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From the Chicago Tribune by Eric Zorn:

MATH RIOTS PROVE FUN INCALCULABLE
by Eric Zorn

June 29, 1993

Mathematicians worldwide were excited and pleased today by the announcement that Princeton University professor Andrew Wiles had finally proved Fermat’s Last Theorem, a 365-year-old problem said to be the most famous in the field.

Yes, admittedly, there was rioting and vandalism last week during the celebration. A few bookstores had windows smashed and shelves stripped, and vacant lots glowed with burning piles of old dissertations. But overall we can feel relief that it was nothing — nothing — compared to the outbreak of exuberant thuggery that occurred in 1984 after Louis DeBranges finally proved the Bieberbach Conjecture.

“Math hooligans are the worst,” said a Chicago Police Department spokesman. “But the city learned from the Bieberbach riots. We were ready for them this time.”

When word hit Wednesday that Fermat’s Last Theorem had fallen, a massive show of force from law enforcement at universities all around the country headed off a repeat of the festive looting sprees that have become the traditional accompaniment to triumphant breakthroughs in higher mathematics.

Mounted police throughout Hyde Park kept crowds of delirious wizards at the University of Chicago from tipping over cars on the midway as they first did in 1976 when Wolfgang Haken and Kenneth Appel cracked the long-vexing Four-Color Problem. Incidents of textbook-throwing and citizens being pulled from their cars and humiliated with difficult story problems last week were described by the university’s math department chairman Bob Zimmer as “isolated.”

Zimmer said, “Most of the celebrations were orderly and peaceful. But there will always be a few — usually graduate students — who use any excuse to cause trouble and steal. These are not true fans of Andrew Wiles.”

Wiles himself pleaded for calm even as he offered up the proof that there is no solution to the equation x^n + y^n = z^n when n is a whole number greater than two, as Pierre de Fermat first proposed in the 17th Century. “Party hard but party safe,” he said, echoing the phrase he had repeated often in interviews with scholarly journals as he came closer and closer to completing his proof.

Some authorities tried to blame the disorder on the provocative taunting of Japanese mathematician Yoichi Miyaoka. Miyaoka thought he had proved Fermat’s Last Theorem in 1988, but his claims did not bear up under the scrutiny of professional referees, leading some to suspect that the fix was in. And ever since, as Wiles chipped away steadily at the Fermat problem, Miyaoka scoffed that there would be no reason to board up windows near universities any time soon; that God wanted Miyaoka to prove it.

In a peculiar sidelight, Miyaoka recently took the trouble to secure a U.S. trademark on the equation x^n + y^n = z^n as well as the now-ubiquitous expression “Take that, Fermat!” Ironically, in defeat, he stands to make a good deal of money on cap and T-shirt sales.

A Pat Riley reference.

The joke is that this is a spoof of the victory riots that did a lot of damage in Chicago in 1992 and 1993 after Michael Jordan’s Bulls won their second and third straight championships. For whatever reason, there was no riot after the first win in 1991, so 1992 caught the Chicago PD by surprise. In 1993, however, there were cavalry cops on horseback on every street corner hours before the final game. But the rioting was still pretty bad.

 
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  1. I thought tightlipped airhead progressive scolds like Zorn abhorred whataboutism.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
  2. OT: Steve, have you seen this?

    https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/

    University of Central Florida prof subjected to nine-hour inquisition for agreeing with a tweet from a notorious crimethinker, i.e. you.

    • Thanks: Escher, Kronos
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Careful what you wish for, people. It's not all good even if they do spell your name right.

    On this topic, however, see also Nick Cave
    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/497954-nick-cave-cancel-culture-millennials/

    , @El Dato
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Some should rewrite "The Name of the Rose" in a modern academic setting.

    I would so fit.

    At the end, the laughter-abhorring guy who sees Nazis everyhwere bumpstock-AR-15s a whole courtyard of vapid, body-problematic, diverse intellectuals with dyed hair as the library burns and a wiper program ravages the backups, while cackling manically. He then notices what he is doing and offs himself.

    Finally the main protagonist and his sideckick from Hillbilly country take off in a muscle car, pursued by Antifa. He says: "We thought Trump's America would be bad ... but we didn't know in which way." They then decide to join a Prepper Group in the Rockies.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I remember about 25 years or so ago I applied for an adjunct teaching position at a college with an overwhelmingly high percentage of minority students. The head of adjuncts and the department chair in that department were minorities themselves.

    At one point in the interview I was asked my opinion about minority education. I went on a rant, saying minority education was a racist concept which implied minority students weren’t capable of learning. The head of adjuncts took me to the department chair and had me repeat my rant. I was hired.

    Not only that, but when I caught some minority students cheating a few years later I was permitted to punish them. Not all colleges allowed that for certain ethnic groups.

    So yes, even many of us liberals don’t want students coddled no matter what the ethnic background, and that includes liberal minorities as well.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @bomag

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "notorious crimethinker"

    Listening to a clip of Tucker Carlson's 8-13-20 monologue, I suspect that Tucker, or one of his writers, is reading the work of renegade sociologist Sailer.

  3. One problem; using enough force to stop a riot is now called systemic racism.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Redneck farmer

    It's like the physics equation for work,

    W=Fs

    In this application:

    W is White privilege,

    F is force,

    which is applied to s, which is the sons-of-bitches causing problems.

  4. There’s an undrawn Far Side cartoon in there somewhere, like the mathematicians overturning a car with a lever or calculating the arch of a Molotov cocktail.

    Alas, only this…

    • LOL: Tsar Nicholas
  5. The last I heard, Wiles was coy about attacking the Riemann Hypothesis, likening his interest in the problem merely to that of a “spectator sport”.

  6. Yoichi Miyaoka thought he had proved Fermat’s Last Theorem in 1988, but his claims did not bear up under the scrutiny of professional referees, leading some to suspect that the fix was in.

    Nowadays he’d just be awarded it on the grounds of POC, though I don’t think the Japanese really qualify. Something about a competent, civilized, self-respecting society which neither invades nor invites.

    • Replies: @Franz Liszt von raiding
    @Mr McKenna

    Yeah real civilized what the Japanese samurai did to the Chinese for millennia

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Gordo
    @Mr McKenna

    'Omnidirectional Peaceful Diplomacy'. They're up to something!

  7. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT: Steve, have you seen this?

    https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/

    University of Central Florida prof subjected to nine-hour inquisition for agreeing with a tweet from a notorious crimethinker, i.e. you.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @El Dato, @Paleo Liberal, @SunBakedSuburb

    Careful what you wish for, people. It’s not all good even if they do spell your name right.

    On this topic, however, see also Nick Cave
    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/497954-nick-cave-cancel-culture-millennials/

  8. @Redneck farmer
    One problem; using enough force to stop a riot is now called systemic racism.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    It’s like the physics equation for work,

    W=Fs

    In this application:

    W is White privilege,

    F is force,

    which is applied to s, which is the sons-of-bitches causing problems.

  9. “there were cavalry cops on horseback on every street corner”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_pension_crisis

    Most of the rioters back then had jobs or at least were permitted to have a job.

    The Chicago, Illinois and US regimes had legitimacy in 1993 that they lack now.

  10. Mathematicians identify different types of riots:

    Natural riots (Nr): Riots that happen spontaneously among locals

    Integer riots (Zr): People who feel positive and negative about something, both rioting together

    Rational riots (Qr): Carefully planned violence among different people whose angers or elations can be expressed as ratios

    Real riots (Rr): When people really, really tear things apart, and the damage occurs some distance along a straight street.

    Irrational riots (Ir): Real riots during which people go particularly crazy

    Imaginary riots: When people on the political right, conservative, patriotic Americans, gather to peacefully demonstrate

    Complex riots (Cr): when Imaginary rioters are attacked by Real rioters and the local government adds them together to express their differences

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Clever and elegant. LOL!
    Silly and not nearly as good but I couldn't resist trying:
    Quaternion riots where the rioters don't associate with any other groups.
    Octonion riots where the rioters don't allow anyone to transit through their territory.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  11. @Mr McKenna

    Yoichi Miyaoka thought he had proved Fermat’s Last Theorem in 1988, but his claims did not bear up under the scrutiny of professional referees, leading some to suspect that the fix was in.
     
    Nowadays he'd just be awarded it on the grounds of POC, though I don't think the Japanese really qualify. Something about a competent, civilized, self-respecting society which neither invades nor invites.

    Replies: @Franz Liszt von raiding, @Gordo

    Yeah real civilized what the Japanese samurai did to the Chinese for millennia

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Franz Liszt von raiding

    Are you bonkers?

    Japanese Samurai tended to stay in Japan because the Chinese mainland had its own wide-area imperialism/warlordism show going.

    They (the "Samurai") also existed for about 250 years max. Plus they were real assholes.

  12. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT: Steve, have you seen this?

    https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/

    University of Central Florida prof subjected to nine-hour inquisition for agreeing with a tweet from a notorious crimethinker, i.e. you.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @El Dato, @Paleo Liberal, @SunBakedSuburb

    Some should rewrite “The Name of the Rose” in a modern academic setting.

    I would so fit.

    At the end, the laughter-abhorring guy who sees Nazis everyhwere bumpstock-AR-15s a whole courtyard of vapid, body-problematic, diverse intellectuals with dyed hair as the library burns and a wiper program ravages the backups, while cackling manically. He then notices what he is doing and offs himself.

    Finally the main protagonist and his sideckick from Hillbilly country take off in a muscle car, pursued by Antifa. He says: “We thought Trump’s America would be bad … but we didn’t know in which way.” They then decide to join a Prepper Group in the Rockies.

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @El Dato

    Thank you, that has legs.

  13. That’s right up there with using a spelling bee to try to shunt public energy away from rioting after canoe races at Coon Creek.

    A plan to end the Coon Creek riots, 29 years ago

    In 1991, La Crosse got unwanted national publicity when a mob on the street overturned a city police car and set it on fire. It happened during the weekend of the Coon Creek Canoe Races in Coon Valley. For three years, people attending the races then went to La Crosse to drink on 3rd Street, and then confront cops trying to keep the peace. In August of ’91, organizers of the Coon Creek event said they would try shortening the two-day festival to just one day in 1992, to reduce the chance of rioting. It didn’t work: crowds still stopped downtown traffic in ’92, and challenged police, who responded with tear gas.

    A corporate spelling bee was being started in ’91, to mark International Literacy Day, the second Sunday in September. Local employers were invited to form three-person teams who would compete in the bee at Valley View Mall. The corporate bee in La Crosse continued for several more years after that.

    https://www.wizmnews.com/2020/02/12/a-plan-to-end-the-coon-creek-riots-29-years-ago/

    Well, OK, it seems the two are not actually connected, but canoe race riots at Coon Creek is still funny. Wouldn’t spelling bee riots be funny?

  14. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT: Steve, have you seen this?

    https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/

    University of Central Florida prof subjected to nine-hour inquisition for agreeing with a tweet from a notorious crimethinker, i.e. you.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @El Dato, @Paleo Liberal, @SunBakedSuburb

    I remember about 25 years or so ago I applied for an adjunct teaching position at a college with an overwhelmingly high percentage of minority students. The head of adjuncts and the department chair in that department were minorities themselves.

    At one point in the interview I was asked my opinion about minority education. I went on a rant, saying minority education was a racist concept which implied minority students weren’t capable of learning. The head of adjuncts took me to the department chair and had me repeat my rant. I was hired.

    Not only that, but when I caught some minority students cheating a few years later I was permitted to punish them. Not all colleges allowed that for certain ethnic groups.

    So yes, even many of us liberals don’t want students coddled no matter what the ethnic background, and that includes liberal minorities as well.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Paleo Liberal

    Liberal upright behavior: Not any more!

    , @bomag
    @Paleo Liberal

    Thanks for maintaining standards.

    But overall, things have not gone too well.

  15. At the University of Wisconsin it was traditional for several years for students etc. to riot every year on the weekend preceding Halloween. White students from neighboring states were visiting Madison for the riots. The City of Madison put a stop to it by having a party on the street with a heavy police presence and required tickets.

    The first person arrested for looting this year in Madison was a white female student.

    So no, it’s not just black men doing the rioting.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Paleo Liberal


    So no, it’s not just black men doing the rioting.
     
    Silly. Spoiled, masked, deranged white brats are doing the rioting. Black men are doing the looting.
  16. @Paleo Liberal
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I remember about 25 years or so ago I applied for an adjunct teaching position at a college with an overwhelmingly high percentage of minority students. The head of adjuncts and the department chair in that department were minorities themselves.

    At one point in the interview I was asked my opinion about minority education. I went on a rant, saying minority education was a racist concept which implied minority students weren’t capable of learning. The head of adjuncts took me to the department chair and had me repeat my rant. I was hired.

    Not only that, but when I caught some minority students cheating a few years later I was permitted to punish them. Not all colleges allowed that for certain ethnic groups.

    So yes, even many of us liberals don’t want students coddled no matter what the ethnic background, and that includes liberal minorities as well.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @bomag

    Liberal upright behavior: Not any more!

  17. Eric Zorn’s article has turned into a somewhat poignant perspective piece. As is so often the case, humor from a bygone era doesn’t age very well.

  18. R(b, w, h, a) = 1* b + 0 *w + 0*h +o*a
    b + w + h + a = 1

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    b + 0 *w + 0*h +o*a
     
    https://cpcmcredit.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/on-the-internet-nobody-knows-youre-a-dog-5160729.png?w=584
  19. @Mr McKenna

    Yoichi Miyaoka thought he had proved Fermat’s Last Theorem in 1988, but his claims did not bear up under the scrutiny of professional referees, leading some to suspect that the fix was in.
     
    Nowadays he'd just be awarded it on the grounds of POC, though I don't think the Japanese really qualify. Something about a competent, civilized, self-respecting society which neither invades nor invites.

    Replies: @Franz Liszt von raiding, @Gordo

    ‘Omnidirectional Peaceful Diplomacy’. They’re up to something!

  20. @Franz Liszt von raiding
    @Mr McKenna

    Yeah real civilized what the Japanese samurai did to the Chinese for millennia

    Replies: @El Dato

    Are you bonkers?

    Japanese Samurai tended to stay in Japan because the Chinese mainland had its own wide-area imperialism/warlordism show going.

    They (the “Samurai”) also existed for about 250 years max. Plus they were real assholes.

  21. For some reason, it reminded me of this, from 2011:

  22. Speaking of math, what does “Black+” mean? It’s mentioned in Google’s pledge of allegiance to “racial justice”, https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/commitments-racial-equity/
    As in,
    “we’re working to create a stronger sense of inclusion and belonging for Googlers in general and our Black+ community in particular”

    And I want to know if an object-oriented Black++ is in the works.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @International Jew

    Perhaps...at least until Microsoft introduces Black#.
    At which point, the functional crowd (pun intended) may explore the possibility of a successor to F#, to be known as FU#.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @International Jew

    Google's "Black+" racial justice inclusion plan means hiring more dot-head Indian engineers. They also hate systemic whitey.

  23. @Buzz Mohawk
    Mathematicians identify different types of riots:

    Natural riots (Nr): Riots that happen spontaneously among locals

    Integer riots (Zr): People who feel positive and negative about something, both rioting together

    Rational riots (Qr): Carefully planned violence among different people whose angers or elations can be expressed as ratios

    Real riots (Rr): When people really, really tear things apart, and the damage occurs some distance along a straight street.

    Irrational riots (Ir): Real riots during which people go particularly crazy

    Imaginary riots: When people on the political right, conservative, patriotic Americans, gather to peacefully demonstrate

    Complex riots (Cr): when Imaginary rioters are attacked by Real rioters and the local government adds them together to express their differences

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    Clever and elegant. LOL!
    Silly and not nearly as good but I couldn’t resist trying:
    Quaternion riots where the rioters don’t associate with any other groups.
    Octonion riots where the rioters don’t allow anyone to transit through their territory.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    LOL. Rioting can sure can get complicated.

    Maybe there could be a Riot Theory, like Chaos Theory. Patterns in seemingly chaotic mobs. There probably are such theories already.

  24. Is this Zorn guy still going to have a job Monday?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Known Fact

    He wrote that in 1993 so hopefully for him he's retired now. But if not, then you're right; publishing that today would instantly be taken as a diss against the "Black community". (Which, of course, it is.)

    Replies: @MBlanc46

  25. @International Jew
    Speaking of math, what does "Black+" mean? It's mentioned in Google's pledge of allegiance to "racial justice", https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/commitments-racial-equity/
    As in,
    "we’re working to create a stronger sense of inclusion and belonging for Googlers in general and our Black+ community in particular"

    And I want to know if an object-oriented Black++ is in the works.

    Replies: @turtle, @SunBakedSuburb

    Perhaps…at least until Microsoft introduces Black#.
    At which point, the functional crowd (pun intended) may explore the possibility of a successor to F#, to be known as FU#.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @turtle


    Perhaps…at least until Microsoft introduces Black#.
    At which point, the functional crowd (pun intended) may explore the possibility of a successor to F#, to be known as FU#.
     
    And I'm sure Larry Ellison has got all his black programmers on the successor to Java -- Purple Drank.
  26. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT: Steve, have you seen this?

    https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/

    University of Central Florida prof subjected to nine-hour inquisition for agreeing with a tweet from a notorious crimethinker, i.e. you.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @El Dato, @Paleo Liberal, @SunBakedSuburb

    “notorious crimethinker”

    Listening to a clip of Tucker Carlson’s 8-13-20 monologue, I suspect that Tucker, or one of his writers, is reading the work of renegade sociologist Sailer.

  27. @International Jew
    Speaking of math, what does "Black+" mean? It's mentioned in Google's pledge of allegiance to "racial justice", https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/commitments-racial-equity/
    As in,
    "we’re working to create a stronger sense of inclusion and belonging for Googlers in general and our Black+ community in particular"

    And I want to know if an object-oriented Black++ is in the works.

    Replies: @turtle, @SunBakedSuburb

    Google’s “Black+” racial justice inclusion plan means hiring more dot-head Indian engineers. They also hate systemic whitey.

  28. The Bulls won their second championship a couple of months after the L.A. riots. The blacks in Chicago were following in the footsteps of their brothas in California.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Stan Adams

    I had forgotten that both the Lakers and the Clippers made the playoffs for the first time that year and both teams had to move Game 4 of their first-round series because of the riots. The Lakers played in Las Vegas while the Clippers played in Anaheim.

  29. Mostly peaceful riots.

  30. Steve you should have your brain donated to science! It is truly unique.

  31. …1976 when Wolfgang Haken and Kenneth Appel cracked the long-vexing Four-Color Problem.

    Their proof was quantitative, not qualitative, thus not “elegant”. Using a computer, they found all 1500 or so permutations of territory-tiling, or tesselation, or whatever. It just so happened that none of those required more than four colors.

    Fellow mathematicians, and geographers, were most disappointed.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    We live in the age of cheap computation. There is nothing wrong with brute force approaches. In 1976 this was still a non-trivial problem for a computer. Today you could solve it in 2 seconds on your laptop. A solution is a solution whether it is "elegant" or not. This is not figure skating - you don't get extra points for style. If Pythagoras had a laptop he would have used it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    The REAL question is, is there a more compressed proof, i.e. one that does not use exhaustive generate-and-test?

    Elegance = highly compressed statement. If you can find it.

    You may spend your whole life trying to understand/decompress the statement though.

    Also applies to physics.

  32. @JohnnyWalker123
    R(b, w, h, a) = 1* b + 0 *w + 0*h +o*a
    b + w + h + a = 1

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    b + 0 *w + 0*h +o*a

  33. @Paleo Liberal
    At the University of Wisconsin it was traditional for several years for students etc. to riot every year on the weekend preceding Halloween. White students from neighboring states were visiting Madison for the riots. The City of Madison put a stop to it by having a party on the street with a heavy police presence and required tickets.

    The first person arrested for looting this year in Madison was a white female student.

    So no, it’s not just black men doing the rioting.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    So no, it’s not just black men doing the rioting.

    Silly. Spoiled, masked, deranged white brats are doing the rioting. Black men are doing the looting.

  34. Actually the Japanese had no interest in doing anything to China until Japan started modernizing after 1868. Japan took control of Taiwan in 1875, and crushed China in a war in 1895. Japan then colonized and massacred its way across China until 1945. Japan has never accepted full responsibility for the horrrors it inflicted on China in the 20th century.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @John Cunningham

    They invaded Korea in the 16th century (IIRC), but were quickly driven out by the locals with Chinese help. After that the Japanese seem to have lost interest in imperialism until the 19th century.

    , @El Dato
    @John Cunningham

    Correct. China has only itself to blame, they could have gotten their act together and kicked some ass, instead they decided to break into little fiefdoms. Things didn't turn out good...

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/014103145X/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i6

    You can get the hardcover edition at the modic sum of 1'008 USD .... I'm rich!!

  35. @Paleo Liberal
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I remember about 25 years or so ago I applied for an adjunct teaching position at a college with an overwhelmingly high percentage of minority students. The head of adjuncts and the department chair in that department were minorities themselves.

    At one point in the interview I was asked my opinion about minority education. I went on a rant, saying minority education was a racist concept which implied minority students weren’t capable of learning. The head of adjuncts took me to the department chair and had me repeat my rant. I was hired.

    Not only that, but when I caught some minority students cheating a few years later I was permitted to punish them. Not all colleges allowed that for certain ethnic groups.

    So yes, even many of us liberals don’t want students coddled no matter what the ethnic background, and that includes liberal minorities as well.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @bomag

    Thanks for maintaining standards.

    But overall, things have not gone too well.

  36. @Reg Cæsar

    ...1976 when Wolfgang Haken and Kenneth Appel cracked the long-vexing Four-Color Problem.
     
    Their proof was quantitative, not qualitative, thus not "elegant". Using a computer, they found all 1500 or so permutations of territory-tiling, or tesselation, or whatever. It just so happened that none of those required more than four colors.

    Fellow mathematicians, and geographers, were most disappointed.

    Replies: @Jack D, @El Dato

    We live in the age of cheap computation. There is nothing wrong with brute force approaches. In 1976 this was still a non-trivial problem for a computer. Today you could solve it in 2 seconds on your laptop. A solution is a solution whether it is “elegant” or not. This is not figure skating – you don’t get extra points for style. If Pythagoras had a laptop he would have used it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    A solution is a solution whether it is “elegant” or not. This is not figure skating – you don’t get extra points for style.
     
    This is similar to literary attribution. Too many make the mistake of concentrating on the content, on what's "important". But the writer himself is doing that as well, so it's necessarily murky. He's putting some spin on it.

    Better to concentrate on style, on the trivial. The writer isn't thinking of this, it's automatic. This is what the Claremont Authorship project did with Shakespeare's works, also using computers. They destroyed every other "candidate" that left writings to analyze. So those who don't like Will get stuck with Rutland or Derby, I forget which, who left nothing. (Or someone else in the cast.)

    But this isn't "elegant", either. Academics, professional or amateur, have Janet Lynn syndrome. School figures don't do it for them.

    Haken, Appel, Claremont, and you, Jack, go with Tonya Harding or Surya Bonaly. Brute force!
  37. @turtle
    @International Jew

    Perhaps...at least until Microsoft introduces Black#.
    At which point, the functional crowd (pun intended) may explore the possibility of a successor to F#, to be known as FU#.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Perhaps…at least until Microsoft introduces Black#.
    At which point, the functional crowd (pun intended) may explore the possibility of a successor to F#, to be known as FU#.

    And I’m sure Larry Ellison has got all his black programmers on the successor to Java — Purple Drank.

  38. @John Cunningham
    Actually the Japanese had no interest in doing anything to China until Japan started modernizing after 1868. Japan took control of Taiwan in 1875, and crushed China in a war in 1895. Japan then colonized and massacred its way across China until 1945. Japan has never accepted full responsibility for the horrrors it inflicted on China in the 20th century.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato

    They invaded Korea in the 16th century (IIRC), but were quickly driven out by the locals with Chinese help. After that the Japanese seem to have lost interest in imperialism until the 19th century.

  39. @John Cunningham
    Actually the Japanese had no interest in doing anything to China until Japan started modernizing after 1868. Japan took control of Taiwan in 1875, and crushed China in a war in 1895. Japan then colonized and massacred its way across China until 1945. Japan has never accepted full responsibility for the horrrors it inflicted on China in the 20th century.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato

    Correct. China has only itself to blame, they could have gotten their act together and kicked some ass, instead they decided to break into little fiefdoms. Things didn’t turn out good…

    You can get the hardcover edition at the modic sum of 1’008 USD …. I’m rich!!

  40. @Reg Cæsar

    ...1976 when Wolfgang Haken and Kenneth Appel cracked the long-vexing Four-Color Problem.
     
    Their proof was quantitative, not qualitative, thus not "elegant". Using a computer, they found all 1500 or so permutations of territory-tiling, or tesselation, or whatever. It just so happened that none of those required more than four colors.

    Fellow mathematicians, and geographers, were most disappointed.

    Replies: @Jack D, @El Dato

    The REAL question is, is there a more compressed proof, i.e. one that does not use exhaustive generate-and-test?

    Elegance = highly compressed statement. If you can find it.

    You may spend your whole life trying to understand/decompress the statement though.

    Also applies to physics.

  41. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    We live in the age of cheap computation. There is nothing wrong with brute force approaches. In 1976 this was still a non-trivial problem for a computer. Today you could solve it in 2 seconds on your laptop. A solution is a solution whether it is "elegant" or not. This is not figure skating - you don't get extra points for style. If Pythagoras had a laptop he would have used it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    A solution is a solution whether it is “elegant” or not. This is not figure skating – you don’t get extra points for style.

    This is similar to literary attribution. Too many make the mistake of concentrating on the content, on what’s “important”. But the writer himself is doing that as well, so it’s necessarily murky. He’s putting some spin on it.

    Better to concentrate on style, on the trivial. The writer isn’t thinking of this, it’s automatic. This is what the Claremont Authorship project did with Shakespeare’s works, also using computers. They destroyed every other “candidate” that left writings to analyze. So those who don’t like Will get stuck with Rutland or Derby, I forget which, who left nothing. (Or someone else in the cast.)

    But this isn’t “elegant”, either. Academics, professional or amateur, have Janet Lynn syndrome. School figures don’t do it for them.

    Haken, Appel, Claremont, and you, Jack, go with Tonya Harding or Surya Bonaly. Brute force!

  42. @Known Fact
    Is this Zorn guy still going to have a job Monday?

    Replies: @International Jew

    He wrote that in 1993 so hopefully for him he’s retired now. But if not, then you’re right; publishing that today would instantly be taken as a diss against the “Black community”. (Which, of course, it is.)

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @International Jew

    Still writing the last time I looked at a Trib, a few weeks ago (I’ve pretty much given up on it).

  43. @El Dato
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Some should rewrite "The Name of the Rose" in a modern academic setting.

    I would so fit.

    At the end, the laughter-abhorring guy who sees Nazis everyhwere bumpstock-AR-15s a whole courtyard of vapid, body-problematic, diverse intellectuals with dyed hair as the library burns and a wiper program ravages the backups, while cackling manically. He then notices what he is doing and offs himself.

    Finally the main protagonist and his sideckick from Hillbilly country take off in a muscle car, pursued by Antifa. He says: "We thought Trump's America would be bad ... but we didn't know in which way." They then decide to join a Prepper Group in the Rockies.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    Thank you, that has legs.

  44. @International Jew
    @Known Fact

    He wrote that in 1993 so hopefully for him he's retired now. But if not, then you're right; publishing that today would instantly be taken as a diss against the "Black community". (Which, of course, it is.)

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    Still writing the last time I looked at a Trib, a few weeks ago (I’ve pretty much given up on it).

  45. I’m kinda reminded of EducationRealist’s link on the “Math Wars” in US Education. It branches off from his deconstruction of Common Core. In three essays he explains the power dynamics and hidden forces fighting in the shadows of Common Core.

    https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2020/01/26/bush-obama-ed-reform-core-meltdown-came/

    Tom Loveless suggested that Common Core might be dogwhistling de-tracking, just as the standards also opened a window for Integrated Math and “conceptual understanding“. He argued that the Common Core math standards were an implicit invitation to schools to implement NCTM standards, root cause of the math wars of the 90s.

    The essays (and Tom Loveless link) kinda reminded me of “The Crying of Lot 49” of secret societies fighting each other amongst an unknowing public.

  46. @Stan Adams
    The Bulls won their second championship a couple of months after the L.A. riots. The blacks in Chicago were following in the footsteps of their brothas in California.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I had forgotten that both the Lakers and the Clippers made the playoffs for the first time that year and both teams had to move Game 4 of their first-round series because of the riots. The Lakers played in Las Vegas while the Clippers played in Anaheim.

  47. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Clever and elegant. LOL!
    Silly and not nearly as good but I couldn't resist trying:
    Quaternion riots where the rioters don't associate with any other groups.
    Octonion riots where the rioters don't allow anyone to transit through their territory.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. Rioting can sure can get complicated.

    Maybe there could be a Riot Theory, like Chaos Theory. Patterns in seemingly chaotic mobs. There probably are such theories already.

  48. California’s is already taking action to nerdify its thug class, as shoplifters can now be recognized by their practice of carrying calculators:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2015/10/10/prop47/

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