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From NPR, more coverage of a long-time iSteve topic: white people getting upset that blacks don’t win all the Grammy Awards.

3 Grammy Contenders Share Outrage At All-White Category, Decline Nominations
January 4, 20215:04 AM ET

MANDALIT DEL BARCO

Three of the five acts nominated for the 2021 best children’s album Grammy Award are saying “no thanks.” They’re upset that the contenders in their category are all white.

One of them is Alastair Moock, whose nominated album, Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

Upon hearing the news he was nominated along with three other white male acts and one white woman, Moock smacked his head. “After this year, to have an all-white slate of nominees seemed really tone-deaf,” he says. …

Moock is protesting by turning down his nomination. So are fellow acts Dog on Fleas and the Okee Dokee Brothers.

“We thought that it was the strongest thing we could do, to stand with people of color whose albums are too often left out of the Grammy nominations,” says Joe Mailander, one of the Okee Dokee Brothers.

Did you know that Stevie Wonder has never even been nominated for a Grammy?

What? He won all the time when I was a kid?

Why was I not informed?

He hopes to expand notions of what children’s music is. “This is not just white guys with guitars playing for kids. We want to welcome all different types of music to this community.”

The Okee Dokee Brothers, Moock and Dog on Fleas — all “white guys with guitars” — sent a letter to the Recording Academy asking that their names be removed from the final Grammy ballots. They wrote they “couldn’t in good conscience benefit from a process that has historically overlooked women and artists of color.”

The other Okee Dokee Brother, Justin Lansing, said they felt a special responsibility to ask for change in a genre “tasked with modeling fairness and kindness to kids and families.”

Last month, the nominees met with the Recording Academy’s new interim president and CEO, Harvey Mason Jr., and its first chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer, Valeisha Butterfield Jones.

Valeisha Butterfield Jones is the daughter of Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), former head of the Congressional Black Caucus even though he looks rather like G.K. Chesterton. “Most recently, Butterfield Jones served as the global head of inclusion for Google, Inc. responsible for accelerating diversity, equity and inclusion outcomes for underrepresented communities internally and externally across the global brand.”

“We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”

Butterfield Jones says since she started her job in May, she’s been looking for ways to increase diversity among the academy’s membership and in the Grammy’s secret nominating committees. The academy recently partnered with the racial justice group Color of Change to begin holding itself and record labels more accountable. They’re pushing for more transparency at the academy and support for artists, especially those who are Black.

If they succeed, someday we might even hear music by Black artists on the radio.

One of the two Grammy nominees who decided to remain on the ballot is Joanie Leeds. Her ninth children’s folk music album is titled All the Ladies.

“I didn’t decline because my album is really about empowering young women. I mean, I have 20 women on my album. So for us, it was like it was kind of counter to our empowering women message to step down,” Leeds says. “I know that this is really about the guys that dropped out, but I feel like a lot of times women are kind of left on the side. It’s a shame. I wish there was more equality with women.”

Someday, we might even hear women singers on the radio.

 
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  1. Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them? This is a pretty niche market.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Half Canadian

    So the nominees are outraged that they, themselves, are not black? Or are they outraged that they wrote better books than any black people did?

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer

    , @botazefa
    @Half Canadian


    Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them?
     
    Meghan the Stallion and her hit WAP, which is bleeped but performed on prime time tv for children to view already. In all her undulating greatness, she should be nominated for the kids category award.

    I'm kidding, of course, but wouldn't be surprised if mainstream vulgar hiphop is very soon officially deemed appropriate for all audiences. We shoulda listened to Tipper Gore.
    , @Bite Moi
    @Half Canadian

    Half Canadian-------Hell,just make all blacks Reverends.

  2. “white guys with guitars playing for kids”

    Minstrels wandering out of Medieval Faires looking for kids.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Wake the hell up. The Okee Dokee Brothers are basically Proud Boys with six-strings. White troubadours of the racial wars. Have you even heard their songs, dude? Read between the damned lines, stand up, and DO something!


    The Great Divide
    There’s a great divide that makes the rivers and the rains
    Flow to the western ocean or run through the eastern plains
    So you go east and I go west
    You go where the sun rises and I go where it sets

    , @bomag
    @SunBakedSuburb

    The raper; er, I meant rapper; R Kelly has been called The Pied Piper of R&B. I heard he likes kids. He should be nominated. It would send the proper signal.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

  3. Have they ever thought that the simplest way to avoid this problem is to do away with the Grammys? And the Oscars? And the Emmys?

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Buffalo Joe

    Au contraire mein giddermeister. All that needs to occur is a new category. Call it Aspiring Rapper du Jour.

    Anytime some goof (I meant yoof) who was just getting their Life together is wrongly offed by another aspiring rapper who was also just getting their life together, the aspiring rapper of the first part automatically wins the Aspiring Rapper du Jour award. The aspiring rapper of the second part, the one who did the offing, wins the Producer du Jour award.

    BBC <<<—— Spell check decided that should be there so I left it.

    Replies: @Marty

    , @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Buffalo Joe

    That's a wonderful idea--leave out the Tonys too. There's nobody like the recently departed Ann Reinking to deserve anything from stupid Broadway shows. Off-topic, but anybody that saw her do the original Roxie Hart in the 1978 Chicago was as lucky as I was. Incredibly talented, sexy, and one of the most beautiful women I've ever seen. It was pretty upsetting to me that she left us this soon. (The movie won all the Oscars, and I thought was a piece of shit: A dance show in which nobody can dance.) You can see lots of Annie on youtube from All That Jazz, and early tapings of the 70s original. I don't think Chicago was ever that much, but Ann Reinking was a goddess of the stage, and that may be harder than film--although she filmed just as gorgeously.

    , @Barnard
    @Buffalo Joe

    About a decade ago, Chris Rock made a comment about these shows saying, giving awards for art is dumb. I am surprised they haven't ever made recant.

    Replies: @Aardvark

    , @MBlanc46
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bingo! Got it in one.

  4. Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King’s predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O’Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he’ll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    • Replies: @jcd1974
    @Art Deco

    The official video for "Be a Pain" has only 3,000 views on YouTube since it was released in March (which is much better than his other videos, some of which only have few hundred views), so I would have thought he'd have appreciated the nomination.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Lurker
    @Art Deco

    Harvey Milk - a pain in the arse.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco


    I think Milk owned his own business at one point...

     

    A camera store. Steve makes it sound like Pornhub before its time.

    After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O’Connor story.
     
    And managing to get mugged inside her own house in Detroit. The Rev'm Jackson was quoted as saying, how could anybody mug Rosa Parks?

    Uh, how could anybody mug anybody? Was it a "mugging gone wrong"?

    Be a Pain
     
    Heard on a YouTube meme channel the other day: "I live in Spain, but the S is silent." Like Biden's Psalmist.


    https://whyy.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/AP_19085834616469-768x504.jpg


    https://media4.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_08/894396/150217-150217-biden-02-4x3-5p-2127_04717baabe5301141444435c53cc9957.jpg

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @duncsbaby
    @Art Deco


    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old.
     
    What's a Moock? You can't call me a Moock.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vw8t4O9JQM

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    "The world actually is getting more juvenile every year."

    Absolutely.

  5. https://www.google.com/amp/s/news.yahoo.com/amphtml/harassed-guards-extorted-inmates-jeffrey-160100777.html

    LOL so the very last inmate who shared a cell with Epstein died of “health related issues” few months back.

    The spooks were busy last yr…..1st I’ve heard of this….

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @Neoconned

    Oh, our good correspondent JohnnyWalker123 has done a fine job for months on this very topic.

    IIRC, lots of mysterious deaths in the Epstein case.

    Of course, it’s all plausible if, in fact, Epstein is still very much alive.
    (A distinct possibility!)

    Replies: @Flip

  6. Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time. That’s a problem for Negro geniuses

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Meretricious

    Some of the Motown stuff is at least pleasant, but there are Negro Geniuses--at least some female singers. There is nobody better than Ella Fitzgerald with all the Broadway songbooks, and they never sound the least bit dated. Listen to 'Thou Swell', for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_nkIO8W5qo The other one that always comes to mind is Dionne Warwick with her legendary (truly) collaboration with Burt Bacharach.

    What these two have in common is that they are considered 'too white' by Negroes. Ella admitted that she was primarily influenced by the white singer Connie Boswell. Warwick was not so obviously white, but she was accused of it often, and the songs were sophisticated and you really don't think of race when she sings those Bacharach/David songs. The Black Gospel elements in some of her ornamentation don't seem particularly black, just that she could do things with her voice that nobody else could.

    Duke Ellington was also a great Negro Genius. I've got some of the ancient LPs from the late 40s and early 50s, and they are not like anything anyone else ever did. The only huge mistake he made was to try to do a jazz version of The Nutcracker, and it is so fucking ugly; there is simply no way not to prefer the original Tchaikowsky, this is just a maiming of it. But with the super-cool cabaret style, he was different from the other jazz musicians, and some of those are great too, but although Ellington is more 'Negro', it's a very 'genteel Negro sound'. I don't think he was ever 'accused' of 'being too white', though, as Ella and Dionne definitely were.

    Of course, you can prefer white singers doing all the show songs from the Broadway songbooks that Ella did, and sometimes I do (she doesn't get "Lush Life" right--too wholesome), and some of the things in the Harold Arlen Songbook, as "Hooray for Love" and "Let's Fall in Love" are a couple in which I think she can't be beat. Dionne put her stamp on the Bacharach songs, and they more or less totally belong to her--even Streisand singing 'Alfie' sounds dimestore by comparison.

    I wouldn't say I thought Billie Holliday was a 'Negro genius'. The ones that got all their psychodrama of drugs into the music are boring. I can't think of any black male geniuses right off, but I have usually preferred French pop male singers like Becaud and Trenet to any of ours.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce

    , @James Speaks
    @Meretricious


    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time.
     
    https://youtu.be/Fjufjv4rH0s

    I rest ny case.

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @Neuday

    , @Charon
    @Meretricious

    Stevie Wonder's music has definitely withstood the test of time, as has most of Motown, jazz, and so on. I wouldn't venture to say the same about much of what passes for the pop music of today, but then I'm over forty.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Meretricious

    Maybe, but Blind Lemon Jefferson and Robert Johnson are still holding up.

    , @Old Prude
    @Meretricious

    "Stevie Wonder’s music has not withstood the test of time". You mean like the lyric "Peace has come to Zimbabwe"? (From the song, I note somewhat ironically, titled "Master Blaster")

    , @Neuday
    @Meretricious


    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time. That’s a problem for Negro geniuses
     
    The Black music of the past incorporated melody and talented musicians, but the Black music of the past 30 years is overwhelmingly rhythmic and generated by computer rather than mastery of an instrument. Prince was the last of his kind. I can tell you that anyone who pursues mastery of drums or bass pays attention to what was done by Motown, Stax, Sly Stone, etc. If anything hasn't stood the test of time, it's Black people losing interest in making music and what it takes to do so instead of posing, grunting and screaming. By lowering expectations of Blacks they've regressed, yet we still praise them and pretend they're awesome, I suppose because we think they're doing their best. Sure, that Motown sound is a boomer thing, but I can get some Gen-X buddies together and do a serviceable cover of many of those songs. Go find the top Rap guys in your town and put them in a room with actual instruments for an hour and let me know how they do.
  7. What is the most obscene rap song that has ever been celebrated with a grammy?

    Did the one with “bitches ain’t nothin’ but hos and tricks lick my nuts and suck my dick” win?

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Morton's toes

    This is my favorite cover version ever of that song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjFRy8jQ_0U

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Gary in Gramercy, @Morton's toes

  8. Stevie Wonder only won 25 Grammies. If they had not been so racist he would have won ALL of them.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Jack D

    It's kinda amusing. All along I thought the Grammy was awarded for the music--with the honor bestowed on the artist. Apparently, listeners (and Grammy voters) should take into account the personal attributes of the artist, judging the artist based on a hierarchy of victimhood Pokemon Points, rather than on an appreciation of the music

    Live and learn...

  9. Blaster must serve Master. I’d feel better if I could pin-point some cynical angle to this, but unless your name is Raffi or John Redcorn, I suspect that as a male children’s musician you have about the same professional shelf -life as a Milwaukee Brewers middle reliever so why throw away this shot to forever add a 50% surcharge to your future birthday party booking fees? (“Acclaimed GRAMMY-nominated children’s artist…”).

    BTW, you heard it here first- either one and/or both of Kendrick Lamar and Kanye West will win the Nobel Prize in Literature in the next 10 years (I’m leaning toward Kanye now as Kendrick is too respectably socially-conscious dull of a rapper).

  10. Assuming woke victory in assuring that no whites need apply for awards, would they then turn their attentions to the market because actual sales numbers might show that the ignorant, unworthy public prefer cheery white guys with guitars singing for children over an ax-grinding POC? Would they pressure retailers to stop stocking whitey’s tunes, and recordings of white children’s musicians become quietly traded in the grey market or passed along like samizdat?

  11. He hopes to expand notions of what children’s music is.

    One thing that might stimulate diversity is if they accepted songs that contained words like motherfυcker. Their fusty old notions of what’s appropriate for children is surely having a disparate impact.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @International Jew

    It’s a children’s category so diverse music hits would include such classics as:

    Who’s my daddy?
    Kill da pimp dat wrecked my mama
    Slap dat hoe
    At muh baby mama crib

    And the perennial favorite:

    Kill whitey, get paid

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    Game. Set. Match

  12. Obviously we need more child-oriented rap.

    “It’s time fo’ yo’ nap!
    The time fo’ yo’ NAP!
    Now git in yo’ bed,
    Fo’ I bust a CAP!”

    • LOL: Cortes, Kylie
  13. @Buffalo Joe
    Have they ever thought that the simplest way to avoid this problem is to do away with the Grammys? And the Oscars? And the Emmys?

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Barnard, @MBlanc46

    Au contraire mein giddermeister. All that needs to occur is a new category. Call it Aspiring Rapper du Jour.

    Anytime some goof (I meant yoof) who was just getting their Life together is wrongly offed by another aspiring rapper who was also just getting their life together, the aspiring rapper of the first part automatically wins the Aspiring Rapper du Jour award. The aspiring rapper of the second part, the one who did the offing, wins the Producer du Jour award.

    BBC <<<—— Spell check decided that should be there so I left it.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @James Speaks

    In the ‘90’s I played in a mostly black lunch-hour basketball game in Berkeley. One of the occasional players was a rapper, a 6’5” block of marble from Hunter’s Point who went by “Primo.” One of our regulars was a skinny undergrad from Beverly Hills who eventually became a lawyer at Morrison & Foerster. The black guys called him “Goldstein.” On Telegraph, two blocks from the gym, was a record store with a sidewalk bargain bin. One day Goldstein came into the gym waving a jewel case and yelled, “Hey Primo, I bought your album - ten cents!” About a dozen brothers fell down laughing.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  14. @International Jew

    He hopes to expand notions of what children’s music is.
     
    One thing that might stimulate diversity is if they accepted songs that contained words like motherfυcker. Their fusty old notions of what's appropriate for children is surely having a disparate impact.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Art Deco

    It’s a children’s category so diverse music hits would include such classics as:

    Who’s my daddy?
    Kill da pimp dat wrecked my mama
    Slap dat hoe
    At muh baby mama crib

    And the perennial favorite:

    Kill whitey, get paid

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Stan d Mute

    Don't forget that evergreen:

    "Fee fi fo fum
    I smell a minoritarian."

  15. @International Jew

    He hopes to expand notions of what children’s music is.
     
    One thing that might stimulate diversity is if they accepted songs that contained words like motherfυcker. Their fusty old notions of what's appropriate for children is surely having a disparate impact.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Art Deco

    Game. Set. Match

    • Agree: botazefa
  16. Canny PR move. Nobody other than kindergarten teachers have heard of any of them before this, now millions do.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Arclight

    Isn’t that why they all do it?

  17. Most people have no idea that the Grammys even had a children’s music category. Much less care who is nominated.

    Of course these childish singers/musicians need to raise a fuss to get noticed. PR and all.

    I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours. Recently some of the black performers (and a few whites) have behaved very rudely and crudely when they weren’t nominated or people they like (or produce) aren’t.

    Being nasty and obnoxious is Black (Black!) Privilege and all. Kanye West barging into Taylor Swift’s award a few years back, etc. Tedious lectures about diversity and inclusion from people think such things are a sign of intelligence rather than hubris.

    They take silly names, dress silly and odd and behave like unruly kids. Sometimes fill their product with lyrics that wouldn’t be tolerated in better whorehouses. But don’t call them ‘minstrels’, as that would be, you know, reasons…

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Muggles

    "I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours."

    Years ago I became suspicious of the way musicals would open a month or so before being nominated for a dozen Tonys (Tonies?). I guess the idea was that all the theater mavens knew what were working out to be the good shows, and delayed openings until as late as possible. Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the "good" films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets "dumped" in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    OTOH, I'm now inclined to think this is just because it's all fixed.

    Possibly related: it's been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly "award winning" Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Stan Adams, @Anonymous

  18. I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

     

    Bingo. I'm sure there must be some people out there who have pure, whimsical (Lord, I hate that word), open hearts just spilling over with the joy that only music can bring, and who dedicate their lives to sharing that bubbly bounty with the babies -- but, I wonder.

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had 'enjoyed'. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these 'artists'.

    It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth -- or even before, as they're more than willing to grant full personhood to a yet-to-be-born child if they it will be one of their own.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Joseph Doaks

    , @James O'Meara
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    https://youtu.be/eXWrj7-4MBo

  19. I like how the chick who stayed in makes the passive aggressive comment about it being all about”the guys.”

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    How do you know this? Maybe she and the other guy who stayed in the competition aren’t ideologues and just want a shot at the award?

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

  20. “ Valeisha Butterfield Jones”
    Steve, you should have edited the post to delete that name. That can’t be a real person’s name and it makes us think that you are fabricating the whole story.
    Or maybe that’s just my brain’s coping mechanism. If my subconscious convinces me these Stevebait stories are just Babylon Bee humorous spoofs, it will get me through the agony of watching our civilization collapsing like a house of cards.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Alfa158

    I talked to a 'Shaneeka' today. (Not even 'Shaneequa'.) I am sorry to report she was very energetic and more knowledgeable than the white one I started with, although I basically agree with everything the commenters are saying

    I really don't give a shit about any of these awards, and should add Nobel and Pulitzer as well. Someone smart, a scientist, told me they must hate to give a Nobel to someone's work that is so prestigious they can't NOT award it--would rather give it to more Nobel-friendly personalities. God knows Toni Morrison didn't deserve the Nobel for Literature, a Pulitzer maybe, but not the Nobel. I frankly don't think Saul Bellow deserved it either, but I'm a clear minority on that one. The National Book Award is sometimes all right, gave it to John O'Hara back in the day (he's unpopular now), and Cheever and DeLillo, and of course Faulkner (but not for his best novels) deserved it. Then that started rotting, and Susan Sontag's horrible novel In America got it. Joan Didion got one for her most celebrated and most inferior work, never for the early piss 'n' vinegar ones. The list of both Fiction and Non-Fiction I just looked at did look as for at least the last 5-6 years the attempts superb 'Diversity' are winning, like Ta Nahisi-Coates, an abomination if there ever was one.

    All this wokeness makes us strongly-white-identified types have to be slier and slier just to stay afloat. Therefore the Oscars, in particular, are totally disgusting freak shows (and they have been except in the very early late 20s and early 30s, before they turned into mere cheap sentimentality.)

    , @James O'Meara
    @Alfa158

    Speaking of real names:

    https://youtu.be/TswwON_Hs1M

    , @James O'Meara
    @Alfa158

    Speaking of phony names:

    https://youtu.be/TswwON_Hs1M

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Alfa158

    Possibly has a Bermuda connection as the bank of NT Butterfield is a major institution there.

    Jones is extremely common surname in the British isles, particularly in Wales.

    Valeisha is one of those hybrid names being a combination of Valerie and a diminutive ending.

  21. All my middle-aged life I’ve heard the complaints with increasing stridency against the abomination of industry award-shows gatherings, which is ultimately just a mask to slam the existence of any awards, period, of course — but till now nobody ever did anything about it. Thank you, Corona-chan/ZOOM-ageddon

  22. “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”

    NPR sure brings the eloquence of Chief DIE Officer Valeisha Butterfield Jones to the fore. She has had to overcome a childhood full of hardship and deprivation, as her mother was a lowly State representative. However generous her compensation may be, I’m sure she’s worth every penny.

    • Replies: @jon
    @ic1000

    You can't bring up the famous African-American Representative G.K. Butterfield without including a photo:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/GK_Butterfield%2C_Official_photo_116th_Congress.jpg

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous, @Possumman

    , @dcthrowback
    @ic1000

    She's married to ex-Duke and ex-NBA player Dahntay Jones. The couple have two kids.

    I see "former google exec" in her profiles, I can only imagine what service she performed for them.

    She definitely passes a certain test involving a color and a bag.

    , @AnotherDad
    @ic1000

    The kicker: these paper-bag test passers are very, very proud of their whiter skin and features and not looking like an actual African. Can't be spoken directly--snide comments amongst themselves about black, blacks only--but their relative "unblackness" in phenotype is very, very important to them even as they parrot BLM nonsense and run their racial shakedown.

    If you asked Mrs. Jones to trade her looks for those of a typical American black in order to keep her grift ... no effing way!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @ziggurat
    @ic1000


    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.
     
    We will have a "racial reckoning" when whites find a way out of this anti-white prison. It's past time, but as of yet, no real and meaningful action has been taken. I guess there are not enough voices yet for the "white awakening".
    https://www.unz.com/article/voices-of-a-white-awakening
  23. @Buffalo Joe
    Have they ever thought that the simplest way to avoid this problem is to do away with the Grammys? And the Oscars? And the Emmys?

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Barnard, @MBlanc46

    That’s a wonderful idea–leave out the Tonys too. There’s nobody like the recently departed Ann Reinking to deserve anything from stupid Broadway shows. Off-topic, but anybody that saw her do the original Roxie Hart in the 1978 Chicago was as lucky as I was. Incredibly talented, sexy, and one of the most beautiful women I’ve ever seen. It was pretty upsetting to me that she left us this soon. (The movie won all the Oscars, and I thought was a piece of shit: A dance show in which nobody can dance.) You can see lots of Annie on youtube from All That Jazz, and early tapings of the 70s original. I don’t think Chicago was ever that much, but Ann Reinking was a goddess of the stage, and that may be harder than film–although she filmed just as gorgeously.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  24. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @James O'Meara

    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

    Bingo. I’m sure there must be some people out there who have pure, whimsical (Lord, I hate that word), open hearts just spilling over with the joy that only music can bring, and who dedicate their lives to sharing that bubbly bounty with the babies — but, I wonder.

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had ‘enjoyed’. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these ‘artists’.

    It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth — or even before, as they’re more than willing to grant full personhood to a yet-to-be-born child if they it will be one of their own.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had ‘enjoyed’. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these ‘artists’.
     
    It's just beyond me how some people chose to "raise" their kids.

    Why feed your kids this garbage music ... if you want them to listen to music, just play some good music. We have an American musical tradition, and songs/music that are part of our inherited Western tradition.

    Even more so TV. Why are you putting on some brain rotting garbage. Give 'em some blocks and trucks and puzzles and--when you have cycles--read 'em books. There's no reason for a kid to ever be watching TV, until the are say five or six and ready to watch an appropriate movie or nature show or something with you.

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    This started earlier. Marlo Thomas’ Free to be You and Me’ was Commie homo miscegenist propaganda start to finish. A few catchy tunes, to be fair.

    , @Joseph Doaks
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth"

    So true. But they are actually only a pushy, noisy minority. The rest of us are in the majority, but we need to understand that and speak out. Richard Nixon identified the phenomenon: "The Silent Majority." Why do we always let them win?

  25. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/nov/26/drake-replace-grammys-black-artists-snubbed-the-weeknd-lil-uzi-vert

    The frustration expressed by Drake and the Weeknd suggests that the Recording Academy’s recent attempts to address diversity and inclusion have not been sufficiently effective.

    In March 2018, it established a task force to examine diversity and inclusion within the institution. Among other ongoing efforts, in September it founded the Black Music Collective (BMC), an advisory group comprising “prominent Black music creators and professionals who share the common goal of amplifying Black voices within the Academy and the wider music community”, with Quincy Jones and John Legend among them.

    The BMC hailed the 2021 nominations as “historic”: “Ten Black women are nominated in the top four categories and more than 20 Black nominees are represented in the general fields. Also, for the first time, all six nominees for best rap album are Black independent artists. This is progress.”

    Progress but somehow not enough. There should be a total ban on all non-blacks from being nominated for best rap album.

    I mean, blinding lights is a great song and he really can sing but the rest of The Weeknd’s output is quite generic. It is an album award.

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Altai

    Though the bigger problem for rap is how it can possibly continue after this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PDKlfbi4tY

    2020 saw the kind of end of form for black rap that Joyce feared about the novel that spurred his efforts to write Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake.

  26. Justin Lansing and Joe Mailander of The Okee Dokee Brothers have declined their 2021 Grammy Award nomination for Best Children’s Album. The duo won the honor in 2013 for their album Can You Canoe?

    This is like the start of one of the Chapelle shows newsreader segments.

    Whenever people talk about ‘whiteness’ as an abstract concept I always get confused but I think we found it in it’s purest form.

  27. @Altai
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/nov/26/drake-replace-grammys-black-artists-snubbed-the-weeknd-lil-uzi-vert

    The frustration expressed by Drake and the Weeknd suggests that the Recording Academy’s recent attempts to address diversity and inclusion have not been sufficiently effective.

    In March 2018, it established a task force to examine diversity and inclusion within the institution. Among other ongoing efforts, in September it founded the Black Music Collective (BMC), an advisory group comprising “prominent Black music creators and professionals who share the common goal of amplifying Black voices within the Academy and the wider music community”, with Quincy Jones and John Legend among them.

    The BMC hailed the 2021 nominations as “historic”: “Ten Black women are nominated in the top four categories and more than 20 Black nominees are represented in the general fields. Also, for the first time, all six nominees for best rap album are Black independent artists. This is progress.”
     
    Progress but somehow not enough. There should be a total ban on all non-blacks from being nominated for best rap album.

    I mean, blinding lights is a great song and he really can sing but the rest of The Weeknd's output is quite generic. It is an album award.

    Replies: @Altai

    Though the bigger problem for rap is how it can possibly continue after this.

    2020 saw the kind of end of form for black rap that Joyce feared about the novel that spurred his efforts to write Ulysses and Finnegan’s Wake.

  28. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    Some of the Motown stuff is at least pleasant, but there are Negro Geniuses–at least some female singers. There is nobody better than Ella Fitzgerald with all the Broadway songbooks, and they never sound the least bit dated. Listen to ‘Thou Swell’, for example:

    The other one that always comes to mind is Dionne Warwick with her legendary (truly) collaboration with Burt Bacharach.

    What these two have in common is that they are considered ‘too white’ by Negroes. Ella admitted that she was primarily influenced by the white singer Connie Boswell. Warwick was not so obviously white, but she was accused of it often, and the songs were sophisticated and you really don’t think of race when she sings those Bacharach/David songs. The Black Gospel elements in some of her ornamentation don’t seem particularly black, just that she could do things with her voice that nobody else could.

    Duke Ellington was also a great Negro Genius. I’ve got some of the ancient LPs from the late 40s and early 50s, and they are not like anything anyone else ever did. The only huge mistake he made was to try to do a jazz version of The Nutcracker, and it is so fucking ugly; there is simply no way not to prefer the original Tchaikowsky, this is just a maiming of it. But with the super-cool cabaret style, he was different from the other jazz musicians, and some of those are great too, but although Ellington is more ‘Negro’, it’s a very ‘genteel Negro sound’. I don’t think he was ever ‘accused’ of ‘being too white’, though, as Ella and Dionne definitely were.

    Of course, you can prefer white singers doing all the show songs from the Broadway songbooks that Ella did, and sometimes I do (she doesn’t get “Lush Life” right–too wholesome), and some of the things in the Harold Arlen Songbook, as “Hooray for Love” and “Let’s Fall in Love” are a couple in which I think she can’t be beat. Dionne put her stamp on the Bacharach songs, and they more or less totally belong to her–even Streisand singing ‘Alfie’ sounds dimestore by comparison.

    I wouldn’t say I thought Billie Holliday was a ‘Negro genius’. The ones that got all their psychodrama of drugs into the music are boring. I can’t think of any black male geniuses right off, but I have usually preferred French pop male singers like Becaud and Trenet to any of ours.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading "Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City" by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. "

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Anon, @Gary in Gramercy, @Redneck farmer

    , @AceDeuce
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Holliday is much overrated--I agree with you on Fitzgerald--BTW, it's not "Connie" Boswell-it's "Connee". Constance to be official, but she spelled her nickname with two ee's. She (and her singing sisters) were indeed excellent.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  29. @ic1000

    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”
     
    NPR sure brings the eloquence of Chief DIE Officer Valeisha Butterfield Jones to the fore. She has had to overcome a childhood full of hardship and deprivation, as her mother was a lowly State representative. However generous her compensation may be, I'm sure she's worth every penny.

    Replies: @jon, @dcthrowback, @AnotherDad, @ziggurat

    You can’t bring up the famous African-American Representative G.K. Butterfield without including a photo:

    • Replies: @Altai
    @jon

    If that was a Turkish flag behind him you could convince me this was a picture of the Turkish finance minister.

    , @Anonymous
    @jon

    i think J Edgar Hover was black by todays standards

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Possumman
    @jon

    Not even a pok---person of khaki

  30. I am mildly curious how the music industry ranks any artist now. In days gone by you had subjective things like Billboard charts which ranked songs by popularity. Then you had the more objective measure of record sales. What music people actually wanted to buy. Those measures of ‘demand’ are long gone so what other than critical approval substitutes today?

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @unit472

    Perhaps skin tone? Seems the way we’re headed with damn near everything.

    , @Mr. Mean
    @unit472

    Streams on Spotify/Apple Music/YouTube, radio and digital sales on iTunes. Also physical albums have made a surprising comeback thanks to the resurgence of vinyl, which started out as a hipster thing and became mainstream over the last 10 years with young people.

  31. Anon[167] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s an air of desperation among liberals. They know that if they can’t push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen, and it won’t happen because they’ll finally have to admit that blacks are inferior. Less smart, less talented, and unwilling to work.

    Liberals are crazy-desperate.

    • Replies: @Shango
    @Anon

    Why this generation? Why are liberals so desperate to find any form of disparity that shows that black is underepresenitive compared to whites in certain fields? They are number a reasons people why our ruling class made blacks there favorite pets ,but it is just confusing andd weird.

    , @Shango
    @Anon

    Why this generation? Why are liberals so desperate to find any form of disparity that shows that black is under representative compared to whites in certain fields? They are number a of reasons people why our ruling class made blacks their favorite pets, but it is just confusing and weird.

    , @Art Deco
    @Anon

    They know that if they can’t push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen,

    Ordinary common-and-garden bourgeois make ready use of all sorts of pricey common provision, among them public schools, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid for nursing home finance. Blacks do not differ in this regard. The programs which ordinary people do not use or of which they make only infrequent use include those which do not consume much in the way of public expenditure (public defenders and legal aid lawyers) and those which have on their client list only narrow slivers of the population on either side of the color bar (TANF, the foster care system, housing subsidies). The two programs which are quite prevalent among blacks but not much used by ordinary people are SNAP and Medicaid for financing medical care. Blacks aren't going to go under if SNAP is eliminated or replaced and everyone undergoing medical treatment for anything but the most mundane problems is being cross-subsized by his actuarial pool.

  32. The Grammys will be a picnic compared to the Tonys — who are they going to nominate for 2020?

  33. @Buffalo Joe
    Have they ever thought that the simplest way to avoid this problem is to do away with the Grammys? And the Oscars? And the Emmys?

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Barnard, @MBlanc46

    About a decade ago, Chris Rock made a comment about these shows saying, giving awards for art is dumb. I am surprised they haven’t ever made recant.

    • Replies: @Aardvark
    @Barnard

    I always viewed these award shows as "let's pat ourselves on the back".

  34. @Half Canadian
    Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them? This is a pretty niche market.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @botazefa, @Bite Moi

    So the nominees are outraged that they, themselves, are not black? Or are they outraged that they wrote better books than any black people did?

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?

    • Replies: @Alan Mercer
    @Hypnotoad666

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?
     

    If there were, it would be dominated by whites who would all then need to withdraw their names. /meta

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  35. The Continuing Crisis: Too Few Plaques for Blacks

    Sez who?



    • Thanks: Charon, Joseph Doaks
  36. @Alfa158
    “ Valeisha Butterfield Jones”
    Steve, you should have edited the post to delete that name. That can’t be a real person’s name and it makes us think that you are fabricating the whole story.
    Or maybe that’s just my brain’s coping mechanism. If my subconscious convinces me these Stevebait stories are just Babylon Bee humorous spoofs, it will get me through the agony of watching our civilization collapsing like a house of cards.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Jonathan Mason

    I talked to a ‘Shaneeka’ today. (Not even ‘Shaneequa’.) I am sorry to report she was very energetic and more knowledgeable than the white one I started with, although I basically agree with everything the commenters are saying

    I really don’t give a shit about any of these awards, and should add Nobel and Pulitzer as well. Someone smart, a scientist, told me they must hate to give a Nobel to someone’s work that is so prestigious they can’t NOT award it–would rather give it to more Nobel-friendly personalities. God knows Toni Morrison didn’t deserve the Nobel for Literature, a Pulitzer maybe, but not the Nobel. I frankly don’t think Saul Bellow deserved it either, but I’m a clear minority on that one. The National Book Award is sometimes all right, gave it to John O’Hara back in the day (he’s unpopular now), and Cheever and DeLillo, and of course Faulkner (but not for his best novels) deserved it. Then that started rotting, and Susan Sontag’s horrible novel In America got it. Joan Didion got one for her most celebrated and most inferior work, never for the early piss ‘n’ vinegar ones. The list of both Fiction and Non-Fiction I just looked at did look as for at least the last 5-6 years the attempts superb ‘Diversity’ are winning, like Ta Nahisi-Coates, an abomination if there ever was one.

    All this wokeness makes us strongly-white-identified types have to be slier and slier just to stay afloat. Therefore the Oscars, in particular, are totally disgusting freak shows (and they have been except in the very early late 20s and early 30s, before they turned into mere cheap sentimentality.)

  37. @Art Deco
    Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King's predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O'Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he'll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    Replies: @jcd1974, @Lurker, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby, @David In TN

    The official video for “Be a Pain” has only 3,000 views on YouTube since it was released in March (which is much better than his other videos, some of which only have few hundred views), so I would have thought he’d have appreciated the nomination.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @jcd1974

    jcd, I don't know much about music videos for the little ones, but my newest grand daughter loves "Pizza Party" and I do too. But, why would you present awards for childish songs? Did "Itsy Bitsy Spider" win a Grammy?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer, @BenKenobi, @Steve Sailer

  38. Nobody interested in the disappearance of Jack Ma? Does the crack down internally precede China flexing its muscle internationally ? Or is this a one-off brush back off a high profile but growing critic?

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Polynikes

    I think people have been talking about him being disappeared real soon now for so many years now that nobody is sure how seriously to take it.

  39. Check this out.

    Click on these documents to get an enlarged view.

    https://imgur.com/a/NcVBhDN

    https://imgur.com/a/8IdyEUI

    https://imgur.com/a/7kOujbo

    • Thanks: bomag, Cloudbuster
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Pretty sure there are Dominican neighborhoods in nyc where the welfare usage rate is >100%

    Replies: @Art Deco

  40. The Netflix show Bridgerton lights the way into our future. We can now see that Hamilton was the big ask (all black founders) that was the persuasion trick that made a black queen of England and a completely racially mixed court in Regency England look reasonable and, well, necessary.

    Everyone was black, or might have been. All roles are now black. All fantasies are now possible, especially to unmarried black showrunners (and their fans). And all plaques.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Anon7

    It occurs to me that shows like Bridgerton are much more effective in destroying white history than just taking down statues of obscure generals, or renaming military bases.

    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    , @Altai
    @Anon7

    The future won't be blacked period dramas, it will be no period dramas or Hamiltons but things like the Juneteenth musical which every school student in the Anglosphere and North West Europe will be obliged to watch several times.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hwd_J4NTDc4

    They'll find or construct some story about the tiny number of blacks in Victorian England or there will be a kind of year zero where British history defacto begins with the arrival of the ancestors of the Windrush generation.

  41. Who should plaques or other renderings of the totally distinguished Rodney King? I mean, who should be forced to. No, that’s not right either, but maybe Damien Hirst could hold his nose, since he’s boring enough to want to do something like that. And proceeds to BLM, and no payment to Damien, because although boring, he’s one of the most highly paid (Hockney is the highest right now) artists, and won’t really like doing charity work for gibsmedat.

  42. @ic1000

    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”
     
    NPR sure brings the eloquence of Chief DIE Officer Valeisha Butterfield Jones to the fore. She has had to overcome a childhood full of hardship and deprivation, as her mother was a lowly State representative. However generous her compensation may be, I'm sure she's worth every penny.

    Replies: @jon, @dcthrowback, @AnotherDad, @ziggurat

    She’s married to ex-Duke and ex-NBA player Dahntay Jones. The couple have two kids.

    I see “former google exec” in her profiles, I can only imagine what service she performed for them.

    She definitely passes a certain test involving a color and a bag.

  43. @SunBakedSuburb
    "white guys with guitars playing for kids"

    Minstrels wandering out of Medieval Faires looking for kids.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @bomag

    Wake the hell up. The Okee Dokee Brothers are basically Proud Boys with six-strings. White troubadours of the racial wars. Have you even heard their songs, dude? Read between the damned lines, stand up, and DO something!


    The Great Divide
    There’s a great divide that makes the rivers and the rains
    Flow to the western ocean or run through the eastern plains
    So you go east and I go west
    You go where the sun rises and I go where it sets

    • LOL: botazefa
  44. How about reimagining the Grammys as a Chitlin Circuit talent contest? You get about 10 seconds to win over a black only audience. If they start throwing chicken bones and empty beer bottles at you, a bouncer exits you from the premises head first through a side stage door.

  45. @Stan d Mute
    @International Jew

    It’s a children’s category so diverse music hits would include such classics as:

    Who’s my daddy?
    Kill da pimp dat wrecked my mama
    Slap dat hoe
    At muh baby mama crib

    And the perennial favorite:

    Kill whitey, get paid

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Don’t forget that evergreen:

    “Fee fi fo fum
    I smell a minoritarian.”

  46. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time.

    https://youtu.be/Fjufjv4rH0s

    I rest ny case.

    • Replies: @Billy Shears
    @James Speaks

    Such a great song that was incredibly only the 32nd top song of the year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_Year-End_Hot_100_singles_of_1969

    Replies: @Aeronerauk

    , @Neuday
    @James Speaks

    Counter-argument. Please note age and race of the performer.

    https://youtu.be/gXHjnYqOQWw

    Replies: @Kylie

  47. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    Stevie Wonder’s music has definitely withstood the test of time, as has most of Motown, jazz, and so on. I wouldn’t venture to say the same about much of what passes for the pop music of today, but then I’m over forty.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  48. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

     

    Bingo. I'm sure there must be some people out there who have pure, whimsical (Lord, I hate that word), open hearts just spilling over with the joy that only music can bring, and who dedicate their lives to sharing that bubbly bounty with the babies -- but, I wonder.

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had 'enjoyed'. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these 'artists'.

    It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth -- or even before, as they're more than willing to grant full personhood to a yet-to-be-born child if they it will be one of their own.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Joseph Doaks

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had ‘enjoyed’. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these ‘artists’.

    It’s just beyond me how some people chose to “raise” their kids.

    Why feed your kids this garbage music … if you want them to listen to music, just play some good music. We have an American musical tradition, and songs/music that are part of our inherited Western tradition.

    Even more so TV. Why are you putting on some brain rotting garbage. Give ’em some blocks and trucks and puzzles and–when you have cycles–read ’em books. There’s no reason for a kid to ever be watching TV, until the are say five or six and ready to watch an appropriate movie or nature show or something with you.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  49. Sound like they’re terrified of a backlash and think disavowals will help them. Sad state of affairs.

  50. @Art Deco
    Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King's predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O'Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he'll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    Replies: @jcd1974, @Lurker, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby, @David In TN

    Harvey Milk – a pain in the arse.

  51. @unit472
    I am mildly curious how the music industry ranks any artist now. In days gone by you had subjective things like Billboard charts which ranked songs by popularity. Then you had the more objective measure of record sales. What music people actually wanted to buy. Those measures of 'demand' are long gone so what other than critical approval substitutes today?

    Replies: @usNthem, @Mr. Mean

    Perhaps skin tone? Seems the way we’re headed with damn near everything.

  52. @Anon7
    The Netflix show Bridgerton lights the way into our future. We can now see that Hamilton was the big ask (all black founders) that was the persuasion trick that made a black queen of England and a completely racially mixed court in Regency England look reasonable and, well, necessary.

    Everyone was black, or might have been. All roles are now black. All fantasies are now possible, especially to unmarried black showrunners (and their fans). And all plaques.

    Replies: @Anon7, @Altai

    It occurs to me that shows like Bridgerton are much more effective in destroying white history than just taking down statues of obscure generals, or renaming military bases.

    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Anon7

    Yep. Audiences for this crap regularly number 20-50 million.

    It's how most people 'learn' about 'their world' or so they think.

    People think TV is a dying medium, but that's only old-timey 'broadcast' media.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/243789/number-of-tv-households-in-the-us/

    People are watching "Pay TV" more than ever. Brains are rotting at record speed.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon7


    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.
     
    How do we know? Netflix says so?

    And Netflix has--just searched--200m subscribers around the world. Let's be generous and say 2 people watch when something gets streamed. They are claiming 30m of their subscribers--15% of all subscribers in the world--have tuned into this black fantasy?

    Not saying there aren't millions as Netflix hypes it. But count me skeptical.

    Replies: @Anon7

  53. @ic1000

    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”
     
    NPR sure brings the eloquence of Chief DIE Officer Valeisha Butterfield Jones to the fore. She has had to overcome a childhood full of hardship and deprivation, as her mother was a lowly State representative. However generous her compensation may be, I'm sure she's worth every penny.

    Replies: @jon, @dcthrowback, @AnotherDad, @ziggurat

    The kicker: these paper-bag test passers are very, very proud of their whiter skin and features and not looking like an actual African. Can’t be spoken directly–snide comments amongst themselves about black, blacks only–but their relative “unblackness” in phenotype is very, very important to them even as they parrot BLM nonsense and run their racial shakedown.

    If you asked Mrs. Jones to trade her looks for those of a typical American black in order to keep her grift … no effing way!

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @AnotherDad

    Are you trying to get Steve shut down?

  54. @Buffalo Joe
    Have they ever thought that the simplest way to avoid this problem is to do away with the Grammys? And the Oscars? And the Emmys?

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Barnard, @MBlanc46

    Bingo! Got it in one.

  55. Why not just have “white stuff”?

    We can have “White Grammys”, “White Academy Awards”, “Miss White America”, etc. etc.

    Ok, i know why that doesn’t work–yet.

    But how about:
    “Best Black in a leading role.”
    “Best White in a leading role”
    “Best Asian in a leading role”
    “Best Hispanic in a leading role”
    “Best Other in a leading role”

    Expand as necessary.

  56. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    Maybe, but Blind Lemon Jefferson and Robert Johnson are still holding up.

  57. • Replies: @vhrm
    @Joe Stalin

    Please don't just post a video link as a comment. Describe what it is and summarize what it says and perhaps why it's worthy of being watched.

  58. The other day I realized that Fat Acceptance in the Black Community was forced down their throats so that Beyonce could be Queen

    Before Beyonce, all famous black women were skinny…and very skinny at that. Beyonce (her management team specifically) needed to destroy the memory of the Paula Abdul’s, Whitney Houston’s, Diana Ross, Billie Holiday, Tina Turner, Lena Horne etc etc

    Blacks had to be further degraded so that Beyonce could be worshipped.

    • Replies: @Giant Duck
    @Thoughts

    Paula Abdul is Jewish, of Syrian and Ukrainian origin. Not black.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Thoughts

    Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey, Aretha Franklin ... and of course Aunt Jemima.

  59. One of them is Alastair Moock, whose nominated album, Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    Yeah, that’s just what kids ought to hear – an inspiring story about Harvey Milk. Aside from whatever depravity he was facilitating in that remarkably empty “camera store” of his, Milk was a political ally of Jim Jones. Maybe this “Moock” fellow ought to sing a song about what a pain Jim Jones was.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  60. @Anon7
    The Netflix show Bridgerton lights the way into our future. We can now see that Hamilton was the big ask (all black founders) that was the persuasion trick that made a black queen of England and a completely racially mixed court in Regency England look reasonable and, well, necessary.

    Everyone was black, or might have been. All roles are now black. All fantasies are now possible, especially to unmarried black showrunners (and their fans). And all plaques.

    Replies: @Anon7, @Altai

    The future won’t be blacked period dramas, it will be no period dramas or Hamiltons but things like the Juneteenth musical which every school student in the Anglosphere and North West Europe will be obliged to watch several times.

    They’ll find or construct some story about the tiny number of blacks in Victorian England or there will be a kind of year zero where British history defacto begins with the arrival of the ancestors of the Windrush generation.

  61. They are motivated by ethics. Corporate “ethics” boil down to two considerations: public relations (externally); and fraud (internally). For artists like these, it is all about public relations — a calculation that giving up something this year for a noble cause will pay off big in the future. A miscalculation, since sacrifices are never remembered.

  62. @Polynikes
    Nobody interested in the disappearance of Jack Ma? Does the crack down internally precede China flexing its muscle internationally ? Or is this a one-off brush back off a high profile but growing critic?

    Replies: @Altai

    I think people have been talking about him being disappeared real soon now for so many years now that nobody is sure how seriously to take it.

  63. @Arclight
    Canny PR move. Nobody other than kindergarten teachers have heard of any of them before this, now millions do.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Isn’t that why they all do it?

  64. @Alfa158
    “ Valeisha Butterfield Jones”
    Steve, you should have edited the post to delete that name. That can’t be a real person’s name and it makes us think that you are fabricating the whole story.
    Or maybe that’s just my brain’s coping mechanism. If my subconscious convinces me these Stevebait stories are just Babylon Bee humorous spoofs, it will get me through the agony of watching our civilization collapsing like a house of cards.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Jonathan Mason

    Speaking of real names:

  65. @jcd1974
    @Art Deco

    The official video for "Be a Pain" has only 3,000 views on YouTube since it was released in March (which is much better than his other videos, some of which only have few hundred views), so I would have thought he'd have appreciated the nomination.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    jcd, I don’t know much about music videos for the little ones, but my newest grand daughter loves “Pizza Party” and I do too. But, why would you present awards for childish songs? Did “Itsy Bitsy Spider” win a Grammy?

    • Replies: @Alan Mercer
    @Buffalo Joe

    I get your point but I think there's more to making great music (or books, toys, etc) for kids than just keeping things simple. It isn't easy to make something that really resonates with a lot of minds, young or otherwise. Since having children I've developed a lot of respect for people who dedicate their lives to enriching children (and who do it well). Blippi, for example, is an absolute genius. It may be calculated or natural, but he's a genius.

    , @BenKenobi
    @Buffalo Joe

    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called "Cocomelon." Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I'm getting diabetes when this stuff is on it's so sweet.

    It's apparently the 3rd biggest channel on the site right now, and wouldn't you have guessed it -- they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Buffalo Joe

    I saw the kids music duo Trout Fishing in America in the 1990s. Their Big Trouble album is really good:

    https://www.troutmusic.com/products/big-trouble

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  66. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

     

    Bingo. I'm sure there must be some people out there who have pure, whimsical (Lord, I hate that word), open hearts just spilling over with the joy that only music can bring, and who dedicate their lives to sharing that bubbly bounty with the babies -- but, I wonder.

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had 'enjoyed'. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these 'artists'.

    It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth -- or even before, as they're more than willing to grant full personhood to a yet-to-be-born child if they it will be one of their own.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Joseph Doaks

    This started earlier. Marlo Thomas’ Free to be You and Me’ was Commie homo miscegenist propaganda start to finish. A few catchy tunes, to be fair.

  67. @Muggles
    Most people have no idea that the Grammys even had a children's music category. Much less care who is nominated.

    Of course these childish singers/musicians need to raise a fuss to get noticed. PR and all.

    I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. Recently some of the black performers (and a few whites) have behaved very rudely and crudely when they weren't nominated or people they like (or produce) aren't.

    Being nasty and obnoxious is Black (Black!) Privilege and all. Kanye West barging into Taylor Swift's award a few years back, etc. Tedious lectures about diversity and inclusion from people think such things are a sign of intelligence rather than hubris.

    They take silly names, dress silly and odd and behave like unruly kids. Sometimes fill their product with lyrics that wouldn't be tolerated in better whorehouses. But don't call them 'minstrels', as that would be, you know, reasons...

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    “I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.”

    Years ago I became suspicious of the way musicals would open a month or so before being nominated for a dozen Tonys (Tonies?). I guess the idea was that all the theater mavens knew what were working out to be the good shows, and delayed openings until as late as possible. Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the “good” films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets “dumped” in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    OTOH, I’m now inclined to think this is just because it’s all fixed.

    Possibly related: it’s been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly “award winning” Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Peter D. Bredon

    No, they are not all junk, but most of them are. The musicals have been unravelling since the high points in the 50s--it seems almost all of the 'great' ones were over by about 1959. After that, in the 60s, there were 'pretty good shows' like Funny Girl, which had a beautiful score but was an idiotic story--who cares about Fanny Brice and Nick Arnstein? Otherwise, all those super-middle-cult Jerry Herman things that are deeply-cherished by show-tune fairies, and by the 70s the celebrity was for quite a long time Sondheim, but even his best ones didn't usually have hits--just 'Send in the Clowns' as I recall. I saw several of the shows, and 2 were very good, and had good songs, but the day of the B'way hit song is antideluvian. I'm surprised musicals are still made, they're mostly so dumb. In the 80s and 90s, I heard 2 good scores by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields (City of Angels and The Life), but no hits. Around 2001, Urinetown was excellent--again had good songs but nothing that has to do with youth culture. After that, only In the Heights in 2010, by Miranda who did Hamilton, and the songs were quite good--but still, nothing to do with youth pop culture, and sort of localized to Washington Hgts. Hispanics. I saw one B'way show, Honeymoon in Vegas with Tony Danza in 2015, and that was the last. It was good B'way energy with real chorine-type girls, but mostly shit.

    So it's not always because all the songs are junk (some of Sondheim's early ones were very good, but maybe not as good as West Side Story and Gypsy, but they're mostly irrelevant and were at the time of their opening, even if there was acclaim.

    Of course, there's the gigantism, and those actually have produced hits: Lloyd Webber's ugly music has some very popular songs, Schonburg has 'I Dreamed a Dream', and I don't even know about things like The Lion king and at this point I don't care. Hope that helps.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Stan Adams
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Fox had so little faith in Star Wars that the studio gave the film a staggered early-summer release - it debuted in different cities on different dates. For example, SW premiered in Miami on June 17 (against the infamous flop Exorcist II: The Heretic); it opened in Milwaukee on June 24.

    The Silence of the Lambs swept the Oscars in late March 1992 despite having been released on Valentine's Day 1991. Silence was ready in the fall of 1990 but was held over to the next year so Orion could throw its limited resources behind the (successful) Oscar campaign for Dances with Wolves.


    Possibly related: it’s been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly “award winning” Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?
     
    Late in her career, Lauren Bacall starred in an awful "thriller" (The Fan) in which she played a Broadway actress stalked by Michael Biehn (Kyle Reese in The Terminator/Col. Hicks in Aliens). The comedic highlight of the movie was her cringeworthy musical performance, which must be heard to be believed:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSr0WGPbGd0

    The sad thing is that the ridiculous fake-musical-in-a-movie is ten times more entertaining than Hamilton. I'd rather listen to two hours' worth of Bacall gargling vodka than thirty seconds' worth of Lin-Manuel Miranda (c)rapping.
    , @Anonymous
    @Peter D. Bredon


    Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the “good” films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets “dumped” in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).
     
    Blazing Saddles was released in February. Apparently the studio thought it would bomb. In fact it became a huge hit.
  68. @Alfa158
    “ Valeisha Butterfield Jones”
    Steve, you should have edited the post to delete that name. That can’t be a real person’s name and it makes us think that you are fabricating the whole story.
    Or maybe that’s just my brain’s coping mechanism. If my subconscious convinces me these Stevebait stories are just Babylon Bee humorous spoofs, it will get me through the agony of watching our civilization collapsing like a house of cards.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Jonathan Mason

    Speaking of phony names:

  69. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @James O'Meara

  70. @Art Deco
    Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King's predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O'Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he'll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    Replies: @jcd1974, @Lurker, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby, @David In TN

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point…

    A camera store. Steve makes it sound like Pornhub before its time.

    After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O’Connor story.

    And managing to get mugged inside her own house in Detroit. The Rev’m Jackson was quoted as saying, how could anybody mug Rosa Parks?

    Uh, how could anybody mug anybody? Was it a “mugging gone wrong”?

    Be a Pain

    Heard on a YouTube meme channel the other day: “I live in Spain, but the S is silent.” Like Biden’s Psalmist.


    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Actually Milk was a kind of interesting character before he came out & moved to SF. He was a deep sea diver in the Navy.

    Some gay politico wrote an expose of the movie. It may still be on the internet but I can't find it. He explained that the movie was trash as was the lazy journalistic "Twinkie Defense."

    Dan White was a Vietnam vet with bad PTSD, and something drove him over the edge. He disliked Moscone and Milk was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Most of Milk's family wants nothing to do with his image but he's got some yapping nephew who's basically a professional homo and who makes money off the Milk name.

  71. @Hypnotoad666
    @Half Canadian

    So the nominees are outraged that they, themselves, are not black? Or are they outraged that they wrote better books than any black people did?

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?

    If there were, it would be dominated by whites who would all then need to withdraw their names. /meta

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Alan Mercer

    There would be so many thousands, maybe millions, of white self-haters, and all so devoted to it, that it wouldn't be possible to organize. They'd ALL deserve ALL the EQUALIZATION AND HUMILIATION AWARDS. I hate flagellants, including the Desert Fathers.

  72. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Meretricious

    Some of the Motown stuff is at least pleasant, but there are Negro Geniuses--at least some female singers. There is nobody better than Ella Fitzgerald with all the Broadway songbooks, and they never sound the least bit dated. Listen to 'Thou Swell', for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_nkIO8W5qo The other one that always comes to mind is Dionne Warwick with her legendary (truly) collaboration with Burt Bacharach.

    What these two have in common is that they are considered 'too white' by Negroes. Ella admitted that she was primarily influenced by the white singer Connie Boswell. Warwick was not so obviously white, but she was accused of it often, and the songs were sophisticated and you really don't think of race when she sings those Bacharach/David songs. The Black Gospel elements in some of her ornamentation don't seem particularly black, just that she could do things with her voice that nobody else could.

    Duke Ellington was also a great Negro Genius. I've got some of the ancient LPs from the late 40s and early 50s, and they are not like anything anyone else ever did. The only huge mistake he made was to try to do a jazz version of The Nutcracker, and it is so fucking ugly; there is simply no way not to prefer the original Tchaikowsky, this is just a maiming of it. But with the super-cool cabaret style, he was different from the other jazz musicians, and some of those are great too, but although Ellington is more 'Negro', it's a very 'genteel Negro sound'. I don't think he was ever 'accused' of 'being too white', though, as Ella and Dionne definitely were.

    Of course, you can prefer white singers doing all the show songs from the Broadway songbooks that Ella did, and sometimes I do (she doesn't get "Lush Life" right--too wholesome), and some of the things in the Harold Arlen Songbook, as "Hooray for Love" and "Let's Fall in Love" are a couple in which I think she can't be beat. Dionne put her stamp on the Bacharach songs, and they more or less totally belong to her--even Streisand singing 'Alfie' sounds dimestore by comparison.

    I wouldn't say I thought Billie Holliday was a 'Negro genius'. The ones that got all their psychodrama of drugs into the music are boring. I can't think of any black male geniuses right off, but I have usually preferred French pop male singers like Becaud and Trenet to any of ours.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading “Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in America’s Loudest City” by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. ”

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Dionne Warwick is a very difficult person. It's quite a contorted life, what with coming from not exactly one of the best families of Newark. She sometimes says bullshit, but she's also been a pillar of strength in her quite disorderly family--including when Whitney Houston died and then the daughter Bobbi Kristina Brown, she even had to fight off idiot relatives that wanted this "Sweet Sixteen Funeral". I'm sure she's ashamed of them, but she's had good luck--a husband she loved, sexy affairs with other men, sons and grandson....but also did that idiot 'Psychic' TV show in the 90s, managed all financial affairs horribly, let her diva-ship go to her head with her AIDS work.

    She hasn't really had any choice to be tough and her incredible talent has saved her from some of the worst events, including her own character flaws. And she used to pull up the racist card quite often. On the other hand, her stubborn independent strength is surely the same animal as that voice, a voice as if made for Bacharach, and he and Hal David cranked out one smart song for her after another. She once walked off Trump's Apprentice, I think, just got pissed, and just said 'this isn't something I'm supposed to be doing'. Tough cookie, no question. Very proud of herself, and rightly so. Her stage presence as it was in 1983 was breathtaking; she's beautiful.

    Sorry to hear that story. It is sad. And shows she goes back and forth about race. Talking to Diahann Carroll once, she was definitely the dominant of the two singers, she did talk about blacks telling her she was 'too white'. Actually you can tell she is black, but it's still a unique instrument, and is in a wholly unique niche. Who else would have the nerve to record 'People', which Barbra Streisand more or less owns. That's because there are a lot of good singers, but those were the 'same large size' at the same time, though totally different. To my taste, she was ultimately the greater, but Streisand was also the Hollywood actress and personality, so is more of a household word even now that she's much older.

    But Dionne, at her peak, did remarkable things like going back to music school to improve herself musically--right in the middle of her career. She is, in a word, formidable.

    I don't think Ella Fitzgerald sounds black, and she's the only one I know of who had that particular sound. I didn't like it that much for a long time, am nuts for everything she recorded now.

    , @Anon
    @Peter D. Bredon


    something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people.
     
    O.K., Dionne Warwick, for whom Whitey McWhite composers Burt Bacharach and Hal David wrote several blazingly white songs that were hits for her? Songs that were whiter than the Ronettes "Be My Baby"? Before they shifted their output to the alabaster Karen Carpenter?

    At any rate, here's an early ultrawhite Bacharach-David composition with lyrics about a superwhite 1950s high school experience, sung by Caucasoid Perry Como:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IibW1A3zyPQ

    The way that we cheered whenever our team
    Was scoring a touchdown
    The time that the floor fell out of my car
    When I put the clutch down
     
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @Peter D. Bredon

    That's a funny story. Michael Bolton resembles a true soul singer about as much as he does a Scott Walker tortured-existentialist-romantic interpreter of Jacques Brel, but using Dionne Warwick -- the supreme vessel for the middlebrow creations of Burt Bacharach and Hal David -- to make the point that Bolton is cadging from Otis Redding, Percy Sledge and other genuine soul singers is hilarious.

    Bolton's a joke, sure, but far more talented white musicians have gotten away with worse, without permanent damage to their reputations. Take, for example, the Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'," with a teenaged Steve Winwood on organ and vocals. Great song, but with obvious antecedents in Sam & Dave's "Hold On! I'm Comin'" and Homer Banks's "(Ain't That) A Lot of Love." But maybe because Winwood was so young at the time, or maybe because he left the pop-oriented Spencer Davis Group to form Traffic (and later Blind Faith, the first "supergroup," with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker), he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music. (Of course, Steve Winwood was one of the best white soul/R&B singers of the '60's, right there with Mitch Ryder, Eric Burdon and Alex Chilton. So chalk up the Spencer Davis songs to "youthful indiscretion.")

    Let's not even talk about John Fogerty's repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR's "Traveling Band."

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @peterike

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Peter D. Bredon

    And that's why you hear Elvis Presley more than Michael Bolton these days.

  73. @SunBakedSuburb
    "white guys with guitars playing for kids"

    Minstrels wandering out of Medieval Faires looking for kids.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @bomag

    The raper; er, I meant rapper; R Kelly has been called The Pied Piper of R&B. I heard he likes kids. He should be nominated. It would send the proper signal.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @bomag

    I can't wait until they nominate R. Kelly's new children's album I Can't Wait Til You Is Legal, Ho, featuring the hit single Momma Teach You Pole Dancing.

    Are there any more suicidal demographics than GoodWhites?

  74. @Art Deco
    Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King's predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O'Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he'll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    Replies: @jcd1974, @Lurker, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby, @David In TN

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old.

    What’s a Moock? You can’t call me a Moock.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @duncsbaby

    "There's not much you hear on the radio today (doin' the things that we want to),

    But you can still see a movie or a play (doin' the things that we want to).

    Here's to Travis Bickle, and here's to Johnny Boy (doin' the things that we want to),

    Growing up in the mean streets of New York (doin' the things that we want to).

    I wrote this song 'cause I'd like to shake your hand (doin' the things that we want to),

    In a way, you guys the best friends I ever had (doin' the things that we want to).

    Doin' the things that we want to."

    -----Lou Reed, "Doing the Things That We Want To" (New Sensations, 1984).

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  75. @Buffalo Joe
    @jcd1974

    jcd, I don't know much about music videos for the little ones, but my newest grand daughter loves "Pizza Party" and I do too. But, why would you present awards for childish songs? Did "Itsy Bitsy Spider" win a Grammy?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer, @BenKenobi, @Steve Sailer

    I get your point but I think there’s more to making great music (or books, toys, etc) for kids than just keeping things simple. It isn’t easy to make something that really resonates with a lot of minds, young or otherwise. Since having children I’ve developed a lot of respect for people who dedicate their lives to enriching children (and who do it well). Blippi, for example, is an absolute genius. It may be calculated or natural, but he’s a genius.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  76. @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco


    I think Milk owned his own business at one point...

     

    A camera store. Steve makes it sound like Pornhub before its time.

    After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O’Connor story.
     
    And managing to get mugged inside her own house in Detroit. The Rev'm Jackson was quoted as saying, how could anybody mug Rosa Parks?

    Uh, how could anybody mug anybody? Was it a "mugging gone wrong"?

    Be a Pain
     
    Heard on a YouTube meme channel the other day: "I live in Spain, but the S is silent." Like Biden's Psalmist.


    https://whyy.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/AP_19085834616469-768x504.jpg


    https://media4.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_08/894396/150217-150217-biden-02-4x3-5p-2127_04717baabe5301141444435c53cc9957.jpg

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Actually Milk was a kind of interesting character before he came out & moved to SF. He was a deep sea diver in the Navy.

    Some gay politico wrote an expose of the movie. It may still be on the internet but I can’t find it. He explained that the movie was trash as was the lazy journalistic “Twinkie Defense.”

    Dan White was a Vietnam vet with bad PTSD, and something drove him over the edge. He disliked Moscone and Milk was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Most of Milk’s family wants nothing to do with his image but he’s got some yapping nephew who’s basically a professional homo and who makes money off the Milk name.

  77. @Thoughts
    The other day I realized that Fat Acceptance in the Black Community was forced down their throats so that Beyonce could be Queen

    Before Beyonce, all famous black women were skinny...and very skinny at that. Beyonce (her management team specifically) needed to destroy the memory of the Paula Abdul's, Whitney Houston's, Diana Ross, Billie Holiday, Tina Turner, Lena Horne etc etc

    Blacks had to be further degraded so that Beyonce could be worshipped.

    Replies: @Giant Duck, @AnotherDad

    Paula Abdul is Jewish, of Syrian and Ukrainian origin. Not black.

  78. @Buffalo Joe
    @jcd1974

    jcd, I don't know much about music videos for the little ones, but my newest grand daughter loves "Pizza Party" and I do too. But, why would you present awards for childish songs? Did "Itsy Bitsy Spider" win a Grammy?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer, @BenKenobi, @Steve Sailer

    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    It’s apparently the 3rd biggest channel on the site right now, and wouldn’t you have guessed it — they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    ...they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

     

    Despite that, the Gardner family of Brooklyn gave it the greatest endorsement imaginable:


    Funeral held for 1-year-old shooting victim Davell Gardner


    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/07/davell-gardner-funeral-18.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1033

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @BenKenobi, @Garlic

  79. @James Speaks
    @Buffalo Joe

    Au contraire mein giddermeister. All that needs to occur is a new category. Call it Aspiring Rapper du Jour.

    Anytime some goof (I meant yoof) who was just getting their Life together is wrongly offed by another aspiring rapper who was also just getting their life together, the aspiring rapper of the first part automatically wins the Aspiring Rapper du Jour award. The aspiring rapper of the second part, the one who did the offing, wins the Producer du Jour award.

    BBC <<<—— Spell check decided that should be there so I left it.

    Replies: @Marty

    In the ‘90’s I played in a mostly black lunch-hour basketball game in Berkeley. One of the occasional players was a rapper, a 6’5” block of marble from Hunter’s Point who went by “Primo.” One of our regulars was a skinny undergrad from Beverly Hills who eventually became a lawyer at Morrison & Foerster. The black guys called him “Goldstein.” On Telegraph, two blocks from the gym, was a record store with a sidewalk bargain bin. One day Goldstein came into the gym waving a jewel case and yelled, “Hey Primo, I bought your album – ten cents!” About a dozen brothers fell down laughing.

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Marty

    I was reading some gushing paleocon piece about Lexington, KY - it does everything right, yada yada. No mention of race. One of the factors they mentioned was U of KY basketball, so I looked up the roster.

    https://ukathletics.com/sports/mens-basketball/roster

    Why so many obviously biracial boys? What's going on here?

    Replies: @Marty

  80. @Buffalo Joe
    @jcd1974

    jcd, I don't know much about music videos for the little ones, but my newest grand daughter loves "Pizza Party" and I do too. But, why would you present awards for childish songs? Did "Itsy Bitsy Spider" win a Grammy?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer, @BenKenobi, @Steve Sailer

    I saw the kids music duo Trout Fishing in America in the 1990s. Their Big Trouble album is really good:

    https://www.troutmusic.com/products/big-trouble

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I saw the kids music duo Trout Fishing in America in the 1990s. Their Big Trouble album is really good:

     

    Around that time is when the songs on Thomas the Tank Engine, mostly written by Junior Campbell (ex-Marmalade) and Mike O'Donnell, beat anything heard on "adult" radio. The more recent songs by other writers are professional but lifeless. The writing and new characters match. Fireman Sam has gone downhill as well.

    CGI ruins everything, not just the look. The writing and soundtrack go down with it.

    Spongebob premiered with Tiny Tim's cover of a 1930 Maurice Chevalier tune co-written by the father of the Sherman brothers of Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang fame. It never reached those heights again.


    Here's the original:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMZL5OYKT8U
  81. @jon
    @ic1000

    You can't bring up the famous African-American Representative G.K. Butterfield without including a photo:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/GK_Butterfield%2C_Official_photo_116th_Congress.jpg

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous, @Possumman

    If that was a Turkish flag behind him you could convince me this was a picture of the Turkish finance minister.

  82. Bees against honey.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  83. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Muggles

    "I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours."

    Years ago I became suspicious of the way musicals would open a month or so before being nominated for a dozen Tonys (Tonies?). I guess the idea was that all the theater mavens knew what were working out to be the good shows, and delayed openings until as late as possible. Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the "good" films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets "dumped" in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    OTOH, I'm now inclined to think this is just because it's all fixed.

    Possibly related: it's been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly "award winning" Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Stan Adams, @Anonymous

    No, they are not all junk, but most of them are. The musicals have been unravelling since the high points in the 50s–it seems almost all of the ‘great’ ones were over by about 1959. After that, in the 60s, there were ‘pretty good shows’ like Funny Girl, which had a beautiful score but was an idiotic story–who cares about Fanny Brice and Nick Arnstein? Otherwise, all those super-middle-cult Jerry Herman things that are deeply-cherished by show-tune fairies, and by the 70s the celebrity was for quite a long time Sondheim, but even his best ones didn’t usually have hits–just ‘Send in the Clowns’ as I recall. I saw several of the shows, and 2 were very good, and had good songs, but the day of the B’way hit song is antideluvian. I’m surprised musicals are still made, they’re mostly so dumb. In the 80s and 90s, I heard 2 good scores by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields (City of Angels and The Life), but no hits. Around 2001, Urinetown was excellent–again had good songs but nothing that has to do with youth culture. After that, only In the Heights in 2010, by Miranda who did Hamilton, and the songs were quite good–but still, nothing to do with youth pop culture, and sort of localized to Washington Hgts. Hispanics. I saw one B’way show, Honeymoon in Vegas with Tony Danza in 2015, and that was the last. It was good B’way energy with real chorine-type girls, but mostly shit.

    So it’s not always because all the songs are junk (some of Sondheim’s early ones were very good, but maybe not as good as West Side Story and Gypsy, but they’re mostly irrelevant and were at the time of their opening, even if there was acclaim.

    Of course, there’s the gigantism, and those actually have produced hits: Lloyd Webber’s ugly music has some very popular songs, Schonburg has ‘I Dreamed a Dream’, and I don’t even know about things like The Lion king and at this point I don’t care. Hope that helps.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    "City of Angels" is a wonderful guy musical about a hard-boiled Chandleresque detective with a book by Larry Gelbart of MASH fame. It's hard to make a musical masculine, but they did a good job.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  84. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Muggles

    "I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours."

    Years ago I became suspicious of the way musicals would open a month or so before being nominated for a dozen Tonys (Tonies?). I guess the idea was that all the theater mavens knew what were working out to be the good shows, and delayed openings until as late as possible. Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the "good" films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets "dumped" in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    OTOH, I'm now inclined to think this is just because it's all fixed.

    Possibly related: it's been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly "award winning" Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Stan Adams, @Anonymous

    Fox had so little faith in Star Wars that the studio gave the film a staggered early-summer release – it debuted in different cities on different dates. For example, SW premiered in Miami on June 17 (against the infamous flop Exorcist II: The Heretic); it opened in Milwaukee on June 24.

    The Silence of the Lambs swept the Oscars in late March 1992 despite having been released on Valentine’s Day 1991. Silence was ready in the fall of 1990 but was held over to the next year so Orion could throw its limited resources behind the (successful) Oscar campaign for Dances with Wolves.

    Possibly related: it’s been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly “award winning” Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    Late in her career, Lauren Bacall starred in an awful “thriller” (The Fan) in which she played a Broadway actress stalked by Michael Biehn (Kyle Reese in The Terminator/Col. Hicks in Aliens). The comedic highlight of the movie was her cringeworthy musical performance, which must be heard to be believed:

    The sad thing is that the ridiculous fake-musical-in-a-movie is ten times more entertaining than Hamilton. I’d rather listen to two hours’ worth of Bacall gargling vodka than thirty seconds’ worth of Lin-Manuel Miranda (c)rapping.

  85. If they want more blacks to get awards at the Grammy. Then just hold a 100 yard dash at the beginning of it.

  86. @BenKenobi
    @Buffalo Joe

    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called "Cocomelon." Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I'm getting diabetes when this stuff is on it's so sweet.

    It's apparently the 3rd biggest channel on the site right now, and wouldn't you have guessed it -- they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    …they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

    Despite that, the Gardner family of Brooklyn gave it the greatest endorsement imaginable:

    Funeral held for 1-year-old shooting victim Davell Gardner

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Reg Cæsar

    I hate that I have to read literally everything, including this, because it's useful to know how bad it's gotten and how much worse it dramatically gets daily.

    , @BenKenobi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Wow that's sad.

    , @Garlic
    @Reg Cæsar

    What a heart breaking photo!

    What kind of world do we live in where the images of dead criminals are splashed in glory across the newspapers of the world, but the image of an innocent one year old victim of criminals attracts no notice whatsoever from the self proclaimed goodthinkers who goodthink their way all over the mass media?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  87. @Alan Mercer
    @Hypnotoad666

    Is there an award category for the most meta-level virtue signal of the year?
     

    If there were, it would be dominated by whites who would all then need to withdraw their names. /meta

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    There would be so many thousands, maybe millions, of white self-haters, and all so devoted to it, that it wouldn’t be possible to organize. They’d ALL deserve ALL the EQUALIZATION AND HUMILIATION AWARDS. I hate flagellants, including the Desert Fathers.

  88. @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    ...they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

     

    Despite that, the Gardner family of Brooklyn gave it the greatest endorsement imaginable:


    Funeral held for 1-year-old shooting victim Davell Gardner


    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/07/davell-gardner-funeral-18.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1033

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @BenKenobi, @Garlic

    I hate that I have to read literally everything, including this, because it’s useful to know how bad it’s gotten and how much worse it dramatically gets daily.

  89. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Peter D. Bredon

    No, they are not all junk, but most of them are. The musicals have been unravelling since the high points in the 50s--it seems almost all of the 'great' ones were over by about 1959. After that, in the 60s, there were 'pretty good shows' like Funny Girl, which had a beautiful score but was an idiotic story--who cares about Fanny Brice and Nick Arnstein? Otherwise, all those super-middle-cult Jerry Herman things that are deeply-cherished by show-tune fairies, and by the 70s the celebrity was for quite a long time Sondheim, but even his best ones didn't usually have hits--just 'Send in the Clowns' as I recall. I saw several of the shows, and 2 were very good, and had good songs, but the day of the B'way hit song is antideluvian. I'm surprised musicals are still made, they're mostly so dumb. In the 80s and 90s, I heard 2 good scores by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields (City of Angels and The Life), but no hits. Around 2001, Urinetown was excellent--again had good songs but nothing that has to do with youth culture. After that, only In the Heights in 2010, by Miranda who did Hamilton, and the songs were quite good--but still, nothing to do with youth pop culture, and sort of localized to Washington Hgts. Hispanics. I saw one B'way show, Honeymoon in Vegas with Tony Danza in 2015, and that was the last. It was good B'way energy with real chorine-type girls, but mostly shit.

    So it's not always because all the songs are junk (some of Sondheim's early ones were very good, but maybe not as good as West Side Story and Gypsy, but they're mostly irrelevant and were at the time of their opening, even if there was acclaim.

    Of course, there's the gigantism, and those actually have produced hits: Lloyd Webber's ugly music has some very popular songs, Schonburg has 'I Dreamed a Dream', and I don't even know about things like The Lion king and at this point I don't care. Hope that helps.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “City of Angels” is a wonderful guy musical about a hard-boiled Chandleresque detective with a book by Larry Gelbart of MASH fame. It’s hard to make a musical masculine, but they did a good job.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Steve Sailer

    Lucky you to see it. I had so many things going on in a bad year that I didn't manage to. Did you see it in NYC? I don't see that particular complex musical going on National Tour, but it may well have. (I've seen several shows at Hollywood Pantages.) I listened to the score a lot, and Coleman and Fields were really on a roll at the end of their careers (and lives) with that and The Life, about Hell's Kitchen prostitutes and pimps--have no idea how such a show had a long run, but it deserved it. I would say City of Angels ought to be made into a movie, but as we know, that's so often the kiss of death for a show.

    Am a Raymond Chandler extreme fan like many. Read all of them, like Farewell, My Lovely and The Little Sister the best probably. Another regret--not going to Frank and Musso for a martini and a steak; I've heard it called "true Raymond Chandler country". I thought La Scala Beverly Hills would be something like that, since also very old, but it was an ordinary dressed-down Xmas crowd in 2009. Although it was great Famous Chopped Salad and the best white wine I've ever had (should have written it down.)

  90. OT:
    No confirmation on the date this was taken but the guy who posted it says he just saw it on Snapchat.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Altai

    Why weren't any White people invited?

    Replies: @Altai

  91. @Altai
    OT:
    No confirmation on the date this was taken but the guy who posted it says he just saw it on Snapchat.

    https://twitter.com/JFrazier_/status/1345439865677225985

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Why weren’t any White people invited?

    • Replies: @Altai
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Why would they be all black super parties are pretty common. The guy is from Britain but I don't know if he is maybe living in the US now because the voices in the video sound American, are dressed like Americans and they're using solo cups (Which are an American thing, rest of the world uses white or transparent cups) so why would he be in the Snap outflow of African-Americans?

  92. Anon[405] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: An internal memo has leaked from Dallas police department about a new policy under consideration, to wit:

    “Dallas police will no longer respond to stolen cars, criminal mischief, reckless damage, runaway kids and child custody escalations, among other offenses.”

    Looks like the big cities are going to bring back the days of the Wild West, and there will have to be a revival of vigilante committees to protect the ordinary citizens. If people have their cars stolen, how are they going to get to work? They’ll lose their jobs if they can’t make to their job. How are they going to haul food back from the grocery store without a car?

    You know what? I had assumed that the next Civil War would be between Red and Blue states. I now think this is wrong. It’s going to be between the law-abiding citizens and the law-breakers inside our big Democratic cities. They’re on collision course with each other. The law-abiding in Blue States are really going to start hating their anti-gun laws. They disarmed themselves right before the Democratic politicians decided to deliberately destroy law and order, let the criminals out of jail en masse, and began to refuse to arrest criminals for almost everything.

    If the leftist Democrats win, our big cities are going to become unlivable, and there will be a mass exodus out of big cities like medieval citizens fleeing the Black Plague. With all the taxpayers chased out, the tax base of big U.S. cities will utterly collapse. They’ll ALL become Detroit. Except that even Detroit has an operating police force that still makes arrests.

    It’s either become Detroit, or a war zone like Syria.

  93. @Anon7
    @Anon7

    It occurs to me that shows like Bridgerton are much more effective in destroying white history than just taking down statues of obscure generals, or renaming military bases.

    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    Yep. Audiences for this crap regularly number 20-50 million.

    It’s how most people ‘learn’ about ‘their world’ or so they think.

    People think TV is a dying medium, but that’s only old-timey ‘broadcast’ media.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/243789/number-of-tv-households-in-the-us/

    People are watching “Pay TV” more than ever. Brains are rotting at record speed.

  94. • Replies: @Altai
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Leave it to a Hungarian living outside the US to synthesize all the aesthetics of American wokeness (Or maybe 'American wokeness' is a tautology) into a single, balanced sculpture. Statue of Liberty, taking a knee, black power fist and rainbow.

    Come on America, how'd he make this first?!

    Multiculturalism and 'nation of immigrants' (Which now somehow includes Britain) mantra were just copes or tropes installed by America's immigrant descendants but misery likes company. They are a uniquely American political ideology. US academia has never seen such domination except in the fields of 'Sociology', 'Psychology' etc. A lesson to the world, don't learn to speak English.

  95. @ic1000

    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.”
     
    NPR sure brings the eloquence of Chief DIE Officer Valeisha Butterfield Jones to the fore. She has had to overcome a childhood full of hardship and deprivation, as her mother was a lowly State representative. However generous her compensation may be, I'm sure she's worth every penny.

    Replies: @jon, @dcthrowback, @AnotherDad, @ziggurat

    “We’re an organization that’s ready for change, but you know, we’re not unique to the challenges of the world and to the challenges of our industry,” Butterfield Jones says of the 63-year-old organization being revamped. “I think it’s time. You know, we saw in 2020 a racial reckoning. So now, you know, it’s, you know, up to us what we’re going to do to take real and meaningful action.

    We will have a “racial reckoning” when whites find a way out of this anti-white prison. It’s past time, but as of yet, no real and meaningful action has been taken. I guess there are not enough voices yet for the “white awakening”.
    https://www.unz.com/article/voices-of-a-white-awakening

  96. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Altai

    Why weren't any White people invited?

    Replies: @Altai

    Why would they be all black super parties are pretty common. The guy is from Britain but I don’t know if he is maybe living in the US now because the voices in the video sound American, are dressed like Americans and they’re using solo cups (Which are an American thing, rest of the world uses white or transparent cups) so why would he be in the Snap outflow of African-Americans?

  97. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/guardian/status/1346327214057517056

    Replies: @Altai

    Leave it to a Hungarian living outside the US to synthesize all the aesthetics of American wokeness (Or maybe ‘American wokeness’ is a tautology) into a single, balanced sculpture. Statue of Liberty, taking a knee, black power fist and rainbow.

    Come on America, how’d he make this first?!

    Multiculturalism and ‘nation of immigrants’ (Which now somehow includes Britain) mantra were just copes or tropes installed by America’s immigrant descendants but misery likes company. They are a uniquely American political ideology. US academia has never seen such domination except in the fields of ‘Sociology’, ‘Psychology’ etc. A lesson to the world, don’t learn to speak English.

  98. @Anon
    There's an air of desperation among liberals. They know that if they can't push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen, and it won't happen because they'll finally have to admit that blacks are inferior. Less smart, less talented, and unwilling to work.

    Liberals are crazy-desperate.

    Replies: @Shango, @Shango, @Art Deco

    Why this generation? Why are liberals so desperate to find any form of disparity that shows that black is underepresenitive compared to whites in certain fields? They are number a reasons people why our ruling class made blacks there favorite pets ,but it is just confusing andd weird.

  99. @Anon
    There's an air of desperation among liberals. They know that if they can't push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen, and it won't happen because they'll finally have to admit that blacks are inferior. Less smart, less talented, and unwilling to work.

    Liberals are crazy-desperate.

    Replies: @Shango, @Shango, @Art Deco

    Why this generation? Why are liberals so desperate to find any form of disparity that shows that black is under representative compared to whites in certain fields? They are number a of reasons people why our ruling class made blacks their favorite pets, but it is just confusing and weird.

  100. One of them is Alastair Moock, whose nominated album, Be a Pain

    He’s just walking the talk.

    • Agree: Polistra
  101. @duncsbaby
    @Art Deco


    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old.
     
    What's a Moock? You can't call me a Moock.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vw8t4O9JQM

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “There’s not much you hear on the radio today (doin’ the things that we want to),

    But you can still see a movie or a play (doin’ the things that we want to).

    Here’s to Travis Bickle, and here’s to Johnny Boy (doin’ the things that we want to),

    Growing up in the mean streets of New York (doin’ the things that we want to).

    I wrote this song ’cause I’d like to shake your hand (doin’ the things that we want to),

    In a way, you guys the best friends I ever had (doin’ the things that we want to).

    Doin’ the things that we want to.”

    —–Lou Reed, “Doing the Things That We Want To” (New Sensations, 1984).

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Lou Reed sucks. Taxi Driver sucks. Mean Streets sucks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  102. @Steve Sailer
    @Buffalo Joe

    I saw the kids music duo Trout Fishing in America in the 1990s. Their Big Trouble album is really good:

    https://www.troutmusic.com/products/big-trouble

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I saw the kids music duo Trout Fishing in America in the 1990s. Their Big Trouble album is really good:

    Around that time is when the songs on Thomas the Tank Engine, mostly written by Junior Campbell (ex-Marmalade) and Mike O’Donnell, beat anything heard on “adult” radio. The more recent songs by other writers are professional but lifeless. The writing and new characters match. Fireman Sam has gone downhill as well.

    CGI ruins everything, not just the look. The writing and soundtrack go down with it.

    Spongebob premiered with Tiny Tim’s cover of a 1930 Maurice Chevalier tune co-written by the father of the Sherman brothers of Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang fame. It never reached those heights again.

    Here’s the original:

  103. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading "Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City" by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. "

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Anon, @Gary in Gramercy, @Redneck farmer

    Dionne Warwick is a very difficult person. It’s quite a contorted life, what with coming from not exactly one of the best families of Newark. She sometimes says bullshit, but she’s also been a pillar of strength in her quite disorderly family–including when Whitney Houston died and then the daughter Bobbi Kristina Brown, she even had to fight off idiot relatives that wanted this “Sweet Sixteen Funeral”. I’m sure she’s ashamed of them, but she’s had good luck–a husband she loved, sexy affairs with other men, sons and grandson….but also did that idiot ‘Psychic’ TV show in the 90s, managed all financial affairs horribly, let her diva-ship go to her head with her AIDS work.

    She hasn’t really had any choice to be tough and her incredible talent has saved her from some of the worst events, including her own character flaws. And she used to pull up the racist card quite often. On the other hand, her stubborn independent strength is surely the same animal as that voice, a voice as if made for Bacharach, and he and Hal David cranked out one smart song for her after another. She once walked off Trump’s Apprentice, I think, just got pissed, and just said ‘this isn’t something I’m supposed to be doing’. Tough cookie, no question. Very proud of herself, and rightly so. Her stage presence as it was in 1983 was breathtaking; she’s beautiful.

    Sorry to hear that story. It is sad. And shows she goes back and forth about race. Talking to Diahann Carroll once, she was definitely the dominant of the two singers, she did talk about blacks telling her she was ‘too white’. Actually you can tell she is black, but it’s still a unique instrument, and is in a wholly unique niche. Who else would have the nerve to record ‘People’, which Barbra Streisand more or less owns. That’s because there are a lot of good singers, but those were the ‘same large size’ at the same time, though totally different. To my taste, she was ultimately the greater, but Streisand was also the Hollywood actress and personality, so is more of a household word even now that she’s much older.

    But Dionne, at her peak, did remarkable things like going back to music school to improve herself musically–right in the middle of her career. She is, in a word, formidable.

    I don’t think Ella Fitzgerald sounds black, and she’s the only one I know of who had that particular sound. I didn’t like it that much for a long time, am nuts for everything she recorded now.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Thanks: Billy Shears
  104. Is this a category that ends up on the televised show? If so, will the winner appear in person, I wonder? If he or she does, will the audience stand up and turn their backs to the stage, or “take a knee,” or hiss and grumble? Will the winner make a “guilt statement,” “I acknowledge … I will never be able to … I must work at this for the rest of my days ….”

  105. Anon[364] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve has emphasized the effectiveness of cleverly and memorably naming concepts.

    In Michael Levin’s Why Race Matters I came across an example of something I have noticed, but which did not have a name, to my knowledge. He refers to something that he calls “neutralizing by clear statement,” “the rhetorical device of presenting a trenchant objection to one’s position with no attempt to refute it, suggesting by this sangfroid that there is a reply too obvious to mention.”

    He gives the example of an author bringing up the model minority “myth,” and then basically doing a sort of “shaking my head” response, listing up the points the “mythmakers” make, without really responding to them.

    I was delighted to have a name for this. But I was crestfallen to find out that Google and Wikipedia have never heard of it. 🙁 I suspect Levin made it up. Also, it’s not as pithy and catchy as I’d ideally like. But for now, it’s better than nothing.

    I think that “neutralizing by clear statement” has become more common in the last year through the influence of Ibram X. Kendi and Robin DiAngelo. For instance,

    Why do Black and Latinx children routinely get lower scores on the standardized tests? Either there’s something wrong with the test takers or there’s something wrong with the tests. Why are Black and Latinx children routinely under-represented in the exam schools? Either there’s something wrong with Black and Latinx children or there’s something wrong with Boston’s admissions policies.

    Uh, yeah, I can agree with that. There is something wrong somewhere, and it’s not the test.

    And,

    DiAngelo says that when challenged on race or privilege, particularly by people of colour, white people often lash out. “We white people so often make it so miserable for people of colour to talk to us about their experiences….

    Yes, that’s true. Maybe stop calling whites racist and blaming them for your lot in life?

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Anon


    Maybe stop calling whites racist and blaming them for your lot in life?
     
    For my part, I'd happily settle for them to stop menacing, assaulting, beating, shooting, rioting, looting, and generally destroying every single thing they touch. If they'd make even the tiniest bit of headway there, I'd happily permit them to engage in all the name-calling and blaming that suits them.

    Funny thing though, if they tried the former they'd find the latter less 'necessary'.
  106. @Thoughts
    The other day I realized that Fat Acceptance in the Black Community was forced down their throats so that Beyonce could be Queen

    Before Beyonce, all famous black women were skinny...and very skinny at that. Beyonce (her management team specifically) needed to destroy the memory of the Paula Abdul's, Whitney Houston's, Diana Ross, Billie Holiday, Tina Turner, Lena Horne etc etc

    Blacks had to be further degraded so that Beyonce could be worshipped.

    Replies: @Giant Duck, @AnotherDad

    Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey, Aretha Franklin … and of course Aunt Jemima.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  107. Anon[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter D. Bredon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading "Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City" by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. "

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Anon, @Gary in Gramercy, @Redneck farmer

    something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people.

    O.K., Dionne Warwick, for whom Whitey McWhite composers Burt Bacharach and Hal David wrote several blazingly white songs that were hits for her? Songs that were whiter than the Ronettes “Be My Baby”? Before they shifted their output to the alabaster Karen Carpenter?

    At any rate, here’s an early ultrawhite Bacharach-David composition with lyrics about a superwhite 1950s high school experience, sung by Caucasoid Perry Como:

    The way that we cheered whenever our team
    Was scoring a touchdown
    The time that the floor fell out of my car
    When I put the clutch down

  108. @AnotherDad
    @ic1000

    The kicker: these paper-bag test passers are very, very proud of their whiter skin and features and not looking like an actual African. Can't be spoken directly--snide comments amongst themselves about black, blacks only--but their relative "unblackness" in phenotype is very, very important to them even as they parrot BLM nonsense and run their racial shakedown.

    If you asked Mrs. Jones to trade her looks for those of a typical American black in order to keep her grift ... no effing way!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Are you trying to get Steve shut down?

  109. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading "Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City" by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. "

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Anon, @Gary in Gramercy, @Redneck farmer

    That’s a funny story. Michael Bolton resembles a true soul singer about as much as he does a Scott Walker tortured-existentialist-romantic interpreter of Jacques Brel, but using Dionne Warwick — the supreme vessel for the middlebrow creations of Burt Bacharach and Hal David — to make the point that Bolton is cadging from Otis Redding, Percy Sledge and other genuine soul singers is hilarious.

    Bolton’s a joke, sure, but far more talented white musicians have gotten away with worse, without permanent damage to their reputations. Take, for example, the Spencer Davis Group’s “Gimme Some Lovin’,” with a teenaged Steve Winwood on organ and vocals. Great song, but with obvious antecedents in Sam & Dave’s “Hold On! I’m Comin’” and Homer Banks’s “(Ain’t That) A Lot of Love.” But maybe because Winwood was so young at the time, or maybe because he left the pop-oriented Spencer Davis Group to form Traffic (and later Blind Faith, the first “supergroup,” with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker), he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music. (Of course, Steve Winwood was one of the best white soul/R&B singers of the ’60’s, right there with Mitch Ryder, Eric Burdon and Alex Chilton. So chalk up the Spencer Davis songs to “youthful indiscretion.”)

    Let’s not even talk about John Fogerty’s repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR’s “Traveling Band.”

    • Replies: @Billy Shears
    @Gary in Gramercy

    I don't think you need to call Bolton a "joke" to make your point.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    , @peterike
    @Gary in Gramercy


    he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music.
     
    This whole conversation is stupid, as whites have consistently taken black music and made it vastly more interesting. The biggest example is the blues. Is there anything duller, more repetitive and uncreative than black blues? But put it into the hands of white bluesmen like Clapton or Led Zeppelin, and it became a thing of wonder. The entire corpus of black blues doesn't equal a single Led Zeppelin album.

    And the only reason old timey black bluesmen exist at all in anyone's memory is because of whites. Same reason that black jazz -- the one area blacks truly excelled -- still exists because of whites (and Asians). Blacks have no interest in their musical heritage.

    Even dolts like Eminem and The Beasty Boys showed that whites could re-think rap in new ways. Not that it matters, other than to note that there is essentially nothing unique or amazing about blacks in music.

    Let’s not even talk about John Fogerty’s repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR’s “Traveling Band.”
     
    Sure, he did imitations. But he did quite a lot more as well. What is the black predecessor to "Proud Mary"? Little Richard was never more than the first five minutes of Little Richard. Same with Chuck Berry. Not one-hit wonders, but one-note wonders.
  110. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Funny you should mention Dionne Warwick. I was reading "Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City" by Steven Miller and found this a couple days ago:

    Dave DiMartino: I talked with Michael Bolton one time. Just before that I interviewed Dionne Warwick of all people, and she said something basically negative about Bolton. So then like a couple months later I had to go out on the road and do a Michael Bolton feature because he was at the peak of his fame. Bolton and I were—it sounds like a such a cliché, it’s almost laughable—but he and I were in the back of a limo. I knew I had to ask this because I was told by higher ups to ask it. I said, “Let me ask you something: what do you think about the whole notion of people saying you’re ripping off black music? Let me read you something Dionne Warwick said.” I read him something about him stealing music from black people. His eyes started watering and he was just really quiet, and I could tell I really hurt him deeply by asking him that trash question. My heart fuckin’ broke. "

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Anon, @Gary in Gramercy, @Redneck farmer

    And that’s why you hear Elvis Presley more than Michael Bolton these days.

  111. The one nominee who’s keeping his head down is Justin Roberts, who in no way looks like a children’s entertainer:

    https://i0.wp.com/www.justinrobertsmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/thumb_JUS160831_159f.jpg?resize=480%2C480&ssl=1

  112. @Anon7
    @Anon7

    It occurs to me that shows like Bridgerton are much more effective in destroying white history than just taking down statues of obscure generals, or renaming military bases.

    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.

    How do we know? Netflix says so?

    And Netflix has–just searched–200m subscribers around the world. Let’s be generous and say 2 people watch when something gets streamed. They are claiming 30m of their subscribers–15% of all subscribers in the world–have tuned into this black fantasy?

    Not saying there aren’t millions as Netflix hypes it. But count me skeptical.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @AnotherDad

    Skepticism is always good.

    I would have said that Netflix is a publicly traded company, and that false reporting of something that they would certainly know (how many streams of what content) would carry criminal penalties. Not that they might not still lie, of course.

    However, it turns out that "watched" means "watched at least two minutes". And the 63 million figure is apparently 63 million households, so there's no telling how many people saw it. Also the 63 million figure is apparently at least partly projected.

    However, it turns out that the first two minutes of the first episode contains several historically false instances of black aristocracy in England in 1812. Not to mention the oddly tinted queen.

    Skepticism is always good. But I stand by what I said, that this sort of content is much worse than taking down statues or renaming bases.

    Replies: @anon

  113. • Replies: @Polistra
    @Lloyd1927


    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/
     
    Hmm. What they consider a 'diversity problem' and what I consider a 'diversity problem' are two wildly different things. I wonder--could we have a 'conversation' and sort this out? I'm certainly willing.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @AnotherDad
    @Lloyd1927

    Thanks for that Lloyd.

    Steve, i realize Lloyd's Harper's link is a couple years old, but man is it on target for the current year. You should post it. Even just the link--without reading a word--is iSteve gold. (Over the top vanity and vapidity.) This is "America" in the current year.

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    Replies: @Rob McX

  114. @jon
    @ic1000

    You can't bring up the famous African-American Representative G.K. Butterfield without including a photo:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/GK_Butterfield%2C_Official_photo_116th_Congress.jpg

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous, @Possumman

    i think J Edgar Hover was black by todays standards

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Anonymous

    Strangely enough, I remember looking at photos of his parents, and if there's a lick of the tarbrush there it seems to be on the side of the mother, whose grandparents (or putative grandparents) were all born in Switzerland.

  115. OT:

    Star Wars: The Kamalarian

    https://www.rt.com/usa/511538-kamala-harris-plagiarism-mlk/

    While speaking with Elle in October, Harris relayed what she claimed was a personal tale from her youth, explaining that during the first civil rights march she attended as a young child, she was separated from her parents after falling out of her stroller.

    “My mother tells the story about how I’m fussing,” Harris told the magazine. “And she’s like ‘Baby, what do you want? What do you need?’ And I just looked at her and said: ‘Fweedom.’”

    However, observers noticed the story has unmistakable similarities to an anecdote told by King during a 1965 Playboy interview – namely a young girl’s endearing mispronunciation of the word “freedom” at a civil rights rally.

    “I never will forget a moment in Birmingham when a white policeman accosted a little negro girl, seven or eight years old, who was walking in a demonstration with her mother,” King told Playboy’s Alex Haley. ‘What do you want?’ the policeman asked her gruffly, and the little girl looked him straight in the eye and answered, ‘Fee-dom.’ She couldn’t even pronounce it, but she knew. It was beautiful!

    I knew they it! They had met earlier. The black force is strong with this one.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

    , @The Alarmist
    @El Dato

    There’s only room for one Wookie in today’s Demonrat Party, and that role was filled long before the Kamelian came on the scene.

  116. @James Speaks
    @Meretricious


    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time.
     
    https://youtu.be/Fjufjv4rH0s

    I rest ny case.

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @Neuday

    Such a great song that was incredibly only the 32nd top song of the year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_Year-End_Hot_100_singles_of_1969

    • Replies: @Aeronerauk
    @Billy Shears

    Incredible that, as a man in my early 30s, I recognize and can hear in my head almost every song on that list.

    More incredibly the Temptations' mediocre "Can't Get Next To You" and Tommy Roe's "Dizzy" were top ten.

    OT: Would it be so bad if "classic rock" stations played a little less Nirvana and maybe one or two hits from the 60s? Did Boomers stop listening to FM radio? My father has his SiriusXM tuned exclusively to the 50s/60s.

    Is listening to FM radio a sign you're lower class/poor?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Polistra

  117. @El Dato
    OT:

    Star Wars: The Kamalarian
     
    https://www.rt.com/usa/511538-kamala-harris-plagiarism-mlk/

    While speaking with Elle in October, Harris relayed what she claimed was a personal tale from her youth, explaining that during the first civil rights march she attended as a young child, she was separated from her parents after falling out of her stroller.

    “My mother tells the story about how I’m fussing,” Harris told the magazine. “And she’s like ‘Baby, what do you want? What do you need?’ And I just looked at her and said: ‘Fweedom.’”

     


    However, observers noticed the story has unmistakable similarities to an anecdote told by King during a 1965 Playboy interview – namely a young girl’s endearing mispronunciation of the word “freedom” at a civil rights rally.

    “I never will forget a moment in Birmingham when a white policeman accosted a little negro girl, seven or eight years old, who was walking in a demonstration with her mother,” King told Playboy’s Alex Haley. ‘What do you want?’ the policeman asked her gruffly, and the little girl looked him straight in the eye and answered, ‘Fee-dom.’ She couldn’t even pronounce it, but she knew. It was beautiful!
     

    I knew they it! They had met earlier. The black force is strong with this one.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Alarmist

    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.

    • LOL: Gary in Gramercy
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.
     
    A fellow Coastie?


    He was the first chief journalist in the Coast Guard, the rating having been expressly created for him in recognition of his literary ability.

    Haley's initials were AMPH. As in amphetamine. His nickname could have been Cyrano:

    Other sailors began to notice his talents and would pay him to write love letters for their girlfriends.

    Chief Journalist Alex P. Haley 1921-1992
     
    Alex Haley in the 1950s:


    https://alexhaley.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/alex_haley_letter_to_walter_write.png


    Alex Haley today:

    282-foot Alex Haley

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/60/50/cd/6050cd93495e9de48e305bb2ab1720da.jpg


    Well, it's a damned sight better than the USNS Harvey Milk! Will the Navy honor Lenny Bruce the same way?
    , @Art Deco
    @Steve Sailer

    The sum of text that Harold Courlander claimed Haley had copied might have filled six pages, or < 1 % of Haley's text.

  118. @Anon
    Steve has emphasized the effectiveness of cleverly and memorably naming concepts.

    In Michael Levin's Why Race Matters I came across an example of something I have noticed, but which did not have a name, to my knowledge. He refers to something that he calls "neutralizing by clear statement," "the rhetorical device of presenting a trenchant objection to one's position with no attempt to refute it, suggesting by this sangfroid that there is a reply too obvious to mention."

    He gives the example of an author bringing up the model minority "myth," and then basically doing a sort of "shaking my head" response, listing up the points the "mythmakers" make, without really responding to them.

    I was delighted to have a name for this. But I was crestfallen to find out that Google and Wikipedia have never heard of it. :-( I suspect Levin made it up. Also, it's not as pithy and catchy as I'd ideally like. But for now, it's better than nothing.

    I think that "neutralizing by clear statement" has become more common in the last year through the influence of Ibram X. Kendi and Robin DiAngelo. For instance,

    Why do Black and Latinx children routinely get lower scores on the standardized tests? Either there’s something wrong with the test takers or there’s something wrong with the tests. Why are Black and Latinx children routinely under-represented in the exam schools? Either there’s something wrong with Black and Latinx children or there’s something wrong with Boston’s admissions policies.
     
    Uh, yeah, I can agree with that. There is something wrong somewhere, and it's not the test.

    And,

    DiAngelo says that when challenged on race or privilege, particularly by people of colour, white people often lash out. "We white people so often make it so miserable for people of colour to talk to us about their experiences....
     
    Yes, that's true. Maybe stop calling whites racist and blaming them for your lot in life?

    Replies: @Polistra

    Maybe stop calling whites racist and blaming them for your lot in life?

    For my part, I’d happily settle for them to stop menacing, assaulting, beating, shooting, rioting, looting, and generally destroying every single thing they touch. If they’d make even the tiniest bit of headway there, I’d happily permit them to engage in all the name-calling and blaming that suits them.

    Funny thing though, if they tried the former they’d find the latter less ‘necessary’.

  119. @Lloyd1927
    Mulatto Elites like Ms. Butterfield Jones and her father have, since the 19th Century, claimed to represent the black race they actually despise in order to gain influence and power with white elites.

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    https://variety.com/2020/music/news/valeisha-butterfield-jones-recording-academy-diversity-inclusion-1234593774/#!

    https://www.blackenterprise.com/valeisha-butterfield-jones-google/

    https://www.famousbirthdays.com/people/valeisha-butterfield.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Butterfield

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    Hmm. What they consider a ‘diversity problem’ and what I consider a ‘diversity problem’ are two wildly different things. I wonder–could we have a ‘conversation’ and sort this out? I’m certainly willing.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Polistra

    When did the trope of random office-dwelling women riding forth to singlehandedly "change the world" become so prevalent?


    “I want to create something that will outlive me,” says Google’s Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. “I want to leave behind a legacy. I’m not sure what it is yet, but I want to build something that can empower a community, and I know it’s going to be centered around women.”
     
    Like a female crater?

    A former senior-level Obama campaign consultant, she was hired by Google in 2016 for a newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement.
     
    So it's not really "Google’s" Valeisha Butterfield-Jones rather than "Democrat's" Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. Nothing says "Kremlinesque Mystery Reshufflings to profit from Prevailing Politicial Winds" like such a sentence. "Yes, Commissar!"

    "In tech, there's no fashion code. I mean, people are in jeans and whatever. But I'll still wear my fabulous designer clothes and my couture to work, because that's just what I'm into."
     
    Tech: It's like Star Trek. The team with the bestest outfit wins. The rest is just flashing lights, looking into weird devices and giving fabulous orders from the bridge.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  120. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Peter D. Bredon

    That's a funny story. Michael Bolton resembles a true soul singer about as much as he does a Scott Walker tortured-existentialist-romantic interpreter of Jacques Brel, but using Dionne Warwick -- the supreme vessel for the middlebrow creations of Burt Bacharach and Hal David -- to make the point that Bolton is cadging from Otis Redding, Percy Sledge and other genuine soul singers is hilarious.

    Bolton's a joke, sure, but far more talented white musicians have gotten away with worse, without permanent damage to their reputations. Take, for example, the Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'," with a teenaged Steve Winwood on organ and vocals. Great song, but with obvious antecedents in Sam & Dave's "Hold On! I'm Comin'" and Homer Banks's "(Ain't That) A Lot of Love." But maybe because Winwood was so young at the time, or maybe because he left the pop-oriented Spencer Davis Group to form Traffic (and later Blind Faith, the first "supergroup," with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker), he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music. (Of course, Steve Winwood was one of the best white soul/R&B singers of the '60's, right there with Mitch Ryder, Eric Burdon and Alex Chilton. So chalk up the Spencer Davis songs to "youthful indiscretion.")

    Let's not even talk about John Fogerty's repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR's "Traveling Band."

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @peterike

    I don’t think you need to call Bolton a “joke” to make your point.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Billy Shears

    Bolton is a joke. Here it is: He sounds like someone trying to pass a particularly hard and large stool.

    And here is all anyone needs to know about the Grammys: Milli-Vanilli.

  121. Sure, we need more twerking booty-shaking children’s book gangsta rappers.

  122. @El Dato
    OT:

    Star Wars: The Kamalarian
     
    https://www.rt.com/usa/511538-kamala-harris-plagiarism-mlk/

    While speaking with Elle in October, Harris relayed what she claimed was a personal tale from her youth, explaining that during the first civil rights march she attended as a young child, she was separated from her parents after falling out of her stroller.

    “My mother tells the story about how I’m fussing,” Harris told the magazine. “And she’s like ‘Baby, what do you want? What do you need?’ And I just looked at her and said: ‘Fweedom.’”

     


    However, observers noticed the story has unmistakable similarities to an anecdote told by King during a 1965 Playboy interview – namely a young girl’s endearing mispronunciation of the word “freedom” at a civil rights rally.

    “I never will forget a moment in Birmingham when a white policeman accosted a little negro girl, seven or eight years old, who was walking in a demonstration with her mother,” King told Playboy’s Alex Haley. ‘What do you want?’ the policeman asked her gruffly, and the little girl looked him straight in the eye and answered, ‘Fee-dom.’ She couldn’t even pronounce it, but she knew. It was beautiful!
     

    I knew they it! They had met earlier. The black force is strong with this one.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Alarmist

    There’s only room for one Wookie in today’s Demonrat Party, and that role was filled long before the Kamelian came on the scene.

  123. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    “Stevie Wonder’s music has not withstood the test of time”. You mean like the lyric “Peace has come to Zimbabwe”? (From the song, I note somewhat ironically, titled “Master Blaster”)

  124. @Alfa158
    “ Valeisha Butterfield Jones”
    Steve, you should have edited the post to delete that name. That can’t be a real person’s name and it makes us think that you are fabricating the whole story.
    Or maybe that’s just my brain’s coping mechanism. If my subconscious convinces me these Stevebait stories are just Babylon Bee humorous spoofs, it will get me through the agony of watching our civilization collapsing like a house of cards.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James O'Meara, @James O'Meara, @Jonathan Mason

    Possibly has a Bermuda connection as the bank of NT Butterfield is a major institution there.

    Jones is extremely common surname in the British isles, particularly in Wales.

    Valeisha is one of those hybrid names being a combination of Valerie and a diminutive ending.

  125. @Polistra
    @Lloyd1927


    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/
     
    Hmm. What they consider a 'diversity problem' and what I consider a 'diversity problem' are two wildly different things. I wonder--could we have a 'conversation' and sort this out? I'm certainly willing.

    Replies: @El Dato

    When did the trope of random office-dwelling women riding forth to singlehandedly “change the world” become so prevalent?

    “I want to create something that will outlive me,” says Google’s Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. “I want to leave behind a legacy. I’m not sure what it is yet, but I want to build something that can empower a community, and I know it’s going to be centered around women.”

    Like a female crater?

    A former senior-level Obama campaign consultant, she was hired by Google in 2016 for a newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement.

    So it’s not really “Google’s” Valeisha Butterfield-Jones rather than “Democrat’s” Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. Nothing says “Kremlinesque Mystery Reshufflings to profit from Prevailing Politicial Winds” like such a sentence. “Yes, Commissar!”

    “In tech, there’s no fashion code. I mean, people are in jeans and whatever. But I’ll still wear my fabulous designer clothes and my couture to work, because that’s just what I’m into.”

    Tech: It’s like Star Trek. The team with the bestest outfit wins. The rest is just flashing lights, looking into weird devices and giving fabulous orders from the bridge.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @El Dato

    "A newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement."

    Translation: S-I-N-E-C-U-R-E.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  126. @El Dato
    @Polistra

    When did the trope of random office-dwelling women riding forth to singlehandedly "change the world" become so prevalent?


    “I want to create something that will outlive me,” says Google’s Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. “I want to leave behind a legacy. I’m not sure what it is yet, but I want to build something that can empower a community, and I know it’s going to be centered around women.”
     
    Like a female crater?

    A former senior-level Obama campaign consultant, she was hired by Google in 2016 for a newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement.
     
    So it's not really "Google’s" Valeisha Butterfield-Jones rather than "Democrat's" Valeisha Butterfield-Jones. Nothing says "Kremlinesque Mystery Reshufflings to profit from Prevailing Politicial Winds" like such a sentence. "Yes, Commissar!"

    "In tech, there's no fashion code. I mean, people are in jeans and whatever. But I'll still wear my fabulous designer clothes and my couture to work, because that's just what I'm into."
     
    Tech: It's like Star Trek. The team with the bestest outfit wins. The rest is just flashing lights, looking into weird devices and giving fabulous orders from the bridge.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “A newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement.”

    Translation: S-I-N-E-C-U-R-E.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Gary in Gramercy

    More bluntly: Parasite.

    Replies: @fish

  127. @Barnard
    @Buffalo Joe

    About a decade ago, Chris Rock made a comment about these shows saying, giving awards for art is dumb. I am surprised they haven't ever made recant.

    Replies: @Aardvark

    I always viewed these award shows as “let’s pat ourselves on the back”.

  128. @Morton's toes
    What is the most obscene rap song that has ever been celebrated with a grammy?

    Did the one with "bitches ain't nothin' but hos and tricks lick my nuts and suck my dick" win?

    Replies: @slumber_j

    This is my favorite cover version ever of that song:

    • LOL: Cloudbuster
    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @slumber_j


    In 2020, the album was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".
     
    Ha ha that beats the m___________g s__t out of any grammy.
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @slumber_j

    Very amusing. But this would never have happened if Paul Westerberg were still alive.

    , @Morton's toes
    @slumber_j

    https://www.vulture.com/2021/01/dr-dre-wife-divorce-settlement-2-million.html

  129. How you guys know so much about popular culture trivia? Makes my head spin….

    This is my stuff ..

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Love me some vintage Pogues. Even after all the booze and drugs, the only thing that could really put an end to Shane's career is a new set of bridgework.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  130. @Billy Shears
    @James Speaks

    Such a great song that was incredibly only the 32nd top song of the year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_Year-End_Hot_100_singles_of_1969

    Replies: @Aeronerauk

    Incredible that, as a man in my early 30s, I recognize and can hear in my head almost every song on that list.

    More incredibly the Temptations’ mediocre “Can’t Get Next To You” and Tommy Roe’s “Dizzy” were top ten.

    OT: Would it be so bad if “classic rock” stations played a little less Nirvana and maybe one or two hits from the 60s? Did Boomers stop listening to FM radio? My father has his SiriusXM tuned exclusively to the 50s/60s.

    Is listening to FM radio a sign you’re lower class/poor?

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Aeronerauk

    Listening to FM is a sign you want to hear something new once in a while. Those streaming stations are just feedback loops, playing the same shit over and over. I remember once, working in a record warehouse. Thousands and thousands of records. There was a record player connected to the sound system. We took turns picking records to play on it. Me, I wandered around trying to find the most obscure stuff I could. I was, for instance, the acknowledged discoverer of the Shaggs. The rest of them, every single one--they just picked the same albums as they had in their collection at home.

    , @Polistra
    @Aeronerauk

    You object to the Temptations and give "The Archies" a pass???

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  131. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I like how the chick who stayed in makes the passive aggressive comment about it being all about”the guys.”

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    How do you know this? Maybe she and the other guy who stayed in the competition aren’t ideologues and just want a shot at the award?

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @S. Anonyia

    Ok, never mind I see she did comment about how it was great for her to stay in it because she’s a woman. However, it appears she was asked about her decision by an interviewer, and the main reason for her rambling response is that she wants to stay in it and win while also looking “nice.” At least she did not bring up racial injustices.

  132. Valeisha Butterfield Jones = Real f***in’ jive-assed butthole

  133. @Art Deco
    Be a Pain, is about American heroes who stood up for their principles: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, Rosa Parks, the Parkland, Fla., shooting student protesters and others.

    I think Milk owned his own business at one point and had some history in the financial sector (as for him being a pain, Oliver Sipple could not be reached for comment). M.L. King's predecessor in Montgomery, Alabama had a side business selling fish (which he found more satisfying than being a pastor). King is notable for extraparliamentary organizing and talking, something that was of interest during a modest run of years, after which cue Eric Hoffer. Rosa Parks was a perfectly ordinary person who was a member of the local chapter of the NAACP. She was chosen for a contrived challenge to the bus company because she was presentable and did not have a bad temper (the other volunteer had attempted this less than a year earlier and had a meltdown which had her issuing a volley of curses). After 1955, she led a perfectly ordinary life except on occasions when she was trotted out rather like Gen. Tennessee Flintrock Sash in the Flannery O'Connor story. As for David Hogg, I doubt he'll ever get anywhere near the amount of trim King and his camarilla scored when they were on the road.

    I was going to go into a rant about the horrid born-yesterday Millennial-tards when I discovered this Moock jerk is 48 years old. The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.

    Replies: @jcd1974, @Lurker, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby, @David In TN

    “The world actually is getting more juvenile every year.”

    Absolutely.

  134. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    I wouldn’t leave my children with these people for 5 minutes.

     

    Bingo. I'm sure there must be some people out there who have pure, whimsical (Lord, I hate that word), open hearts just spilling over with the joy that only music can bring, and who dedicate their lives to sharing that bubbly bounty with the babies -- but, I wonder.

    When Daughter C was an infant, a couple of my friends (both of whom had turned very proggy as adults) were eager to pass along CDs of the music their recently-born babies had 'enjoyed'. Some of the songs were pretty good, but there were also many that sounded like bad late-60s protest music. It was pretty clear why Mom and Dad had favored these 'artists'.

    It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth -- or even before, as they're more than willing to grant full personhood to a yet-to-be-born child if they it will be one of their own.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Joseph Doaks

    “It reminded me that leftists never rest. Their great project of remaking mankind to usurp the Almighty begins immediately at birth”

    So true. But they are actually only a pushy, noisy minority. The rest of us are in the majority, but we need to understand that and speak out. Richard Nixon identified the phenomenon: “The Silent Majority.” Why do we always let them win?

  135. @slumber_j
    @Morton's toes

    This is my favorite cover version ever of that song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjFRy8jQ_0U

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Gary in Gramercy, @Morton's toes

    In 2020, the album was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

    Ha ha that beats the m___________g s__t out of any grammy.

  136. @Anonymous
    @jon

    i think J Edgar Hover was black by todays standards

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Strangely enough, I remember looking at photos of his parents, and if there’s a lick of the tarbrush there it seems to be on the side of the mother, whose grandparents (or putative grandparents) were all born in Switzerland.

  137. @AnotherDad
    @Anon7


    This show has been watched by 63 million people, mostly white. It implants its false historical message more effectively than Leftist public school ever could.
     
    How do we know? Netflix says so?

    And Netflix has--just searched--200m subscribers around the world. Let's be generous and say 2 people watch when something gets streamed. They are claiming 30m of their subscribers--15% of all subscribers in the world--have tuned into this black fantasy?

    Not saying there aren't millions as Netflix hypes it. But count me skeptical.

    Replies: @Anon7

    Skepticism is always good.

    I would have said that Netflix is a publicly traded company, and that false reporting of something that they would certainly know (how many streams of what content) would carry criminal penalties. Not that they might not still lie, of course.

    However, it turns out that “watched” means “watched at least two minutes”. And the 63 million figure is apparently 63 million households, so there’s no telling how many people saw it. Also the 63 million figure is apparently at least partly projected.

    However, it turns out that the first two minutes of the first episode contains several historically false instances of black aristocracy in England in 1812. Not to mention the oddly tinted queen.

    Skepticism is always good. But I stand by what I said, that this sort of content is much worse than taking down statues or renaming bases.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anon7

    However, it turns out that “watched” means “watched at least two minutes”. And the 63 million figure is apparently 63 million households, so there’s no telling how many people saw it. Also the 63 million figure is apparently at least partly projected.

    "Household" is an accounting term as far as I know. So if Mom and Dad have a Netflix account that they use once in a while, but their high schoolers are sometimes binging vid on their smartphones...or their collegiate offspring are binging Netflix every weekend in the dorm...it's all in the same "household" bin. Who knows what the actual viewing numbers are? Even Netflix account trolls probably do not.

    Which reminds me of this from last spring.

    https://babylonbee.com/news/new-law-would-allow-millennials-to-stay-on-their-parents-netflix-account-until-theyre-35

  138. @Gary in Gramercy
    @El Dato

    "A newly created position: Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement."

    Translation: S-I-N-E-C-U-R-E.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    More bluntly: Parasite.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Rob McX


    More bluntly: Parasite.
     
    Less a sinecure and more a PR insurance product. Google if ever called on the carpet can jump up and yell...."Look, we got one...we got one"!
  139. @S. Anonyia
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    How do you know this? Maybe she and the other guy who stayed in the competition aren’t ideologues and just want a shot at the award?

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    Ok, never mind I see she did comment about how it was great for her to stay in it because she’s a woman. However, it appears she was asked about her decision by an interviewer, and the main reason for her rambling response is that she wants to stay in it and win while also looking “nice.” At least she did not bring up racial injustices.

  140. @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    ...they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

     

    Despite that, the Gardner family of Brooklyn gave it the greatest endorsement imaginable:


    Funeral held for 1-year-old shooting victim Davell Gardner


    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/07/davell-gardner-funeral-18.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1033

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @BenKenobi, @Garlic

    Wow that’s sad.

  141. @Anon
    There's an air of desperation among liberals. They know that if they can't push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen, and it won't happen because they'll finally have to admit that blacks are inferior. Less smart, less talented, and unwilling to work.

    Liberals are crazy-desperate.

    Replies: @Shango, @Shango, @Art Deco

    They know that if they can’t push blacks up the ladder and make them self-sustaining in this generation, then it will never happen,

    Ordinary common-and-garden bourgeois make ready use of all sorts of pricey common provision, among them public schools, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid for nursing home finance. Blacks do not differ in this regard. The programs which ordinary people do not use or of which they make only infrequent use include those which do not consume much in the way of public expenditure (public defenders and legal aid lawyers) and those which have on their client list only narrow slivers of the population on either side of the color bar (TANF, the foster care system, housing subsidies). The two programs which are quite prevalent among blacks but not much used by ordinary people are SNAP and Medicaid for financing medical care. Blacks aren’t going to go under if SNAP is eliminated or replaced and everyone undergoing medical treatment for anything but the most mundane problems is being cross-subsized by his actuarial pool.

  142. Anon[364] • Disclaimer says:

    Blacks tend to whup the asses of their kids more than whites and think it helps the kids (and I’m not saying that’s a bad thing). This might not fit in a children’s song.

    Here’s the American Psychological Association explaining why the black practice of corporal punishment is actually the fault of whitey. In Africa blacks didn’t have a word for whup in their languages, and kids were doted upon as reincarnated gods. But the brutal legacy of slavery warped black culture.

    https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/newsletter/2017/04/racial-trauma

    And here:

    In a Warning Against Spanking, Some Pediatricians See an Attack on Black Families
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/17/parenting/stacey-patton-spanking.html

    And ubiquitous black op-ed writer Stacey Patton wrote a book telling parents to stop spanking:

    https://slate.com/human-interest/2017/04/its-time-for-black-america-to-stop-spanking-its-kids-says-author-stacey-patton.html

    I dunno. I think this is the way forward for blacks:

    1. Get the fathers to stick around.

    2. The fathers should regularly beat the asses of black sons from puberty on up.

    This might fix some things.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anon

    It's characteristic of the mental health trade and the pediatrics trade to pretend their personal tastes are SCIENCE. No point in paying attention.


    In Africa blacks didn’t have a word for whup in their languages, and kids were doted upon as reincarnated gods. But the brutal legacy of slavery warped black culture.

    Pop anthropology isn't less inane when practiced by psychologists. Those doting Africans raided neighboring territories, took captives, and sold the captives to traders on the coast.


    I dunno. I think this is the way forward for blacks:

    Most manage their family lives badly. If relations between men and women were less of a free-for-all, they might manage their family lives better. (Something that's true on the other side of the color bar as well). There is no set of public policies which are going to induce people to manage their family lives better. There is a set of institutions that can deter criminals and sequester them. You just have to hire the manpower, deploy them, and not act to entangle them in bureaucratic nonsense. You can also re-jigger your incentives in the economic sphere - matching funds for earned income rather than open-ended doles.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  143. Nobody needs children’s “music”. Why subject them to that dreck? Society exposes them from day one to a constant barrage of rock, pop, disco, hip hop, country, novelty songs, and noises of whatever description, so when do they ever hear MUSIC?

    Parents, play Vivaldi, Haydn, Grieg, et al, or your children will NEVER hear them,

  144. @Meretricious
    Stevie Wonder's music, like most of Motown's, has not withstood the test of time. That's a problem for Negro geniuses

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @James Speaks, @Charon, @MBlanc46, @Old Prude, @Neuday

    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time. That’s a problem for Negro geniuses

    The Black music of the past incorporated melody and talented musicians, but the Black music of the past 30 years is overwhelmingly rhythmic and generated by computer rather than mastery of an instrument. Prince was the last of his kind. I can tell you that anyone who pursues mastery of drums or bass pays attention to what was done by Motown, Stax, Sly Stone, etc. If anything hasn’t stood the test of time, it’s Black people losing interest in making music and what it takes to do so instead of posing, grunting and screaming. By lowering expectations of Blacks they’ve regressed, yet we still praise them and pretend they’re awesome, I suppose because we think they’re doing their best. Sure, that Motown sound is a boomer thing, but I can get some Gen-X buddies together and do a serviceable cover of many of those songs. Go find the top Rap guys in your town and put them in a room with actual instruments for an hour and let me know how they do.

    • Agree: Gary in Gramercy
  145. @jon
    @ic1000

    You can't bring up the famous African-American Representative G.K. Butterfield without including a photo:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/GK_Butterfield%2C_Official_photo_116th_Congress.jpg

    Replies: @Altai, @Anonymous, @Possumman

    Not even a pok—person of khaki

  146. “Did you know that Stevie Wonder has never even been nominated for a Grammy?”

    This is funny because, as you link, Mr. Wonder has about 25 Grammys. But it raises a problem.

    How can we maintain the myth that the horrors (horrors!) of mistreatment occurred right up to the present day? How can we get a sense of how much change is needed? What can be done when an accurate story provides less leverage on whitey?

    Obviously, the historical documents need to be altered. Stevie can keep his plaques, but the wins are erased. Or never mentioned (this strategy is preferred by Big Media and tech giants alike).The best story always wins in the news game, and everything is going to be shown in the same context: the news is the same as movies is the same as TV reality shows is the same as documentaries, it’s all on tap thanks to the Internet, it’s all equally authoritative.

  147. @JohnnyWalker123
    Check this out.

    Click on these documents to get an enlarged view.

    https://imgur.com/a/NcVBhDN

    https://imgur.com/a/8IdyEUI

    https://imgur.com/a/7kOujbo

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Pretty sure there are Dominican neighborhoods in nyc where the welfare usage rate is >100%

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    How many people live in those 'neighborhoods'? The Census Bureau estimates there are 674,000 Dominicans in the Five Boroughs accounting for 8% of the population. The state government in New York reports that as of December 2019 there were 102,000 TANF recipients in the Five Boroughs and 217,000 receiving 'safety net assistance' from the state government. So you have 319,000 welfare recipients in NYC accounting for just shy of 4% of the population. A neighborhood where a quarter of the population were collecting checks would have welfare usage in excess of 6x the norm ((25/75) / (4/96)) = 6.24x.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

  148. @James Speaks
    @Meretricious


    Stevie Wonder’s music, like most of Motown’s, has not withstood the test of time.
     
    https://youtu.be/Fjufjv4rH0s

    I rest ny case.

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @Neuday

    Counter-argument. Please note age and race of the performer.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Neuday

    No argument. Same age and race as the drummer boy.

    https://youtu.be/aRtspFOrt5I

  149. @Rob McX
    @Gary in Gramercy

    More bluntly: Parasite.

    Replies: @fish

    More bluntly: Parasite.

    Less a sinecure and more a PR insurance product. Google if ever called on the carpet can jump up and yell….”Look, we got one…we got one”!

    • Agree: Rob McX
  150. @bomag
    @SunBakedSuburb

    The raper; er, I meant rapper; R Kelly has been called The Pied Piper of R&B. I heard he likes kids. He should be nominated. It would send the proper signal.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    I can’t wait until they nominate R. Kelly’s new children’s album I Can’t Wait Til You Is Legal, Ho, featuring the hit single Momma Teach You Pole Dancing.

    Are there any more suicidal demographics than GoodWhites?

  151. @Bardon Kaldian
    How you guys know so much about popular culture trivia? Makes my head spin....

    This is my stuff ..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJx5GJFyy9Q

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Love me some vintage Pogues. Even after all the booze and drugs, the only thing that could really put an end to Shane’s career is a new set of bridgework.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Of course. I'd add, quoting YouTube comments ....

    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.

    https://i.gifer.com/Pwrt.gif

    Replies: @Rob McX

  152. If the OK symbol means white power, surely the Okee Dokee Brothers must mean, like, white power squared.

  153. @slumber_j
    @Morton's toes

    This is my favorite cover version ever of that song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjFRy8jQ_0U

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Gary in Gramercy, @Morton's toes

    Very amusing. But this would never have happened if Paul Westerberg were still alive.

  154. @Billy Shears
    @Gary in Gramercy

    I don't think you need to call Bolton a "joke" to make your point.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    Bolton is a joke. Here it is: He sounds like someone trying to pass a particularly hard and large stool.

    And here is all anyone needs to know about the Grammys: Milli-Vanilli.

  155. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Peter D. Bredon

    That's a funny story. Michael Bolton resembles a true soul singer about as much as he does a Scott Walker tortured-existentialist-romantic interpreter of Jacques Brel, but using Dionne Warwick -- the supreme vessel for the middlebrow creations of Burt Bacharach and Hal David -- to make the point that Bolton is cadging from Otis Redding, Percy Sledge and other genuine soul singers is hilarious.

    Bolton's a joke, sure, but far more talented white musicians have gotten away with worse, without permanent damage to their reputations. Take, for example, the Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'," with a teenaged Steve Winwood on organ and vocals. Great song, but with obvious antecedents in Sam & Dave's "Hold On! I'm Comin'" and Homer Banks's "(Ain't That) A Lot of Love." But maybe because Winwood was so young at the time, or maybe because he left the pop-oriented Spencer Davis Group to form Traffic (and later Blind Faith, the first "supergroup," with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker), he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music. (Of course, Steve Winwood was one of the best white soul/R&B singers of the '60's, right there with Mitch Ryder, Eric Burdon and Alex Chilton. So chalk up the Spencer Davis songs to "youthful indiscretion.")

    Let's not even talk about John Fogerty's repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR's "Traveling Band."

    Replies: @Billy Shears, @peterike

    he never really faced hard questions about borrowing from black music.

    This whole conversation is stupid, as whites have consistently taken black music and made it vastly more interesting. The biggest example is the blues. Is there anything duller, more repetitive and uncreative than black blues? But put it into the hands of white bluesmen like Clapton or Led Zeppelin, and it became a thing of wonder. The entire corpus of black blues doesn’t equal a single Led Zeppelin album.

    And the only reason old timey black bluesmen exist at all in anyone’s memory is because of whites. Same reason that black jazz — the one area blacks truly excelled — still exists because of whites (and Asians). Blacks have no interest in their musical heritage.

    Even dolts like Eminem and The Beasty Boys showed that whites could re-think rap in new ways. Not that it matters, other than to note that there is essentially nothing unique or amazing about blacks in music.

    Let’s not even talk about John Fogerty’s repeated Little Richard imitations, most notably on CCR’s “Traveling Band.”

    Sure, he did imitations. But he did quite a lot more as well. What is the black predecessor to “Proud Mary”? Little Richard was never more than the first five minutes of Little Richard. Same with Chuck Berry. Not one-hit wonders, but one-note wonders.

  156. @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    Joe, my youngest is now 19 months. My wife recently found some y*utube channel called “Cocomelon.” Computer-animated music videos teaching good manners and whatnot. I feel like I’m getting diabetes when this stuff is on it’s so sweet.

    ...they are under fire for starring an all-White hetero-normative family.

     

    Despite that, the Gardner family of Brooklyn gave it the greatest endorsement imaginable:


    Funeral held for 1-year-old shooting victim Davell Gardner


    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/07/davell-gardner-funeral-18.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1033

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @BenKenobi, @Garlic

    What a heart breaking photo!

    What kind of world do we live in where the images of dead criminals are splashed in glory across the newspapers of the world, but the image of an innocent one year old victim of criminals attracts no notice whatsoever from the self proclaimed goodthinkers who goodthink their way all over the mass media?

    • Agree: Occasional lurker
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Garlic

    Garlic, words fail me. Emmit Tills mother left his coffin open for the world to see her beaten son, and yet, maybe things might swing a bit toward sanity if we showed these little shooting victims prone on the ground or slumped in their car seat.And I think there were about 40 children shot, not all killed, just in Chicago. The MSM put the photo of a drowned migrant child, washed ashore in Italy on a loop. Never have I seen such coverage of a shot and killed black child.

  157. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Pretty sure there are Dominican neighborhoods in nyc where the welfare usage rate is >100%

    Replies: @Art Deco

    How many people live in those ‘neighborhoods’? The Census Bureau estimates there are 674,000 Dominicans in the Five Boroughs accounting for 8% of the population. The state government in New York reports that as of December 2019 there were 102,000 TANF recipients in the Five Boroughs and 217,000 receiving ‘safety net assistance’ from the state government. So you have 319,000 welfare recipients in NYC accounting for just shy of 4% of the population. A neighborhood where a quarter of the population were collecting checks would have welfare usage in excess of 6x the norm ((25/75) / (4/96)) = 6.24x.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Art Deco

    Who knows? How many rats live in the subway?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  158. @Neoconned
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/news.yahoo.com/amphtml/harassed-guards-extorted-inmates-jeffrey-160100777.html

    LOL so the very last inmate who shared a cell with Epstein died of "health related issues" few months back.

    The spooks were busy last yr.....1st I've heard of this....

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    Oh, our good correspondent JohnnyWalker123 has done a fine job for months on this very topic.

    IIRC, lots of mysterious deaths in the Epstein case.

    Of course, it’s all plausible if, in fact, Epstein is still very much alive.
    (A distinct possibility!)

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Paul Jolliffe


    Of course, it’s all plausible if, in fact, Epstein is still very much alive.
    (A distinct possibility!)
     
    The picture of the supposed Epstein corpse didn't look like him, I thought. The nose was quite different.

    I think it is possible that the Dems and Republicans put aside their differences and let him go to keep things under wrap.
  159. “Close to You” Dionne Warwick.

  160. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter D. Bredon
    @Muggles

    "I suspect most nominations are awarded on a fairly corrupt basis. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours."

    Years ago I became suspicious of the way musicals would open a month or so before being nominated for a dozen Tonys (Tonies?). I guess the idea was that all the theater mavens knew what were working out to be the good shows, and delayed openings until as late as possible. Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the "good" films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets "dumped" in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    OTOH, I'm now inclined to think this is just because it's all fixed.

    Possibly related: it's been decades since I ever heard a song from a supposedly "award winning" Broadway show, either before or after. Such tunes used to be on the radio/TV all the time; did that die out after Ed Sullivan went off the air? Or are they just junk now?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race, @Stan Adams, @Anonymous

    Then I learned that Hollywood does the same thing: the studios decide what the “good” films are and hold up releases until end of the year. (Occasionally something gets “dumped” in the spring or so and winds up as a hit; I think Star Wars was one but I could be wrong).

    Blazing Saddles was released in February. Apparently the studio thought it would bomb. In fact it became a huge hit.

  161. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Love me some vintage Pogues. Even after all the booze and drugs, the only thing that could really put an end to Shane's career is a new set of bridgework.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Of course. I’d add, quoting YouTube comments ….

    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Bardon Kaldian


    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.
     
    There must be something in those drugs that induces a kind of live mummification.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  162. @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    How many people live in those 'neighborhoods'? The Census Bureau estimates there are 674,000 Dominicans in the Five Boroughs accounting for 8% of the population. The state government in New York reports that as of December 2019 there were 102,000 TANF recipients in the Five Boroughs and 217,000 receiving 'safety net assistance' from the state government. So you have 319,000 welfare recipients in NYC accounting for just shy of 4% of the population. A neighborhood where a quarter of the population were collecting checks would have welfare usage in excess of 6x the norm ((25/75) / (4/96)) = 6.24x.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Who knows? How many rats live in the subway?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I thought you said you were 'pretty sure'.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

  163. @Steve Sailer
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    "City of Angels" is a wonderful guy musical about a hard-boiled Chandleresque detective with a book by Larry Gelbart of MASH fame. It's hard to make a musical masculine, but they did a good job.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Lucky you to see it. I had so many things going on in a bad year that I didn’t manage to. Did you see it in NYC? I don’t see that particular complex musical going on National Tour, but it may well have. (I’ve seen several shows at Hollywood Pantages.) I listened to the score a lot, and Coleman and Fields were really on a roll at the end of their careers (and lives) with that and The Life, about Hell’s Kitchen prostitutes and pimps–have no idea how such a show had a long run, but it deserved it. I would say City of Angels ought to be made into a movie, but as we know, that’s so often the kiss of death for a show.

    Am a Raymond Chandler extreme fan like many. Read all of them, like Farewell, My Lovely and The Little Sister the best probably. Another regret–not going to Frank and Musso for a martini and a steak; I’ve heard it called “true Raymond Chandler country”. I thought La Scala Beverly Hills would be something like that, since also very old, but it was an ordinary dressed-down Xmas crowd in 2009. Although it was great Famous Chopped Salad and the best white wine I’ve ever had (should have written it down.)

  164. @Half Canadian
    Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them? This is a pretty niche market.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @botazefa, @Bite Moi

    Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them?

    Meghan the Stallion and her hit WAP, which is bleeped but performed on prime time tv for children to view already. In all her undulating greatness, she should be nominated for the kids category award.

    I’m kidding, of course, but wouldn’t be surprised if mainstream vulgar hiphop is very soon officially deemed appropriate for all audiences. We shoulda listened to Tipper Gore.

  165. @Gary in Gramercy
    @duncsbaby

    "There's not much you hear on the radio today (doin' the things that we want to),

    But you can still see a movie or a play (doin' the things that we want to).

    Here's to Travis Bickle, and here's to Johnny Boy (doin' the things that we want to),

    Growing up in the mean streets of New York (doin' the things that we want to).

    I wrote this song 'cause I'd like to shake your hand (doin' the things that we want to),

    In a way, you guys the best friends I ever had (doin' the things that we want to).

    Doin' the things that we want to."

    -----Lou Reed, "Doing the Things That We Want To" (New Sensations, 1984).

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Lou Reed sucks. Taxi Driver sucks. Mean Streets sucks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @obwandiyag


    Lou Reed sucks. Taxi Driver sucks. Mean Streets sucks.
     
    Congratulations. You've finally said something intelligent. If crudely put.
  166. @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHdcxxtcWDY

    Replies: @vhrm

    Please don’t just post a video link as a comment. Describe what it is and summarize what it says and perhaps why it’s worthy of being watched.

  167. @Aeronerauk
    @Billy Shears

    Incredible that, as a man in my early 30s, I recognize and can hear in my head almost every song on that list.

    More incredibly the Temptations' mediocre "Can't Get Next To You" and Tommy Roe's "Dizzy" were top ten.

    OT: Would it be so bad if "classic rock" stations played a little less Nirvana and maybe one or two hits from the 60s? Did Boomers stop listening to FM radio? My father has his SiriusXM tuned exclusively to the 50s/60s.

    Is listening to FM radio a sign you're lower class/poor?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Polistra

    Listening to FM is a sign you want to hear something new once in a while. Those streaming stations are just feedback loops, playing the same shit over and over. I remember once, working in a record warehouse. Thousands and thousands of records. There was a record player connected to the sound system. We took turns picking records to play on it. Me, I wandered around trying to find the most obscure stuff I could. I was, for instance, the acknowledged discoverer of the Shaggs. The rest of them, every single one–they just picked the same albums as they had in their collection at home.

  168. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Art Deco

    Who knows? How many rats live in the subway?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I thought you said you were ‘pretty sure’.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Art Deco

    I was referring to the endemic theft of services carried out by Dominicans. They claim for children that aren’t theirs, and cash checks for parents who aren’t alive.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  169. America as a melting pot. It’s metling down fast.

    Protesters in Minneapolis raise SOMALI flag after police kill suspected felon

    Black Lives Matter and Muslim organizations led a protest in Minneapolis, Minnesota against the police shooting of a suspected gun felon who shot first. The protesters hoisted a Somali flag over a building at one point.

    IDD SHOT FIRST!

    Idd was shot dead by Minneapolis police last Wednesday. Body camera footage of the fatal shooting released on Thursday showed Idd firing at police after they stopped his car in what they called a “probable cause” weapons investigation. He was killed when officers returned fire. Though the video footage showed Idd firing first, one Muslim activist told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that he believed the footage to be edited and “inconclusive.”

    Maybe this whole city is a hologram, who knows! Salami aleikum etc.

    There may be as many as 250,000 Somalis in the Twin Cities

    To quote ex-General Petraeus, “Tell me how this ends”.

    Meanwhile in NY: “Implement Order A416

    New York’s new law setting up detention centers to lock up suspected Covid-19 cases heralds a Kafkaesque nightmare

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @El Dato

    There are about 30,000 Somalis in the seven counties around Minneapolis.

    , @BenKenobi
    @El Dato

    How can you be released “if no longer contagious “ — if you were never contagious to begin with?

    Can any of our kindest, warmest, bravest, most wonderful chicken-little covid shills weigh in on how this is a good thing and that we’re all uneducated plebs for thinking otherwise?

    Paging TWBT, utu and HA to the thread...

  170. @Marty
    @James Speaks

    In the ‘90’s I played in a mostly black lunch-hour basketball game in Berkeley. One of the occasional players was a rapper, a 6’5” block of marble from Hunter’s Point who went by “Primo.” One of our regulars was a skinny undergrad from Beverly Hills who eventually became a lawyer at Morrison & Foerster. The black guys called him “Goldstein.” On Telegraph, two blocks from the gym, was a record store with a sidewalk bargain bin. One day Goldstein came into the gym waving a jewel case and yelled, “Hey Primo, I bought your album - ten cents!” About a dozen brothers fell down laughing.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    I was reading some gushing paleocon piece about Lexington, KY – it does everything right, yada yada. No mention of race. One of the factors they mentioned was U of KY basketball, so I looked up the roster.

    https://ukathletics.com/sports/mens-basketball/roster

    Why so many obviously biracial boys? What’s going on here?

    • Replies: @Marty
    @Paperback Writer

    Despite having been a basketball junkie in my ‘30s, I haven’t followed black sports since 1998. That was the year I finally admitted to myself that blacks are crazy and hate me (I was an early victim of the polar bear game, losing a front tooth which has cost me $6k to date). With blacks being so much more common in the southeast than in California, I’m not surprised that b-ball rosters there have so many milk-chocolates. Actually, what’s remarkable about that pic is the hairstyles. I’ve noticed that in the last decade, almost anytime you look up some horrific race crime, the perp wears dreads or those spiky semi-braids. So I expect at least one of those guys will rape/kill somebody.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  171. Notice Butterfield is wearing makeup in that photo making his skin appear darker than natural. Enlarge photo and look at his eyelids, ear top/front and temple area hairline to see his natural, pale tone.

  172. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Of course. I'd add, quoting YouTube comments ....

    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.

    https://i.gifer.com/Pwrt.gif

    Replies: @Rob McX

    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.

    There must be something in those drugs that induces a kind of live mummification.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Rob McX

    Either that, or Nietzsche really was right. (Worked for Iggy Pop too, although he's been clean for years.)

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  173. My new Mantra : Satire is Dead.

    My New Hope (ht G.Lucas) is that there will be at least one day in 2021 where that will not be an approtiate comment on isteve

  174. Universities cutting track programs is now an act of racial discrimination – https://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/30655868/complaint-alleges-clemson-removal-men-track-racial-discrimination

    An activist attempting to reinstate Clemson’s men’s track and cross country programs filed a complaint with the Department of Education last week, claiming that eliminating the teams is an act of illegal racial discrimination.

    The complaint asks the department’s Office for Civil Rights to investigate whether Clemson’s decision to end its men’s track and cross country programs violates Title VI of the Civil Rights Act

  175. @Lloyd1927
    Mulatto Elites like Ms. Butterfield Jones and her father have, since the 19th Century, claimed to represent the black race they actually despise in order to gain influence and power with white elites.

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    https://variety.com/2020/music/news/valeisha-butterfield-jones-recording-academy-diversity-inclusion-1234593774/#!

    https://www.blackenterprise.com/valeisha-butterfield-jones-google/

    https://www.famousbirthdays.com/people/valeisha-butterfield.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Butterfield

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    Thanks for that Lloyd.

    Steve, i realize Lloyd’s Harper’s link is a couple years old, but man is it on target for the current year. You should post it. Even just the link–without reading a word–is iSteve gold. (Over the top vanity and vapidity.) This is “America” in the current year.

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad


    Even just the link–without reading a word–is iSteve gold.
     
    It is. This non-entity, in her make-believe "job" of Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement, is living proof that there are more than enough blacks in the tech industry as it is.
  176. anon[113] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon7
    @AnotherDad

    Skepticism is always good.

    I would have said that Netflix is a publicly traded company, and that false reporting of something that they would certainly know (how many streams of what content) would carry criminal penalties. Not that they might not still lie, of course.

    However, it turns out that "watched" means "watched at least two minutes". And the 63 million figure is apparently 63 million households, so there's no telling how many people saw it. Also the 63 million figure is apparently at least partly projected.

    However, it turns out that the first two minutes of the first episode contains several historically false instances of black aristocracy in England in 1812. Not to mention the oddly tinted queen.

    Skepticism is always good. But I stand by what I said, that this sort of content is much worse than taking down statues or renaming bases.

    Replies: @anon

    However, it turns out that “watched” means “watched at least two minutes”. And the 63 million figure is apparently 63 million households, so there’s no telling how many people saw it. Also the 63 million figure is apparently at least partly projected.

    “Household” is an accounting term as far as I know. So if Mom and Dad have a Netflix account that they use once in a while, but their high schoolers are sometimes binging vid on their smartphones…or their collegiate offspring are binging Netflix every weekend in the dorm…it’s all in the same “household” bin. Who knows what the actual viewing numbers are? Even Netflix account trolls probably do not.

    Which reminds me of this from last spring.

    https://babylonbee.com/news/new-law-would-allow-millennials-to-stay-on-their-parents-netflix-account-until-theyre-35

  177. @Anon
    Blacks tend to whup the asses of their kids more than whites and think it helps the kids (and I'm not saying that's a bad thing). This might not fit in a children's song.

    Here's the American Psychological Association explaining why the black practice of corporal punishment is actually the fault of whitey. In Africa blacks didn't have a word for whup in their languages, and kids were doted upon as reincarnated gods. But the brutal legacy of slavery warped black culture.

    https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/newsletter/2017/04/racial-trauma

    And here:

    In a Warning Against Spanking, Some Pediatricians See an Attack on Black Families
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/17/parenting/stacey-patton-spanking.html

    And ubiquitous black op-ed writer Stacey Patton wrote a book telling parents to stop spanking:

    https://slate.com/human-interest/2017/04/its-time-for-black-america-to-stop-spanking-its-kids-says-author-stacey-patton.html

    I dunno. I think this is the way forward for blacks:

    1. Get the fathers to stick around.

    2. The fathers should regularly beat the asses of black sons from puberty on up.

    This might fix some things.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    It’s characteristic of the mental health trade and the pediatrics trade to pretend their personal tastes are SCIENCE. No point in paying attention.

    In Africa blacks didn’t have a word for whup in their languages, and kids were doted upon as reincarnated gods. But the brutal legacy of slavery warped black culture.

    Pop anthropology isn’t less inane when practiced by psychologists. Those doting Africans raided neighboring territories, took captives, and sold the captives to traders on the coast.

    I dunno. I think this is the way forward for blacks:

    Most manage their family lives badly. If relations between men and women were less of a free-for-all, they might manage their family lives better. (Something that’s true on the other side of the color bar as well). There is no set of public policies which are going to induce people to manage their family lives better. There is a set of institutions that can deter criminals and sequester them. You just have to hire the manpower, deploy them, and not act to entangle them in bureaucratic nonsense. You can also re-jigger your incentives in the economic sphere – matching funds for earned income rather than open-ended doles.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Art Deco


    You can also re-jigger
     
    Re-jigger? Re-jigger? What is it with you people?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  178. @El Dato
    America as a melting pot. It's metling down fast.

    Protesters in Minneapolis raise SOMALI flag after police kill suspected felon


    Black Lives Matter and Muslim organizations led a protest in Minneapolis, Minnesota against the police shooting of a suspected gun felon who shot first. The protesters hoisted a Somali flag over a building at one point.

     

    IDD SHOT FIRST!

    Idd was shot dead by Minneapolis police last Wednesday. Body camera footage of the fatal shooting released on Thursday showed Idd firing at police after they stopped his car in what they called a “probable cause” weapons investigation. He was killed when officers returned fire. Though the video footage showed Idd firing first, one Muslim activist told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that he believed the footage to be edited and “inconclusive.”
     
    Maybe this whole city is a hologram, who knows! Salami aleikum etc.

    There may be as many as 250,000 Somalis in the Twin Cities
     
    To quote ex-General Petraeus, "Tell me how this ends".

    Meanwhile in NY: "Implement Order A416"

    New York’s new law setting up detention centers to lock up suspected Covid-19 cases heralds a Kafkaesque nightmare

    Replies: @Art Deco, @BenKenobi

    There are about 30,000 Somalis in the seven counties around Minneapolis.

  179. @AnotherDad
    @Lloyd1927

    Thanks for that Lloyd.

    Steve, i realize Lloyd's Harper's link is a couple years old, but man is it on target for the current year. You should post it. Even just the link--without reading a word--is iSteve gold. (Over the top vanity and vapidity.) This is "America" in the current year.

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a22675904/tech-has-a-huge-diversity-problem-this-woman-is-determined-to-fix-it/

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Even just the link–without reading a word–is iSteve gold.

    It is. This non-entity, in her make-believe “job” of Global Head of Women and Black Community Engagement, is living proof that there are more than enough blacks in the tech industry as it is.

  180. @Paul Jolliffe
    @Neoconned

    Oh, our good correspondent JohnnyWalker123 has done a fine job for months on this very topic.

    IIRC, lots of mysterious deaths in the Epstein case.

    Of course, it’s all plausible if, in fact, Epstein is still very much alive.
    (A distinct possibility!)

    Replies: @Flip

    Of course, it’s all plausible if, in fact, Epstein is still very much alive.
    (A distinct possibility!)

    The picture of the supposed Epstein corpse didn’t look like him, I thought. The nose was quite different.

    I think it is possible that the Dems and Republicans put aside their differences and let him go to keep things under wrap.

  181. It just occurred to me that the Grammies are basically the opposite of the Nobel Prize. The list of people who’ve won or been nominated for Grammies includes basically every popular musician ever, and a lot of other people besides. Because there are so many categories, it’s hard to come up with a list of any significant pop artists who failed to win at least one Grammy. It’s the easiest to check off on the EGOT.

    Meanwhile, the list of people who never won a Nobel Prize (in all categories) includes lots and lots of conspicuous omissions.

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    @Mr. Blank

    I should probably have written, "the list of people who never won a Nobel Prize (in all categories) includes lots and lots of names conspicuous by their omission from the winner's list."

    My bad.

  182. @Rob McX
    @Bardon Kaldian


    The fact that Shane MacGowan is still alive in 2020 blows my mind > Shane MacGowan, Ozzy Osbourne and Keith Richards will bury us all.
     
    There must be something in those drugs that induces a kind of live mummification.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Either that, or Nietzsche really was right. (Worked for Iggy Pop too, although he’s been clean for years.)

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Gary in Gramercy

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Vsm0gFtOd4

  183. @Garlic
    @Reg Cæsar

    What a heart breaking photo!

    What kind of world do we live in where the images of dead criminals are splashed in glory across the newspapers of the world, but the image of an innocent one year old victim of criminals attracts no notice whatsoever from the self proclaimed goodthinkers who goodthink their way all over the mass media?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Garlic, words fail me. Emmit Tills mother left his coffin open for the world to see her beaten son, and yet, maybe things might swing a bit toward sanity if we showed these little shooting victims prone on the ground or slumped in their car seat.And I think there were about 40 children shot, not all killed, just in Chicago. The MSM put the photo of a drowned migrant child, washed ashore in Italy on a loop. Never have I seen such coverage of a shot and killed black child.

  184. The academy recently partnered with the racial justice group Color of Change to begin holding itself and record labels more accountable. They’re pushing for more transparency at the academy and support for artists, especially those who are Black.

    Absurd when blacks are vastly over represented among acts signed to major labels these days, and among the top albums and songs of the year. Just open your Spotify app and go to the US charts.

    This is purely about power and lording it over whitey.

  185. @Mr. Blank
    It just occurred to me that the Grammies are basically the opposite of the Nobel Prize. The list of people who've won or been nominated for Grammies includes basically every popular musician ever, and a lot of other people besides. Because there are so many categories, it's hard to come up with a list of any significant pop artists who failed to win at least one Grammy. It's the easiest to check off on the EGOT.

    Meanwhile, the list of people who never won a Nobel Prize (in all categories) includes lots and lots of conspicuous omissions.

    Replies: @Mr. Blank

    I should probably have written, “the list of people who never won a Nobel Prize (in all categories) includes lots and lots of names conspicuous by their omission from the winner’s list.”

    My bad.

  186. @unit472
    I am mildly curious how the music industry ranks any artist now. In days gone by you had subjective things like Billboard charts which ranked songs by popularity. Then you had the more objective measure of record sales. What music people actually wanted to buy. Those measures of 'demand' are long gone so what other than critical approval substitutes today?

    Replies: @usNthem, @Mr. Mean

    Streams on Spotify/Apple Music/YouTube, radio and digital sales on iTunes. Also physical albums have made a surprising comeback thanks to the resurgence of vinyl, which started out as a hipster thing and became mainstream over the last 10 years with young people.

  187. @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I thought you said you were 'pretty sure'.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I was referring to the endemic theft of services carried out by Dominicans. They claim for children that aren’t theirs, and cash checks for parents who aren’t alive.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The term 'theft of services' doesn't mean what you think it means, unless you're telling me that dine-and-dash is a Dominican specialty.

    That aside, when the number of Dominicans in the city exceeds the number of people of all descriptions collecting and > 90% of the population is not Dominican, it's hard to see how any of your contentions could be anywhere close to correct.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

  188. @Neuday
    @James Speaks

    Counter-argument. Please note age and race of the performer.

    https://youtu.be/gXHjnYqOQWw

    Replies: @Kylie

    No argument. Same age and race as the drummer boy.

  189. @Art Deco
    @Anon

    It's characteristic of the mental health trade and the pediatrics trade to pretend their personal tastes are SCIENCE. No point in paying attention.


    In Africa blacks didn’t have a word for whup in their languages, and kids were doted upon as reincarnated gods. But the brutal legacy of slavery warped black culture.

    Pop anthropology isn't less inane when practiced by psychologists. Those doting Africans raided neighboring territories, took captives, and sold the captives to traders on the coast.


    I dunno. I think this is the way forward for blacks:

    Most manage their family lives badly. If relations between men and women were less of a free-for-all, they might manage their family lives better. (Something that's true on the other side of the color bar as well). There is no set of public policies which are going to induce people to manage their family lives better. There is a set of institutions that can deter criminals and sequester them. You just have to hire the manpower, deploy them, and not act to entangle them in bureaucratic nonsense. You can also re-jigger your incentives in the economic sphere - matching funds for earned income rather than open-ended doles.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    You can also re-jigger

    Re-jigger? Re-jigger? What is it with you people?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Johann Ricke

    ?

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=re-jigger


    English isn't your 1st language, I take it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  190. @El Dato
    America as a melting pot. It's metling down fast.

    Protesters in Minneapolis raise SOMALI flag after police kill suspected felon


    Black Lives Matter and Muslim organizations led a protest in Minneapolis, Minnesota against the police shooting of a suspected gun felon who shot first. The protesters hoisted a Somali flag over a building at one point.

     

    IDD SHOT FIRST!

    Idd was shot dead by Minneapolis police last Wednesday. Body camera footage of the fatal shooting released on Thursday showed Idd firing at police after they stopped his car in what they called a “probable cause” weapons investigation. He was killed when officers returned fire. Though the video footage showed Idd firing first, one Muslim activist told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that he believed the footage to be edited and “inconclusive.”
     
    Maybe this whole city is a hologram, who knows! Salami aleikum etc.

    There may be as many as 250,000 Somalis in the Twin Cities
     
    To quote ex-General Petraeus, "Tell me how this ends".

    Meanwhile in NY: "Implement Order A416"

    New York’s new law setting up detention centers to lock up suspected Covid-19 cases heralds a Kafkaesque nightmare

    Replies: @Art Deco, @BenKenobi

    How can you be released “if no longer contagious “ — if you were never contagious to begin with?

    Can any of our kindest, warmest, bravest, most wonderful chicken-little covid shills weigh in on how this is a good thing and that we’re all uneducated plebs for thinking otherwise?

    Paging TWBT, utu and HA to the thread…

  191. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Meretricious

    Some of the Motown stuff is at least pleasant, but there are Negro Geniuses--at least some female singers. There is nobody better than Ella Fitzgerald with all the Broadway songbooks, and they never sound the least bit dated. Listen to 'Thou Swell', for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_nkIO8W5qo The other one that always comes to mind is Dionne Warwick with her legendary (truly) collaboration with Burt Bacharach.

    What these two have in common is that they are considered 'too white' by Negroes. Ella admitted that she was primarily influenced by the white singer Connie Boswell. Warwick was not so obviously white, but she was accused of it often, and the songs were sophisticated and you really don't think of race when she sings those Bacharach/David songs. The Black Gospel elements in some of her ornamentation don't seem particularly black, just that she could do things with her voice that nobody else could.

    Duke Ellington was also a great Negro Genius. I've got some of the ancient LPs from the late 40s and early 50s, and they are not like anything anyone else ever did. The only huge mistake he made was to try to do a jazz version of The Nutcracker, and it is so fucking ugly; there is simply no way not to prefer the original Tchaikowsky, this is just a maiming of it. But with the super-cool cabaret style, he was different from the other jazz musicians, and some of those are great too, but although Ellington is more 'Negro', it's a very 'genteel Negro sound'. I don't think he was ever 'accused' of 'being too white', though, as Ella and Dionne definitely were.

    Of course, you can prefer white singers doing all the show songs from the Broadway songbooks that Ella did, and sometimes I do (she doesn't get "Lush Life" right--too wholesome), and some of the things in the Harold Arlen Songbook, as "Hooray for Love" and "Let's Fall in Love" are a couple in which I think she can't be beat. Dionne put her stamp on the Bacharach songs, and they more or less totally belong to her--even Streisand singing 'Alfie' sounds dimestore by comparison.

    I wouldn't say I thought Billie Holliday was a 'Negro genius'. The ones that got all their psychodrama of drugs into the music are boring. I can't think of any black male geniuses right off, but I have usually preferred French pop male singers like Becaud and Trenet to any of ours.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce

    Holliday is much overrated–I agree with you on Fitzgerald–BTW, it’s not “Connie” Boswell-it’s “Connee”. Constance to be official, but she spelled her nickname with two ee’s. She (and her singing sisters) were indeed excellent.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @AceDeuce

    Hey, thanks. But you know what, I looked it up, and it was, in fact 'Connie'. She herself changed it to 'Connee'. I haven't actually ever heard the Boswell Sisters, and they were big, it seems. So now I'm going to listen.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  192. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.

    A fellow Coastie?

    He was the first chief journalist in the Coast Guard, the rating having been expressly created for him in recognition of his literary ability.

    Haley’s initials were AMPH. As in amphetamine. His nickname could have been Cyrano:

    Other sailors began to notice his talents and would pay him to write love letters for their girlfriends.

    Chief Journalist Alex P. Haley 1921-1992

    Alex Haley in the 1950s:

    Alex Haley today:

    282-foot Alex Haley

    Well, it’s a damned sight better than the USNS Harvey Milk! Will the Navy honor Lenny Bruce the same way?

  193. @obwandiyag
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Lou Reed sucks. Taxi Driver sucks. Mean Streets sucks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Lou Reed sucks. Taxi Driver sucks. Mean Streets sucks.

    Congratulations. You’ve finally said something intelligent. If crudely put.

  194. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Rob McX

    Either that, or Nietzsche really was right. (Worked for Iggy Pop too, although he's been clean for years.)

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    • Thanks: Gary in Gramercy
  195. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Art Deco

    I was referring to the endemic theft of services carried out by Dominicans. They claim for children that aren’t theirs, and cash checks for parents who aren’t alive.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The term ‘theft of services’ doesn’t mean what you think it means, unless you’re telling me that dine-and-dash is a Dominican specialty.

    That aside, when the number of Dominicans in the city exceeds the number of people of all descriptions collecting and > 90% of the population is not Dominican, it’s hard to see how any of your contentions could be anywhere close to correct.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Art Deco

    Dine and dash is theft of goods, not services. But coming here illegally and having Americans pay for healthcare and senior services and schools is theft of service in my book, even if progs will tell that illegals clogging the ERs in Jackson Heights or Inwood is perfectly ‘legal.’

    Anyway, it was hyperbole. Dominicans use welfare at a higher rate than any other group, is what I’m saying. Look it up if you care to.

  196. @Johann Ricke
    @Art Deco


    You can also re-jigger
     
    Re-jigger? Re-jigger? What is it with you people?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    ?

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=re-jigger

    English isn’t your 1st language, I take it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco

    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  197. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Heck, Alex Haley probably borrowed the anecdote from somebody else.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

    The sum of text that Harold Courlander claimed Haley had copied might have filled six pages, or < 1 % of Haley's text.

  198. @AceDeuce
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Holliday is much overrated--I agree with you on Fitzgerald--BTW, it's not "Connie" Boswell-it's "Connee". Constance to be official, but she spelled her nickname with two ee's. She (and her singing sisters) were indeed excellent.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Hey, thanks. But you know what, I looked it up, and it was, in fact ‘Connie’. She herself changed it to ‘Connee’. I haven’t actually ever heard the Boswell Sisters, and they were big, it seems. So now I’m going to listen.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Hey, I already knew that she went by "Connie" when she was a kid and that she changed it later at the start of her career.

    So what?

    The fact is, she changed it and performed and was known as "Connee", so that's what to call her. mmm-kay? Just setting you straight in a nice way. Sheesh.

    I noticed you call Billie Holiday "Billie" when her actual first name was "Eleanora". Same thing.

    You've never even listened to the Boswell Sisters?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  199. @Art Deco
    @Johann Ricke

    ?

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=re-jigger


    English isn't your 1st language, I take it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

    • Agree: Gary in Gramercy
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Reg Cæsar


    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

     

    I was pulling his leg, playing Antifa commissar. Unfortunately, this is the world we live in.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  200. @Art Deco
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The term 'theft of services' doesn't mean what you think it means, unless you're telling me that dine-and-dash is a Dominican specialty.

    That aside, when the number of Dominicans in the city exceeds the number of people of all descriptions collecting and > 90% of the population is not Dominican, it's hard to see how any of your contentions could be anywhere close to correct.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Dine and dash is theft of goods, not services. But coming here illegally and having Americans pay for healthcare and senior services and schools is theft of service in my book, even if progs will tell that illegals clogging the ERs in Jackson Heights or Inwood is perfectly ‘legal.’

    Anyway, it was hyperbole. Dominicans use welfare at a higher rate than any other group, is what I’m saying. Look it up if you care to.

  201. @Jack D
    Stevie Wonder only won 25 Grammies. If they had not been so racist he would have won ALL of them.

    Replies: @Forbes

    It’s kinda amusing. All along I thought the Grammy was awarded for the music–with the honor bestowed on the artist. Apparently, listeners (and Grammy voters) should take into account the personal attributes of the artist, judging the artist based on a hierarchy of victimhood Pokemon Points, rather than on an appreciation of the music

    Live and learn…

  202. @Paperback Writer
    @Marty

    I was reading some gushing paleocon piece about Lexington, KY - it does everything right, yada yada. No mention of race. One of the factors they mentioned was U of KY basketball, so I looked up the roster.

    https://ukathletics.com/sports/mens-basketball/roster

    Why so many obviously biracial boys? What's going on here?

    Replies: @Marty

    Despite having been a basketball junkie in my ‘30s, I haven’t followed black sports since 1998. That was the year I finally admitted to myself that blacks are crazy and hate me (I was an early victim of the polar bear game, losing a front tooth which has cost me $6k to date). With blacks being so much more common in the southeast than in California, I’m not surprised that b-ball rosters there have so many milk-chocolates. Actually, what’s remarkable about that pic is the hairstyles. I’ve noticed that in the last decade, almost anytime you look up some horrific race crime, the perp wears dreads or those spiky semi-braids. So I expect at least one of those guys will rape/kill somebody.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Marty

    "milk chocolates"

    These look more like cafe au laits. It's striking.

    I noticed the same thing about the hair.

  203. @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco

    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

    I was pulling his leg, playing Antifa commissar. Unfortunately, this is the world we live in.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Johann Ricke

    Unfortunately, you chose a distinctly humorless commenter as the target for your leg-pulling jape. At least, I find him parsimonious -- downright niggardly -- with the laughs.

    Very good with official statistics, though: we must give credit where it's due.

  204. @Marty
    @Paperback Writer

    Despite having been a basketball junkie in my ‘30s, I haven’t followed black sports since 1998. That was the year I finally admitted to myself that blacks are crazy and hate me (I was an early victim of the polar bear game, losing a front tooth which has cost me $6k to date). With blacks being so much more common in the southeast than in California, I’m not surprised that b-ball rosters there have so many milk-chocolates. Actually, what’s remarkable about that pic is the hairstyles. I’ve noticed that in the last decade, almost anytime you look up some horrific race crime, the perp wears dreads or those spiky semi-braids. So I expect at least one of those guys will rape/kill somebody.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    “milk chocolates”

    These look more like cafe au laits. It’s striking.

    I noticed the same thing about the hair.

  205. @Johann Ricke
    @Reg Cæsar


    I think he was accusing you of employing a sly pun. That would suggest his comment shows a particularly good command of English for a non-native speaker.

    Confess: was your use of the word deliberate, or accidental?

     

    I was pulling his leg, playing Antifa commissar. Unfortunately, this is the world we live in.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Unfortunately, you chose a distinctly humorless commenter as the target for your leg-pulling jape. At least, I find him parsimonious — downright niggardly — with the laughs.

    Very good with official statistics, though: we must give credit where it’s due.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  206. @Half Canadian
    Did they have suggestions on who could be nominated besides them? This is a pretty niche market.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @botazefa, @Bite Moi

    Half Canadian——-Hell,just make all blacks Reverends.

  207. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @AceDeuce

    Hey, thanks. But you know what, I looked it up, and it was, in fact 'Connie'. She herself changed it to 'Connee'. I haven't actually ever heard the Boswell Sisters, and they were big, it seems. So now I'm going to listen.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Hey, I already knew that she went by “Connie” when she was a kid and that she changed it later at the start of her career.

    So what?

    The fact is, she changed it and performed and was known as “Connee”, so that’s what to call her. mmm-kay? Just setting you straight in a nice way. Sheesh.

    I noticed you call Billie Holiday “Billie” when her actual first name was “Eleanora”. Same thing.

    You’ve never even listened to the Boswell Sisters?

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @AceDeuce

    You're too crude. I was agreeing with you, and looked it up in wiki. I wasn't trying to 'teach you' anything, actually saying both things. And typical internet jerk, you take it personally. A lot of people haven't listened to the Boswell Sisters. Anyway, you go on Ignore. Too touchy, like many here. Or just a peevish drunk. Yeah. Quit being so tacky. When I see types like you, I banish them just like Louis XIV. Although I'm sure you're all nice and tucked away in some nice province already, now aren't you? How am I supposed to know what you knew or didn't?

  208. @AceDeuce
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Hey, I already knew that she went by "Connie" when she was a kid and that she changed it later at the start of her career.

    So what?

    The fact is, she changed it and performed and was known as "Connee", so that's what to call her. mmm-kay? Just setting you straight in a nice way. Sheesh.

    I noticed you call Billie Holiday "Billie" when her actual first name was "Eleanora". Same thing.

    You've never even listened to the Boswell Sisters?

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    You’re too crude. I was agreeing with you, and looked it up in wiki. I wasn’t trying to ‘teach you’ anything, actually saying both things. And typical internet jerk, you take it personally. A lot of people haven’t listened to the Boswell Sisters. Anyway, you go on Ignore. Too touchy, like many here. Or just a peevish drunk. Yeah. Quit being so tacky. When I see types like you, I banish them just like Louis XIV. Although I’m sure you’re all nice and tucked away in some nice province already, now aren’t you? How am I supposed to know what you knew or didn’t?

    • Troll: AceDeuce
  209. @Aeronerauk
    @Billy Shears

    Incredible that, as a man in my early 30s, I recognize and can hear in my head almost every song on that list.

    More incredibly the Temptations' mediocre "Can't Get Next To You" and Tommy Roe's "Dizzy" were top ten.

    OT: Would it be so bad if "classic rock" stations played a little less Nirvana and maybe one or two hits from the 60s? Did Boomers stop listening to FM radio? My father has his SiriusXM tuned exclusively to the 50s/60s.

    Is listening to FM radio a sign you're lower class/poor?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Polistra

    You object to the Temptations and give “The Archies” a pass???

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    "Sugar Sugar" is kind of a genius hit song.

    "I Can't Get Next to You" is kind of run of the mill for the Temptations, who had a lot of great singles. I would rank "My Girl," "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Papa Was a Rolling Stone" and "Ball of Confusion" ahead of it.

  210. @Polistra
    @Aeronerauk

    You object to the Temptations and give "The Archies" a pass???

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Sugar Sugar” is kind of a genius hit song.

    “I Can’t Get Next to You” is kind of run of the mill for the Temptations, who had a lot of great singles. I would rank “My Girl,” “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” and “Ball of Confusion” ahead of it.

  211. @slumber_j
    @Morton's toes

    This is my favorite cover version ever of that song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjFRy8jQ_0U

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Gary in Gramercy, @Morton's toes

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