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The Appeal of the Apocalypse
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People like to imagine the end of the world has to happen real soon now. Many people find too mentally burdensome the alternative possibility: that history will just go on and on, one damn thing after another, and our existences will be forgotten by those who come after us.

It’s especially hard for young people, whose lives seem so compellingly crucial to them, to imagine that humanity won’t end, but instead will just carry on and forget that they ever lived. In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.

 
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  1. Mega drought in the American West+Yellowstone Cauldera eruption+Race Riots+War with Iran…this should do the job….

    Steve

    If you are not familiar with Bertrand Russell’s chicken….

    • LOL: IHTG
  2. 56% of surveyed young people said “humanity was doomed” due to climate change.

    Le 56% face!

  3. Forbes says:

    16-25 year olds? Wait ’til they start paying taxes…

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @theMann
  4. As I said in response to your tweet on this topic, I’d say “like to imagine” is putting it too mildly. The need to feel that your lifetime is the climax – the culmination of something of great moment – is powerful.

    That’s why, I suspect, so many religions – Christianity being the salient example – contained from their origins the idea that the end is coming soon.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  5. Humanity won’t end, but this facade of an economy will. That will happen much before any working model of the Earth’s climate is developed. I do predict things will be heating up, but it’ll have not a damn thing to do with Carbon Dioxide.

    • Agree: fish, Old Prude
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  6. Unable to decide whether to fantasize about apocalypse or utopia, we’re hedging our bets and contributing equally to a bipartisan compromise solution that preserves key characteristics of both.

  7. This is what kids thought about World War III when I was in high school in the 80s. We had “The Day After”, now they have “An Inconvenient Truth” or whatever it was.

    Did we manage in spite of it all or is this kind of psychological burden why we all ended up on pills?

  8. David M says:

    It’s something young people believe in theory, but not as an actual likely reality. So they can make a FB post demanding action now to stop global climatic disaster while simultaneously posting a photo on Instagram that they traveled halfway around the world on a fossil fuel burning jet to get (because they saw some other young person who fervently believes in climatic doom post the same photo on Instagram).

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    , @Forbes
  9. Barnard says:

    It is hard to believe the samples from India and the Philippines are representative of the entire country given their large populations and massive disparities in standards of living. If that is what the children of their elite believe, consider just one more piece of evidence we don’t need any of them moving here.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  10. Poirot says:

    UK libertarian James Delingpole once spoke of “the atavistic impulse which leads generation after generation to believe it is the chosen one: the generation so special that it and it alone will be the one privileged to experience the end of the world; and the generation so egotistical that it imagines itself largely responsible for that imminent destruction.”

    • Replies: @Clyde
  11. epebble says:

    Well, thankfully we have some Anti-Apocalyptic news:

    U.S. top general secretly called China twice as Trump term ended

    https://www.reuters.com/world/us/us-top-general-secretly-called-china-twice-trump-term-ended-report-2021-09-14/

  12. If you consider the sun going nova and turning into a lifeless blackened husk as “climate change,” these darned kids may well be right in a few gazillion years

    • Agree: ben tillman
  13. @Faraday's Bobcat

    I remember how solemnly and seriously people took The Day After (and that tiny little Jonathan Schell book about nuclear doom) — amid all the lib fears that Reagan would get us blown to bits. But it really was not much more than a longer Twilight Zone, without the irony. And for a Mizzou alum there was a frisson of schadenfreude in seeing the home of the Jayhawks reduced to rubble.

  14. Bravo, Steve. Brilliant.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  15. Awful lot of Chicken Littles on here. Cheez.

    What gets me is that their tone suggests they revel in it. They think collapse will be great.

    I think maybe they are retarded, and they can’t imagine how much they themselves will suffer.

    There’s some clinical name for the inability to imagine consequences, but I forget what it is.

  16. Ralph L says:

    I suppose the climate will change when the Sun goes super nova, so they’re right, just off a few billion years.

  17. How much of this response is a sincere belief in the imminent end of the world and how much is an exhibitionist response calculated to get other people to think that lots of people think the world will end because others won’t do what the first group wants?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  18. usNthem says:

    Climate change? Hell, I figured everyone would think covid will be the doom of humanity…

  19. Anonymous[658] • Disclaimer says:
    @War for Blair Mountain

    There wouldnt be much of a water shortage were 1/3 of Mexico not permitted to invade and settle California in the last 30 years.

    #mass immigration

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    , @bomag
  20. My mother, born in 1917, at the tail end of the Spanish Flu and WWI, lived through the Great Deprssion, polio epidemic and WWII, with a husband, three brothers and two brothers-in-law all serving in the Army, Air Corp or Navy overseas. She remembers storms, blizzards, droughts and hurricanes that she now says happened every year of her life and who am I to argue ? My father’s ship in WWII was caught in the massive typhon that sank ships and drowned thousands of sailers. I have driven through forrested areas of Canada that had just been burned and two years later looked normal. Every night on the local news weather report they give the record high and low for the date. Climate changes since forever and that is all I have to say. Oh, and I am not confusing climate with weather, but Greenland was once ice covered.

  21. S Johnson says:
    @David M

    I am not sure how genuinely young people believe it (in the sense of letting it affect their own short-term plans) but being taught from a young age that the world is ending must have an impact on their wider worldview, willingness to experiment, create new things, etc. The most concrete way of seeing this would be in falling birth rates in developed nations (and there more steeply among the educated). Bringing children into the world depends upon a degree of optimism and the sense that you want to leave your civilisation to heirs. When the sense of pessimism is so widespread doing so must seem pointless. It would be interesting to compare with previous millenarian cults that thought the world was ending, such as in Reformation-era Europe.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Wency
  22. Gamecock says:

    It’s not true that life is one damn thing after another; sometimes they overlap. – Anon

  23. TWS says:

    The strange thing to me is that no one has used a nuke since WWII. ‘Every hottentot and every Eskimo’ seems to have one now, but no ones popped one off. A few times chemical and biological weapons have been used but very few.

    This cannot forever hold. Someday, someone will start the ‘party’. New York, Los Angeles, London, someday someone is going to do it. Unless we get lucky enough to find a counter measure.

  24. fish says:

    It’s especially hard for young people, whose lives seem so compellingly crucial to them, to imagine that humanity won’t end, but instead will just carry on and forget that they ever lived. In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.

    THIS!

    If only I’d known what a complete non-entity I was destined to become I would have had so much more fun!

    • Replies: @LP5
    , @Bill Jones
  25. Careful, Steve. Somebody will say, “OK boomer.”

    “Climate Change™” née “Global Warming™,” is to young people what nuclear war was to the “boomers” they so enthusiastically deride.

    The difference is that our planet’s climate has changed forever and is not actually under the control of human beings.

    War is.

  26. Despair over the fate of the world isn’t confined to the left. Plenty of people on the right are predicting that the end of Western civilization – the wellspring of all the things that make life living – is nigh.

    Being relatively young myself, I admit that sometimes I indulge in nihilistic apathy. “Well, I’m a failure in life, but the world that’s coming will be a rotting cesspool, so it doesn’t matter whether I fulfill my Darwinian mandate or not. Better just to focus on simple pleasures in the here and now than to sire spawn who will end up as fodder for the hellmouth. Fortunately, I have Pornhub and YouTube to keep me busy until I die of existential boredom.” Fatalistic defeatism is hard to shake once it gets into your system.

    There’s an almost giddy quality to some of the conspiracy theories about the Great Reset and the ensuing massive depopulation of the earth: “Finally, all of the useless eaters will be gone! The cream will rise to the top!” I know some self-proclaimed John Galt types who are looking forward to the culling of the human herd. (Of course, they’re assuming that they’ll be among the survivors.)

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Thanks: Old Prude
  27. El Dato says:

    Young people are boring. I have seen it all before.

  28. @Faraday's Bobcat

    World War 3 didn’t break out in the 80’s, but we still got war in Europe in the Balkans in the 90’s. An 80’s friend of mine narrowly escaped death from a grenade in that one.

    Just when people think something could never happen, history surprises us.

  29. Anon7 says:

    Climate change provides a host of vivid images that can be used to manipulate people, which is the reason it was created:

    “Climate change will make floods and sea level rise deadlier than ever before!”
    (Subtext: You will drown!)

    “Climate change will lead to hotter and hotter days! Drought and resulting forest fires will consume the Earth!
    (Subtext: You will burn alive!)

    “Climate change will disrupt the world’s food supply!”
    (Subtext: You will starve to death!)

    “Climate change will create bigger and more deadly storms of all kinds!”
    (Subtext: The place where you live will be destroyed utterly!”)

    The media reinforces this message every day, and by the expedient of never mentioning contrary evidence or opinion, makes it the only possible future.

    No wonder people are terrified. They’ll do anything, endure any privation; as the United States is transformed into a third-world country, they’ll think they’re saving the world.

    Of course, none of these things is really happening. Sea levels have been increasing at the same rate for the last 2,000 years as the glaciers of the last Ice Age slowly melt. Look in historical records for the past couple of centuries and see the incredible deadly floods in the United States.

    This is the hottest year ever! says the media. So how many all time state high temperature records were set this summer? None! In 1931, twenty states set their high temperature records, many of them above 115 degrees. Forest fires? Forest fires in the 1920’s consumed five times as many acres per year as today.

    The food supply? The biggest threat is that natural gas will not be allowed; this is how artificial fertilizer is created, pound for pound 100 times as potent.

    Bigger and more deadly storms? Look at the historical record: the US has been hit by 204 hurricanes since 1851, and the frequency of US hurricane strikes has dropped by one-fourth. Deadlier? The town of Galveston, TX was wiped off the map in 1900, killing at least 10,000 people. Debris and bodies washed up for weeks along the coast.

  30. It’s kind of jarring that ‘Apocalypse’ now means ‘end of the world’ or something along those lines: etymologically it means ‘revelation’ (the book of Revelation – aka the Apocalypse of St John – is apocalyptic in that it describes a set of hallucinations that were interpreted as revelatory by the hallucinator [and are meant to be interpreted esoterically by ‘insiders’]).

    As with all interesting terms corrupted by the Beta-Jew Death Cult that sought to replace the cult of Dionysus (Bacchus in the Roman pantheon), it was originally Greek; the key thing is that the importance of the revelation is ‘hidden’ (in that it is intended for ‘insiders’ – it is specifically esoteric, and not part of the exoteric material for the schlubs).

    Rather than having an actual apocalypse (a profound experience that has esoteric content that provides grist for the contemplative mill), schlubs are happy with the exoteric; the easiest – and most profitable – trope used by charlatans to grift a living from the schlubs, is that they live in the End of Days.

    It’s why the COVID scam resonates with halfwits: halfwits have always been suckers for millenarian ‘End of Days’ masturbatory fantasies, and there has never been a shortage of bullshitters willing to exploit the gullibility of the average fuckwit.

    This in turn is why almost half the population thinks that the risk of hospitalisation given infection with SARS-nCov-2, is more than 50%…. when it’s actually 2-5%, and upwards of half the community is immune to begin with.

    I’lll just leave this here, to celebrate the ‘pandemic of the unvaccinated’… heretics, all.

  31. @Achmed E. Newman

    I do predict things will be heating up, but it’ll have not a damn thing to do with Carbon Dioxide.

    “There’s something funny goin’ on / But you don’t know what it is / Do you, Mr.Jones?”

    Bob Dylan Highway 61 Revisited Spook

  32. People like to imagine the end of the world has to happen real soon now. Many people find too mentally burdensome the alternative possibility: that history will just go on and on, one damn thing after another, and our existences will be forgotten by those who come after us.

    I figure many who took the COVID Death-Jabs will get their wishes by J+2-years. It’s going to be an interesting Winter.

  33. @Buzz Mohawk

    As an unrepentant Cold Warrior, I really miss those days … the world was much safer and friendlier back then.

  34. @Barnard

    If that is what the children of their elite believe, consider just one more piece of evidence we don’t need any of them moving here.

    It was once called internationalism and is now called wokism. It is the same old story. The younger ones are idealizing worldly matters to overcome their fear. Basically a religious thing. A form of self-idolizing.

  35. Muggles says:

    It’s especially hard for young people, whose lives seem so compellingly crucial to them, to imagine that humanity won’t end, but instead will just carry on and forget that they ever lived. In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.

    It’s the “It’s All About Me” syndrome.

    Very young people all live in Me World but most grow out of it. Especially since they eventually realize that most others live in their own Me World, not yours.

    Some never grow out of it.

    When it gets bad enough psychologists call it Histrionic Personality Disorder.

    “Social Media” of various kinds has spread this illness far and wide. But really no one cares what You Say, or Do. Maybe your mother. Even she no longer checks your FB.

    Sure Tik-Tok, Instagram, FB and others might pay you a pittance from the ad revenue they collect off of your “influencer” materials posted online. Even dancing bears get fed. But they never seem to be very happy…

    • Replies: @Marty
  36. @Dieter Kief

    So the kids, they dance, they shake their bones,
    and the politicians throwing stones,
    Singing ashes to ashes, all fall down.
    Ashes to ashes, all fall down..

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  37. i had no idea the jewish media had such reach. sad.

    there is a way to get rid of the fear of global warming.

    a revolution without gas chambers is meaningless. — vladimir ilyich ulianov, better known to the world as hitler

  38. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:

    Which countries have youth that reject this? Where is the country by country data? If I find a country both intelligent and with optimistic youth, might be good investment location. Finland is looking good.

  39. Ralph L says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    drowned thousands of sailers.

    How could you bring that up here, of all places?

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  40. @Achmed E. Newman

    Utterly charming Mod. – I’m almost Grateful – Dead, hehe

    https://www.facebook.com/GarciasAtTheCap/videos/1297213337075910/

    If I may – say what thou willst against The Dead: They are existentially on the right track against the dark underbelly of all the teenage phantasies (= teenage angst/ teenage rage/ teenage – so and so.

  41. Jack D says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Sure. In the grand scheme of things we are between ice ages and someday Buffalo will again be covered by a mile thick ice sheet as it was in the last ice age for 100,000 years up until 12,000 years ago.

    However, in a human time scale, it has been getting noticeably hotter in my lifetime, especially at night:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/09/13/upshot/up-hot-nights.html

    Whether this is caused by man or by some natural cycle, I cannot say but it’s definitely not cooling off at night in the summer in the way that it used to.

  42. SafeNow says:

    “Findings also revealed that while younger people (under 18) were more likely to say climate change is an emergency, other age groups were not far behind, with 65 per cent aged 18-35; 66 per cent aged 36-59; and 58 per cent over 60, expressing affirmation.” – UN News

    That’s an “emergency” poll and not an “end of humanity” poll, but it suggests that extreme climate worry is not confined to the young. The human brain has been called “an anticipation machine.” It churns and churns. The graph is interesting because it shows that “anticipatory anxiety” is churning away at different magnitudes in different places. As for me, I’d like to see DiMaggio’s streak still be alive when humanity ends.

  43. Ano says:

    Dear Mr Sailer,

    How dare you!

    We are not a lot of brainwashed robot-programmed egomaniacally narcisitic kiddies who think grownp-ups like you should take us seriously and listen to and bow down to our demands (as inculcated by our activist (useless) parents and (even more useless) teachers!

    Yours,

    Greta T

    PS: Eat your bugs bigot!

    • LOL: Old Prude
  44. @Jack D

    Similarly, the permanent snow fields above timberline in my old mountain haunts have diminished considerably. Instead of beautiful, white and blue-gray peaks in summer, they are mostly just gray now. The alpine lakes up in the tundra are smaller too.

    This has been a decades-long process I have observed up close, on foot, as well as from panoramic distances.

    Nobody is arguing that things aren’t getting warmer and drying out in some places. It’s just that this is something that will happen, and that you should want people to be prepared for it, if you care. It is not going to stop, and our people should not sacrifice their way of life in some feeble, futile attempt to stop it.

  45. @Buffalo Joe

    That’s why Geology should be a mandatory course every year for the entire duration of one’s secondary education. I majored in Geology, more or less by accident, and though I ended up working in a completely different profession, I never regretted studying Earth sciences.

    Geology puts your life in perspective, especially when you’re young and impetuous. It makes you realise you aren’t even a tittle of a tittle in this world and helps you quickly dispel humanity’s power fantasy du jour, that we can influence Earth’s climate on a global scale.

    None of what we do will leave a lasting mark on Earth. The only thing that’s real is science and peak oil, and neither we nor our children will live to see what will come after.

  46. Kirt says:

    It’s easy to understand the appeal of the Apocalypse to Christians. It means the second coming of Jesus Christ, the salvation of all believers, a new heavens and earth, a new Jerusalem, life eternal. Hard not to find that appealing. But what is the appeal of the various secular scenarios, where the end is simply non-existence since in their belief there is no life beyond the present?

  47. @War for Blair Mountain

    “Mega drought in the American West+Yellowstone Cauldera eruption+Race Riots+War with Iran…this should do the job….”

  48. Forbes says:
    @David M

    they traveled halfway around the world on a fossil fuel burning jet to go on remote eco-tour in a exotic location.

  49. In any apocalyptic scenario, remember: women and blacks will be hit hardest and 6 gorillion more Jews will drown in a rising tide of anti-semiticism.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  50. Forbes says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The difference is that our planet’s climate … is not actually under the control of human beings.

    Careful. That’s blasphemy for far too many folks these days.
    ‘-)

  51. Corvinus says:

    “In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.“

    It’s not just young people,Mr. Sailer. We bear witness to it everyday on your fine blog, with commenters lamenting about the end of whiteness, the evil of Jews, the downfall of Western Civilization, etc. I suspect you are offering your usual caginess here that those posters who offer such pointed commentary are overhyping matters.

    • Troll: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  52. Franz says:

    “Those who won’t ever be the first of something
    Are more than happy to accept being the last of something.”

    Gore Vidal’s observation on The Rise of Christianity and the End of Hellenism in his 1964 novel, Julian.

  53. Marty says:
    @Muggles

    But “all about me” syndrome might just as well manifest as a ruthless empirical drive to smoke out lies by one’s elders. Why doesn’t it? Straight kids in the eighties and nineties could have asserted their egos against the AIDS scare-industry which had to have dampened their sex lives quite a bit. And now the same guy who overhyped HIV is at it again. The one thing David Brooks (no longer talked about here) got right is that by around 2000, elite college kids had become followers, not questioners.

  54. Anon7 says:

    Back in the day, we were more resilient, and could laugh. This song is from one of the very few albums that my dad owned, and I listened to it many times as a child (it came out in 1959).

    “The Merry Minuet” by The Kingston Trio

    “They’re rioting in Africa,
    They’re starving in Spain,
    There’re hurricanes in Florida,
    And Texas needs rain.”

    Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

  55. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s especially hard for young people, whose lives seem so compellingly crucial to them, to imagine that humanity won’t end, but instead will just carry on and forget that they ever lived. In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.

    That is absolutely spot on. The core behind every “it’s the end of the world” scenario.

  56. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    However, in a human time scale, it has been getting noticeably hotter in my lifetime,

    No, it hasn’t. Not to any noticeable amount, unless you’re a thermometer. You’ve gotten older and don’t handle the seasonal temperatures changes as well as you used to. It’s as simple as that. Solipsism is not a climate metric.

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @International Jew
  57. @Buffalo Joe

    My father’s ship in WWII was caught in the massive typhon that sank ships and drowned thousands of sailers.

    Does Steve know about this?

  58. @Dieter Kief

    “Everything you know is wrong.” –Frank Zappa

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  59. anon[418] • Disclaimer says:

    Our military hyping alien sightings out at sea all the time doesn’t help.

    If 100 million Christians dissapear one night, ya’ might get nervous though.

    The Bible does speak about a latter-day Babylon that “sits on the waters” that is “destroyed from the north in an hour” with “a heat so great that the elements shall melt” and how “all the worlds merchants” would bemoan her destruction. My dad always said that be the USA getting nuked over the north pole by the Russians. Still not completely out of the realm of possibilities given how our government acts.

  60. @Corvinus

    When Western civilization does collapse, at least we won’t have to read dreary boilerplate leftist talking points anymore.

    • Agree: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  61. nebulafox says:

    If you were born between 1988 and 1998, the odds are your life experience has largely been conditioned around the expectation that the walls are slowly closing in. Every year, things somehow get just a bit worse. Of lack of ability to get your life off the ground, of authority being something that only be appeased like a capricious Homeric deity, not controlled or defied, of a maze of endless bureaucratic and institutional rules, of the basic things worth living for being squeezed further and further into the dust, the sense that everything in your life can explode in your face in one moment due to some minor incident, or for no reason at all.

    So, I ask you: if you were in this position, why *wouldn’t* you want to blow up this world? The fact that mental illness has exploded isn’t shocking, the real thing that’s stunning is how relatively peaceful everything is given how utterly, totally unhappy too many young people are.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  62. Everything the man did from the day of the photo-op (sic) on was.

    If you can’t tell do you even have a country?

  63. nebulafox says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It’s worth pointing out that for the overwhelming majority of human history, societies have been agrarian. Aka: far, far more vulnerable to wrong shifts in the climate than we are today. (I’d recommend Kyle Harper’s book for anybody interested in the “disease and weather” angle on why Rome fell.)

    The truth is… climate science is, well, complex-actually, the weather can be quite mathematically interesting! Hats off to PhysicistDave for recommending me Judith Curry’s blog.

    What’s not complex is this: chances are, somebody whining about the environment and global warming yet being strictly against building new nuclear plants yesterday is someone not to be taken seriously.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, ic1000
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  64. @nebulafox

    Why do you use 1988 as a cutoff? I can verify that people born as early as 1985 have many of the same issues.

  65. I’ll let you all in on a little secret.

    I’m actually a 10,000 year old dragon sleeping in a crystal cave on a planet with purple skies and two suns. For 64 years I’ve been napping and having the strangest dream about being a two-legged creature who drinks too much beer and reads what you guys post on iSteve every day.

    I’ll wake up soon.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • LOL: Captain Tripps
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Stan Adams
  66. @nebulafox

    What’s not complex is this: chances are, somebody whining about the environment and global warming yet being strictly against building new nuclear plants yesterday is someone not to be taken seriously.

    I agree completely. Unfortunately, most of the people with any influence at all now are not serious people, though they may think they are.

    Nuclear reactors, including new ones that could use the thorium cycle, should have been taken seriously for decades now, but have not been.

    Humanity is lead and influenced by fools. This is probably not new.

  67. Anon[145] • Disclaimer says:

    I remember reading that children were traumatized by the fear of nuclear annihilation in the 1960s.

    As someone who was 13 in 1970 I can’t say I ever thought about it. I do remember my Schwinn bicycle and my Flexi-Flyer wheeled sled.

    I’m inclined to think the claim was bullshit, but perhaps my mostly non-political family (no dinner table politics talks), and predilection for Disney live-action movies rather than Roger Corman had something to do with my happy cocoon Los Angeles childhood.

    My father worked in the defense industry, as did every dad in the neighborhood. Perhaps the idea that the Cold War provided our comfortable home prevailed. I wonder if kids of coal and gas industry kids have different attitudes about climate change than kids of Jewish PMC parents? Or if the internet makes all kids think alike these days?

  68. J.Ross says:

    This should be a slam dunk for Reasonable Steve pointing out the obvious logic skip in people confusing their wants with their thoughts, but, between the fraudulent election, the fraudulent lockdown, and General Milley, I really have thought about it and I really honestly do want the Cheltingham Wainscoting.

  69. @Faraday's Bobcat

    We were all going to die of AIDS in the late 80s, according to the experts.

    • Replies: @3g4me
  70. J.Ross says:
    @Paul Mendez

    >beer

    Get on my level. I have reconsidered stripper drinks because apparently the vitamins help mellow the side effects. Consider one of those Dole minicans of pineapple juice, and the Solo cup balanced out with Montmorency or organic tart cherry juice, with a dash of key lime juice, buffering two or three shots of decent wheat vodka. It’s not like beer or hardstuff, there’s a longevity to it, probably because of the vitamins. I smirked when I saw a White Claw competitor boasting about vitamins (processing alcohol costs you vitamins, so a relaxing adult beverage with vitamins is like a sugary drink touting its antioxidents — not wasted, but spent as soon as the check clears) but as far as drunkenness if not health is concerned it seems they do help.

  71. “It’s the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine”!

  72. Old Prude says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    ‘Xaclty. Nuclear power is the word. Don’t sweat “peak oil”. When shit gets serious, people will be splitting atoms like crazy. Shutting down nuke plants is the hobby of people’s with more cheap fossil fuel than they need…

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  73. Bill H. says: • Website

    “the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.”

    Awesome.

  74. @Paul Mendez

    My dreams are very boring.

    [MORE]

    This might seem OT, but it relates to the basic theme of fear that the world is going to hell.

    I trust my gut instinct. When I post something, it’s always based on a gut feeling that I need to do it.

    Until today my gut was telling me to open up. Every night I would post more embarrassing details about myself. Every morning I would say, “Jesus, I need to stop.” But then the next night I would feel the compulsion to share even more. I don’t know why. It felt … not right, but necessary.

    I don’t think it was necessary for you to read my posts, but I do think it was necessary for me to write them, to sort out my feelings. And I think it was necessary for me to post them to a public forum so that I couldn’t retract them. I couldn’t deny what I said, because it was out there for everyone to see. I had no choice but to go further and deeper.

    This morning I looked at the totality of everything I’d written and I thought to myself, “You’re basically just an attention whore, if not a full-blown narcissist. You’re not happy because people don’t kiss your ass as much as you’d like. That’s really your only genuine problem in life.” This seemed like a major revelation.

    Today I had an unpleasant encounter with a friend and I realized how much I’ve always hated him. He’s a weak little man ruled by fear. I’m not afraid of the same things he’s afraid of, so we have nothing in common. I don’t feel anger, only a cold indifference. I wish him well.

    Then, a little while ago, I had a sudden compulsion to shut down my abortive blog. I felt a sense of … danger. I’d shared too much and now I needed to pull back.

    I have a guardian angel. Either God likes me, or the Force is strong with me, or the spirits of my ancestors are protecting me, or something. But I have a recurring pattern in life. I skirt *this* close to the edge of the cliff but I never go over. Something or someone always pulls me back. Somebody wants me around, even when I don’t really want to be around.

    That is why, although I am often melancholy, I have an underlying sense of optimism. I have faith. I cannot believe that God or Fate or the universe or whatever is keeping me alive just to watch the world become a place where life is not worth living.

  75. @nebulafox

    This is all superficial. The real reason young people are increasingly unhappy is that, apart from being emotional over everything and anything (which is the default state of youth anyway), they’re also sexless. In a free, unregulated sexual market, there’s no guarantee you’ll get a partner anymore, so the number of losers has grown to levels seen only in polygamous societies. If you’re twentysomething and haven’t gotten laid in years, or ever, when everyone around you is signaling availability –just not to you– that’s all there is on your mind, all the time.

    On the other hand, online porn and video games have had a real effect in pacifying the young and the restless who would have become way more violent otherwise. That, and the increased median age, too. I can’t think of a country suffering from civil war that didn’t have a youth bulge.

  76. @Jack D

    And worse …

    As cities get hotter, the burden of extreme heat is unequally distributed. Within cities, the hottest neighborhoods tend to be those where people of color and poorer people live. These areas have fewer trees and more paved surfaces.

    Her research on New York City has shown that Black New Yorkers are more likely than other groups to die during heat waves, and that deaths during heat waves were higher in neighborhoods with fewer green spaces. These environmental inequalities are linked to systemic racist practices (such as redlining neighborhoods), which have created large racial disparities in income, housing and health.

    … women and minorities hardest hit!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  77. Some of young folks apocalypsism strikes me as a result of being unmoored because of minoritarianism.

    When i was a kid in the 60s, obviously the nuclear war thing was possible–we had a scare with Cuban Missile Crisis. But we weren’t–at least early on–unmoored from our nation. I certainly didn’t think there was going to be any nuclear war. (Obviously lose-lose for the–presumably rational–leaders of the US and Soviet Union.) I full expected growing up to find a nice girl to be my wife, have kids, raise them like my parents were raising my (only better) and turn over “America” to them.

    What the heck does a kid growing up today make of this minoritarian pig pile? Even the minoritarian victors whine all the time about how freaking terrible it is. And the odd “based” young person looks out at the odious freak show that was supposed to be his nation–America– … slumping off into a carnival freak show version of Brazil.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Rob
  78. Coemgen says:

    58% of Nigerians recognize the AGW scam.

    Most of 42% who don’t recognize it, well, they’re probably in on it.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  79. Clyde says:
    @Poirot

    UK libertarian James Delingpole once spoke of “the atavistic impulse which leads generation after generation to believe it is the chosen one: the generation so special that it and it alone will be the one privileged to experience the end of the world; and the generation so egotistical that it imagines itself largely responsible for that imminent destruction.”

    Someone said that the apocalyptic Book of Revelations is based on exactly this. Dittos for other religions that have end times prophecies.

  80. Cortes says:

    John Michael Greer addresses the desire for apocalypse in various works, including “The Long Descent”. Perhaps the best is

  81. @nebulafox

    If you were born between 1988 and 1998 …

    ” and are white” is what I’d add, NebulaFox. I’d like to see the survey results (as worthless as survey results usually are in general anyway) for Americans of various races – like a typical Audacious Epigone bar graph.

    One could extend the end date to 2015 or so, at least to the time a white kid would have attended public school already. From the early 1990s on, the political power was being purposefully shifted from whites to non-whites, the number of non-whites was being increased rapidly, and almost all of these people’s parents had already been under the thumb of the discrimination of AA. All these young white people have ever known is a government and Establishment that hates them.

    I wonder how many of them really believe in the Global Climate Disruption™ BS, but I could see that as a good way to offload the anger at the real culprits. “Those boomers and their SUVs, yeah, that’s who done it.”

    I would also add that people at the young age of your range probably just haven’t lived long enough to see enough weather phenomena to not be snowed (oh right, no more snow after ’15, or was it ’10?) by the Lyin’ Press hysterics about that. Some of us have seen good hurricane seasons for a while, then bad ones, then good ones, and yes, severe thunderstorms happen with occasional tornadoes, sometimes even if you’re not in Kansas with your dog Toto, and droughts here, floods there, and subsequently, floods there and droughts there.

  82. @AnotherDad

    So plant some freakin’ trees! Oh wait, would that be acting too White?

  83. @Clyde

    Yeah, Clyde, but people ought to admit that the Mark-‘o-the-Beast stuff is coming to fruition right before our eyes. China has taken the lead, but that stuff is being pushed here too. Another “benefit” of the Kung Flu PanicFest was the big fear of handling things, such, as I don’t know … CASH!

    Back in the 1980s I knew a guy who would talk about this, but 1-D bar codes on or about the forehead were the closest one could imagine, but too far-fetched for me.

    What else in Revelation have we not understood because it doesn’t match what we can imagine yet? Whatever you do, Ron Unz, don’t open the 7th seal, not till I get to 20,000 comments.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  84. “It’s especially hard for young people, whose lives seem so compellingly crucial to them, to imagine that humanity won’t end, but instead will just carry on and forget that they ever lived. In contrast, the apocalypse seems like a fitting climax to the unique drama of their lives.”

    From a realist standpoint, it sounds all well and good. Except…

    “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it IS, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”–by some long forgotten PM from some remote island back in the day.

  85. @Ralph L

    How could you bring that up here, of all places?

    Shirley, you can’t be serious.

    • Replies: @Rob
  86. Corvinus says:
    @Stan Adams

    “When Western civilization does collapse, at least we won’t have to read dreary boilerplate leftist talking points anymore.“

    If, you mean. Nonetheless, thanks for proving my (and iSteve’s) point, Chicken Little.

    • Replies: @Wency
    , @Stan Adams
  87. @Buffalo Joe

    Oh, and I am not confusing climate with weather, but Greenland was once ice covered.

    I’m pretty sure it still is.

  88. @Stan Adams

    “(Of course, they’re assuming that they’ll be among the survivors.)“

    Kind of reminds me of the guys who think polygamy would be a great idea, because they automatically assume they’ll be the ones who end up with a harem.

  89. It might be that Indians are at the top of the list because the god Shiva, one of the major Hindu trinity, represents the principle of destruction, and their mythology speaks to the cosmic dance he performs as he destroys the universe and starts over.

    If you keep hearing from childhood that the end of the world is in the natural order of things, and part of a cosmic balance, you would perhaps tend to answer in the affirmative to the questionnaire. Climate change is just a detail, a confirmation.

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
  90. @I, Libertine

    As I said in response to your tweet on this topic, I’d say “like to imagine” is putting it too mildly. The need to feel that your lifetime is the climax – the culmination of something of great moment – is powerful.

    Perhaps for some people. I find that notion dreadful, repulsive, and entirely alien.

    That’s why, I suspect, so many religions – Christianity being the salient example – contained from their origins the idea that the end is coming soon.

    There might be something to *that*.

  91. @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, Clyde, but people ought to admit that the Mark-‘o-the-Beast stuff is coming to fruition right before our eyes.

    No kidding. Three or four weeks ago, the church service included a reading from Revelations.

    I don’t know what was more shocking: that it was a Lutheran service or that the reading was trenchant and topical.

  92. Sean says:

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2209648-james-lovelock-says-artificial-intelligence-is-the-start-of-new-life/

    “I know a fair amount about Mars. I don’t think we’ll start colonies on Mars. I cannot think of a much more inhospitable place. I think Elon Musk is a very clever man, he must be, [otherwise] he wouldn’t be so rich. But to want to go and live on Mars is just about as crazy as you could be. He must hate people even more than I do.”

    You said it would be better for Elon Musk to crash on impact

    “Yes.”

    What James Lovelock thinks about astronauts who call Earth ‘fragile’…

    “Why fragile? It’s as tough as old boots. It’s been here billions of years. It can’t be very fragile. There, see, that’s a word that slips in, until it becomes a truth that isn’t a truth. They just don’t understand it. They like the look of it. It looks good, it’s like the view outside here [of Chesil Beach]. It’s beautiful.”

    Hope I am as good when I’m a hundred years’ old.

  93. @peterike

    “Unless you’re a thermometer.” Nice.

    The Times article he cited is pretty typical: out of 56 million square miles of planet, and an unlimited number of possible metrics, pick that combination of locations and metrics that best confirm what they’re pushing.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  94. @Jack D

    It has been getting noticeably hotter in my lifetime

    Since the advent of modern record keeping in 1880, the global average temperature has risen 1.6°F. Is that noticeable?

    https://www.climatecentral.org/gallery/graphics/rise-in-global-temperatures-since-1880

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  95. Anon[184] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s not climate that will cause global disaster, but overpopulation. People are not sensitive enough to the stretching food supply and the gradual climb in food prices. Much of our meat in the US is being sold to the Chinese. In grocery stores, beef is 10 dollars a pound.

    • Agree: Etruscan Film Star
    • Replies: @Rob
    , @BB753
    , @Wency
  96. @The Alarmist

    1) there certainly existed “clarity “

    2) I recall a 1981 Time mag interview with Al Haig. Haig said that he did not worry about his peers in the USSR starting a war as they had lived through such hellish battles as Stalingrad.

    But is complacency creeping into consciousness ? There seems to exist more complacency in USA today than in Russia

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  97. theMann says:
    @Forbes

    They would have to work first.

  98. @obwandiyag

    I would love to see what their reaction would be if the internet went down for 2 weeks. I grew up in the before time, and would actually welcome a 2 week break from emails, news articles based on someone being outraged or offended by a tweet, social media, etc, but I’d wager 99% of people under 30 would have nervous breakdowns and not know how to deal with life. You would definitely see a spike in suicides.

  99. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    How much of this response is a sincere belief in the imminent end of the world and how much is an exhibitionist response calculated to get other people to think that lots of people think the world will end because others won’t do what the first group wants?

    This is an eternal secret. To make his explicit: Nobody will ever know.
    But it is not useless at all nevertheless to ask this question.
    For details see: Heidegger’s Time and Being and/or Ernst Bloch’s Traces (much shorter, more fun!). And Goethe’s Faust, Lichtenberg’s and Jean Joubert’s (!) aphorisms****, and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Ernest (I read this one a few weeks ago – I found it in the most charming Palatinate wine village Annweiler. One of its German translators lives nearby.
    I always recommend reading maybe a hundred or so pages of Don Quichotte.

    Paul Auster’s edition is just excellent and his short foreword is very interesting.

    https://newcriterion.com/issues/1982/12/notebooks-of-joseph-joubert

  100. @HammerJack

    Zappa’s humor and playfulness (and his impressive musical skills -his aesthetic will) made him immune to snowflakery*** and apocalypticism.

    *** the snowflakes’ “Waka-Jawaka”-state of mind.

  101. I always recommend reading maybe a hundred or so pages of Don Quichotte.

    To paraphrase Bruce Feirstein, “Real men don’t read Quichotte.”

  102. Anonymous[700] • Disclaimer says:

    Funny how all of these young people seem completely unaware of ‘The World’s Most Important Graph’, the actual state of white birth rates throughout the world, the exponential law – which Einstein himself said was the most ominous thing in the universe -, and most importantly of all the immigration policies pursued by the modern, western Economist-whipped elites.

    Compared to all that, “climate change” is merely a vicarage tea party.

    But I suspect their great grandkids, the few that they have, will be very aware of all the preceding.

    Oh, and I almost forgot, germane to ‘exponential growth’ is, for sure, total full spectrum, financial,economic, political, military, industrial and scientific global Chinese dominance.

    – and China will still be Chinese.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  103. 56% of surveyed young people said “humanity was doomed” due to climate change.

    Might this vary by elevation? Rising ocean levels will doom the Maldives and Tuvalu for sure. But all the islands around Africa are blessed with very high elevations:

    Watch out, Gambia! You’re the Florida of Africa. Interestingly, Spain’s high point is in Africa (the Canaries), but Egypt’s is in Asia.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  104. Anyone who ignores the reality of accelerating global ecological collapse, rapid climate destabilisation, massive biodiversity loss, even down to insects, ubiquitous pollution globally of every type imaginable etc, is brain dead, or some sort of Rightwing psychopath, if you’ll pardon the tautology.

  105. @Clyde

    Delingpole is a typical Rightist-not so sharp, but thinks he’s a genius. Since the construction of the H-bomb, human destruction is a real possibility. And no human generation has lived in an era of such global ecological devastation. The probability that the currently living human population will see human extinction, or humanity’s reduction to a fraction of its current population, is higher than ever in human history. But the root cause of this disaster is capitalism with its neoplastic nature, and capitalism pays Delingpole and the other Rightist arthropods, so he is given a bully pulpit that his intellect and morality would not deserve in a sane society.

    • Troll: TWS
  106. TyRade says:

    Self fulfilling? For humanity surely doomed if 56% of the next generation think it is.

  107. @Buzz Mohawk

    Nuclear is the only industry that, as it matures, becomes ever more expensive. The average length of time for planning, construction and commissioning of a nuke in the West is ten to twenty years that we don’t have, when renewables can be rolled out rapidly. Nukes are stalking-horses for fossil fuels, wasting time and money, and beloved of Rightist imbeciles and hypocrites simply because the ‘Left’ opposes them.

    • Troll: TWS
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  108. @International Jew

    Not only that, we’ve only had reliable direct temperature measurement for what, 130 years? And that only in the developing West. Perhaps the Chinese also had some type of reasonably accurate temperature measuring system too, I don’t know. Beyond that, the science has to extrapolate using various indirect techniques, such as tree rings, ice cores and etc. Paleoclimatology indicates the Earth’s average temperature was both much hotter, and much colder in the past than it is now, long before advanced human civilization.

  109. Rob says:
    @AnotherDad

    I think it’s due to minoritarianism, too. The future of the US with an adult non-white is majority literally inconceivable. The new nation will not be America. It will not be first-world for everyone. Even inconceivable for blacks – the black middle class will die, the Hispanics do not want AA for blacks, they did not come here for blacks. Ditto AFDC – once again, the Hispanics ate not here to help and feed crime. It is inconceivable even for Hispanics – they did not come here to live in a Hispanic country again.

    [MORE]

    When China stops buying bonds, what will happen? We have no industry, past a first strike, granted, that could be devastating, we cannot wage war. Can we even make ball bearings anymore? Even if military contractors have to manufacture in the US or friendly nations, do they have to manufacture with only domestically produced equipment? I doubt it, but if they do, it is to laugh that that equipment has to be produced in the US and friendlies.

    We could have recovered from a few years, a decade even, with constant deficit spending, but forty years of it has distorted our economy. The owners of the politicians would balk at paying for the government. The poor have no money. The class working class is becoming poor, and in many cases, that tense is wrong. The middle class is next. The rich don’t even own the factories in China; the Chinese communists are not international communists.

    Why does China keep borrowing from the US, if it knows it’s never getting paid back? Asks the midwit. I can think of three or four reasons. The Chinese communist party officials that are doing it do not get to keep the money themselves, so they are less sensitive to “rational” arguments against it. Stop debt purchases now, and maybe the US recovers. There is still some industry in America, and the direction of the flow in the means of production is assuredly towards China, why mess with a good thing? If it all goes south, they can just shoot the bankers – someone always wants to be a banker.

    The US is on the cusp of true biotech revolution, one that will reduce medical costs. When the revolution, China is catching up in biotech, and the Party is race realist, they must realize they are less creative than whites, so let whites cure aging, let whites find the universal cancer vaccine – better not be mRNA, says the conservative – the biotech industry will move offshore. Just like everyone else did. We still have other R&D, though the math-heavy portion of the research is heavily, and increasingly, done by Asians. Maybe they are waiting for an inevitable recession to encourage the Chinese here to make yellow aliyah.

    Lastly, as it stands today, the US is less likely to confiscate a billionaire’s fortune and throw him in prison with neither trial nor acknowledgment. In twenty years, when China is comfortably first world, the fear of a groundswell push for Westernization – why, to be poor, fractionalized, and replaced by a lesser breed? – the billionaires will have more solid control over the party, and they will provide carrots to keep their wealth, freedom, and influence. Who knows, might even come with rights for everyone. Anyway, right now, America provides a bolthole for billionaire and communist-for-whom-politics-has gone badly alike. Twenty years from now? Who knows?

    The future for conservative whites has been inconceivable, hence Trump. Progressives still think Hispanics will be junior partners in the progressive-black alliance party. But they will make their weight felt, if only under cadet branches – made suitably brown – of powerful Latin American families gone north to lead the peons. Soon, the future won’t look like prog boots stamping on conservative faces forever. Who knows how progs will react? My guess, Hardening (get it? Lol) their hearts into bioprogressives.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  110. Rob says:
    @Johann Ricke

    No, but he can Sirius. Unless the dog days of summer are over? I think so, but I’m not paw-sitive.

  111. @Harry Baldwin

    “Since the advent of modern record keeping in 1880, the global average temperature has risen 1.6°F. Is that noticeable?”

    On iSteve of all places! We know what happens when you compare two populations, one with IQ of 100, one with IQ of 105 – the 105 IQ population will have a greatly increased incidence of “extreme intelligence events” and a greatly decreased incidence of “extreme dullard events”. Small changes in average mean big changes at the tail.

    This year (2019) was warmer than any other year in the UK between 1884 and 1990, and since 2002 we have seen the warmest ten years in the series. By contrast, to find a year in the coldest ten we have to go back to 1963; over 50 years ago.”

    The Central England Temperature series is the longest instrumental record of temperature in the world, with annual, seasonal and average monthly temperature information stretching back to 1659.

    Mike Kendon added: “The Central England Temperature series shows us that the 21st Century so far has been warmer than the previous three centuries.”

    The Central England mean temperature for the period 2001-2019 has been 10.3° C. The remaining averages in the series are: 1901-2000 (9.5° C); 1801-1900 (9.1° C); 1701-1800 (9.2° C); 1659-1700 (8.7° C).

    https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/about-us/press-office/news/weather-and-climate/2020/state-of-the-uk-climate-report-2019

    In the UK it’s more noticeable at the bottom end – we don’t have winters like 1947 or 1963 any more, when snow lay on the ground in Southern England for a couple of months. Snow is now a rare treat for children, instead of a common feature of winter. So is making ice slides in playgrounds and on pavements.

    In 1974 I climbed Ben Nevis for the first time and the top 2000 feet were snow and ice – this was in August. You’re lucky to find a few snow patches at the top in August now. Scottish winters persuaded entrepreneurs to open “Aviemore Mountain Resort” in 1966, with an ice rink, cinema, swimming pool and hotels in what had previously been a small village. It was going to be Scotland’s Val D’Isere, with happy middle-class skiers and their kids strolling the snow-covered streets.

    All bar the hotels have been demolished now. My kids learned to ski in the mountains nearby, but I’ve never actually seen snow in Aviemore in half a dozen different winter visits.

    I went to Iceland in 2013 and saw the glacier at Solheimajokull. Went again in 2018, and the glacier had retreated maybe 250 metres. A real big difference.

    The cafe for tourists visiting (lower left at the end of the road), built IIRC at the tip of the glacier some time around 2000, is now over 500m away.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  112. Rob says:
    @Anon

    Could be a remnant of slaughterhouses having been shut down for a while. American slaughterhouses. European slaughterhouses did not have so much cheap labor. I guess muslims can only work in halal ones? So, they had to automate and live with expensive labor.

    Score another victory for the high price of cheap labor!

  113. @Anonymous

    Have an agree, Blair. Completely and always and apparently forever unmentioned in the entire Western U.S. Water ‘discussion is the very simple FACT that the entire system of water distribution out there, Vegas to the coast was designed in the early 1900s and finished by 1969. With a third to half the population of today. That’s it. That’s the deal. The environmental nutcakes blocked every project aimed at increasing capacity and distribution expansion. Amazing is the bonus acquired by said nutcakes fifty years later, the reservoirs all being drained by excess population and golf courses and almonds and somehow claiming their favorite agenda, climate change.

    The truth is cloaked right there in plain sight. Fun fact: even with the braying from jewish -run Every-Media, the jewish football owners installed a grass field in Vegas, in the God damned desert drawing from the lake system that is the most important, Hoover Dam. Oh, they’ll show us recycled water, but it’s not. Hope the unions are testing the turf for carcinogens. Vegas is also nearly three times bigger than 1969, maybe 4. But warming did it. They better start making rain, and fast.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  114. Maciano says:

    They’ve been brainwashed since junior high abt catastrophic climate change.

    No wonder they see that as a huge looming disaster

  115. @Houston 1992

    But is complacency creeping into consciousness ? There seems to exist more complacency in USA today than in Russia

    Oh, absolutely! Imagine having a president in the 1960s whose administration was caught murdering an innocent man and his family, by drone attack now, and claiming that he was an enemy.

    That is exactly what just happened, and what do you hear? Crickets.

    The younger like to bash the aging baby boomers, but at least the boomers made a fuss when they read outrageous news. Today, nobody of any energetic young age seems to care that we make war around the world and kill innocent people. Why? Because only volunteers go. Currently youthful generations in America are no better than any before them, and they are shielded from the realities that others their age do face. They are hothouse flowers living on borrowed time.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  116. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    And a water shortage is one of the lesser problems caused by mass immigration.

  117. @The Alarmist

    …the world was much safer and friendlier back then.

    Alas, that world was run by far more serious, sober, and thoughtful people than today’s tranny clown show.

    • Agree: The Alarmist
  118. Escher says:
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Sounds like the 21st century sequel to Billy Joel’s “We didn’t start the fire”.

  119. BB753 says:
    @Anon

    Don’t worry, vaccines are taking care of the problem as we speak.

  120. Whether climate change will or will not hurt us the way the pessimistic prognosticators say, it is clear that the extinction of species continues at a good pace, with habitat destruction a principal cause. Humanity survived by many instincts and skills that aren’t all that suited to life on the planet today. It seems to me that one can still be a full-blooded reactionary and not want to see more of the natural bounty of the Earth imperiled.

  121. Ganderson says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Joe- drove by on the Thruway Monday on my way back from Cincinnati- sorry I couldn’t stop and help with the yard work.

    Your mom’s story matches my mom’s, more or less (Mom and dad were born in 1918 and 1917 respectively) Their attitudes were that stuff happens, and there is not much to be done about most of it.

  122. Ganderson says:
    @Stan Adams

    I’m pretty pessimistic about the future, although I won’t be around for much of it. I worry about the kids and grandkids.

  123. Ganderson says:
    @Jack D

    “ Buffalo will again be covered by a mile thick ice sheet…”

    I thought it already was…

  124. mousey says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    My father’s ship in WWII was caught in the massive typhon that sank ships and drowned thousands of sailers.

    Ah yes, the great typhoon “Loose Lips”.

  125. LP5 says:
    @fish

    If only I’d known what a complete non-entity I was destined to become I would have had so much more fun!

    It would be nice to be young again, but if you do it right, once is enough.

  126. @Reg Cæsar

    I really like Geography, Reg, so it’s too bad this is unwatchable or really, unlistenable, for me. I got about 2 minutes in, and that was enough. This narrator speaks with an artificially low voice, and he splices the audio to put each sentence right after the previous one, with no pause. Too bad, cause I’m not sure I can just watch with the sound off either and learn enough. What an idiot.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Reg Cæsar
  127. @Rob

    Except for the gratuitous unnecessary crack about vaccines that not all of us will take, that was an excellent comment, Rob. You have a great take on the world big financial picture there. (Did you ever read any ZeroHedge?) I agree with most of your speculation on why the Chinese are still taking dollar for their goods.

    Indeed, the Chinese Communist officials want to part their bribe money (a lot of them only make \$600 per month, you know) in assets in the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. They are still of the opinion that the rule of law, developed by the White Man, will keep their assets and family safer than in China, where things can turn ugly sometimes.

    I will add that it’s also the fact that the Chinese economy is still dependent very much on exports. It doesn’t have to be, but it still is now. They can’t quickly turn off the spigot of their Cheap China-made Crap without greatly interrupting their economic prosperity.

    The way all this money is borrowed by us, and lots owed to China, is via Treasury Bonds. As with paper dollar bills, they are fungible. One can’t just renege on only the ones the Chinese government and businesses own. I wish it were one big note, like a mortgage. Then it would be “Listen, you’d all be speaking Japanese if it hadn’t been for the American Army, Navy, and Marines. Call it even. Oh, you want the money, still? Sorry, you fucked up. You trusted us.” It’s be a great way to get America off its life of debt, as “you will not get another manufactured good from us with your dollars, not even a single crappily-glued sneaker!”. Fine.

    • Replies: @Rob
  128. Wency says:
    @S Johnson

    I think this is about right — people don’t live every day as if it’s true, but they do let a sense of doom sap their motivation to accomplish greater things.

    I might put metaphysical naturalism/materialism in the same category. People can carry around this worldview and still get passionate about topics, still talk themselves into frameworks that provide meaning to life. But somewhere in the depths is a gnawing feeling that human existence is an accident, without purpose, that nothing we do matters, and that death will finally end the drudgery. And yeah, I do think this weighs on the soul, sometimes in ways that aren’t obvious.

    I once dated a girl with this worldview, significantly younger than me (she was more of a core Millennial, stereotypically Millennial in many ways, while I’m more of an “Xennial”). She seldom thought hard about existential matters, but whenever she did, she got depressed. She also proved incapable of improving her life.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @S Johnson
  129. BB753 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Agree. The narrator sounds like this irritating guy:

  130. Wency says:
    @Anon

    There’s no shortage of food in the US. Chicken and pork are still dirt cheap. I just bought a large fresh pork loin for \$1.90/lb. It’s a beef-specific thing. Beef prices were already growing faster than pork for a long time, but then beef futures doubled under Covid and pork did not.

    Somewhere along the way, Americans got more and more beef-crazy and forgot how to make use of pork. I have to wonder if one factor is that the USDA started telling people to cook pork well-done, and then some people took this a step further and just incinerated their pork, and then they concluded pork isn’t very good. In any case, you only need to cook pork chops or roasts to medium.

    Of course, chicken consumption has also surged, but for some reason the prices have not. I guess it was a lot easier to increase chicken production on the margin than beef production.

  131. Muggles says:

    Regarding this supposed survey and its results.

    While I don’t know the exact name, I’m sure there is a concept in psychology that is a well documented effect something like this.

    You pose a question to an audience about “Do you believe such-and-such is a problem?”

    The effect will be that far more respondents agree that “yes, it’s a problem” than there would be if you posed the same issue in a more balanced, neutral manner. Such a ranking of possible problems.

    People tend to want to seem smart, usually smarter than they are. They are also easily intimidated by questions for which they have given little or no previous thought to.

    Younger people in particular are more fearful of being seen as dumb, clueless or stupid. So they tend to agree with the bias of the question. Should I mention females here?

    There is also the well known bias in favor of “fear” over “hope.” People can list a dozen things which make them fearful. Barely any for hopeful or happy.

    Also, finally, most people are clueless about history. Like dogs and cats, they live in the present and only respond to stimuli they have already known. To ask a teen to speculate about the future is like asking your cat if it wants dinner soon. “Soon” has little context.

    And your dog isn’t influenced by social media…

    • Agree: Etruscan Film Star
  132. 3g4me says:
    @Redneck farmer

    @69 Redneck farmer: No, no, that was expert Dr. Fauci then. Now we’re all going to die from the Asian flu. Keep up, man.

  133. @obwandiyag

    There’s some clinical name for the inability to imagine consequences…,

    Politician

  134. @Sollipsist

    Unable to decide whether to fantasize about apocalypse or utopia, we’re hedging our bets and contributing equally to a bipartisan compromise solution that preserves key characteristics of both.

    Too right. All aboard for the final leg of our trip to apocalyptic utopia.

  135. @Buzz Mohawk

    In the ‘70s a big stink was made when the Swine Flu vaxx killed fewer than 50 recipients and the vaxx was pulled from the market. Nowadays the COVID vaxxes are “coincident” with tens of thousands of deaths, and plenty of folks are ok with that.

  136. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    This is also very typical iSteve commenter logic – if you don’t like the conclusions that the data leads you to, dismiss the data or make up your own data. Did you know that Covid is harmless to 99.999% of the population? It’s not true, but if you say it then you don’t have to get vaccinated.

    As I said before, I really have no idea whether the planet is getting warmer due to human causes or whether it’s just some natural cycle that we have no control over, but it’s pretty undeniable (and noticeable without a thermometer) that it’s getting warmer in most places (nor is it cherry picking because the # of places where it’s getting colder instead of warmer are very few). If you agree with a Leftist that the sky is blue, that doesn’t automatically make you a Leftist too or require you to sign up for Leftist policy prescriptions. You can agree on basic facts but disagree about what to do about them. If you deny the obvious, people will rightly dismiss the rest of what you have to say as well. Leftists make the same mistake with their pronouncement that everyone is the same when it’s clearly not true.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Euro passerby
    , @HA
  137. @BB753

    Yep. I wonder if they are using some electronics for this, or if they are even both the same computer-generated voice. At least the guy or computer program in your video doesn’t do that splicing thing after his sentences.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  138. @mulga mumblebrain

    insects

    F’em all! I am in favor of terminating mosquitoes, fleas, tics, gnats, and chiggers, with extreme prejudice. If that makes me a Rightwing psychopath, so be it!

    PS: You’re one of those guys in the bar graph. Admit it.

  139. nebulafox says:
    @BB753

    The mere suggestion of the idea was one of the final straws that led to her deposition, though it probably didn’t do more than exacerbate the situation. After she blinded her son, Irene was doomed to be replaced by somebody.

    The Constantinople mob could and did intervene with regime change when they saw fit: it was widely understood as part of the social contract, underlining the fact that the emperor held an office rather than a hereditary title. This was a holdover from the classical Roman days that survived in Byzantium, but not in the West, and cultural misunderstandings about who conferred “legitimacy” would lead to great tragedy in both 1182 and then 1204.

    • Agree: BB753
  140. nebulafox says:
    @Wency

    “And I may often have to hump my pack still, when my
    shoulders are already weary; often hesitate at the cross-
    ways and boundaries, often have to leave something behind
    me, often stumble and fall—but I will get up again and not
    just lie there, I will go on and not look back. Perhaps I shall
    never be really happy again, perhaps the war has destroyed
    that, and no doubt I shall always be a little inattentive and
    nowhere quite at homes—but I shall probably never be
    wholly unhappy either—for something will always be there
    to sustain me, be it merely my own hands, or a tree, or the
    breathing earth.”

    Sometimes, just wiggling your finger against a blade of grass, and appreciating the physical sensation, you know? It’s so much better to be alive and to feel this, and to enjoy the process of feeling it. And it helps you find your way back.

    (I’m a “Zennial”, so younger than her, but I get what you mean. But you don’t have to be the product of what you once were.)

  141. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I think this is a human speaking but there has been digital post-processing used to speed up his word rate and take out the pause between words in order to lessen the run time. This is a less extreme version of what they do at the end of the car lease commercials where they make all of the disclaimers really fast.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  142. @Jack D

    Agreed, but why the artificially low voice. I’m not saying that’s electronic or run through some electronics, but it’s just not natural sounding. It sounds so stupid, that even without the pauses being taken away, which stresses me out, it’s too annoying to keep listening to.

    Yes, I do know the disclaimers at end of those commercials. “The legal department says you’ve got to put these 3 disclaimers in, fellows. You’ve got 3 seconds.” Haha, they are so blatant as to be very humorous to me.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  143. Anonymous[237] • Disclaimer says:
    @mulga mumblebrain

    ‘ …. down even to insects ….’

    Anyone who *really* *seriously* believes that insects – any insect species – are seriously threatened with extinction by anything man can do, being fully cognizant of insect breeding patterns – is a damned fool.

    • Agree: TWS
  144. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If you mean low as in baritone, I think this is another digital artifact. In the old (pre-digital days) if you sped up speech you would also increase the frequency – remember Alvin and the Chipmunks? But nowadays it’s possible to speed up the speech rate but bring the frequency back down again (BTW, I do this when listening to YouTubes of people talking. Usually 2x is a bit too fast but at 1.5x or 1.75x I find that I can usually follow along just fine and after a while you don’t even notice that you’ve speeded it up).

    YouTube takes care of this automatically but I assume there is software where you can mess with the frequency independently of the word rate – whoever did the processing on this brought the guy’s voice down a bit too low. People usually prefer male narrators with deep voices over tenors.

    When this is done professionally, the results are seamless – you probably hear digitally processed speech all the time and you’re not even aware of it. But when you do it badly, it’s like badly done makeup or photoshop – you get that uncanny valley effect that is disturbing.

  145. @mulga mumblebrain

    LOL. You, in your comment, explained why nuclear energy is currently so expensive:

    The average length of time for planning, construction and commissioning of a nuke in the West is ten to twenty years…

    That time is taken up by satisfying regulatory nonsense, nothing else. You must know that. It is a destructive process that serves YOUR interests, whatever in God’s name they are!

    Furthermore, what is twenty years in the scheme of things anyway, even if that were seriously required, which it isn’t. In the long term, nuclear makes absolute technical sense. You are inserting politics into this, which is a time-tested tactic of those who have held back nuclear energy for decades.

    To put it simply: Nuclear makes sense. It makes sense from a technical standpoint, an environmental standpoint, and an economic standpoint. Truly, if the pro-nuclear side used the same tactics as your side does, we would show the world how evil, rotten, and anti-human you really are.

    BTW, how much does the oil industry, the neocons, the Israel-Middle-East-big-oil lobby, et al. pay you to shill for them here?

    • Agree: Gamecock
    • Replies: @TWS
    , @Jack D
  146. @Jack D

    I’m inclined to think that’s not just the average iSteve commenter’s logic, but it’s a permanent feature of the general population.

    Politics and vested interests make it much harder to paint a clear picture about climate, of which we still know little. I once proposed to a smart leftist the idea that climate change might be occurring naturally and he was utterly shocked I could hold such an opinion, thinking I might be some kind of conspiracy theorist or an oil company’s shill.

    Also, people might see changes in the landscape and think they’re permanent, or ominous signs. At my father’s rural village, plenty of people saw small lakes and rivers disappear during their lifetime, and believed it was due to global warming (prompting them to attend the church more often, just in case the end was near). What actually happened: well drilling became more prevalent during the 70s and 80s, so the level of the water table naturally went down. But the aquifer didn’t go anywhere and the rivers keep flowing underground. The worst part is you might explain everything to them and the very next day they’ll have forgotten all about it.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  147. TWS says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Because like all leftists mumbly really wants the end of the West. If nuclear power would hasten that he’d be for it.

  148. epebble says:

    Nuclear makes sense. It makes sense from a technical standpoint, an environmental standpoint, and an economic standpoint.

    Yes, but what about Political standpoint? The Yucca mountain facility was killed even though, probably, even desert rats don’t live there in 100 mile radius – all because Why should we Nevadans accept nuclear waste from all over the country? No one asked such questions while siting Oak Ridge for Manhattan Project, dropping a real nuke on Alamogordo, New Mexico or running reactors in Hanford, WA

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  149. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is chutzpah. The classic example of chutzpah (nerve or gall) is a man who kills his parents and then pleads for mercy because he is an orphan.

    Another example are the folks who say that we should do away with the death penalty because it’s too expensive to execute someone. The reason it’s expensive is that if you give someone the death penalty, they get 20 years of appeals that are shepherded by the folks same who say that we should do away with the death penalty because it’s too expensive to execute someone.

    That being said, I am not in favor of current water cooled nuclear reactors. Their safety depends on the cooling system working and there are too many ways for the cooling system to lose power or fail and then you are in big trouble. If we had reactors that would fail safe in the case of coolant lose they would be great – no greenhouse gasses. But I don’t trust the current designs, especially not after Fukushima. You could say that the Fukushima faults were fixable – you could take the reactors out of the tsunami zone, put the backup generators up higher. But the next time there would just be a different failure mode because human stupidity is infinite. You need a reactor that won’t explode no matter how stupidly it is operated.

  150. Rob says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thank you, Achmed. I appreciate your opinions, too. I must say, though, i found you too long-winded at first, lol.

    Rumor has it that the Chinese do not recognize that Americans and Brits are different people. After all, they would say, China has been divided many times, but they are one nation. Leave aside thst i’m sure there have been many ways to be Chinese, including mutually unintelligible “dialects”, the US has mighty cozy relationships with the rest of the Anglosphere. All of it.

    [MORE]

    I wonder, do the Chinese consider America a democracy or a “democracy”? (oh we’re a republic, Achmed? Yeah, anout that…) We still have the forms of a democravy, and the forma must be obeyed, the thorough and complete block of Trump’s agenda, coupled with the media, at least, not giving him the accolades of a former President, shows that an oligarchy, perhaps not only the billionairez, but certainly including them – except the Trumps and Kushners, probably a few others on the outs.

    Do the Chinese communists even bother learning the Constitutional brsakdown of the government? I can see too keen an interest in a “liberal democracy’s founding documents being unhealthy. Do the just say – “Presidents make war. No, Congress does have control of that – that text is obsolete, Li, why are you still reading that? Judges make law, according to what judges have decided before, except when they want to make their own decisions.” Congress? What is Congress for? Yes Li,”[totally different guy] “Yes, that is right Congress exists to take bribes.” – “What? No, you bribe them after they do you favors? Before you ask, yes, they reallly believe you” [laughter]

    Really, it’s a mess. The Republicans spent decades railing against government workers. Not so effectually that there are fewer government workers than before, nor does the government have less power than it had before Republican cosplay. The difference is now they hate Republicans and conservatives. The right is finally going to gey what the base has wanted for decades – Roe overturned. Abortion outlawed. They played by the rules. The courts were the prize to overturning Roe. There were a few stillborn abortion bans in Red states. But conservatives played by the rules, obeyed every court decision, especially Brown and Roe. Even though the North ignored Brown. They were patient, and got judges.Then justices.

    Then Trump came out of the blue. He said things they did not dare to dream. He was blocked on everything. Everything but judges and justices. Courts overturned executive orders repealing previous dude’s blatantly illegal daca amnesty. The supremes? Nope, just some random judge after a venue search. Trump, literally Hitler, obeyed every court order.

    That was the second round of cons playing by the rules, and getting only justices. Now that the end of Roe is nigh. Republicans are freaking out! “Holy crap! Those justices we’ve spent decades promising would overturn that decision, it’s happened. We were just making campaign promises – all our judges turn left.” But the Dems were so pissed about Garland, they turned two new justices into enemies. I cannotbsee Kavanaugh ever turning left. Barrett? She has a bunch of kids, and wants all of them to go to ggood schools on scholarships. She might turn left for the right offer, one time for every kid. But not on abortion. Republican women will vote democratic. They liked low taxes, but they liked dodging Downs even more.

    After decades of playing by the rules, progressives are strongly signalling they’ll ignore the courts when they feel like it. They’ll pack the court, cuz Republicans did it firsr. Sadly, no Republicans filled vacancies as they became available. One time under Trump, a vacancy became available through diplomacy.

    Think conservatives are totally going to follow the rules, still? The progressives better serve up something good – end birthright citizenship, constitutional ban on immigration, end AA… but every issue is a moral one, and they cannot compromise.

    Interesting times – i wanted boringly hideously white times, myself.

  151. @Achmed E. Newman

    …it’s too bad this is unwatchable or really, unlistenable, for me.

    I put up with all that for the drama of the lowest-to-highest presentation. Here is Peakbaggers’ list, given in meters. Note that Mauritius, Mayotte, and Bouvet have peaks over 2000′, and are not going anywhere soon. Let alone Comoros, Cape Verde, and Reunion.

    https://peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=1106

  152. HA says:
    @Jack D

    “it’s pretty undeniable (and noticeable without a thermometer) that it’s getting warmer in most places”

    The urban heat island effect has made much of the larger cities in the US (where most of its people actually live) noticeably hotter, significantly more so than the rise in the global temperature. All that additional asphalt and concrete changes the microclimate in and around cities.

    According to the EPA, many U.S. cities have air temperatures up to 10°F (5.6°C) warmer than the surrounding natural land cover… The main causes are changes in the land surface by urban development along with waste heat generated by energy use…

  153. @BB753

    What if Spartacus had a Piper Cub?

  154. @epebble

    Agreed on the NIMBY thing, but one tiny quibble: The Alamogordo “Trinity” project bomb was exploded on a test stand/tower, not dropped.

  155. S Johnson says:
    @Wency

    Good points. I think the rise of vegetarianism/veganism/de-growth economics/green movements/trans-humanism are all related, the common factor being seeing humans as unnecessary and ultimately more trouble than they’re worth.

  156. Wency says:
    @Corvinus

    There’s quite a difference between saying that Western civilization as we know it will collapse, or at least be replaced by something that drops much of what made that civilization distinctive (this seems an inevitable pattern of history), and saying that human civilization more broadly will collapse to the Stone Age or that the species will go extinct — this is the doomsaying that I understood Steve’s post to be about.

    You could argue somewhat accurately that the period 1914-1945 represented a civilizational collapse of sorts in Europe. What remained of the West managed to pick up the pieces and put something back together again, but it’s not quite right, like a vase that’s been glued back together and still missing some pieces. One thing that didn’t happen is a technological collapse, but Europe, which dominated technological and scientific achievement prior to this period, has played second fiddle to the US ever-after.

    I don’t really expect to live to see it, but on the scale of centuries, I’d say it’s a pretty good prediction that some even worse period than 1914-1945 awaits both Europe and North America. But I don’t think that means we’ll be living out Mad Max.

  157. @Corvinus

    Chicken Little

    Let the sky fall
    When it crumbles
    We will stand tall
    Face it all together
    Let the sky fall
    When it crumbles
    We will stand tall
    Face it all together
    At Skyfall
    At Skyfall

  158. @fish

    There were low times in my life when the only thing stopping me from ending it all was consideration of the loss to humanity.

  159. Tom Grey says: • Website

    Nuclear War, maybe could destroy the world.
    Escaped lethal virus or other bio-weapon, maybe.
    (Pseudo?) super intelligent AI takes control and lets people all die, maybe.

    Climate Change? Certainly not. Can kill millions, and there will still be billions left.

    Fear mongering is bad for mental health, and for civilization.

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