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The Continuing Misadventures of Stereotype Threat
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Since the 1990s, “stereotype threat” — the assertion that the reason politically privileged groups score worse on high stakes tests is because they perversely make themselves live down to pernicious stereotypes — has been far more popular than vindicated by evidence from low stakes tests. It’s easy to get papers upholding stereotype threat published, while the many failed replications tend to be tossed into the circular file.

From Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin in 2018:

Cardiovascular and Self-Regulatory Consequences of SES-Based Social Identity Threat
September 2018 Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 45(5):014616721879515
DOI: 10.1177/0146167218795157
Authors:
Abdiel J. Flores
15.18Columbia University
Tanya A. Chavez
Niall Bolger
38.32Columbia University
Bettina Casad
22.12University of Missouri – St. Louis

This work examined the effects of socioeconomic status (SES)-based social identity threat on cardiovascular indexes of challenge and threat and self-regulatory strength. Participants (N = 104) took an exam described as either diagnostic of intellectual ability (identity threat) or framed as a problem-solving task (control) while we recorded cardiovascular reactivity and assessed participants’ physical self-control. Under identity threat, lower SES students exhibited impaired performance, reduced self-control, and cardiovascular threat reactivity. In contrast, higher SES students under threat exhibited the reverse pattern—a boost in performance, no change in self-regulation, and cardiovascular challenge reactivity. Furthermore, while measures of general arousal (heart rate and pre-ejection period) were unrelated to performance, cardiovascular patterns of challenge and threat were significantly associated with performance under identity threat. Results provide evidence that SES-based stigma influences physiological and self-regulatory processes.

From Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin in 2020:

Retraction Notice
First Published November 13, 2020 Correction

The editor and the authors agreed to retract the following article:

Flores AJ, Chavez TA, Bolger N, Casad BJ. Cardiovascular and Self-Regulatory Consequences of SES-Based Social Identity Threat. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2019;45(5):700-714. Original doi:10.1177/0146167218795157.

This article is being retracted at the request of all of the authors. The first author of the paper, Abdiel J. Flores, contacted the journal on his own initiative to inform it that he falsified data in the paper. He altered specific data values in Figures 1 and 2 and associated analyses that resulted in incorrect and misleading results on the effects of SES identity threat on cardiovascular challenge/threat reactivity and on mathematics performance. Because this data manipulation invalidates the findings, the entire article is being retracted. Mr. Flores informed the journal that he takes full responsibility for alteration of data; none of the co-authors participated in or had knowledge of the first author’s actions. Mr. Flores self-reported this matter to his institution, Columbia University, which is handling it in accordance with institutional policy and procedure.

 
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  1. Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What’s the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    • Replies: @eee
    @nglaer

    Probably got busted on some other academic fraud and is now copping to it all. You can ask him: https://twitter.com/AbdielJFlores

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @bigdicknick, @Kronos

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @nglaer


    Sounds like it might be worth a novel.
     
    Or at least a short article in the NYT, right? Not holding our breath are we?
    , @Gordo
    @nglaer


    Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What’s the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.
     
    At a guess he was caught and told to fess up or be informed on.

    I doubt it was a matter of conscience.
  2. Social psychology is a pseudoscience. Very few studies replicate, one of the exceptions being stereotype accuracy and yet social psychologists and their textbooks claim otherwise because stereotypes are bad. A bizarre field of study.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @eee


    Very few studies replicate
     
    We don't need "studies" to replicate. We need each other to.

    OT (kinda)-- Coincidence? Catch the name of the coffeehouse that shares an address with Dominion Voting Systems' HQ:



    https://commercialofficeleasing.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/215_Spadina_Exterior1-1024x683.jpg
    , @Not Raul
    @eee

    A lot of what passes for Social Psychology in the media is what researchers in the field used to believe a decade or more ago. It's not news to people in the field that a lot of what they used to believe has been discredited.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022103109001206?via%3Dihub

    Unfortunately, the discredited stuff still shows up in Education Departments, and Cultural Studies Departments, since it's politically correct.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @eee

    You'd think they would know by now that any social science study that isn't pre-registered is presumptively garbage.

    But then again, pre-registration is no defense to outright fraud.

  3. @nglaer
    Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What's the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    Replies: @eee, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Gordo

    Probably got busted on some other academic fraud and is now copping to it all. You can ask him: https://twitter.com/AbdielJFlores

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Change that Matters
    @eee

    Thanks for the link (here's an archived version in case it's locked at some point). He's a sodomite from Mexico who received his permanent resident card earlier this year. Of course the poor darling is also exhausted. Which is why Flores will be able to no doubt spin this as another example of white "science" victimizing Wetsods. Prediction: he'll be awarded his PhD and a fat grant in no time flat.

    , @bigdicknick
    @eee

    was going to say he probably had been caught....similar to when CEOs "resign" from their job when the company is tanking.

    , @Kronos
    @eee

    The Academic Integrity Investigation Force (AIIF) is closing in!

    https://pics.me.me/sherlock-holmes-and-the-case-ofthe-missing-chromosomes-imgflip-com-down-54083890.png

  4. like the Stanford Prison Experiment, i’m beginning to think the majority of these findings are just leftist BS that got traction and were perpetuated for decades.

    when you really, really go down the rabbit hole, how much of history over the last 100 years is just pure leftist BS lies and propaganda? a lot of it, it seems now. the Statue Of Immigration is a lie. Rosa Parks was a setup. MLK was a communist and hated America. it goes on and on.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @prime noticer

    Fortunately for us, King's daughter is doing a great job of ripping the mask off of her father's false legacy.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/BerniceKing/status/1299340664409395202

    , @ben tillman
    @prime noticer

    And it goes back a lot further than 100 years, all the way to Charles . . . and presumably beyond that.

  5. • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Robert Dolan

    I'm sure I would have enjoyed my one Humble Pie concert, but was rendered deaf by the opening act -- Black Oak Arkansas.

  6. Somewhat off topic, but speaking of stereotypes, isn’t it about time that the media stop reporting that every thuggish black teen who gets shot was “an aspiring rapper”? Because it’s become a laugh line. As precedent, recall that before his death, Trayvon Martin purchased Skittles and an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail. That watermelon part was just too painfully stereotypical for the media, so they called it Arizona Iced Tea. Maybe the media needs to similarly deep six the term “aspiring rapper.”

    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Harry Baldwin

    Before this latest utterly innocent Afro-cherub pavement prince was wantonly exterminated by the vast rightwing conspiracy lurking unchecked in the otherwise pristine cities of America, he was a perspiring jogger.

    , @Mokiki
    @Harry Baldwin

    Search for "purple drank Trayvon Martin".

    , @Known Fact
    @Harry Baldwin

    That's not entirely fair -- many of them are also looking forward to college and med school

    , @Goob
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Expiring raper" more apt.

  7. Hi Steve!

    Thank you for bringing Abdiel J. Flores to our attention!

    With Georgia on our minds (ha! ha!), he’s just the kind of guy we want…

    Can you pass on his contact details to our HR people please.

    Thanks.

    Yours,

    Democratic National Committee

    PS: With the Dems, you don’t have to worry about the Stereotype! Just the Threat….

  8. Ph.D. candidate Abdiel J. Flores was no doubt under the stress of stereotype threat, his cardiovascular reactivity high, when he faked his data. It is our fault. We failed him.

    As he retweets:

    “Equity isn’t just offering students equal access to support; it means tailoring our support based on each student’s needs.”

    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores can stop faking data. Or we should just give them their Ph.D.s and not force them to practice White Science methodology to earn their titles.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Buzz Mohawk

    He's def a piece of work

    https://mobile.twitter.com/AbdielJFlores/status/1318206983460225025

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores ...
     
    I'll give future Professor Flores some equity from my house, as a personal HELOC or something. I'm just telling you all ahead of time, though, that my rates are, let's just say, nothing like the Federal Reserve overnight discount rates. My loan officer is a guy named Vito.

    We know dis guy is gonna pay though. He's goin' places. Just look at that abstract. The guy is so smart, I can't make heads or tails outta it.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Buzz Mohawk

    When the article referred to him as Mr. Flores (rather than Dr.) I thought they were just being modest and not using the Dr. honorific since everyone is assumed to have a Ph.D. Well it turns out he is merely a doctoral candidate rather than an actual Ph.D. I would dare say this is going to gum up the works,

  9. “ Columbia University, which is handling it in accordance with institutional policy and procedure”
    That means what; he is being promoted to head of the psychology department as a reward for his ideological fervor?

    • Agree: Trelane
  10. @prime noticer
    like the Stanford Prison Experiment, i'm beginning to think the majority of these findings are just leftist BS that got traction and were perpetuated for decades.

    when you really, really go down the rabbit hole, how much of history over the last 100 years is just pure leftist BS lies and propaganda? a lot of it, it seems now. the Statue Of Immigration is a lie. Rosa Parks was a setup. MLK was a communist and hated America. it goes on and on.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @ben tillman

    Fortunately for us, King’s daughter is doing a great job of ripping the mask off of her father’s false legacy.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/BerniceKing/status/1299340664409395202

  11. @Buzz Mohawk
    Ph.D. candidate Abdiel J. Flores was no doubt under the stress of stereotype threat, his cardiovascular reactivity high, when he faked his data. It is our fault. We failed him.

    As he retweets:

    “Equity isn’t just offering students equal access to support; it means tailoring our support based on each student’s needs.”

    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores can stop faking data. Or we should just give them their Ph.D.s and not force them to practice White Science methodology to earn their titles.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Achmed E. Newman, @ScarletNumber

  12. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:

    Chapter 30 of Russell Warne’s “In the Know” goes into stereotype threat in detail. It’s been decisively debunked for girls and math. There are four or five large sample size studies on blacks and tests that will probably be the final nails in the coffin for that. Amazingly all the studies until now have had sample sizes around 50, about 1 percent of what you really need.

    Warne is amazingly amazingly charitable towards the concept, “plausible, but unproven.” The strength of his book, as with Charles Murray’s book from last January, is that he doesn’t exaggerate or extrapolate from what “the science” has shown. He’s very conservative in his debunking. On the other hand, his bibliography and notes include Unz.com (James Thompson), Quillette, Lynne, and other sources that bring cancellation risk. Warne’s a young guy with four young kids, I think with tenure, but at a small Utah college. He’s very courageous.

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Anon

    He’s probably safe at Utah Valley University. That’s a place that cultivates close relationships with the state’s pro corporation legislators. It also serves as a training ground for kids whose scores weren’t high enough to get into nearby BYU—a feat more difficult than it seems since most pious Mormons want to go there.

    But yes in this environment stating that the sky is blue is an act of courage, if BLM and Trans-America deem the color blue to be bigoted.

    , @anon
    @Anon

    Amazingly all the studies until now have had sample sizes around 50, about 1 percent of what you really need.

    Those small sample N's are a red flag for any real science, because the Confidence Interval for some statistics can exceed the N thus rendering all results without any meaning. It's so wrong it is not even wrong.

    Medical research works with such sizes because of necessity and the error problems are known. Social "science" does not have the same limitations or restrictions.

    Junk science such as this is a major factor in the replication crisis.

  13. From the original article’s abstract:

    “Under identity threat, lower SES students exhibited impaired performance, reduced self-control…”

    Hey, Sr. Flores is already 2 for 3!

    “…and cardiovascular threat reactivity.”

    If we knew his heart rate at the precise time he sent in the falsified data, he could be batting 1.000.

  14. @eee
    @nglaer

    Probably got busted on some other academic fraud and is now copping to it all. You can ask him: https://twitter.com/AbdielJFlores

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @bigdicknick, @Kronos

    Thanks for the link (here’s an archived version in case it’s locked at some point). He’s a sodomite from Mexico who received his permanent resident card earlier this year. Of course the poor darling is also exhausted. Which is why Flores will be able to no doubt spin this as another example of white “science” victimizing Wetsods. Prediction: he’ll be awarded his PhD and a fat grant in no time flat.

  15. Since the 1990s, “stereotype threat”

    1. Which stereotype fits blacks better?

    A. Work
    B. Crime

    2. What did they do on the plantations for centuries?

    A. Work
    B. Poison the food

    You’d think answers consistent to both might anger the woke, the PC, the of-colour. Bizarrely, though, it’s the Fire Eaters and WNs who go ballistic in the comments here. Even then, only Corvinus has explicitly answered “A” to #2, and even he had to admit, only under threat of torture.

    But it’s just choosing to use Occam’s switchblade rather than his frosting applicator.

    The “Good Negro” stereotype dies hard. Especially among whites.

    • Replies: @jb
    @Reg Cæsar

    Could you be a little more clear here? I may have gotten this backwards, but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn't work, that their masters (who should all be dead, because they were poisoned) were totally blind, and that the cotton those masters got rich off of somehow picked itself and sent itself off to market. If that's what you are saying then it is truly unhelpful!

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

  16. @Buzz Mohawk
    Ph.D. candidate Abdiel J. Flores was no doubt under the stress of stereotype threat, his cardiovascular reactivity high, when he faked his data. It is our fault. We failed him.

    As he retweets:

    “Equity isn’t just offering students equal access to support; it means tailoring our support based on each student’s needs.”

    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores can stop faking data. Or we should just give them their Ph.D.s and not force them to practice White Science methodology to earn their titles.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Achmed E. Newman, @ScarletNumber

    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores …

    I’ll give future Professor Flores some equity from my house, as a personal HELOC or something. I’m just telling you all ahead of time, though, that my rates are, let’s just say, nothing like the Federal Reserve overnight discount rates. My loan officer is a guy named Vito.

    We know dis guy is gonna pay though. He’s goin’ places. Just look at that abstract. The guy is so smart, I can’t make heads or tails outta it.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I used to know a man from Romania who had done some loan sharking on the side there. (He was neither a relative nor a friend. Believe it or not, he actually worked in a nearby office at the time.) He openly told me and others in the room how he and some "friends" would lend money to people and then take their stuff, by force if necessary, when they couldn't pay it back.

    It sounded like to him it was just a normal side business that he did when he was younger. He seemed to think it was funny. Clearly he had no idea what it sounded like to us.

    Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Gordo, @Peter D. Bredon

  17. • Replies: @black sea
    @MEH 0910

    So it seems that people who love New York should be given a wide berth.

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @MEH 0910

    Why on earth did the police pursue this single assault case? You and I know it's because of white privilege. Actually it's a couple other kinds of privilege but I so want to get published.

  18. @Harry Baldwin
    Somewhat off topic, but speaking of stereotypes, isn't it about time that the media stop reporting that every thuggish black teen who gets shot was "an aspiring rapper"? Because it's become a laugh line. As precedent, recall that before his death, Trayvon Martin purchased Skittles and an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail. That watermelon part was just too painfully stereotypical for the media, so they called it Arizona Iced Tea. Maybe the media needs to similarly deep six the term "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Mokiki, @Known Fact, @Goob

    Before this latest utterly innocent Afro-cherub pavement prince was wantonly exterminated by the vast rightwing conspiracy lurking unchecked in the otherwise pristine cities of America, he was a perspiring jogger.

  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores ...
     
    I'll give future Professor Flores some equity from my house, as a personal HELOC or something. I'm just telling you all ahead of time, though, that my rates are, let's just say, nothing like the Federal Reserve overnight discount rates. My loan officer is a guy named Vito.

    We know dis guy is gonna pay though. He's goin' places. Just look at that abstract. The guy is so smart, I can't make heads or tails outta it.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I used to know a man from Romania who had done some loan sharking on the side there. (He was neither a relative nor a friend. Believe it or not, he actually worked in a nearby office at the time.) He openly told me and others in the room how he and some “friends” would lend money to people and then take their stuff, by force if necessary, when they couldn’t pay it back.

    It sounded like to him it was just a normal side business that he did when he was younger. He seemed to think it was funny. Clearly he had no idea what it sounded like to us.

    Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that's how "high trust" they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the "high trust" in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever "high trust" US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don't-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official "high trust" narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn't go to the police when one of their customers didn't pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn't extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO - anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don't pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it's therefore fine by me.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave

    , @Gordo
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.
     
    Our former 'hard left' Justice Secretary in UK, Jack Straw, did something similar.
    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket."

    Nonsense. Regulations are simply the way moochers and second-handers impede muh Market! (A. Rand). As for "high trust society," don't you know that "There is no society" (M. Thatcher).

  20. @eee
    Social psychology is a pseudoscience. Very few studies replicate, one of the exceptions being stereotype accuracy and yet social psychologists and their textbooks claim otherwise because stereotypes are bad. A bizarre field of study.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Not Raul, @Hypnotoad666

    Very few studies replicate

    We don’t need “studies” to replicate. We need each other to.

    OT (kinda)– Coincidence? Catch the name of the coffeehouse that shares an address with Dominion Voting Systems’ HQ:

  21. OT: Beatings and intimidation of Trump supporters by BLM, antifa and others is already on the rise, and “President-elect” Joe Biden is still sleeping in his basement. Will he emerge and ask his shock troops to return to the woodwork from whence they came? Will they ignore him, and pillage Apple stores in search of the newest phones, so as to capture better quality video of looting and arson for social media?

  22. OT: News reports indicate that retired Colonel Doug Macgregor has been chosen as senior advisor by the new Sec Def. As the story notes:

    President Trump’s newly installed acting Pentagon chief is bringing on a senior adviser in a sign the administration wants to accelerate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Middle East before the end of his presidency in January, three people familiar with the move told Axios.

    Assuming Biden pulls off the coup, there will be limits to how much Macgregor can accomplish. However, Trump does have two more months in office.

    And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.

    For anyone unfamiliar with Macgregor, he was one of the few patriots among the military brass and has appeared numerous times on Tucker.

    We are still in the early stages of defending the Republic, everyone. No matter what happens in the next few weeks or months, it is going to take years to defeat the Left and restore the Republic:

    These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    https://twitter.com/KFILE/status/1327353832955895809

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @PhysicistDave, @Neoconned

    , @Whiskey
    @PhysicistDave

    Oh please nagger. America is dead as a Norwegian Gray Parrot.

    What is slouching towards Bethlehem (PA) is a rough beast its hour come at last. Forget all that bs Christianity. Wotan laughs last. HE has a whole bunch of demands. And like Conan's "Crom" god, has a taste for blood.

    Really, what does Christianity offer the average White man after he's survived the camps to come? Really?

    Wotan has an answer.

    Replies: @Neoconned

    , @James O'Meara
    @PhysicistDave

    "And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt."

    If that's even remotely true, it proves Trump is even stupider than he has seemed. You know, for all the (legitimate) harping on Sleepy Joe's infirmities, if Trump is only now "starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted," I would assume he's the one needing a pair of Depends and his wife's guiding hands to get through the day.

    I guess the "4D chess" stuff got old, but rather than admit he was a Zionist tool all along, you'd rather portraying him now as a simpleton.

    Speaking of which, the talk about money-lending up thread might be a useful angle to pursue re: Why does Trump do what he does?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @PhysicistDave

    Correct me if I'm wrong, Sidney, but there aren't judicial appointments. Anyone Trump appoints will be out on his ass the afternoon of January 12th.

    Another Trumcomplishment! Winning!

  23. @eee
    @nglaer

    Probably got busted on some other academic fraud and is now copping to it all. You can ask him: https://twitter.com/AbdielJFlores

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @bigdicknick, @Kronos

    was going to say he probably had been caught….similar to when CEOs “resign” from their job when the company is tanking.

  24. @PhysicistDave
    OT: News reports indicate that retired Colonel Doug Macgregor has been chosen as senior advisor by the new Sec Def. As the story notes:

    President Trump's newly installed acting Pentagon chief is bringing on a senior adviser in a sign the administration wants to accelerate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Middle East before the end of his presidency in January, three people familiar with the move told Axios.
     
    Assuming Biden pulls off the coup, there will be limits to how much Macgregor can accomplish. However, Trump does have two more months in office.

    And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.

    For anyone unfamiliar with Macgregor, he was one of the few patriots among the military brass and has appeared numerous times on Tucker.

    We are still in the early stages of defending the Republic, everyone. No matter what happens in the next few weeks or months, it is going to take years to defeat the Left and restore the Republic:

    These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Anonymous

    If you can't trust a man with a name like Kaczynski to be objective about history, who can you trust?

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    You can see why Trump only appointed Macgregor after the election. And why Macgregor, who has a reputation for being very bright, never made it beyond colonel.

    For the record, neither I, nor I am sure Colonel Macgregor, hates Israel or wishes Hitler had won. I have known several Israelis and found them to be decent people. If I were forced to live in the Mideast, I would rather live in Israel than in most of the Arab countries (perhaps some of the oil sheikdoms might be more or less livable?).

    But the Palestinians have gotten a raw deal, and I do not see why it is the job of the US to bail Israel out of that very nasty neighborhood we call the "Mideast." (Was it Sailer who suggested that the Israelis just buy Baja and move to a much nicer locale?)

    And, while Hitler was a truly insane, genocidal monster, I do not see why Americans needed to die to save Stalin from Hitler. (If the goal was to save the Jews, well, we didn't.)

    So, Macgregor's views are eminently defensible intellectually. But it still took guts for Trump to bring him into the fold.

    Replies: @Nachum

    , @Neoconned
    @Anonymous

    I'm generally pro Israel and being raised a Southern Baptist I'll proudly admit to being a Christian Zionist.

    All that said I've had enough of the Islamic World & the ME in particular.....and not 1 drop of American blood, Christian or otherwise.....should be spilled in that wasteland in the name of whatever folly American technocrats and functionaries can cough up to stay there....

    I support Israel and their nuke capabilities.....because Lord have mercy they'll need it going forward. I dunno what the future holds in that region but i do know this "country" won't be much of a country in 20 odd yrs unless it becomes a HIGHLY segregated Brazil like entity armed to the teeth and always on edge.....

    Israel can and should defend itself but furthermore after this they have our blessing but militarily they are on their own.

    Replies: @Nachum

  25. @PhysicistDave
    OT: News reports indicate that retired Colonel Doug Macgregor has been chosen as senior advisor by the new Sec Def. As the story notes:

    President Trump's newly installed acting Pentagon chief is bringing on a senior adviser in a sign the administration wants to accelerate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Middle East before the end of his presidency in January, three people familiar with the move told Axios.
     
    Assuming Biden pulls off the coup, there will be limits to how much Macgregor can accomplish. However, Trump does have two more months in office.

    And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.

    For anyone unfamiliar with Macgregor, he was one of the few patriots among the military brass and has appeared numerous times on Tucker.

    We are still in the early stages of defending the Republic, everyone. No matter what happens in the next few weeks or months, it is going to take years to defeat the Left and restore the Republic:

    These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    Oh please nagger. America is dead as a Norwegian Gray Parrot.

    What is slouching towards Bethlehem (PA) is a rough beast its hour come at last. Forget all that bs Christianity. Wotan laughs last. HE has a whole bunch of demands. And like Conan’s “Crom” god, has a taste for blood.

    Really, what does Christianity offer the average White man after he’s survived the camps to come? Really?

    Wotan has an answer.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Whiskey

    Are you saying PhysicistDave is 1 of those Odin WN nuts?

  26. @eee
    @nglaer

    Probably got busted on some other academic fraud and is now copping to it all. You can ask him: https://twitter.com/AbdielJFlores

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @bigdicknick, @Kronos

    The Academic Integrity Investigation Force (AIIF) is closing in!

  27. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1327751486705709057

    Replies: @black sea, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    So it seems that people who love New York should be given a wide berth.

  28. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I used to know a man from Romania who had done some loan sharking on the side there. (He was neither a relative nor a friend. Believe it or not, he actually worked in a nearby office at the time.) He openly told me and others in the room how he and some "friends" would lend money to people and then take their stuff, by force if necessary, when they couldn't pay it back.

    It sounded like to him it was just a normal side business that he did when he was younger. He seemed to think it was funny. Clearly he had no idea what it sounded like to us.

    Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Gordo, @Peter D. Bredon

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that’s how “high trust” they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the “high trust” in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever “high trust” US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don’t-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official “high trust” narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn’t go to the police when one of their customers didn’t pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn’t extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO – anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don’t pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it’s therefore fine by me.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the “high trust” in America was a facade.
     
    Your 'experience' is anecdotal, irrelevant, and fifty years out of date.

    You have no idea what America was like, and frankly you don't care.

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Romania has a 13% African population?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    The commenter doth protest too much, methinks.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Dacian Julien Soros wrote:


    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don’t-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms.
     
    That America actually existed in the early 1960s, even in big Eastern industrial cities. I know: I lived it.

    I grew up in an inner suburb of Saint Louis, within a long walk of the city limits, lower-middle-class/working-class community. It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized.

    We were supposed to put our bikes away every night, but we often forgot and left them on the front lawn. Never stolen.

    To get into our house, you just had to give our garage door a hard rap to get it open. And the door from the garage into the house just used a "skeleton key." Hey, it was America.

    To be sure, by the early '60s, you did not take a stroll in the black parts of town. But, in the late 1940s, when my mom was an adolescent, adolescent white girls freely used mass transit (electric streetcars) to go wherever they wanted around town on their own. No one worried. It was America.

    People do not know what we have lost.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

  29. @nglaer
    Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What's the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    Replies: @eee, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Gordo

    Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    Or at least a short article in the NYT, right? Not holding our breath are we?

  30. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1327751486705709057

    Replies: @black sea, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Why on earth did the police pursue this single assault case? You and I know it’s because of white privilege. Actually it’s a couple other kinds of privilege but I so want to get published.

  31. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that's how "high trust" they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the "high trust" in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever "high trust" US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don't-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official "high trust" narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn't go to the police when one of their customers didn't pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn't extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO - anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don't pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it's therefore fine by me.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave

    In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the “high trust” in America was a facade.

    Your ‘experience’ is anecdotal, irrelevant, and fifty years out of date.

    You have no idea what America was like, and frankly you don’t care.

  32. In Freakonomics, there’s a case of a black man naming his two sons Winner and Loser. Winner ends up being the serial foulup while Loser’s life is one success after another.

  33. @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    https://twitter.com/KFILE/status/1327353832955895809

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @PhysicistDave, @Neoconned

    If you can’t trust a man with a name like Kaczynski to be objective about history, who can you trust?

  34. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that's how "high trust" they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the "high trust" in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever "high trust" US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don't-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official "high trust" narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn't go to the police when one of their customers didn't pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn't extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO - anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don't pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it's therefore fine by me.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave

    Romania has a 13% African population?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Redneck farmer

    LOL, They have gypsies, who commonly steal and beg.

    My colleague was a real Romanian from a well-to-do family that owned a nice business in one of their major cities. His wife was a doctor.

    We were bankers, and it was funny for us to listen to him describe what he had done. We wrote loans at single-digit interest rates for borrowers we had carefully determined could pay us back and who had histories of paying back loans. We earned honest returns on our investments, and we endeavored to follow the laws and do no harm.

    What he described, on the other hand, was real loan sharking. He and his previous "colleagues" deliberately lent money at exorbitant rates to people they expected not to pay it back. When that inevitably happened, they had an excuse to bust down the borrower's door, rough them up and take anything and everything they wanted from the premises.

    They weren't just repossessing or collecting on a debt, they were taking everything they could from the suckers -- and getting away with it.

    We have loansharking in the US too. It is even institutionalized by our credit card companies. (And as I reminded, Joe Biden helped pass laws that enabled those companies to get away with it.)

    The Dacian commenter was touched off by my use of the term "high-trust societies." He need not have been, because I was not impugning his country. I was thinking of communities like every one I have lived in, coast-to-coast, across the United States. I was not implying that our whole country is high-trust everywhere and that his is nowhere. He may very well live in a high-trust pocket.

    However, here is just one, little anecdote among many that are quite revealing: When my wife's parents first visited us from their nice city in Romania (where we ourselves have an apartment) they were surprised to see that I kept my gas grill outside behind the house, because they thought somebody would steal it. They lived in a perfectly normal place in their country, but no one would ever think of being as trusting as I was in that way, because they could not.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  35. @eee
    Social psychology is a pseudoscience. Very few studies replicate, one of the exceptions being stereotype accuracy and yet social psychologists and their textbooks claim otherwise because stereotypes are bad. A bizarre field of study.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Not Raul, @Hypnotoad666

    A lot of what passes for Social Psychology in the media is what researchers in the field used to believe a decade or more ago. It’s not news to people in the field that a lot of what they used to believe has been discredited.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022103109001206?via%3Dihub

    Unfortunately, the discredited stuff still shows up in Education Departments, and Cultural Studies Departments, since it’s politically correct.

  36. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I used to know a man from Romania who had done some loan sharking on the side there. (He was neither a relative nor a friend. Believe it or not, he actually worked in a nearby office at the time.) He openly told me and others in the room how he and some "friends" would lend money to people and then take their stuff, by force if necessary, when they couldn't pay it back.

    It sounded like to him it was just a normal side business that he did when he was younger. He seemed to think it was funny. Clearly he had no idea what it sounded like to us.

    Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Gordo, @Peter D. Bredon

    I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    Our former ‘hard left’ Justice Secretary in UK, Jack Straw, did something similar.

  37. @nglaer
    Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What's the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    Replies: @eee, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Gordo

    Kind of fascinating that he would self-report his distortion of data. What’s the story behind that? Sounds like it might be worth a novel.

    At a guess he was caught and told to fess up or be informed on.

    I doubt it was a matter of conscience.

  38. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that's how "high trust" they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the "high trust" in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever "high trust" US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don't-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official "high trust" narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn't go to the police when one of their customers didn't pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn't extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO - anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don't pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it's therefore fine by me.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave

    The commenter doth protest too much, methinks.

  39. @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    https://twitter.com/KFILE/status/1327353832955895809

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @PhysicistDave, @Neoconned

    Thanks.

    You can see why Trump only appointed Macgregor after the election. And why Macgregor, who has a reputation for being very bright, never made it beyond colonel.

    For the record, neither I, nor I am sure Colonel Macgregor, hates Israel or wishes Hitler had won. I have known several Israelis and found them to be decent people. If I were forced to live in the Mideast, I would rather live in Israel than in most of the Arab countries (perhaps some of the oil sheikdoms might be more or less livable?).

    But the Palestinians have gotten a raw deal, and I do not see why it is the job of the US to bail Israel out of that very nasty neighborhood we call the “Mideast.” (Was it Sailer who suggested that the Israelis just buy Baja and move to a much nicer locale?)

    And, while Hitler was a truly insane, genocidal monster, I do not see why Americans needed to die to save Stalin from Hitler. (If the goal was to save the Jews, well, we didn’t.)

    So, Macgregor’s views are eminently defensible intellectually. But it still took guts for Trump to bring him into the fold.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @PhysicistDave

    Well, the Chief of Staff of the IDF made Macgregor's book required reading for all senior officers and invited Macgregor to address his staff. So clearly Israel has no problem with Macgregor, and as Macgregor accepted and came to Tel Aviv to speak to them, clearly he has no problem with Israel. Speaking as an Israeli, I don't have a problem with him either.

  40. @eee
    Social psychology is a pseudoscience. Very few studies replicate, one of the exceptions being stereotype accuracy and yet social psychologists and their textbooks claim otherwise because stereotypes are bad. A bizarre field of study.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Not Raul, @Hypnotoad666

    You’d think they would know by now that any social science study that isn’t pre-registered is presumptively garbage.

    But then again, pre-registration is no defense to outright fraud.

  41. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans have the highest number of armed households on the planet, that's how "high trust" they are. In my experience, even 10 years ago, most of the "high trust" in America was a facade. Most of the low crime was achieved by not recording incidents. Most of the high crime was ritually exorcised by periodic defenestration of a Blagojevic. At this point, Americans are afraid of confessing for whom they vote; whatever "high trust" US residents claim in opinion polls is just as valid as their confessions of love for George Floyd.

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don't-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms. By the age of 40, Americans either disconnect or, more often, hate lots of their neighbors. (Again, I am looking at GOP fans.) This, is of course, fine by Romanian standards; you already noticed that we dispense easily with lies for the sake of niceness. But this whole board is a solid refutation of the official "high trust" narrative dominating the US public space.

    Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend didn't go to the police when one of their customers didn't pay his drugs on time. The Polish Brigade tried the legal way, and still couldn't extract their wages from Donald Trump. Borrowing money and beating the guy who fails to pay back is something that works when the borrower is some weakling without a network of his own, possibly hiding from the police, or at the very least, thought of as a fraud by the local LEO - anywhere in the world. Romania has plenty of guys who borrow and don't pay back, but they just have to be the perfect opposite (able to pay for protection, believable in front of LEO etc).

    Claiming that some borrowers should be pitied, be they in Romania or in US, is denying their agency. Dealing with a loan shark is an option everywhere in the world, and it is essentially a lifestyle choice. Your 13% do it a lot, and so do ours. I doubt anybody can borrow for life-or-death issues from a loan shark. So if they want a big TV on the off-chance that one day the big TV is gone, it must be fine by their standards, and it's therefore fine by me.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @PhysicistDave

    Dacian Julien Soros wrote:

    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don’t-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms.

    That America actually existed in the early 1960s, even in big Eastern industrial cities. I know: I lived it.

    I grew up in an inner suburb of Saint Louis, within a long walk of the city limits, lower-middle-class/working-class community. It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized.

    We were supposed to put our bikes away every night, but we often forgot and left them on the front lawn. Never stolen.

    To get into our house, you just had to give our garage door a hard rap to get it open. And the door from the garage into the house just used a “skeleton key.” Hey, it was America.

    To be sure, by the early ’60s, you did not take a stroll in the black parts of town. But, in the late 1940s, when my mom was an adolescent, adolescent white girls freely used mass transit (electric streetcars) to go wherever they wanted around town on their own. No one worried. It was America.

    People do not know what we have lost.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @PhysicistDave

    "It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized."

    An honest question: in that case, why did they need a lock in the first place?

    Compare: If you wear a mask/get vaccinated because you think it's safe and effective, why then do you care if I don't? Doesn't the mask/vaccine protect you? Isn't that the point?

    If no one would use the key, why do you?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  42. @Redneck farmer
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Romania has a 13% African population?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL, They have gypsies, who commonly steal and beg.

    My colleague was a real Romanian from a well-to-do family that owned a nice business in one of their major cities. His wife was a doctor.

    We were bankers, and it was funny for us to listen to him describe what he had done. We wrote loans at single-digit interest rates for borrowers we had carefully determined could pay us back and who had histories of paying back loans. We earned honest returns on our investments, and we endeavored to follow the laws and do no harm.

    What he described, on the other hand, was real loan sharking. He and his previous “colleagues” deliberately lent money at exorbitant rates to people they expected not to pay it back. When that inevitably happened, they had an excuse to bust down the borrower’s door, rough them up and take anything and everything they wanted from the premises.

    They weren’t just repossessing or collecting on a debt, they were taking everything they could from the suckers — and getting away with it.

    We have loansharking in the US too. It is even institutionalized by our credit card companies. (And as I reminded, Joe Biden helped pass laws that enabled those companies to get away with it.)

    The Dacian commenter was touched off by my use of the term “high-trust societies.” He need not have been, because I was not impugning his country. I was thinking of communities like every one I have lived in, coast-to-coast, across the United States. I was not implying that our whole country is high-trust everywhere and that his is nowhere. He may very well live in a high-trust pocket.

    However, here is just one, little anecdote among many that are quite revealing: When my wife’s parents first visited us from their nice city in Romania (where we ourselves have an apartment) they were surprised to see that I kept my gas grill outside behind the house, because they thought somebody would steal it. They lived in a perfectly normal place in their country, but no one would ever think of being as trusting as I was in that way, because they could not.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not only that ("steal and beg"). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the "I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard". Women wouldn't go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn't be able to take stuff from someone's house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @anon

  43. Assuming the whole “”stereotype threat” thing were true , wouldn’t it work both ways? Meaning, if you keep telling white people that they are inherently and irredeemably racist, won’t many of them be all like “okay then, I guess I’ll be a racist”?

  44. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Redneck farmer

    LOL, They have gypsies, who commonly steal and beg.

    My colleague was a real Romanian from a well-to-do family that owned a nice business in one of their major cities. His wife was a doctor.

    We were bankers, and it was funny for us to listen to him describe what he had done. We wrote loans at single-digit interest rates for borrowers we had carefully determined could pay us back and who had histories of paying back loans. We earned honest returns on our investments, and we endeavored to follow the laws and do no harm.

    What he described, on the other hand, was real loan sharking. He and his previous "colleagues" deliberately lent money at exorbitant rates to people they expected not to pay it back. When that inevitably happened, they had an excuse to bust down the borrower's door, rough them up and take anything and everything they wanted from the premises.

    They weren't just repossessing or collecting on a debt, they were taking everything they could from the suckers -- and getting away with it.

    We have loansharking in the US too. It is even institutionalized by our credit card companies. (And as I reminded, Joe Biden helped pass laws that enabled those companies to get away with it.)

    The Dacian commenter was touched off by my use of the term "high-trust societies." He need not have been, because I was not impugning his country. I was thinking of communities like every one I have lived in, coast-to-coast, across the United States. I was not implying that our whole country is high-trust everywhere and that his is nowhere. He may very well live in a high-trust pocket.

    However, here is just one, little anecdote among many that are quite revealing: When my wife's parents first visited us from their nice city in Romania (where we ourselves have an apartment) they were surprised to see that I kept my gas grill outside behind the house, because they thought somebody would steal it. They lived in a perfectly normal place in their country, but no one would ever think of being as trusting as I was in that way, because they could not.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Not only that (“steal and beg”). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the “I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard”. Women wouldn’t go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn’t be able to take stuff from someone’s house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.
     
    About half of it is. What you see comes to you via our media and globalist media. Our media owners live in that NYC/LA to which you refer, and to them, that is America, and so it is to you.

    Fully half of it now, and far more before, is not. I have lived my whole life in that part you seem not to have any awareness of and want so hard to deny. You simply cannot comprehend it, because you have never lived in anything like it.

    It was, not many years ago, even more non NYC/LA, but immigration from lower-trust countries is the biggest variable that has reduced it.

    Whereas, your country is majority the part I am familiar with. In fact, I am familiar with and related by marriage to the better parts of it. I like your country and your people, but you have had a bigger trust problem than we, until our very recent changes.

    And I do indeed take offense to your easy, stupid, "Murrican with his grill outside" insult. I know damn well your people suffer from greater overall distrust and fear than I do. That however is changing, and I am sure this will make you happy. My country is going down the toilet. Everything is getting worse and frankly becoming more like your world.

    Together you and I will live much the same in a global toilet bowl, and I will hide my grill in the garage.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    BTW, Mr. Dacia...
    .
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SrAUhUu5MA0/TbOSMZ4ap1I/AAAAAAAAApc/Y34Esmmkxw0/s1600/1dacia+%252828%2529.jpg
    .
    You say you lived in New York, and you posit that experience as proof of your understanding of my country.

    You therefore remind me of a fat lady manicurist who was painting my wife's nails on my first visit to your country, twenty years ago. I knew enough Romanian to hear her say to my wife, in front of me, "Americans have no culture." She was surprised when I challenged her.

    She explained to me that her daughter had married a man in New Jersey and that she had been there.

    I said to her, "Oh, I understand. New Jersey. No wonder you think Americans have no culture."

    Your limited perspective, and your backwards, narrow, arrogance toward me and my country, is EXACTLY like that of that stupid, peasant, fat lady who spent every day by the door of a salon, painting nails.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @The Alarmist

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    PS: If you're ever in the area, I will treat you, from my backyard grill you despise so much, to a mesquite-smoked, ribeye steak. All-American beef, something you people don't have there. (I've looked for anything remotely approaching it in your stores. You live on chicken and pork. When you buy fish, it is common trout.)

    We will drink California Cabernet with the beef. It is vastly superior to that godawful crap wine you make over there.

    Afterward, we will drink 100-proof Kentucky bourbon. It's a hell of a lot better than palinka, and quite frankly stronger, man-to-man. I have seen how you boys think palinka is strong, and I laugh at that.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    , @anon
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    No. It is not. Despite the efforts of our social elites, it is not.

  45. @Harry Baldwin
    Somewhat off topic, but speaking of stereotypes, isn't it about time that the media stop reporting that every thuggish black teen who gets shot was "an aspiring rapper"? Because it's become a laugh line. As precedent, recall that before his death, Trayvon Martin purchased Skittles and an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail. That watermelon part was just too painfully stereotypical for the media, so they called it Arizona Iced Tea. Maybe the media needs to similarly deep six the term "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Mokiki, @Known Fact, @Goob

    Search for “purple drank Trayvon Martin”.

  46. I have always thought that a major factor in the studies which seem to support the environmental side of the nature/nurture issue is outright fraud. The incentives are just far too tempting, and the risks of exposure far too low.

    God only knows how many other famous studies of stereotype threat, for example, including some of the most famous and seminal, are based on fraud.

    But these concerns can’t be spoken of in polite company. Which is why I appreciate the rude company of iSteve.

  47. @Buzz Mohawk
    Ph.D. candidate Abdiel J. Flores was no doubt under the stress of stereotype threat, his cardiovascular reactivity high, when he faked his data. It is our fault. We failed him.

    As he retweets:

    “Equity isn’t just offering students equal access to support; it means tailoring our support based on each student’s needs.”

    We need to work harder and give more of our equity so Ph.D. candidates like Flores can stop faking data. Or we should just give them their Ph.D.s and not force them to practice White Science methodology to earn their titles.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Achmed E. Newman, @ScarletNumber

    When the article referred to him as Mr. Flores (rather than Dr.) I thought they were just being modest and not using the Dr. honorific since everyone is assumed to have a Ph.D. Well it turns out he is merely a doctoral candidate rather than an actual Ph.D. I would dare say this is going to gum up the works,

  48. @prime noticer
    like the Stanford Prison Experiment, i'm beginning to think the majority of these findings are just leftist BS that got traction and were perpetuated for decades.

    when you really, really go down the rabbit hole, how much of history over the last 100 years is just pure leftist BS lies and propaganda? a lot of it, it seems now. the Statue Of Immigration is a lie. Rosa Parks was a setup. MLK was a communist and hated America. it goes on and on.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @ben tillman

    And it goes back a lot further than 100 years, all the way to Charles . . . and presumably beyond that.

  49. @Anon
    Chapter 30 of Russell Warne's "In the Know" goes into stereotype threat in detail. It's been decisively debunked for girls and math. There are four or five large sample size studies on blacks and tests that will probably be the final nails in the coffin for that. Amazingly all the studies until now have had sample sizes around 50, about 1 percent of what you really need.

    Warne is amazingly amazingly charitable towards the concept, "plausible, but unproven." The strength of his book, as with Charles Murray's book from last January, is that he doesn't exaggerate or extrapolate from what "the science" has shown. He's very conservative in his debunking. On the other hand, his bibliography and notes include Unz.com (James Thompson), Quillette, Lynne, and other sources that bring cancellation risk. Warne's a young guy with four young kids, I think with tenure, but at a small Utah college. He's very courageous.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @anon

    He’s probably safe at Utah Valley University. That’s a place that cultivates close relationships with the state’s pro corporation legislators. It also serves as a training ground for kids whose scores weren’t high enough to get into nearby BYU—a feat more difficult than it seems since most pious Mormons want to go there.

    But yes in this environment stating that the sky is blue is an act of courage, if BLM and Trans-America deem the color blue to be bigoted.

  50. @Robert Dolan
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVVWrhZ_8xw

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I’m sure I would have enjoyed my one Humble Pie concert, but was rendered deaf by the opening act — Black Oak Arkansas.

  51. @Harry Baldwin
    Somewhat off topic, but speaking of stereotypes, isn't it about time that the media stop reporting that every thuggish black teen who gets shot was "an aspiring rapper"? Because it's become a laugh line. As precedent, recall that before his death, Trayvon Martin purchased Skittles and an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail. That watermelon part was just too painfully stereotypical for the media, so they called it Arizona Iced Tea. Maybe the media needs to similarly deep six the term "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Mokiki, @Known Fact, @Goob

    That’s not entirely fair — many of them are also looking forward to college and med school

  52. @Harry Baldwin
    Somewhat off topic, but speaking of stereotypes, isn't it about time that the media stop reporting that every thuggish black teen who gets shot was "an aspiring rapper"? Because it's become a laugh line. As precedent, recall that before his death, Trayvon Martin purchased Skittles and an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice Cocktail. That watermelon part was just too painfully stereotypical for the media, so they called it Arizona Iced Tea. Maybe the media needs to similarly deep six the term "aspiring rapper."

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Mokiki, @Known Fact, @Goob

    “Expiring raper” more apt.

  53. My lying eyes kept reading “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” as “Personality and Social Psychology Bullshit”…

  54. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not only that ("steal and beg"). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the "I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard". Women wouldn't go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn't be able to take stuff from someone's house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @anon

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    About half of it is. What you see comes to you via our media and globalist media. Our media owners live in that NYC/LA to which you refer, and to them, that is America, and so it is to you.

    Fully half of it now, and far more before, is not. I have lived my whole life in that part you seem not to have any awareness of and want so hard to deny. You simply cannot comprehend it, because you have never lived in anything like it.

    It was, not many years ago, even more non NYC/LA, but immigration from lower-trust countries is the biggest variable that has reduced it.

    Whereas, your country is majority the part I am familiar with. In fact, I am familiar with and related by marriage to the better parts of it. I like your country and your people, but you have had a bigger trust problem than we, until our very recent changes.

    And I do indeed take offense to your easy, stupid, “Murrican with his grill outside” insult. I know damn well your people suffer from greater overall distrust and fear than I do. That however is changing, and I am sure this will make you happy. My country is going down the toilet. Everything is getting worse and frankly becoming more like your world.

    Together you and I will live much the same in a global toilet bowl, and I will hide my grill in the garage.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The town where I lived as a child and teenager is the size of Kenosha. Thirty years ago, there was no problem in leaving stuff outside, in the peripheral areas where people had their own yards.

    The Evil Dictator™ ran a very effective police force, who would preemptively beat the hell out of Gypsies walking far from their homes after midnight.

    It's only when OSF came, that the police stopped bothering with prevention. In the early nineties, institutionalizing antisocial and schizophrenic individuals became harder and harder. This is when police completely withdrew from Gypsy villages. This got us out no-go areas. I am now going round the pubic park at night, although my dad used to cross it at 10 PM for decades, in the way to the night shift.

    There were no loansharks or thieves rummaging through backyards before "market economy". It has nothing to do with trust. There are features of "democracy".

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  55. @Reg Cæsar

    Since the 1990s, “stereotype threat”
     
    1. Which stereotype fits blacks better?

    A. Work
    B. Crime

    2. What did they do on the plantations for centuries?

    A. Work
    B. Poison the food


    You'd think answers consistent to both might anger the woke, the PC, the of-colour. Bizarrely, though, it's the Fire Eaters and WNs who go ballistic in the comments here. Even then, only Corvinus has explicitly answered "A" to #2, and even he had to admit, only under threat of torture.

    But it's just choosing to use Occam's switchblade rather than his frosting applicator.

    The "Good Negro" stereotype dies hard. Especially among whites.

    Replies: @jb

    Could you be a little more clear here? I may have gotten this backwards, but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn’t work, that their masters (who should all be dead, because they were poisoned) were totally blind, and that the cotton those masters got rich off of somehow picked itself and sent itself off to market. If that’s what you are saying then it is truly unhelpful!

    • Replies: @anon
    @jb

    Could you be a little more clear here?

    https://positek.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/sign-do-not-feed-trolls-image-from-shutterstock.jpg

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @jb


    but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn’t work
     
    Black "labor" goes against observation, experience, anthropology, African history, common sense, nature, and everything HBD. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

    There is a telling reluctance of commenters here to affirm that Negroes did work. Why is that? Are they afraid it could it be used against them to nail them for reparations?

    I'm trying to abort the reparationists' case in the womb by arguing that slaves have never been a net plus to this country. In other words, they're lying. Are you implying Africans were a net gain?

  56. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not only that ("steal and beg"). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the "I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard". Women wouldn't go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn't be able to take stuff from someone's house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @anon

    BTW, Mr. Dacia…
    ..
    You say you lived in New York, and you posit that experience as proof of your understanding of my country.

    You therefore remind me of a fat lady manicurist who was painting my wife’s nails on my first visit to your country, twenty years ago. I knew enough Romanian to hear her say to my wife, in front of me, “Americans have no culture.” She was surprised when I challenged her.

    She explained to me that her daughter had married a man in New Jersey and that she had been there.

    I said to her, “Oh, I understand. New Jersey. No wonder you think Americans have no culture.”

    Your limited perspective, and your backwards, narrow, arrogance toward me and my country, is EXACTLY like that of that stupid, peasant, fat lady who spent every day by the door of a salon, painting nails.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Like Škoda, Dacia went from being a joke to making some of the most reliable cars on the market. A survey by Auto Express magazine in 2016 gave them a score of 96 out of 100 for reliability, beaten only by Lexus and Tesla.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @The Alarmist
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The fat Romanian was indeed wrong: An average American’s idea of culture is yoghurt.

  57. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.
     
    About half of it is. What you see comes to you via our media and globalist media. Our media owners live in that NYC/LA to which you refer, and to them, that is America, and so it is to you.

    Fully half of it now, and far more before, is not. I have lived my whole life in that part you seem not to have any awareness of and want so hard to deny. You simply cannot comprehend it, because you have never lived in anything like it.

    It was, not many years ago, even more non NYC/LA, but immigration from lower-trust countries is the biggest variable that has reduced it.

    Whereas, your country is majority the part I am familiar with. In fact, I am familiar with and related by marriage to the better parts of it. I like your country and your people, but you have had a bigger trust problem than we, until our very recent changes.

    And I do indeed take offense to your easy, stupid, "Murrican with his grill outside" insult. I know damn well your people suffer from greater overall distrust and fear than I do. That however is changing, and I am sure this will make you happy. My country is going down the toilet. Everything is getting worse and frankly becoming more like your world.

    Together you and I will live much the same in a global toilet bowl, and I will hide my grill in the garage.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    The town where I lived as a child and teenager is the size of Kenosha. Thirty years ago, there was no problem in leaving stuff outside, in the peripheral areas where people had their own yards.

    The Evil Dictator™ ran a very effective police force, who would preemptively beat the hell out of Gypsies walking far from their homes after midnight.

    It’s only when OSF came, that the police stopped bothering with prevention. In the early nineties, institutionalizing antisocial and schizophrenic individuals became harder and harder. This is when police completely withdrew from Gypsy villages. This got us out no-go areas. I am now going round the pubic park at night, although my dad used to cross it at 10 PM for decades, in the way to the night shift.

    There were no loansharks or thieves rummaging through backyards before “market economy”. It has nothing to do with trust. There are features of “democracy”.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    You don't realize it, but you are actually insulting your own people. Your description of your boyhood town makes it sound like Romanians needed a dictator and thug police to prevent them from going wild.

    They are better than that. We have learned the hard way that some other peoples, like Iraqis and Libyans (and your gypsies and our blacks) need that kind of authoritarianism, but you are European. Your people are better than that.

    The places in America where I have lived, coast-to-coast my whole life, are as pleasant as your hometown once was, and the people there do not need a dictator and police who beat people up. That is because the people make the high-trust communities, not the government.

    Your people can do that too. They suffered a long time in that Ceaușescu utopia you seem to long for, and it is taking them a long time to climb out of the damage that was done.

    I want you to know that I respect you. I do not want to leave you feeling insulted. Your people have a much more realistic view of the subjects we discuss on this blog. Americans are naive and are allowing themselves to be destroyed by their own good intentions -- and also by the same forces you describe, like the OSF.

    Be well, and good luck with all of this. We both will need it.

  58. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    BTW, Mr. Dacia...
    .
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SrAUhUu5MA0/TbOSMZ4ap1I/AAAAAAAAApc/Y34Esmmkxw0/s1600/1dacia+%252828%2529.jpg
    .
    You say you lived in New York, and you posit that experience as proof of your understanding of my country.

    You therefore remind me of a fat lady manicurist who was painting my wife's nails on my first visit to your country, twenty years ago. I knew enough Romanian to hear her say to my wife, in front of me, "Americans have no culture." She was surprised when I challenged her.

    She explained to me that her daughter had married a man in New Jersey and that she had been there.

    I said to her, "Oh, I understand. New Jersey. No wonder you think Americans have no culture."

    Your limited perspective, and your backwards, narrow, arrogance toward me and my country, is EXACTLY like that of that stupid, peasant, fat lady who spent every day by the door of a salon, painting nails.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @The Alarmist

    Like Škoda, Dacia went from being a joke to making some of the most reliable cars on the market. A survey by Auto Express magazine in 2016 gave them a score of 96 out of 100 for reliability, beaten only by Lexus and Tesla.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob McX

    I know. My father-in-law had an old one and then a new one. I rode in both, and I am not knocking Dacias at all. I think they are sensible cars for the situation.

    He had to wait months to buy the first one, when the economy there was communist and centrally "managed." He kept it running for 25 years. Lots of people did the same thing. The simple design was perfect for that. It looked just like the one in my picture. It was a Renault design.

    His new one was a fine economy car that was as practical as the first, but much better of course. Few people there in the Ceaușescu days had cars, and now everybody does.

  59. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not only that ("steal and beg"). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the "I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard". Women wouldn't go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn't be able to take stuff from someone's house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @anon

    PS: If you’re ever in the area, I will treat you, from my backyard grill you despise so much, to a mesquite-smoked, ribeye steak. All-American beef, something you people don’t have there. (I’ve looked for anything remotely approaching it in your stores. You live on chicken and pork. When you buy fish, it is common trout.)

    We will drink California Cabernet with the beef. It is vastly superior to that godawful crap wine you make over there.

    Afterward, we will drink 100-proof Kentucky bourbon. It’s a hell of a lot better than palinka, and quite frankly stronger, man-to-man. I have seen how you boys think palinka is strong, and I laugh at that.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Looks like like we both took it personally. I understand you were exposed to a subset of Romanian that was shittier than your US environment. Believe me, it works the other way around: most of the time I spent in US, someone tried to fleece me, with a passion I have never seen before.

    When I was looking to rent, I used to joke that it would preferable if a gang of Blacks or Gypsies would rob me They can take only what is in my wallet, but the (((landlord))) will take far more. Now, you probably have a mortgage, and you can't sympathize, but 40% of the locals and 99% of newcomers have to rent.

    Same went with a lot of intermediaries (real estate agents, car dealers, independent recruiters for jobs). But even the dentists would tell me I have some caries that will kill me. Asymmetric wisdom teeth? "You are chewing yourself buddy! " Really? How many people did you see with a hole through their cheek, just because they kept their wisdom teeth? Again, I'd rather be robbed by a gang of Blacks than go to an American dentist.

    And here's the rub: If I'd tell any local I don't trust US dentist, because I changed 5, and each wanted to fill another healthy tooth, the locals would "explain" how the dentist knows what he is doing. They would feel responsible for the honor of the system, just like you. Yes, yes, I know about "my country, right or wrong". But that is just a turn of phrase, not law of the land. Nobody will lock you up if you admit exceptions. There is no slippery slope: America is richer than Romania, meaning your superpredators should be able to buy their grills instead of looking for one to steal. For economic reasons, long after we will die, an American will be objectively less tempted to steal.

    But grills are one thing and trust is another. Save for a few psychos and Mother Theresas, all people are equally trustworthy. If they can get away with loansharking, and if it makes money, they will do it. If they carjack without consequence, they will.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  60. Welcome to the New Dark Age.

  61. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    BTW, Mr. Dacia...
    .
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SrAUhUu5MA0/TbOSMZ4ap1I/AAAAAAAAApc/Y34Esmmkxw0/s1600/1dacia+%252828%2529.jpg
    .
    You say you lived in New York, and you posit that experience as proof of your understanding of my country.

    You therefore remind me of a fat lady manicurist who was painting my wife's nails on my first visit to your country, twenty years ago. I knew enough Romanian to hear her say to my wife, in front of me, "Americans have no culture." She was surprised when I challenged her.

    She explained to me that her daughter had married a man in New Jersey and that she had been there.

    I said to her, "Oh, I understand. New Jersey. No wonder you think Americans have no culture."

    Your limited perspective, and your backwards, narrow, arrogance toward me and my country, is EXACTLY like that of that stupid, peasant, fat lady who spent every day by the door of a salon, painting nails.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @The Alarmist

    The fat Romanian was indeed wrong: An average American’s idea of culture is yoghurt.

  62. @Whiskey
    @PhysicistDave

    Oh please nagger. America is dead as a Norwegian Gray Parrot.

    What is slouching towards Bethlehem (PA) is a rough beast its hour come at last. Forget all that bs Christianity. Wotan laughs last. HE has a whole bunch of demands. And like Conan's "Crom" god, has a taste for blood.

    Really, what does Christianity offer the average White man after he's survived the camps to come? Really?

    Wotan has an answer.

    Replies: @Neoconned

    Are you saying PhysicistDave is 1 of those Odin WN nuts?

  63. @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    https://twitter.com/KFILE/status/1327353832955895809

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @PhysicistDave, @Neoconned

    I’m generally pro Israel and being raised a Southern Baptist I’ll proudly admit to being a Christian Zionist.

    All that said I’ve had enough of the Islamic World & the ME in particular…..and not 1 drop of American blood, Christian or otherwise…..should be spilled in that wasteland in the name of whatever folly American technocrats and functionaries can cough up to stay there….

    I support Israel and their nuke capabilities…..because Lord have mercy they’ll need it going forward. I dunno what the future holds in that region but i do know this “country” won’t be much of a country in 20 odd yrs unless it becomes a HIGHLY segregated Brazil like entity armed to the teeth and always on edge…..

    Israel can and should defend itself but furthermore after this they have our blessing but militarily they are on their own.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @Neoconned

    Bibi promised to end all American aid back when he was first elected in 1996. Obviously that hasn't happened, not in the three years he served then nor in the past eleven he's been in power. I nurse a sneaking suspicion that Israel doesn't really need it, but there are those who profit, monetarily and/or politically, in both countries from the aid that it keeps going. (Also, aid to Israel is the only excuse for American aid to Egypt, so that's a whole other team of lobbyists.)

    Anyway, as an Israeli, I couldn't agree more. Of course, with an end to all aid, it would be nice if there was also an end to the US' constantly pushing "peace plans" and lecturing Israel every time a settler extends his porch. (And for all their being "pro-Israel," the neocons are just as to blame here as the more left-wing types.) I think the two would be a good trade. The US gets to keep billions of dollars for not wasting its time and efforts- win-win for them.

  64. anon[391] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Chapter 30 of Russell Warne's "In the Know" goes into stereotype threat in detail. It's been decisively debunked for girls and math. There are four or five large sample size studies on blacks and tests that will probably be the final nails in the coffin for that. Amazingly all the studies until now have had sample sizes around 50, about 1 percent of what you really need.

    Warne is amazingly amazingly charitable towards the concept, "plausible, but unproven." The strength of his book, as with Charles Murray's book from last January, is that he doesn't exaggerate or extrapolate from what "the science" has shown. He's very conservative in his debunking. On the other hand, his bibliography and notes include Unz.com (James Thompson), Quillette, Lynne, and other sources that bring cancellation risk. Warne's a young guy with four young kids, I think with tenure, but at a small Utah college. He's very courageous.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @anon

    Amazingly all the studies until now have had sample sizes around 50, about 1 percent of what you really need.

    Those small sample N’s are a red flag for any real science, because the Confidence Interval for some statistics can exceed the N thus rendering all results without any meaning. It’s so wrong it is not even wrong.

    Medical research works with such sizes because of necessity and the error problems are known. Social “science” does not have the same limitations or restrictions.

    Junk science such as this is a major factor in the replication crisis.

  65. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not only that ("steal and beg"). in places where Gypsies are a majority, they also rob and assault for the sake of dominance. They are also more ethnically cohesive, compared to US-Africans.

    On the other hand, I lived in New York. You can spare me the "I am Murrican, I leave stuff unattended in the backyard". Women wouldn't go out unaccompanied there, unless they were fresh off the boat, so to say.

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    Again, you wouldn't be able to take stuff from someone's house, if that guy was ready to receive a visit from the police. But if he needed the money to buy stolen goods or moonshine tools (or is meth labs in US?), he chose to stay away from formal lenders and formal LEO.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @Buzz Mohawk, @anon

    And most of USA is now NYC / LA.

    No. It is not. Despite the efforts of our social elites, it is not.

  66. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I used to know a man from Romania who had done some loan sharking on the side there. (He was neither a relative nor a friend. Believe it or not, he actually worked in a nearby office at the time.) He openly told me and others in the room how he and some "friends" would lend money to people and then take their stuff, by force if necessary, when they couldn't pay it back.

    It sounded like to him it was just a normal side business that he did when he was younger. He seemed to think it was funny. Clearly he had no idea what it sounded like to us.

    Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Gordo, @Peter D. Bredon

    “Lending is a very old business, and without strong regulations and/or a high-trust society, bad things can happen to naive people. I believe one Joe Biden helped make this sort of thing easier for his pals in the credit card racket.”

    Nonsense. Regulations are simply the way moochers and second-handers impede muh Market! (A. Rand). As for “high trust society,” don’t you know that “There is no society” (M. Thatcher).

  67. @jb
    @Reg Cæsar

    Could you be a little more clear here? I may have gotten this backwards, but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn't work, that their masters (who should all be dead, because they were poisoned) were totally blind, and that the cotton those masters got rich off of somehow picked itself and sent itself off to market. If that's what you are saying then it is truly unhelpful!

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

    Could you be a little more clear here?

  68. @PhysicistDave
    OT: News reports indicate that retired Colonel Doug Macgregor has been chosen as senior advisor by the new Sec Def. As the story notes:

    President Trump's newly installed acting Pentagon chief is bringing on a senior adviser in a sign the administration wants to accelerate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Middle East before the end of his presidency in January, three people familiar with the move told Axios.
     
    Assuming Biden pulls off the coup, there will be limits to how much Macgregor can accomplish. However, Trump does have two more months in office.

    And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.

    For anyone unfamiliar with Macgregor, he was one of the few patriots among the military brass and has appeared numerous times on Tucker.

    We are still in the early stages of defending the Republic, everyone. No matter what happens in the next few weeks or months, it is going to take years to defeat the Left and restore the Republic:

    These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    “And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.”

    If that’s even remotely true, it proves Trump is even stupider than he has seemed. You know, for all the (legitimate) harping on Sleepy Joe’s infirmities, if Trump is only now “starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted,” I would assume he’s the one needing a pair of Depends and his wife’s guiding hands to get through the day.

    I guess the “4D chess” stuff got old, but rather than admit he was a Zionist tool all along, you’d rather portraying him now as a simpleton.

    Speaking of which, the talk about money-lending up thread might be a useful angle to pursue re: Why does Trump do what he does?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @James O'Meara

    James O'Meara wrote to me:


    If that’s even remotely true, it proves Trump is even stupider than he has seemed. You know, for all the (legitimate) harping on Sleepy Joe’s infirmities, if Trump is only now “starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted,” I would assume he’s the one needing a pair of Depends and his wife’s guiding hands to get through the day.
     
    Well, as I have commented before, human beings are willing to die to preserve a false picture of the world that makes them feel comfortable -- be it the nobility of the proletariat or the superiority of the Aryan race or transubstantiation or whatever.

    Trump grew up in an America, as did I, in which very few Americans hated most of their fellow citizens. And even in recent decades in the corporate world (in which I also have spent a few years), most subordinates do not have as their primary goal undercutting their boss.

    Trump wanted to see American society as basically benign. So do most Americans -- they want to think that the people who run their health care, their public schools, their legislatures, the news media, etc. are basically good people, if sometimes confused, misguided, or incompetent.

    That was more or less true when Trump was an impressionable adolescent. It is not true today.

    Probably the most important aspect of the Trump phenomenon is that it has opened the eyes of tens of millions of Americans at the same time it has opened Trump's eyes to the fact that the people who now run this country hate their fellow Americans.

    This is not going to end well, but at least tens of millions of Americans are starting to realize what we are up against.
  69. @PhysicistDave
    OT: News reports indicate that retired Colonel Doug Macgregor has been chosen as senior advisor by the new Sec Def. As the story notes:

    President Trump's newly installed acting Pentagon chief is bringing on a senior adviser in a sign the administration wants to accelerate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Middle East before the end of his presidency in January, three people familiar with the move told Axios.
     
    Assuming Biden pulls off the coup, there will be limits to how much Macgregor can accomplish. However, Trump does have two more months in office.

    And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt.

    For anyone unfamiliar with Macgregor, he was one of the few patriots among the military brass and has appeared numerous times on Tucker.

    We are still in the early stages of defending the Republic, everyone. No matter what happens in the next few weeks or months, it is going to take years to defeat the Left and restore the Republic:

    These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Whiskey, @James O'Meara, @Peter D. Bredon

    Correct me if I’m wrong, Sidney, but there aren’t judicial appointments. Anyone Trump appoints will be out on his ass the afternoon of January 12th.

    Another Trumcomplishment! Winning!

  70. @PhysicistDave
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Dacian Julien Soros wrote:


    One of the reasons why I come to this comments sections is to find constant reaffirmations of the fact that the high trust don’t-lock-your-door America exists mostly in the movies, in areas inhabited by the 1%, and in dorms.
     
    That America actually existed in the early 1960s, even in big Eastern industrial cities. I know: I lived it.

    I grew up in an inner suburb of Saint Louis, within a long walk of the city limits, lower-middle-class/working-class community. It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized.

    We were supposed to put our bikes away every night, but we often forgot and left them on the front lawn. Never stolen.

    To get into our house, you just had to give our garage door a hard rap to get it open. And the door from the garage into the house just used a "skeleton key." Hey, it was America.

    To be sure, by the early '60s, you did not take a stroll in the black parts of town. But, in the late 1940s, when my mom was an adolescent, adolescent white girls freely used mass transit (electric streetcars) to go wherever they wanted around town on their own. No one worried. It was America.

    People do not know what we have lost.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    “It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized.”

    An honest question: in that case, why did they need a lock in the first place?

    Compare: If you wear a mask/get vaccinated because you think it’s safe and effective, why then do you care if I don’t? Doesn’t the mask/vaccine protect you? Isn’t that the point?

    If no one would use the key, why do you?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Peter D. Bredon asked me:


    An honest question: in that case, why did they need a lock in the first place?
     
    Well, the houses came with locks, though, as I said, you could get inside our house via the garage -- and it was trivial to get into the garage -- with only a skeleton key.

    The old saying was, "Locks only keep honest people out." Obviously, occasionally burglaries did occur back then in the USA, so there was a reason, sort of insurance, to lock up. Though throughout my childhood, I never actually heard of any burglaries at all in the suburb we lived in, which was right on the city limits of Saint Louis. People were not all that fanatic about locking up at all, since it seemed that burglaries just did not occur in our area.

    My grandparents lived in a town about an hour's drive from Saint Louis, Farmington, which was the county seat of Saint Francis county.

    The folks in Farmington used to laugh at the silly folks in Saint Louis who saw any reason at all to lock their homes.
  71. @jb
    @Reg Cæsar

    Could you be a little more clear here? I may have gotten this backwards, but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn't work, that their masters (who should all be dead, because they were poisoned) were totally blind, and that the cotton those masters got rich off of somehow picked itself and sent itself off to market. If that's what you are saying then it is truly unhelpful!

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

    but it almost sounds like you are suggesting that black slaves didn’t work

    Black “labor” goes against observation, experience, anthropology, African history, common sense, nature, and everything HBD. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

    There is a telling reluctance of commenters here to affirm that Negroes did work. Why is that? Are they afraid it could it be used against them to nail them for reparations?

    I’m trying to abort the reparationists’ case in the womb by arguing that slaves have never been a net plus to this country. In other words, they’re lying. Are you implying Africans were a net gain?

  72. What a minute;
    I thought the going mantra was ,”trust the science”.

  73. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    PS: If you're ever in the area, I will treat you, from my backyard grill you despise so much, to a mesquite-smoked, ribeye steak. All-American beef, something you people don't have there. (I've looked for anything remotely approaching it in your stores. You live on chicken and pork. When you buy fish, it is common trout.)

    We will drink California Cabernet with the beef. It is vastly superior to that godawful crap wine you make over there.

    Afterward, we will drink 100-proof Kentucky bourbon. It's a hell of a lot better than palinka, and quite frankly stronger, man-to-man. I have seen how you boys think palinka is strong, and I laugh at that.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Looks like like we both took it personally. I understand you were exposed to a subset of Romanian that was shittier than your US environment. Believe me, it works the other way around: most of the time I spent in US, someone tried to fleece me, with a passion I have never seen before.

    When I was looking to rent, I used to joke that it would preferable if a gang of Blacks or Gypsies would rob me They can take only what is in my wallet, but the (((landlord))) will take far more. Now, you probably have a mortgage, and you can’t sympathize, but 40% of the locals and 99% of newcomers have to rent.

    Same went with a lot of intermediaries (real estate agents, car dealers, independent recruiters for jobs). But even the dentists would tell me I have some caries that will kill me. Asymmetric wisdom teeth? “You are chewing yourself buddy! ” Really? How many people did you see with a hole through their cheek, just because they kept their wisdom teeth? Again, I’d rather be robbed by a gang of Blacks than go to an American dentist.

    And here’s the rub: If I’d tell any local I don’t trust US dentist, because I changed 5, and each wanted to fill another healthy tooth, the locals would “explain” how the dentist knows what he is doing. They would feel responsible for the honor of the system, just like you. Yes, yes, I know about “my country, right or wrong”. But that is just a turn of phrase, not law of the land. Nobody will lock you up if you admit exceptions. There is no slippery slope: America is richer than Romania, meaning your superpredators should be able to buy their grills instead of looking for one to steal. For economic reasons, long after we will die, an American will be objectively less tempted to steal.

    But grills are one thing and trust is another. Save for a few psychos and Mother Theresas, all people are equally trustworthy. If they can get away with loansharking, and if it makes money, they will do it. If they carjack without consequence, they will.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Thank you for your reply, #73. Please note that it did not become visible here until after I had already posted my reply, #75, to another one of your comments.

    We could go on, but I will just wish you well again. You have made some good points, and this has been a worthwhile discussion.

  74. @Rob McX
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Like Škoda, Dacia went from being a joke to making some of the most reliable cars on the market. A survey by Auto Express magazine in 2016 gave them a score of 96 out of 100 for reliability, beaten only by Lexus and Tesla.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I know. My father-in-law had an old one and then a new one. I rode in both, and I am not knocking Dacias at all. I think they are sensible cars for the situation.

    He had to wait months to buy the first one, when the economy there was communist and centrally “managed.” He kept it running for 25 years. Lots of people did the same thing. The simple design was perfect for that. It looked just like the one in my picture. It was a Renault design.

    His new one was a fine economy car that was as practical as the first, but much better of course. Few people there in the Ceaușescu days had cars, and now everybody does.

  75. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The town where I lived as a child and teenager is the size of Kenosha. Thirty years ago, there was no problem in leaving stuff outside, in the peripheral areas where people had their own yards.

    The Evil Dictator™ ran a very effective police force, who would preemptively beat the hell out of Gypsies walking far from their homes after midnight.

    It's only when OSF came, that the police stopped bothering with prevention. In the early nineties, institutionalizing antisocial and schizophrenic individuals became harder and harder. This is when police completely withdrew from Gypsy villages. This got us out no-go areas. I am now going round the pubic park at night, although my dad used to cross it at 10 PM for decades, in the way to the night shift.

    There were no loansharks or thieves rummaging through backyards before "market economy". It has nothing to do with trust. There are features of "democracy".

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    You don’t realize it, but you are actually insulting your own people. Your description of your boyhood town makes it sound like Romanians needed a dictator and thug police to prevent them from going wild.

    They are better than that. We have learned the hard way that some other peoples, like Iraqis and Libyans (and your gypsies and our blacks) need that kind of authoritarianism, but you are European. Your people are better than that.

    The places in America where I have lived, coast-to-coast my whole life, are as pleasant as your hometown once was, and the people there do not need a dictator and police who beat people up. That is because the people make the high-trust communities, not the government.

    Your people can do that too. They suffered a long time in that Ceaușescu utopia you seem to long for, and it is taking them a long time to climb out of the damage that was done.

    I want you to know that I respect you. I do not want to leave you feeling insulted. Your people have a much more realistic view of the subjects we discuss on this blog. Americans are naive and are allowing themselves to be destroyed by their own good intentions — and also by the same forces you describe, like the OSF.

    Be well, and good luck with all of this. We both will need it.

  76. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Looks like like we both took it personally. I understand you were exposed to a subset of Romanian that was shittier than your US environment. Believe me, it works the other way around: most of the time I spent in US, someone tried to fleece me, with a passion I have never seen before.

    When I was looking to rent, I used to joke that it would preferable if a gang of Blacks or Gypsies would rob me They can take only what is in my wallet, but the (((landlord))) will take far more. Now, you probably have a mortgage, and you can't sympathize, but 40% of the locals and 99% of newcomers have to rent.

    Same went with a lot of intermediaries (real estate agents, car dealers, independent recruiters for jobs). But even the dentists would tell me I have some caries that will kill me. Asymmetric wisdom teeth? "You are chewing yourself buddy! " Really? How many people did you see with a hole through their cheek, just because they kept their wisdom teeth? Again, I'd rather be robbed by a gang of Blacks than go to an American dentist.

    And here's the rub: If I'd tell any local I don't trust US dentist, because I changed 5, and each wanted to fill another healthy tooth, the locals would "explain" how the dentist knows what he is doing. They would feel responsible for the honor of the system, just like you. Yes, yes, I know about "my country, right or wrong". But that is just a turn of phrase, not law of the land. Nobody will lock you up if you admit exceptions. There is no slippery slope: America is richer than Romania, meaning your superpredators should be able to buy their grills instead of looking for one to steal. For economic reasons, long after we will die, an American will be objectively less tempted to steal.

    But grills are one thing and trust is another. Save for a few psychos and Mother Theresas, all people are equally trustworthy. If they can get away with loansharking, and if it makes money, they will do it. If they carjack without consequence, they will.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Thank you for your reply, #73. Please note that it did not become visible here until after I had already posted my reply, #75, to another one of your comments.

    We could go on, but I will just wish you well again. You have made some good points, and this has been a worthwhile discussion.

  77. @Peter D. Bredon
    @PhysicistDave

    "It was normal for people to leave a spare house key under their front door mat, and everyone knew that many people did this. No one worried. No one got burglarized."

    An honest question: in that case, why did they need a lock in the first place?

    Compare: If you wear a mask/get vaccinated because you think it's safe and effective, why then do you care if I don't? Doesn't the mask/vaccine protect you? Isn't that the point?

    If no one would use the key, why do you?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Peter D. Bredon asked me:

    An honest question: in that case, why did they need a lock in the first place?

    Well, the houses came with locks, though, as I said, you could get inside our house via the garage — and it was trivial to get into the garage — with only a skeleton key.

    The old saying was, “Locks only keep honest people out.” Obviously, occasionally burglaries did occur back then in the USA, so there was a reason, sort of insurance, to lock up. Though throughout my childhood, I never actually heard of any burglaries at all in the suburb we lived in, which was right on the city limits of Saint Louis. People were not all that fanatic about locking up at all, since it seemed that burglaries just did not occur in our area.

    My grandparents lived in a town about an hour’s drive from Saint Louis, Farmington, which was the county seat of Saint Francis county.

    The folks in Farmington used to laugh at the silly folks in Saint Louis who saw any reason at all to lock their homes.

  78. @James O'Meara
    @PhysicistDave

    "And it is a sign that Trump is starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted: this is critically important for the Trump movement going forward, even if Biden succeeds in the coup attempt."

    If that's even remotely true, it proves Trump is even stupider than he has seemed. You know, for all the (legitimate) harping on Sleepy Joe's infirmities, if Trump is only now "starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted," I would assume he's the one needing a pair of Depends and his wife's guiding hands to get through the day.

    I guess the "4D chess" stuff got old, but rather than admit he was a Zionist tool all along, you'd rather portraying him now as a simpleton.

    Speaking of which, the talk about money-lending up thread might be a useful angle to pursue re: Why does Trump do what he does?

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    James O’Meara wrote to me:

    If that’s even remotely true, it proves Trump is even stupider than he has seemed. You know, for all the (legitimate) harping on Sleepy Joe’s infirmities, if Trump is only now “starting to recognize that only those who actually agree with his policies can be trusted,” I would assume he’s the one needing a pair of Depends and his wife’s guiding hands to get through the day.

    Well, as I have commented before, human beings are willing to die to preserve a false picture of the world that makes them feel comfortable — be it the nobility of the proletariat or the superiority of the Aryan race or transubstantiation or whatever.

    Trump grew up in an America, as did I, in which very few Americans hated most of their fellow citizens. And even in recent decades in the corporate world (in which I also have spent a few years), most subordinates do not have as their primary goal undercutting their boss.

    Trump wanted to see American society as basically benign. So do most Americans — they want to think that the people who run their health care, their public schools, their legislatures, the news media, etc. are basically good people, if sometimes confused, misguided, or incompetent.

    That was more or less true when Trump was an impressionable adolescent. It is not true today.

    Probably the most important aspect of the Trump phenomenon is that it has opened the eyes of tens of millions of Americans at the same time it has opened Trump’s eyes to the fact that the people who now run this country hate their fellow Americans.

    This is not going to end well, but at least tens of millions of Americans are starting to realize what we are up against.

  79. @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    You can see why Trump only appointed Macgregor after the election. And why Macgregor, who has a reputation for being very bright, never made it beyond colonel.

    For the record, neither I, nor I am sure Colonel Macgregor, hates Israel or wishes Hitler had won. I have known several Israelis and found them to be decent people. If I were forced to live in the Mideast, I would rather live in Israel than in most of the Arab countries (perhaps some of the oil sheikdoms might be more or less livable?).

    But the Palestinians have gotten a raw deal, and I do not see why it is the job of the US to bail Israel out of that very nasty neighborhood we call the "Mideast." (Was it Sailer who suggested that the Israelis just buy Baja and move to a much nicer locale?)

    And, while Hitler was a truly insane, genocidal monster, I do not see why Americans needed to die to save Stalin from Hitler. (If the goal was to save the Jews, well, we didn't.)

    So, Macgregor's views are eminently defensible intellectually. But it still took guts for Trump to bring him into the fold.

    Replies: @Nachum

    Well, the Chief of Staff of the IDF made Macgregor’s book required reading for all senior officers and invited Macgregor to address his staff. So clearly Israel has no problem with Macgregor, and as Macgregor accepted and came to Tel Aviv to speak to them, clearly he has no problem with Israel. Speaking as an Israeli, I don’t have a problem with him either.

  80. @Neoconned
    @Anonymous

    I'm generally pro Israel and being raised a Southern Baptist I'll proudly admit to being a Christian Zionist.

    All that said I've had enough of the Islamic World & the ME in particular.....and not 1 drop of American blood, Christian or otherwise.....should be spilled in that wasteland in the name of whatever folly American technocrats and functionaries can cough up to stay there....

    I support Israel and their nuke capabilities.....because Lord have mercy they'll need it going forward. I dunno what the future holds in that region but i do know this "country" won't be much of a country in 20 odd yrs unless it becomes a HIGHLY segregated Brazil like entity armed to the teeth and always on edge.....

    Israel can and should defend itself but furthermore after this they have our blessing but militarily they are on their own.

    Replies: @Nachum

    Bibi promised to end all American aid back when he was first elected in 1996. Obviously that hasn’t happened, not in the three years he served then nor in the past eleven he’s been in power. I nurse a sneaking suspicion that Israel doesn’t really need it, but there are those who profit, monetarily and/or politically, in both countries from the aid that it keeps going. (Also, aid to Israel is the only excuse for American aid to Egypt, so that’s a whole other team of lobbyists.)

    Anyway, as an Israeli, I couldn’t agree more. Of course, with an end to all aid, it would be nice if there was also an end to the US’ constantly pushing “peace plans” and lecturing Israel every time a settler extends his porch. (And for all their being “pro-Israel,” the neocons are just as to blame here as the more left-wing types.) I think the two would be a good trade. The US gets to keep billions of dollars for not wasting its time and efforts- win-win for them.

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