For instance, you need people armed with H2O2 foggers and PPE to make deliveries to those under protective sequestration. Someone’s gotta make the H2O2 foggers and PPEs. It also helps to have an economy going to supply the ERs so they can handle the resurgence that will accompany “opening up the economy”.

    • Replies: @Travis
    just give all residents Vitamin D and access to hydroxychloroquine as a prophylactic..This will reduce the risk of residents from contracting the Wahu flu.
    https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/texas-elderly-hydroxychloroquine-coronavirus-treatment-texas-city/287-7383185c-940c-4cb2-82ea-c4a5ffad3ffb
  43. @Buffalo Joe
    yet, the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week. That is POW or slave labor type numbers. I have done that for six weeks, bone aching, mind numbing.

    Buff, There are expats all over world who work 12/7 for years on end. Not a lot more than 100years ago, it was that way for many, many Americans. It seems impossible to us easy-livers how long and hard everyone used to work, and how most still do. Work like that, or remain desperately impoverished. Take your choice.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Brian, I am talking about rebuilding a Blast Furnace, total tear down, rebuild in less than two months. Not to disparage farmers whose days are often 12 hours.
  44. Real cheap quick fix that may help a lot but will require Top Down orders to get facilities to do:

    Until we get enough CV tests to test nursing home residents & workers, they should be Pulse Oximeter tested as often as possible- every other day maybe. The devices are only $30-$60 and can detect silent hypoxia which may be what kills most undetected CV victims at home or in Long term care.

  45. Re Cost: About a quarter to half of the people dying or in danger of dying are nursing home/other long term care facilities residents, depending on the state or polity. This is a case where the lockdown skeptics had a good point: They said “Why not protect the vulnerable”. Everyone else said “No that’s impossible without locking down society” But locking down society was not sufficient (or at least lockdowns the West is capable of are not sufficient). We needed to listen to the COVID skeptics good point that we do still need to Protect the Vulnerable. To a rough approximation they are a good chunk of the reason we locked down society at cost of Trillions, and due to neglect we are letting them die en-masse.

    Here is a cheap improvement: Until we get enough CV tests to test all nursing home residents & health pros weekly, they should be Pulse Oximeter tested as often as possible as a widespread standard – it should be required and recorded. Nursing homes won’t do universally do it unless it is universally required. The devices are only $50 and can detect silent hypoxia which may be what kills most undetected CV victims at home or in Long term care. Here is the NTY article steve originally posted on Pulse Oximeters: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/20/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-testing-pneumonia.html

  46. I had an idea I believe should be publicized: Until we get enough CV tests to test all nursing home residents & health pros weekly, they should be Pulse Oximeter tested as often as possible as a widespread standard – it should be required and recorded. The devices are only $50 and can detect silent hypoxia which may be what kills most undetected CV victims at home or in Long term care. Here is more on Pulse Oximeters. If a governor universally required this in some state maybe it would lower deaths there: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/20/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-testing-pneumonia.html

  47. @Buffalo Joe
    Ben, twice I went to Columbia,SA to rebuild a blast furnace. Twelve hour days from start to finish, which is the 84 hour week in this story. Contractor paid our expenses, but in truth it was the same pay as any our rush steel mill job that worked seven twelve hour days, without expenses. The problem is you live with guys you wouldn't want to have lunch with, let alone live with 24/7.

    Sort of intrigued here. Why didn’t you like the guys you worked with in Colombia? They weren’t the same (kind of) guys you worked with normally, or what?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Mr, McK, Buffalo was home to the huge Bethlehem Steel Mill, one of the world's largest. There were also a number of smaller mills. So, Buffalo became home office for two companies that specialized in refractory work, because a blast furnace (or before that open hearth furnace) is a brick cauldron surrounded by a steel shell. There were a lot of ironworkers, boilermakers,steamfitters, and most importantly bricklayers who were very good in rebuilding blast furnaces, including the heavy rigging. Columbia had a steel mill at Pas de Rio with one blast furnace, but not the trained man power for a quick turn around tear down, rebuild. Need lots of good welders,riggers and high production bricklayers. Teardown and relight in about six weeks, two twelve hour shifts, no days off. There was also a one blast furnace steel mill in Peru, Chimboti (sic), but I never went there. Now if a boilermaker was the super on the job, he took no ironworkers. If an ironworker was the job super then he took no boilermakers. Be true to your own.And the answer to your question is hard work in close quarters far from home brings out the worst in people. Can't quit and walk home.
  48. @Mr. Anon
    Sure, the whole Coronavirus response is rational and proportionate:

    Coronavirus: Outcry as Spanish beach sprayed with bleach

    Zahara de los Atunes, near Cadiz, used tractors to spray more than 2km (1.2 miles) of beach with a bleach solution a day before Spain allowed children out of lockdown for the first time.

    Environmentalists say the move caused "brutal damage" to the local ecosystem.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-52471208
     
    It's a good thing that we have wise people in government to "Keep Us Safe" in this time of plague. The Lockdown and all the associated measures are undoubtedly "Best Practices" recommended by sage and experienced public health professionals. Did I say professionals? Sorry. I meant heroes. Nothing less than the word "Heroes" will do.

    Local official Agustín Conejo admitted it was “a wrong move”.

    “I admit that it was a mistake, it was done with the best intention,” he said.

    Heh, if only Newsom, Cuomo, Fauci et al would come out tomorrow and say this about the lockdown.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Throw Trump in there. Republican or Democrat, it doesn’t matter. They’ll never admit it.

    And they won’t back off of it in the near future. Polling still shows support for lockdowns. Some places are in for a long ride. And still years from now they’ll be claiming a certain moral righteousness.
  49. Abbott has a five minute machine test if one is negative, and thirteen minute test for the positives among us.

    Stagger arrival times and test everyone each shift change.

    Establishing priorities on who get the limited tests hospitals, doctors, homes…is it beyond us?

  50. @Brian Reilly
    Buff, There are expats all over world who work 12/7 for years on end. Not a lot more than 100years ago, it was that way for many, many Americans. It seems impossible to us easy-livers how long and hard everyone used to work, and how most still do. Work like that, or remain desperately impoverished. Take your choice.

    Brian, I am talking about rebuilding a Blast Furnace, total tear down, rebuild in less than two months. Not to disparage farmers whose days are often 12 hours.

  51. @vhrm

    Local official Agustín Conejo admitted it was "a wrong move".

    "I admit that it was a mistake, it was done with the best intention," he said.
     
    Heh, if only Newsom, Cuomo, Fauci et al would come out tomorrow and say this about the lockdown.

    Throw Trump in there. Republican or Democrat, it doesn’t matter. They’ll never admit it.

    And they won’t back off of it in the near future. Polling still shows support for lockdowns. Some places are in for a long ride. And still years from now they’ll be claiming a certain moral righteousness.

  52. @Mr McKenna
    Sort of intrigued here. Why didn't you like the guys you worked with in Colombia? They weren't the same (kind of) guys you worked with normally, or what?

    Mr, McK, Buffalo was home to the huge Bethlehem Steel Mill, one of the world’s largest. There were also a number of smaller mills. So, Buffalo became home office for two companies that specialized in refractory work, because a blast furnace (or before that open hearth furnace) is a brick cauldron surrounded by a steel shell. There were a lot of ironworkers, boilermakers,steamfitters, and most importantly bricklayers who were very good in rebuilding blast furnaces, including the heavy rigging. Columbia had a steel mill at Pas de Rio with one blast furnace, but not the trained man power for a quick turn around tear down, rebuild. Need lots of good welders,riggers and high production bricklayers. Teardown and relight in about six weeks, two twelve hour shifts, no days off. There was also a one blast furnace steel mill in Peru, Chimboti (sic), but I never went there. Now if a boilermaker was the super on the job, he took no ironworkers. If an ironworker was the job super then he took no boilermakers. Be true to your own.And the answer to your question is hard work in close quarters far from home brings out the worst in people. Can’t quit and walk home.

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Dissident

    So, Buffalo became home office for two companies that specialized in refractory work, because a blast furnace (or before that open hearth furnace) is a brick cauldron surrounded by a steel shell. There were a lot of ironworkers, boilermakers,steamfitters, and most importantly bricklayers who were very good in rebuilding blast furnaces, including the heavy rigging. Columbia had a steel mill at Pas de Rio with one blast furnace, but not the trained man power for a quick turn around tear down, rebuild. Need lots of good welders,riggers and high production bricklayers. Teardown and relight in about six weeks, two twelve hour shifts, no days off.
     
    These accounts of yours here remind me of one of the colorful stories that the late raconteur Jean Shepherd was famous for telling. Unfortunately, I cannot remember the title or enough other info to facilitate finding a link to it with any ease.
  53. @Polynikes
    104 Billion is child's play these days. We just shelled out a few Trillion dollars. And there's more on the way!

    Yes, had everyone kept their collective minds we could've spent a fraction of that money to protect the vulnerable while allowing everyone else to go about their way for the most part. The economy would have still suffered as things like tourism, sports, and concerts (anything with thousands of people indoors for hours at a time would still seem like a sensible thing, to me, to restrict initially) dramatically scaled back for a few months. But the bulk of economic activity could have carried. And we could have saved ourselves the embarrassment of readily submitting ourselves to authoritariansim-style governance in a panic-laced stupor of insanity.

    But, but, we would have missed out on Great Game III!!

  54. @Reg Cæsar

    I’m looking forward to the NYT article describing all the good works the LGBTQ+ charities provided over the course of the Panda Plague.

  55. @Buffalo Joe
    yet, the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week. That is POW or slave labor type numbers. I have done that for six weeks, bone aching, mind numbing.

    “the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week”

    Is that really correct? I’d have thought that would be very hard on the mental health and would have a lot of unwanted and dangerous secondary effects, like a carer snapping and hitting a patient – which happens sometimes even with a 40 hour week.

    Even the Victorian Brits mandated the whole of Sunday as a day of rest, following the orders of a higher authority than government. OK, it’s a rest day in lockdown, but I don’t see why carers couldn’t drive to the hills for a walk on days off, as long as they avoided others.

    (Maybe for a 6 week job like relining a furnace, where you can see the point and there’s a start and an end, but not for a year where the work is essentially the same every day)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The 43 factory workers in Pennsylvania worked 4 straight 84 hour weeks while locked in. But then they went home.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Yet Amother, A friend of mine was a millwright at the now shuttered local American Axle plant. Worked 10 to 12 hour shifts, with two Sundays off a month. But, when you were not installing equipment you basically waited for a break down in your assigned area, not plant wide. So lots of time with nothing to do.
  56. @YetAnotherAnon
    "the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week"

    Is that really correct? I'd have thought that would be very hard on the mental health and would have a lot of unwanted and dangerous secondary effects, like a carer snapping and hitting a patient - which happens sometimes even with a 40 hour week.

    Even the Victorian Brits mandated the whole of Sunday as a day of rest, following the orders of a higher authority than government. OK, it's a rest day in lockdown, but I don't see why carers couldn't drive to the hills for a walk on days off, as long as they avoided others.


    (Maybe for a 6 week job like relining a furnace, where you can see the point and there's a start and an end, but not for a year where the work is essentially the same every day)

    The 43 factory workers in Pennsylvania worked 4 straight 84 hour weeks while locked in. But then they went home.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    PeopleMen can put up with a lot of crap if they know there is a light at the end of the tunnel.
  57. @Steve Sailer
    The 43 factory workers in Pennsylvania worked 4 straight 84 hour weeks while locked in. But then they went home.

    PeopleMen can put up with a lot of crap if they know there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

  58. @YetAnotherAnon
    "the $180000 is only obtainable if you work for a full year, 12 hours per day, seven days a week"

    Is that really correct? I'd have thought that would be very hard on the mental health and would have a lot of unwanted and dangerous secondary effects, like a carer snapping and hitting a patient - which happens sometimes even with a 40 hour week.

    Even the Victorian Brits mandated the whole of Sunday as a day of rest, following the orders of a higher authority than government. OK, it's a rest day in lockdown, but I don't see why carers couldn't drive to the hills for a walk on days off, as long as they avoided others.


    (Maybe for a 6 week job like relining a furnace, where you can see the point and there's a start and an end, but not for a year where the work is essentially the same every day)

    Yet Amother, A friend of mine was a millwright at the now shuttered local American Axle plant. Worked 10 to 12 hour shifts, with two Sundays off a month. But, when you were not installing equipment you basically waited for a break down in your assigned area, not plant wide. So lots of time with nothing to do.

  59. @Buffalo Joe
    Mr, McK, Buffalo was home to the huge Bethlehem Steel Mill, one of the world's largest. There were also a number of smaller mills. So, Buffalo became home office for two companies that specialized in refractory work, because a blast furnace (or before that open hearth furnace) is a brick cauldron surrounded by a steel shell. There were a lot of ironworkers, boilermakers,steamfitters, and most importantly bricklayers who were very good in rebuilding blast furnaces, including the heavy rigging. Columbia had a steel mill at Pas de Rio with one blast furnace, but not the trained man power for a quick turn around tear down, rebuild. Need lots of good welders,riggers and high production bricklayers. Teardown and relight in about six weeks, two twelve hour shifts, no days off. There was also a one blast furnace steel mill in Peru, Chimboti (sic), but I never went there. Now if a boilermaker was the super on the job, he took no ironworkers. If an ironworker was the job super then he took no boilermakers. Be true to your own.And the answer to your question is hard work in close quarters far from home brings out the worst in people. Can't quit and walk home.

    So, Buffalo became home office for two companies that specialized in refractory work, because a blast furnace (or before that open hearth furnace) is a brick cauldron surrounded by a steel shell. There were a lot of ironworkers, boilermakers,steamfitters, and most importantly bricklayers who were very good in rebuilding blast furnaces, including the heavy rigging. Columbia had a steel mill at Pas de Rio with one blast furnace, but not the trained man power for a quick turn around tear down, rebuild. Need lots of good welders,riggers and high production bricklayers. Teardown and relight in about six weeks, two twelve hour shifts, no days off.

    These accounts of yours here remind me of one of the colorful stories that the late raconteur Jean Shepherd was famous for telling. Unfortunately, I cannot remember the title or enough other info to facilitate finding a link to it with any ease.

  60. Diss, thank you, that’s a compliment I think.

  61. @James Bowery
    I've suggested a modification to Ann Coulter's proposal to "have the National Guard surround the old folks's homes":

    For the duration of the pandemic have the National Guard take the place of the facility staff (and of course if necessary living in the facility).

    Yes, divorce is a possibility anytime you deploy military away from home for extended periods of time.

    I've also proposed a number of more modest measures to protect my wife who is housed in such a facility, but until the CDC recommends measures, "corporate" will not implement them and the CDC has not been, shall way say, quite as motivated as the loved ones of those endangered by CDC's recommendations: Can't sue the CDC and can't withhold funds lest you find yourself sold for a pack of cigarettes in a pen.

    Of course, there are the residual "old folks" and other vulnerable members of the population, but they can be better cared for by a population that is freed from house arrest. For instance, you need people armed with H2O2 foggers and PPE to make deliveries to those under protective sequestration. Someone's gotta make the H2O2 foggers and PPEs. It also helps to have an economy going to supply the ERs so they can handle the resurgence that will accompany "opening up the economy".

    just give all residents Vitamin D and access to hydroxychloroquine as a prophylactic..This will reduce the risk of residents from contracting the Wahu flu.
    https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/texas-elderly-hydroxychloroquine-coronavirus-treatment-texas-city/287-7383185c-940c-4cb2-82ea-c4a5ffad3ffb

  62. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    One authority believes that the rollout of the 5G cell network-which, she implies, is protected by the Official Secrets Act in Formerly Great Britain-is somehow connected to the coronavirus outbreak:

    I’m not sure if her camera setup is using an optimum focal length lens. Perhaps I should offer to cobble up an industrial CCD camera with a C-mount to some old lens pulled off a retired folding camera for her.

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