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The Atlantic: China Is Right About Free Speech
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Here’s that article in The Atlantic I mentioned in my new Taki’s column on how free speech is most valuable when dealing with a novel problem:

Internet Speech Will Never Go Back to Normal

In the debate over freedom versus control of the global network, China was largely correct, and the U.S. was wrong.

APRIL 25, 2020
by Jack Goldsmith, Harvard Law School professor,

Here’s Goldsmith’s recent book about how it’s totally not true that his stepfather murdered Jimmy Hoffa.

and Andrew Keane Woods, Professor of law at the University of Arizona College of Law

Covid-19 has emboldened American tech platforms to emerge from their defensive crouch. Before the pandemic, they were targets of public outrage over life under their dominion. Today, the platforms are proudly collaborating with one another, and following government guidance, to censor harmful information related to the coronavirus. And they are using their prodigious data-collection capacities, in coordination with federal and state governments, to improve contact tracing, quarantine enforcement, and other health measures. …

But the “extraordinary” measures we are seeing are not all that extraordinary. … As surprising as it may sound, digital surveillance and speech control in the United States already show many similarities to what one finds in authoritarian states such as China. Constitutional and cultural differences mean that the private sector, rather than the federal and state governments, currently takes the lead in these practices, which further values and address threats different from those in China. But the trend toward greater surveillance and speech control here, and toward the growing involvement of government, is undeniable and likely inexorable.

In the great debate of the past two decades about freedom versus control of the network, China was largely right and the United States was largely wrong. Significant monitoring and speech control are inevitable components of a mature and flourishing internet, and governments must play a large role in these practices to ensure that the internet is compatible with a society’s norms and values.

Beginning in the 1990s, the U.S. government and powerful young tech firms began promoting nonregulation and American-style freedom of speech as essential features of the internet. …

China quickly became worried about unregulated digital speech—both as a threat to the Communist Party’s control and to the domestic social order more generally. It began building ever more powerful mechanisms of surveillance and control to meet these threats. …

In these and so many other ways, the public internet in its first two decades seemed good for open societies and bad for closed ones. But this conventional wisdom turned out to be mostly backwards. China and other authoritarian states became adept at reverse engineering internet architecture to enhance official control over digital networks in their countries and thus over their populations. And in recent years, the American public has grown fearful of ubiquitous digital monitoring and has been reeling from the disruptive social effects of digital networks.

Two events were wake-up calls. The first was Edward Snowden’s revelations in 2013 about the astonishing extent of secret U.S. government monitoring of digital networks at home and abroad. The U.S. government’s domestic surveillance is legally constrained, especially compared with what authoritarian states do. But this is much less true of private actors. Snowden’s documents gave us a glimpse of the scale of surveillance of our lives by U.S. tech platforms, and made plain how the government accessed privately collected data to serve its national-security needs.

The second wake-up call was Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.” Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system. The episode showed how easily a foreign adversary could exploit the United States’ deep reliance on relatively unregulated digital networks. It also highlighted how legal limitations grounded in the First Amendment (freedom of speech and press) and the Fourth Amendment (privacy) make it hard for the U.S. government to identify, prevent, and respond to malicious cyber operations from abroad.

These constitutional limits help explain why, since the Russian electoral interference, digital platforms have taken the lead in combatting all manner of unwanted speech on their networks—and, if anything, have increased their surveillance of our lives. But the government has been in the shadows of these developments, nudging them along and exploiting them when it can.

Of course, I’m a dangerous extremist who holds wacko views like that the First Amendment is good, especially when the authorities don’t yet know the right answers to an unprecedented problem. Instead, you should listen to sensible sources like The Atlantic telling you that Xi Jinping’s views on Winnie the Pooh is Who We Are.

 
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  1. The men and women, and what the eff ever, of The Atlantic have truly become degenerate! I mean, I don’t trust them at all, any of them. I would never have a play date or sleepover at their children’s homes! i don’t trust these people anymore!

    These writers are so messed up, so uneducated in history that they do not “know what they do.” But, their main job is to raise their children, and, if they continue to ignore human trafficking and child trafficking and child ritual killing, they will lose.

  2. James Fallows is smiling. And here I thought The Atlantic’s celebration of Tennessee Coates would be the worst bad idea they ever supported.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G. Camara

    "Tennessee Coates"

    Oldster white liberals and their outlets like The Atlantic have been lead off the deep end by identity politics. The millennial virulence in pushing race, gender, whathaveyou, into the Left spectrum caught the ancient pale lefties with their pants down, exposing their dried up gonads and shriveled penises. This is amusing considering a lot of them were New Left in the 60s and 70s, which used the anti-war movement as cover for their negrophilia. Now they embrace the totalitarianism of their millennial comrades to prove they are not badwhites. I bet Tee-Hee has gained a lot weight during the Brooklyn quarantine. His moobs may be approaching D Cup.

  3. Anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    I will never vote to convict anyone in a trial where the FBI played more than a peripheral role. The FBI has shown itself to be a thoroughly corrupt and wicked organization.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @ben tillman
    @Anonymous

    Holy shit -- Wittes isn't even a lawyer!!!!! But he is a moron:

    "Nothing that has come out suggests the facts that he admitted to in the context of his plea are untrue."

    ALL FACTS ARE TRUE.

    And his defense of the FBI:

    "They're a lot worse than you think."

    Brilliant!!!!

  4. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Wow, coronavirus is much worse than we think. The dean of Harvard’s Medical School belives that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases, but that the actual number of deaths is between 60% to 300% higher. He belives that even though there are officially around 208,000 dead Worldwide from the disease, the actual figure has exceeded 500,000.

    *”This is not only a highly contagious disease, but highly virulent and aggressive. This is much, much worse than any flu.*”

    I know that people in this blog won’t like this because it is MSNBC and Chris Hayes, but the dean of Harvard’s Medical School actually has his reputation on the line when he makes public claims, so we should take this seriously.

    • Troll: Manfred Arcane
    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    I love how we all think we're all clever and that in our shiny modern world but then apparently we can't even be certain about whether hundreds of thousands of people have died or not

    , @Paolo Pagliaro
    @Anonymous

    "The dean of Harvard’s Medical School believes that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases"

    I recall our host's article, some days ago, about the Italian town of Robbio, in Lombardy, where extensive blood testing had been performed on 1/3 of the population:
    - 6,000 inhabitants
    - 15 official cases
    - more than 800 people with antibodies

    So, those actually infected were at least 53 times more than the official number; and we are talking of a little rural town in the Lombard farmland.

    I don't believe what this dean believes.

  5. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Wow, coronavirus is much worse than we think. The dean of Harvard’s Medical School believes that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases, but that the actual number of deaths is between 60% to 300% higher. He belives that even though there are officially around 208,000 dead Worldwide from the disease, the actual figure has exceeded 500,000.

    *”This is not only a highly contagious disease, but highly virulent and aggressive. This is much, much worse than any flu.*”

    I know that people in this blog won’t like this because it is MSNBC and Chris Hayes, but the dean of Harvard’s Medical School actually has his reputation on the line when he makes public claims, so we should take this seriously.

    • Replies: @alt right moderate
    @Anonymous

    Military industrial complex: military threats are everywhere, so we must spend huge amounts of money on arms

    Education industrial complex: everyone should go to college and take out big student loans

    Medical industrial complex: we must take every medical issue very, very seriously and ramp up health spending.

  6. First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the “N-Word” or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called “Huwhite Advocate”. Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn’t, it’s gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    • Disagree: SINCERITY.net
    • Replies: @Deadite
    @J Adelman

    Perhaps he needs to be re-educated. Yes. Education can do much to CONCENTRATE the mind.

    Perhaps that’s where Jarad could be convinced to re-examine his views. In a Camp Where He Can Concentrate on his past Bad Think.

    Perhaps we can call these places Concentration Camps.

    Yes, I think that’s right!

    Perhaps our grandkids can go there too. I’m sure they will need a shower when they arrive.

    Thanks J for pointing out Bad Think. Mustn’t let that nasty First Amendment let people just say whatever they want!

    , @fnn
    @J Adelman

    You're very confused-or more likely highly disingenuous. Jared Taylor doesn't call anyone "the n word" or "wetback."


    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.
     
    If you're really an American, you don't have a shaky command of English. I'm pretty sure the word you were looking for is "virulent" not "virile."

    Replies: @anon

    , @jbwilson24
    @J Adelman

    Why do you limp wristed pansies focus so much on hate? Hate is but one emotion. Gluttony, fear, greed, envy, lust. You could pick any number of things, but it is always hate. 24/7, hate.

    Perhaps you imagine that if enough people say hateful things, Hitler will return from the grave with a legion of SS soldiers and begin to purge the country.

    Odd too that you don't like it when blacks are called nasty names, but the omnipresent black on white/asian violence is perfectly fine.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/california-man-guilty-killing-race-related-rampage-70342850

    Actual violence is fine, because Hitler coming back is the real threat.

    How many Americans were wiped out in 2008 in the GFC, losing homes, 401ks, etc. Not a result of hate, but rather of greed by a wall street elite. I guess greed isn't as catchy as hate.

    , @Anon
    @J Adelman


    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
     
    The First ammendment is and was meant to be absolute.

    What you think that it "should" do is irrelevant. If you dislike it, then Israel is a short flight away. The Constitution won't be exchanged for your personal interests.

    There is no such thing as "hate speech" in the United States. This is a communist term meant to silence political critiques of small non-White mafias like those represented by Jews and Islamists.

    In short, your opinions are of a mafia member who wishes to keep operating, exploiting, and oppressing free of notice.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.
     
    If it were up to Jews, as stated in the Jewish books, the entire world would be cleansed of "impure" non-Jews.

    In the world in which we live, Jews, as a mafia, attempt to control every Western nation in spite of having a nation of their own.

    Jews label the interests of the people who fight against this imperialism as "vile hatred" but the Jewish books and actions in Israel are much worse. Taylor isn't advocating occupying other nations as Jews do.

    If Jared Taylor were a Jew, his opinions would be a default for any Jew that took his or her religion and identity seriously. And they are.

    Jared's family isn't at risk for racial inbreeding disease. Most Jew families are. Calling Jared the racist in comparison with Jews is top comedy. Taylor can barely fathom the depth of the racism of Judaism and racial commitment of Jews.

    Any Jew pointing his finger at Jared is ignoring the beam in his own eye.

    Assuming for one second that your accusations against Taylor have any moral or political legitimacy, which they do not. They are pure anti-European hatred.

    But Christ best summarized the Jewish collective nature that I refer to above:


    Matthew 23

    Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples,

    2 Saying: The scribes and the Pharisees have sitten on the chair of Moses.

    3 All things therefore whatsoever they shall say to you, observe and do: but according to their works do ye not; for they say, and do not.

    4 For they bind heavy and insupportable burdens, and lay them on men's shoulders; but with a finger of their own they will not move them.

    5 And all their works they do for to be seen of men. For they make their phylacteries broad, and enlarge their fringes.

    24 Blind guides, who strain out a gnat, and swallow a camel.

    25 Woe to you scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites; because you make clean the outside of the cup and of the dish, but within you are full of rapine and uncleanness

    27 Woe to you scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites; because you are like to whited sepulchres, which outwardly appear to men beautiful, but within are full of dead men's bones, and of all filthiness

    28 So you also outwardly indeed appear to men just; but inwardly you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.

    33 You serpents, generation of vipers, how will you flee from the judgment of hell?
     
    , @SINCERITY.net
    @J Adelman

    It is perfectly acceptable to call white Trump voters "deplorables". Native Germans can be called "Köterrasse" (street dog breed), a German court decided. And no Black was ever arrested for saying "cracker" or, as a Black person, using the N_word.
    Like most of the anti-racist Left, you probably support these unequal rights, aka anti-white racism. Only minorities have rights, quota privileges and more.
    Sincerity dot net describes how #TrueSpeech, patently true facts, are not allowed to be told (like "Pakistani Muslims gang raped 1400 white children, over 14 years")
    Unfortunately, people like you are on the winning side, Europe is already almost like China, the US is on the way of losing free speech.

    , @Tusk
    @J Adelman

    Hey Tiny Duck

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @J Adelman


    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free...

     

    ...and William Henry Cosby, Jr is not, thanks to a vast white-wing Becky conspiracy against him. Are you up for springing him, before he's roomed with Jerry Sandusky?
    , @PSR
    @J Adelman

    "First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the “N-Word” or calling an immigrant a Wetback."

    Fortunately, in America your OPINION on what is acceptable speech is largely irrelevant.

    , @Mmw
    @J Adelman

    Troll

    , @Anonymous
    @J Adelman

    Your post is as pure hatred as anything one could find anywhere.

    , @San Fernando Curt
    @J Adelman

    Anyone willing to crush words with state power is a weakling and coward, Mr. Adelman. Besides, in both social analysis and suggested remedy, white supremacists and racists are often correct; I appreciate their input.

    , @Paolo Pagliaro
    @J Adelman

    It haunts me that people like J Adelman wants anybody not free to roam anymore, just because he said something.

    What about putting in jail all those support abortion? I found that unacceptable.
    And what about black supremacist Leonard Howell? Has he been banned from Europe?

    It's time to migrate to North Korea, J Adelman, that's a place for you.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  7. As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.”

    Stopped Clock Is Right Again

  8. @Anonymous
    Wow, coronavirus is much worse than we think. The dean of Harvard's Medical School belives that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases, but that the actual number of deaths is between 60% to 300% higher. He belives that even though there are officially around 208,000 dead Worldwide from the disease, the actual figure has exceeded 500,000.

    *"This is not only a highly contagious disease, but highly virulent and aggressive. This is much, much worse than any flu.*"

    I know that people in this blog won't like this because it is MSNBC and Chris Hayes, but the dean of Harvard's Medical School actually has his reputation on the line when he makes public claims, so we should take this seriously.

    https://youtu.be/ixuBCal7aZM

    Replies: @anon, @Paolo Pagliaro

    I love how we all think we’re all clever and that in our shiny modern world but then apparently we can’t even be certain about whether hundreds of thousands of people have died or not

  9. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    Then there is this: https://www.tampabay.com/news/health/2020/04/29/florida-medical-examiners-were-releasing-coronavirus-death-data-the-state-made-them-stop/

    It appears Florida may be underreporting Covid deaths so that plans to relax lockdown are not endangered. They are helped in this by the prevailing shortage of tests. If a dead person is not tested, he/she is not counted (in Covid deaths). And obviously a living patient deserves a test more than a corpse, when tests are scarce. U.K. tried this trick for sometime, but abandoned it under public pressure today and upped the count by an extra 4,000.

  10. Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China, and only in certain areas. Even with “censored” topics like anti-vax and anti-semitism, the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all. Has Kevin MacDonald been banned from either one for example?

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them. Thus, Milo was banned from twitter for mild trolling at the expense of humorless comedian Leslie Jones, when a progtard would’ve been suspended for a day at worst.

    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Lot

    It's called a VPN, people, it isn't very expensive.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @SINCERITY.net
    @Lot


    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.
     
    Our next post will point out how nowadays domains are being taken away by domain registrars, and all monetization is made near impossible by coordinated cartel refusal to provide financial services.
    Soon it will be: No electricity for white supremacists
    , @Almost Missouri
    @Lot


    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China
     
    You got any statistics for that?

    I happen to have some compatriots in China, and between us, I seem to be the one experiencing more censorship on American-based social media platforms.


    the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all
     
    That's weird. About two thirds of the Twitter accounts I used to follow are vaporized, gone, POOF, not even archives remain.

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them.
     
    Yeah, widespread demonetization and shadowbanning are on top of plain old deletion censorship.

    if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab
     
    Thank God—and Andrew Torba—for Gab.

    Seriously, that guy deserves a Nobel Peace Prize. But they'll give it to some terrorist or grifter instead, like they usually do.


    or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.
     
    How much traffic does the typical $20 website get?

    Though it pains me to admit it, the internet's open frontier promise of the early years has largely fallen by the wayside. To get traffic on the network, you need a network effect: to be where others go. For better or worse the social media platforms have largely corralled the network effect for themselves. Yeah, you can build your own website, but if no one knows about it, will they come? No, of course not.

    Facebook, Twitter and Google largely determine what the world sees beyond traditional broadcast media. And increasingly they are confining that view to the same thing as traditional broadcast media. If they don't like your $20 website, no one will find it. There's a reason the ADL, SPLC, et al. are concentrating their efforts on these platforms. They know where the chokepoints are.

    It's ironic in a way. Back in the mid-1990s, when the internet was first exploding into public consciousness, most people were "accessing" it through America OnLine, Compuserve and other purveyors of a "walled garden of content". Gradually, the public slipped beyond their grasp into the wider web. Then came the "social web", "social media" and everything having to have a "social" aspect. I mistrusted that new wave instinctively at the time. Today I can see that mistrust was spot on. Those social media sites have become new improved AOL walled gardens of content. If they don't like, you don't exist, for all practical digital purposes. Meet the new boss, same as the old. It took a decade, millions of manhours, and billions of dollars, but they really have managed to stuff most of that freed toothpaste back into the tube. Now they just have to wipe out the little untubed smudges that remain. Like you and me.

    Let us pause for a moment's remembrance of the freedom that was the turn of the century's internet.

    We shall not look upon its like again.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  11. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Perhaps he needs to be re-educated. Yes. Education can do much to CONCENTRATE the mind.

    Perhaps that’s where Jarad could be convinced to re-examine his views. In a Camp Where He Can Concentrate on his past Bad Think.

    Perhaps we can call these places Concentration Camps.

    Yes, I think that’s right!

    Perhaps our grandkids can go there too. I’m sure they will need a shower when they arrive.

    Thanks J for pointing out Bad Think. Mustn’t let that nasty First Amendment let people just say whatever they want!

  12. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/benjaminwittes/status/1255670822234132483

    Replies: @Anon, @ben tillman

    I will never vote to convict anyone in a trial where the FBI played more than a peripheral role. The FBI has shown itself to be a thoroughly corrupt and wicked organization.

    • Agree: ben tillman, Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Anon

    The FBI has always been corrupt. A lot of people don't realize that the first director of the FBI (as we know it today) ruled it with an iron fist for..........................48 years. Forty-eight f**king years! Does that sound like something that happens with an upright law enforcement agency in a free republic? Heinrich Mueller and Laventi Beria would be green with envy at the tenure of J. Edgar Hoover.

    The FBI has straight-up murdered people. Look up the case of Kenneth Trentadue:

    https://off-guardian.org/2017/04/17/requiem-for-the-suicided-kenneth-trentadue/

    To say nothing of Pretty Boy Floyd, Ruby Ridge, Waco.

    Then there were the investigations they botched, like the Unabomber.

    Or the cases they intentionally botched, like TWA 800

    The FBI are just the enforcers for the state.

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

  13. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    You’re very confused-or more likely highly disingenuous. Jared Taylor doesn’t call anyone “the n word” or “wetback.”

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    If you’re really an American, you don’t have a shaky command of English. I’m pretty sure the word you were looking for is “virulent” not “virile.”

    • Replies: @anon
    @fnn

    Maybe not just wobbly English - hell hath no hatred as the impotent for the virile.

  14. Who defends free speech? Seems like it’s pretty much just White people.

    I don’t notice non-Asian minorities (NAMs) or Asians caring much about it.

    Not that all Whites care. Many are hostile to it. But those who do defend free speech are pretty much pale faces. What say Muh Libertarianism crowd?

    • Replies: @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    It's a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment...but now that the left doesn't believe in it anymore, it's going away; the right (except for the libertarian fraction) is more into tradition and authority (as always).

    You get your occasional Razib Khan who takes to it like a fish to water, I should say.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @Art Deco
    @RichardTaylor

    What say Muh Libertarianism crowd?

    If they have faculty appointments, they're chuffering about 'Coasian solutions' and dreaming up reasons we must have MOAR immigration. (The exception is Richard Epstein, who is 76 years old). If they're associated with the v. Mises Institute, they're promoting goldbuggery or issuing working papers on how Roosevelt snookered everyone into WWii. If they're associated with the Libertarian Party, the only thing they give a rip about is the drug laws. If they're associated with the Niskanen Center, their book is persuading you to vote Democratic.

  15. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Why do you limp wristed pansies focus so much on hate? Hate is but one emotion. Gluttony, fear, greed, envy, lust. You could pick any number of things, but it is always hate. 24/7, hate.

    Perhaps you imagine that if enough people say hateful things, Hitler will return from the grave with a legion of SS soldiers and begin to purge the country.

    Odd too that you don’t like it when blacks are called nasty names, but the omnipresent black on white/asian violence is perfectly fine.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/california-man-guilty-killing-race-related-rampage-70342850

    Actual violence is fine, because Hitler coming back is the real threat.

    How many Americans were wiped out in 2008 in the GFC, losing homes, 401ks, etc. Not a result of hate, but rather of greed by a wall street elite. I guess greed isn’t as catchy as hate.

  16. @Lot
    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China, and only in certain areas. Even with “censored” topics like anti-vax and anti-semitism, the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all. Has Kevin MacDonald been banned from either one for example?

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them. Thus, Milo was banned from twitter for mild trolling at the expense of humorless comedian Leslie Jones, when a progtard would’ve been suspended for a day at worst.

    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @SINCERITY.net, @Almost Missouri

    It’s called a VPN, people, it isn’t very expensive.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @nebulafox

    Social media oligopolies censor the transmitters, not the receivers, so VPNs don't help.

    VPNs are useful for evading surveillance, which is sort of the inverse of censorship, however.

  17. Anon[288] • Disclaimer says:
    @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.

    The First ammendment is and was meant to be absolute.

    What you think that it “should” do is irrelevant. If you dislike it, then Israel is a short flight away. The Constitution won’t be exchanged for your personal interests.

    There is no such thing as “hate speech” in the United States. This is a communist term meant to silence political critiques of small non-White mafias like those represented by Jews and Islamists.

    In short, your opinions are of a mafia member who wishes to keep operating, exploiting, and oppressing free of notice.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    If it were up to Jews, as stated in the Jewish books, the entire world would be cleansed of “impure” non-Jews.

    In the world in which we live, Jews, as a mafia, attempt to control every Western nation in spite of having a nation of their own.

    Jews label the interests of the people who fight against this imperialism as “vile hatred” but the Jewish books and actions in Israel are much worse. Taylor isn’t advocating occupying other nations as Jews do.

    If Jared Taylor were a Jew, his opinions would be a default for any Jew that took his or her religion and identity seriously. And they are.

    Jared’s family isn’t at risk for racial inbreeding disease. Most Jew families are. Calling Jared the racist in comparison with Jews is top comedy. Taylor can barely fathom the depth of the racism of Judaism and racial commitment of Jews.

    Any Jew pointing his finger at Jared is ignoring the beam in his own eye.

    Assuming for one second that your accusations against Taylor have any moral or political legitimacy, which they do not. They are pure anti-European hatred.

    But Christ best summarized the Jewish collective nature that I refer to above:

    Matthew 23

    Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples,

    2 Saying: The scribes and the Pharisees have sitten on the chair of Moses.

    3 All things therefore whatsoever they shall say to you, observe and do: but according to their works do ye not; for they say, and do not.

    4 For they bind heavy and insupportable burdens, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but with a finger of their own they will not move them.

    5 And all their works they do for to be seen of men. For they make their phylacteries broad, and enlarge their fringes.

    24 Blind guides, who strain out a gnat, and swallow a camel.

    25 Woe to you scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites; because you make clean the outside of the cup and of the dish, but within you are full of rapine and uncleanness

    27 Woe to you scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites; because you are like to whited sepulchres, which outwardly appear to men beautiful, but within are full of dead men’s bones, and of all filthiness

    28 So you also outwardly indeed appear to men just; but inwardly you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.

    33 You serpents, generation of vipers, how will you flee from the judgment of hell?

  18. Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system.

    Trump as the confidence man with a heart of gold, the jaded self-promoter secretly brimming with hidden depths of idealism. THAT is what you need to hang on to. THAT is the only thing that is going to get you through this. Because if you keep that formula near the forefront for your mind, you remember the world is mostly full of scumbags, grifters, self-promoters, con artists, and likewise such trash, and so you dismiss them from your front step with a contemptuous wave of your hand, their jive making no more an imprint on your mind and your soul than the buzzings of some gnat.

    Because otherwise you must engage with in all seriousness this spectacle of a law professor, a wholly serious and respectable man according to 95% of all other likewise socially-recognized serious and respectable men, arguing that we must junk the 2nd Amendment because, maladroit and low budget as the Russian social media strategy is and always will be, “the meme will always get through”, and it will therefore always wreak “still-ongoing havoc on the American political system” as the lumpen press and lumpen intelligentsia seize on it to produce thousands of articles and TV segments and books claiming the new US President is as much a made-in-Moscow artifact as any Opal stretch limo. Articles such as, well- the very one you are reading right now!

    Here, put on this straight jacket and never more have the freedom of your two strong arms. It’s for your own protection since you just can’t stop hitting yourself. Why are hitting yourself, huh? Why do you keep hitting yourself? Why do you keep hitting yourself??…

    • Agree: Change that Matters
  19. We’re much more seriously screwed than we think we are.

    Some entrepreneurial guy in Detroit figured out how to have an outdoor theater, cars socially distanced, the whole nine yards. Beautiful!

    Our state governor, Gretchen Whitmer, shut this guy down. Nope, no business for you. Most women in the state reflexively support her – she just wants everyone to be safe.

    Just imagine living in a state where some woman can just point to something she doesn’t like and just outlaw it. There’s no recourse.

    Glad you don’t live in Michigan? The joke’s on you! She’ll be president by next year, because she will ace Joe Biden’s hair-sniffing test for vice-president. And Joe is cognitively impaired.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Anon7


    Just imagine living in a state where some woman can just point to something she doesn’t like and just outlaw it.
     
    Lots of men live in such a state. It's called marriage.
  20. Anon[401] • Disclaimer says:

    The most alarming thing about this article, for me, was the sliding that occurred when the authors advanced the common “election interference” refrain to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election“.

    That’s a large jump, though it was always obvious that this was the ultimate goal.

    Until now, the media mostly had been disciplined abourt riding the bleeding edge of claiming the ludicrous “interference” without outright claiming that the election was illegitimate.

    Claiming that a US election was illegitiamte, based on voter exposure to information not approved of by neoliberal instutions, crosses the line into rank anti-Americanism and authoritarianism.

    Such a claim puts democracy at grave risk.

    In all, the assertion is more than worrying as implanted in an article that cosigns Chinese information suppression tactics.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Anon

    This is nothing new. Over the last three years, there have been thousands of articles published in mainstream media publications describing Trump as illegitimate. The Atlantic published this one in January 2017:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/01/what-happens-when-a-president-is-declared-illegitimate/513473/

    The newspapers were calling Bush illegitimate after the 2000 election.

    Even those of us who loathed the Bushes - the deepest of the deep-staters - could concede that a win was a win. But the leftists couldn't, and they dragged the entire country through 36 days of uncertainty that undermined faith in the American electoral system for generations to come.

    Anyone who wants to talk about massive interference in a presidential election should be prepared to discuss the army of Democratic lawyers that descended upon Florida in November 2000. They demanded recount after recount, agonizing over hanging chads and pregnant chads and butterfly ballots, and the entire protracted clusterf**k ended up coalescing into a big steaming pile of nothing. At one point, Gore was even talking about staging another election.

    As for the "interference" argument, it's always amusing to speculate about the mental capacity of people who fervently believe that Russia made a decisive impact on the outcome of the presidential election with $200,000 in Facebook ads, whereas "Little Mike" Bloomberg failed to win even a single Democratic primary after blowing well over half a billion dollars on a massive TV/radio/Internet campaign.

    Replies: @Anon

  21. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/benjaminwittes/status/1255670822234132483

    Replies: @Anon, @ben tillman

    Holy shit — Wittes isn’t even a lawyer!!!!! But he is a moron:

    “Nothing that has come out suggests the facts that he admitted to in the context of his plea are untrue.”

    ALL FACTS ARE TRUE.

    And his defense of the FBI:

    “They’re a lot worse than you think.”

    Brilliant!!!!

    • Agree: Lurker
  22. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    It is perfectly acceptable to call white Trump voters “deplorables”. Native Germans can be called “Köterrasse” (street dog breed), a German court decided. And no Black was ever arrested for saying “cracker” or, as a Black person, using the N_word.
    Like most of the anti-racist Left, you probably support these unequal rights, aka anti-white racism. Only minorities have rights, quota privileges and more.
    Sincerity dot net describes how #TrueSpeech, patently true facts, are not allowed to be told (like “Pakistani Muslims gang raped 1400 white children, over 14 years”)
    Unfortunately, people like you are on the winning side, Europe is already almost like China, the US is on the way of losing free speech.

  23. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Hey Tiny Duck

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Tusk


    Hey Tiny Duck

     

    No, he said "huwhite". Even Tiny wouldn't stoop to mock a man for pronouncing a word as the dictionary instructs us to.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  24. The same edition says NZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is the most effective leader on the planet.

    We were hit by the virus late. If she had closed the borders a couple of weeks earlier, we might not have been hit at all.

    Clearly not a serious publication.

    She has the instincts of a dictator. Maybe that is why the Atlantic likes her.

    • Agree: Change that Matters
  25. White women are the natural and eternal enemy of the beta White male. No other hates him so.

    Hence Ardern and Whitmer.

  26. @SteveSailer: This is just a shocking extension of PC Gag orders, that have been officially enforced for over half a century. #TrueSpeech about “minority” crime, IQ, etc. was not permissible.

    http://sincerity.net/covid19-censorship/
    After encountering no opposition, the liars just became bolder and want to censor more. In the the past, we failed to point out, and failed to unequivocally oppose the #PCGagOrder: “Never speak negatively of “minorities” in order to avoid ‘prejudice’ (prejudice which is frequently accurate and correct)
    This gag order, in writing, mandates police, media to hide ‘minority’ crime and failures. Our pro-egalitarian speech codes resemble Chinese repression.

  27. @Tusk
    @J Adelman

    Hey Tiny Duck

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Hey Tiny Duck

    No, he said “huwhite”. Even Tiny wouldn’t stoop to mock a man for pronouncing a word as the dictionary instructs us to.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    I would. It's still funny, I don't care huwoo you are.

  28. @Lot
    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China, and only in certain areas. Even with “censored” topics like anti-vax and anti-semitism, the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all. Has Kevin MacDonald been banned from either one for example?

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them. Thus, Milo was banned from twitter for mild trolling at the expense of humorless comedian Leslie Jones, when a progtard would’ve been suspended for a day at worst.

    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @SINCERITY.net, @Almost Missouri

    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    Our next post will point out how nowadays domains are being taken away by domain registrars, and all monetization is made near impossible by coordinated cartel refusal to provide financial services.
    Soon it will be: No electricity for white supremacists

  29. Blacks use free speech all the time. It’s just that everyone else is afraid to slap them down for it.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon

    Blacks use free speech all the time. It’s just that everyone else is afraid to slap them down for it.

    That, and people treat them as if they were small children, and it would be silly to to take them seriously or hold them accountable.

  30. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free…

    …and William Henry Cosby, Jr is not, thanks to a vast white-wing Becky conspiracy against him. Are you up for springing him, before he’s roomed with Jerry Sandusky?

  31. China and other authoritarian states became adept at reverse engineering

    Lol, these law professors don’t know what “reverse engineering” means.

    As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.” Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system.

    These law professors plus the former Law Professor In Chief do know what misinformation campaigns, tendentious arguments, hypocrisy and projection are: they’re soaking us in it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Almost Missouri


    Lol, these law professors don’t know what “reverse engineering” means.
     
    They evidently don't know what the law means either.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  32. @nebulafox
    @Lot

    It's called a VPN, people, it isn't very expensive.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Social media oligopolies censor the transmitters, not the receivers, so VPNs don’t help.

    VPNs are useful for evading surveillance, which is sort of the inverse of censorship, however.

  33. @Anon
    @Anonymous

    I will never vote to convict anyone in a trial where the FBI played more than a peripheral role. The FBI has shown itself to be a thoroughly corrupt and wicked organization.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The FBI has always been corrupt. A lot of people don’t realize that the first director of the FBI (as we know it today) ruled it with an iron fist for……………………..48 years. Forty-eight f**king years! Does that sound like something that happens with an upright law enforcement agency in a free republic? Heinrich Mueller and Laventi Beria would be green with envy at the tenure of J. Edgar Hoover.

    The FBI has straight-up murdered people. Look up the case of Kenneth Trentadue:

    https://off-guardian.org/2017/04/17/requiem-for-the-suicided-kenneth-trentadue/

    To say nothing of Pretty Boy Floyd, Ruby Ridge, Waco.

    Then there were the investigations they botched, like the Unabomber.

    Or the cases they intentionally botched, like TWA 800

    The FBI are just the enforcers for the state.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon said:

    “Or the cases they intentionally botched . . .”

    Yes, absolutely right.

    Such as the murder of a president.

    Here’s J. Edgar Hoover himself, 22 hours after JFK’s death, telling LBJ that the suspect “Oswald” was IMPERSONATED eight weeks earlier in Mexico City!

    The FBI had proof positive there was a second “Oswald” running around (with the CIA watching!) less than two months before 11/22/63!

    Hoover knew this screamed “conspiracy”!

    The tape of Hoover’s 10:01 am call to LBJ on 11/23/63 was later erased, but the transcript was released decades later.

    https://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk/lbjlib/phone_calls/Nov_1963/html/LBJ-Nov-1963_0030a.htm

  34. @Almost Missouri

    China and other authoritarian states became adept at reverse engineering
     
    Lol, these law professors don't know what "reverse engineering" means.

    As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.” Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system.
     
    These law professors plus the former Law Professor In Chief do know what misinformation campaigns, tendentious arguments, hypocrisy and projection are: they're soaking us in it.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Lol, these law professors don’t know what “reverse engineering” means.

    They evidently don’t know what the law means either.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Anon

    Thanks, that's the epigrammatic version of what I was trying to say.

  35. There’s a great two part Bloggingheads video podcast from when he was promoting his book. He’s a really interesting, smart, and nice guy who’s lived an interesting life.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Anon

    >>There’s a great two part Bloggingheads video podcast from when he was promoting his book. He’s a really interesting, smart, and nice guy who’s lived an interesting life.<<

    Doesn't that describe everyone plugging their latest book?

    How is that carefully managed appearance relevant to him being a censorship fascist? Was his stepfather the "house painter" widely described as being a known mafia hit man and Hoffa's killer?

    If so, and the special pleading on behalf of his family member, wouldn't that raise some questions about his judgement?

    The Hong Kong Chinese protesters don't seem to be so enthusiastic about the CCP censorship regime they are opposing. Why would any honest and non corrupt author ever stooge for censorship?

  36. @Anon7
    We’re much more seriously screwed than we think we are.

    Some entrepreneurial guy in Detroit figured out how to have an outdoor theater, cars socially distanced, the whole nine yards. Beautiful!

    Our state governor, Gretchen Whitmer, shut this guy down. Nope, no business for you. Most women in the state reflexively support her - she just wants everyone to be safe.

    Just imagine living in a state where some woman can just point to something she doesn’t like and just outlaw it. There’s no recourse.

    Glad you don’t live in Michigan? The joke’s on you! She’ll be president by next year, because she will ace Joe Biden’s hair-sniffing test for vice-president. And Joe is cognitively impaired.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Just imagine living in a state where some woman can just point to something she doesn’t like and just outlaw it.

    Lots of men live in such a state. It’s called marriage.

  37. @Lot
    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China, and only in certain areas. Even with “censored” topics like anti-vax and anti-semitism, the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all. Has Kevin MacDonald been banned from either one for example?

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them. Thus, Milo was banned from twitter for mild trolling at the expense of humorless comedian Leslie Jones, when a progtard would’ve been suspended for a day at worst.

    And if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @SINCERITY.net, @Almost Missouri

    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China

    You got any statistics for that?

    I happen to have some compatriots in China, and between us, I seem to be the one experiencing more censorship on American-based social media platforms.

    the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all

    That’s weird. About two thirds of the Twitter accounts I used to follow are vaporized, gone, POOF, not even archives remain.

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them.

    Yeah, widespread demonetization and shadowbanning are on top of plain old deletion censorship.

    if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab

    Thank God—and Andrew Torba—for Gab.

    Seriously, that guy deserves a Nobel Peace Prize. But they’ll give it to some terrorist or grifter instead, like they usually do.

    or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.

    How much traffic does the typical $20 website get?

    Though it pains me to admit it, the internet’s open frontier promise of the early years has largely fallen by the wayside. To get traffic on the network, you need a network effect: to be where others go. For better or worse the social media platforms have largely corralled the network effect for themselves. Yeah, you can build your own website, but if no one knows about it, will they come? No, of course not.

    Facebook, Twitter and Google largely determine what the world sees beyond traditional broadcast media. And increasingly they are confining that view to the same thing as traditional broadcast media. If they don’t like your $20 website, no one will find it. There’s a reason the ADL, SPLC, et al. are concentrating their efforts on these platforms. They know where the chokepoints are.

    It’s ironic in a way. Back in the mid-1990s, when the internet was first exploding into public consciousness, most people were “accessing” it through America OnLine, Compuserve and other purveyors of a “walled garden of content”. Gradually, the public slipped beyond their grasp into the wider web. Then came the “social web”, “social media” and everything having to have a “social” aspect. I mistrusted that new wave instinctively at the time. Today I can see that mistrust was spot on. Those social media sites have become new improved AOL walled gardens of content. If they don’t like, you don’t exist, for all practical digital purposes. Meet the new boss, same as the old. It took a decade, millions of manhours, and billions of dollars, but they really have managed to stuff most of that freed toothpaste back into the tube. Now they just have to wipe out the little untubed smudges that remain. Like you and me.

    Let us pause for a moment’s remembrance of the freedom that was the turn of the century’s internet.

    We shall not look upon its like again.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Almost Missouri


    I happen to have some compatriots in China, and between us, I seem to be the one experiencing more censorship on American-based social media platforms.
     
    I bet the Chinese social media platforms are so free that you and your compatriots in China can use them to criticize Donald Trump for his incompetence.
  38. @Anon
    The most alarming thing about this article, for me, was the sliding that occurred when the authors advanced the common "election interference" refrain to "disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election".

    That's a large jump, though it was always obvious that this was the ultimate goal.

    Until now, the media mostly had been disciplined abourt riding the bleeding edge of claiming the ludicrous "interference" without outright claiming that the election was illegitimate.

    Claiming that a US election was illegitiamte, based on voter exposure to information not approved of by neoliberal instutions, crosses the line into rank anti-Americanism and authoritarianism.

    Such a claim puts democracy at grave risk.

    In all, the assertion is more than worrying as implanted in an article that cosigns Chinese information suppression tactics.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    This is nothing new. Over the last three years, there have been thousands of articles published in mainstream media publications describing Trump as illegitimate. The Atlantic published this one in January 2017:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/01/what-happens-when-a-president-is-declared-illegitimate/513473/

    The newspapers were calling Bush illegitimate after the 2000 election.

    Even those of us who loathed the Bushes – the deepest of the deep-staters – could concede that a win was a win. But the leftists couldn’t, and they dragged the entire country through 36 days of uncertainty that undermined faith in the American electoral system for generations to come.

    Anyone who wants to talk about massive interference in a presidential election should be prepared to discuss the army of Democratic lawyers that descended upon Florida in November 2000. They demanded recount after recount, agonizing over hanging chads and pregnant chads and butterfly ballots, and the entire protracted clusterf**k ended up coalescing into a big steaming pile of nothing. At one point, Gore was even talking about staging another election.

    As for the “interference” argument, it’s always amusing to speculate about the mental capacity of people who fervently believe that Russia made a decisive impact on the outcome of the presidential election with $200,000 in Facebook ads, whereas “Little Mike” Bloomberg failed to win even a single Democratic primary after blowing well over half a billion dollars on a massive TV/radio/Internet campaign.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Stan Adams

    All good points.

    Its also amusing to listen to interference arguments by people with an additional passport from a nationalistic (or other) nation.

    The notion that a certain quality of publicly available information renders an election illegitimate is an attack on voter agency. That is, its an atack on the legitimacy of an individual's vote based on the deemed-to-be unnaceptable state of his mind. Those making that distinction will invariably be his open competition.

    When this question of legitimacy is supported in the media and by anything propping itself up as an "institution", Americans need to sit up and close attention needs to be paid. America is being attacked from within.

    Those attacks are likely to get more, not less, extreme going forward. What came from in the prior four years is groundwork.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  39. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:

    Harold Covington always said not to junk those old A B Dick presses and mimeograph machines, because physical paper would once again be the only way to reach people. He was prescient.

    “ The powers that be” effectively learned to control print media, then radio and television, and then the internet. It’s almost like they are two legged cattle dogs who instinctively herd cattle as others instinctively eat, have sex, or lowriderize ‘64 Chevys.

  40. Atlantic is really covering itself in glory today. There’s also this:

    President Trump seems to want to stop immigration to the U.S. entirely, and the administration has now closed the southern border to migrants. Many Central American countries have implemented domestic curfews, making most border crossings impossible. But even without these measures, the pandemic has effectively frozen international travel and migration.

    Curtailed immigration will hurt immigrant families and communities first and foremost. It will also change the face of American cities. Immigrants aren’t just more likely to start companies than native-born Americans. The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr.

    “If we shut the door on immigration because of the pandemic, something important will be lost on American streets,” William Kerr told me. “What’s obvious is that this will be really bad for immigrant communities and for people who live in cities. What’s less obvious, but also important, is that talent flows to these cities because of these amenities. If immigrants in New York suffer, that makes the city less attractive to young immigrants, but it also makes the city less hip-seeming to some 20-something in Albany thinking about moving.”

    Leave aside the weird logic (fewer new immigrants means immigrants already here suffer…how precisely?) or that the last thing we need is yet more ‘bodegas’ and nail salons. I’m trying to imagine this 20-something in Albany. He learns that the big apple will have to make do with the millions of immigrants it already has, it’s not going to have a steady stream of new ones…and that’s it? He’s staying where he is?

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Telemachos

    Well, I mean there's some truth to it, particularly pre-COVID. A lot of people in small towns with high openness to experience (on the five-factor model) get sick of the conformity and move to big cities. If you have artistic interests it's a much more stimulating environment. This was pretty much true throughout history--Shakespeare didn't try to start a theater company in Stratford-upon-Avon, after all.

    I'd say the immigration thing is a lot less important right now than the threat of death by coronavirus though.

    , @Ganderson
    @Telemachos

    Trump’s new immigration ban seems to be “no one allowed in, except those allowed in”. It reminds me of General Melchett’s security list:

    https://youtu.be/Pxbzb8XXiGQ


    Melchett: Now, I've compiled a list of those with security clearance, have you got it Darling?
    Darling: Yes sir.
    Melchett: Read it please.
    Darling: It's top security sir, I think that's all the Captain needs to know.
    Melchett: Nonsense! Let's hear the list in full!
    Darling: Very well sir. "List of personnel cleared for mission Gainsborough, as dictated by General C. H. Melchett: You and me, Darling, obviously. Field Marshal Haig, Field Marshal Haig's wife, all Field Marshal Haig's wife's friends, their families, their families' servants, their families' servants' tennis partners, and some chap I bumped into the mess the other day called Bernard."
    Melchett: So, it's maximum security, is that clear?
    Blackadder: Quite so sir, only myself and the rest of the English-speaking world is to know.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Telemachos

    "The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr."

    So, what this is saying the businesses they are creating simply serve the 'immigrant' community and expand the GDP, not the income of the current citizens. You can see this along Cermak road in Chicago with all the Spanish signage on the stores.

    As SS's teacher said: The idea is that CURRENT shareholders benefit, not future shareholders.

    And expanding the GDP by importing MORE mouths to feed is bad, very, very BAD for the FUTURE of current Americans.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSsINX9u8JU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkDz1Akw2R8

  41. After reading this statement, so wrong as to deserve only public ridicule, I didn’t read further.

    “The U.S. government’s domestic surveillance is legally constrained, especially compared with what authoritarian states do.”

    “Legally constrained?” The ‘legal constraints’ wouldn’t seem to be a hindrance, would they? How can Americans propagate such outrageous rubbish? Black is white. By all reports, US government surveillance is universal and total, unlike anything in the world. It isn’t China who tries to intercept and record every transmission of every kind in the entire world but, so far as Sailer is concerned, the NSA is nevertheless ‘legally constrained’.

    Well, good for them. That makes us better than China, and feeling good to be an American is all we live for. Nothing more to see here. Let’s move on.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Ayatollah Smith

    Carter Page and Roger Stone could not be reached for comment

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ayatollah Smith


    By all reports, US government surveillance is universal and total, unlike anything in the world. It isn’t China who tries to intercept and record every transmission of every kind in the entire world but, so far as Sailer is concerned, the NSA is nevertheless ‘legally constrained’.
     
    They both want, and likely have, near universal surveillance. I think the Chinese are having an easier time with compliance. As big a flock of sheep as we have here, it's nothing compared to the flock in China.
  42. Steve, The First Amendment includes:

    “the right of the people peaceably to assemble”

    • Replies: @SFG
    @moshe

    You could make a pretty good case spreading a deadly virus violates 'peaceably', I think.

    People here disagree on how deadly this thing is, but if it were, say, Ebola you might feel differently.

  43. @RichardTaylor
    Who defends free speech? Seems like it's pretty much just White people.

    I don't notice non-Asian minorities (NAMs) or Asians caring much about it.

    Not that all Whites care. Many are hostile to it. But those who do defend free speech are pretty much pale faces. What say Muh Libertarianism crowd?

    Replies: @SFG, @Art Deco

    It’s a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment…but now that the left doesn’t believe in it anymore, it’s going away; the right (except for the libertarian fraction) is more into tradition and authority (as always).

    You get your occasional Razib Khan who takes to it like a fish to water, I should say.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    @SFG


    It’s a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment…
     
    Yes, definitely associated with the West. The East usually claimed to already have all Truth.

    But I wonder if it really came out of the Enlightenment. I used to think that because, well, that's what I was taught. But I've learned there was a lot of disparagement of the Middle Ages by intellectuals who desired to claim that they were the source of all progress.

    Beyond that, while Japan is sorta considered in the West I guess, I don't get the same sense of a free speech culture. So, I'm doubting that the ultimate source is just cultural.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @SFG

    Exactly, because everyone knows that the Left (and its inspired governments such as communism) isn't into authoritarianism at all, whatsoever.

    Also, Eastern nations, Eastern thought is apparently lacking in the concept of the individual as prominent in society. Individualism, and the idea that personal happiness is for the individual to choose as they will, doesn't appear to have an equivalent in say, China. China, Japan, Korea, etc have never based their governments much less how their society is ordered and run around the individual. People are cogs to follow in line and do as they're told.

    The needs of the few (or the one) outweigh the needs of the many--Western Thought, the beginnings of which can be traced back to the Greek philosophers. Individual happiness is one of the highest noble virtues.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few (or the one)---Eastern Thought, which is for the most part unchanging. The concept of the individual owes precious little to Oriental philosophy. It is purely a Western concept.

  44. @Telemachos
    Atlantic is really covering itself in glory today. There's also this:

    President Trump seems to want to stop immigration to the U.S. entirely, and the administration has now closed the southern border to migrants. Many Central American countries have implemented domestic curfews, making most border crossings impossible. But even without these measures, the pandemic has effectively frozen international travel and migration.

    Curtailed immigration will hurt immigrant families and communities first and foremost. It will also change the face of American cities. Immigrants aren’t just more likely to start companies than native-born Americans. The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr.

    “If we shut the door on immigration because of the pandemic, something important will be lost on American streets,” William Kerr told me. “What’s obvious is that this will be really bad for immigrant communities and for people who live in cities. What’s less obvious, but also important, is that talent flows to these cities because of these amenities. If immigrants in New York suffer, that makes the city less attractive to young immigrants, but it also makes the city less hip-seeming to some 20-something in Albany thinking about moving.”
     
    Leave aside the weird logic (fewer new immigrants means immigrants already here suffer...how precisely?) or that the last thing we need is yet more 'bodegas' and nail salons. I'm trying to imagine this 20-something in Albany. He learns that the big apple will have to make do with the millions of immigrants it already has, it's not going to have a steady stream of new ones...and that's it? He's staying where he is?

    Replies: @SFG, @Ganderson, @Joe Stalin

    Well, I mean there’s some truth to it, particularly pre-COVID. A lot of people in small towns with high openness to experience (on the five-factor model) get sick of the conformity and move to big cities. If you have artistic interests it’s a much more stimulating environment. This was pretty much true throughout history–Shakespeare didn’t try to start a theater company in Stratford-upon-Avon, after all.

    I’d say the immigration thing is a lot less important right now than the threat of death by coronavirus though.

  45. @moshe
    Steve, The First Amendment includes:

    "the right of the people peaceably to assemble"

    Replies: @SFG

    You could make a pretty good case spreading a deadly virus violates ‘peaceably’, I think.

    People here disagree on how deadly this thing is, but if it were, say, Ebola you might feel differently.

  46. @Anon
    Blacks use free speech all the time. It's just that everyone else is afraid to slap them down for it.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Blacks use free speech all the time. It’s just that everyone else is afraid to slap them down for it.

    That, and people treat them as if they were small children, and it would be silly to to take them seriously or hold them accountable.

  47. @Mr. Anon
    @Almost Missouri


    Lol, these law professors don’t know what “reverse engineering” means.
     
    They evidently don't know what the law means either.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Thanks, that’s the epigrammatic version of what I was trying to say.

  48. In the future, perhaps all those who desire free speech should hire African-American proxies to speak or write for them, for a small fee. Censoring Black dialogue would obviously be racist and unconstitutional.

    • Replies: @anon
    @PiltdownMan

    And for good measure also have them translate classic quotes in defence of free speech into the protected realm of Ebonics.


    Yo If niggas is ta be precluded from offering they sentiments on uh matter, which may involve da most serious an' alarming consequences dat can invite da consideration o' mankind, reason iz o' nahh use ta us; da freedom o' speech may be taken away, an' dum an' silent we's may be led, like sheep, ta da slaughter and shit.

  49. @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    It's a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment...but now that the left doesn't believe in it anymore, it's going away; the right (except for the libertarian fraction) is more into tradition and authority (as always).

    You get your occasional Razib Khan who takes to it like a fish to water, I should say.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    It’s a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment…

    Yes, definitely associated with the West. The East usually claimed to already have all Truth.

    But I wonder if it really came out of the Enlightenment. I used to think that because, well, that’s what I was taught. But I’ve learned there was a lot of disparagement of the Middle Ages by intellectuals who desired to claim that they were the source of all progress.

    Beyond that, while Japan is sorta considered in the West I guess, I don’t get the same sense of a free speech culture. So, I’m doubting that the ultimate source is just cultural.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @RichardTaylor


    The East usually claimed to already have all Truth.
     
    Is that where that blackfellow went? Haven't seen him here in a while.
  50. @Telemachos
    Atlantic is really covering itself in glory today. There's also this:

    President Trump seems to want to stop immigration to the U.S. entirely, and the administration has now closed the southern border to migrants. Many Central American countries have implemented domestic curfews, making most border crossings impossible. But even without these measures, the pandemic has effectively frozen international travel and migration.

    Curtailed immigration will hurt immigrant families and communities first and foremost. It will also change the face of American cities. Immigrants aren’t just more likely to start companies than native-born Americans. The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr.

    “If we shut the door on immigration because of the pandemic, something important will be lost on American streets,” William Kerr told me. “What’s obvious is that this will be really bad for immigrant communities and for people who live in cities. What’s less obvious, but also important, is that talent flows to these cities because of these amenities. If immigrants in New York suffer, that makes the city less attractive to young immigrants, but it also makes the city less hip-seeming to some 20-something in Albany thinking about moving.”
     
    Leave aside the weird logic (fewer new immigrants means immigrants already here suffer...how precisely?) or that the last thing we need is yet more 'bodegas' and nail salons. I'm trying to imagine this 20-something in Albany. He learns that the big apple will have to make do with the millions of immigrants it already has, it's not going to have a steady stream of new ones...and that's it? He's staying where he is?

    Replies: @SFG, @Ganderson, @Joe Stalin

    Trump’s new immigration ban seems to be “no one allowed in, except those allowed in”. It reminds me of General Melchett’s security list:

    Melchett: Now, I’ve compiled a list of those with security clearance, have you got it Darling?
    Darling: Yes sir.
    Melchett: Read it please.
    Darling: It’s top security sir, I think that’s all the Captain needs to know.
    Melchett: Nonsense! Let’s hear the list in full!
    Darling: Very well sir. “List of personnel cleared for mission Gainsborough, as dictated by General C. H. Melchett: You and me, Darling, obviously. Field Marshal Haig, Field Marshal Haig’s wife, all Field Marshal Haig’s wife’s friends, their families, their families’ servants, their families’ servants’ tennis partners, and some chap I bumped into the mess the other day called Bernard.”
    Melchett: So, it’s maximum security, is that clear?
    Blackadder: Quite so sir, only myself and the rest of the English-speaking world is to know.

  51. @Ayatollah Smith
    After reading this statement, so wrong as to deserve only public ridicule, I didn't read further.

    "The U.S. government’s domestic surveillance is legally constrained, especially compared with what authoritarian states do."

    "Legally constrained?" The 'legal constraints' wouldn't seem to be a hindrance, would they? How can Americans propagate such outrageous rubbish? Black is white. By all reports, US government surveillance is universal and total, unlike anything in the world. It isn't China who tries to intercept and record every transmission of every kind in the entire world but, so far as Sailer is concerned, the NSA is nevertheless 'legally constrained'.

    Well, good for them. That makes us better than China, and feeling good to be an American is all we live for. Nothing more to see here. Let's move on.

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Achmed E. Newman

    Carter Page and Roger Stone could not be reached for comment

  52. Anon[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams
    @Anon

    This is nothing new. Over the last three years, there have been thousands of articles published in mainstream media publications describing Trump as illegitimate. The Atlantic published this one in January 2017:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/01/what-happens-when-a-president-is-declared-illegitimate/513473/

    The newspapers were calling Bush illegitimate after the 2000 election.

    Even those of us who loathed the Bushes - the deepest of the deep-staters - could concede that a win was a win. But the leftists couldn't, and they dragged the entire country through 36 days of uncertainty that undermined faith in the American electoral system for generations to come.

    Anyone who wants to talk about massive interference in a presidential election should be prepared to discuss the army of Democratic lawyers that descended upon Florida in November 2000. They demanded recount after recount, agonizing over hanging chads and pregnant chads and butterfly ballots, and the entire protracted clusterf**k ended up coalescing into a big steaming pile of nothing. At one point, Gore was even talking about staging another election.

    As for the "interference" argument, it's always amusing to speculate about the mental capacity of people who fervently believe that Russia made a decisive impact on the outcome of the presidential election with $200,000 in Facebook ads, whereas "Little Mike" Bloomberg failed to win even a single Democratic primary after blowing well over half a billion dollars on a massive TV/radio/Internet campaign.

    Replies: @Anon

    All good points.

    Its also amusing to listen to interference arguments by people with an additional passport from a nationalistic (or other) nation.

    The notion that a certain quality of publicly available information renders an election illegitimate is an attack on voter agency. That is, its an atack on the legitimacy of an individual’s vote based on the deemed-to-be unnaceptable state of his mind. Those making that distinction will invariably be his open competition.

    When this question of legitimacy is supported in the media and by anything propping itself up as an “institution”, Americans need to sit up and close attention needs to be paid. America is being attacked from within.

    Those attacks are likely to get more, not less, extreme going forward. What came from in the prior four years is groundwork.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anon


    The notion that a certain quality of publicly available information renders an election illegitimate is an attack on voter agency. That is, its an atack on the legitimacy of an individual’s vote based on the deemed-to-be unnaceptable state of his mind.
     
    It's perfectly reasonable in concept. In practice, however, it is the anti-white Left that has rendered every election for the last 80 years flagrantly illegitimate.
  53. In the debate over freedom versus control of the global network, China was largely correct, and the U.S. was wrong.

    (((Jack Goldsmith))) from (((Harvard))), eh?

    You don’t say…

  54. @fnn
    @J Adelman

    You're very confused-or more likely highly disingenuous. Jared Taylor doesn't call anyone "the n word" or "wetback."


    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.
     
    If you're really an American, you don't have a shaky command of English. I'm pretty sure the word you were looking for is "virulent" not "virile."

    Replies: @anon

    Maybe not just wobbly English – hell hath no hatred as the impotent for the virile.

  55. anon[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    In the future, perhaps all those who desire free speech should hire African-American proxies to speak or write for them, for a small fee. Censoring Black dialogue would obviously be racist and unconstitutional.

    Replies: @anon

    And for good measure also have them translate classic quotes in defence of free speech into the protected realm of Ebonics.

    Yo If niggas is ta be precluded from offering they sentiments on uh matter, which may involve da most serious an’ alarming consequences dat can invite da consideration o’ mankind, reason iz o’ nahh use ta us; da freedom o’ speech may be taken away, an’ dum an’ silent we’s may be led, like sheep, ta da slaughter and shit.

  56. @RichardTaylor
    Who defends free speech? Seems like it's pretty much just White people.

    I don't notice non-Asian minorities (NAMs) or Asians caring much about it.

    Not that all Whites care. Many are hostile to it. But those who do defend free speech are pretty much pale faces. What say Muh Libertarianism crowd?

    Replies: @SFG, @Art Deco

    What say Muh Libertarianism crowd?

    If they have faculty appointments, they’re chuffering about ‘Coasian solutions’ and dreaming up reasons we must have MOAR immigration. (The exception is Richard Epstein, who is 76 years old). If they’re associated with the v. Mises Institute, they’re promoting goldbuggery or issuing working papers on how Roosevelt snookered everyone into WWii. If they’re associated with the Libertarian Party, the only thing they give a rip about is the drug laws. If they’re associated with the Niskanen Center, their book is persuading you to vote Democratic.

  57. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    “First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the “N-Word” or calling an immigrant a Wetback.”

    Fortunately, in America your OPINION on what is acceptable speech is largely irrelevant.

  58. @Telemachos
    Atlantic is really covering itself in glory today. There's also this:

    President Trump seems to want to stop immigration to the U.S. entirely, and the administration has now closed the southern border to migrants. Many Central American countries have implemented domestic curfews, making most border crossings impossible. But even without these measures, the pandemic has effectively frozen international travel and migration.

    Curtailed immigration will hurt immigrant families and communities first and foremost. It will also change the face of American cities. Immigrants aren’t just more likely to start companies than native-born Americans. The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr.

    “If we shut the door on immigration because of the pandemic, something important will be lost on American streets,” William Kerr told me. “What’s obvious is that this will be really bad for immigrant communities and for people who live in cities. What’s less obvious, but also important, is that talent flows to these cities because of these amenities. If immigrants in New York suffer, that makes the city less attractive to young immigrants, but it also makes the city less hip-seeming to some 20-something in Albany thinking about moving.”
     
    Leave aside the weird logic (fewer new immigrants means immigrants already here suffer...how precisely?) or that the last thing we need is yet more 'bodegas' and nail salons. I'm trying to imagine this 20-something in Albany. He learns that the big apple will have to make do with the millions of immigrants it already has, it's not going to have a steady stream of new ones...and that's it? He's staying where he is?

    Replies: @SFG, @Ganderson, @Joe Stalin

    “The companies they start are twice as likely to be restaurants and retail outlets like bodegas and nail salons. In some places, like San Jose, California, 60 percent of all new companies, including new restaurants, are started by immigrants, according to research by the economists William Kerr and Sari Pekkala Kerr.”

    So, what this is saying the businesses they are creating simply serve the ‘immigrant’ community and expand the GDP, not the income of the current citizens. You can see this along Cermak road in Chicago with all the Spanish signage on the stores.

    As SS’s teacher said: The idea is that CURRENT shareholders benefit, not future shareholders.

    And expanding the GDP by importing MORE mouths to feed is bad, very, very BAD for the FUTURE of current Americans.

  59. @R.G. Camara
    James Fallows is smiling. And here I thought The Atlantic's celebration of Tennessee Coates would be the worst bad idea they ever supported.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Tennessee Coates”

    Oldster white liberals and their outlets like The Atlantic have been lead off the deep end by identity politics. The millennial virulence in pushing race, gender, whathaveyou, into the Left spectrum caught the ancient pale lefties with their pants down, exposing their dried up gonads and shriveled penises. This is amusing considering a lot of them were New Left in the 60s and 70s, which used the anti-war movement as cover for their negrophilia. Now they embrace the totalitarianism of their millennial comrades to prove they are not badwhites. I bet Tee-Hee has gained a lot weight during the Brooklyn quarantine. His moobs may be approaching D Cup.

  60. The status quo’s only goal is to maintain the status quo.

    All actions in furtherance of this are justified. Things like morals, principles, etc are just after the fact justifications and rationalizations of self interest.

    When american politicians looks at china, they feel envy. They see a country that is very good at protecting and preserving the status quo of its ruling class. They want to learn from china, and bring this system to the U.S., not because the U.S. benefits from it, but because they do.

  61. @Anon
    There's a great two part Bloggingheads video podcast from when he was promoting his book. He's a really interesting, smart, and nice guy who's lived an interesting life.

    Replies: @Muggles

    >>There’s a great two part Bloggingheads video podcast from when he was promoting his book. He’s a really interesting, smart, and nice guy who’s lived an interesting life.<<

    Doesn't that describe everyone plugging their latest book?

    How is that carefully managed appearance relevant to him being a censorship fascist? Was his stepfather the "house painter" widely described as being a known mafia hit man and Hoffa's killer?

    If so, and the special pleading on behalf of his family member, wouldn't that raise some questions about his judgement?

    The Hong Kong Chinese protesters don't seem to be so enthusiastic about the CCP censorship regime they are opposing. Why would any honest and non corrupt author ever stooge for censorship?

  62. @RichardTaylor
    @SFG


    It’s a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment…
     
    Yes, definitely associated with the West. The East usually claimed to already have all Truth.

    But I wonder if it really came out of the Enlightenment. I used to think that because, well, that's what I was taught. But I've learned there was a lot of disparagement of the Middle Ages by intellectuals who desired to claim that they were the source of all progress.

    Beyond that, while Japan is sorta considered in the West I guess, I don't get the same sense of a free speech culture. So, I'm doubting that the ultimate source is just cultural.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    The East usually claimed to already have all Truth.

    Is that where that blackfellow went? Haven’t seen him here in a while.

  63. @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    It's a Western idea. Most non-Western cultures are fine with restricting speech to maintain social peace. It was an outgrowth of the Enlightenment...but now that the left doesn't believe in it anymore, it's going away; the right (except for the libertarian fraction) is more into tradition and authority (as always).

    You get your occasional Razib Khan who takes to it like a fish to water, I should say.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Exactly, because everyone knows that the Left (and its inspired governments such as communism) isn’t into authoritarianism at all, whatsoever.

    Also, Eastern nations, Eastern thought is apparently lacking in the concept of the individual as prominent in society. Individualism, and the idea that personal happiness is for the individual to choose as they will, doesn’t appear to have an equivalent in say, China. China, Japan, Korea, etc have never based their governments much less how their society is ordered and run around the individual. People are cogs to follow in line and do as they’re told.

    The needs of the few (or the one) outweigh the needs of the many–Western Thought, the beginnings of which can be traced back to the Greek philosophers. Individual happiness is one of the highest noble virtues.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few (or the one)—Eastern Thought, which is for the most part unchanging. The concept of the individual owes precious little to Oriental philosophy. It is purely a Western concept.

  64. The second wake-up call was Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.” Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system.

    Notice the lawyerly sleight-of-hand: The alleged “interference” was trivial; they could have easily said “inconsequential” and that would be telling the truth. There were no shady Soros-like billion dollar PACs funded by Moscow, no gangs of hooligans with pockets full of the Kremlins cash intimidating voters, no shenanigans with ballots. Nothing. But the people who lost simply can’t handle it so they’ve spent nearly 4 years trying to get a do-over with this un-proven, tinfoil hat nonsense.

    And voila! Now it’s become real. Because millions of people feel they were cheated and therefore “question the result,” we now have a “questionable result”! See how that works? It’s a variant of the old “This raises questions” gambit. The questions might be something only an insane person would ask, but if CNN says it’s legit, then gosh darn it, “THIS RAISES QUESTIONS.”

    • Agree: ben tillman
  65. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Troll

  66. The second wake-up call was Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. As Barack Obama noted, the most consequential misinformation campaign in modern history was “not particularly sophisticated—this was not some elaborate, complicated espionage scheme.” Russia used a simple phishing attack and a blunt and relatively limited social-media strategy to disrupt the legitimacy of the 2016 election and wreak still-ongoing havoc on the American political system. The episode showed how easily a foreign adversary could exploit the United States’ deep reliance on relatively unregulated digital networks. It also highlighted how legal limitations grounded in the First Amendment (freedom of speech and press) and the Fourth Amendment (privacy) make it hard for the U.S. government to identify, prevent, and respond to malicious cyber operations from abroad.

    A law professor at a major university actually believes this. This guy is an embarrassment to the University of Arizona.

  67. @Anonymous
    Wow, coronavirus is much worse than we think. The dean of Harvard's Medical School believes that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases, but that the actual number of deaths is between 60% to 300% higher. He belives that even though there are officially around 208,000 dead Worldwide from the disease, the actual figure has exceeded 500,000.

    *"This is not only a highly contagious disease, but highly virulent and aggressive. This is much, much worse than any flu.*"

    I know that people in this blog won't like this because it is MSNBC and Chris Hayes, but the dean of Harvard's Medical School actually has his reputation on the line when he makes public claims, so we should take this seriously.

    https://youtu.be/ixuBCal7aZM

    Replies: @alt right moderate

    Military industrial complex: military threats are everywhere, so we must spend huge amounts of money on arms

    Education industrial complex: everyone should go to college and take out big student loans

    Medical industrial complex: we must take every medical issue very, very seriously and ramp up health spending.

  68. OT but china is handling its negro situation just like you’d expect them to.

  69. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Your post is as pure hatred as anything one could find anywhere.

  70. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    Anyone willing to crush words with state power is a weakling and coward, Mr. Adelman. Besides, in both social analysis and suggested remedy, white supremacists and racists are often correct; I appreciate their input.

  71. SF says:

    I have successfully linked a few of your posts to facebook, but I just got a notice that “Fun and Profit with a telephoto lens,” was flagged as violating community standards on spam and deleted. That could be political censorship, or it could be that their algorithm flagged it because the words fun and profit inplied a commercial message.

  72. “Of course, I’m a dangerous extremist who holds wacko views like that the First Amendment is good, especially when the authorities don’t yet know the right answers to an unprecedented problem.”

    That is not quite as categorical a defense of the First Amendment as I would have liked to have seen from the likes of Steve. I do believe there are right answers to some unprecedented as well as precedented problems but I think they should always be open to debate and contrary commentary

  73. @Anonymous
    Wow, coronavirus is much worse than we think. The dean of Harvard's Medical School belives that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases, but that the actual number of deaths is between 60% to 300% higher. He belives that even though there are officially around 208,000 dead Worldwide from the disease, the actual figure has exceeded 500,000.

    *"This is not only a highly contagious disease, but highly virulent and aggressive. This is much, much worse than any flu.*"

    I know that people in this blog won't like this because it is MSNBC and Chris Hayes, but the dean of Harvard's Medical School actually has his reputation on the line when he makes public claims, so we should take this seriously.

    https://youtu.be/ixuBCal7aZM

    Replies: @anon, @Paolo Pagliaro

    “The dean of Harvard’s Medical School believes that the number of real infected people is fairly accurately represented by the number of people with confirmed cases”

    I recall our host’s article, some days ago, about the Italian town of Robbio, in Lombardy, where extensive blood testing had been performed on 1/3 of the population:
    – 6,000 inhabitants
    – 15 official cases
    – more than 800 people with antibodies

    So, those actually infected were at least 53 times more than the official number; and we are talking of a little rural town in the Lombard farmland.

    I don’t believe what this dean believes.

  74. @J Adelman
    First Amendment should not enable White Supremacists and racists to spread hate speech.
    It is completely unacceptable in modern society to call a Black person the "N-Word" or calling an immigrant a Wetback.

    As an American, it haunts me that people like Jared Taylor are still roaming free and using First Amendment to spew their virile hatred.

    European countries have banned this so called "Huwhite Advocate". Britain banned him a long time ago.

    Hopefully, America follows the suit too.
    If it doesn't, it's gonna come back to haunt your Grandkids.

    Replies: @Deadite, @fnn, @jbwilson24, @Anon, @SINCERITY.net, @Tusk, @Reg Cæsar, @PSR, @Mmw, @Anonymous, @San Fernando Curt, @Paolo Pagliaro

    It haunts me that people like J Adelman wants anybody not free to roam anymore, just because he said something.

    What about putting in jail all those support abortion? I found that unacceptable.
    And what about black supremacist Leonard Howell? Has he been banned from Europe?

    It’s time to migrate to North Korea, J Adelman, that’s a place for you.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Paolo Pagliaro

    J Adelman doesn't believe what he's writing.

  75. The second wake-up call was Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

    I can’t even.

    Beliefs can survive potent logical or empirical challenges. They can survive and even be bolstered by evidence that most uncommitted observers would agree logically demands some weakening of such beliefs. They can even survive the total destruction of their original evidential bases.
    [Lee Ross and Craig Anderson, ‘Shortcomings in the attribution process: On the origins and maintenance of erroneous social assessments’, in Kahneman, Slovic & Tversky (eds), Judgement under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases, pp.129-152]

  76. @Reg Cæsar
    @Tusk


    Hey Tiny Duck

     

    No, he said "huwhite". Even Tiny wouldn't stoop to mock a man for pronouncing a word as the dictionary instructs us to.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I would. It’s still funny, I don’t care huwoo you are.

  77. @Ayatollah Smith
    After reading this statement, so wrong as to deserve only public ridicule, I didn't read further.

    "The U.S. government’s domestic surveillance is legally constrained, especially compared with what authoritarian states do."

    "Legally constrained?" The 'legal constraints' wouldn't seem to be a hindrance, would they? How can Americans propagate such outrageous rubbish? Black is white. By all reports, US government surveillance is universal and total, unlike anything in the world. It isn't China who tries to intercept and record every transmission of every kind in the entire world but, so far as Sailer is concerned, the NSA is nevertheless 'legally constrained'.

    Well, good for them. That makes us better than China, and feeling good to be an American is all we live for. Nothing more to see here. Let's move on.

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Achmed E. Newman

    By all reports, US government surveillance is universal and total, unlike anything in the world. It isn’t China who tries to intercept and record every transmission of every kind in the entire world but, so far as Sailer is concerned, the NSA is nevertheless ‘legally constrained’.

    They both want, and likely have, near universal surveillance. I think the Chinese are having an easier time with compliance. As big a flock of sheep as we have here, it’s nothing compared to the flock in China.

  78. > Goldsmith

    Oy vey, every time!

  79. gary says:

    Steve,

    Your blogs have turned to insipid milktoast babel closely

    moderated by your (((handlers))) who shout down figuratively

    any incisive insights and analysis. Too bad you won’t have

    any Golden Years in your “retirement.” Already hiding

    in your closet ready for $25 trillion debt USS Titanic to

    collapse. You won’t enjoy the healthful lavish lifestyle

    I have enjoyed before and during retirement as one of

    eldest boomers.

  80. @Anon
    @Stan Adams

    All good points.

    Its also amusing to listen to interference arguments by people with an additional passport from a nationalistic (or other) nation.

    The notion that a certain quality of publicly available information renders an election illegitimate is an attack on voter agency. That is, its an atack on the legitimacy of an individual's vote based on the deemed-to-be unnaceptable state of his mind. Those making that distinction will invariably be his open competition.

    When this question of legitimacy is supported in the media and by anything propping itself up as an "institution", Americans need to sit up and close attention needs to be paid. America is being attacked from within.

    Those attacks are likely to get more, not less, extreme going forward. What came from in the prior four years is groundwork.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    The notion that a certain quality of publicly available information renders an election illegitimate is an attack on voter agency. That is, its an atack on the legitimacy of an individual’s vote based on the deemed-to-be unnaceptable state of his mind.

    It’s perfectly reasonable in concept. In practice, however, it is the anti-white Left that has rendered every election for the last 80 years flagrantly illegitimate.

  81. @Paolo Pagliaro
    @J Adelman

    It haunts me that people like J Adelman wants anybody not free to roam anymore, just because he said something.

    What about putting in jail all those support abortion? I found that unacceptable.
    And what about black supremacist Leonard Howell? Has he been banned from Europe?

    It's time to migrate to North Korea, J Adelman, that's a place for you.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    J Adelman doesn’t believe what he’s writing.

    • Agree: San Fernando Curt
  82. governments must play a large role in these practices to ensure that the internet is compatible with a society’s norms and values.

    That’s great! In the Anglosphere, our norms and values are that speech need not conform to the Party Line, and the government’s role is to back off and let us say whatever we like.

  83. the jig is up. We had open debate and they lost. unfortunately they have almost all the power so the debate is over. It’s the equivalent of a little kid who starts to lose a board game and knocks over all the pieces except the little kid is 90% of the world’s elite.

  84. @Mr. Anon
    @Anon

    The FBI has always been corrupt. A lot of people don't realize that the first director of the FBI (as we know it today) ruled it with an iron fist for..........................48 years. Forty-eight f**king years! Does that sound like something that happens with an upright law enforcement agency in a free republic? Heinrich Mueller and Laventi Beria would be green with envy at the tenure of J. Edgar Hoover.

    The FBI has straight-up murdered people. Look up the case of Kenneth Trentadue:

    https://off-guardian.org/2017/04/17/requiem-for-the-suicided-kenneth-trentadue/

    To say nothing of Pretty Boy Floyd, Ruby Ridge, Waco.

    Then there were the investigations they botched, like the Unabomber.

    Or the cases they intentionally botched, like TWA 800

    The FBI are just the enforcers for the state.

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    Mr. Anon said:

    “Or the cases they intentionally botched . . .”

    Yes, absolutely right.

    Such as the murder of a president.

    Here’s J. Edgar Hoover himself, 22 hours after JFK’s death, telling LBJ that the suspect “Oswald” was IMPERSONATED eight weeks earlier in Mexico City!

    The FBI had proof positive there was a second “Oswald” running around (with the CIA watching!) less than two months before 11/22/63!

    Hoover knew this screamed “conspiracy”!

    The tape of Hoover’s 10:01 am call to LBJ on 11/23/63 was later erased, but the transcript was released decades later.

    https://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk/lbjlib/phone_calls/Nov_1963/html/LBJ-Nov-1963_0030a.htm

  85. @Almost Missouri
    @Lot


    Facebook and Twitter are very lightly censored compared to China
     
    You got any statistics for that?

    I happen to have some compatriots in China, and between us, I seem to be the one experiencing more censorship on American-based social media platforms.


    the censorship is slow moving and trivial to evade, and that only when it actually is applied at all
     
    That's weird. About two thirds of the Twitter accounts I used to follow are vaporized, gone, POOF, not even archives remain.

    What’s more common is demonetization of high traffic “extremists” and enforcing the rules more harshly against them.
     
    Yeah, widespread demonetization and shadowbanning are on top of plain old deletion censorship.

    if all that bothers people, they are free to use Gab
     
    Thank God—and Andrew Torba—for Gab.

    Seriously, that guy deserves a Nobel Peace Prize. But they'll give it to some terrorist or grifter instead, like they usually do.


    or spend $20 setting up their own domain and website.
     
    How much traffic does the typical $20 website get?

    Though it pains me to admit it, the internet's open frontier promise of the early years has largely fallen by the wayside. To get traffic on the network, you need a network effect: to be where others go. For better or worse the social media platforms have largely corralled the network effect for themselves. Yeah, you can build your own website, but if no one knows about it, will they come? No, of course not.

    Facebook, Twitter and Google largely determine what the world sees beyond traditional broadcast media. And increasingly they are confining that view to the same thing as traditional broadcast media. If they don't like your $20 website, no one will find it. There's a reason the ADL, SPLC, et al. are concentrating their efforts on these platforms. They know where the chokepoints are.

    It's ironic in a way. Back in the mid-1990s, when the internet was first exploding into public consciousness, most people were "accessing" it through America OnLine, Compuserve and other purveyors of a "walled garden of content". Gradually, the public slipped beyond their grasp into the wider web. Then came the "social web", "social media" and everything having to have a "social" aspect. I mistrusted that new wave instinctively at the time. Today I can see that mistrust was spot on. Those social media sites have become new improved AOL walled gardens of content. If they don't like, you don't exist, for all practical digital purposes. Meet the new boss, same as the old. It took a decade, millions of manhours, and billions of dollars, but they really have managed to stuff most of that freed toothpaste back into the tube. Now they just have to wipe out the little untubed smudges that remain. Like you and me.

    Let us pause for a moment's remembrance of the freedom that was the turn of the century's internet.

    We shall not look upon its like again.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    I happen to have some compatriots in China, and between us, I seem to be the one experiencing more censorship on American-based social media platforms.

    I bet the Chinese social media platforms are so free that you and your compatriots in China can use them to criticize Donald Trump for his incompetence.

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