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Nordau: the Portland Shooter's Arrest Was Mostly Peaceful
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The Antifa guy who shot the pro-Trump guy in Portland is dead.

Judging from what little I’ve read about the shooter, mostly from his sister, he was your basic Trouble-With-A-Capital-T type: e.g., he’d steal his mom’s seizure medicine. I doubt if he was exceptionally ideological, but in Portland being on the left gives you an excuse to act out your various anti-social urges.

He was arrested once or twice over the summer for carrying a gun before he shot the guy who was spraying him with something defensive like mace, but the Portland criminal justice system doesn’t seem to be enforcing gun control laws against Antifa. From Oregon Live:

Reinoehl’s posts indicate he attended many protests in Portland that began three months ago after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis under the knee of a police officer.

On July 5 at one of the demonstrations, Reinoehl was cited at 2:10 a.m. in the 700 block of Southwest Main Street on allegations of possessing a loaded gun in a public place, resisting arrest and interfering with police

He was given a date to appear in court later that month, but the allegations were dropped on July 30 with a “no complaint,” according to court records. The documents don’t indicate why prosecutors decided not to pursue the accusations. Reinoehl spent no time behind bars.

Brent Weisberg, a spokesman for Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt, said the office is still reviewing that July case involving Reinoehl.

Schmidt earlier Sunday decried the deadly violence. He took office on Aug. 1 and quickly announced that he wouldn’t pursue low-level charges against demonstrators, such as interfering with police or resisting arrest. He wasn’t district attorney when the office handled Reinoehl’s gun case.

It wasn’t an evil rifle, it was a mere handgun. What’s the worst that could happen with an unstable jerk with a loaded gun who thinks he’s Antifa Security?

Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?

 
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  1. Let me guess. He was killed by white supremacists.

  2. Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    • Replies: @neutral
    @Anonymous

    Any surname with "Rosen" in it is definitely not going to be of Germanic ancestry.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Sean
    @Anonymous

    A skateboarder and now a snowboarder. Sports created by the white flight away from black athletic superiority.

    Which has bearing on him choosing death

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ar6kRtCuuUo

    Beats being in jail with blacks.

    , @Drew
    @Anonymous

    Shouldn't be that surprising. Lots of Germans who participated in the revolutions of 1848 immigrated to the US after their revolution failed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-Eighters

    They tended to settle in the upper Midwest, particularly Milwaukee. I guess their spirit is still alive in their descendants.

    , @The Alarmist
    @Anonymous

    Interestingly, if you ignore the second ‘h’ is name translates to ‘pure oil.’

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    Three of those being from Kenosha/Milwuakee, so essentially a coincidence. Kyle Rittenhouse as well.

    , @KenH
    @Anonymous


    Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz
     
    I believe all three or at least two of these three were Jewish.
    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anonymous

    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash. The three-quarters mick wants to set off bombs in antifa crashpads, specifically targeting the black-clad soft bodies whilst mitigating any collateral damage. The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go. Unleash the Hun for the big stuff.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @PV van der Byl

    , @El Dato
    @Anonymous

    These names are all suspiciously sonoriously compound except "Huber", which is indeed standard German. What's the likelihood?

    Rosenbaum = Rose tree

    Grosskreutz = Big cross or Large lower back

    Reinoehl = Pure oil

  3. Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @bruce county

    'Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.'

    That would be nice. I could sleep soundly that night, reassured of the reelection of the incumbent and the preservation of at least a shard of predictability, if not actual stability.

    , @Bill Jones
    @bruce county

    "Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family."


    Do they have a young daughter?
    Is their basement up to spec?

    , @Kylie
    @bruce county

    "Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family."

    If he does, I'm sure it will be a touching occasion.

    , @Single malt
    @bruce county

    “Jill and I are praying for his family.”

  4. He was arrested once or twice over the summer for carrying a gun before he shot the guy who was spraying him with something defensive like mace,

    Apparently, the victim had his back to the killer. When the killer fired, one of the shots pierced the can of bear spray the victim was carrying. He had no time to take any defensive action.

  5. The documents don’t indicate why prosecutors decided not to pursue the accusations.

    They were the Kim Foxx type of prosecutor. Restorative Justice.

    • Agree: Realist
  6. He got Jack Ruby’d. Or not. They don’t let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he’s dead.

    • Replies: @Oscar Peterson
    @Hippopotamusdrome


    "He got Jack Ruby’d. Or not. They don’t let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he’s dead."
     
    Good point. My sources say he was actually flown to Wakanda to become the leader in exile of a Progressive White Liberation Army (PWLA) backed by the Wakandan military and their super-awesome military-industrial-tech complex.

    My sources further reveal that Chadwick Boseman is also not dead and is negotiating with Reinoehl for the latter to play his radical white sidekick in Black Panther II.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    , @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    What was Jack Ruby preventing Oswald from saying? Anything, obviously, but is there something specific? I know little of this matter.

  7. The legacy media reaction to this will be telling.

    If they bury it (most likely), they’re sticking with the NYT-led de-escalation that began last week.

    If they decry this as yet another unjust killing in Trump’s America, they’re choosing a path.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Ma Laoshi
    @Nikolai Vladivostok


    If they decry this as yet another unjust killing
     
    For the media to do that, the victim must be black--the Narrative must be protected. "100% Antifa" or not, whitey had it coming. Jeez, get with the program.
    , @Eric416
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    They'll keep it off the front page where the normies might see, but Twitter and other echo chambers for the radicals will proclaim his martydom and "rest in power".

  8. “He was arrested once or twice over the summer for carrying a gun before he shot the guy who was spraying him with something defensive like mace….”

    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend, without any apparent legal provocation— an assault that created a reasonable fear of imminent death or serious bodily injury. In other words, ‘Jay’ had acted in self-defense; the killer had not, and did not. In my eyes, as an erstwhile attorney, it was first-degree murder. The fact that the killer fled the scene, and later fled the state altogether, apparently without his ever contacting the authorities to report the shooting and give his side of the event, shows his consciousness of guilt. As for his self-defense claim, did anyone see a “friend of color” with him on the scene to whom he was referring? I certainly did not.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @D. K.


    As for his self-defense claim, did anyone see a “friend of color” with him on the scene to whom he was referring? I certainly did not.
     
    As a Certified Antifa Poster Boy, he's permitted to use the "FoC" card any time he likes, same as how he's permitted to go free after committing murder.
    , @istevelurker
    @D. K.


    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend
     
    No, this is wrong and Steve is giving the benefit of the doubt to the shooter. Danielson's friend Chandler Pappas was alongside him when he was killed. Told Tucker Carlson last night that he and the victim were caught completely off guard and were attacked without provocation. The killer's bullet went through Danielson's can of bear spray. Pappas and Danielson were unarmed and carried the spray for self-defense.

    See: https://www.foxnews.com/media/friend-of-portland-shooting-victim-aaron-danielson-speaks-out-us-needs-a-lot-of-healing.

    Replies: @D. K., @D. K., @D. K.

  9. This was the first guy the 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse killed, Joseph Rosenbaum. It’s crushing we lost such a wonderful citizen.

    https://twitter.com/RadioFreeElk/status/1301359539925655552

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Bernard

    For those who haven't read. He not only abused but anally raped several boys, between 9-11 years old. All of them were either his nephews or second cousins. He did this when he was being given shelter in his sisters and cousins homes after being kicked out at 18 of his mothers home.

    Replies: @S, @JMcG

    , @Alden
    @Bernard

    Thanks for doing the work. I ignore the news reports and try to look up the actual laws, lawsuit, criminal and civil charges , judicial findings and judicial orders but got lazy on this one.

    At least the liberal media didn’t claim he was 18 with a 16 or 15 year old consenting girl.

    The Kenosha riots might put Trump over the top. Most people, urban rural, whatever think of towns like Kenosha Sheboygan Dubuque Des Moines as 100 % old American White, crime free, safe, hard working , well educated in the local public schools middle and prosperous working class happy little towns.

    But turns out Kenosha has ghetto blacks who rape, steal cars, beat up their baby mammas and have 6 kids in welfare at age 29.

    So if ghetto rats can live in , and a riot can happen, in Kenosha, it just might happen in your 90% White 10% Asian Hispanic Philippino mixed whatever upper middle class suburb full of half million to 2 million dollar houses depending on location

    We’ve always voted republican no matter what the contractors associations say. But we’ve never thought the Republicans would help Whites. But this time, I’m really worried about what might happen if the democrats aka anti White party gets in.

    , @anon
    @Bernard

    Could Rosenbaum be anymore stereotypically Jewish?

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Not Raul
    @Bernard

    How do you know that those docs are legit?

    Anyone with a computer could have created the image.

  10. Why does a lawyer-DA need a spokesman?!

    Every government bureaucracy seems to have its own public (dis-)information officer.

    It’s only a matter of time til the spokesman will have one, too.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Abolish_public_education

    "It's spokeshuman all the way down! And some are actually Artificial Neural Networks!"

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Abolish_public_education


    Why does a lawyer-DA need a spokesman?!
     
    That's easy. It's so they have someone to blame if what the spokesman says turns out wrong.

    Same thing with Hollywood. You never hear from the actor, only his publicist.
  11. It will be interesting to compare the firepower of the federal task forces engaged in apprehending Reinoehl vis-a-vis the Roger Stone apprehension directed by Andrew Weissmann!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dan Hayes


    It will be interesting to compare the firepower of the federal task forces engaged in apprehending Reinoehl vis-a-vis the Roger Stone apprehension directed by Andrew Weissmann!
     
    Here’s video (link below) taken right after the shooting. You can see the body of the murderer. Looks like a residential neighborhood.

    https://m.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=400&width=224&referrer=www.twitter.com&share_id&href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjugheadjonez%2Fvideos%2F10163785015735276%2F
    , @Hibernian
    @Dan Hayes

    Four officers fired their weapons. Expect at least the fringes of the left to shriek and scream about it.

  12. … protests in Portland that began three months ago after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis under the knee of a police officer.

    Now there’s a reporter who chooses his words carefully!

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Digital Samizdat

    Not carefully enough. Floyd took his last breath either on an EMS gurney or in a hospital bed.

    , @Paco Wové
    @Digital Samizdat

    It's as though there's a directive to work that into every single story.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

    , @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Digital Samizdat

    Not carefully enough. He didn't die under the knee, but in the hospital well after his arrest.

    Still, it's not as sloppy as those reports mentioning the "killing of George Floyd." He wasn't killed. He died of a fentanyl overdose despite efforts of those cops to save his life.

    At least they're not throwing around the incendiary "murder" word any more.

    Replies: @Gordo

  13. This is the best ending the Democrats could have hoped for. It would have been great for Trump to have this guy and his black power tattoo being perp walked in front of the cameras. Also he was going to represent himself and so the media, who want to ignore him, would have been forced to cover him. With him dead the story dies as well two months before the election.

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald’s untimely demise.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Torn and Frayed

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald’s untimely demise.

    It shouldn't. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely. The one sentimental attachment he had was to his dog, who was waiting in the car while he went to buy some money orders.

    Replies: @Sparkon, @Gordo

  14. I’m not a good person, but one good thing about me is illustrated by this. At one job (one of a sequence of mostly commodiously and decorously departed positions, always [knock on wood] with the pay going up) I was offered some “good $#!%,” which appealed because as a one-time subscriber to Parabola and a one-time whore for Shambala* books (especially Shambala pocket books! You haven’t read the Hagakure until you’ve squinted like a you-know-who-sama!) I have a thoroughly irrational soft spot for supernatural foolery. When I was younger I used to wish fervently for a hallucination. My girlfriend is a lilit. However, I never partook. I had to work. If it looked like my employer needed it, I would down a cardiac arrest-inducing amount of Redbulls. If I had to work within a 72-hour period there was no possibility of taking hallucinogens. So my excuse for being a square was that I really honestly was a square.
    So this guy has a gun, good for him, it’s the American thing to do. So thing guy stole his mother’s medicine, I only wish I could, there’s a lot of money in that. If Obamacare is restarted the only medicine will be stolen medicine. But, it leaps out at me: he attended several fake outrage rallies? When did he have the time? I would love to be able to do that; you know, to hunt them, because I don’t hunt but surely they cannot be particularly dangerous game.

    *Yeah, it’s right there in the name.

    • Troll: Hibernian
    • Replies: @wren
    @J.Ross

    I think A LOT of the protesters are/were living off of the current generous unemployment benefits.

    $1,000 a week not to work because it might spread germs opens up a lot of time to spread violence.

    , @TWS
    @J.Ross

    Upstanding guy like you ought to be able to indulge yourself now and then. You work hard show up mostly straight, you should get a chance to relax. Steal Grandma's medicine and go to town.

    You've missed the block parties the blue cities have thrown? There's still time, take a little Vacay and get to it.

    , @wren
    @J.Ross

    These guys will put you up. Stay there on the city's dime and go to town.

    https://youtu.be/cYwaXTahJNc

  15. Judging from what little I’ve read about the shooter, mostly from his sister, he was your basic Trouble-With-A-Capital-T type

    Yeah, he was a real upstanding, responsible citizen:

    https://www.bakercityherald.com/news/local/father-son-charged-after-allegedly-racing-at-111-mph-on-interstate-84/article_d4ce15e0-aa5c-11ea-b7be-e72ba4f60fa1.html

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @Mr. Anon

    Reinoehl was arrested in June for driving @110 mph w/an 11 yr old girl in the vehicle, while high and holding a concealed weapon. THIS IS FU#*ING INSANE. Why wasn't this guy in jail?! No wonder he was shooting people dead on the street 2 months later. He assumed that he was above the law. Apparently in Oregon there is no greater white privilege than Portland Antifa. The law won't touch them at all. It took the U.S. Marshals to do the job that the Oregon courts should've taken care of. Btw, the car this fighter for the oppressed was driving was a Cadillac. I can't even look at a Cadillac w/out my credit rating taking a dip. This waste of human space was putting his 11 yr old's life in danger while high in one.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

  16. As some know, I have been posting for some time now, “Why hasn’t the Portland shooter been arrested?”

    It’s been days. If he was a white supremacist, he would have been picked up immediately.

    Anyway, when I read the headline, my first reaction was CONSPIRACY. Is that because I’ve become addled by too much knowledge? Or is it because it was actually a conspiracy? Whatever the case, sigh, fine, Epstein didn’t kill himself. It’s all so tiring.

  17. • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    https://i.ibb.co/BcS4hwY/reddit-antifa.jpg

    Note that upvoting is disabled on just one (1) comment.

    Replies: @Pericles, @J.Ross

  18. Anonymous[417] • Disclaimer says:

    What a fiasco. This is another Soros owned DA.

    Did Soros order no action on the arrest? Trying to start a war? I thought today how diabolical it would be to let this guy skate. That might’ve triggered hotheads for real. Blood revenge stuff.

    But then the nutty perp forced their hand?

    Sure seemed like they DA were telegraphing a non-prosecution. Five days of radio silence. I hope all the details of what was going on during the five days comes out.

    Should be some lawsuits that arise over this entire mess. Civil action and maybe we can see some texts and emails. I would assume the worst kind of maneuvering was going on in the background.

    ANOTHER BLACK EYE FOR PORTLAND

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Anonymous

    He gave a media interview to "tell his side of the story." I think that forced their hand.

  19. OT – This was satire in 2013. Now it is part of the Democratic Party platform:

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  20. OT
    Welp…

    I was threatened with literal murder two hours ago.

    For relating factual information about St. Kyle, PBUH.

    A man half my age and twice my weight, whom I’ve known for years…

    A friend. Former coworker. Party pal.

    Heh.

    Openly threatened to cave my face in, if I didn’t shut the fuck up.

    In public, in front of mutual friends. He repeated the threat and included bashing my skull in.

    I must be doing something right.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adolph Oliver Busch

    Book 'em Dano, Literal Murder One!

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  21. Were the Feds sent to “arrest” Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to “capture” OBL?

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Not Raul

    They did at least bury OBL in that traditional muslim way, at sea.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Not Raul


    Were the Feds sent to “arrest” Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to “capture” OBL?
     
    Or like how they "arrested" Bonnie and Clyde


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/1932_Ford_V-8_containing_the_remains_of_Bonnie_Parker_and_Clyde_Barrow.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @SkylertheWeird
    @Not Raul

    Always wonder why pics of OBLs bullet ridden body never leaked.

  22. @D. K.
    “He was arrested once or twice over the summer for carrying a gun before he shot the guy who was spraying him with something defensive like mace....”

    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend, without any apparent legal provocation— an assault that created a reasonable fear of imminent death or serious bodily injury. In other words, ‘Jay’ had acted in self-defense; the killer had not, and did not. In my eyes, as an erstwhile attorney, it was first-degree murder. The fact that the killer fled the scene, and later fled the state altogether, apparently without his ever contacting the authorities to report the shooting and give his side of the event, shows his consciousness of guilt. As for his self-defense claim, did anyone see a “friend of color” with him on the scene to whom he was referring? I certainly did not.

    Replies: @Charon, @istevelurker

    As for his self-defense claim, did anyone see a “friend of color” with him on the scene to whom he was referring? I certainly did not.

    As a Certified Antifa Poster Boy, he’s permitted to use the “FoC” card any time he likes, same as how he’s permitted to go free after committing murder.

  23. https://www.oregonlive.com/crime/2020/09/man-sought-in-the-fatal-downtown-portland-shooting-reported-to-have-been-killed-by-officers-in-wa.html

    Looks like Reinoehl, the 48 year old Antifa went to his car to get his rifle in order to shoot US Marshals. The Marshals are trained to a higher level of proficiency than any city cops.

  24. Good news, but the real problem is not the little Antifa children playing at being revolutionaries nor their NAM pawns who do the looting while Antifa sets the fires.

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    But the critical front is the schools and the universities.

    The producers have to unite around the slogan “Defund the public schools and the universities!” Their business model makes no sense in the age of the Internet: their own behavior in the course of the Covid shutdown should make that clear even to people of limited intelligence.

    Tear down the brick-and-mortar schools and colleges and sow the ground with salt.

    It will take time, but now is the time when ordinary people are starting to see the truth.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    , @AnotherDad
    @PhysicistDave


    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.
     
    Bingo. Spot on again Phys Dave.

    The whole premise of the American founding and our Constitution is that responsible productive men will rule themselves. An open push-back against the idea of being ruled by royalty or "the court".

    But there's this inevitable tendency--basically since settlement and the neolithic agricultural revolution--for parasites who don't produce to find rule over producers and feed off them. And what we've had is a coup by the verbalist parasites against majoritarianism, productive people and our republic.

    If Trump had a clue he'd engage on this. Refer to the Democrats as "the parasite party". That's what they are--a coalition of parasites high and low. Cut through all the prog b.s. and rip the mask off: "parasite party".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    , @shoot
    @PhysicistDave

    Verbalism is deployed, typically subcontract, by uber compulsion, which, along with symbiotic unter compulsion, would not have it any other way.

    Some compelling theorizing lobs the shell that verbalism is the tool used in pursuit of shorter cuts to fatter slices – via lying – & that it’s all that practice to deceive that added all the uber-architecture surrounding quivering amygdalae.

    The long march in place of these sorts of constitutions is a lot older than the so-called long march through the institutions, & the institutional wo/man projections of that fattened head.

    So brick & mortar teardowns, destroying the village to save it, what can’t be saved at net negative interest rates, nor ostensibly positive rates, either, won’t work.

    But make-work has always been good enough. Fake it busy until ya’ make it, Sisyphus. Cue Luke, moving the dirt from here to there, & back again....

  25. @PhysicistDave
    Good news, but the real problem is not the little Antifa children playing at being revolutionaries nor their NAM pawns who do the looting while Antifa sets the fires.

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    But the critical front is the schools and the universities.

    The producers have to unite around the slogan "Defund the public schools and the universities!" Their business model makes no sense in the age of the Internet: their own behavior in the course of the Covid shutdown should make that clear even to people of limited intelligence.

    Tear down the brick-and-mortar schools and colleges and sow the ground with salt.

    It will take time, but now is the time when ordinary people are starting to see the truth.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @Alden, @shoot

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn’t work that way.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @JimB
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen, and other things cannot.
     
    All humanities courses can be taught on line. Labs for online science classes, at least through high school, can be done in your kitchen. Many online science courses require you to purchase a lab kit. So Dave is certainly right about public schools and mostly right about colleges, but I agree that once students have acquired a certain level of collegiate book learning it’s time to move into a lab, maybe around sophomore or junior year. But most college classes can happen online.
    , @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I didn't read that as a call for eliminating schools. The comment was, "Defund the public schools and universities." I took the latter as shorthand for, specifically, the tonier ones with the 4-to-5-year debutante-ball-plus-Rumspringa package, before the little darlings are given away to The Economy. That really has to go, and it won't affect teaching/learning one whit.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    , @AnotherDad
    @Buzz Mohawk


    ome things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn’t work that way.

     

    Buzz, this is just way off base.

    The big revolution in learning is 500 years old--it's called "the printing press". "School" as we know it--sit in a classroom all day long--is a relatively recent invention for mass education and never a very satisfying one for intelligent people and especially males.

    I'll grant there are a bunch of things that are essentially "learn to do this", that are better learned by demonstration--in person or video--then doing. (I coached my daughter through putting in a new kitchen faucet. Probably superior to her reading a book, though that could have worked.)

    But almost any academic subject, people actually learn from reading--then thinking, puzzling, writing or doing problems. There were a few classes in college--i'm think about my senior level stats course in particular--where i rarely even showed up for the (9:00 am) lecture. But i could read the book and do the problems. Anyone whose "learning" came primarily from their "great teachers" lectures is basically an idiot with a very thin knowledge base. Band width is just too low, too slow.

    What the traditional classroom delivered was a bit of instruction, but mostly structure, routine, a schedule to push kids along. And, of course, some feedback assessment. (And a baby-sitting service for parents of minor children. And socialization, friend groups for those kids.) Now we can have the lecture on-line and do assessment remotely as well. At tiny fractions of the cost.

    Real learning remains the same--reading and doing the work.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Buzz Mohawk

    What Physicist Dave doesn't realize is that, as a physicist, he knows physics, but that that doesn't give him license to speak about those fields in which he is not trained.

    Child psychologist Piaget showed that the human mind passes through a sequence of learning stages as it matures from infancy to adulthood. In short, a child doesn't learn in the same way an adult learns. At each stage in our cognitive development, we must be taught in a way commensurate with the mechanics of our brain's development.

    What works for a 14 year old, who has entered the formal operational stage of learning is not at all appropriate to a 6 year old.

    Much as I agree with Physicist Dave's take on doers vs. verbalizers, I believe that he has forgotten how he learned as a child and is projecting his adult experience backwards. He wasn't always the abstract-thinking theoretician that he is today. As a boy, he learned by doing things and seeing them done.

    Medical school mantra, "See one, do one, show one." That's how we learn.

    Ironically, Physicist Dave advocates for the doers but claims they become who they are through just verbal means i.e. the written word.

  26. @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen, and other things cannot.

    All humanities courses can be taught on line. Labs for online science classes, at least through high school, can be done in your kitchen. Many online science courses require you to purchase a lab kit. So Dave is certainly right about public schools and mostly right about colleges, but I agree that once students have acquired a certain level of collegiate book learning it’s time to move into a lab, maybe around sophomore or junior year. But most college classes can happen online.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  27. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1301750631946833920

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Note that upvoting is disabled on just one (1) comment.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Mr McKenna

    Also note that their butts are hurt that people are cooperating with the police to catch a killer. How unfair!

    , @J.Ross
    @Mr McKenna

    "coordinated under the table with law enforcement"

    Wow just wow.

  28. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    I didn’t read that as a call for eliminating schools. The comment was, “Defund the public schools and universities.” I took the latter as shorthand for, specifically, the tonier ones with the 4-to-5-year debutante-ball-plus-Rumspringa package, before the little darlings are given away to The Economy. That really has to go, and it won’t affect teaching/learning one whit.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    I took the latter as shorthand for, specifically, the tonier ones with the 4-to-5-year debutante-ball-plus-Rumspringa package, before the little darlings are given away to The Economy.

    Outstanding!

  29. Meanwhile, in NYC, it was a dark and stormy night for the losers with BLM:

    • Replies: @znon
    @anonymous

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Z-tCU-sULA
    Reputedly an impromptu performance after assault by right wing new yawk cabbie.

  30. Perfect wind-up toy for Antifa. Much better than their usual noodle-armed trannies.

    One thing that is a factor with the Patriot Prayer, Proud Boy and other rallies is that much of the right wing side comes from the Washington side of the Columbia River (usually Vancouver). Oregon has no reciprocity with any other state’s concealed carry permits, so most of the rightists are unarmed (or at least unarmed with firearms), whereas they’d usually be carrying in their home state.

    Some Oregon sheriffs will issue carry permits to Washington residents, but it’s on a “may-issue” basis (versus “shall-issue” for Oregon residents). That means having to jump through some hoops at the local sheriff’s office, which most people won’t bother with unless they’re particularly committed to being able to carry as many places as possible. And right now, with the pandemic, I expect many if not most sheriffs aren’t taking new applications at all.

  31. Generally i avoid this argument because it seems too cute, but in this case it strikes me as apt: Is there anything the current “left” aren’t hypocrites about?

    Other than the fact that they rely on armed security and that all the dem politicians seem to have carry permits as a special favor even in places like SF, i assumed that they really DO want to keep guns away from citizens or criminals or crazy people or something.

    But here we have a dude arrested on a gun charge who at the time had pending drug related DUI (with his 11yo daughter in the car) and reckless driving / street racing cases against him (with / vs his 17 yo son at speeds > 110 mph) and … did anyone take his guns away? give him a stay away order? anything? No. they just dismissed the case.

    Get ready for another round of gun control laws to come out of this one who, again will only be enforce against stodgy dowdy law abiding people who depend on not having a criminal record.

    ETA: i’m curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)

    • Replies: @Rob Lee
    @vhrm

    While I don't personally know the individual officers / agents on this interdiction group, I have worked with two groups of U.S. Marshals Service fugitive task forces before. Of those two groups, no one on the team wanted to proactively put down their target, regardless of how monstrous the warrant and attendant report read. A positively-concluded fugitive arrest and delivery to a holding facility is a half sheet worth of writing; basically a receipt of positive delivery. A killing, however justified, opens up a huge can of writing, including scene processing, endless statements, dealing with inter-agency attorneys, activates your Wright's liability insurance, etc. It's really not worth the effort if you can avoid it. Even the most zealous federal agent / local task force members that I knew didn't want to spend the next three days filling out forms and doing paperwork. It's not like it's portrayed on TV - killing someone is the start of an enormous procedure, not the end of one.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @Getaclue
    @vhrm

    I just read he had an assault rifle and came out blasting multiple rounds leading to his death...-- would that make you feel better as to the poor lads departure? "martyred"? He murdered an unarmed man in cold blood, probably in a planned set up with others, and by all descriptions lived his life in the manner of a complete dirt bag the evidence seems to show?-- I read his family's comments on his death were approximately "Glad we, and no one else, will have to deal with him anymore" -- in that nature they were I believe, you can check for yourself...., whatever happened to him thereafter his shooting the unarmed man twice in the chest-- wherein he is now receiving his "Eternal Reward" -- he wasn't a "martyr" nor was he "martyred"....murderers who get killed receive justice.

    Replies: @hooodathunkit

    , @hooodathunkit
    @vhrm


    ETA: i’m curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)
     
    Yes.
    Knowing his personality, they staked the place out with unmarked cars at a good distance; didn't want to assault inside the apartment building. Reinoehl made them quickly, but couldn't stand it much longer and made a run for it. According to two witnesses the cops let him shoot a bit before returning the favor; so it was clearly a 'good' shoot. Not a lot of choices when your suspect believes they're in a holy war and you're the minion of Satan ... or when your suspect thinks he's going to get 20-life for a cold-blooded murder and spend his last days assraped alternately by supremacists and darkies.

    Replies: @S

  32. @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:

    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all — the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, “Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light.” One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach “bonehead math.”

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the “lab campus” and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I’m quite familiar with lots of academic “research” in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.’s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway — TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around — except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    • Agree: JMcG, Travis, NickG
    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Wilbur and Orville did not go to university, but they went to school. Furthermore, they were exceptional, like you.

    You are not a representative sample. A fraction of people are self-teachers like you, but I agree the university is overrated in its necessity, and most subjects are a waste of time.

    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed -- in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.

    This of course does not apply to the perhaps one or two percent like you who can just sit at home with books, self-motivated little angels.

    I agree though, yes, a huge part of public school and college programs and costs are a waste. And, yes, most profs are lousy teachers and really don't teach much at all.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I’m quite familiar with lots of academic “research” in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.
     
    I've seen this myself at lesser universities. You're saying that it is true even at the most prestigious ones? That is dis-heartening. On the other hand, I guess it isn't just me that feels this way. A lot of what goes on nowadays under the guise of "research" seems to be just wheel-spinning. The whole enterprise certainly isn't fun anymore. Like a lot of things in our society, it's just sort of gone to crap.
    , @Anon 2
    @PhysicistDave

    I visited Boston a couple of years ago, and while there I found myself in Harvard
    Square across the river. Looking at the Harvard buildings, totally unexpectedly
    I felt overcome by a sense of profound disgust for the institution (except possibly
    for STEM), and other institutions like it. This surprised me because only 20-30
    years ago I would have at least felt a sense of respect for the intellectual caliber
    of the people who teach there. Now I feel that Ivy League universities, and other
    places like them, have become so degenerate, that they (and their graduates) no longer
    deserve any respect. As to STEM, according to John Horgan of Scientific American,
    even physics “has lost its fizz.”

    Replies: @Anon 2

    , @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily.
     
    Dude, just the other day you were talking up things like Coursera instead of the traditional college route. But Coursera courses are lectures by university professors, albeit free or cheap. Now you’re advocating plain old books for real learning.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Another Canadian
    @PhysicistDave

    Agreed. Defunding public schools and universities is low hanging fruit for cash-strapped jurisdictions at the state and local level.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @PhysicistDave

    You are right & you are wrong.

    Right: most scientists are bad teachers; also, with some exceptions like Poincare, who simply followed the lectures & memorized & understood it all- people learn the best from books.

    Wrong: physics exercises & experiments are good, especially at high school level.

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @PhysicistDave

    Fantastic.

    I just forwarded your comment to one of my kids, who just started the UC application process for grad school.

  33. @PhysicistDave
    Good news, but the real problem is not the little Antifa children playing at being revolutionaries nor their NAM pawns who do the looting while Antifa sets the fires.

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    But the critical front is the schools and the universities.

    The producers have to unite around the slogan "Defund the public schools and the universities!" Their business model makes no sense in the age of the Internet: their own behavior in the course of the Covid shutdown should make that clear even to people of limited intelligence.

    Tear down the brick-and-mortar schools and colleges and sow the ground with salt.

    It will take time, but now is the time when ordinary people are starting to see the truth.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @Alden, @shoot

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    Bingo. Spot on again Phys Dave.

    The whole premise of the American founding and our Constitution is that responsible productive men will rule themselves. An open push-back against the idea of being ruled by royalty or “the court”.

    But there’s this inevitable tendency–basically since settlement and the neolithic agricultural revolution–for parasites who don’t produce to find rule over producers and feed off them. And what we’ve had is a coup by the verbalist parasites against majoritarianism, productive people and our republic.

    If Trump had a clue he’d engage on this. Refer to the Democrats as “the parasite party”. That’s what they are–a coalition of parasites high and low. Cut through all the prog b.s. and rip the mask off: “parasite party”.

    • Thanks: Buck Ransom
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    Careful there, Another Dad. You are sounding like a Libertarian here. Ixnay on the onstitutionCay, or something... I never got a handle on Pig Latin.

    I could see Trump using that wording "parasite party" and so on, as you say. As far as actually standing on any principles, or describing things as you do here, based on how this country is supposed to work, don't count on that one. He doesn't have a principled bone in his body. That's not why I voted for him though.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  34. OT: Watching the local news here in Sacramento a few minutes ago, I saw that a number of the school districts in the metro area are losing students this year — a good sign.

    In related news, the Sacramento Unified School Board has decided to strip the name from “Sutter Middle School” — that is the Johann Sutter of “Sutter’s Mill” fame where gold was discovered. Kind of an important figure in California history, not to mention being the founder of Sacramento. (They are accusing Sutter of basically enslaving the local Amerindians, odd since California was a free state.)

    They are also changing the name of a school named after California’s first governor — get this! — because he opposed slavery and wanted California to be a free state! They are accusing him of opposing slavery because that was the easiest way to keep blacks out of the state.

    I have a modest proposal for a famous Californian whose name can be put on the school: how about “Charles Manson Middle School”??? After all, Manson did not do anything mean to Blacks or the Amerindians, did he?

    I wonder how many apparatchiks on the School Board would even get the reference.

    • LOL: lavoisier
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Why not O.J. Simpson High School? After all, he was found innocent in the murder of a Karen and some White guy. Just another mostly peaceful Black victim of systemic racism.

    We really do live in Clown World, especially you unfortunate souls in California.

  35. Anonymous[148] • Disclaimer says:

    Pelosi ecstatic tonight that news cycle is moving on.

    Bad outcome for Mondale I mean Biden. Pretty good conclusion for Trump.

    The nation has been spared a toxic legal circus atmosphere over this crap.

    Whole episode is very bad for Antifa’s reputation. Suburban moms just really starting to process the menace to society that is Antifa.

    Let’s see what Kamala has to say tomorrow! “Who is Kamala?” you might ask. Yeah. Was she un-personed by the Dem shotcallers? Imagine how bad the internal Dem polling must be for Kamala that the campaign just YANKED HER OUT OF THE SPOTLIGHT.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @Anonymous

    Harris is openly a BLM agent, so this election will reveal just how twisted (or not) the Sub Moms are.

    Replies: @lavoisier

  36. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    Wilbur and Orville did not go to university, but they went to school. Furthermore, they were exceptional, like you.

    You are not a representative sample. A fraction of people are self-teachers like you, but I agree the university is overrated in its necessity, and most subjects are a waste of time.

    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.

    This of course does not apply to the perhaps one or two percent like you who can just sit at home with books, self-motivated little angels.

    I agree though, yes, a huge part of public school and college programs and costs are a waste. And, yes, most profs are lousy teachers and really don’t teach much at all.

    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk says:


    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.
     
    Sure. But normal parents can do that. Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by "sounding it out": we call it "phonics" now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    Parents who are truly mentally deficient will need outside help. Most will not.

    Of course, we have decided that parents are more "productive" if they spend their time doing pointlessly unproductive paperwork and turn over the raising of their children to the babysitters we euphemistically call "teachers."

    We forget that schools are a historical anomaly: throughout most of human history, most human beings never attended school. But they learned what they needed to survive in their society.

    Yes, in our society, you need the three Rs. But, again, any normal adult can teach that. Beyond the three Rs... well, it is notorious that the kids really interested in how computers work teach themselves. And the ones not interested still teach themselves to type and point-and-click.

    Abolish schools and most people will not learn much more than they need to learn to function in society and hold down a job. But the schools do not even teach that.

    As I have said, my daughter is at UCLA, one of the two top "public Ivies" (basically tied with Berkeley). She was bemoaning to me the other day that so many of her friends learned a musical instrument or learned a language to impress the admissions committee... and then just threw it away once they got in.

    The schools degrade learning. Instead of actually having some passion you really care about -- whether it is learning modern Greek or gourmet cooking or car repair -- everything the kids do through age 22, aside from partying and getting drunk or high, is just a "paper chase."

    It is child abuse. We are cheating them. Huxley's Brave New World come true. We are teaching them to earn enough money to be frantic consumers who will keep the wheels of the economy spinning but depriving them of the right to be human beings.

    Our whole society is a Potemkin village.

    John Adams wrote:

    I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.
     
    If he had known what was really coming, he would have added:

    In order that my great-great-great-great-great grandsons could "hook-up" with girls they do not really care about, get high on pot or drunk on alcohol, and waste their time listening to music whose main virtue is its anesthetic effect.
     
    It's a crime against humanity, the humanity of our own children.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Another Canadian, @Jack D

  37. @PhysicistDave
    OT: Watching the local news here in Sacramento a few minutes ago, I saw that a number of the school districts in the metro area are losing students this year -- a good sign.

    In related news, the Sacramento Unified School Board has decided to strip the name from "Sutter Middle School" -- that is the Johann Sutter of "Sutter's Mill" fame where gold was discovered. Kind of an important figure in California history, not to mention being the founder of Sacramento. (They are accusing Sutter of basically enslaving the local Amerindians, odd since California was a free state.)

    They are also changing the name of a school named after California's first governor -- get this! -- because he opposed slavery and wanted California to be a free state! They are accusing him of opposing slavery because that was the easiest way to keep blacks out of the state.

    I have a modest proposal for a famous Californian whose name can be put on the school: how about "Charles Manson Middle School"??? After all, Manson did not do anything mean to Blacks or the Amerindians, did he?

    I wonder how many apparatchiks on the School Board would even get the reference.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Why not O.J. Simpson High School? After all, he was found innocent in the murder of a Karen and some White guy. Just another mostly peaceful Black victim of systemic racism.

    We really do live in Clown World, especially you unfortunate souls in California.

  38. Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?

    Die Fahne hoch…………….

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    • Replies: @znon
    @Mr. Anon

    Joseph Goebbels; "The best Nazis are ex-communists".
    The National SOCIALIST Party was a response to the Soviet system that emulated their concentration camps and totalitarian system while also co-opting the old German right wing and military. Goebbels also copied Hollywood propaganda and was a big movie buff, along with Hitler.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @anonymous
    @Mr. Anon

    Questions remain about attacks reportedly by white supremacists during George Floyd riots.

    http://strib.mn/31X5OkZ

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists...
     
    The “Original Nazis” (Rohm, the Strasser brothers, etc.) were patriotic socialists/anti-capitalists. The SA was largely working class. Hitler and his cronies and the SS were more bourgeois. Hence The Night of the Long Knives.

    Many of Hitler’s economic programs would fit nicely into the Democratic Party Platform.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,
     
    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Mr. Anon, @Oscar Peterson

    , @Svigor
    @Mr. Anon


    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.
     
    Black-and-red is a good color scheme if you want to project strength, and it's well suited to the long-standing hipster love of black (and Black - from afar and through screens, anyway). It's a good way for leftists to aesthetically "in before" the dissident right.

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives.
     
    Sigh. It's depressing. "Hi, I'm a cuckservative; I hate leftists' enemies way more than leftists do; I'm more passionate about anti-White and homosexualist politics than the leftists are! Notice me (((sempai))), notice me!"

    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists. We can talk about "no true Scotsman/socialist/communist/fascist/jevv" until the cows come home, but the truth is that the Nazi/fascist popular appeal was third positionist; left-wing economics plus nationalism. Socialism without that horrible globalist aftertaste.


    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.
     
    Yeah and the "National" means NATIONALIST. It's right there in the name. Hence, a Third Position, orthogonal to left/right.

    LoL.

    Using "socialist" as a wordy dird strikes me as pretty boomer. Like saying "duh, yeah, you're lucky we won, or you'd be speaking German right now." Quelle horreur! Homogeneous huwhite and German-speaking???

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Mr. Anon

  39. @Abolish_public_education
    Why does a lawyer-DA need a spokesman?!

    Every government bureaucracy seems to have its own public (dis-)information officer.

    It’s only a matter of time til the spokesman will have one, too.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jim Don Bob

    “It’s spokeshuman all the way down! And some are actually Artificial Neural Networks!”

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  40. OT: COVID-19 proves that homeopathy is real! Random noise really can heal you (or in this case, kill you)!

    Up to 90% of people who test positive for Covid barely carry any virus & are not contagious. Every stat about the disease is bogus

    Data from three US states – New York, Nevada and Massachusetts – shows that when the amount of the virus found in a person is taken into account, up to 90 percent of people who have tested positive should actually have been negative, as they are carrying only tiny amounts of the virus, are not contagious, pose no risk to others, and have no need to isolate.

    This means that only a fraction of the daily “cases” being reported so hysterically in the mainstream media are actual, bona fide Covid-19 sufferers, and need treatment and to separate themselves from others.

    So how could this have happened? The answer has to do with the sensitivity of PCR (Polymerase chain reaction) tests for Covid, which it turns out can be ramped up according to the taste of the testing companies [they have no baseline? who ARE those idiots?]. Most testing companies have chosen the outrageously high sensitivity limit of 40 PCR cycles – meaning that the DNA in a sample is exponentially increased 40 times in order to amplify its signal.

    But using such a ridiculously sensitive test means that the faintest traces of a dead virus, or even leftovers from previous infections, can result in a positive. Professor Juliet Morrison, a University of California virologist, said that even a limit of 35 PCR cycles is too high, let alone 40. She said she was “shocked that people would think that 40 could represent a positive.” But apparently, pretty much everyone in the US Covid brain trust took exactly that on faith.

    • Thanks: Svigor
    • Replies: @William Oliver
    @El Dato

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qy5FD0XameI

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @El Dato

    "Every stat about the disease is bogus"

    Yep, confirmed ✔ last Sunday by the very perpetrators of BULL$$$HIT-2020: the CDC. But the economic destruction and psychological terror are all too real.

    Diaper up. Forever.

    Lockdown 2.0 begins T-minus three weeks: prep accordingly.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  41. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I’m quite familiar with lots of academic “research” in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    I’ve seen this myself at lesser universities. You’re saying that it is true even at the most prestigious ones? That is dis-heartening. On the other hand, I guess it isn’t just me that feels this way. A lot of what goes on nowadays under the guise of “research” seems to be just wheel-spinning. The whole enterprise certainly isn’t fun anymore. Like a lot of things in our society, it’s just sort of gone to crap.

  42. @J.Ross
    I'm not a good person, but one good thing about me is illustrated by this. At one job (one of a sequence of mostly commodiously and decorously departed positions, always [knock on wood] with the pay going up) I was offered some "good $#!%," which appealed because as a one-time subscriber to Parabola and a one-time whore for Shambala* books (especially Shambala pocket books! You haven't read the Hagakure until you've squinted like a you-know-who-sama!) I have a thoroughly irrational soft spot for supernatural foolery. When I was younger I used to wish fervently for a hallucination. My girlfriend is a lilit. However, I never partook. I had to work. If it looked like my employer needed it, I would down a cardiac arrest-inducing amount of Redbulls. If I had to work within a 72-hour period there was no possibility of taking hallucinogens. So my excuse for being a square was that I really honestly was a square.
    So this guy has a gun, good for him, it's the American thing to do. So thing guy stole his mother's medicine, I only wish I could, there's a lot of money in that. If Obamacare is restarted the only medicine will be stolen medicine. But, it leaps out at me: he attended several fake outrage rallies? When did he have the time? I would love to be able to do that; you know, to hunt them, because I don't hunt but surely they cannot be particularly dangerous game.

    *Yeah, it's right there in the name.

    Replies: @wren, @TWS, @wren

    I think A LOT of the protesters are/were living off of the current generous unemployment benefits.

    $1,000 a week not to work because it might spread germs opens up a lot of time to spread violence.

  43. @PhysicistDave
    Good news, but the real problem is not the little Antifa children playing at being revolutionaries nor their NAM pawns who do the looting while Antifa sets the fires.

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    But the critical front is the schools and the universities.

    The producers have to unite around the slogan "Defund the public schools and the universities!" Their business model makes no sense in the age of the Internet: their own behavior in the course of the Covid shutdown should make that clear even to people of limited intelligence.

    Tear down the brick-and-mortar schools and colleges and sow the ground with salt.

    It will take time, but now is the time when ordinary people are starting to see the truth.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @Alden, @shoot

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Alden

    Our local Catholic school is at capacity and the Hillsdale College charter where my oldest attend is at capacity without the tax incentives. Neither can expand on their current property. I am sure a similar situation would exist in most states. Public schools have all the land.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Alden

    Great comment, Alden! I was going to reply to Physicist Dave myself, but you nailed it pretty well. What I'd add, going too far for most Conservatives even, is that I don't agree with the money being there in the first place. Abolish_Public_Education, the commenter, is right. There are plenty of great conscientious teachers, but they are not allowed to do the job properly. They, the kids, and the parents would all be happier at privately-run schools, and the taxpayers as a whole would have more spending money.

    [This is partially in reply to Buzz Mohawk also:] Nobody says that alternate schooling can't have plenty of child interaction. It should, of course. There's nothing preventing people from forming their own schools that can do all that, and, as you say, Alden, there is so much time wasted.

    I have seen in person the waste in both money* and time. Per Peak Stupidity in "Arts & Crafts", during the spring Kung Flu hiatus, I asked my elementary school boy how much time was wasted on coloring/cutting/pasting still. "Oh about a quarter of the day." Haha, see, we were in the middle of multiplying/adding/subtracting/reducing fractions at the time!

    See also "The modern grade school as medium-security correctional facility".


    .

    * The 2 certified/registered/whatever letters sent to us because we didn't email the right lady when our boy was absent (sick) 3 days in a row, the 2nd one being an even greater example of how you spend OPM. See, after the 1st letter, we'd gone in to what looked like a damn deposition and filled out paperwork about an "attendance plan". OK, fine. A week later I got the 2nd $20 registered letter: I went back to the school office. "Hey, I thought we took care of this?" "Yeah, you're fine. They just sent letters to everyone to make it easier."

    , @anonymous
    @Alden


    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.
     
    True, but in the case of Portland Antifa, the city has been providing taxpayer funded shelter intended for the homeless. The arrested are released without bail and then provided with a place to stay, rinse and repeat.

    Good chance that Antifa has been able to flood Portland precisely because the city has been providing them free shelter and that the local powers that be have been in on it from the start.

    Did Reinoehl spend the last 3 months in one of these tent cities?

    https://thespectator.info/2020/09/03/videographer-discovers-portland-antifa-war-camp-where-notable-anarchists-like-trumpet-man-reside/
    , @Hibernian
    @Alden


    Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals.
     
    The task force consisted mostly of local & state LEOs who were depitized as Marshals.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Oscar Peterson
    @Alden


    "Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization."
     
    Really? I had no idea. How/when did that happen?

    Replies: @West reanimator

  44. @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    ome things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn’t work that way.

    Buzz, this is just way off base.

    The big revolution in learning is 500 years old–it’s called “the printing press”. “School” as we know it–sit in a classroom all day long–is a relatively recent invention for mass education and never a very satisfying one for intelligent people and especially males.

    I’ll grant there are a bunch of things that are essentially “learn to do this”, that are better learned by demonstration–in person or video–then doing. (I coached my daughter through putting in a new kitchen faucet. Probably superior to her reading a book, though that could have worked.)

    But almost any academic subject, people actually learn from reading–then thinking, puzzling, writing or doing problems. There were a few classes in college–i’m think about my senior level stats course in particular–where i rarely even showed up for the (9:00 am) lecture. But i could read the book and do the problems. Anyone whose “learning” came primarily from their “great teachers” lectures is basically an idiot with a very thin knowledge base. Band width is just too low, too slow.

    What the traditional classroom delivered was a bit of instruction, but mostly structure, routine, a schedule to push kids along. And, of course, some feedback assessment. (And a baby-sitting service for parents of minor children. And socialization, friend groups for those kids.) Now we can have the lecture on-line and do assessment remotely as well. At tiny fractions of the cost.

    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad


    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.
     
    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I'm reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the "3S" system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Abolish_public_education

  45. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    I visited Boston a couple of years ago, and while there I found myself in Harvard
    Square across the river. Looking at the Harvard buildings, totally unexpectedly
    I felt overcome by a sense of profound disgust for the institution (except possibly
    for STEM), and other institutions like it. This surprised me because only 20-30
    years ago I would have at least felt a sense of respect for the intellectual caliber
    of the people who teach there. Now I feel that Ivy League universities, and other
    places like them, have become so degenerate, that they (and their graduates) no longer
    deserve any respect. As to STEM, according to John Horgan of Scientific American,
    even physics “has lost its fizz.”

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: Physics has lost its fizz

    One more point about physics: Because of the failure of string theories,
    especially compared to the hype (remember Brian Greene, physics prof
    at Columbia, who took acting lessons to become more effective at pro-string
    propaganda on TV?), even physics has often become an object of ridicule.
    If someone had told me 30 years ago there would come a time when fundamental
    physics would be an object of ridicule, I would’ve dismissed the notion
    as totally insane, and yet that’s where we are now

    Replies: @Anon 2, @El Dato, @dearieme

  46. anonymous[218] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: The police are policing non-mask wearer’s across the pond.

    Diversity eliminating the bind of community trust is interesting to me. It’s like there’s a subconscious “rule book” which combatting parties go by, no matter what, when the “community” is of the same origin.

    I doubt a non-western european immigrant would be so self-contained, while fully disagreeing with an elderly policeman. I would expect the old man to get laid out in no time.

    This scenario is Laurel and Hardyesqe. Heavy conflict, but kind of silly and gentle at the same time.

    Anyway, I guess that’s why “diversity” unchecked is ruinous to a nation.

    https://twitter.com/StopComplying/status/1301603595842998272?s=20

    • Replies: @Altai
    @anonymous


    I doubt a non-western european immigrant would be so self-contained
     
    I'd say plenty of Eastern or Southern European immigrants would definitely make a scene. Americans, particularly on the alt-right seem to have weird idealistic notions of Slavs.

    Diversity eliminating the bind of community trust is interesting to me.
     
    Most of the immigration to Britain in the last 16 years has been from Eastern and Southern Europe and has been devastating to this. This is one of the necessary conditions for Brexit. It has displaced working class communities and has massively made public spaces alienating. Most Europeans and Americans don't realise this.

    'White people' aren't a people.

    , @Polynikes
    @anonymous

    Ridiculous, but child’s play compared to what is happening in Australia.

  47. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    The legacy media reaction to this will be telling.

    If they bury it (most likely), they're sticking with the NYT-led de-escalation that began last week.

    If they decry this as yet another unjust killing in Trump's America, they're choosing a path.

    Replies: @Ma Laoshi, @Eric416

    If they decry this as yet another unjust killing

    For the media to do that, the victim must be black–the Narrative must be protected. “100% Antifa” or not, whitey had it coming. Jeez, get with the program.

  48. @Bernard
    This was the first guy the 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse killed, Joseph Rosenbaum. It's crushing we lost such a wonderful citizen.

    https://twitter.com/RadioFreeElk/status/1301359539925655552

    Replies: @Altai, @Alden, @anon, @Not Raul

    For those who haven’t read. He not only abused but anally raped several boys, between 9-11 years old. All of them were either his nephews or second cousins. He did this when he was being given shelter in his sisters and cousins homes after being kicked out at 18 of his mothers home.

    • Replies: @S
    @Altai

    Additional video has come out that shows the multi-conviction pedophile Rosenbaum and another guy rolling a dumpster which has been set afire at the gas station KR was guarding, ostensibly to commit arson against some nearby parked police squad cars. Kyle is shown getting a fire extinguisher (and it appears) putting the dumpster fire out with it.

    This royally PO'd Rosenbaum and the other antifa, and is thought what may have led to the mob chase led by Rosenbaum that followed.

    , @JMcG
    @Altai

    How was he not murdered before now?

  49. @AnotherDad
    @Buzz Mohawk


    ome things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn’t work that way.

     

    Buzz, this is just way off base.

    The big revolution in learning is 500 years old--it's called "the printing press". "School" as we know it--sit in a classroom all day long--is a relatively recent invention for mass education and never a very satisfying one for intelligent people and especially males.

    I'll grant there are a bunch of things that are essentially "learn to do this", that are better learned by demonstration--in person or video--then doing. (I coached my daughter through putting in a new kitchen faucet. Probably superior to her reading a book, though that could have worked.)

    But almost any academic subject, people actually learn from reading--then thinking, puzzling, writing or doing problems. There were a few classes in college--i'm think about my senior level stats course in particular--where i rarely even showed up for the (9:00 am) lecture. But i could read the book and do the problems. Anyone whose "learning" came primarily from their "great teachers" lectures is basically an idiot with a very thin knowledge base. Band width is just too low, too slow.

    What the traditional classroom delivered was a bit of instruction, but mostly structure, routine, a schedule to push kids along. And, of course, some feedback assessment. (And a baby-sitting service for parents of minor children. And socialization, friend groups for those kids.) Now we can have the lecture on-line and do assessment remotely as well. At tiny fractions of the cost.

    Real learning remains the same--reading and doing the work.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.

    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I’m reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the “3S” system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    No, it really isn't.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in "pony" was the same as the vowel in "bit" rather than in "beet."

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said "pohnee" not "pohnih."

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma's study of American elementary teachers' knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching "whole language" as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma's study of US grade-school teachers' lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose "whole-language"?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Ron Mexico, @Alden, @Escher

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    I definitely agree that math/engineering/physics concepts can be learned much better in person than from a book. I had a full week to try to get ahead in Dynamics before the semester. I just couldn't get anywhere! (I aced it in the classroom). However,

    a) That doesn't mean on-line grade school math can't have any Q/A and interruptions for questions, if the teacher will allow it - which IS a big question. They seem to be too rigorous with the on-line stuff, and on some kind of fast schedule with no extra time. Maybe it's not as good, but,

    b) I take it you don't have anything against this 3S system being in a private venue. Same learning or better, half the time because no time wasted with Ed-School-based BS, and half the cost or better!
    , @AnotherDad
    @Buzz Mohawk


    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.
     
    We just disagree Buzz. Both about how real learning happens and about the relative proportion of kids/people willing to do it. (I think basically everyone who does an AP or even honors HS class or is actual "college material" has to be able to apply butt to chair and learn--or they suck. The class is essentially just the schedule--the prod. You must study this tonight instead of partying with your friends ... or your grade will suck.)

    But let me say that your math example is the weirdest choice.

    Math is far and away the easiest subject to completely automate away.

    And traditional math classes instruction is some of the most useless/inefficient because the ability to absorb math is one of the most directly g-loaded activities. What the math teacher is saying is usually obvious and boring to the bright students and whooshing over the head of the dumb ones.

    While there's no doubt some benefit to gathering kids together when studying Shakespeare to have a discussion and act out the parts, math absolutely cries out for an individual pace. Which fortunately is ridiculously easy to do, to automate:

    -- There is a fairly standard math canon.
    -- The "how to do it" instruction of one teacher is going to be pretty much identical to another teachers and is easy to show in an instructional program.
    -- Since proficiency involves being able to do calculations it's ridiculously easy to have a program figure out when a student has mastered the material.
    -- Furthermore the wrong answers the student gives are a really good hint of what they are not understanding. A program can--usually--figure out the students' error and from that what they have not mastered ... and then give specific, ever more detailed, instruction on that.

    Seriously, for say a billion dollars--a fraction of a years' annual math teacher salaries--i'll deliver a series of terrific adaptive math programs for the standard curriculum, and i'll have a wild wildly intellectually stimulating parties for iSteve commenters at my new mountain lake and beachfront estates.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Buzz Mohawk

    to claim .. you just learned all your math from books

    That’s not BS.

    At my alma mater (a 2nd-tier public), the sci/eng teaching was occasionally entertaining (yep), but otherwise either non-existent or dreadful. A science student was either an autodidact or a cheater.

    (Oddly, the foreign-born profsters, though thickly accented speakers, were still better communicators than their English mother-tongued colleagues.)

    The number of JC kids who require remedial math courses speaks for itself. Public K-12 types who succeed at math do so in spite of the schools.

    At our home school, I taught the math & science. Hands-on, several days per week, forty-five minutes to an hour per lesson, blah blah blah.

    The public schools are a bad joke.

  50. @anonymous
    OT: The police are policing non-mask wearer's across the pond.

    Diversity eliminating the bind of community trust is interesting to me. It's like there's a subconscious "rule book" which combatting parties go by, no matter what, when the "community" is of the same origin.

    I doubt a non-western european immigrant would be so self-contained, while fully disagreeing with an elderly policeman. I would expect the old man to get laid out in no time.

    This scenario is Laurel and Hardyesqe. Heavy conflict, but kind of silly and gentle at the same time.

    Anyway, I guess that's why "diversity" unchecked is ruinous to a nation.

    https://twitter.com/StopComplying/status/1301603595842998272?s=20

    Replies: @Altai, @Polynikes

    I doubt a non-western european immigrant would be so self-contained

    I’d say plenty of Eastern or Southern European immigrants would definitely make a scene. Americans, particularly on the alt-right seem to have weird idealistic notions of Slavs.

    Diversity eliminating the bind of community trust is interesting to me.

    Most of the immigration to Britain in the last 16 years has been from Eastern and Southern Europe and has been devastating to this. This is one of the necessary conditions for Brexit. It has displaced working class communities and has massively made public spaces alienating. Most Europeans and Americans don’t realise this.

    ‘White people’ aren’t a people.

    • Agree: S
  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Wilbur and Orville did not go to university, but they went to school. Furthermore, they were exceptional, like you.

    You are not a representative sample. A fraction of people are self-teachers like you, but I agree the university is overrated in its necessity, and most subjects are a waste of time.

    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed -- in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.

    This of course does not apply to the perhaps one or two percent like you who can just sit at home with books, self-motivated little angels.

    I agree though, yes, a huge part of public school and college programs and costs are a waste. And, yes, most profs are lousy teachers and really don't teach much at all.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Buzz Mohawk says:

    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.

    Sure. But normal parents can do that. Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    Parents who are truly mentally deficient will need outside help. Most will not.

    Of course, we have decided that parents are more “productive” if they spend their time doing pointlessly unproductive paperwork and turn over the raising of their children to the babysitters we euphemistically call “teachers.”

    We forget that schools are a historical anomaly: throughout most of human history, most human beings never attended school. But they learned what they needed to survive in their society.

    Yes, in our society, you need the three Rs. But, again, any normal adult can teach that. Beyond the three Rs… well, it is notorious that the kids really interested in how computers work teach themselves. And the ones not interested still teach themselves to type and point-and-click.

    Abolish schools and most people will not learn much more than they need to learn to function in society and hold down a job. But the schools do not even teach that.

    As I have said, my daughter is at UCLA, one of the two top “public Ivies” (basically tied with Berkeley). She was bemoaning to me the other day that so many of her friends learned a musical instrument or learned a language to impress the admissions committee… and then just threw it away once they got in.

    The schools degrade learning. Instead of actually having some passion you really care about — whether it is learning modern Greek or gourmet cooking or car repair — everything the kids do through age 22, aside from partying and getting drunk or high, is just a “paper chase.”

    It is child abuse. We are cheating them. Huxley’s Brave New World come true. We are teaching them to earn enough money to be frantic consumers who will keep the wheels of the economy spinning but depriving them of the right to be human beings.

    Our whole society is a Potemkin village.

    John Adams wrote:

    I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.

    If he had known what was really coming, he would have added:

    In order that my great-great-great-great-great grandsons could “hook-up” with girls they do not really care about, get high on pot or drunk on alcohol, and waste their time listening to music whose main virtue is its anesthetic effect.

    It’s a crime against humanity, the humanity of our own children.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    School is also about pupils. It's nice to learn in your peer group. The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two - no three times in elementary school) - and the pleasure to be in a vivid and inspirational and warm-hearted open-minded peer group. It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds (and this would have been a disaster at times without my peers). I did journalism from 15 ys. on -my peers read my stuff at the schoolyard (what I'd written in the Cologne magazine SOUNDS or in the Zürich based PoP about Ravi Shankar, whom I met in Heidelberg for the interview...or well-known folkies or Alexis Korner, etc. pp. (The Rolling Stones)). Nothing beat that. Definitely not the checks that arrived at home much to the surprise o my parents (even though that was nice). And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We - soon - found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and - (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard...).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Clyde

    , @Another Canadian
    @PhysicistDave

    You're on a roll, Dave. Keep it up.

    , @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.
     
    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn't.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought - explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you'd get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read - humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford - oops no it doesn't) is very valuable so it's easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual - some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for "one size fits all" because it's easier that way - no thinking required.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Hibernian, @Reg Cæsar, @PhysicistDave

  52. This is my guess about Reinoehl: he was a weird loser in his school school days and picked on by the alpha jock chads, and he grew to hate them. During his time in the army, he learned gun skills, developed a war mentality, and got ptsd even more f’ed up. After discharge, he became like many AntiFa: a garbage person, barely getting by financially and coming to hate “capitalism”, and getting in various forms low level trouble with the law and coming to hate cops.

    He developed a rep among the Portland AntiFa as a guns guy, as a crazy guy ready to do crazy stuff, and as someone with a deeply hateful ready-for-war mentality. When many AntiFa were enraged by the Rittenhouse and put together a well organized hit squad to (as they saw it, reciprocally) murder a Patriot Prayer guy they could find isolated from the main group, Reinoehl – seeing echoes in guys like Aaron Danielson of the chads that beat on him at age fifteen – said “yes” to being their trigger guy.

    It’s fortunate for them that he got Jack Ruby’d before spilling the beans on how well organized (as shown by various videos floating around the net) and implicating many people the hit on Aaron Danielson was. Or, given the FBIs seeming complete lack of interest in RICOing Antifa, maybe it would have made no difference.

    That’s my conjecture at least.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Ian

    I'm not sure about all of the psychological analysis here, since I don't think we know that much about his early childhood/school/etc. However your theory does have merit. As a starting point.

    I think he was at least a sociopath, if not a total psychopath. Unfortunately for us, he is the type of man (usually men) who float to the top in chaos when normal law enforcement breaks down. His fugitive behavior (online vid interview, pronouncements, etc.) also speak to histrionic and narcissistic tendencies.

    He may have believed that his lies about protecting some "brown" person would establish enough of some kind of vague self defense theory for his shoot-in-the-back murder. I think you're right about the "vengeance" motive re: Rittenhouse. This guy was probably a bully and braggart who finally had to put up or shut up. Go out in the dark and murder some easy targets. Big Man!

    They should find out who paid his expenses, hid him, provided him the weapons and logistics, round up all associates, etc. He was a coward but stupidly thought he would shoot his way out of an arrest. At least his lying will cease. But since he was white, no looting or heroic funeral for him.

    It is usually impolite and even unseemly to speak ill of the dead. But there are exceptions.

  53. @Anonymous
    Pelosi ecstatic tonight that news cycle is moving on.

    Bad outcome for Mondale I mean Biden. Pretty good conclusion for Trump.

    The nation has been spared a toxic legal circus atmosphere over this crap.

    Whole episode is very bad for Antifa's reputation. Suburban moms just really starting to process the menace to society that is Antifa.

    Let's see what Kamala has to say tomorrow! "Who is Kamala?" you might ask. Yeah. Was she un-personed by the Dem shotcallers? Imagine how bad the internal Dem polling must be for Kamala that the campaign just YANKED HER OUT OF THE SPOTLIGHT.

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    Harris is openly a BLM agent, so this election will reveal just how twisted (or not) the Sub Moms are.

    • Replies: @lavoisier
    @Mike_from_SGV


    Harris is openly a BLM agent, so this election will reveal just how twisted (or not) the Sub Moms are.
     
    They are not twisted, they are generally ill-informed and not particularly engaged by political considerations.

    Plus, the siren call of liberalism is particularly enticing to the many empty headed Suburban Moms.

  54. That guy had some problems, but I didn’t get he did actually an interview with Vice before the arrest that went wrong

    ‘I had no choice’: Portland’s ‘100% Antifa’ suspect says he shot & killed Trump supporter in self-defense – 4 Sep, 2020

    Suspect in Portland shooting of Trump supporter KILLED during attempted arrest – reports – 4 Sep, 2020

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @El Dato


    before the arrest that went wrong
     
    Wrong for him anyway.
  55. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Any surname with “Rosen” in it is definitely not going to be of Germanic ancestry.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @neutral

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Rosenberg


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1985-0723-500%2C_Alfred_Rosenberg_headcrop.jpg

    Next.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Not Raul

  56. @Anon 2
    @PhysicistDave

    I visited Boston a couple of years ago, and while there I found myself in Harvard
    Square across the river. Looking at the Harvard buildings, totally unexpectedly
    I felt overcome by a sense of profound disgust for the institution (except possibly
    for STEM), and other institutions like it. This surprised me because only 20-30
    years ago I would have at least felt a sense of respect for the intellectual caliber
    of the people who teach there. Now I feel that Ivy League universities, and other
    places like them, have become so degenerate, that they (and their graduates) no longer
    deserve any respect. As to STEM, according to John Horgan of Scientific American,
    even physics “has lost its fizz.”

    Replies: @Anon 2

    Re: Physics has lost its fizz

    One more point about physics: Because of the failure of string theories,
    especially compared to the hype (remember Brian Greene, physics prof
    at Columbia, who took acting lessons to become more effective at pro-string
    propaganda on TV?), even physics has often become an object of ridicule.
    If someone had told me 30 years ago there would come a time when fundamental
    physics would be an object of ridicule, I would’ve dismissed the notion
    as totally insane, and yet that’s where we are now

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: The jokes write themselves

    AFTER my posts expressing a sense of disenchantment with the upper echelons
    of American academia, I learned that 81 American Nobel Laureates in Physics,
    Chemistry, and Medicine have signed a letter to express their support for Joe
    Biden, i.e., someone who is clearly in the early (?) stages of senility, and can barely put
    a sentence together. Among the physicists, a few are reasonably well-known
    to the public, namely Sheldon Glashow, James Peebles, Arno Penzias, Kip Thorne,
    and Frank Wilczek. So, presumably, the best and the brightest among us believe
    that the person most qualified to be president is an individual who is clearly
    feeble-minded. It’s a sad commentary on the state of the American academia,
    and, as I said earlier, the jokes write themselves

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

    , @El Dato
    @Anon 2

    That's just "String Theory" though, which just a small part of "Physics" and people are gonna do what they gonna do to keep the bacon the table (or something else, considering the population makeup of people interested in highly abstract ideas)

    The good fight goes on at Peter Woit's blog (trigger warning: reads and believes in the NYT)


    While one of my least favorite aspects of discussions of this subject is the various ways the terms “real” and “reality” get used, I have realized that one has to get over that when trying to follow people’s arguments, since the terms have become standard sign-posts. What’s at issue here are fundamental questions about physical science and reality, including the question of what the words “real” and “reality” might mean. In Quantum Reality, Baggott provides a well-informed, reliable and enlightening tour of the increasingly complex and contentious terrain of arguments over what our best fundamental theory is telling us about what is physically “real”.
     
    It's like "blackness" really.

    Also:


    One of the topics the students are presented is What is String Theory?, and you can watch the 2019 video or look at the slides. Timo Weigand’s presentation can be accurately described as pure, unadulterated hype, with not a hint of the existence of any significant problem with ideas presented. In the Q and A yesterday, Weigand did come up with a new piece of “evidence for string theory”: it “predicts” no continuous spin representations.

    I can’t begin to understand why anyone thinks it’s all right for CERN to subject impressionable students to this kind of thing. Someone, not me, should be complaining to the organizers and to CERN management.
     

    No I don't know anything about that stuff. But neither does anyone else, really.

    Replies: @Anon 2

    , @dearieme
    @Anon 2

    I've got one of Greene's books. He writes well. There is a cost though: it becomes clear that String Theory is an intellectual adventure that failed.

    No wonder social scientists seek sanctuary in impenetrable thickets of wordy confusion.

  57. @Not Raul
    Were the Feds sent to "arrest" Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to "capture" OBL?

    Replies: @Pericles, @Hypnotoad666, @SkylertheWeird

    They did at least bury OBL in that traditional muslim way, at sea.

    • LOL: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Pericles

    Bin Laden was buried in the traditional muslim way. in a grave, in December 2011.

    https://www.foxnews.com/story/report-bin-laden-already-dead

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/osama-bin-ladens-obituary-notice/5358889

    Or maybe May 2011

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/69213935/osama-bin_laden


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/may/02/osama-bin-laden-obituary

    Replies: @Muggles

  58. @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    https://i.ibb.co/BcS4hwY/reddit-antifa.jpg

    Note that upvoting is disabled on just one (1) comment.

    Replies: @Pericles, @J.Ross

    Also note that their butts are hurt that people are cooperating with the police to catch a killer. How unfair!

  59. @anonymous
    OT: The police are policing non-mask wearer's across the pond.

    Diversity eliminating the bind of community trust is interesting to me. It's like there's a subconscious "rule book" which combatting parties go by, no matter what, when the "community" is of the same origin.

    I doubt a non-western european immigrant would be so self-contained, while fully disagreeing with an elderly policeman. I would expect the old man to get laid out in no time.

    This scenario is Laurel and Hardyesqe. Heavy conflict, but kind of silly and gentle at the same time.

    Anyway, I guess that's why "diversity" unchecked is ruinous to a nation.

    https://twitter.com/StopComplying/status/1301603595842998272?s=20

    Replies: @Altai, @Polynikes

    Ridiculous, but child’s play compared to what is happening in Australia.

  60. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    A skateboarder and now a snowboarder. Sports created by the white flight away from black athletic superiority.

    Which has bearing on him choosing death

    Beats being in jail with blacks.

  61. I’m preaching to the choir here, but looking at this guy and the three guys shot in Kenosha one thing becomes clear. These protesters are mainly a bunch of losers, low level thugs, and miscreants. On the first night of this crap, the cities that shut it down and arrested a few of these losers have had little to no problems. The ones that let it fester and carry on have been held hostage for three months on and off.

    Do you need any more proof that we are run by childless, urbanite loons?

    • Agree: JimDandy, donut
  62. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: Physics has lost its fizz

    One more point about physics: Because of the failure of string theories,
    especially compared to the hype (remember Brian Greene, physics prof
    at Columbia, who took acting lessons to become more effective at pro-string
    propaganda on TV?), even physics has often become an object of ridicule.
    If someone had told me 30 years ago there would come a time when fundamental
    physics would be an object of ridicule, I would’ve dismissed the notion
    as totally insane, and yet that’s where we are now

    Replies: @Anon 2, @El Dato, @dearieme

    Re: The jokes write themselves

    AFTER my posts expressing a sense of disenchantment with the upper echelons
    of American academia, I learned that 81 American Nobel Laureates in Physics,
    Chemistry, and Medicine have signed a letter to express their support for Joe
    Biden, i.e., someone who is clearly in the early (?) stages of senility, and can barely put
    a sentence together. Among the physicists, a few are reasonably well-known
    to the public, namely Sheldon Glashow, James Peebles, Arno Penzias, Kip Thorne,
    and Frank Wilczek. So, presumably, the best and the brightest among us believe
    that the person most qualified to be president is an individual who is clearly
    feeble-minded. It’s a sad commentary on the state of the American academia,
    and, as I said earlier, the jokes write themselves

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon 2

    Yup, crazy. Where's E. Neumann?

    More than Hillary or Obama: Biden gets endorsements from 81 Nobel laureates, who cite his ‘willingness to listen’ to expert orders


    While science laureates have thrown their weight behind Democratic candidates for the last several US elections, Biden’s endorsement haul outstripped that of his predecessor, Hillary Clinton, who was endorsed by 70 Nobelists in 2016. She was in turn more popular than Barack Obama, who was endorsed by 61 laureates in 2008 and 68 in 2012 – after winning the Nobel Peace Prize himself shortly after he was elected to his first term.

    The list of Nobelists backing Biden notably included no laureates of the controversial Peace Prize, the value of which has been questioned due to the Nobel committee’s recurring decision to bestow it upon hawks like Obama and then-Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Biden’s former boss has worked tirelessly to get his erstwhile underling elected, but does not appear to have been involved in the letter-writing campaign.
     
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anon 2

    Somebody who has won a Nobel Prize in Physics, Chemistry, or Medicine is undoubtedly pretty smart. But that doesn't mean they have good judgement or are particularly well informed about other things than their own field. They live cossetted lives in universities and research establishments where most of the people they interact with are above average in smarts. That they have won prizes for understanding how the natural World works, does not mean they have much understanding of how the World of people works.

    One thing that most of those Nobel laureates have in common with Joe Biden is that they're old. A lot of people their age just don't realize that the country they grew up in and made their career in is gone. The assumptions they have about how society works are just wrong.

  63. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: Physics has lost its fizz

    One more point about physics: Because of the failure of string theories,
    especially compared to the hype (remember Brian Greene, physics prof
    at Columbia, who took acting lessons to become more effective at pro-string
    propaganda on TV?), even physics has often become an object of ridicule.
    If someone had told me 30 years ago there would come a time when fundamental
    physics would be an object of ridicule, I would’ve dismissed the notion
    as totally insane, and yet that’s where we are now

    Replies: @Anon 2, @El Dato, @dearieme

    That’s just “String Theory” though, which just a small part of “Physics” and people are gonna do what they gonna do to keep the bacon the table (or something else, considering the population makeup of people interested in highly abstract ideas)

    The good fight goes on at Peter Woit’s blog (trigger warning: reads and believes in the NYT)

    While one of my least favorite aspects of discussions of this subject is the various ways the terms “real” and “reality” get used, I have realized that one has to get over that when trying to follow people’s arguments, since the terms have become standard sign-posts. What’s at issue here are fundamental questions about physical science and reality, including the question of what the words “real” and “reality” might mean. In Quantum Reality, Baggott provides a well-informed, reliable and enlightening tour of the increasingly complex and contentious terrain of arguments over what our best fundamental theory is telling us about what is physically “real”.

    It’s like “blackness” really.

    Also:

    One of the topics the students are presented is What is String Theory?, and you can watch the 2019 video or look at the slides. Timo Weigand’s presentation can be accurately described as pure, unadulterated hype, with not a hint of the existence of any significant problem with ideas presented. In the Q and A yesterday, Weigand did come up with a new piece of “evidence for string theory”: it “predicts” no continuous spin representations.

    I can’t begin to understand why anyone thinks it’s all right for CERN to subject impressionable students to this kind of thing. Someone, not me, should be complaining to the organizers and to CERN management.

    No I don’t know anything about that stuff. But neither does anyone else, really.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @El Dato

    Yes, I’ve been a reader of Woit’s Not Even Wrong blog for a number
    of years now. And, of course, applied physics (condensed matter physics,
    optics, nuclear physics, acoustics, etc), which is perhaps 80% of physics,
    is still making progress, although at a glacial pace. But new fundamental
    discoveries, on the scale of Quantum Mechanics or Theory of Relativity,
    have basically dried up in the last 30-40 years. Astrophysics and Cosmology
    are slowly accumulating knowledge, but, again, without new fundamental
    breakthroughs, although the discovery of the accelerated expansion of
    the Universe, although still controversial, might qualify as such. I certainly
    wouldn’t advise anyone to go into physics now unless you’re a genius or
    an immigrant, i.e., someone who has fewer choices in life. The last Heroic
    Age in Physics was in the 1970s when the Standard Model of Elementary
    Particles was being completed. Compared to that era physics today seems to be
    basically dead

  64. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: The jokes write themselves

    AFTER my posts expressing a sense of disenchantment with the upper echelons
    of American academia, I learned that 81 American Nobel Laureates in Physics,
    Chemistry, and Medicine have signed a letter to express their support for Joe
    Biden, i.e., someone who is clearly in the early (?) stages of senility, and can barely put
    a sentence together. Among the physicists, a few are reasonably well-known
    to the public, namely Sheldon Glashow, James Peebles, Arno Penzias, Kip Thorne,
    and Frank Wilczek. So, presumably, the best and the brightest among us believe
    that the person most qualified to be president is an individual who is clearly
    feeble-minded. It’s a sad commentary on the state of the American academia,
    and, as I said earlier, the jokes write themselves

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

    Yup, crazy. Where’s E. Neumann?

    More than Hillary or Obama: Biden gets endorsements from 81 Nobel laureates, who cite his ‘willingness to listen’ to expert orders

    While science laureates have thrown their weight behind Democratic candidates for the last several US elections, Biden’s endorsement haul outstripped that of his predecessor, Hillary Clinton, who was endorsed by 70 Nobelists in 2016. She was in turn more popular than Barack Obama, who was endorsed by 61 laureates in 2008 and 68 in 2012 – after winning the Nobel Peace Prize himself shortly after he was elected to his first term.

    The list of Nobelists backing Biden notably included no laureates of the controversial Peace Prize, the value of which has been questioned due to the Nobel committee’s recurring decision to bestow it upon hawks like Obama and then-Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Biden’s former boss has worked tirelessly to get his erstwhile underling elected, but does not appear to have been involved in the letter-writing campaign.

  65. So he was killed by a police death squad. That is going to go down really well, calm things down, and bring people to those senses.

    Mr Trump in particular should be praised for his sensitive diplomacy and ability to bring the nation together.

    Okay I’m being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    This has been the case in most presidential assassinations and attempts. Most of the assassins have been crazies, not Day of the Jackal type assassins, but their crimes have often been committed during an atmosphere of great political hostility.

    At the present time in the United States we have a situation where people are talking about elections being nullified and so on. The kind of situation where international observers are going to be needed to see if we have fair elections.

    Such situations bring crazies out of the closet.

    True leaders know this and play down the hostility that fuels the unstable and insane elements in society, on whatever side of the political spectrum.

    • Replies: @Paco Wové
    @Jonathan Mason

    Okay I’m being ironic here

    I think you've got the concepts of "irony", "sarcasm", and "trolling" all mixed up in your head.

    , @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    Okay I’m being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don't conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations. I examine most days the political commentary which comes from our friends and relations. It's remarkable only for a certain vicious stupidity. We have Republican friends and relations, of course. They post pictures of their grandchildren, inspirational messages, puzzles, &c.

    You're forgetting that this is all nonsense. About 360,000 blacks in this country die every year. About 8,000 are homicide victims, killed by other blacks. Fewer than 900 are killed by law enforcement or by non-black civilians, and the number killed by law enforcement in questionable circumstances can be counted on your fingers. These sorts of controversies erupt in local communities every few years and have for decades. It has nothing to do with Trump and everything to do with the emotional lives of various subfractions of the population and with the political gamesmanship of grifters like Ben Crump.

    The specific case here was a cavalcade of nonsense from the get go. A man dies of a fentanyl overdose and the police officers present are charged with murder. The deceased, who was a mess of a man on a good day and a menace to public order on a bad day, gets an enormous ceremonial funeral (when your grandmother's is limited to 10 people) while a large fraction of our public health officialdom endorses buts-t0-nuts public protests because, you know, racism is a public health issue. Trump didn't provoke this crazy.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    , @Anon
    @Jonathan Mason

    The Kenosha riots died down once a guy got all shooty with leftists who tried to bully him. Leftists fold rapidly if someone attacks them back. They go down and whine like children for the cops to protect them.

  66. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk says:


    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.
     
    Sure. But normal parents can do that. Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by "sounding it out": we call it "phonics" now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    Parents who are truly mentally deficient will need outside help. Most will not.

    Of course, we have decided that parents are more "productive" if they spend their time doing pointlessly unproductive paperwork and turn over the raising of their children to the babysitters we euphemistically call "teachers."

    We forget that schools are a historical anomaly: throughout most of human history, most human beings never attended school. But they learned what they needed to survive in their society.

    Yes, in our society, you need the three Rs. But, again, any normal adult can teach that. Beyond the three Rs... well, it is notorious that the kids really interested in how computers work teach themselves. And the ones not interested still teach themselves to type and point-and-click.

    Abolish schools and most people will not learn much more than they need to learn to function in society and hold down a job. But the schools do not even teach that.

    As I have said, my daughter is at UCLA, one of the two top "public Ivies" (basically tied with Berkeley). She was bemoaning to me the other day that so many of her friends learned a musical instrument or learned a language to impress the admissions committee... and then just threw it away once they got in.

    The schools degrade learning. Instead of actually having some passion you really care about -- whether it is learning modern Greek or gourmet cooking or car repair -- everything the kids do through age 22, aside from partying and getting drunk or high, is just a "paper chase."

    It is child abuse. We are cheating them. Huxley's Brave New World come true. We are teaching them to earn enough money to be frantic consumers who will keep the wheels of the economy spinning but depriving them of the right to be human beings.

    Our whole society is a Potemkin village.

    John Adams wrote:

    I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.
     
    If he had known what was really coming, he would have added:

    In order that my great-great-great-great-great grandsons could "hook-up" with girls they do not really care about, get high on pot or drunk on alcohol, and waste their time listening to music whose main virtue is its anesthetic effect.
     
    It's a crime against humanity, the humanity of our own children.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Another Canadian, @Jack D

    School is also about pupils. It’s nice to learn in your peer group. The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two – no three times in elementary school) – and the pleasure to be in a vivid and inspirational and warm-hearted open-minded peer group. It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds (and this would have been a disaster at times without my peers). I did journalism from 15 ys. on -my peers read my stuff at the schoolyard (what I’d written in the Cologne magazine SOUNDS or in the Zürich based PoP about Ravi Shankar, whom I met in Heidelberg for the interview…or well-known folkies or Alexis Korner, etc. pp. (The Rolling Stones)). Nothing beat that. Definitely not the checks that arrived at home much to the surprise o my parents (even though that was nice). And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We – soon – found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and – (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…).

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two – no three times in elementary school)...

    It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds ...

    And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We – soon – found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and – (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…).
     
    You have made my point for me.

    If you have kids and if that is what you want for your kids..."dope etc. ... what the drugs hinted at... (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…" well, I feel sorry for your kids. I think kids should learn the greatest achievement of our civilization, among which I would not include "jerks and freaks... dope... transcendence... Meister Eckhard..."

    But I cannot raise your kids.

    In any case, I am quite certain that the taxpayers who paid for the schools I attended did not want their children to have the barbaric experiences you describe (and thankfully our schools were merely boring, not The Lord of the Flies environment you describe!), and I am pretty sure that large numbers of parents do not wish that for their children today.

    You want twelve years of "jerks and freaks... dope... transcendenec... Meister Eckhard..."? I want to free the children from that insanity.

    At the very least, those of us who oppose The Lord of the Flies should not be paying for it under the subterfuge that it provides a traditional education.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Clyde
    @Dieter Kief

    I like the/your Ravi Shankar interview. I never could arrange to see him. And the only reason was due to George Harrison
    So I saw Ali Akbar Khan instead. Back in the day of course. Ever go to IOOR? As in- https://iorr.org/talk/list.php?1

  67. @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad


    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.
     
    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I'm reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the "3S" system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Abolish_public_education

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    No, it really isn’t.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in “pony” was the same as the vowel in “bit” rather than in “beet.”

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said “pohnee” not “pohnih.”

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma’s study of American elementary teachers’ knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching “whole language” as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma’s study of US grade-school teachers’ lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose “whole-language”?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @PhysicistDave

    You would have taken great delight at my 12th grade sociology teacher's attempt to bamboozle me with her Boasian blank slate blatherings about how humans didn't have any instincts whatsoever, that they had to be taught everything.

    The Blue Lagoon was the hit movie at the time, so I asked her how English first cousins Richard and Emmeline (whose last contact with human instruction of any kind was at age seven, in times which sexuality was only discussed in taverns and brothels) knew how to get it on at age fifteen and make a baby. I phrased it in somewhat more coarse terms, as I am, to this day, quite prone to do. The whole class erupted in gut busting guffaws at my devastating deconstruction of her "lesson plan" that no doubt was programmed into her little noggin by our betters in the con-ed educracy. The teacher was not some young recent university graduate, but into her sixties and ready for a fully vested retirement, which made it all the more remarkable.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    , @Ron Mexico
    @PhysicistDave

    "If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished."
    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism....
    Your solution is too simplistic.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.

    I suppose the teachers could be private tutors. Some kids over say 10 can do online schooling by themselves. Others just can’t. Or won’t

    Not all jobs can be done online at home. Plenty of people can work solely at home. Others just can’t.

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.

    We can’t go back to child and teen labor as long as American adults are unemployed and the capitalist pigs chamber of commerce insists on bringing in non White foreign labor for every job from Dr to dishwasher.

    For most of human history child and teen labor and training worked very well. Only because adult men died in their early forties or earlier.

    So the labor force needed constant replenishment from young teens and even younger kids.

    But now that adults work till they’re in their mid sixties, there’s no need for teen workers any more.

    We can’t reduce wages any more by putting teens into the workforce. There might be a better solution than public high school, 4 years of college, grad school, internship , and delaying adult hood till 35, but at the present time, there’s no alternative.

    Look at anti fa, 20 to 40 year old unemployed college educated Whites. If they had full time jobs, kids to care for, homes to maintain, they wouldn’t be in anti fa.

    All we can do is take care of our families.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @PhysicistDave

    , @Escher
    @PhysicistDave

    Or better quality teachers can be recruited by paying them higher salaries and incentivizing them through performance based bonuses.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  68. @Digital Samizdat

    ... protests in Portland that began three months ago after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis under the knee of a police officer.
     
    Now there's a reporter who chooses his words carefully!

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Paco Wové, @Hamlet's Ghost

    Not carefully enough. Floyd took his last breath either on an EMS gurney or in a hospital bed.

  69. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    School is also about pupils. It's nice to learn in your peer group. The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two - no three times in elementary school) - and the pleasure to be in a vivid and inspirational and warm-hearted open-minded peer group. It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds (and this would have been a disaster at times without my peers). I did journalism from 15 ys. on -my peers read my stuff at the schoolyard (what I'd written in the Cologne magazine SOUNDS or in the Zürich based PoP about Ravi Shankar, whom I met in Heidelberg for the interview...or well-known folkies or Alexis Korner, etc. pp. (The Rolling Stones)). Nothing beat that. Definitely not the checks that arrived at home much to the surprise o my parents (even though that was nice). And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We - soon - found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and - (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard...).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Clyde

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:

    The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two – no three times in elementary school)…

    It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds …

    And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We – soon – found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and – (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…).

    You have made my point for me.

    If you have kids and if that is what you want for your kids…”dope etc. … what the drugs hinted at… (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…” well, I feel sorry for your kids. I think kids should learn the greatest achievement of our civilization, among which I would not include “jerks and freaks… dope… transcendence… Meister Eckhard…”

    But I cannot raise your kids.

    In any case, I am quite certain that the taxpayers who paid for the schools I attended did not want their children to have the barbaric experiences you describe (and thankfully our schools were merely boring, not The Lord of the Flies environment you describe!), and I am pretty sure that large numbers of parents do not wish that for their children today.

    You want twelve years of “jerks and freaks… dope… transcendenec… Meister Eckhard…”? I want to free the children from that insanity.

    At the very least, those of us who oppose The Lord of the Flies should not be paying for it under the subterfuge that it provides a traditional education.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    As I said - it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).

    And I'm serious about transcendence and religion. I don't want that to be diminished or - beware - eradicated.

    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group. I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. - That's just not what puberty is about. It's about opening up.

    Nothing in my schools had something to do with the Lord of the Flies. -

    - Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh, @PhysicistDave

  70. @bruce county
    Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Bill Jones, @Kylie, @Single malt

    ‘Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.’

    That would be nice. I could sleep soundly that night, reassured of the reelection of the incumbent and the preservation of at least a shard of predictability, if not actual stability.

  71. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    School is also about pupils. It's nice to learn in your peer group. The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two - no three times in elementary school) - and the pleasure to be in a vivid and inspirational and warm-hearted open-minded peer group. It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds (and this would have been a disaster at times without my peers). I did journalism from 15 ys. on -my peers read my stuff at the schoolyard (what I'd written in the Cologne magazine SOUNDS or in the Zürich based PoP about Ravi Shankar, whom I met in Heidelberg for the interview...or well-known folkies or Alexis Korner, etc. pp. (The Rolling Stones)). Nothing beat that. Definitely not the checks that arrived at home much to the surprise o my parents (even though that was nice). And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We - soon - found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and - (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard...).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Clyde

    I like the/your Ravi Shankar interview. I never could arrange to see him. And the only reason was due to George Harrison
    So I saw Ali Akbar Khan instead. Back in the day of course. Ever go to IOOR? As in- https://iorr.org/talk/list.php?1

  72. Going down fighting was hard core. Is there going to be a huge Antifa funeral?

  73. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    No, it really isn't.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in "pony" was the same as the vowel in "bit" rather than in "beet."

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said "pohnee" not "pohnih."

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma's study of American elementary teachers' knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching "whole language" as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma's study of US grade-school teachers' lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose "whole-language"?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Ron Mexico, @Alden, @Escher

    You would have taken great delight at my 12th grade sociology teacher’s attempt to bamboozle me with her Boasian blank slate blatherings about how humans didn’t have any instincts whatsoever, that they had to be taught everything.

    The Blue Lagoon was the hit movie at the time, so I asked her how English first cousins Richard and Emmeline (whose last contact with human instruction of any kind was at age seven, in times which sexuality was only discussed in taverns and brothels) knew how to get it on at age fifteen and make a baby. I phrased it in somewhat more coarse terms, as I am, to this day, quite prone to do. The whole class erupted in gut busting guffaws at my devastating deconstruction of her “lesson plan” that no doubt was programmed into her little noggin by our betters in the con-ed educracy. The teacher was not some young recent university graduate, but into her sixties and ready for a fully vested retirement, which made it all the more remarkable.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I enjoyed that.

  74. Anonymous[149] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    It will be interesting to compare the firepower of the federal task forces engaged in apprehending Reinoehl vis-a-vis the Roger Stone apprehension directed by Andrew Weissmann!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Hibernian

    It will be interesting to compare the firepower of the federal task forces engaged in apprehending Reinoehl vis-a-vis the Roger Stone apprehension directed by Andrew Weissmann!

    Here’s video (link below) taken right after the shooting. You can see the body of the murderer. Looks like a residential neighborhood.

    https://m.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=400&width=224&referrer=www.twitter.com&share_id&href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjugheadjonez%2Fvideos%2F10163785015735276%2F

  75. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Shouldn’t be that surprising. Lots of Germans who participated in the revolutions of 1848 immigrated to the US after their revolution failed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-Eighters

    They tended to settle in the upper Midwest, particularly Milwaukee. I guess their spirit is still alive in their descendants.

  76. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Interestingly, if you ignore the second ‘h’ is name translates to ‘pure oil.’

  77. @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, much as I agree with the sentiment, you are oversimplifying. Some things can be taught and learned effectively over a video screen (though still not very well) and other things cannot. There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.

    People have been claiming that school can happen by video ever since television was invented, before even. It doesn't work that way.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    What Physicist Dave doesn’t realize is that, as a physicist, he knows physics, but that that doesn’t give him license to speak about those fields in which he is not trained.

    Child psychologist Piaget showed that the human mind passes through a sequence of learning stages as it matures from infancy to adulthood. In short, a child doesn’t learn in the same way an adult learns. At each stage in our cognitive development, we must be taught in a way commensurate with the mechanics of our brain’s development.

    What works for a 14 year old, who has entered the formal operational stage of learning is not at all appropriate to a 6 year old.

    Much as I agree with Physicist Dave’s take on doers vs. verbalizers, I believe that he has forgotten how he learned as a child and is projecting his adult experience backwards. He wasn’t always the abstract-thinking theoretician that he is today. As a boy, he learned by doing things and seeing them done.

    Medical school mantra, “See one, do one, show one.” That’s how we learn.

    Ironically, Physicist Dave advocates for the doers but claims they become who they are through just verbal means i.e. the written word.

    • Agree: donut, GoRedWings!
  78. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    The school was for me a lottery (concerning teachers) in which I won five times (two – no three times in elementary school)...

    It was also inspirational to make the acquaintance of some kinds of jerks and freaks and nerds ...

    And yes we did dope etc. and no, it was not devastating or some such. We – soon – found out what the drugs hinted at: Sens and sensibility (the arts) and – (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…).
     
    You have made my point for me.

    If you have kids and if that is what you want for your kids..."dope etc. ... what the drugs hinted at... (a bit later) transcendence (Religion, Lau Dse, Duang Dse, Meister Eckhard…" well, I feel sorry for your kids. I think kids should learn the greatest achievement of our civilization, among which I would not include "jerks and freaks... dope... transcendence... Meister Eckhard..."

    But I cannot raise your kids.

    In any case, I am quite certain that the taxpayers who paid for the schools I attended did not want their children to have the barbaric experiences you describe (and thankfully our schools were merely boring, not The Lord of the Flies environment you describe!), and I am pretty sure that large numbers of parents do not wish that for their children today.

    You want twelve years of "jerks and freaks... dope... transcendenec... Meister Eckhard..."? I want to free the children from that insanity.

    At the very least, those of us who oppose The Lord of the Flies should not be paying for it under the subterfuge that it provides a traditional education.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    As I said – it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).

    And I’m serious about transcendence and religion. I don’t want that to be diminished or – beware – eradicated.

    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group. I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. – That’s just not what puberty is about. It’s about opening up.

    Nothing in my schools had something to do with the Lord of the Flies. –

    – Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Dieter Kief

    I rather am satisfied with being homeschooled with the company of saints in my library. I am rather glad and proud to have a pretty non-degenerate life, which would be harder with modern students.

    My children will have similar lives, fortunately.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    As I said – it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).
     
    "Just a phase" -- a phrase from the post-Freudian collapse of civilization. Lord of the Flies was "just a phase" -- that's Golding's point: once the grown-ups showed up, the little thugs returned to being little English schoolboys, a "peer group," as you say.

    Your upbringing has deprived you of the ability to see that there is something wrong with your upbringing. You are so parochial in your post-Western, post-civilizational mindset that you think your depraved childhood is normal.

    You've been cheated.

    Dieter also wrote:


    And I’m serious about transcendence and religion. I don’t want that to be diminished or – beware – eradicated.
     
    Oh, I don't doubt it. One more sign of drug-induced decadence: you are the one who admitted that drugs led you to that.

    Dieter also wrote:


    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group.
     
    And that is what is wrong with your life.

    Again, you lack the historical perspective to realize that it is not normal for human beings to develop their values and attitudes in a narrow, age-graded peer group. The human norm is for children to mature in an environment consisting largely of adults, as well as young people of a wide range of ages, not an age-graded "peer group."

    Spending a large fraction of your time with a "peer group" whose age is within +/- 12 months of your own was not even possible in typical villages or bands throughout human history -- there were simply too few people that close to an individual in age in a small village or band.

    That is Lord of the Flies.

    But you think being dominated by your peer group is the human norm.

    You are ignorant of history and anthropology.

    Dieter also wrote:


    I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. – That’s just not what puberty is about. It’s about opening up.
     
    In sane human societies, yes, children are influenced by their parents and other adults and by youth of a wide variety of ages, not by their age-graded "peer group." Again, you throw around psycho terms like "puberty" to hide your ignorance and the decadence in which you were raised.

    Dieter also wrote:


    Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.
     
    Neoplatonism does fit in well with a drug trip, doesn't it? No, Newton, Bach, Shakespeare, Maxwell, Gauss, Debussy, Monet, etc. were geniuses. To call crackpot "Eckhart" a "genius" is a sign of decadence.

    But, when you are immersed in decadence, it is hard to see it, isn't it, Dieter?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Dieter Kief

  79. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Three of those being from Kenosha/Milwuakee, so essentially a coincidence. Kyle Rittenhouse as well.

  80. @Mr. Anon

    Judging from what little I’ve read about the shooter, mostly from his sister, he was your basic Trouble-With-A-Capital-T type
     
    Yeah, he was a real upstanding, responsible citizen:

    https://www.bakercityherald.com/news/local/father-son-charged-after-allegedly-racing-at-111-mph-on-interstate-84/article_d4ce15e0-aa5c-11ea-b7be-e72ba4f60fa1.html

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Reinoehl was arrested in June for driving @110 mph w/an 11 yr old girl in the vehicle, while high and holding a concealed weapon. THIS IS FU#*ING INSANE. Why wasn’t this guy in jail?! No wonder he was shooting people dead on the street 2 months later. He assumed that he was above the law. Apparently in Oregon there is no greater white privilege than Portland Antifa. The law won’t touch them at all. It took the U.S. Marshals to do the job that the Oregon courts should’ve taken care of. Btw, the car this fighter for the oppressed was driving was a Cadillac. I can’t even look at a Cadillac w/out my credit rating taking a dip. This waste of human space was putting his 11 yr old’s life in danger while high in one.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @duncsbaby



    Why wasn’t this guy in jail?!

     

    Possibly because he was made a deal that he wouldn't have to go to prison if he would agree to become an "asset". I suspect most of Antifa members work this way too. Doubtful skid row druggies are so strongly interested in politics and even if they were that they would gravitate to such a stupidly ridiculous ideology.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

  81. @Bernard
    This was the first guy the 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse killed, Joseph Rosenbaum. It's crushing we lost such a wonderful citizen.

    https://twitter.com/RadioFreeElk/status/1301359539925655552

    Replies: @Altai, @Alden, @anon, @Not Raul

    Thanks for doing the work. I ignore the news reports and try to look up the actual laws, lawsuit, criminal and civil charges , judicial findings and judicial orders but got lazy on this one.

    At least the liberal media didn’t claim he was 18 with a 16 or 15 year old consenting girl.

    The Kenosha riots might put Trump over the top. Most people, urban rural, whatever think of towns like Kenosha Sheboygan Dubuque Des Moines as 100 % old American White, crime free, safe, hard working , well educated in the local public schools middle and prosperous working class happy little towns.

    But turns out Kenosha has ghetto blacks who rape, steal cars, beat up their baby mammas and have 6 kids in welfare at age 29.

    So if ghetto rats can live in , and a riot can happen, in Kenosha, it just might happen in your 90% White 10% Asian Hispanic Philippino mixed whatever upper middle class suburb full of half million to 2 million dollar houses depending on location

    We’ve always voted republican no matter what the contractors associations say. But we’ve never thought the Republicans would help Whites. But this time, I’m really worried about what might happen if the democrats aka anti White party gets in.

  82. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    Our local Catholic school is at capacity and the Hillsdale College charter where my oldest attend is at capacity without the tax incentives. Neither can expand on their current property. I am sure a similar situation would exist in most states. Public schools have all the land.

  83. Anon[149] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily.

    Dude, just the other day you were talking up things like Coursera instead of the traditional college route. But Coursera courses are lectures by university professors, albeit free or cheap. Now you’re advocating plain old books for real learning.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[149] wrote to me:


    Dude, just the other day you were talking up things like Coursera instead of the traditional college route. But Coursera courses are lectures by university professors, albeit free or cheap. Now you’re advocating plain old books for real learning.
     
    Well, dude, you are just a wee bit deprived in terms of gray matter, aren't you?

    First and most obviously, Coursera, edX, or the Teaching Company all have one radical difference from sitting in a classroom: the student can move at his own pace. My best friend in grade school, a guy named Mike, was a really nice fellow who functioned fine in normal life (we were not only classmates but also in Cub Scouts together). But Mike just could not absorb academic material quite as fast as most kids. It was quite horrifying seeing this kid who was quite normal out on the playground turned into a sort of zombie in the classroom.

    On the other hand, I could have moved at about twice the pace that the teacher was going.

    Both Mike and I were ill-served by the schools.

    Second, Coursera, edX, and the Teaching Company can find the very best teachers from across the country. Obviously, it is logically impossible for all schools to have the very best teachers (the Lake Woebegon fallacy).

    Finally, yeah, I myself do prefer books. But lots of people do not. So I mentioned contemporary alternatives like Coursera and edX for such folks.

    Now, do you get it, dude??? (No, of course not, because you were eddicated in the publick skoolz!)
  84. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    No, it really isn't.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in "pony" was the same as the vowel in "bit" rather than in "beet."

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said "pohnee" not "pohnih."

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma's study of American elementary teachers' knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching "whole language" as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma's study of US grade-school teachers' lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose "whole-language"?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Ron Mexico, @Alden, @Escher

    “If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.”
    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism….
    Your solution is too simplistic.

    • Disagree: Abolish_public_education
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Ron Mexico

    Ron Mexico wrote to me:


    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism….
    Your solution is too simplistic.
     
    No civil rights issues arise: I want to abolish the schools for all races.

    Of course, under federalism, the states have to abolish the schools separately. Nothing happens overnight.

    Your objections are simplistic: Almost no public schools existed in 1800. By 1900, they were nation-wide. It's reversible: no reason they cannot be abolished before 2100.

    The brick-and-mortar business model for schools no longer makes any sense at all. They are dinosaurs. Inertia rules short-term, but the logic of the situation will eventually prevail.

    The only issue is will responsible people keep their eyes on what is necessary for the children. The discrediting of schools due to Covid gives us a chance to quick-start the inevitable.

    Defund the schools!

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

  85. @bruce county
    Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Bill Jones, @Kylie, @Single malt

    “Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.”

    Do they have a young daughter?
    Is their basement up to spec?

  86. anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Nothing spells ‘loser’ like a neck tattoo on a 48 yr old. Doesn’t seem like a person of his age with an obvious drug problem would make much of an impression in snowboarding so not much of a career future. Like the others shot in Kenosha he appears to be some unstable, violence-prone criminal type who’ll go off unpredictably. They’ve found political cover for their anti-social behavior and the lefties have found their hooligan street fighters.

  87. @Adolph Oliver Busch
    OT
    Welp...

    I was threatened with literal murder two hours ago.

    For relating factual information about St. Kyle, PBUH.

    A man half my age and twice my weight, whom I've known for years...

    A friend. Former coworker. Party pal.

    Heh.

    Openly threatened to cave my face in, if I didn't shut the fuck up.

    In public, in front of mutual friends. He repeated the threat and included bashing my skull in.

    I must be doing something right.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Book ’em Dano, Literal Murder One!

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee, Achmed, you don't seem like you'd be into Radio Birdman. They were nothing like the Carpenters, that's for sure.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  88. @Pericles
    @Not Raul

    They did at least bury OBL in that traditional muslim way, at sea.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Bill Jones


    Bin Laden was buried in the traditional muslim way. in a grave, in December 2011.
     
    Other (unattributed) sources say that his corpse was thrown out of the back of one of the SEAL team's helicopters over the Hindu Kush on the way back from the raid.

    Thus giving him a flying start on his way to paradise.
  89. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    No, it really isn't.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in "pony" was the same as the vowel in "bit" rather than in "beet."

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said "pohnee" not "pohnih."

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma's study of American elementary teachers' knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching "whole language" as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma's study of US grade-school teachers' lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose "whole-language"?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Ron Mexico, @Alden, @Escher

    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.

    I suppose the teachers could be private tutors. Some kids over say 10 can do online schooling by themselves. Others just can’t. Or won’t

    Not all jobs can be done online at home. Plenty of people can work solely at home. Others just can’t.

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.

    We can’t go back to child and teen labor as long as American adults are unemployed and the capitalist pigs chamber of commerce insists on bringing in non White foreign labor for every job from Dr to dishwasher.

    For most of human history child and teen labor and training worked very well. Only because adult men died in their early forties or earlier.

    So the labor force needed constant replenishment from young teens and even younger kids.

    But now that adults work till they’re in their mid sixties, there’s no need for teen workers any more.

    We can’t reduce wages any more by putting teens into the workforce. There might be a better solution than public high school, 4 years of college, grad school, internship , and delaying adult hood till 35, but at the present time, there’s no alternative.

    Look at anti fa, 20 to 40 year old unemployed college educated Whites. If they had full time jobs, kids to care for, homes to maintain, they wouldn’t be in anti fa.

    All we can do is take care of our families.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Alden

    The go-to strategy of every political conservative who wants to control the US economy: the US tax code.

    (Controlling entire, third-world countries must not be as much fun as it used to.)

    I don’t know what will happen to kids if we a_p_e (though US literacy rates from the pre-Progressive Era suggest that the kids will be far better off), but — look around, I do know what will happen to them if we don’t.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Alden

    Alden wrote to me:


    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.
     
    Workers in actual productive jobs today -- agriculture, manufacturing, etc. -- are enormously more productive than workers were in the 1950s.

    So why was a single-worker income sufficient then and not now?

    Mainly because productive workers are paying huge "implicit taxes" to the parasites in the verbalist overclass. (Note: by "implicit taxes," I mean the lower wages and higher prices that exist due to all the wealth siphoned off by the parasites.)

    So, yes, along with abolishing the schools, we also need to abolish the universities (lots of parasites there!), the compliance, regulatory, and diversity officers, the non-medical personnel who get fat off of our "medical system," the whole national war machine, etc.

    One wage earner per family working 30 hours a week should easily provide nicely for a family -- if our economy were not infested with parasites.

    Alden wrote to me:

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.
     
    Fine with me, as long as you include homeschools as private schools.

    But we will still need to get to the root of the problem: we need to deprive members of the non-productive verbalist overclass of their jobs.

    They need to learn to engage in productive labor.

    Or starve.

    I suspect many of them would rather starve than actually do honest work.
  90. @anonymous
    Meanwhile, in NYC, it was a dark and stormy night for the losers with BLM:

    https://twitter.com/datainput/status/1301674733172338688?s=20

    Replies: @znon

    Reputedly an impromptu performance after assault by right wing new yawk cabbie.

  91. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    Great comment, Alden! I was going to reply to Physicist Dave myself, but you nailed it pretty well. What I’d add, going too far for most Conservatives even, is that I don’t agree with the money being there in the first place. Abolish_Public_Education, the commenter, is right. There are plenty of great conscientious teachers, but they are not allowed to do the job properly. They, the kids, and the parents would all be happier at privately-run schools, and the taxpayers as a whole would have more spending money.

    [This is partially in reply to Buzz Mohawk also:] Nobody says that alternate schooling can’t have plenty of child interaction. It should, of course. There’s nothing preventing people from forming their own schools that can do all that, and, as you say, Alden, there is so much time wasted.

    I have seen in person the waste in both money* and time. Per Peak Stupidity in “Arts & Crafts”, during the spring Kung Flu hiatus, I asked my elementary school boy how much time was wasted on coloring/cutting/pasting still. “Oh about a quarter of the day.” Haha, see, we were in the middle of multiplying/adding/subtracting/reducing fractions at the time!

    See also “The modern grade school as medium-security correctional facility”.

    .

    * The 2 certified/registered/whatever letters sent to us because we didn’t email the right lady when our boy was absent (sick) 3 days in a row, the 2nd one being an even greater example of how you spend OPM. See, after the 1st letter, we’d gone in to what looked like a damn deposition and filled out paperwork about an “attendance plan”. OK, fine. A week later I got the 2nd $20 registered letter: I went back to the school office. “Hey, I thought we took care of this?” “Yeah, you’re fine. They just sent letters to everyone to make it easier.”

  92. @Digital Samizdat

    ... protests in Portland that began three months ago after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis under the knee of a police officer.
     
    Now there's a reporter who chooses his words carefully!

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Paco Wové, @Hamlet's Ghost

    It’s as though there’s a directive to work that into every single story.

    • Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey
    @Paco Wové

    I could have been a thug but then I took a knee to my neck.

  93. @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad


    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.
     
    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I'm reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the "3S" system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Abolish_public_education

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    I definitely agree that math/engineering/physics concepts can be learned much better in person than from a book. I had a full week to try to get ahead in Dynamics before the semester. I just couldn’t get anywhere! (I aced it in the classroom). However,

    a) That doesn’t mean on-line grade school math can’t have any Q/A and interruptions for questions, if the teacher will allow it – which IS a big question. They seem to be too rigorous with the on-line stuff, and on some kind of fast schedule with no extra time. Maybe it’s not as good, but,

    b) I take it you don’t have anything against this 3S system being in a private venue. Same learning or better, half the time because no time wasted with Ed-School-based BS, and half the cost or better!

  94. @Mr. Anon

    Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?
     
    Die Fahne hoch................

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Rose_City_Antifa_logo.png

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don't believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    Replies: @znon, @anonymous, @Paul Mendez, @Jack D, @Svigor

    Joseph Goebbels; “The best Nazis are ex-communists”.
    The National SOCIALIST Party was a response to the Soviet system that emulated their concentration camps and totalitarian system while also co-opting the old German right wing and military. Goebbels also copied Hollywood propaganda and was a big movie buff, along with Hitler.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @znon


    The National SOCIALIST Party was a response to the Soviet system that emulated their concentration camps and totalitarian system
     
    The "l" in GULAG stands for "lager" which is German for camp. The Soviets found it handy to borrow the term. They both had concentration camps, though said to have been invented by the Brits during the Boer War.
  95. @Altai
    @Bernard

    For those who haven't read. He not only abused but anally raped several boys, between 9-11 years old. All of them were either his nephews or second cousins. He did this when he was being given shelter in his sisters and cousins homes after being kicked out at 18 of his mothers home.

    Replies: @S, @JMcG

    Additional video has come out that shows the multi-conviction pedophile Rosenbaum and another guy rolling a dumpster which has been set afire at the gas station KR was guarding, ostensibly to commit arson against some nearby parked police squad cars. Kyle is shown getting a fire extinguisher (and it appears) putting the dumpster fire out with it.

    This royally PO’d Rosenbaum and the other antifa, and is thought what may have led to the mob chase led by Rosenbaum that followed.

  96. @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I didn't read that as a call for eliminating schools. The comment was, "Defund the public schools and universities." I took the latter as shorthand for, specifically, the tonier ones with the 4-to-5-year debutante-ball-plus-Rumspringa package, before the little darlings are given away to The Economy. That really has to go, and it won't affect teaching/learning one whit.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    I took the latter as shorthand for, specifically, the tonier ones with the 4-to-5-year debutante-ball-plus-Rumspringa package, before the little darlings are given away to The Economy.

    Outstanding!

  97. @Jonathan Mason
    So he was killed by a police death squad. That is going to go down really well, calm things down, and bring people to those senses.

    Mr Trump in particular should be praised for his sensitive diplomacy and ability to bring the nation together.

    Okay I'm being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    This has been the case in most presidential assassinations and attempts. Most of the assassins have been crazies, not Day of the Jackal type assassins, but their crimes have often been committed during an atmosphere of great political hostility.

    At the present time in the United States we have a situation where people are talking about elections being nullified and so on. The kind of situation where international observers are going to be needed to see if we have fair elections.

    Such situations bring crazies out of the closet.

    True leaders know this and play down the hostility that fuels the unstable and insane elements in society, on whatever side of the political spectrum.

    Replies: @Paco Wové, @Art Deco, @Anon

    Okay I’m being ironic here

    I think you’ve got the concepts of “irony”, “sarcasm”, and “trolling” all mixed up in your head.

  98. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    Agreed. Defunding public schools and universities is low hanging fruit for cash-strapped jurisdictions at the state and local level.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Another Canadian

    But the prospect of removing children from the brainwashing mills during their most malleable years would scare the daylights out of the ruling elites.

  99. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk says:


    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.
     
    Sure. But normal parents can do that. Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by "sounding it out": we call it "phonics" now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    Parents who are truly mentally deficient will need outside help. Most will not.

    Of course, we have decided that parents are more "productive" if they spend their time doing pointlessly unproductive paperwork and turn over the raising of their children to the babysitters we euphemistically call "teachers."

    We forget that schools are a historical anomaly: throughout most of human history, most human beings never attended school. But they learned what they needed to survive in their society.

    Yes, in our society, you need the three Rs. But, again, any normal adult can teach that. Beyond the three Rs... well, it is notorious that the kids really interested in how computers work teach themselves. And the ones not interested still teach themselves to type and point-and-click.

    Abolish schools and most people will not learn much more than they need to learn to function in society and hold down a job. But the schools do not even teach that.

    As I have said, my daughter is at UCLA, one of the two top "public Ivies" (basically tied with Berkeley). She was bemoaning to me the other day that so many of her friends learned a musical instrument or learned a language to impress the admissions committee... and then just threw it away once they got in.

    The schools degrade learning. Instead of actually having some passion you really care about -- whether it is learning modern Greek or gourmet cooking or car repair -- everything the kids do through age 22, aside from partying and getting drunk or high, is just a "paper chase."

    It is child abuse. We are cheating them. Huxley's Brave New World come true. We are teaching them to earn enough money to be frantic consumers who will keep the wheels of the economy spinning but depriving them of the right to be human beings.

    Our whole society is a Potemkin village.

    John Adams wrote:

    I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.
     
    If he had known what was really coming, he would have added:

    In order that my great-great-great-great-great grandsons could "hook-up" with girls they do not really care about, get high on pot or drunk on alcohol, and waste their time listening to music whose main virtue is its anesthetic effect.
     
    It's a crime against humanity, the humanity of our own children.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Another Canadian, @Jack D

    You’re on a roll, Dave. Keep it up.

  100. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz

    I believe all three or at least two of these three were Jewish.

  101. @Dan Hayes
    It will be interesting to compare the firepower of the federal task forces engaged in apprehending Reinoehl vis-a-vis the Roger Stone apprehension directed by Andrew Weissmann!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Hibernian

    Four officers fired their weapons. Expect at least the fringes of the left to shriek and scream about it.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  102. @Anonymous
    What a fiasco. This is another Soros owned DA.

    Did Soros order no action on the arrest? Trying to start a war? I thought today how diabolical it would be to let this guy skate. That might've triggered hotheads for real. Blood revenge stuff.

    But then the nutty perp forced their hand?

    Sure seemed like they DA were telegraphing a non-prosecution. Five days of radio silence. I hope all the details of what was going on during the five days comes out.

    Should be some lawsuits that arise over this entire mess. Civil action and maybe we can see some texts and emails. I would assume the worst kind of maneuvering was going on in the background.

    ANOTHER BLACK EYE FOR PORTLAND

    Replies: @Hibernian

    He gave a media interview to “tell his side of the story.” I think that forced their hand.

  103. @Torn and Frayed
    This is the best ending the Democrats could have hoped for. It would have been great for Trump to have this guy and his black power tattoo being perp walked in front of the cameras. Also he was going to represent himself and so the media, who want to ignore him, would have been forced to cover him. With him dead the story dies as well two months before the election.

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald's untimely demise.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald’s untimely demise.

    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely. The one sentimental attachment he had was to his dog, who was waiting in the car while he went to buy some money orders.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    @Art Deco


    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.
     
    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald's transfer?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Gordo
    @Art Deco

    Jack Rubinstein was an ‘antifa’ activist against the Chicago Silvershirts in the 1930s.

    Pure coincidence of course.

  104. anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    True, but in the case of Portland Antifa, the city has been providing taxpayer funded shelter intended for the homeless. The arrested are released without bail and then provided with a place to stay, rinse and repeat.

    Good chance that Antifa has been able to flood Portland precisely because the city has been providing them free shelter and that the local powers that be have been in on it from the start.

    Did Reinoehl spend the last 3 months in one of these tent cities?

    https://thespectator.info/2020/09/03/videographer-discovers-portland-antifa-war-camp-where-notable-anarchists-like-trumpet-man-reside/

  105. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals.

    The task force consisted mostly of local & state LEOs who were depitized as Marshals.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Hibernian

    Thank you.

  106. @Hippopotamusdrome
    He got Jack Ruby'd. Or not. They don't let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he's dead.
    https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1QT8eNpXXXXXgXVXXq6xXFXXXd/Lee-Harvey-Oswald-Foto-Original-Jack-Ruby-Tiro-Arte-Enorme-de-P-steres-TXHOME-D6772.jpg

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    “He got Jack Ruby’d. Or not. They don’t let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he’s dead.”

    Good point. My sources say he was actually flown to Wakanda to become the leader in exile of a Progressive White Liberation Army (PWLA) backed by the Wakandan military and their super-awesome military-industrial-tech complex.

    My sources further reveal that Chadwick Boseman is also not dead and is negotiating with Reinoehl for the latter to play his radical white sidekick in Black Panther II.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Oscar Peterson

    There's video on Youtube showing he was one man in a hit team. Why is nothing going on with that? Show me the news article with their pictures and descriptions? Show me the FBI press briefing telling us about the others. They are at large and a danger to the public.

    But its just "yeah, the guys dead now, move along". The scales tip in favor of conspiracy theory.

  107. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Agree agree agree. Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization. Good for them for doing their job, unlike the White Mayor, council, media and police force of Portland. And mostly White race traitors FBI.

    I’m sure the liberal Soros organization anticipated a grandiose show trial like Sacco Vanzetti, if, if the Portland Soros DA ever charged him in the first place.

    Historically, revolutionary organizations had hideouts and underground railways so their operatives could escape.

    America doesn’t need a real revolution to become completely anti White and totalitarian.

    The constitution, separate states within and cooperating with the national government, judicial supremacy, the way the USA has operated since the 1770s; there’s no real need to change the laws and structures.

    All that’s needed is the liberal propaganda blast since 1950 and placing hard core cultural marxists in every institution from the greatest universities to kindergarten.

    The curriculum standards of every state education department are on the internet. The standards apply to public and private schools.

    You’ll be surprised at how little time is spent on academics, especially K-5 20 minutes for math 30 minutes reading a day. 20 minutes social studies liberal propaganda basically, just more reading The bookstores kids sections have those how to draw books. An oval is the duck’s body, a curve is the neck, small oval is the head, add the beak. That’s art class.

    Lots of K-6 math. workbooks for math problems. And the internet math classes addition to Algebra 2 and trig are phenomenal. Makes me wonder what all those teachers and math books were doing all those centuries.

    Plus, all the time saved by not commuting and shuffling class to class and a couple totally useless hours gives plenty of time for music dance sports karate all the classes it’s hard to fit in between time school lets out and dinner.

    Plus with more time at home the kids can do their share of housework and keeping things nice. And even if parents don’t know how to do repairs etc, there lots of simple carpentry and home repair and remodeling books and videos.

    My kids always loved school, being on sports teams and clubs and roaming around town after school with friends and made excellent contacts.

    The present situation in which the public schools are just propaganda against the children and parents who attend and pay the taxes to support them is awful.

    My perfect solution to the entire problem is make private school tuition 100% tax deductible including uniforms, including school winter jackets and transportation. Every family in America would go for that deal. 150K gross income, 30K deduction for 2 kids; I think that would mean no taxes or almost none.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Achmed E. Newman, @anonymous, @Hibernian, @Oscar Peterson

    “Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization.”

    Really? I had no idea. How/when did that happen?

    • Replies: @West reanimator
    @Oscar Peterson

    It didn't. He made it up.

  108. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    Ya sure they ain’t all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos…

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It’s interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Troll: GoRedWings!
    • Replies: @Oscar Peterson
    @Jack D


    "Ya sure they ain’t all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos…"
     
    A classic expression of the Jew's need to talk about Jews when no one else is, except it has to be "Joos" just to show that no one other than he should be talking about it.

    But since you bring it up, I'm listening to "Antifa: The Anti-fascist Handbook" by an obsessive little Jew--or Joo, if you prefer--for whom Antifa and Jews are basically inseparable. I was looking for some sort of history of Antifa and this was all I could find on Audible. And it was free--just Audible playing its part in the struggle for racial justice, I guess.

    Mark Bray, the author, can't stop regaling us with his long tale of Jewish woe, and how it justifies the Jewish-inspired ethos of Antifa--a sustained program of violently disrupting and abrogating the civil and constitutional rights of others, because their activities, no matter how legal, might, some day or other, be threatening to a Jew.

    It's the same self-indulgence that makes the ADL feel entitled to maintain its own domestic surveillance and data collection effort. So yes, one can certainly detect a Jewish stench around Antifa.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Jack D

    "getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing."

    You're sure it's not a Jewish Bolshevik thing? I've got a couple million stacks of dead Russian Christians and starved Ukrainians that call you a liar.

    Stop with the "Jooos" nonsense, and cop to your enormous blood-soaked history. You even have a massive pile of holy scriptures about murdering other people in the name of racist supremacy. You have holidays about it. Cut it out. We know.

    , @Svigor
    @Jack D


    the Portland Antifa Shooter's Arrest Was Mostly Peaceful
     
    Lol, nice.

    but in Portland being on the left gives you an excuse to act out your various anti-social urges.
     
    Sure, if you don't get too spergy about the definition of "anti-social." 'Cause part of the draw for this guy seems to have been the social aspect of antifa; his fellow extrajudicial mercenaries for the (((regime))) (AKA, antifa) spoke warmly of him, and of how he helped patrol observe the riots peaceful protests and arrest deescalate the worst rioters less-than-mostly-peaceful protesters. Basically this nut wanted to be exactly what I describe antifa as being; extrajudicial enforcers for the (((regime))).

    The documents don’t indicate why prosecutors decided not to pursue the accusations.
     
    I'm sure it was an entirely independent decision on their part, and nothing to do with a systemic pattern of behavior resulting from secret orders emanating from (((the regime))). The fact that this sort of thing is entirely consistent with the obvious (((regime))) agenda of encouraging antifa/BLM in their campaign of rioting and violence aimed at suppressing )))White American((( voter turnout, right to assembly, right to redress of grievances, and right to free speech is mere cohencidence.

    Ya sure they ain’t all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos…
     
    It probably is, especially at the leadership level. It's definitely getting cover from the judenpresse and (((big media))) in general. What did (((Nadler))) say? "Antifa are a myth"? LOL. Weimerica is not being given any info on who antifa are. So forgive me if, in the absence of evidence forthcoming from the judenpresse about the violent mobs serving the (((regime))) (and believing the exact same shit the (((regime))) believes), I speculate that they may be thick with jevvs, or at least have a lot of jevvish commissars, like during the previous (((Bolshevik))) unpleasantness.

    I mean, let's apply your "logic" to the Bolshevik Revolution; kinda falls apart, dunnit? The BR was definitely violent and definitely heavily-jevvish and definitely jevvish-led. Jevvs like this "people of the book" image of the harmless bespectacled jevv, but I doubt the Palestinians are buying it. Hell, jevvs can't even get their story straight, just look at all the bragging they've done about the violence and prowess of Israelis and the IDF down through the years.

    That one room-temp antifa from the Rittenhouse heroics had a German-sounding name and definitely looked jevvish (some Germans look jevvish, but then again they probably are and just don't know it, and vice-versa). Rosenbaum may have been jevvish, we don't know yet.


    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.
     
    Well, I don't know what they wear, but Israelis aren't exactly not engaging in ethnic mob violence against Arabs at higher rates than milquetoast American Whites would be comfortable knowing about. Are you the only warm jevv who doesn't read any of the jevvish press?
    , @Neoconned
    @Jack D

    Most Germans I've found for whatever are communal by nature....which is why they often get along with blacks.....who also tend to think in a "lets band together against the man" kinda thing....this dude though sounds like he has a few screws loose...

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/watch-students-think-trumps-2nd-term-plans-are-great-when-told-they-are-bidens

    Anyway in the above link Trumps policies are shown to college students and told they are Biden's policies and the stupid students go along with & support Trumps policies just because someone said they were Biden's ideas...

    , @International Jew
    @Jack D

    I don't think we've ever had a Grosskreutz at my shul. Rosenbaums yes...

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    "Rosenbaum" was really the only Jewish sounding name among them. The others sounded more like gentile German names. And "Rosenbaum" is commonly but not necessarily a Jewish name.

    Sort of like "Rosenberg". "Rosenberg" is typically a Jewish name, but not necessarily. For example, the notorious Nazi official Alfred Rosenberg wasn't Jewish.

    All the background information about the Rosenbaum guy who got killed in Kenosha indicated that he was of gentile Texas German background, not Jewish.

    Confirmation bias seems to motivate the commenters and alt-righters who insist that these guys are Jewish.

    , @El Dato
    @Jack D

    Isn't this a Prussian/Polish thing?

    Afer WWI, didn't Foch propose to have everything West of the Rhine annexed as he wanted the Germans separated into the "good ones" and the "bad ones"?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.
     
    So is something else:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armin_Meiwes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Dahmer
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dean_Corll
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Gein
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Gotthold_Enslin
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M_(1931_film)
    , @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

    , @Alden
    @Jack D

    Check the ADL website. According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism. They sure aren’t like any Jewish adult men I’ve ever known. But ADL claims and defends them as Jewish victims of the anti Semitic kid Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Arlo L. Ramsbottom
    @Jack D

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died "practicing Judaism." I don't know if she's saying he was a Jew,but apparently his actions with regard to trying to murder Kyle qualify as Judaism.

    Whatever these boys are or were,certainly attacking Antifa is anti-semite!

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost, @anon, @Jack D

    , @anon
    @Jack D


    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.
     
    I don't know, Jack. I think there is another tribe that likes to do that as well...

    https://english.alaraby.co.uk/english/news/2020/9/2/israeli-soldier-filmed-kneeling-on-60-year-old-palestinian-mans-neck
  109. @Jonathan Mason
    So he was killed by a police death squad. That is going to go down really well, calm things down, and bring people to those senses.

    Mr Trump in particular should be praised for his sensitive diplomacy and ability to bring the nation together.

    Okay I'm being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    This has been the case in most presidential assassinations and attempts. Most of the assassins have been crazies, not Day of the Jackal type assassins, but their crimes have often been committed during an atmosphere of great political hostility.

    At the present time in the United States we have a situation where people are talking about elections being nullified and so on. The kind of situation where international observers are going to be needed to see if we have fair elections.

    Such situations bring crazies out of the closet.

    True leaders know this and play down the hostility that fuels the unstable and insane elements in society, on whatever side of the political spectrum.

    Replies: @Paco Wové, @Art Deco, @Anon

    Okay I’m being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don’t conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations. I examine most days the political commentary which comes from our friends and relations. It’s remarkable only for a certain vicious stupidity. We have Republican friends and relations, of course. They post pictures of their grandchildren, inspirational messages, puzzles, &c.

    You’re forgetting that this is all nonsense. About 360,000 blacks in this country die every year. About 8,000 are homicide victims, killed by other blacks. Fewer than 900 are killed by law enforcement or by non-black civilians, and the number killed by law enforcement in questionable circumstances can be counted on your fingers. These sorts of controversies erupt in local communities every few years and have for decades. It has nothing to do with Trump and everything to do with the emotional lives of various subfractions of the population and with the political gamesmanship of grifters like Ben Crump.

    The specific case here was a cavalcade of nonsense from the get go. A man dies of a fentanyl overdose and the police officers present are charged with murder. The deceased, who was a mess of a man on a good day and a menace to public order on a bad day, gets an enormous ceremonial funeral (when your grandmother’s is limited to 10 people) while a large fraction of our public health officialdom endorses buts-t0-nuts public protests because, you know, racism is a public health issue. Trump didn’t provoke this crazy.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    Trump didn’t provoke this crazy.
     
    In a sense he did because he publicly and from the highest perch stands against it and so those who are with it need to use whatever means are available to refute him and his bully pulpit.

    Imagine a situation where a large segment of the population, maybe half of it or approaching half, has adopted fervent Christianity while the remainder of the population, and most especially the king, are still (at least nominal) pagans and carry out pagan rituals (there must have been times in early Christianity where this was the situation in various places). Once the king adopts Christianity then everyone can relax (once you have rounded up all the stragglers), but (especially when the Christians think that they are within spitting distance of installing a Christian king) until then the Christians are in a high state of agitation.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Matt Buckalew

    , @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco



    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don’t conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations.
     
    Solid gold.
  110. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    As I said - it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).

    And I'm serious about transcendence and religion. I don't want that to be diminished or - beware - eradicated.

    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group. I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. - That's just not what puberty is about. It's about opening up.

    Nothing in my schools had something to do with the Lord of the Flies. -

    - Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh, @PhysicistDave

    I rather am satisfied with being homeschooled with the company of saints in my library. I am rather glad and proud to have a pretty non-degenerate life, which would be harder with modern students.

    My children will have similar lives, fortunately.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Daniel Chieh

    Congrats. I must say I'm astonished though to read those - fundamental objections of - what? Drugs?
    There is nothing wrong with drugs per se, I'd say. The most important rule to deal with them stems from Jackson Browne (the line is on Runnin' On Empty) - It takes a clear mind to make it!

    Wonderful book about drugs of any kind: 1) Ernst Jünger - Drogen und Rausch. Ernst Jünger, great writer and highly decorated and often times wounded officer in WWI and WW II was close to LSD discoverer Albert Hoffmann from Basel.

    T. C. Boyles LSD novel Inside Looking Out is great too, in showing one thing especially, that is indeed deeply related to LSD: That the sexual longing has no borders (no limits) in itself. it is something quite natural, which - can eat you (and your soul) up alive. I think that this is a rather precious (and very (very) important insight.

    Ahh - now I remember my above mentioned Heidelbergian interview with Ravi Shankar: He was fiercely outspoken against drugs of all kind (I asked him about his experiences with The Beatles). - We got along perfectly well.

    As I said: It was something which we peers left pretty much behind pretty soon. I still drink (mostly wine) at times.

    I like the part about the saints in your post.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

  111. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    “Ya sure they ain’t all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos…”

    A classic expression of the Jew’s need to talk about Jews when no one else is, except it has to be “Joos” just to show that no one other than he should be talking about it.

    But since you bring it up, I’m listening to “Antifa: The Anti-fascist Handbook” by an obsessive little Jew–or Joo, if you prefer–for whom Antifa and Jews are basically inseparable. I was looking for some sort of history of Antifa and this was all I could find on Audible. And it was free–just Audible playing its part in the struggle for racial justice, I guess.

    Mark Bray, the author, can’t stop regaling us with his long tale of Jewish woe, and how it justifies the Jewish-inspired ethos of Antifa–a sustained program of violently disrupting and abrogating the civil and constitutional rights of others, because their activities, no matter how legal, might, some day or other, be threatening to a Jew.

    It’s the same self-indulgence that makes the ADL feel entitled to maintain its own domestic surveillance and data collection effort. So yes, one can certainly detect a Jewish stench around Antifa.

  112. @Mr. Anon

    Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?
     
    Die Fahne hoch................

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Rose_City_Antifa_logo.png

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don't believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    Replies: @znon, @anonymous, @Paul Mendez, @Jack D, @Svigor

    Questions remain about attacks reportedly by white supremacists during George Floyd riots.

    http://strib.mn/31X5OkZ

  113. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk says:


    The earlier grades require most young students to participate and to be coached, questioned, and observed in person. Teaching and learning are things that humans have done for as long as they have existed — in person. Nobody can re-invent the process, and a video system is not a substitute.
     
    Sure. But normal parents can do that. Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by "sounding it out": we call it "phonics" now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    Parents who are truly mentally deficient will need outside help. Most will not.

    Of course, we have decided that parents are more "productive" if they spend their time doing pointlessly unproductive paperwork and turn over the raising of their children to the babysitters we euphemistically call "teachers."

    We forget that schools are a historical anomaly: throughout most of human history, most human beings never attended school. But they learned what they needed to survive in their society.

    Yes, in our society, you need the three Rs. But, again, any normal adult can teach that. Beyond the three Rs... well, it is notorious that the kids really interested in how computers work teach themselves. And the ones not interested still teach themselves to type and point-and-click.

    Abolish schools and most people will not learn much more than they need to learn to function in society and hold down a job. But the schools do not even teach that.

    As I have said, my daughter is at UCLA, one of the two top "public Ivies" (basically tied with Berkeley). She was bemoaning to me the other day that so many of her friends learned a musical instrument or learned a language to impress the admissions committee... and then just threw it away once they got in.

    The schools degrade learning. Instead of actually having some passion you really care about -- whether it is learning modern Greek or gourmet cooking or car repair -- everything the kids do through age 22, aside from partying and getting drunk or high, is just a "paper chase."

    It is child abuse. We are cheating them. Huxley's Brave New World come true. We are teaching them to earn enough money to be frantic consumers who will keep the wheels of the economy spinning but depriving them of the right to be human beings.

    Our whole society is a Potemkin village.

    John Adams wrote:

    I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.
     
    If he had known what was really coming, he would have added:

    In order that my great-great-great-great-great grandsons could "hook-up" with girls they do not really care about, get high on pot or drunk on alcohol, and waste their time listening to music whose main virtue is its anesthetic effect.
     
    It's a crime against humanity, the humanity of our own children.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Another Canadian, @Jack D

    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.

    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn’t.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought – explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you’d get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read – humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford – oops no it doesn’t) is very valuable so it’s easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual – some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for “one size fits all” because it’s easier that way – no thinking required.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Jack D

    Lover, mover, rover. So how does one pronounce “plover”? Why?

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    Phonics is the best. Then you learn the exceptions. That's how my Mom taught me before I started school, and how they taught at school in my day. A lot of exceptions are not individual cases, but exceptions for a class of words, such as "I before E, except after C, or when pronounced as in neighbor and weigh." That one is not perfect, it has at least one exception to the exception.

    Replies: @Elsewhere

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc.
     
    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn't so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.


    Indeed, many languages use syllabaries rather than alphabets. Korean hangul is an alphabet written like a syllabary. Cherokee looks like an alphabet, borrowing characters from ours, but is actually a syllabary.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Jack D

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:


    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn’t.
     
    Sure, but should we construct a huge dysfunctional national system to serve a small minority of children? That would be like outlawing peanut butter because some kids are allergic to peanuts.

    I am not advocating a one-size-fits-all educational system. Quite the contrary. Most American parents can teach their kids the three Rs, and that is the obvious way to do it, at least if we can eliminate the parasitic verbalist overclass so that one paycheck is adequate for most families.

    But I am not trying to pass a law requiring homeschooling! Indeed, even homeschoolers usually hire someone from outside the family to teach violin or dance or whatever.

    A sane approach to education would have as many variations as there are families. It is doubtful that any of those variations would look that much like the current public schools.

    By the way, I know a Chinese woman who came to the States at age 7, not speaking English. She spent a year watching American television to learn English and then went to school -- was top of her class in English as well as math. She ended up graduating from Berkeley with a degree in Comp Sci/EE. Her English is better than most American adults'.

    Jack D also wrote:

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought – explain those to me using phonics.
     
    You seem to know nothing about phonics. Systematic phonics programs go into all that, show how "a" has many different sounds in different environments, have lists of the common exceptions to the rules, etc. If you are really interested, I can give you some references.

    But, the truth is, that is really not necessary. My Mom, without systematic training in phonics, taught me how to sound out simple words, I got the hang of it, and I learned to sound out words for myself. For centuries, millions of people have had the same experience. It is actually quite easy, if you are patient.

    Jack D also wrote:

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically.
     
    Indeed, But both systematic studies and historical experience shows that some sort of phonetic approach is the way to learn to read. Our alphabet is basically phonetically based, despite all the oddities and exceptions.

    Jack D also wrote:

    Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read
     
    I know some Chinese and have looked into details as to how long it takes Chinese kids to learn to read. For obvious reasons, they learn much more slowly, in terms of developing reading vocabulary, than American kids. The alphabet is a godsend.

    Jack D also wrote:

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual
     
    No, you do not need a combination. Teach the kids to sound out words and acquire a significant reading vocabulary and they automatically start reading faster and faster and, yes, starting to recognize the common words as wholes. It's like walking or riding a bike: eventually it becomes automatic.

    The problem is how to get the process started, and, in languages that use an alphabet, some sort of phonetic approach is the way to do that.

    I know a bit of Russian (which has an alphabet) and a bit of Chinese: again, an alphabet is a godsend.
  114. @Abolish_public_education
    Why does a lawyer-DA need a spokesman?!

    Every government bureaucracy seems to have its own public (dis-)information officer.

    It’s only a matter of time til the spokesman will have one, too.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jim Don Bob

    Why does a lawyer-DA need a spokesman?!

    That’s easy. It’s so they have someone to blame if what the spokesman says turns out wrong.

    Same thing with Hollywood. You never hear from the actor, only his publicist.

  115. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    “getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.”

    You’re sure it’s not a Jewish Bolshevik thing? I’ve got a couple million stacks of dead Russian Christians and starved Ukrainians that call you a liar.

    Stop with the “Jooos” nonsense, and cop to your enormous blood-soaked history. You even have a massive pile of holy scriptures about murdering other people in the name of racist supremacy. You have holidays about it. Cut it out. We know.

    • Thanks: Oscar Peterson
  116. @J.Ross
    I'm not a good person, but one good thing about me is illustrated by this. At one job (one of a sequence of mostly commodiously and decorously departed positions, always [knock on wood] with the pay going up) I was offered some "good $#!%," which appealed because as a one-time subscriber to Parabola and a one-time whore for Shambala* books (especially Shambala pocket books! You haven't read the Hagakure until you've squinted like a you-know-who-sama!) I have a thoroughly irrational soft spot for supernatural foolery. When I was younger I used to wish fervently for a hallucination. My girlfriend is a lilit. However, I never partook. I had to work. If it looked like my employer needed it, I would down a cardiac arrest-inducing amount of Redbulls. If I had to work within a 72-hour period there was no possibility of taking hallucinogens. So my excuse for being a square was that I really honestly was a square.
    So this guy has a gun, good for him, it's the American thing to do. So thing guy stole his mother's medicine, I only wish I could, there's a lot of money in that. If Obamacare is restarted the only medicine will be stolen medicine. But, it leaps out at me: he attended several fake outrage rallies? When did he have the time? I would love to be able to do that; you know, to hunt them, because I don't hunt but surely they cannot be particularly dangerous game.

    *Yeah, it's right there in the name.

    Replies: @wren, @TWS, @wren

    Upstanding guy like you ought to be able to indulge yourself now and then. You work hard show up mostly straight, you should get a chance to relax. Steal Grandma’s medicine and go to town.

    You’ve missed the block parties the blue cities have thrown? There’s still time, take a little Vacay and get to it.

  117. @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    Okay I’m being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don't conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations. I examine most days the political commentary which comes from our friends and relations. It's remarkable only for a certain vicious stupidity. We have Republican friends and relations, of course. They post pictures of their grandchildren, inspirational messages, puzzles, &c.

    You're forgetting that this is all nonsense. About 360,000 blacks in this country die every year. About 8,000 are homicide victims, killed by other blacks. Fewer than 900 are killed by law enforcement or by non-black civilians, and the number killed by law enforcement in questionable circumstances can be counted on your fingers. These sorts of controversies erupt in local communities every few years and have for decades. It has nothing to do with Trump and everything to do with the emotional lives of various subfractions of the population and with the political gamesmanship of grifters like Ben Crump.

    The specific case here was a cavalcade of nonsense from the get go. A man dies of a fentanyl overdose and the police officers present are charged with murder. The deceased, who was a mess of a man on a good day and a menace to public order on a bad day, gets an enormous ceremonial funeral (when your grandmother's is limited to 10 people) while a large fraction of our public health officialdom endorses buts-t0-nuts public protests because, you know, racism is a public health issue. Trump didn't provoke this crazy.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    Trump didn’t provoke this crazy.

    In a sense he did because he publicly and from the highest perch stands against it and so those who are with it need to use whatever means are available to refute him and his bully pulpit.

    Imagine a situation where a large segment of the population, maybe half of it or approaching half, has adopted fervent Christianity while the remainder of the population, and most especially the king, are still (at least nominal) pagans and carry out pagan rituals (there must have been times in early Christianity where this was the situation in various places). Once the king adopts Christianity then everyone can relax (once you have rounded up all the stragglers), but (especially when the Christians think that they are within spitting distance of installing a Christian king) until then the Christians are in a high state of agitation.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    Jack, this is garbage. How does the Christianity metaphor accommodate the same people showing up at the riots? Or the people driving in from out of state?

    , @Matt Buckalew
    @Jack D

    141 countries folks.

  118. @D. K.
    “He was arrested once or twice over the summer for carrying a gun before he shot the guy who was spraying him with something defensive like mace....”

    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend, without any apparent legal provocation— an assault that created a reasonable fear of imminent death or serious bodily injury. In other words, ‘Jay’ had acted in self-defense; the killer had not, and did not. In my eyes, as an erstwhile attorney, it was first-degree murder. The fact that the killer fled the scene, and later fled the state altogether, apparently without his ever contacting the authorities to report the shooting and give his side of the event, shows his consciousness of guilt. As for his self-defense claim, did anyone see a “friend of color” with him on the scene to whom he was referring? I certainly did not.

    Replies: @Charon, @istevelurker

    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend

    No, this is wrong and Steve is giving the benefit of the doubt to the shooter. Danielson’s friend Chandler Pappas was alongside him when he was killed. Told Tucker Carlson last night that he and the victim were caught completely off guard and were attacked without provocation. The killer’s bullet went through Danielson’s can of bear spray. Pappas and Danielson were unarmed and carried the spray for self-defense.

    See: https://www.foxnews.com/media/friend-of-portland-shooting-victim-aaron-danielson-speaks-out-us-needs-a-lot-of-healing.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @istevelurker

    I have watched the video of the shooting umpteen times. I see the spray, a fraction of a second before I hear the first shot. Was the distance from the killer to the videographer, standing on the corner, just across the intersection, far enough to cause that much delay in the sound (at c. 1125 feet per second) vis-a-vis the view, such that a shot that actually preceded the spray appears to the viewer to follow it? Perhaps....

    , @D. K.
    @istevelurker

    I found a blow up of the shooting. ‘Jay’ clearly raised his right arm to spray his armed attacker:

    https://twitter.com/robobbobpv58/status/1301643761664000006

    , @D. K.
    @istevelurker

    ***

    Several witnesses told police they saw Danielson holding a can of mace or bear spray and then heard two shots, the affidavit said.

    Police found damage to the bear spray canister that was retrieved from the street, leading investigators to believe it was struck by the first of two bullets fired by Reinoehl.

    Police slowed down video captured by a livestreamer of the shooting and said it appeared that a shot was fired, followed by an explosion of the chemical and then a quick second gunshot, the affidavit said. Danielson stumbled two or three steps before collapsing in the street.

    ***

    https://www.oregonlive.com/crime/2020/09/arrest-warrant-against-michael-reinoehl-for-2nd-degree-murder-unlawful-use-of-a-firearm-unsealed.html

  119. Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?

    Wow, are you riffing on that moron who suggested that Kyle “The Punisher” Rittenhouse is the Horst Wessel of the right?

  120. I am unwilling to visit the Bezos Blog to check if this is real but would accept it either way: “Austere snowboard scholar.”
    https://postimg.cc/sMM2NBk3

  121. @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    Trump didn’t provoke this crazy.
     
    In a sense he did because he publicly and from the highest perch stands against it and so those who are with it need to use whatever means are available to refute him and his bully pulpit.

    Imagine a situation where a large segment of the population, maybe half of it or approaching half, has adopted fervent Christianity while the remainder of the population, and most especially the king, are still (at least nominal) pagans and carry out pagan rituals (there must have been times in early Christianity where this was the situation in various places). Once the king adopts Christianity then everyone can relax (once you have rounded up all the stragglers), but (especially when the Christians think that they are within spitting distance of installing a Christian king) until then the Christians are in a high state of agitation.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Matt Buckalew

    Jack, this is garbage. How does the Christianity metaphor accommodate the same people showing up at the riots? Or the people driving in from out of state?

  122. @Bernard
    This was the first guy the 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse killed, Joseph Rosenbaum. It's crushing we lost such a wonderful citizen.

    https://twitter.com/RadioFreeElk/status/1301359539925655552

    Replies: @Altai, @Alden, @anon, @Not Raul

    Could Rosenbaum be anymore stereotypically Jewish?

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @anon

    There's nothing "stereotypically Jewish" about him.

    You, on the other hand...

  123. @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    Trump didn’t provoke this crazy.
     
    In a sense he did because he publicly and from the highest perch stands against it and so those who are with it need to use whatever means are available to refute him and his bully pulpit.

    Imagine a situation where a large segment of the population, maybe half of it or approaching half, has adopted fervent Christianity while the remainder of the population, and most especially the king, are still (at least nominal) pagans and carry out pagan rituals (there must have been times in early Christianity where this was the situation in various places). Once the king adopts Christianity then everyone can relax (once you have rounded up all the stragglers), but (especially when the Christians think that they are within spitting distance of installing a Christian king) until then the Christians are in a high state of agitation.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Matt Buckalew

    141 countries folks.

  124. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    the Portland Antifa Shooter’s Arrest Was Mostly Peaceful

    Lol, nice.

    but in Portland being on the left gives you an excuse to act out your various anti-social urges.

    Sure, if you don’t get too spergy about the definition of “anti-social.” ‘Cause part of the draw for this guy seems to have been the social aspect of antifa; his fellow extrajudicial mercenaries for the (((regime))) (AKA, antifa) spoke warmly of him, and of how he helped patrol observe the riots peaceful protests and arrest deescalate the worst rioters less-than-mostly-peaceful protesters. Basically this nut wanted to be exactly what I describe antifa as being; extrajudicial enforcers for the (((regime))).

    The documents don’t indicate why prosecutors decided not to pursue the accusations.

    I’m sure it was an entirely independent decision on their part, and nothing to do with a systemic pattern of behavior resulting from secret orders emanating from (((the regime))). The fact that this sort of thing is entirely consistent with the obvious (((regime))) agenda of encouraging antifa/BLM in their campaign of rioting and violence aimed at suppressing )))White American((( voter turnout, right to assembly, right to redress of grievances, and right to free speech is mere cohencidence.

    Ya sure they ain’t all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos…

    It probably is, especially at the leadership level. It’s definitely getting cover from the judenpresse and (((big media))) in general. What did (((Nadler))) say? “Antifa are a myth”? LOL. Weimerica is not being given any info on who antifa are. So forgive me if, in the absence of evidence forthcoming from the judenpresse about the violent mobs serving the (((regime))) (and believing the exact same shit the (((regime))) believes), I speculate that they may be thick with jevvs, or at least have a lot of jevvish commissars, like during the previous (((Bolshevik))) unpleasantness.

    I mean, let’s apply your “logic” to the Bolshevik Revolution; kinda falls apart, dunnit? The BR was definitely violent and definitely heavily-jevvish and definitely jevvish-led. Jevvs like this “people of the book” image of the harmless bespectacled jevv, but I doubt the Palestinians are buying it. Hell, jevvs can’t even get their story straight, just look at all the bragging they’ve done about the violence and prowess of Israelis and the IDF down through the years.

    That one room-temp antifa from the Rittenhouse heroics had a German-sounding name and definitely looked jevvish (some Germans look jevvish, but then again they probably are and just don’t know it, and vice-versa). Rosenbaum may have been jevvish, we don’t know yet.

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.

    Well, I don’t know what they wear, but Israelis aren’t exactly not engaging in ethnic mob violence against Arabs at higher rates than milquetoast American Whites would be comfortable knowing about. Are you the only warm jevv who doesn’t read any of the jevvish press?

  125. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    Most Germans I’ve found for whatever are communal by nature….which is why they often get along with blacks…..who also tend to think in a “lets band together against the man” kinda thing….this dude though sounds like he has a few screws loose…

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/watch-students-think-trumps-2nd-term-plans-are-great-when-told-they-are-bidens

    Anyway in the above link Trumps policies are shown to college students and told they are Biden’s policies and the stupid students go along with & support Trumps policies just because someone said they were Biden’s ideas…

  126. @bruce county
    Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Bill Jones, @Kylie, @Single malt

    “Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.”

    If he does, I’m sure it will be a touching occasion.

  127. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: Physics has lost its fizz

    One more point about physics: Because of the failure of string theories,
    especially compared to the hype (remember Brian Greene, physics prof
    at Columbia, who took acting lessons to become more effective at pro-string
    propaganda on TV?), even physics has often become an object of ridicule.
    If someone had told me 30 years ago there would come a time when fundamental
    physics would be an object of ridicule, I would’ve dismissed the notion
    as totally insane, and yet that’s where we are now

    Replies: @Anon 2, @El Dato, @dearieme

    I’ve got one of Greene’s books. He writes well. There is a cost though: it becomes clear that String Theory is an intellectual adventure that failed.

    No wonder social scientists seek sanctuary in impenetrable thickets of wordy confusion.

  128. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    You are right & you are wrong.

    Right: most scientists are bad teachers; also, with some exceptions like Poincare, who simply followed the lectures & memorized & understood it all- people learn the best from books.

    Wrong: physics exercises & experiments are good, especially at high school level.

  129. Here’s a new double-limerick about Jacob Blake.

    One Black Man Opinion

    They shot Jacob Blake in the back.
    His crime? Knife collectin’ while black!
    White dudes that collect ’em
    don’t get shot in the rectum,
    or kidney, or spine, or nutsack.

    He was shot in the car, with his brats
    screamin’ in the back seat; Baby, that’s
    some cold-blooded sh*t!
    How cold can blood git?
    It give brain-freeze when drunken by bats!

  130. @Mr. Anon

    Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?
     
    Die Fahne hoch................

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Rose_City_Antifa_logo.png

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don't believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    Replies: @znon, @anonymous, @Paul Mendez, @Jack D, @Svigor

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists…

    The “Original Nazis” (Rohm, the Strasser brothers, etc.) were patriotic socialists/anti-capitalists. The SA was largely working class. Hitler and his cronies and the SS were more bourgeois. Hence The Night of the Long Knives.

    Many of Hitler’s economic programs would fit nicely into the Democratic Party Platform.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Paul Mendez


    Many of Hitler’s economic programs would fit nicely into the Democratic Party Platform.
     
    Many of Hitler's economic programs fit nicely into the Democratic Party's platform of 1932. Many of thier policies - like rooting out the works of Magnus Hirshfeld - would not fit into the Democratic Party platform of today. There is more to the left/right divide than economics.

    Many of Otto von Bismarck's economic programs might be considered "progressive". Was the Iron Chancellor a leftist?

  131. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.
     
    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn't.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought - explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you'd get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read - humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford - oops no it doesn't) is very valuable so it's easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual - some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for "one size fits all" because it's easier that way - no thinking required.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Hibernian, @Reg Cæsar, @PhysicistDave

    Lover, mover, rover. So how does one pronounce “plover”? Why?

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    Try “The Chaos” by Trenite:

    http://ncf.idallen.com/english.html

    Replies: @Cortes

  132. @Mr. Anon

    Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?
     
    Die Fahne hoch................

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Rose_City_Antifa_logo.png

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don't believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    Replies: @znon, @anonymous, @Paul Mendez, @Jack D, @Svigor

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,

    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.

    • Agree: JimDandy, Alden
    • LOL: GoRedWings!
    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Jack D

    You couldn't be be any clearer.
    Might I add:

    Upon his release Hitler quickly set about rebuilding his moribund party, vowing to achieve power only through legal political means thereafter. The Nazi Party’s membership grew from 25,000 in 1925 to about 180,000 in 1929. Its organizational system of gauleiters (“district leaders”) spread through Germany at this time, and the party began contesting municipal, state, and federal elections with increasing frequency.
    Then big-business circles had begun to finance the Nazi electoral campaigns, and swelling bands of SA toughs increasingly dominated the street fighting with the communists that accompanied such campaigns.
    Sounds like a lefty playbook to me.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jack D

    This has to be the most perspicacious thing Jack D has said!

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.
     
    And "Democratic" is right there in the name of the "Democratic Party". Are they?

    Socialism meant nothing to Hitler. He did away with the socialism part of NSDAP when he purged the SA. That was a precondition for the support of the army and the industrialists. The Nazis were pretty right wing - nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family. They locked up commies, but not aristocrats.

    I'm surprised at you, Jack - buying into that crap that Jonah Goldberg and others promoted about "Nazis being the real leftists". It's a silly and childish view: "I'm on the Right. Nazis were bad. Therefore they must have been on the Left, because nobody on my side can be bad." You're sounding like somebody calling into Sean Hannity's radio show. You're a lot smarter than that.

    Replies: @fnn

    , @Oscar Peterson
    @Jack D


    "Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name."

     

    Who cares what's in the name? The question is, were they socialists in practice? Answer: No. The means of production were kept in private hands. The Night of the Long Knives was in large part about eliminating the left wing of the Nazi Party that was more inclined towards actual socialism.

    Hitler was a concerted opponent of echt socialism and the ideological left well before he discovered what organized Jewry was up to, which wasn't, it seems, until the end of WW I.

    The Nazi Volksgemeinschaft implied something of a welfare state, but not socialism.

    Hannah Arendt helped begin this trend of conflating the left and right in her mendacious/deluded work, The Origins of Totalitarianism.

  133. @Digital Samizdat

    ... protests in Portland that began three months ago after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis under the knee of a police officer.
     
    Now there's a reporter who chooses his words carefully!

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Paco Wové, @Hamlet's Ghost

    Not carefully enough. He didn’t die under the knee, but in the hospital well after his arrest.

    Still, it’s not as sloppy as those reports mentioning the “killing of George Floyd.” He wasn’t killed. He died of a fentanyl overdose despite efforts of those cops to save his life.

    At least they’re not throwing around the incendiary “murder” word any more.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Hamlet's Ghost


    At least they’re not throwing around the incendiary “murder” word any more.
     
    Perhaps because editors took a little Valium and finally sought legal advice, Chauvin will be a millionaire many times over once he cleans up in libel court.
  134. Michael Reinoehl: John Brown.

    • Replies: @Oscar Peterson
    @Currahee

    Mike Reinoehl's body lies a moulderin' in the grave...

  135. @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,
     
    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Mr. Anon, @Oscar Peterson

    You couldn’t be be any clearer.
    Might I add:

    Upon his release Hitler quickly set about rebuilding his moribund party, vowing to achieve power only through legal political means thereafter. The Nazi Party’s membership grew from 25,000 in 1925 to about 180,000 in 1929. Its organizational system of gauleiters (“district leaders”) spread through Germany at this time, and the party began contesting municipal, state, and federal elections with increasing frequency.
    Then big-business circles had begun to finance the Nazi electoral campaigns, and swelling bands of SA toughs increasingly dominated the street fighting with the communists that accompanied such campaigns.
    Sounds like a lefty playbook to me.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @bruce county

    Good point.

    Not only were the Nazis funded by big businesses, and fought the left wing in the streets; but during the Night of the Long Knives, the more left adjacent factions of the party, who actually wanted some socialism, were wiped out.

  136. @Altai
    @Bernard

    For those who haven't read. He not only abused but anally raped several boys, between 9-11 years old. All of them were either his nephews or second cousins. He did this when he was being given shelter in his sisters and cousins homes after being kicked out at 18 of his mothers home.

    Replies: @S, @JMcG

    How was he not murdered before now?

  137. Joe Biden wants you to know that Europeans becoming a minority in the USA is a good thing:

    https://twitter.com/greatwestdev/status/1301837020084318209

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @syonredux

    It shows how diseased white societies have become that they could even contemplate voting for someone who revels in their imminent extinction.

  138. @El Dato
    OT: COVID-19 proves that homeopathy is real! Random noise really can heal you (or in this case, kill you)!

    Up to 90% of people who test positive for Covid barely carry any virus & are not contagious. Every stat about the disease is bogus

    Data from three US states – New York, Nevada and Massachusetts – shows that when the amount of the virus found in a person is taken into account, up to 90 percent of people who have tested positive should actually have been negative, as they are carrying only tiny amounts of the virus, are not contagious, pose no risk to others, and have no need to isolate.

    This means that only a fraction of the daily “cases” being reported so hysterically in the mainstream media are actual, bona fide Covid-19 sufferers, and need treatment and to separate themselves from others.

    So how could this have happened? The answer has to do with the sensitivity of PCR (Polymerase chain reaction) tests for Covid, which it turns out can be ramped up according to the taste of the testing companies [they have no baseline? who ARE those idiots?]. Most testing companies have chosen the outrageously high sensitivity limit of 40 PCR cycles – meaning that the DNA in a sample is exponentially increased 40 times in order to amplify its signal.

    But using such a ridiculously sensitive test means that the faintest traces of a dead virus, or even leftovers from previous infections, can result in a positive. Professor Juliet Morrison, a University of California virologist, said that even a limit of 35 PCR cycles is too high, let alone 40. She said she was “shocked that people would think that 40 could represent a positive.” But apparently, pretty much everyone in the US Covid brain trust took exactly that on faith.
     

    Replies: @William Oliver, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  139. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    I don’t think we’ve ever had a Grosskreutz at my shul. Rosenbaums yes…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @International Jew

    Since Grosskreutz means "Great Cross" it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JimDandy, @International Jew

  140. @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    Okay I’m being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don't conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations. I examine most days the political commentary which comes from our friends and relations. It's remarkable only for a certain vicious stupidity. We have Republican friends and relations, of course. They post pictures of their grandchildren, inspirational messages, puzzles, &c.

    You're forgetting that this is all nonsense. About 360,000 blacks in this country die every year. About 8,000 are homicide victims, killed by other blacks. Fewer than 900 are killed by law enforcement or by non-black civilians, and the number killed by law enforcement in questionable circumstances can be counted on your fingers. These sorts of controversies erupt in local communities every few years and have for decades. It has nothing to do with Trump and everything to do with the emotional lives of various subfractions of the population and with the political gamesmanship of grifters like Ben Crump.

    The specific case here was a cavalcade of nonsense from the get go. A man dies of a fentanyl overdose and the police officers present are charged with murder. The deceased, who was a mess of a man on a good day and a menace to public order on a bad day, gets an enormous ceremonial funeral (when your grandmother's is limited to 10 people) while a large fraction of our public health officialdom endorses buts-t0-nuts public protests because, you know, racism is a public health issue. Trump didn't provoke this crazy.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    Has very little to do with Trump per se, and a great deal to do with the social and cultural reality in this country. That reality is that a large slice of our professional managerial class and their dependents and hangers-on (1) have a stupefying hostility to the rest of the population (or, at least, those they don’t conceive of as their clientele) and (2) a stupefying contempt for previous generations.

    Solid gold.

  141. @AnotherDad
    @PhysicistDave


    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.
     
    Bingo. Spot on again Phys Dave.

    The whole premise of the American founding and our Constitution is that responsible productive men will rule themselves. An open push-back against the idea of being ruled by royalty or "the court".

    But there's this inevitable tendency--basically since settlement and the neolithic agricultural revolution--for parasites who don't produce to find rule over producers and feed off them. And what we've had is a coup by the verbalist parasites against majoritarianism, productive people and our republic.

    If Trump had a clue he'd engage on this. Refer to the Democrats as "the parasite party". That's what they are--a coalition of parasites high and low. Cut through all the prog b.s. and rip the mask off: "parasite party".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Careful there, Another Dad. You are sounding like a Libertarian here. Ixnay on the onstitutionCay, or something… I never got a handle on Pig Latin.

    I could see Trump using that wording “parasite party” and so on, as you say. As far as actually standing on any principles, or describing things as you do here, based on how this country is supposed to work, don’t count on that one. He doesn’t have a principled bone in his body. That’s not why I voted for him though.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Ixnay on the onstitutionCay...
    I never got a handle on Pig Latin.
     
    Eemssay ikelay ouyay avehay ayay inefay aspgray ofyay ethay igpay atinlay indkay irsay.

  142. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Re: The jokes write themselves

    AFTER my posts expressing a sense of disenchantment with the upper echelons
    of American academia, I learned that 81 American Nobel Laureates in Physics,
    Chemistry, and Medicine have signed a letter to express their support for Joe
    Biden, i.e., someone who is clearly in the early (?) stages of senility, and can barely put
    a sentence together. Among the physicists, a few are reasonably well-known
    to the public, namely Sheldon Glashow, James Peebles, Arno Penzias, Kip Thorne,
    and Frank Wilczek. So, presumably, the best and the brightest among us believe
    that the person most qualified to be president is an individual who is clearly
    feeble-minded. It’s a sad commentary on the state of the American academia,
    and, as I said earlier, the jokes write themselves

    Replies: @El Dato, @Mr. Anon

    Somebody who has won a Nobel Prize in Physics, Chemistry, or Medicine is undoubtedly pretty smart. But that doesn’t mean they have good judgement or are particularly well informed about other things than their own field. They live cossetted lives in universities and research establishments where most of the people they interact with are above average in smarts. That they have won prizes for understanding how the natural World works, does not mean they have much understanding of how the World of people works.

    One thing that most of those Nobel laureates have in common with Joe Biden is that they’re old. A lot of people their age just don’t realize that the country they grew up in and made their career in is gone. The assumptions they have about how society works are just wrong.

  143. @Mr McKenna
    @MEH 0910

    https://i.ibb.co/BcS4hwY/reddit-antifa.jpg

    Note that upvoting is disabled on just one (1) comment.

    Replies: @Pericles, @J.Ross

    “coordinated under the table with law enforcement”

    Wow just wow.

  144. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.
     
    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn't.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought - explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you'd get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read - humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford - oops no it doesn't) is very valuable so it's easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual - some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for "one size fits all" because it's easier that way - no thinking required.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Hibernian, @Reg Cæsar, @PhysicistDave

    Phonics is the best. Then you learn the exceptions. That’s how my Mom taught me before I started school, and how they taught at school in my day. A lot of exceptions are not individual cases, but exceptions for a class of words, such as “I before E, except after C, or when pronounced as in neighbor and weigh.” That one is not perfect, it has at least one exception to the exception.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Elsewhere
    @Hibernian

    Agreed. Ignoring phonics is handicapping yourself to really learning spelling.

  145. @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,
     
    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Mr. Anon, @Oscar Peterson

    This has to be the most perspicacious thing Jack D has said!

  146. @bruce county
    Will Sleepy Joe have a private meeting with his family.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Bill Jones, @Kylie, @Single malt

    “Jill and I are praying for his family.”

  147. @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,
     
    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Mr. Anon, @Oscar Peterson

    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.

    And “Democratic” is right there in the name of the “Democratic Party”. Are they?

    Socialism meant nothing to Hitler. He did away with the socialism part of NSDAP when he purged the SA. That was a precondition for the support of the army and the industrialists. The Nazis were pretty right wing – nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family. They locked up commies, but not aristocrats.

    I’m surprised at you, Jack – buying into that crap that Jonah Goldberg and others promoted about “Nazis being the real leftists”. It’s a silly and childish view: “I’m on the Right. Nazis were bad. Therefore they must have been on the Left, because nobody on my side can be bad.” You’re sounding like somebody calling into Sean Hannity’s radio show. You’re a lot smarter than that.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @Mr. Anon


    The Nazis were pretty right wing – nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family.
     
    The Communists gave up on cultural degeneracy in the 1920s and the last torchlight parade I can recall (aside from Cville) was in support of the candidacy of Hubert Humphrey:
    https://outlet.historicimages.com/products/rrv18601

    https://www.google.com/search?q=hubert+humphrey+torchlight+parade&tbm=bks&sxsrf=ALeKk01xFs4OU7mBbzUNB_YMPbTMkh-Nrw:1599268562319&source=lnt&tbs=bkv:p&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixqLrU69DrAhVrpVkKHSpiDdsQpwUIIQ&biw=1920&bih=1057&dpr=1

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  148. @Jonathan Mason
    So he was killed by a police death squad. That is going to go down really well, calm things down, and bring people to those senses.

    Mr Trump in particular should be praised for his sensitive diplomacy and ability to bring the nation together.

    Okay I'm being ironic here. This is the result of escalating rhetoric. It brings the crazies out of the closet.

    This has been the case in most presidential assassinations and attempts. Most of the assassins have been crazies, not Day of the Jackal type assassins, but their crimes have often been committed during an atmosphere of great political hostility.

    At the present time in the United States we have a situation where people are talking about elections being nullified and so on. The kind of situation where international observers are going to be needed to see if we have fair elections.

    Such situations bring crazies out of the closet.

    True leaders know this and play down the hostility that fuels the unstable and insane elements in society, on whatever side of the political spectrum.

    Replies: @Paco Wové, @Art Deco, @Anon

    The Kenosha riots died down once a guy got all shooty with leftists who tried to bully him. Leftists fold rapidly if someone attacks them back. They go down and whine like children for the cops to protect them.

  149. I have to run off to the local ER, for an allusion OD. Steve’s been on a roll for weeks, but this was just too much.

  150. It’s a start… but I won’t heap praise until law enforcement finishes the job. Reinoehl’s accomplices still need to be arrested and Grosskreutz still needs to be arrested for attempted murder, as do the BLM/Antifa who tried to kill Steven Baca.

    There are thousands upon thousands of BLM/Antifa who either attempted or succeeded in committing murder, assault, arson, and other violent crimes. They all need to be arrested – we do not forget and we do not forgive.

    In fact, I’d even go so far as to charge everyone who participated in a “protest” with incitement to riot, even if the majority didn’t commit violence per se. But they still incited riots and violence with their rhetoric, material support, and their cover for violent actors, and they all need to be punished with relentless lawfare.

  151. @Ian
    This is my guess about Reinoehl: he was a weird loser in his school school days and picked on by the alpha jock chads, and he grew to hate them. During his time in the army, he learned gun skills, developed a war mentality, and got ptsd even more f'ed up. After discharge, he became like many AntiFa: a garbage person, barely getting by financially and coming to hate "capitalism", and getting in various forms low level trouble with the law and coming to hate cops.

    He developed a rep among the Portland AntiFa as a guns guy, as a crazy guy ready to do crazy stuff, and as someone with a deeply hateful ready-for-war mentality. When many AntiFa were enraged by the Rittenhouse and put together a well organized hit squad to (as they saw it, reciprocally) murder a Patriot Prayer guy they could find isolated from the main group, Reinoehl - seeing echoes in guys like Aaron Danielson of the chads that beat on him at age fifteen - said "yes" to being their trigger guy.

    It's fortunate for them that he got Jack Ruby'd before spilling the beans on how well organized (as shown by various videos floating around the net) and implicating many people the hit on Aaron Danielson was. Or, given the FBIs seeming complete lack of interest in RICOing Antifa, maybe it would have made no difference.

    That's my conjecture at least.

    Replies: @Muggles

    I’m not sure about all of the psychological analysis here, since I don’t think we know that much about his early childhood/school/etc. However your theory does have merit. As a starting point.

    I think he was at least a sociopath, if not a total psychopath. Unfortunately for us, he is the type of man (usually men) who float to the top in chaos when normal law enforcement breaks down. His fugitive behavior (online vid interview, pronouncements, etc.) also speak to histrionic and narcissistic tendencies.

    He may have believed that his lies about protecting some “brown” person would establish enough of some kind of vague self defense theory for his shoot-in-the-back murder. I think you’re right about the “vengeance” motive re: Rittenhouse. This guy was probably a bully and braggart who finally had to put up or shut up. Go out in the dark and murder some easy targets. Big Man!

    They should find out who paid his expenses, hid him, provided him the weapons and logistics, round up all associates, etc. He was a coward but stupidly thought he would shoot his way out of an arrest. At least his lying will cease. But since he was white, no looting or heroic funeral for him.

    It is usually impolite and even unseemly to speak ill of the dead. But there are exceptions.

  152. @syonredux
    Joe Biden wants you to know that Europeans becoming a minority in the USA is a good thing:


    https://twitter.com/greatwestdev/status/1301837020084318209

    Replies: @Rob McX

    It shows how diseased white societies have become that they could even contemplate voting for someone who revels in their imminent extinction.

  153. @El Dato
    That guy had some problems, but I didn't get he did actually an interview with Vice before the arrest that went wrong

    ‘I had no choice’: Portland’s ‘100% Antifa’ suspect says he shot & killed Trump supporter in self-defense - 4 Sep, 2020

    Suspect in Portland shooting of Trump supporter KILLED during attempted arrest – reports - 4 Sep, 2020

    Replies: @Muggles

    before the arrest that went wrong

    Wrong for him anyway.

  154. @Mr. Anon

    Will Antifa make him their designated martyr and sing “The Horst Reinoehl Song” about him?
     
    Die Fahne hoch................

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Rose_City_Antifa_logo.png

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Somebody here posted some interesting articles about how easily bolshevik street-fighters migrated to the SA after the Nazis became ascendent. I had heard that such things had happened, but he provided some real documentation that it was a real thing. I don't believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives. The fact that communist goons became Nazi goons hardly proves that contention. Goons are goons. At least a lot of goons are in it for the goon-action, not the details of the politics (to a certain extent, this goes for the police, too). If there ever is a fascist movement in America, I can imagine that some of the antifa scum will enthusiastically sign on. Especially if the pay is better. That first guy that Kyle Rittenhouse shot seems to have had some Sturm-Abteilung proclivities.

    Replies: @znon, @anonymous, @Paul Mendez, @Jack D, @Svigor

    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.

    Black-and-red is a good color scheme if you want to project strength, and it’s well suited to the long-standing hipster love of black (and Black – from afar and through screens, anyway). It’s a good way for leftists to aesthetically “in before” the dissident right.

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives.

    Sigh. It’s depressing. “Hi, I’m a cuckservative; I hate leftists’ enemies way more than leftists do; I’m more passionate about anti-White and homosexualist politics than the leftists are! Notice me (((sempai))), notice me!”

    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists. We can talk about “no true Scotsman/socialist/communist/fascist/jevv” until the cows come home, but the truth is that the Nazi/fascist popular appeal was third positionist; left-wing economics plus nationalism. Socialism without that horrible globalist aftertaste.

    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.

    Yeah and the “National” means NATIONALIST. It’s right there in the name. Hence, a Third Position, orthogonal to left/right.

    LoL.

    Using “socialist” as a wordy dird strikes me as pretty boomer. Like saying “duh, yeah, you’re lucky we won, or you’d be speaking German right now.” Quelle horreur! Homogeneous huwhite and German-speaking???

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Svigor

    Best response to "Democrats are the real racists": "Republicans are the real SJWs".

    Some blogger (I think it was the Unamusement Park guy) had a riposte for people who called him a racist: "They called Hitler a racist too!"

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Svigor


    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists.
     
    Partially so, I would agree. But not entirely orthogonal. They still have a strong projection on the "Right" axis.

    For me, the central distinction between right and left is how you view your own culture and people (do you like them or not?) and how important to you is tradition and organic society.
  155. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    “Rosenbaum” was really the only Jewish sounding name among them. The others sounded more like gentile German names. And “Rosenbaum” is commonly but not necessarily a Jewish name.

    Sort of like “Rosenberg”. “Rosenberg” is typically a Jewish name, but not necessarily. For example, the notorious Nazi official Alfred Rosenberg wasn’t Jewish.

    All the background information about the Rosenbaum guy who got killed in Kenosha indicated that he was of gentile Texas German background, not Jewish.

    Confirmation bias seems to motivate the commenters and alt-righters who insist that these guys are Jewish.

    • Agree: Ripple Earthdevil
  156. @International Jew
    @Jack D

    I don't think we've ever had a Grosskreutz at my shul. Rosenbaums yes...

    Replies: @Jack D

    Since Grosskreutz means “Great Cross” it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Since Grosskreutz means “Great Cross” it would be a strange name for a Jew.
     
    Though no stranger than Noel Ignatiev, "Christmas, son of Loyola".

    Lawrence Auster liked to point out to Samuel Francis and (Samuel) Jared Taylor that it was he, born a Jew, who had the saint's name. Their names were Hebraic.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @JimDandy
    @Jack D

    "Grosskreutz" sounds like a made up name a Jewish writer would have assigned to a minor Nazi character in Hogan's Heroes.

    , @International Jew
    @Jack D

    We might have had a Grosskratz, though, that wet spring when there was a big mosquito hatch.

  157. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    Isn’t this a Prussian/Polish thing?

    Afer WWI, didn’t Foch propose to have everything West of the Rhine annexed as he wanted the Germans separated into the “good ones” and the “bad ones”?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @El Dato

    >Isn’t this a Prussian/Polish thing?

    Prussia was no liberal dream, but it was remarkably religiously tolerant in the context of its time period, nor was its foreign policy out of the common European standard. Moreover, the emphasis on the military was the rational reaction of a state with no defensible frontiers and a memory of the Thirty Year's War.

    >Afer WWI, didn’t Foch propose to have everything West of the Rhine annexed as he wanted the Germans separated into the “good ones” and the “bad ones”?

    By that point, German identity was far too entrenched for that to be realistic, but he wasn't wrong about underlying regional views Germans from that time period had of each other. Whenever Adenauer headed east, he always ordered the train curtains closed. "Here comes Asia."

    That being said, the totalitarian nature of the Nazi years did much to lessen regional distinctions for the war generation, along with much else. It took the postwar years to fully solidify these changes, but they got started in 1933.

  158. @Paul Mendez
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists...
     
    The “Original Nazis” (Rohm, the Strasser brothers, etc.) were patriotic socialists/anti-capitalists. The SA was largely working class. Hitler and his cronies and the SS were more bourgeois. Hence The Night of the Long Knives.

    Many of Hitler’s economic programs would fit nicely into the Democratic Party Platform.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Many of Hitler’s economic programs would fit nicely into the Democratic Party Platform.

    Many of Hitler’s economic programs fit nicely into the Democratic Party’s platform of 1932. Many of thier policies – like rooting out the works of Magnus Hirshfeld – would not fit into the Democratic Party platform of today. There is more to the left/right divide than economics.

    Many of Otto von Bismarck’s economic programs might be considered “progressive”. Was the Iron Chancellor a leftist?

  159. @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad


    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.
     
    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I'm reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the "3S" system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Abolish_public_education

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    We just disagree Buzz. Both about how real learning happens and about the relative proportion of kids/people willing to do it. (I think basically everyone who does an AP or even honors HS class or is actual “college material” has to be able to apply butt to chair and learn–or they suck. The class is essentially just the schedule–the prod. You must study this tonight instead of partying with your friends … or your grade will suck.)

    But let me say that your math example is the weirdest choice.

    Math is far and away the easiest subject to completely automate away.

    And traditional math classes instruction is some of the most useless/inefficient because the ability to absorb math is one of the most directly g-loaded activities. What the math teacher is saying is usually obvious and boring to the bright students and whooshing over the head of the dumb ones.

    While there’s no doubt some benefit to gathering kids together when studying Shakespeare to have a discussion and act out the parts, math absolutely cries out for an individual pace. Which fortunately is ridiculously easy to do, to automate:

    — There is a fairly standard math canon.
    — The “how to do it” instruction of one teacher is going to be pretty much identical to another teachers and is easy to show in an instructional program.
    — Since proficiency involves being able to do calculations it’s ridiculously easy to have a program figure out when a student has mastered the material.
    — Furthermore the wrong answers the student gives are a really good hint of what they are not understanding. A program can–usually–figure out the students’ error and from that what they have not mastered … and then give specific, ever more detailed, instruction on that.

    Seriously, for say a billion dollars–a fraction of a years’ annual math teacher salaries–i’ll deliver a series of terrific adaptive math programs for the standard curriculum, and i’ll have a wild wildly intellectually stimulating parties for iSteve commenters at my new mountain lake and beachfront estates.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @AnotherDad

    Khan academy on YT is a fantastic resource for math education. It’s been a huge help to my kids all through high school.

  160. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

  161. @vhrm
    Generally i avoid this argument because it seems too cute, but in this case it strikes me as apt: Is there anything the current "left" aren't hypocrites about?

    Other than the fact that they rely on armed security and that all the dem politicians seem to have carry permits as a special favor even in places like SF, i assumed that they really DO want to keep guns away from citizens or criminals or crazy people or something.

    But here we have a dude arrested on a gun charge who at the time had pending drug related DUI (with his 11yo daughter in the car) and reckless driving / street racing cases against him (with / vs his 17 yo son at speeds > 110 mph) and ... did anyone take his guns away? give him a stay away order? anything? No. they just dismissed the case.

    Get ready for another round of gun control laws to come out of this one who, again will only be enforce against stodgy dowdy law abiding people who depend on not having a criminal record.

    ETA: i'm curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)

    Replies: @Rob Lee, @Getaclue, @hooodathunkit

    While I don’t personally know the individual officers / agents on this interdiction group, I have worked with two groups of U.S. Marshals Service fugitive task forces before. Of those two groups, no one on the team wanted to proactively put down their target, regardless of how monstrous the warrant and attendant report read. A positively-concluded fugitive arrest and delivery to a holding facility is a half sheet worth of writing; basically a receipt of positive delivery. A killing, however justified, opens up a huge can of writing, including scene processing, endless statements, dealing with inter-agency attorneys, activates your Wright’s liability insurance, etc. It’s really not worth the effort if you can avoid it. Even the most zealous federal agent / local task force members that I knew didn’t want to spend the next three days filling out forms and doing paperwork. It’s not like it’s portrayed on TV – killing someone is the start of an enormous procedure, not the end of one.

    • Thanks: Jim Don Bob, Gordo
    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Rob Lee

    That "tough men restrainedly doing a tough job that needs to be done" vibe is what I generally hope for and I hope that's how it went down here.

    Yesterday's information release somewhat cryptically said that Reinoehl "was armed". Not that he threatened police, let alone attacked them, just that he was armed.

    It was early hours and they were surely still collecting statements and all.

    A bit of clarification today (Friday) is that he had only a pistol, not the previously rumored rifle, but still no statement that he used it.
    (https://nypost.com/2020/09/04/alleged-portland-shooter-michael-reinoehl-had-gun-when-killed-cops/ )

    Let's see how it develops...

    Replies: @vhrm, @Jim Don Bob

  162. @Jack D
    @International Jew

    Since Grosskreutz means "Great Cross" it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JimDandy, @International Jew

    Since Grosskreutz means “Great Cross” it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    Though no stranger than Noel Ignatiev, “Christmas, son of Loyola”.

    Lawrence Auster liked to point out to Samuel Francis and (Samuel) Jared Taylor that it was he, born a Jew, who had the saint’s name. Their names were Hebraic.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ignatiev is indeed usually a Russian name rather than a Jewish one - there must be some story about how his family got this name. Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn't refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).

    As for his first name, I have never been able to find the actual item but I am convinced that there must have been a baby name list for Yiddish speakers looking to give their kids English names that corresponded to their Hebrew names (and calling your kid Shmuel or Shlomo on his birth certificate was unthinkable in those days - the registrar probably wouldn't have accepted it even if you tried) and whoever wrote the list was a little bit out of touch with (then) modern culture and came up with a list of names that had been popular in the 19th century like Seymour and Irving and Isadore so that most of the people in the 20th century who carried those names were Jewish. Maybe Noel was on that list instead of Yoel or Noach.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Matt Buckalew

  163. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash. The three-quarters mick wants to set off bombs in antifa crashpads, specifically targeting the black-clad soft bodies whilst mitigating any collateral damage. The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go. Unleash the Hun for the big stuff.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SunBakedSuburb


    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash.
     
    Hello fellow quarter kraut!

    Let me know when it's time to break out the feldgrau und Panzers!
    , @PV van der Byl
    @SunBakedSuburb


    The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go.
     
    Yup.
  164. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Bill P

    Thanks. I always wondered about why Missouri went with the confederacy.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @James O'Meara
    @Bill P

    French collaborators were quite surprised to learn Hitler's postwar United States of Europe would be a German run empire. Russians and other Slavs were surprised to learn that they were being "liberated" from Communism in order to serve as serfs on future SS plantations.

    A pattern does begin to emerge.

    Strip away all the pious verbal diarrhea, and it's always just "Squareheads down for the the big Boche gangbang."

    https://youtu.be/gMx0RH_YXgU

    , @syonredux
    @Bill P

    Things were slightly more complicated:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_secession

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_in_the_American_Civil_War

    , @Svigor
    @Bill P


    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the Confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the War of Northern Aggression.

    I like Germans - the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.
     

    FIFY. :)
    , @Hibernian
    @Bill P

    The Germans were generally pro-Union. Missouri did not secede. There were many Missourians on both sides. This was typical of the Border States.

  165. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.
     
    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn't.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought - explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you'd get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read - humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford - oops no it doesn't) is very valuable so it's easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual - some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for "one size fits all" because it's easier that way - no thinking required.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Hibernian, @Reg Cæsar, @PhysicistDave

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc.

    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn’t so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.

    Indeed, many languages use syllabaries rather than alphabets. Korean hangul is an alphabet written like a syllabary. Cherokee looks like an alphabet, borrowing characters from ours, but is actually a syllabary.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Reg Cæsar


    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn’t so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.
     

    You just have to memorise everything, which is a good mental exercise. The ending -его is pronounced "yayva", except when it's - more phonetically faithful to the spelling - "yayga". Hardest of all in Russian pronunciation is syllable stress, which is seemingly completely random.
    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Right, you can memorize the syllable -ive and then you know how to say give - the e makes the i short. That's why give rhymes with five and dive and one of the pronunciations of live. Then you learn -ove and you know how to say love and grove.

    Hangul is MUCH easier to learn than English. The inventors of Hangul (before that Korean was written with Chinese characters) said that a wise man can learn it in one day and a stupid man could learn it in ten (just how to make the sounds, not to learn the Korean language itself). This is about right because the rules of Hangul (which was an intentionally created system which only dates back to the 15th century and not something that evolved randomly over many centuries) are very consistent. There are 14 consonants and 11 vowels/vowel blends (ya, yo, yu, etc.) and each character is a combination of the two. So you have 25 symbols to memorize, about the same as English but all the combinations are consistent. When you combine the ch symbol and "ah" symbol and get the character that is pronounced cha it's always cha and not chai or chay.

    https://www.meridianlinguistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/hangeul-chart.jpeg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  166. The sad thing about Michael Reinoehl is that he gave his life trying to enforce Apple’s HR policy

    https://twitter.com/robert_mariani/status/1301743000922525698

  167. @Anonymous
    Reinoehl. German name. Looks very German too.

    Notice the Antifa hotheads getting into violent confrontations have been Germanic: Huber, Rosenbaum, Grosskreutz, and now Reinoehl.

    Replies: @neutral, @Sean, @Drew, @The Alarmist, @anon, @KenH, @Jack D, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato

    These names are all suspiciously sonoriously compound except “Huber”, which is indeed standard German. What’s the likelihood?

    Rosenbaum = Rose tree

    Grosskreutz = Big cross or Large lower back

    Reinoehl = Pure oil

  168. @Hibernian
    @Alden


    Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals.
     
    The task force consisted mostly of local & state LEOs who were depitized as Marshals.

    Replies: @Alden

    Thank you.

  169. @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    Phonics is the best. Then you learn the exceptions. That's how my Mom taught me before I started school, and how they taught at school in my day. A lot of exceptions are not individual cases, but exceptions for a class of words, such as "I before E, except after C, or when pronounced as in neighbor and weigh." That one is not perfect, it has at least one exception to the exception.

    Replies: @Elsewhere

    Agreed. Ignoring phonics is handicapping yourself to really learning spelling.

  170. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    Check the ADL website. According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism. They sure aren’t like any Jewish adult men I’ve ever known. But ADL claims and defends them as Jewish victims of the anti Semitic kid Kyle Rittenhouse.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alden

    Check the ADL website.

    I am looking at adl.org right now. There is nothing like what you claim on their site. Nothing.

    According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism.

    False. Nothing of the sort is there.

    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.

    Replies: @Svigor

  171. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died “practicing Judaism.” I don’t know if she’s saying he was a Jew,but apparently his actions with regard to trying to murder Kyle qualify as Judaism.

    Whatever these boys are or were,certainly attacking Antifa is anti-semite!

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Arlo L. Ramsbottom

    Having sex with little boys, his own relatives no less, also seems to part of "practicing Judaism".

    , @anon
    @Arlo L. Ramsbottom

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died “practicing Judaism.”

    Looking through her Twatter timeline it is obvious she's a solid SJW public Jew person. She writes for Haaretz among others.

    This is the alleged tweet.

    https://social.infogalactic.com/images/posts/bc69968c-13a9-4af5-b1c3-e2a062a6c6a8/original-f29c21131250ff5665d78ab8659940e2.png?v=63766442658

    Then someone pointed out to Hauser via the timeline some excerpts from court documents: Rosenbaum had sexual contact with little boys aged 9 to 11, some of them his relatives (nephews, I think) including anal intercourse. Since then Hauser has been backpedaling and squid inking. "No, I really care about victims of sexual abuse! Even this crime isn't punished with death by a vigilante!" and so forth. Totally lame on her part. She really stepped in it and can't admit she was wrong.

    Hauser is just another pseudo-intellectual "public thinker" who is obviously too lazy or ignorant to bother to check facts before Twitting off. It would be appropriate if some of the publications she writes for dropped her for this, in my opinion, because it demonstrated her incompetence at her craft. What's Haaretz's editorial position on anal rape of 9 year old boys?

    Her Twatter handle contains the words "I write! Hire me!" but she does not write well or accurately, so she should not be hired. And if she's serious about Tikuning the Olem a humble retraction and apology is in order.

    Not gonna happen, of course. But it would be appropriate.

    , @Jack D
    @Arlo L. Ramsbottom

    Hauser said "Joseph Rosenbaum died fighting for justice. He was practicing Judaism."

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews but she might as well been one for a certain variety of secular Leftist Jew who has left the actual practice of the Jewish religion behind. For them, fighting for justice (by which they really mean "social justice") IS practicing Judaism. They is confused.

    Also, by implication, "fighting for justice" was the ONLY kind of Judaism that Rosenbaum was practicing or in other words, he wasn't really a Jew at all.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

  172. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

    Thanks. I always wondered about why Missouri went with the confederacy.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Alden

    They didn't (although some of their people did as guerillas) and the Germans were generally pro-Union.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

  173. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

    French collaborators were quite surprised to learn Hitler’s postwar United States of Europe would be a German run empire. Russians and other Slavs were surprised to learn that they were being “liberated” from Communism in order to serve as serfs on future SS plantations.

    A pattern does begin to emerge.

    Strip away all the pious verbal diarrhea, and it’s always just “Squareheads down for the the big Boche gangbang.”

  174. Waiting for Steve to write something about the Jewish lady professor who cancels herself for passing as a black lady professor. She descends into a public display of self-flagellation that nears the cringe of the Christian white men washing stanky black fleet. The meltdown within the negrophiliac anti-racist cult is quite satisfying. Schadenfreude, as we quarter Huns are wont to say.

  175. @Jack D
    @International Jew

    Since Grosskreutz means "Great Cross" it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JimDandy, @International Jew

    “Grosskreutz” sounds like a made up name a Jewish writer would have assigned to a minor Nazi character in Hogan’s Heroes.

  176. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc.
     
    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn't so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.


    Indeed, many languages use syllabaries rather than alphabets. Korean hangul is an alphabet written like a syllabary. Cherokee looks like an alphabet, borrowing characters from ours, but is actually a syllabary.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Jack D

    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn’t so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.

    You just have to memorise everything, which is a good mental exercise. The ending -его is pronounced “yayva”, except when it’s – more phonetically faithful to the spelling – “yayga”. Hardest of all in Russian pronunciation is syllable stress, which is seemingly completely random.

  177. @AnotherDad
    @Buzz Mohawk


    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.
     
    We just disagree Buzz. Both about how real learning happens and about the relative proportion of kids/people willing to do it. (I think basically everyone who does an AP or even honors HS class or is actual "college material" has to be able to apply butt to chair and learn--or they suck. The class is essentially just the schedule--the prod. You must study this tonight instead of partying with your friends ... or your grade will suck.)

    But let me say that your math example is the weirdest choice.

    Math is far and away the easiest subject to completely automate away.

    And traditional math classes instruction is some of the most useless/inefficient because the ability to absorb math is one of the most directly g-loaded activities. What the math teacher is saying is usually obvious and boring to the bright students and whooshing over the head of the dumb ones.

    While there's no doubt some benefit to gathering kids together when studying Shakespeare to have a discussion and act out the parts, math absolutely cries out for an individual pace. Which fortunately is ridiculously easy to do, to automate:

    -- There is a fairly standard math canon.
    -- The "how to do it" instruction of one teacher is going to be pretty much identical to another teachers and is easy to show in an instructional program.
    -- Since proficiency involves being able to do calculations it's ridiculously easy to have a program figure out when a student has mastered the material.
    -- Furthermore the wrong answers the student gives are a really good hint of what they are not understanding. A program can--usually--figure out the students' error and from that what they have not mastered ... and then give specific, ever more detailed, instruction on that.

    Seriously, for say a billion dollars--a fraction of a years' annual math teacher salaries--i'll deliver a series of terrific adaptive math programs for the standard curriculum, and i'll have a wild wildly intellectually stimulating parties for iSteve commenters at my new mountain lake and beachfront estates.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Khan academy on YT is a fantastic resource for math education. It’s been a huge help to my kids all through high school.

  178. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

  179. Well the NYTimes mentioned antifa in the first sentence of their story, so maybe we are making some progress?

    Law enforcement agents shot and killed an antifa supporter on Thursday as they moved to arrest him in the fatal shooting of a right-wing activist who was part of a pro-Trump caravan in Portland, Ore., officials said.

    Although given the “I am 100% ANTIFA all the way!” quote further down they may have felt it simply couldn’t be avoided…

  180. @Arlo L. Ramsbottom
    @Jack D

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died "practicing Judaism." I don't know if she's saying he was a Jew,but apparently his actions with regard to trying to murder Kyle qualify as Judaism.

    Whatever these boys are or were,certainly attacking Antifa is anti-semite!

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost, @anon, @Jack D

    Having sex with little boys, his own relatives no less, also seems to part of “practicing Judaism”.

    • LOL: Tlotsi
  181. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Since Grosskreutz means “Great Cross” it would be a strange name for a Jew.
     
    Though no stranger than Noel Ignatiev, "Christmas, son of Loyola".

    Lawrence Auster liked to point out to Samuel Francis and (Samuel) Jared Taylor that it was he, born a Jew, who had the saint's name. Their names were Hebraic.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Ignatiev is indeed usually a Russian name rather than a Jewish one – there must be some story about how his family got this name. Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn’t refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).

    As for his first name, I have never been able to find the actual item but I am convinced that there must have been a baby name list for Yiddish speakers looking to give their kids English names that corresponded to their Hebrew names (and calling your kid Shmuel or Shlomo on his birth certificate was unthinkable in those days – the registrar probably wouldn’t have accepted it even if you tried) and whoever wrote the list was a little bit out of touch with (then) modern culture and came up with a list of names that had been popular in the 19th century like Seymour and Irving and Isadore so that most of the people in the 20th century who carried those names were Jewish. Maybe Noel was on that list instead of Yoel or Noach.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jack D


    Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn’t refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).
     
    Rather it refers to an earlier Saint Ignatius of Antioch, from the early days when the Eastern and Western churches were still in communion (although Russia was not yet Christian.) I'd be surprised if Ignatius de Loyola wasn't named after him. Ignatius of Antioch would mean something to both Russian Orthodox and Roman Catholics. Ignatius de Loyola means a lot to many Roman Catholics (The alma mater of my Father and Mother [Loyola of Chicago] was named after him, as were Loyola Universities or Colleges in Baltimore, New Orleans, and LA.) but not so much to the Russian Orthodox or any but a few Jews. BTW, Ignatius de Loyola founded the Jesuits.
    , @Matt Buckalew
    @Jack D

    Generally when the name is preceded by an “of” it’s a warning to perceptive non-Christians that there are probably two saints with that name. I think you’ll find the of Antioch one pretty damn meaningful to all Christianity’s branches.

    Replies: @Jack D

  182. Is the jerk and Antifa martyr yet? So nice he managed to get his Vice interview in before his arrest warrant and jaunt across state lines. It was convenient to make the feds the boogeyman rather than the wishy washy Portland cops. Can’t wait for the Hollywood easy to script movie on this topic.

  183. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:

    Off topic, but the Russians did it!! They did it!! The vaccine has been proven both for effectiveness and safety.

    https://youtu.be/OXQ4Y7XTf6Q

    The Russian Sputnik vaccine is upon us! It’s crazy that a Third World country can perform such feats. There is more than meets the eyes.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Anonymous


    The Russian Sputnik vaccine is upon us! It’s crazy that a Third World country can perform such feats. There is more than meets the eyes.
     
    Putler strikes again!
  184. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:


    There are just some subjects and activities that require in-person interaction in a classroom or lab. You, a physicist, know this.
     
    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily. In fact, offhand, I can only think of one thing I learned in an undergrad physics classroom at all -- the Dirac ladder operators for the simple harmonic operator (from Dick Feynman). Feynman was entertaining, though, and I did at least learn one more thing from him than from the other physics or math profs.

    The dirty little secret is that very, very few physics profs want to teach at all, and almost all of them are truly horrific teachers: again, I cannot think of any exceptions from all the classes I took in physics (or math) nor from any of the physics classes my kids took over the last three years.

    It is truly, deeply pathetic.

    Of course, my high-school physics teacher was even worse: he tried to teach us things that weer hilariously, ludicrously wrong. For example, on one occasion he informed us, "Some matter turns into energy at the speed of light and some matter turns into energy at the square of the speed of light." One of a huge number of examples. At the end of the year, I convinced the high-school administrators to take him off physics and assign him to teach "bonehead math."

    As to labs, in the Covid crisis universities are doing online labs. Yeah, I know it is idiotic, but there you have it.

    Probably the right model is to have learning centers in each city for hands-on lab work: e.g., turn Cal State LA into the "lab campus" and shut down all other campuses in metro LA. But even that ignores the fact that actually working in industry is far more learning-intensive and purposeful than any form of school. I learned a lot more in my first couple years in industry than I did in all the years it took to get my Ph.D. at Stanford.

    Lord Kelvin worked on the transatlantic cable. The academic physicists I knew would disdain such practical work today. I'm quite familiar with lots of academic "research" in hard STEM areas from fundamental physics to applied engineering at leading research institutions, ranging from Caltech and MIT to UCLA and UC Berkeley. Mostly worthless, a lot of it is plainly make-work.

    The universities exist to provide welfare to over-schooled, under-worked, Ph.D.'s, and much of what work is done is done by people without tenure anyway -- TAs, adjunct faculty, etc.

    Orville and Wilbur, Edison, Heaviside, Faraday, and many others did not go to university.

    No, shut them all down. And, aside from the dramatic improvement in education, we will incidentally shot down a major source of propaganda and indoctrination used by the Left. Win-win all around -- except for all the lazy professors who will have to engage in some sort of productive labor.

    Or starve.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon, @Anon 2, @Anon, @Another Canadian, @Bardon Kaldian, @Abolish_public_education

    Fantastic.

    I just forwarded your comment to one of my kids, who just started the UC application process for grad school.

  185. anon[221] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    @Jack D

    Check the ADL website. According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism. They sure aren’t like any Jewish adult men I’ve ever known. But ADL claims and defends them as Jewish victims of the anti Semitic kid Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @anon

    Check the ADL website.

    I am looking at adl.org right now. There is nothing like what you claim on their site. Nothing.

    According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism.

    False. Nothing of the sort is there.

    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    @anon


    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.
     
    Contrary to what you may have learned from judaism, the goyim are not here to serve you.

    Replies: @anon

  186. @neutral
    @Anonymous

    Any surname with "Rosen" in it is definitely not going to be of Germanic ancestry.

    Replies: @Jack D

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    Not to mention Claes Martenszen van Rosenveldt, the first Roosevelt in America.

    , @Not Raul
    @Jack D

    Now that’s one based Jew ;)

  187. @Not Raul
    Were the Feds sent to "arrest" Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to "capture" OBL?

    Replies: @Pericles, @Hypnotoad666, @SkylertheWeird

    Were the Feds sent to “arrest” Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to “capture” OBL?

    Or like how they “arrested” Bonnie and Clyde

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    To send a message, or to suppress information?

    Replies: @Not Raul

  188. anon[221] • Disclaimer says:
    @Arlo L. Ramsbottom
    @Jack D

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died "practicing Judaism." I don't know if she's saying he was a Jew,but apparently his actions with regard to trying to murder Kyle qualify as Judaism.

    Whatever these boys are or were,certainly attacking Antifa is anti-semite!

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost, @anon, @Jack D

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died “practicing Judaism.”

    Looking through her Twatter timeline it is obvious she’s a solid SJW public Jew person. She writes for Haaretz among others.

    This is the alleged tweet.

    Then someone pointed out to Hauser via the timeline some excerpts from court documents: Rosenbaum had sexual contact with little boys aged 9 to 11, some of them his relatives (nephews, I think) including anal intercourse. Since then Hauser has been backpedaling and squid inking. “No, I really care about victims of sexual abuse! Even this crime isn’t punished with death by a vigilante!” and so forth. Totally lame on her part. She really stepped in it and can’t admit she was wrong.

    Hauser is just another pseudo-intellectual “public thinker” who is obviously too lazy or ignorant to bother to check facts before Twitting off. It would be appropriate if some of the publications she writes for dropped her for this, in my opinion, because it demonstrated her incompetence at her craft. What’s Haaretz’s editorial position on anal rape of 9 year old boys?

    Her Twatter handle contains the words “I write! Hire me!” but she does not write well or accurately, so she should not be hired. And if she’s serious about Tikuning the Olem a humble retraction and apology is in order.

    Not gonna happen, of course. But it would be appropriate.

  189. @Arlo L. Ramsbottom
    @Jack D

    Vox displayed a tweet by a creature called Emily L. Hauser,saying that Rosenbaum died "practicing Judaism." I don't know if she's saying he was a Jew,but apparently his actions with regard to trying to murder Kyle qualify as Judaism.

    Whatever these boys are or were,certainly attacking Antifa is anti-semite!

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost, @anon, @Jack D

    Hauser said “Joseph Rosenbaum died fighting for justice. He was practicing Judaism.”

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews but she might as well been one for a certain variety of secular Leftist Jew who has left the actual practice of the Jewish religion behind. For them, fighting for justice (by which they really mean “social justice”) IS practicing Judaism. They is confused.

    Also, by implication, “fighting for justice” was the ONLY kind of Judaism that Rosenbaum was practicing or in other words, he wasn’t really a Jew at all.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Jack D


    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews
     
    The same could be said about you.

    Replies: @GoRedWings!

  190. @Not Raul
    Were the Feds sent to "arrest" Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to "capture" OBL?

    Replies: @Pericles, @Hypnotoad666, @SkylertheWeird

    Always wonder why pics of OBLs bullet ridden body never leaked.

  191. On a positive note, now that Reinoehl is dead, he’ll be reliably voting a straight Democrat Party ticket in every election for the next two hundred years.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  192. @Another Canadian
    @PhysicistDave

    Agreed. Defunding public schools and universities is low hanging fruit for cash-strapped jurisdictions at the state and local level.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    But the prospect of removing children from the brainwashing mills during their most malleable years would scare the daylights out of the ruling elites.

  193. @Jack D
    @neutral

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Rosenberg


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1985-0723-500%2C_Alfred_Rosenberg_headcrop.jpg

    Next.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Not Raul

    Not to mention Claes Martenszen van Rosenveldt, the first Roosevelt in America.

  194. @Buzz Mohawk
    @AnotherDad


    Real learning remains the same–reading and doing the work.
     
    And how do the students learn to read in the first place? To write? To do basic math?

    What is your approach to elementary education?

    Everything I'm reading from the responses here so far sounds doable by self-motivated people above a certain age and development.

    I agree with much of what is being said. In fact, I like to say my educational philosophy is what I call the "3S" system: Sit down, Shut up, and Study, but that involves supervision, observation and guidance. My focus in this conversation is more toward younger students who need supervision.

    And even for high school, what about math classes? Do you remember a good math teacher not only working problems on the board, but calling on you? You had to follow. You went home and worked problems, but first you saw your teacher do similar ones, and you and your classmates asked questions and tried to answer other ones.

    The teacher explained things.

    You went to the board and worked problems while the teacher and everyone else watched. This can be done via internet, but it simply is never as effective as in-person. The teacher cannot observe and interact as effectively with all the students.

    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Abolish_public_education

    to claim .. you just learned all your math from books

    That’s not BS.

    At my alma mater (a 2nd-tier public), the sci/eng teaching was occasionally entertaining (yep), but otherwise either non-existent or dreadful. A science student was either an autodidact or a cheater.

    (Oddly, the foreign-born profsters, though thickly accented speakers, were still better communicators than their English mother-tongued colleagues.)

    The number of JC kids who require remedial math courses speaks for itself. Public K-12 types who succeed at math do so in spite of the schools.

    At our home school, I taught the math & science. Hands-on, several days per week, forty-five minutes to an hour per lesson, blah blah blah.

    The public schools are a bad joke.

  195. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ignatiev is indeed usually a Russian name rather than a Jewish one - there must be some story about how his family got this name. Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn't refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).

    As for his first name, I have never been able to find the actual item but I am convinced that there must have been a baby name list for Yiddish speakers looking to give their kids English names that corresponded to their Hebrew names (and calling your kid Shmuel or Shlomo on his birth certificate was unthinkable in those days - the registrar probably wouldn't have accepted it even if you tried) and whoever wrote the list was a little bit out of touch with (then) modern culture and came up with a list of names that had been popular in the 19th century like Seymour and Irving and Isadore so that most of the people in the 20th century who carried those names were Jewish. Maybe Noel was on that list instead of Yoel or Noach.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Matt Buckalew

    Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn’t refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).

    Rather it refers to an earlier Saint Ignatius of Antioch, from the early days when the Eastern and Western churches were still in communion (although Russia was not yet Christian.) I’d be surprised if Ignatius de Loyola wasn’t named after him. Ignatius of Antioch would mean something to both Russian Orthodox and Roman Catholics. Ignatius de Loyola means a lot to many Roman Catholics (The alma mater of my Father and Mother [Loyola of Chicago] was named after him, as were Loyola Universities or Colleges in Baltimore, New Orleans, and LA.) but not so much to the Russian Orthodox or any but a few Jews. BTW, Ignatius de Loyola founded the Jesuits.

  196. @Daniel Chieh
    @Dieter Kief

    I rather am satisfied with being homeschooled with the company of saints in my library. I am rather glad and proud to have a pretty non-degenerate life, which would be harder with modern students.

    My children will have similar lives, fortunately.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Congrats. I must say I’m astonished though to read those – fundamental objections of – what? Drugs?
    There is nothing wrong with drugs per se, I’d say. The most important rule to deal with them stems from Jackson Browne (the line is on Runnin’ On Empty) – It takes a clear mind to make it!

    Wonderful book about drugs of any kind: 1) Ernst Jünger – Drogen und Rausch. Ernst Jünger, great writer and highly decorated and often times wounded officer in WWI and WW II was close to LSD discoverer Albert Hoffmann from Basel.

    T. C. Boyles LSD novel Inside Looking Out is great too, in showing one thing especially, that is indeed deeply related to LSD: That the sexual longing has no borders (no limits) in itself. it is something quite natural, which – can eat you (and your soul) up alive. I think that this is a rather precious (and very (very) important insight.

    Ahh – now I remember my above mentioned Heidelbergian interview with Ravi Shankar: He was fiercely outspoken against drugs of all kind (I asked him about his experiences with The Beatles). – We got along perfectly well.

    As I said: It was something which we peers left pretty much behind pretty soon. I still drink (mostly wine) at times.

    I like the part about the saints in your post.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Dieter Kief

    I've known innocent preteen girls beaten to miscarriage multiple times, lives ruined into living death and monsters allowed to roam free because of drugs. Not to mention the fate of my ancestral nation. The consequences of a libertine view are much more endemic than you would think. Harmless indeed, right up until your friend gets raped and forced into stripping to support her rapist's habit.

    Tell me more about those beautiful life experiences. Or rather, thanks, but no.

    I know what I have done to and would like to do to those demons. Death is too good for them, but its the least they deserve.

  197. @Svigor
    @Mr. Anon


    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.
     
    Black-and-red is a good color scheme if you want to project strength, and it's well suited to the long-standing hipster love of black (and Black - from afar and through screens, anyway). It's a good way for leftists to aesthetically "in before" the dissident right.

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives.
     
    Sigh. It's depressing. "Hi, I'm a cuckservative; I hate leftists' enemies way more than leftists do; I'm more passionate about anti-White and homosexualist politics than the leftists are! Notice me (((sempai))), notice me!"

    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists. We can talk about "no true Scotsman/socialist/communist/fascist/jevv" until the cows come home, but the truth is that the Nazi/fascist popular appeal was third positionist; left-wing economics plus nationalism. Socialism without that horrible globalist aftertaste.


    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.
     
    Yeah and the "National" means NATIONALIST. It's right there in the name. Hence, a Third Position, orthogonal to left/right.

    LoL.

    Using "socialist" as a wordy dird strikes me as pretty boomer. Like saying "duh, yeah, you're lucky we won, or you'd be speaking German right now." Quelle horreur! Homogeneous huwhite and German-speaking???

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Mr. Anon

    Best response to “Democrats are the real racists”: “Republicans are the real SJWs”.

    Some blogger (I think it was the Unamusement Park guy) had a riposte for people who called him a racist: “They called Hitler a racist too!”

  198. @Alden
    @Bill P

    Thanks. I always wondered about why Missouri went with the confederacy.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    They didn’t (although some of their people did as guerillas) and the Germans were generally pro-Union.

    • Agree: GoRedWings!
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Hibernian

    The Battle of Pea Ridge, in northern Arkansas pretty much ended the rebels’ chances of bringing MO into the rebellion.

  199. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc.
     
    How many of them have tried to learn a language using another alphabet (not script) as an adult? When learning Russian, I noticed that is wasn't so much individual letters or whole words that stuck, but syllables.

    E.g., many Russian words end in -его, which the Russians either misspell or mispronounce, whichever you prefer. You learn to recognize it rather quickly.


    Indeed, many languages use syllabaries rather than alphabets. Korean hangul is an alphabet written like a syllabary. Cherokee looks like an alphabet, borrowing characters from ours, but is actually a syllabary.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Jack D

    Right, you can memorize the syllable -ive and then you know how to say give – the e makes the i short. That’s why give rhymes with five and dive and one of the pronunciations of live. Then you learn -ove and you know how to say love and grove.

    Hangul is MUCH easier to learn than English. The inventors of Hangul (before that Korean was written with Chinese characters) said that a wise man can learn it in one day and a stupid man could learn it in ten (just how to make the sounds, not to learn the Korean language itself). This is about right because the rules of Hangul (which was an intentionally created system which only dates back to the 15th century and not something that evolved randomly over many centuries) are very consistent. There are 14 consonants and 11 vowels/vowel blends (ya, yo, yu, etc.) and each character is a combination of the two. So you have 25 symbols to memorize, about the same as English but all the combinations are consistent. When you combine the ch symbol and “ah” symbol and get the character that is pronounced cha it’s always cha and not chai or chay.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    All known alphabets, with the exception of hangul and possibly runic, ultimately derive from the Phoenician. Criticizing them will thus expose one to charges of being anti-Semitic.

    Replies: @Jack D

  200. @J.Ross
    I'm not a good person, but one good thing about me is illustrated by this. At one job (one of a sequence of mostly commodiously and decorously departed positions, always [knock on wood] with the pay going up) I was offered some "good $#!%," which appealed because as a one-time subscriber to Parabola and a one-time whore for Shambala* books (especially Shambala pocket books! You haven't read the Hagakure until you've squinted like a you-know-who-sama!) I have a thoroughly irrational soft spot for supernatural foolery. When I was younger I used to wish fervently for a hallucination. My girlfriend is a lilit. However, I never partook. I had to work. If it looked like my employer needed it, I would down a cardiac arrest-inducing amount of Redbulls. If I had to work within a 72-hour period there was no possibility of taking hallucinogens. So my excuse for being a square was that I really honestly was a square.
    So this guy has a gun, good for him, it's the American thing to do. So thing guy stole his mother's medicine, I only wish I could, there's a lot of money in that. If Obamacare is restarted the only medicine will be stolen medicine. But, it leaps out at me: he attended several fake outrage rallies? When did he have the time? I would love to be able to do that; you know, to hunt them, because I don't hunt but surely they cannot be particularly dangerous game.

    *Yeah, it's right there in the name.

    Replies: @wren, @TWS, @wren

    These guys will put you up. Stay there on the city’s dime and go to town.

  201. @El Dato
    OT: COVID-19 proves that homeopathy is real! Random noise really can heal you (or in this case, kill you)!

    Up to 90% of people who test positive for Covid barely carry any virus & are not contagious. Every stat about the disease is bogus

    Data from three US states – New York, Nevada and Massachusetts – shows that when the amount of the virus found in a person is taken into account, up to 90 percent of people who have tested positive should actually have been negative, as they are carrying only tiny amounts of the virus, are not contagious, pose no risk to others, and have no need to isolate.

    This means that only a fraction of the daily “cases” being reported so hysterically in the mainstream media are actual, bona fide Covid-19 sufferers, and need treatment and to separate themselves from others.

    So how could this have happened? The answer has to do with the sensitivity of PCR (Polymerase chain reaction) tests for Covid, which it turns out can be ramped up according to the taste of the testing companies [they have no baseline? who ARE those idiots?]. Most testing companies have chosen the outrageously high sensitivity limit of 40 PCR cycles – meaning that the DNA in a sample is exponentially increased 40 times in order to amplify its signal.

    But using such a ridiculously sensitive test means that the faintest traces of a dead virus, or even leftovers from previous infections, can result in a positive. Professor Juliet Morrison, a University of California virologist, said that even a limit of 35 PCR cycles is too high, let alone 40. She said she was “shocked that people would think that 40 could represent a positive.” But apparently, pretty much everyone in the US Covid brain trust took exactly that on faith.
     

    Replies: @William Oliver, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Every stat about the disease is bogus”

    Yep, confirmed ✔ last Sunday by the very perpetrators of BULL$$$HIT-2020: the CDC. But the economic destruction and psychological terror are all too real.

    Diaper up. Forever.

    Lockdown 2.0 begins T-minus three weeks: prep accordingly.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    https://postimg.cc/1V3v7QGp

    Replies: @MB

  202. @PhysicistDave
    Good news, but the real problem is not the little Antifa children playing at being revolutionaries nor their NAM pawns who do the looting while Antifa sets the fires.

    The real problem is the verbalist overclass, the people who rule the country though they lack the ability to engage in productive labor.

    The real civil war is between the producers and the verbalist overclass, and it has many fronts ranging from HR departments to federal regulatory agencies.

    But the critical front is the schools and the universities.

    The producers have to unite around the slogan "Defund the public schools and the universities!" Their business model makes no sense in the age of the Internet: their own behavior in the course of the Covid shutdown should make that clear even to people of limited intelligence.

    Tear down the brick-and-mortar schools and colleges and sow the ground with salt.

    It will take time, but now is the time when ordinary people are starting to see the truth.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @Alden, @shoot

    Verbalism is deployed, typically subcontract, by uber compulsion, which, along with symbiotic unter compulsion, would not have it any other way.

    Some compelling theorizing lobs the shell that verbalism is the tool used in pursuit of shorter cuts to fatter slices – via lying – & that it’s all that practice to deceive that added all the uber-architecture surrounding quivering amygdalae.

    The long march in place of these sorts of constitutions is a lot older than the so-called long march through the institutions, & the institutional wo/man projections of that fattened head.

    So brick & mortar teardowns, destroying the village to save it, what can’t be saved at net negative interest rates, nor ostensibly positive rates, either, won’t work.

    But make-work has always been good enough. Fake it busy until ya’ make it, Sisyphus. Cue Luke, moving the dirt from here to there, & back again….

  203. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Right, you can memorize the syllable -ive and then you know how to say give - the e makes the i short. That's why give rhymes with five and dive and one of the pronunciations of live. Then you learn -ove and you know how to say love and grove.

    Hangul is MUCH easier to learn than English. The inventors of Hangul (before that Korean was written with Chinese characters) said that a wise man can learn it in one day and a stupid man could learn it in ten (just how to make the sounds, not to learn the Korean language itself). This is about right because the rules of Hangul (which was an intentionally created system which only dates back to the 15th century and not something that evolved randomly over many centuries) are very consistent. There are 14 consonants and 11 vowels/vowel blends (ya, yo, yu, etc.) and each character is a combination of the two. So you have 25 symbols to memorize, about the same as English but all the combinations are consistent. When you combine the ch symbol and "ah" symbol and get the character that is pronounced cha it's always cha and not chai or chay.

    https://www.meridianlinguistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/hangeul-chart.jpeg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    All known alphabets, with the exception of hangul and possibly runic, ultimately derive from the Phoenician. Criticizing them will thus expose one to charges of being anti-Semitic.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    There is nothing wrong with the Roman alphabet. The Spanish use it and spelling in Spanish is ridiculously easy. The problem is English spelling.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  204. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.

    I suppose the teachers could be private tutors. Some kids over say 10 can do online schooling by themselves. Others just can’t. Or won’t

    Not all jobs can be done online at home. Plenty of people can work solely at home. Others just can’t.

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.

    We can’t go back to child and teen labor as long as American adults are unemployed and the capitalist pigs chamber of commerce insists on bringing in non White foreign labor for every job from Dr to dishwasher.

    For most of human history child and teen labor and training worked very well. Only because adult men died in their early forties or earlier.

    So the labor force needed constant replenishment from young teens and even younger kids.

    But now that adults work till they’re in their mid sixties, there’s no need for teen workers any more.

    We can’t reduce wages any more by putting teens into the workforce. There might be a better solution than public high school, 4 years of college, grad school, internship , and delaying adult hood till 35, but at the present time, there’s no alternative.

    Look at anti fa, 20 to 40 year old unemployed college educated Whites. If they had full time jobs, kids to care for, homes to maintain, they wouldn’t be in anti fa.

    All we can do is take care of our families.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @PhysicistDave

    The go-to strategy of every political conservative who wants to control the US economy: the US tax code.

    (Controlling entire, third-world countries must not be as much fun as it used to.)

    I don’t know what will happen to kids if we a_p_e (though US literacy rates from the pre-Progressive Era suggest that the kids will be far better off), but — look around, I do know what will happen to them if we don’t.

  205. @Rob Lee
    @vhrm

    While I don't personally know the individual officers / agents on this interdiction group, I have worked with two groups of U.S. Marshals Service fugitive task forces before. Of those two groups, no one on the team wanted to proactively put down their target, regardless of how monstrous the warrant and attendant report read. A positively-concluded fugitive arrest and delivery to a holding facility is a half sheet worth of writing; basically a receipt of positive delivery. A killing, however justified, opens up a huge can of writing, including scene processing, endless statements, dealing with inter-agency attorneys, activates your Wright's liability insurance, etc. It's really not worth the effort if you can avoid it. Even the most zealous federal agent / local task force members that I knew didn't want to spend the next three days filling out forms and doing paperwork. It's not like it's portrayed on TV - killing someone is the start of an enormous procedure, not the end of one.

    Replies: @vhrm

    That “tough men restrainedly doing a tough job that needs to be done” vibe is what I generally hope for and I hope that’s how it went down here.

    Yesterday’s information release somewhat cryptically said that Reinoehl “was armed”. Not that he threatened police, let alone attacked them, just that he was armed.

    It was early hours and they were surely still collecting statements and all.

    A bit of clarification today (Friday) is that he had only a pistol, not the previously rumored rifle, but still no statement that he used it.
    (https://nypost.com/2020/09/04/alleged-portland-shooter-michael-reinoehl-had-gun-when-killed-cops/ )

    Let’s see how it develops…

    • Thanks: Not Raul
    • Replies: @vhrm
    @vhrm

    To continue... it looks like the cops have gone from "was armed" to
    "was armed and had drawn the weapon".

    At this point it sounds pretty unlikely that he shot at them, or they would have said so.

    From a WSJ article this evening even the "drawn" sounds ... questionable:


    Law-enforcement officials said Mr. Reinoehl, 48 years old, was armed with a handgun and had drawn the weapon, which led our members of the task force to open fire as he tried to drive away. They shot at him again as he ditched the car and attempted to flee on foot, the officials said. He eventually collapsed in the street and was pronounced dead at the scene.
     
    (https://www.wsj.com/articles/attorney-general-praises-law-enforcement-after-pursuit-killing-of-michael-reinoehl-11599245921?mod=business_minor_pos4 )

    How was he threatening them "as he tried to drive away" and then later got out of the car and attempted to flee on foot and CONTINUED to threaten them but during this whole time but he never got around to shooting at them?

    I really hope there's video of this that shows them to have been reasonably threatened, because so far it's sounding pretty sad for the police side. Even if t was legal, this was a pretty crappy apprehension. A multi-agency "violent perpetrator" (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise...

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hibernian, @PhysicistDave

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @vhrm

    It would not bother me one bit if the cops shot Reinoehl while he was on his knees begging for his life. That's one less POS Antifa hero to deal with.

  206. @Bill Jones
    @Pericles

    Bin Laden was buried in the traditional muslim way. in a grave, in December 2011.

    https://www.foxnews.com/story/report-bin-laden-already-dead

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/osama-bin-ladens-obituary-notice/5358889

    Or maybe May 2011

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/69213935/osama-bin_laden


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/may/02/osama-bin-laden-obituary

    Replies: @Muggles

    Bin Laden was buried in the traditional muslim way. in a grave, in December 2011.

    Other (unattributed) sources say that his corpse was thrown out of the back of one of the SEAL team’s helicopters over the Hindu Kush on the way back from the raid.

    Thus giving him a flying start on his way to paradise.

    • LOL: Grahamsno(G64)
  207. @znon
    @Mr. Anon

    Joseph Goebbels; "The best Nazis are ex-communists".
    The National SOCIALIST Party was a response to the Soviet system that emulated their concentration camps and totalitarian system while also co-opting the old German right wing and military. Goebbels also copied Hollywood propaganda and was a big movie buff, along with Hitler.

    Replies: @Muggles

    The National SOCIALIST Party was a response to the Soviet system that emulated their concentration camps and totalitarian system

    The “l” in GULAG stands for “lager” which is German for camp. The Soviets found it handy to borrow the term. They both had concentration camps, though said to have been invented by the Brits during the Boer War.

  208. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Ya sure they ain't all Joos? I hear that antifa is fulla Joos...

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing. It's interesting that this racial characteristic, like so many others, has been conserved even though German Americans are so thoroughly assimilated that no one (not even themselves) thinks of them as having any connection to Germany other than their vestigial German names.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Svigor, @Neoconned, @International Jew, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill P, @Alden, @Arlo L. Ramsbottom, @anon

    Yes, getting all dressed up in boots and stuff and going out to bash heads is more of a German thing.

    I don’t know, Jack. I think there is another tribe that likes to do that as well…

    https://english.alaraby.co.uk/english/news/2020/9/2/israeli-soldier-filmed-kneeling-on-60-year-old-palestinian-mans-neck

  209. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    The legacy media reaction to this will be telling.

    If they bury it (most likely), they're sticking with the NYT-led de-escalation that began last week.

    If they decry this as yet another unjust killing in Trump's America, they're choosing a path.

    Replies: @Ma Laoshi, @Eric416

    They’ll keep it off the front page where the normies might see, but Twitter and other echo chambers for the radicals will proclaim his martydom and “rest in power”.

  210. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    As I said - it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).

    And I'm serious about transcendence and religion. I don't want that to be diminished or - beware - eradicated.

    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group. I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. - That's just not what puberty is about. It's about opening up.

    Nothing in my schools had something to do with the Lord of the Flies. -

    - Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh, @PhysicistDave

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:

    As I said – it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).

    “Just a phase” — a phrase from the post-Freudian collapse of civilization. Lord of the Flies was “just a phase” — that’s Golding’s point: once the grown-ups showed up, the little thugs returned to being little English schoolboys, a “peer group,” as you say.

    Your upbringing has deprived you of the ability to see that there is something wrong with your upbringing. You are so parochial in your post-Western, post-civilizational mindset that you think your depraved childhood is normal.

    You’ve been cheated.

    Dieter also wrote:

    And I’m serious about transcendence and religion. I don’t want that to be diminished or – beware – eradicated.

    Oh, I don’t doubt it. One more sign of drug-induced decadence: you are the one who admitted that drugs led you to that.

    Dieter also wrote:

    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group.

    And that is what is wrong with your life.

    Again, you lack the historical perspective to realize that it is not normal for human beings to develop their values and attitudes in a narrow, age-graded peer group. The human norm is for children to mature in an environment consisting largely of adults, as well as young people of a wide range of ages, not an age-graded “peer group.”

    Spending a large fraction of your time with a “peer group” whose age is within +/- 12 months of your own was not even possible in typical villages or bands throughout human history — there were simply too few people that close to an individual in age in a small village or band.

    That is Lord of the Flies.

    But you think being dominated by your peer group is the human norm.

    You are ignorant of history and anthropology.

    Dieter also wrote:

    I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. – That’s just not what puberty is about. It’s about opening up.

    In sane human societies, yes, children are influenced by their parents and other adults and by youth of a wide variety of ages, not by their age-graded “peer group.” Again, you throw around psycho terms like “puberty” to hide your ignorance and the decadence in which you were raised.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.

    Neoplatonism does fit in well with a drug trip, doesn’t it? No, Newton, Bach, Shakespeare, Maxwell, Gauss, Debussy, Monet, etc. were geniuses. To call crackpot “Eckhart” a “genius” is a sign of decadence.

    But, when you are immersed in decadence, it is hard to see it, isn’t it, Dieter?

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) - enjoying sadness even - - - that's all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology - and in literature - cf.  - - - JWv Goethe's Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) - ok -

    - and these are all things, without which your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) dwelled on time and time again - not least in St. Mathew's Passion and in lots of cantata's and songs - - - cf. My sighs, Ny Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S
    Mein Kummer nimmet zu
    Und raubt mir alle Ruh,
    Mein Jammerkrug ist ganz
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cvkm2mdNIQ

    So - this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) - in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and - - power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with - words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach's major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals - all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. - And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been - without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  - Strange Reformation - Luther's Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated - yet?) - or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart's God in the cow-stable and in the peasant's fields and anywhere else. and that is - Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don't forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German - now think of Luther's translation of the Bible... Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind - like twins. And Bach was their - Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

    Replies: @bruce county, @PhysicistDave

    , @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) - enjoying sadness even - - - that's all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology - and in literature - cf.  - - - JWv Goethe's Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) - ok -

    - and these are all things, your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) belabored on time and time again - not least in St. Mathew's Passion and in lots of cantata's and songs - - - cf. My sighs, My Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S<!
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cvkm2mdNIQ

    So - this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) - in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and - - power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with - words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach's major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals - all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. - And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been - without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  - Strange Reformation - Luther's Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated - yet?) - or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart's God in the cow-stable and in the peasant's fields and anywhere else. and that is - Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don't forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German - now think of Luther's translation of the Bible... Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind - like twins. And Bach was their - Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

  211. @Currahee
    Michael Reinoehl: John Brown.

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson

    Mike Reinoehl’s body lies a moulderin’ in the grave…

  212. @anon
    @Bernard

    Could Rosenbaum be anymore stereotypically Jewish?

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    There’s nothing “stereotypically Jewish” about him.

    You, on the other hand…

  213. @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon


    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists,
     
    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @bruce county, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Mr. Anon, @Oscar Peterson

    “Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.”

    Who cares what’s in the name? The question is, were they socialists in practice? Answer: No. The means of production were kept in private hands. The Night of the Long Knives was in large part about eliminating the left wing of the Nazi Party that was more inclined towards actual socialism.

    Hitler was a concerted opponent of echt socialism and the ideological left well before he discovered what organized Jewry was up to, which wasn’t, it seems, until the end of WW I.

    The Nazi Volksgemeinschaft implied something of a welfare state, but not socialism.

    Hannah Arendt helped begin this trend of conflating the left and right in her mendacious/deluded work, The Origins of Totalitarianism.

  214. @Dieter Kief
    @Daniel Chieh

    Congrats. I must say I'm astonished though to read those - fundamental objections of - what? Drugs?
    There is nothing wrong with drugs per se, I'd say. The most important rule to deal with them stems from Jackson Browne (the line is on Runnin' On Empty) - It takes a clear mind to make it!

    Wonderful book about drugs of any kind: 1) Ernst Jünger - Drogen und Rausch. Ernst Jünger, great writer and highly decorated and often times wounded officer in WWI and WW II was close to LSD discoverer Albert Hoffmann from Basel.

    T. C. Boyles LSD novel Inside Looking Out is great too, in showing one thing especially, that is indeed deeply related to LSD: That the sexual longing has no borders (no limits) in itself. it is something quite natural, which - can eat you (and your soul) up alive. I think that this is a rather precious (and very (very) important insight.

    Ahh - now I remember my above mentioned Heidelbergian interview with Ravi Shankar: He was fiercely outspoken against drugs of all kind (I asked him about his experiences with The Beatles). - We got along perfectly well.

    As I said: It was something which we peers left pretty much behind pretty soon. I still drink (mostly wine) at times.

    I like the part about the saints in your post.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    I’ve known innocent preteen girls beaten to miscarriage multiple times, lives ruined into living death and monsters allowed to roam free because of drugs. Not to mention the fate of my ancestral nation. The consequences of a libertine view are much more endemic than you would think. Harmless indeed, right up until your friend gets raped and forced into stripping to support her rapist’s habit.

    Tell me more about those beautiful life experiences. Or rather, thanks, but no.

    I know what I have done to and would like to do to those demons. Death is too good for them, but its the least they deserve.

  215. @istevelurker
    @D. K.


    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend
     
    No, this is wrong and Steve is giving the benefit of the doubt to the shooter. Danielson's friend Chandler Pappas was alongside him when he was killed. Told Tucker Carlson last night that he and the victim were caught completely off guard and were attacked without provocation. The killer's bullet went through Danielson's can of bear spray. Pappas and Danielson were unarmed and carried the spray for self-defense.

    See: https://www.foxnews.com/media/friend-of-portland-shooting-victim-aaron-danielson-speaks-out-us-needs-a-lot-of-healing.

    Replies: @D. K., @D. K., @D. K.

    I have watched the video of the shooting umpteen times. I see the spray, a fraction of a second before I hear the first shot. Was the distance from the killer to the videographer, standing on the corner, just across the intersection, far enough to cause that much delay in the sound (at c. 1125 feet per second) vis-a-vis the view, such that a shot that actually preceded the spray appears to the viewer to follow it? Perhaps….

  216. @Bernard
    This was the first guy the 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse killed, Joseph Rosenbaum. It's crushing we lost such a wonderful citizen.

    https://twitter.com/RadioFreeElk/status/1301359539925655552

    Replies: @Altai, @Alden, @anon, @Not Raul

    How do you know that those docs are legit?

    Anyone with a computer could have created the image.

  217. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    As I said – it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).
     
    "Just a phase" -- a phrase from the post-Freudian collapse of civilization. Lord of the Flies was "just a phase" -- that's Golding's point: once the grown-ups showed up, the little thugs returned to being little English schoolboys, a "peer group," as you say.

    Your upbringing has deprived you of the ability to see that there is something wrong with your upbringing. You are so parochial in your post-Western, post-civilizational mindset that you think your depraved childhood is normal.

    You've been cheated.

    Dieter also wrote:


    And I’m serious about transcendence and religion. I don’t want that to be diminished or – beware – eradicated.
     
    Oh, I don't doubt it. One more sign of drug-induced decadence: you are the one who admitted that drugs led you to that.

    Dieter also wrote:


    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group.
     
    And that is what is wrong with your life.

    Again, you lack the historical perspective to realize that it is not normal for human beings to develop their values and attitudes in a narrow, age-graded peer group. The human norm is for children to mature in an environment consisting largely of adults, as well as young people of a wide range of ages, not an age-graded "peer group."

    Spending a large fraction of your time with a "peer group" whose age is within +/- 12 months of your own was not even possible in typical villages or bands throughout human history -- there were simply too few people that close to an individual in age in a small village or band.

    That is Lord of the Flies.

    But you think being dominated by your peer group is the human norm.

    You are ignorant of history and anthropology.

    Dieter also wrote:


    I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. – That’s just not what puberty is about. It’s about opening up.
     
    In sane human societies, yes, children are influenced by their parents and other adults and by youth of a wide variety of ages, not by their age-graded "peer group." Again, you throw around psycho terms like "puberty" to hide your ignorance and the decadence in which you were raised.

    Dieter also wrote:


    Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.
     
    Neoplatonism does fit in well with a drug trip, doesn't it? No, Newton, Bach, Shakespeare, Maxwell, Gauss, Debussy, Monet, etc. were geniuses. To call crackpot "Eckhart" a "genius" is a sign of decadence.

    But, when you are immersed in decadence, it is hard to see it, isn't it, Dieter?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Dieter Kief

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) – enjoying sadness even – – – that’s all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology – and in literature – cf.  – – – JWv Goethe’s Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) – ok –

    – and these are all things, without which your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) dwelled on time and time again – not least in St. Mathew’s Passion and in lots of cantata’s and songs – – – cf. My sighs, Ny Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S
    Mein Kummer nimmet zu
    Und raubt mir alle Ruh,
    Mein Jammerkrug ist ganz
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    So – this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) – in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and – – power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with – words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach’s major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals – all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. – And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been – without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  – Strange Reformation – Luther’s Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated – yet?) – or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart’s God in the cow-stable and in the peasant’s fields and anywhere else. and that is – Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don’t forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German – now think of Luther’s translation of the Bible… Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind – like twins. And Bach was their – Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Dieter Kief

    Holy shit... I hear tinges of Led Zeppelin Stairway To Heaven in the first minute.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) – enjoying sadness even – – – that’s all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology – and in literature – cf. – – – JWv Goethe’s Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) – ok –
     
    Maybe it is sort of a human thing that self-absorbed, spoiled, coddled adolescents think is unique to themselves?

    Dieter also wrote:

    So – this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language...
     
    Gee... so nobody before Crazy Eckhart knew that the German language could express sadness, suffering, insecurity, etc.! Quite a guy, that Eckhart -- the Germans had no feelings before him.

    Did you know that English had no word for "sadness," "courage," "humility," kindness," etc. before Shakespeare? I mean, how could mere ordinary people have such feelings before they were allowed to by Eckhart, et al.?

    Do you really believe such nonsense, Dieter?

    You are more lost than I suspected!

    Dieter also wrote:

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany, Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.
     
    Or just maybe Bach had normal human feelings, feelings that he had in common with all normal human beings, the difference being that Bach had a genius for expressing those feelings musically?

    Y'know, Dylan and Lennon and McCartney are better songwriters than I am (I have tried!). So did Sir Paul have to stand "on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders" in order to write "Yesterday"? Or maybe did McCartney just have ordinary human feelings and, alas, a greater talent for songwriting than I have?

    Dieter also wrote:

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach’s major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals – all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. – And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been – without the mystics.
     
    Except those of us who have very little sympathy for Luther or even Christianity find that we respond to Bach. Maybe because Bach expresses human feelings, not just Lutheran feelings.

    Dieter also wrote:

    For further detail have a look at – Strange Reformation – Luther’s Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin...
     
    Your level of parochialism is steadily increasing. Perhaps I should merely point out that more people listen to Bach nowadays than seriously read Luther.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  218. @Jack D
    @neutral

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Rosenberg


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1985-0723-500%2C_Alfred_Rosenberg_headcrop.jpg

    Next.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Not Raul

    Now that’s one based Jew 😉

  219. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    As I said – it was just a phase we were going through with the drugs. (We hardly did them at school anyways).
     
    "Just a phase" -- a phrase from the post-Freudian collapse of civilization. Lord of the Flies was "just a phase" -- that's Golding's point: once the grown-ups showed up, the little thugs returned to being little English schoolboys, a "peer group," as you say.

    Your upbringing has deprived you of the ability to see that there is something wrong with your upbringing. You are so parochial in your post-Western, post-civilizational mindset that you think your depraved childhood is normal.

    You've been cheated.

    Dieter also wrote:


    And I’m serious about transcendence and religion. I don’t want that to be diminished or – beware – eradicated.
     
    Oh, I don't doubt it. One more sign of drug-induced decadence: you are the one who admitted that drugs led you to that.

    Dieter also wrote:


    My peer group was basically as sane as being sane can get when puberty is at play. And it was a life-forming experience for me to be in this group.
     
    And that is what is wrong with your life.

    Again, you lack the historical perspective to realize that it is not normal for human beings to develop their values and attitudes in a narrow, age-graded peer group. The human norm is for children to mature in an environment consisting largely of adults, as well as young people of a wide range of ages, not an age-graded "peer group."

    Spending a large fraction of your time with a "peer group" whose age is within +/- 12 months of your own was not even possible in typical villages or bands throughout human history -- there were simply too few people that close to an individual in age in a small village or band.

    That is Lord of the Flies.

    But you think being dominated by your peer group is the human norm.

    You are ignorant of history and anthropology.

    Dieter also wrote:


    I mentioned that as opposed to homeschooling and being mainly with your parents. – That’s just not what puberty is about. It’s about opening up.
     
    In sane human societies, yes, children are influenced by their parents and other adults and by youth of a wide variety of ages, not by their age-graded "peer group." Again, you throw around psycho terms like "puberty" to hide your ignorance and the decadence in which you were raised.

    Dieter also wrote:


    Eckhart is a genius if ever there was one.
     
    Neoplatonism does fit in well with a drug trip, doesn't it? No, Newton, Bach, Shakespeare, Maxwell, Gauss, Debussy, Monet, etc. were geniuses. To call crackpot "Eckhart" a "genius" is a sign of decadence.

    But, when you are immersed in decadence, it is hard to see it, isn't it, Dieter?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Dieter Kief

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) – enjoying sadness even – – – that’s all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology – and in literature – cf.  – – – JWv Goethe’s Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) – ok –

    – and these are all things, your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) belabored on time and time again – not least in St. Mathew’s Passion and in lots of cantata’s and songs – – – cf. My sighs, My Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S<!
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    So – this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) – in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and – – power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with – words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach's major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals – all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. – And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been – without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  – Strange Reformation – Luther’s Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated – yet?) – or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart’s God in the cow-stable and in the peasant’s fields and anywhere else. and that is – Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don’t forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German – now think of Luther’s translation of the Bible… Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind – like twins. And Bach was their – Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

  220. @bruce county
    @Jack D

    You couldn't be be any clearer.
    Might I add:

    Upon his release Hitler quickly set about rebuilding his moribund party, vowing to achieve power only through legal political means thereafter. The Nazi Party’s membership grew from 25,000 in 1925 to about 180,000 in 1929. Its organizational system of gauleiters (“district leaders”) spread through Germany at this time, and the party began contesting municipal, state, and federal elections with increasing frequency.
    Then big-business circles had begun to finance the Nazi electoral campaigns, and swelling bands of SA toughs increasingly dominated the street fighting with the communists that accompanied such campaigns.
    Sounds like a lefty playbook to me.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Good point.

    Not only were the Nazis funded by big businesses, and fought the left wing in the streets; but during the Night of the Long Knives, the more left adjacent factions of the party, who actually wanted some socialism, were wiped out.

  221. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adolph Oliver Busch

    Book 'em Dano, Literal Murder One!

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Gee, Achmed, you don’t seem like you’d be into Radio Birdman. They were nothing like the Carpenters, that’s for sure.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Gary in Gramercy

    I wasn't the type to be into Radio Birdman, Gary, only because I'd never heard of them. I took about 5 minutes to figure out what you even were talking about, but I pulled the video up. Great stuff, man! I liked the sound right away. This one is good enough for a Peak Stupidity music post. Thank you. Also, apparently, I've been spelling Danno wrong my whole life.


    No, they aren't like the Carpenters, granted. Karen played a meaner set of drums. ;-}

  222. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the Confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the War of Northern Aggression.

    I like Germans – the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    FIFY. 🙂

  223. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    All known alphabets, with the exception of hangul and possibly runic, ultimately derive from the Phoenician. Criticizing them will thus expose one to charges of being anti-Semitic.

    Replies: @Jack D

    There is nothing wrong with the Roman alphabet. The Spanish use it and spelling in Spanish is ridiculously easy. The problem is English spelling.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    There is nothing wrong with the Roman alphabet. The Spanish use it and spelling in Spanish is ridiculously easy.
     
    CH. LL. C/QU. C/S/Z. G/J/X.

    The problem is English spelling.
     
    Spelling, or pronunciation? Should we stop writing the T in often, or start pronouncing it? How should we spell fast? "F-æ-s-t", or "F-ah-s-t"?

    • Agree: Hibernian
     
    That someone named "Hibernian" dare spout an opinion on English spelling is as rich as St Stephen's Day Pie paired with a Guinness float.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/you-think-english-spelling-bad-john-derbyshire/

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/irish-spelling-explained-john-derbyshire/amp/

  224. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anonymous

    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash. The three-quarters mick wants to set off bombs in antifa crashpads, specifically targeting the black-clad soft bodies whilst mitigating any collateral damage. The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go. Unleash the Hun for the big stuff.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @PV van der Byl

    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash.

    Hello fellow quarter kraut!

    Let me know when it’s time to break out the feldgrau und Panzers!

  225. @Anonymous
    Off topic, but the Russians did it!! They did it!! The vaccine has been proven both for effectiveness and safety. https://youtu.be/jWgtJBq00ko https://youtu.be/OXQ4Y7XTf6Q

    The Russian Sputnik vaccine is upon us! It's crazy that a Third World country can perform such feats. There is more than meets the eyes.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    The Russian Sputnik vaccine is upon us! It’s crazy that a Third World country can perform such feats. There is more than meets the eyes.

    Putler strikes again!

  226. @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.
     
    And "Democratic" is right there in the name of the "Democratic Party". Are they?

    Socialism meant nothing to Hitler. He did away with the socialism part of NSDAP when he purged the SA. That was a precondition for the support of the army and the industrialists. The Nazis were pretty right wing - nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family. They locked up commies, but not aristocrats.

    I'm surprised at you, Jack - buying into that crap that Jonah Goldberg and others promoted about "Nazis being the real leftists". It's a silly and childish view: "I'm on the Right. Nazis were bad. Therefore they must have been on the Left, because nobody on my side can be bad." You're sounding like somebody calling into Sean Hannity's radio show. You're a lot smarter than that.

    Replies: @fnn

    The Nazis were pretty right wing – nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family.

    The Communists gave up on cultural degeneracy in the 1920s and the last torchlight parade I can recall (aside from Cville) was in support of the candidacy of Hubert Humphrey:
    https://outlet.historicimages.com/products/rrv18601

    https://www.google.com/search?q=hubert+humphrey+torchlight+parade&tbm=bks&sxsrf=ALeKk01xFs4OU7mBbzUNB_YMPbTMkh-Nrw:1599268562319&source=lnt&tbs=bkv:p&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixqLrU69DrAhVrpVkKHSpiDdsQpwUIIQ&biw=1920&bih=1057&dpr=1

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @fnn


    The Communists gave up on cultural degeneracy in the 1920s....
     
    Social degeneracy as a policy is essentially left-wing, unless you're talking about the Spartans or some similar group.
  227. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) - enjoying sadness even - - - that's all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology - and in literature - cf.  - - - JWv Goethe's Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) - ok -

    - and these are all things, without which your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) dwelled on time and time again - not least in St. Mathew's Passion and in lots of cantata's and songs - - - cf. My sighs, Ny Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S
    Mein Kummer nimmet zu
    Und raubt mir alle Ruh,
    Mein Jammerkrug ist ganz
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cvkm2mdNIQ

    So - this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) - in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and - - power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with - words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach's major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals - all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. - And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been - without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  - Strange Reformation - Luther's Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated - yet?) - or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart's God in the cow-stable and in the peasant's fields and anywhere else. and that is - Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don't forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German - now think of Luther's translation of the Bible... Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind - like twins. And Bach was their - Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

    Replies: @bruce county, @PhysicistDave

    Holy shit… I hear tinges of Led Zeppelin Stairway To Heaven in the first minute.

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
  228. @istevelurker
    @D. K.


    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend
     
    No, this is wrong and Steve is giving the benefit of the doubt to the shooter. Danielson's friend Chandler Pappas was alongside him when he was killed. Told Tucker Carlson last night that he and the victim were caught completely off guard and were attacked without provocation. The killer's bullet went through Danielson's can of bear spray. Pappas and Danielson were unarmed and carried the spray for self-defense.

    See: https://www.foxnews.com/media/friend-of-portland-shooting-victim-aaron-danielson-speaks-out-us-needs-a-lot-of-healing.

    Replies: @D. K., @D. K., @D. K.

    I found a blow up of the shooting. ‘Jay’ clearly raised his right arm to spray his armed attacker:

  229. @Old Prude
    @Jack D

    Lover, mover, rover. So how does one pronounce “plover”? Why?

    Replies: @Cortes

    Try “The Chaos” by Trenite:

    http://ncf.idallen.com/english.html

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Cortes

    In particular:

    Mark the difference, moreover,
    Between mover, plover, Dover.
    Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
    Chalice, but police and lice,

  230. @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    Try “The Chaos” by Trenite:

    http://ncf.idallen.com/english.html

    Replies: @Cortes

    In particular:

    Mark the difference, moreover,
    Between mover, plover, Dover.
    Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
    Chalice, but police and lice,

  231. @vhrm
    Generally i avoid this argument because it seems too cute, but in this case it strikes me as apt: Is there anything the current "left" aren't hypocrites about?

    Other than the fact that they rely on armed security and that all the dem politicians seem to have carry permits as a special favor even in places like SF, i assumed that they really DO want to keep guns away from citizens or criminals or crazy people or something.

    But here we have a dude arrested on a gun charge who at the time had pending drug related DUI (with his 11yo daughter in the car) and reckless driving / street racing cases against him (with / vs his 17 yo son at speeds > 110 mph) and ... did anyone take his guns away? give him a stay away order? anything? No. they just dismissed the case.

    Get ready for another round of gun control laws to come out of this one who, again will only be enforce against stodgy dowdy law abiding people who depend on not having a criminal record.

    ETA: i'm curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)

    Replies: @Rob Lee, @Getaclue, @hooodathunkit

    I just read he had an assault rifle and came out blasting multiple rounds leading to his death…– would that make you feel better as to the poor lads departure? “martyred”? He murdered an unarmed man in cold blood, probably in a planned set up with others, and by all descriptions lived his life in the manner of a complete dirt bag the evidence seems to show?– I read his family’s comments on his death were approximately “Glad we, and no one else, will have to deal with him anymore” — in that nature they were I believe, you can check for yourself…., whatever happened to him thereafter his shooting the unarmed man twice in the chest– wherein he is now receiving his “Eternal Reward” — he wasn’t a “martyr” nor was he “martyred”….murderers who get killed receive justice.

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
    @Getaclue

    Handgun or rifle? Yes, it probably was.

    Pistol: https://www.springfield-armory.com/saint-series-pistols/
    Rifle: https://www.springfield-armory.com/saint-series/saint-victor-ar-15-rifles/

  232. @Art Deco
    @Torn and Frayed

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald’s untimely demise.

    It shouldn't. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely. The one sentimental attachment he had was to his dog, who was waiting in the car while he went to buy some money orders.

    Replies: @Sparkon, @Gordo

    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.

    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald’s transfer?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Sparkon



    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.
     
    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald’s transfer?
     
    Because Richard Nixon, who was in the city that day, bribed them to? The way the Shah bribed Ronald Reagan to conspire with the towelheads who overthrew him, because they were all so jealous of Peanut Jimmy.

    I have to bring this up at the next Comic Conspiracy Con.

    Replies: @Sparkon

  233. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    German immigrants managed to push Missouri into the confederacy by marching around St. Louis and beating up ethnic Americans at the outset of the Civil War.

    I like Germans, but the pattern is kind of hard to ignore.

    Replies: @Alden, @James O'Meara, @syonredux, @Svigor, @Hibernian

    The Germans were generally pro-Union. Missouri did not secede. There were many Missourians on both sides. This was typical of the Border States.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  234. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee, Achmed, you don't seem like you'd be into Radio Birdman. They were nothing like the Carpenters, that's for sure.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I wasn’t the type to be into Radio Birdman, Gary, only because I’d never heard of them. I took about 5 minutes to figure out what you even were talking about, but I pulled the video up. Great stuff, man! I liked the sound right away. This one is good enough for a Peak Stupidity music post. Thank you. Also, apparently, I’ve been spelling Danno wrong my whole life.

    No, they aren’t like the Carpenters, granted. Karen played a meaner set of drums. ;-}

  235. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) - enjoying sadness even - - - that's all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology - and in literature - cf.  - - - JWv Goethe's Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) - ok -

    - and these are all things, without which your beloved Johann Sebastian Bach (my beloved Johann Sebastian Bach, too) dwelled on time and time again - not least in St. Mathew's Passion and in lots of cantata's and songs - - - cf. My sighs, Ny Tears.

    My sighs, my tears
    can not be counted.
    When one daily encounters despair
    and the anguish does not fade,
    Ah! Then this pain must already
    be building the road to death for us.2. Rezitativ A
    .
    My dearest God lets me
    still call in vain
    and in my weeping
    no comfort appears to me.
    The hour indeed
    can be seen far in the distance,
    yet still I must plead in vain.3. Choral A
    .
    The God, that has promised me
    His presence always,
    lets Himself be sought in vain
    now in my sorrow.
    Ah! Will He then for ever and ever
    be darkly wrathful over me;
    can and will He now
    not be merciful to us poor as before?4. Rezitativ S
    Mein Kummer nimmet zu
    Und raubt mir alle Ruh,
    Mein Jammerkrug ist ganz
    .
    My turmoil seizes
    and robs me of all rest,
    my vessel of sorrow is completely
    filled up with tears,
    and this anguish will not be stilled,
    and makes me numb and emotionless.
    The troubled night of worry
    presses my congested heart down,
    for which I sing only songs of sorrow.
    Yet, soul, no,
    be comforted in your pain:
    God can transform the wormwood sap
    so easily into the wine of joy
    and preserve for you then many thousand delights.5. Arie B
    .
    Groaning and pitiful weeping
    does not help the sickness of care;
    yet he who looks towards heaven
    and concerns himself there for comfort,
    for him a light of joy can easily
    illuminate the sorrowful breast.6. Choral
    .
    Therefore take hold of yourself, my soul,
    and trust only in Him
    who has created you;
    Let it go how it goes;
    your Father in the heights
    knows the wisdom of all matters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cvkm2mdNIQ

    So - this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language and his pupil Seuse deepened: An inner realm never before seen and spoken about in such detail (= geworted = worded (a new word by Heinrich Seuse) - in such riches, colors, differentiations, and clarity and - - power. Heinrich Seuse also works on the joy part of this inner continent they discovered by cartographing it with - words.

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany,  Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach's major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals - all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. - And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been - without the mystics. 

    For further detail have a look at  - Strange Reformation - Luther's Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin (not translated - yet?) - or a myriad of other texts. Luther referred to Eckhart's God in the cow-stable and in the peasant's fields and anywhere else. and that is - Eckhart and Tauler and Seuse. Don't forget, that Eckhart was the first to preach in German - now think of Luther's translation of the Bible... Eckhart and Luther were of the same kind - like twins. And Bach was their - Heavenly Trumpet and Golden Tongue from Leipzig.

    *****Volker Leppin: Die fremde Reformation. Luthers mystische Wurzeln.
    Verlag C. H. Beck, München 2016.
    247 Seiten, 21,95 EUR.
    ISBN-13: 9783406690815

    Replies: @bruce county, @PhysicistDave

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:

    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) – enjoying sadness even – – – that’s all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology – and in literature – cf. – – – JWv Goethe’s Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) – ok –

    Maybe it is sort of a human thing that self-absorbed, spoiled, coddled adolescents think is unique to themselves?

    Dieter also wrote:

    So – this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language…

    Gee… so nobody before Crazy Eckhart knew that the German language could express sadness, suffering, insecurity, etc.! Quite a guy, that Eckhart — the Germans had no feelings before him.

    Did you know that English had no word for “sadness,” “courage,” “humility,” kindness,” etc. before Shakespeare? I mean, how could mere ordinary people have such feelings before they were allowed to by Eckhart, et al.?

    Do you really believe such nonsense, Dieter?

    You are more lost than I suspected!

    Dieter also wrote:

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany, Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.

    Or just maybe Bach had normal human feelings, feelings that he had in common with all normal human beings, the difference being that Bach had a genius for expressing those feelings musically?

    Y’know, Dylan and Lennon and McCartney are better songwriters than I am (I have tried!). So did Sir Paul have to stand “on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders” in order to write “Yesterday”? Or maybe did McCartney just have ordinary human feelings and, alas, a greater talent for songwriting than I have?

    Dieter also wrote:

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach’s major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals – all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. – And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been – without the mystics.

    Except those of us who have very little sympathy for Luther or even Christianity find that we respond to Bach. Maybe because Bach expresses human feelings, not just Lutheran feelings.

    Dieter also wrote:

    For further detail have a look at – Strange Reformation – Luther’s Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin…

    Your level of parochialism is steadily increasing. Perhaps I should merely point out that more people listen to Bach nowadays than seriously read Luther.

    • Disagree: GoRedWings!
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    This is a very short cultural history of central Europe - how it came to bloom and how it influenced the world seen as a dialectical process between divine inspiration  and earthly soberness and suffering

    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/


    At  the medieval beginning of modern-day central Europe, there is this tension between the Liebfraumilch (Milk of the Madonna - rhine wine! s. link below) and the Milk of the sober way to think (= Milch der frommen Denkungsaart - a German saying, which is often (but not necessarily) brought forward with an ironic sigh.
    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/
    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc. and the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read - clandestine - in Basel by Carthusians - and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of - - the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in  - the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities - still under the control of the founding Carthusian monastery in the Alps, near Grenoble. Hospitals (genuine places of suffering) grew out of monasteries and - grew wine throughout. The Konstanz hospital, now under community control, still do that - and the wine they grow is still called the Spital-Wein. 
    And who got that - The Milk of The Madonna wine from - Nierstein - and sang about it in a truly otherwordly mood - Joni Mitchell. Now, remember what I said about Eckhart as the discoverer and cartographer of our inner landscape of  - - pain - - and now look at the title of the song, in which Jony Mitchell mentions the "Milk of The Madonna Rhine Wine" - it reads: "Don't Interrupt the Sorrow".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6Wsdkll5-s

    Bach is a lot about sex (you can't have twenty kids without a lot of sex), suffering, drugs (drugs, drugs, drugs) - and music, of course. Take the alcohol away from Bach, and you have eradicated him. That's what kept him going, day in day. - Could that have been any other way? I don't know. All I say is: It was that way. To promote coffee, what Bach did, was a risky thing, because all kinds of people claimed, it would be very devastating and lead to "Oriental decay" in the end... Bach didn't care, he liked his coffee, too!
    Coffee was  Bach's other favored drug - I need not mention his coffee hymn - the perfectly fitting Coffee Cantata - quite speedy - but I do nonetheless.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5Ocydot-vA&feature=youtu.be&t=33  

    If we accompany Eckhart to Straßburg, we find a monumental work of art in nearby Colmar - one of such a quality, that it is known now all over the world. - The Isenheierm Altar - it was painted as a means to come to grips with the pain in the hospital of the Antoniter - we are still in Eckharts realm of pain and sorrow and - faith, see? 
    https://www.musee-unterlinden.com/de/categorie_oeuvre/der-isenheimer-altar/

    But here we've crossed the line to psychedelics too because this painting was meant to be a cure - especially for pains induced by the Mother's Corn - the basis for Hoffman's discovery of LSD in - nearby Basel, eight hundred years later. Straßburg was known to suffer from Mother Corn induced crazes - and so were the surrounding regions. - See - full circle:  - the (cultural) core of Europe ist strung out like a bluesy heart between earthly matters of all kind (love, dance, joy, sorrow, painting, cures, music ...) and the rational sobriety, which co-evolved with it. Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein, Gödel, and our contemporary Enzensberger (and don't underestimate Joni Mitchell).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  236. @Hypnotoad666
    @Not Raul


    Were the Feds sent to “arrest” Reinoehl in a similar way to how the SEALs were sent to “capture” OBL?
     
    Or like how they "arrested" Bonnie and Clyde


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/1932_Ford_V-8_containing_the_remains_of_Bonnie_Parker_and_Clyde_Barrow.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy

    To send a message, or to suppress information?

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @JimDandy

    Both, IMHO.

  237. @Jack D
    @Arlo L. Ramsbottom

    Hauser said "Joseph Rosenbaum died fighting for justice. He was practicing Judaism."

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews but she might as well been one for a certain variety of secular Leftist Jew who has left the actual practice of the Jewish religion behind. For them, fighting for justice (by which they really mean "social justice") IS practicing Judaism. They is confused.

    Also, by implication, "fighting for justice" was the ONLY kind of Judaism that Rosenbaum was practicing or in other words, he wasn't really a Jew at all.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews

    The same could be said about you.

    • Replies: @GoRedWings!
    @BenKenobi


    @Jack D

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews

     

    The same could be said about you.
     
    Not entirely correct: He appointed himself.
  238. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @El Dato

    "Every stat about the disease is bogus"

    Yep, confirmed ✔ last Sunday by the very perpetrators of BULL$$$HIT-2020: the CDC. But the economic destruction and psychological terror are all too real.

    Diaper up. Forever.

    Lockdown 2.0 begins T-minus three weeks: prep accordingly.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    • Replies: @MB
    @J.Ross

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXUtsft0Z74

  239. Did Reinoehl have a permit to carry a gun in Oregon?

  240. Is anyone still claiming that the typical white antifa is socially and psychologically similar the average NDSAP supporter?

  241. @Hippopotamusdrome
    He got Jack Ruby'd. Or not. They don't let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he's dead.
    https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1QT8eNpXXXXXgXVXXq6xXFXXXd/Lee-Harvey-Oswald-Foto-Original-Jack-Ruby-Tiro-Arte-Enorme-de-P-steres-TXHOME-D6772.jpg

    Replies: @Oscar Peterson, @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    What was Jack Ruby preventing Oswald from saying? Anything, obviously, but is there something specific? I know little of this matter.

  242. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    There is nothing wrong with the Roman alphabet. The Spanish use it and spelling in Spanish is ridiculously easy. The problem is English spelling.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    There is nothing wrong with the Roman alphabet. The Spanish use it and spelling in Spanish is ridiculously easy.

    CH. LL. C/QU. C/S/Z. G/J/X.

    The problem is English spelling.

    Spelling, or pronunciation? Should we stop writing the T in often, or start pronouncing it? How should we spell fast? “F-æ-s-t”, or “F-ah-s-t”?

    • Agree: Hibernian

    That someone named “Hibernian” dare spout an opinion on English spelling is as rich as St Stephen’s Day Pie paired with a Guinness float.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/you-think-english-spelling-bad-john-derbyshire/

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/irish-spelling-explained-john-derbyshire/amp/

    • LOL: Hibernian
  243. @Jack D
    @International Jew

    Since Grosskreutz means "Great Cross" it would be a strange name for a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JimDandy, @International Jew

    We might have had a Grosskratz, though, that wet spring when there was a big mosquito hatch.

  244. @Oscar Peterson
    @Hippopotamusdrome


    "He got Jack Ruby’d. Or not. They don’t let Doubting Thomases go to the morgue and stick their fingers in the bullet holes to confirm he’s dead."
     
    Good point. My sources say he was actually flown to Wakanda to become the leader in exile of a Progressive White Liberation Army (PWLA) backed by the Wakandan military and their super-awesome military-industrial-tech complex.

    My sources further reveal that Chadwick Boseman is also not dead and is negotiating with Reinoehl for the latter to play his radical white sidekick in Black Panther II.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    There’s video on Youtube showing he was one man in a hit team. Why is nothing going on with that? Show me the news article with their pictures and descriptions? Show me the FBI press briefing telling us about the others. They are at large and a danger to the public.

    But its just “yeah, the guys dead now, move along”. The scales tip in favor of conspiracy theory.

    • Agree: Gordo
  245. @Getaclue
    @vhrm

    I just read he had an assault rifle and came out blasting multiple rounds leading to his death...-- would that make you feel better as to the poor lads departure? "martyred"? He murdered an unarmed man in cold blood, probably in a planned set up with others, and by all descriptions lived his life in the manner of a complete dirt bag the evidence seems to show?-- I read his family's comments on his death were approximately "Glad we, and no one else, will have to deal with him anymore" -- in that nature they were I believe, you can check for yourself...., whatever happened to him thereafter his shooting the unarmed man twice in the chest-- wherein he is now receiving his "Eternal Reward" -- he wasn't a "martyr" nor was he "martyred"....murderers who get killed receive justice.

    Replies: @hooodathunkit

  246. @duncsbaby
    @Mr. Anon

    Reinoehl was arrested in June for driving @110 mph w/an 11 yr old girl in the vehicle, while high and holding a concealed weapon. THIS IS FU#*ING INSANE. Why wasn't this guy in jail?! No wonder he was shooting people dead on the street 2 months later. He assumed that he was above the law. Apparently in Oregon there is no greater white privilege than Portland Antifa. The law won't touch them at all. It took the U.S. Marshals to do the job that the Oregon courts should've taken care of. Btw, the car this fighter for the oppressed was driving was a Cadillac. I can't even look at a Cadillac w/out my credit rating taking a dip. This waste of human space was putting his 11 yr old's life in danger while high in one.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    Why wasn’t this guy in jail?!

    Possibly because he was made a deal that he wouldn’t have to go to prison if he would agree to become an “asset”. I suspect most of Antifa members work this way too. Doubtful skid row druggies are so strongly interested in politics and even if they were that they would gravitate to such a stupidly ridiculous ideology.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    @Hippopotamusdrome


    Possibly because he was made a deal that he wouldn’t have to go to prison if he would agree to become an “asset”.
     
    That would make sense if the local prosecutors, Portland mayor, and Portland police chief intended to round all the Antifas up at the end of some moderate period of time.

    Can you see any evidence of that? I certainly can't.

    Everything I have seen and heard from the pathetic Ted Wheeler tells me he lacks the stomach to offer Antifa/BLM the least bit of resistance. Apparently, he has recently fled Portland. And his only political challenger for mayor is actually a memeber of Antifa and BLM herself.
  247. @vhrm
    Generally i avoid this argument because it seems too cute, but in this case it strikes me as apt: Is there anything the current "left" aren't hypocrites about?

    Other than the fact that they rely on armed security and that all the dem politicians seem to have carry permits as a special favor even in places like SF, i assumed that they really DO want to keep guns away from citizens or criminals or crazy people or something.

    But here we have a dude arrested on a gun charge who at the time had pending drug related DUI (with his 11yo daughter in the car) and reckless driving / street racing cases against him (with / vs his 17 yo son at speeds > 110 mph) and ... did anyone take his guns away? give him a stay away order? anything? No. they just dismissed the case.

    Get ready for another round of gun control laws to come out of this one who, again will only be enforce against stodgy dowdy law abiding people who depend on not having a criminal record.

    ETA: i'm curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)

    Replies: @Rob Lee, @Getaclue, @hooodathunkit

    ETA: i’m curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)

    Yes.
    Knowing his personality, they staked the place out with unmarked cars at a good distance; didn’t want to assault inside the apartment building. Reinoehl made them quickly, but couldn’t stand it much longer and made a run for it. According to two witnesses the cops let him shoot a bit before returning the favor; so it was clearly a ‘good’ shoot. Not a lot of choices when your suspect believes they’re in a holy war and you’re the minion of Satan … or when your suspect thinks he’s going to get 20-life for a cold-blooded murder and spend his last days assraped alternately by supremacists and darkies.

    • Replies: @S
    @hooodathunkit


    Not a lot of choices when your suspect believes they’re in a holy war and you’re the minion of Satan...
     
    Yes, when everyone else sees this...

    https://i2-prod.belfastlive.co.uk/incoming/article14234258.ece/ALTERNATES/s810/John-2.jpg

    The Antifa sort will see this..

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7SG5_chQ-IA/T0NJ3Kv9P_I/AAAAAAAAITE/1jiYZgNGt_o/s1600/warsaw-ghetto-uprising-ww2-010_e.jpg
  248. @fnn
    @Mr. Anon


    The Nazis were pretty right wing – nostaligia for the middle ages, torchlight parades, opposing those forces that promoted cultural degeneracy and sought to abolish the family.
     
    The Communists gave up on cultural degeneracy in the 1920s and the last torchlight parade I can recall (aside from Cville) was in support of the candidacy of Hubert Humphrey:
    https://outlet.historicimages.com/products/rrv18601

    https://www.google.com/search?q=hubert+humphrey+torchlight+parade&tbm=bks&sxsrf=ALeKk01xFs4OU7mBbzUNB_YMPbTMkh-Nrw:1599268562319&source=lnt&tbs=bkv:p&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixqLrU69DrAhVrpVkKHSpiDdsQpwUIIQ&biw=1920&bih=1057&dpr=1

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The Communists gave up on cultural degeneracy in the 1920s….

    Social degeneracy as a policy is essentially left-wing, unless you’re talking about the Spartans or some similar group.

  249. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    To claim that all of you just learned all your math from books without ever having a teacher is to be purely bullshitting or forgetting your own past.
     
    No, it really isn't.

    My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. Any adult of normal intelligence can teach kids to read between ages four and six. I did it with my own kids (okay, I started before age four), so I have seen it from both the side of the child and the parent. It only takes patience.

    And once you can read, you can teach yourself anything, at least anything taught in a classroom.

    Sure, you need a bicycle to learn to ride a bicycle, but that makes my point: that is not taught in a classroom! It is taught by normal parents in the course of life. Easily.

    Do some kids require help with long division or fractions? Sure. But the average grade-school teacher is a mathematical idiot. Better to be taught by the average adult.

    I.e., a parent.

    Education majors are stupid, by the test scores. If you do not remember how dumb your grade-school teachers were, you were probably not paying attention.

    I remember in first grade our reading book said the final vowel in "pony" was the same as the vowel in "bit" rather than in "beet."

    This is of course untrue in most of the United States, as dictionaries of American English generally confirm.

    In particular, my first-grade teacher herself, and everyone else I knew in my hometown, said "pohnee" not "pohnih."

    So, I pointed out this obvious error to my teacher.

    She insisted that the textbook was right because it was the textbook.

    Despite the fact that neither she nor anyone she knew nor the majority of Americans spoke that way.

    At which point I concluded that she was a moron.

    Look at Liping Ma's study of American elementary teachers' knowledge of grade-school math in her Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: not 100 % morons, but an awfully large number.

    Maybe you just really liked your grade-school teachers and did not care that they were morons. Or maybe you, as a statistical fluke, actually had smart grade-school teachers.

    But whether you look at the SAT scores, or the long-time insistence on teaching "whole language" as a means of learning to read, or Dr. Ma's study of US grade-school teachers' lack of basic numeracy, the reality is clear:

    Grade-school teacher in America going back many decades are not-very-bright babysitters. An adult of normal intelligence can do better (who would choose "whole-language"?). And subnormal adults can get help if they need it.

    No, American public schools were created to control and homogenize their charges. They were not created to optimize learning.

    At least, in the mid-twentieth century, the homogenized products of those schools usually were not a threat to their fellow citizens.

    Now, the public schools are citadels of barbarism.

    If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished.

    For the kids. And civilization.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Ron Mexico, @Alden, @Escher

    Or better quality teachers can be recruited by paying them higher salaries and incentivizing them through performance based bonuses.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Escher

    Yea, right, the teacher's unions will really go for those performance based bonuses.

  250. Steve Sailer Retweeted

    Matthew Yglesias

    @mattyglesias
    Does anyone understand *why* The Generals are so determined to be engaged in Afghanistan forever?

    Afghanistan is a nation of Joseph Rosenbaums.

    Was Joseph really trying to kill Kyle Rittenhouse, or just rape him? Then again, at 17, Kyle may have aged out of that particular danger.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  251. @Sparkon
    @Art Deco


    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.
     
    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald's transfer?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.

    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald’s transfer?

    Because Richard Nixon, who was in the city that day, bribed them to? The way the Shah bribed Ronald Reagan to conspire with the towelheads who overthrew him, because they were all so jealous of Peanut Jimmy.

    I have to bring this up at the next Comic Conspiracy Con.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Comic Conspiracy Con is just the place for you Reg, since you seem determined to play the online comedy and ridicule routine, rather than addressing my point.

    If Ruby was a known thug, what was he doing in the Dallas police station during Oswald's transfer? It's a simple question. If you can't answer it, be still, rather than scoring an own goal with your giddy fantasies.


    Nixon was a greasy operator who had fallen in debt gambling in Havana, but had his debts covered by his "pal" Bebe Rebozo, a suspected hood, with whom Nixon vacationed on many occasions, often playing "King of the Pool" with Rebozo, a water game that presented plenty of opportunities for the two men to, you know, rub skin.


    https://spartacus-educational.com/JFKrebozo3.jpg

    Nixon lied about being in Dallas at the time of Kennedy's assassination. Since he had legitimate business in Dallas at the time, there was no apparent reason for Nixon to lie about it, other than a guilty conscience.

    People lie when they are trying to conceal something, like GHW Bush did when he claimed he never used the term "Voodoo Economics" during the 1980 presidential campaign.

    When a video surfaced of Bush using the term "Voodoo Economics" in reference to Reagan's economic plan, Poppy insisted that he had been joking.

    Of course everyone recognized that ol' Poppy was a real comedian - a regular laugh-a-minute guy - all you had to do was read his lips.

  252. @vhrm
    @Rob Lee

    That "tough men restrainedly doing a tough job that needs to be done" vibe is what I generally hope for and I hope that's how it went down here.

    Yesterday's information release somewhat cryptically said that Reinoehl "was armed". Not that he threatened police, let alone attacked them, just that he was armed.

    It was early hours and they were surely still collecting statements and all.

    A bit of clarification today (Friday) is that he had only a pistol, not the previously rumored rifle, but still no statement that he used it.
    (https://nypost.com/2020/09/04/alleged-portland-shooter-michael-reinoehl-had-gun-when-killed-cops/ )

    Let's see how it develops...

    Replies: @vhrm, @Jim Don Bob

    To continue… it looks like the cops have gone from “was armed” to
    “was armed and had drawn the weapon”.

    At this point it sounds pretty unlikely that he shot at them, or they would have said so.

    From a WSJ article this evening even the “drawn” sounds … questionable:

    Law-enforcement officials said Mr. Reinoehl, 48 years old, was armed with a handgun and had drawn the weapon, which led our members of the task force to open fire as he tried to drive away. They shot at him again as he ditched the car and attempted to flee on foot, the officials said. He eventually collapsed in the street and was pronounced dead at the scene.

    (https://www.wsj.com/articles/attorney-general-praises-law-enforcement-after-pursuit-killing-of-michael-reinoehl-11599245921?mod=business_minor_pos4 )

    How was he threatening them “as he tried to drive away” and then later got out of the car and attempted to flee on foot and CONTINUED to threaten them but during this whole time but he never got around to shooting at them?

    I really hope there’s video of this that shows them to have been reasonably threatened, because so far it’s sounding pretty sad for the police side. Even if t was legal, this was a pretty crappy apprehension. A multi-agency “violent perpetrator” (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise…

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @vhrm



    they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

     

    Uh, yeah, that's how it's supposed to work.

    Cops: Stop! Drop your gun!

    Fugitive hitman on the lam holding a gun: No.

    Cops: *pew pew pew*

    By the book.

    Replies: @Svigor

    , @Hibernian
    @vhrm

    The absolute rule that cops can shoot a fleeing felon is gone, but if the fleeing felon:

    Is wanted for at least Murder 2,

    Has a firearm, and

    Has very recently pointed the firearm at the cops,

    I'd call it a good shoot.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @PhysicistDave
    @vhrm

    vhrm asked skeptically:


    A multi-agency “violent perpetrator” (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?
     
    He had already confessed in the interview with Vice to the murder.

    Yeah, if I had been a cop, at the sight of his handgun, I would have started shooting. You wouldn't have? Really?

    vhrm also wrote:

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise…
     
    Do vests protect against a head shot? I think the cops wanted to spend the night with their families, not lying on a slab in the morgue.
  253. @Ron Mexico
    @PhysicistDave

    "If America is to endure, the public schools must be defunded and abolished."
    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism....
    Your solution is too simplistic.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Ron Mexico wrote to me:

    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism….
    Your solution is too simplistic.

    No civil rights issues arise: I want to abolish the schools for all races.

    Of course, under federalism, the states have to abolish the schools separately. Nothing happens overnight.

    Your objections are simplistic: Almost no public schools existed in 1800. By 1900, they were nation-wide. It’s reversible: no reason they cannot be abolished before 2100.

    The brick-and-mortar business model for schools no longer makes any sense at all. They are dinosaurs. Inertia rules short-term, but the logic of the situation will eventually prevail.

    The only issue is will responsible people keep their eyes on what is necessary for the children. The discrediting of schools due to Covid gives us a chance to quick-start the inevitable.

    Defund the schools!

    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @PhysicistDave


    Defund the schools!
     
    The Taliban agree with you.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Malla

  254. @BenKenobi
    @Jack D


    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews
     
    The same could be said about you.

    Replies: @GoRedWings!

    No one appointed Hauser the spokesperson of the Jews

    The same could be said about you.

    Not entirely correct: He appointed himself.

  255. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    Suffering, feeling sad, insecure, forever longing (in vain) – enjoying sadness even – – – that’s all pretty much a puberty thing (well documented in social psychology and in evolutionary psychology – and in literature – cf. – – – JWv Goethe’s Werther, a novel, Napoleon loved and adored) – ok –
     
    Maybe it is sort of a human thing that self-absorbed, spoiled, coddled adolescents think is unique to themselves?

    Dieter also wrote:

    So – this is the exploration of something that Eckhart discovered in the German language...
     
    Gee... so nobody before Crazy Eckhart knew that the German language could express sadness, suffering, insecurity, etc.! Quite a guy, that Eckhart -- the Germans had no feelings before him.

    Did you know that English had no word for "sadness," "courage," "humility," kindness," etc. before Shakespeare? I mean, how could mere ordinary people have such feelings before they were allowed to by Eckhart, et al.?

    Do you really believe such nonsense, Dieter?

    You are more lost than I suspected!

    Dieter also wrote:

    You could always argue, that Bach fell from the sky and was suddenly there. Of course. But it would be against all odds. In the real world of 17th century (pietist) protestant Germany, Bach stood on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders.
     
    Or just maybe Bach had normal human feelings, feelings that he had in common with all normal human beings, the difference being that Bach had a genius for expressing those feelings musically?

    Y'know, Dylan and Lennon and McCartney are better songwriters than I am (I have tried!). So did Sir Paul have to stand "on Eckharts and Seuses shoulders" in order to write "Yesterday"? Or maybe did McCartney just have ordinary human feelings and, alas, a greater talent for songwriting than I have?

    Dieter also wrote:

    The protestant God you find when you go through Bach’s major works is one that is seen and worshipped through the minds and souls of individuals – all of them counting in their earthly and quite human (that is the Jesus part) sufferings and joys. – And this is just as impossible as Luther would have been – without the mystics.
     
    Except those of us who have very little sympathy for Luther or even Christianity find that we respond to Bach. Maybe because Bach expresses human feelings, not just Lutheran feelings.

    Dieter also wrote:

    For further detail have a look at – Strange Reformation – Luther’s Mystic Roots***** by Volker Leppin...
     
    Your level of parochialism is steadily increasing. Perhaps I should merely point out that more people listen to Bach nowadays than seriously read Luther.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    This is a very short cultural history of central Europe – how it came to bloom and how it influenced the world seen as a dialectical process between divine inspiration  and earthly soberness and suffering

    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/

    At  the medieval beginning of modern-day central Europe, there is this tension between the Liebfraumilch (Milk of the Madonna – rhine wine! s. link below) and the Milk of the sober way to think (= Milch der frommen Denkungsaart – a German saying, which is often (but not necessarily) brought forward with an ironic sigh.
    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/
    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc. and the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read – clandestine – in Basel by Carthusians – and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of – – the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in  – the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities – still under the control of the founding Carthusian monastery in the Alps, near Grenoble. Hospitals (genuine places of suffering) grew out of monasteries and – grew wine throughout. The Konstanz hospital, now under community control, still do that – and the wine they grow is still called the Spital-Wein. 
    And who got that – The Milk of The Madonna wine from – Nierstein – and sang about it in a truly otherwordly mood – Joni Mitchell. Now, remember what I said about Eckhart as the discoverer and cartographer of our inner landscape of  – – pain – – and now look at the title of the song, in which Jony Mitchell mentions the “Milk of The Madonna Rhine Wine” – it reads: “Don’t Interrupt the Sorrow”.

    Bach is a lot about sex (you can’t have twenty kids without a lot of sex), suffering, drugs (drugs, drugs, drugs) – and music, of course. Take the alcohol away from Bach, and you have eradicated him. That’s what kept him going, day in day. – Could that have been any other way? I don’t know. All I say is: It was that way. To promote coffee, what Bach did, was a risky thing, because all kinds of people claimed, it would be very devastating and lead to “Oriental decay” in the end… Bach didn’t care, he liked his coffee, too!
    Coffee was  Bach’s other favored drug – I need not mention his coffee hymn – the perfectly fitting Coffee Cantata – quite speedy – but I do nonetheless.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5Ocydot-vA&feature=youtu.be&t=33  

    If we accompany Eckhart to Straßburg, we find a monumental work of art in nearby Colmar – one of such a quality, that it is known now all over the world. – The Isenheierm Altar – it was painted as a means to come to grips with the pain in the hospital of the Antoniter – we are still in Eckharts realm of pain and sorrow and – faith, see? 
    https://www.musee-unterlinden.com/de/categorie_oeuvre/der-isenheimer-altar/

    But here we’ve crossed the line to psychedelics too because this painting was meant to be a cure – especially for pains induced by the Mother’s Corn – the basis for Hoffman’s discovery of LSD in – nearby Basel, eight hundred years later. Straßburg was known to suffer from Mother Corn induced crazes – and so were the surrounding regions. – See – full circle:  – the (cultural) core of Europe ist strung out like a bluesy heart between earthly matters of all kind (love, dance, joy, sorrow, painting, cures, music …) and the rational sobriety, which co-evolved with it. Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein, Gödel, and our contemporary Enzensberger (and don’t underestimate Joni Mitchell).

    • Thanks: Oscar Peterson
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc.
     
    You haven't figured out that I, and most of our contemporaries, are not real big on the Middle Ages??

    Bubonic plague, no flush toilets, no anesthesia, the hunts for heretics, and a not-exactly-inviting attitude towards the scientific method (to be a scientist is to be s skeptic) -- thanks, but I think I prefer the Enlightenment.

    Dieter also wrote:

    the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read – clandestine – in Basel by Carthusians – and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of – – the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in – the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities...
     
    If I understand you correctly, you seem to be promulgating a theory that alcoholism is the root of human progress.

    Sorry, but I am an old-fashioned guy: I think alcoholism is bad.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein...
     
    Do I have to think about those guys? Do I really, really have to?

    No, thankfully, I don't.

    I think instead I will think about Locke and Hume and Newton and Maxwell and Gauss and Riemann... and, well, you get the idea.

    You are giving us a very nice picture of how a true decadent views the civilization whose wreckage he now lives in.

    And for that, I thank you, Dieter.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  256. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.

    I suppose the teachers could be private tutors. Some kids over say 10 can do online schooling by themselves. Others just can’t. Or won’t

    Not all jobs can be done online at home. Plenty of people can work solely at home. Others just can’t.

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.

    We can’t go back to child and teen labor as long as American adults are unemployed and the capitalist pigs chamber of commerce insists on bringing in non White foreign labor for every job from Dr to dishwasher.

    For most of human history child and teen labor and training worked very well. Only because adult men died in their early forties or earlier.

    So the labor force needed constant replenishment from young teens and even younger kids.

    But now that adults work till they’re in their mid sixties, there’s no need for teen workers any more.

    We can’t reduce wages any more by putting teens into the workforce. There might be a better solution than public high school, 4 years of college, grad school, internship , and delaying adult hood till 35, but at the present time, there’s no alternative.

    Look at anti fa, 20 to 40 year old unemployed college educated Whites. If they had full time jobs, kids to care for, homes to maintain, they wouldn’t be in anti fa.

    All we can do is take care of our families.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @PhysicistDave

    Alden wrote to me:

    Abolish public schools and what happens to the kids. Most mothers are either working or on welfare because it’s near impossible for a 1 income 2 parent family to keep 1 parent at home.

    Workers in actual productive jobs today — agriculture, manufacturing, etc. — are enormously more productive than workers were in the 1950s.

    So why was a single-worker income sufficient then and not now?

    Mainly because productive workers are paying huge “implicit taxes” to the parasites in the verbalist overclass. (Note: by “implicit taxes,” I mean the lower wages and higher prices that exist due to all the wealth siphoned off by the parasites.)

    So, yes, along with abolishing the schools, we also need to abolish the universities (lots of parasites there!), the compliance, regulatory, and diversity officers, the non-medical personnel who get fat off of our “medical system,” the whole national war machine, etc.

    One wage earner per family working 30 hours a week should easily provide nicely for a family — if our economy were not infested with parasites.

    Alden wrote to me:

    My plan for getting rid of public schools is to make private school tuition plus uniforms, transportation sports and club costs 100 % tax deductible. That would mean most private school parents wouldn’t pay any state or federal tax. Ideally, the tuition deduction would apply to property taxes as well.

    Fine with me, as long as you include homeschools as private schools.

    But we will still need to get to the root of the problem: we need to deprive members of the non-productive verbalist overclass of their jobs.

    They need to learn to engage in productive labor.

    Or starve.

    I suspect many of them would rather starve than actually do honest work.

    • Agree: Gordo
  257. General Veers, prepare your troops for a surface attack

  258. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    This is a very short cultural history of central Europe - how it came to bloom and how it influenced the world seen as a dialectical process between divine inspiration  and earthly soberness and suffering

    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/


    At  the medieval beginning of modern-day central Europe, there is this tension between the Liebfraumilch (Milk of the Madonna - rhine wine! s. link below) and the Milk of the sober way to think (= Milch der frommen Denkungsaart - a German saying, which is often (but not necessarily) brought forward with an ironic sigh.
    https://www.germanwines.de/tourism/landmarks-of-wine-culture/landmarks-and-wineculture-details/highlight/liebfrauenstift-kirchenstueck-vineyard-the-original-liebfraumilch/
    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc. and the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read - clandestine - in Basel by Carthusians - and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of - - the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in  - the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities - still under the control of the founding Carthusian monastery in the Alps, near Grenoble. Hospitals (genuine places of suffering) grew out of monasteries and - grew wine throughout. The Konstanz hospital, now under community control, still do that - and the wine they grow is still called the Spital-Wein. 
    And who got that - The Milk of The Madonna wine from - Nierstein - and sang about it in a truly otherwordly mood - Joni Mitchell. Now, remember what I said about Eckhart as the discoverer and cartographer of our inner landscape of  - - pain - - and now look at the title of the song, in which Jony Mitchell mentions the "Milk of The Madonna Rhine Wine" - it reads: "Don't Interrupt the Sorrow".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6Wsdkll5-s

    Bach is a lot about sex (you can't have twenty kids without a lot of sex), suffering, drugs (drugs, drugs, drugs) - and music, of course. Take the alcohol away from Bach, and you have eradicated him. That's what kept him going, day in day. - Could that have been any other way? I don't know. All I say is: It was that way. To promote coffee, what Bach did, was a risky thing, because all kinds of people claimed, it would be very devastating and lead to "Oriental decay" in the end... Bach didn't care, he liked his coffee, too!
    Coffee was  Bach's other favored drug - I need not mention his coffee hymn - the perfectly fitting Coffee Cantata - quite speedy - but I do nonetheless.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5Ocydot-vA&feature=youtu.be&t=33  

    If we accompany Eckhart to Straßburg, we find a monumental work of art in nearby Colmar - one of such a quality, that it is known now all over the world. - The Isenheierm Altar - it was painted as a means to come to grips with the pain in the hospital of the Antoniter - we are still in Eckharts realm of pain and sorrow and - faith, see? 
    https://www.musee-unterlinden.com/de/categorie_oeuvre/der-isenheimer-altar/

    But here we've crossed the line to psychedelics too because this painting was meant to be a cure - especially for pains induced by the Mother's Corn - the basis for Hoffman's discovery of LSD in - nearby Basel, eight hundred years later. Straßburg was known to suffer from Mother Corn induced crazes - and so were the surrounding regions. - See - full circle:  - the (cultural) core of Europe ist strung out like a bluesy heart between earthly matters of all kind (love, dance, joy, sorrow, painting, cures, music ...) and the rational sobriety, which co-evolved with it. Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein, Gödel, and our contemporary Enzensberger (and don't underestimate Joni Mitchell).

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:

    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc.

    You haven’t figured out that I, and most of our contemporaries, are not real big on the Middle Ages??

    Bubonic plague, no flush toilets, no anesthesia, the hunts for heretics, and a not-exactly-inviting attitude towards the scientific method (to be a scientist is to be s skeptic) — thanks, but I think I prefer the Enlightenment.

    Dieter also wrote:

    the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read – clandestine – in Basel by Carthusians – and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of – – the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in – the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities…

    If I understand you correctly, you seem to be promulgating a theory that alcoholism is the root of human progress.

    Sorry, but I am an old-fashioned guy: I think alcoholism is bad.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein…

    Do I have to think about those guys? Do I really, really have to?

    No, thankfully, I don’t.

    I think instead I will think about Locke and Hume and Newton and Maxwell and Gauss and Riemann… and, well, you get the idea.

    You are giving us a very nice picture of how a true decadent views the civilization whose wreckage he now lives in.

    And for that, I thank you, Dieter.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    I see, Physicist Dave - what you're after ist the virginity of the artistic production. - It shall follow the harshest (or purest) moral guidelines - yours? (cf. Jonathan Franzen's novels Freedom (not least about Bob Dylan) and - Purity - about exactly that - purity as a moral guideline through modern lives).


    I'd hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin and confusion (Dosstojewski, Thomas Mann), dirt, honor, madness and outrage (The Illiad, Iggy Pop, Shakespeare's History Plays, Francois Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel), Rainer Maria Rilke - cf. Collected Poems ed. C. F. McIntyre - the best English Rilke ever). Add to this list Wagner, Beethoven, - and Bach, as well as Joni Mitchell, John Coltrane, Phil Glass and Wayne Shorter.

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for - geometry without contradictions/distractions (= problems, dirt). 

    But Gauß arrived at this goal via a simple declaration: That for him a straight in "physical geometry", as he put it, was straight because he would only be interested in the definition of it as long as this definition was free of empirical hindrances: Let's imagine, he (with the refreshing openness and straightforwardness of the Brunswick Welf, he indeed was) claimed, that points of light form a straight by perfectly alining one after another, because in the - hypothesized room I am looking at, there'd be no distractions). -

    - All right, you get this kind of purity if you imagine a physical world without distractions - he himself said so! Imagine conditions, under which there are no distractions. - In other words - if you look upon physical reality as an ideal realm.

    So - Gauß's theoretical purity should rather not be understood as a proposition of the real world. To do that would be the mistake, the early Wittgenstein made in his Tractatus. And that was the very mistake which the later Wittgenstein used to call a - grammatical - error.

    The late Wittgenstein argued throughout, that formal systems cannot help us out as soon as inner-worldly (human) problems arise because these are of a different nature than the ones we can solve with formal tools like logic or algebra. He showed that tirelessly - example after example in his Notebooks and in his Remarks and in On Certainty.


    I still see your point, Physicist Dave, to live without drugs (sins?). And I can quite easily respect this form of asceticism. 

    I'd just conclude from the above, that your ascetic world is definitely not the world of the artist, for example - or that of Meister Eckhart and his  - dirty (=worldly) God. A God within the turmoils of the everyday world and within each and every - sinner's - soul.
    -

    - Now, have a look at - Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/"rips" (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, - made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald's Isenheimer Altar or Renoir or August Sander/ Daido Moriyama / Ansel Adams (Hockney, Warhol, Picasso, Hopper) - or listen to Johann Sebastian Bach in this - twilight - or, hehe, Let it Be.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  259. @vhrm
    @vhrm

    To continue... it looks like the cops have gone from "was armed" to
    "was armed and had drawn the weapon".

    At this point it sounds pretty unlikely that he shot at them, or they would have said so.

    From a WSJ article this evening even the "drawn" sounds ... questionable:


    Law-enforcement officials said Mr. Reinoehl, 48 years old, was armed with a handgun and had drawn the weapon, which led our members of the task force to open fire as he tried to drive away. They shot at him again as he ditched the car and attempted to flee on foot, the officials said. He eventually collapsed in the street and was pronounced dead at the scene.
     
    (https://www.wsj.com/articles/attorney-general-praises-law-enforcement-after-pursuit-killing-of-michael-reinoehl-11599245921?mod=business_minor_pos4 )

    How was he threatening them "as he tried to drive away" and then later got out of the car and attempted to flee on foot and CONTINUED to threaten them but during this whole time but he never got around to shooting at them?

    I really hope there's video of this that shows them to have been reasonably threatened, because so far it's sounding pretty sad for the police side. Even if t was legal, this was a pretty crappy apprehension. A multi-agency "violent perpetrator" (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise...

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hibernian, @PhysicistDave

    they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    Uh, yeah, that’s how it’s supposed to work.

    Cops: Stop! Drop your gun!

    Fugitive hitman on the lam holding a gun: No.

    Cops: *pew pew pew*

    By the book.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Libertardians live in alternate reality, where their ignorant and disingenuous armchair quarterbacking of po-po is of positive significance to anyone else. People who aren't libertardians/antifa/BLM are capable of thinking about having to do cops' job for a few seconds are are instantly repelled. They next feel a bit of (even if only grudging) respect for people who aren't so repelled, and that informs the rest of their thinking about cops.

    Yes, cops are enforcers of a malignant regime who spend most of their time sitting around or writing tickets. Yes, acting the fool with them when they feel threatened is a great way to get dead (and yes, in a country of 350m people, you're going to have the occasional unjustified homicide at the hands of police). Regime change, state laws, and not acting the fool are the ways forward. Libertardians sperging online about how guns and arrest procedure should really work is beyond tedious.

  260. @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    To send a message, or to suppress information?

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Both, IMHO.

  261. @Paco Wové
    @Digital Samizdat

    It's as though there's a directive to work that into every single story.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

    I could have been a thug but then I took a knee to my neck.

  262. @El Dato
    @Anon 2

    That's just "String Theory" though, which just a small part of "Physics" and people are gonna do what they gonna do to keep the bacon the table (or something else, considering the population makeup of people interested in highly abstract ideas)

    The good fight goes on at Peter Woit's blog (trigger warning: reads and believes in the NYT)


    While one of my least favorite aspects of discussions of this subject is the various ways the terms “real” and “reality” get used, I have realized that one has to get over that when trying to follow people’s arguments, since the terms have become standard sign-posts. What’s at issue here are fundamental questions about physical science and reality, including the question of what the words “real” and “reality” might mean. In Quantum Reality, Baggott provides a well-informed, reliable and enlightening tour of the increasingly complex and contentious terrain of arguments over what our best fundamental theory is telling us about what is physically “real”.
     
    It's like "blackness" really.

    Also:


    One of the topics the students are presented is What is String Theory?, and you can watch the 2019 video or look at the slides. Timo Weigand’s presentation can be accurately described as pure, unadulterated hype, with not a hint of the existence of any significant problem with ideas presented. In the Q and A yesterday, Weigand did come up with a new piece of “evidence for string theory”: it “predicts” no continuous spin representations.

    I can’t begin to understand why anyone thinks it’s all right for CERN to subject impressionable students to this kind of thing. Someone, not me, should be complaining to the organizers and to CERN management.
     

    No I don't know anything about that stuff. But neither does anyone else, really.

    Replies: @Anon 2

    Yes, I’ve been a reader of Woit’s Not Even Wrong blog for a number
    of years now. And, of course, applied physics (condensed matter physics,
    optics, nuclear physics, acoustics, etc), which is perhaps 80% of physics,
    is still making progress, although at a glacial pace. But new fundamental
    discoveries, on the scale of Quantum Mechanics or Theory of Relativity,
    have basically dried up in the last 30-40 years. Astrophysics and Cosmology
    are slowly accumulating knowledge, but, again, without new fundamental
    breakthroughs, although the discovery of the accelerated expansion of
    the Universe, although still controversial, might qualify as such. I certainly
    wouldn’t advise anyone to go into physics now unless you’re a genius or
    an immigrant, i.e., someone who has fewer choices in life. The last Heroic
    Age in Physics was in the 1970s when the Standard Model of Elementary
    Particles was being completed. Compared to that era physics today seems to be
    basically dead

  263. @vhrm
    @Rob Lee

    That "tough men restrainedly doing a tough job that needs to be done" vibe is what I generally hope for and I hope that's how it went down here.

    Yesterday's information release somewhat cryptically said that Reinoehl "was armed". Not that he threatened police, let alone attacked them, just that he was armed.

    It was early hours and they were surely still collecting statements and all.

    A bit of clarification today (Friday) is that he had only a pistol, not the previously rumored rifle, but still no statement that he used it.
    (https://nypost.com/2020/09/04/alleged-portland-shooter-michael-reinoehl-had-gun-when-killed-cops/ )

    Let's see how it develops...

    Replies: @vhrm, @Jim Don Bob

    It would not bother me one bit if the cops shot Reinoehl while he was on his knees begging for his life. That’s one less POS Antifa hero to deal with.

  264. @anon
    @Alden

    Check the ADL website.

    I am looking at adl.org right now. There is nothing like what you claim on their site. Nothing.

    According to ADL, Rosenbaun, Huber and Grosskeurtz are all Jewish martyred to anti semitism.

    False. Nothing of the sort is there.

    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.

    Replies: @Svigor

    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.

    Contrary to what you may have learned from judaism, the goyim are not here to serve you.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Svigor

    Contrary to what you may have learned from judaism, the goyim are not here to serve you.

    lol, dude, either adl.org has the page Alden claims or it doesn't. Facts are what they are. Go look for yourself, it's not there. She's either stupid and got fooled by a fake or she's telling a really, really stupid lie.

    Don't live by lies.

  265. @Hippopotamusdrome
    @vhrm



    they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

     

    Uh, yeah, that's how it's supposed to work.

    Cops: Stop! Drop your gun!

    Fugitive hitman on the lam holding a gun: No.

    Cops: *pew pew pew*

    By the book.

    Replies: @Svigor

    Libertardians live in alternate reality, where their ignorant and disingenuous armchair quarterbacking of po-po is of positive significance to anyone else. People who aren’t libertardians/antifa/BLM are capable of thinking about having to do cops’ job for a few seconds are are instantly repelled. They next feel a bit of (even if only grudging) respect for people who aren’t so repelled, and that informs the rest of their thinking about cops.

    Yes, cops are enforcers of a malignant regime who spend most of their time sitting around or writing tickets. Yes, acting the fool with them when they feel threatened is a great way to get dead (and yes, in a country of 350m people, you’re going to have the occasional unjustified homicide at the hands of police). Regime change, state laws, and not acting the fool are the ways forward. Libertardians sperging online about how guns and arrest procedure should really work is beyond tedious.

  266. @Oscar Peterson
    @Alden


    "Roehnoel was killed by federal marshals. They’re a heavily black organization."
     
    Really? I had no idea. How/when did that happen?

    Replies: @West reanimator

    It didn’t. He made it up.

  267. @Reg Cæsar
    @Sparkon



    It shouldn’t. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely.
     
    That being the case, why did the Dallas PD permit his presence in the police station at the time of Oswald’s transfer?
     
    Because Richard Nixon, who was in the city that day, bribed them to? The way the Shah bribed Ronald Reagan to conspire with the towelheads who overthrew him, because they were all so jealous of Peanut Jimmy.

    I have to bring this up at the next Comic Conspiracy Con.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    The Comic Conspiracy Con is just the place for you Reg, since you seem determined to play the online comedy and ridicule routine, rather than addressing my point.

    If Ruby was a known thug, what was he doing in the Dallas police station during Oswald’s transfer? It’s a simple question. If you can’t answer it, be still, rather than scoring an own goal with your giddy fantasies.

    Nixon was a greasy operator who had fallen in debt gambling in Havana, but had his debts covered by his “pal” Bebe Rebozo, a suspected hood, with whom Nixon vacationed on many occasions, often playing “King of the Pool” with Rebozo, a water game that presented plenty of opportunities for the two men to, you know, rub skin.


    Nixon lied about being in Dallas at the time of Kennedy’s assassination. Since he had legitimate business in Dallas at the time, there was no apparent reason for Nixon to lie about it, other than a guilty conscience.

    People lie when they are trying to conceal something, like GHW Bush did when he claimed he never used the term “Voodoo Economics” during the 1980 presidential campaign.

    When a video surfaced of Bush using the term “Voodoo Economics” in reference to Reagan’s economic plan, Poppy insisted that he had been joking.

    Of course everyone recognized that ol’ Poppy was a real comedian – a regular laugh-a-minute guy – all you had to do was read his lips.

  268. @hooodathunkit
    @vhrm


    ETA: i’m curious to see if the police shooting this guy was actually justified or if they basically martyred him. (as much as i often think these protests are BS, police in the US do go to the gun way too easily.)
     
    Yes.
    Knowing his personality, they staked the place out with unmarked cars at a good distance; didn't want to assault inside the apartment building. Reinoehl made them quickly, but couldn't stand it much longer and made a run for it. According to two witnesses the cops let him shoot a bit before returning the favor; so it was clearly a 'good' shoot. Not a lot of choices when your suspect believes they're in a holy war and you're the minion of Satan ... or when your suspect thinks he's going to get 20-life for a cold-blooded murder and spend his last days assraped alternately by supremacists and darkies.

    Replies: @S

    Not a lot of choices when your suspect believes they’re in a holy war and you’re the minion of Satan…

    Yes, when everyone else sees this…

    The Antifa sort will see this..

  269. @Svigor
    @Mr. Anon


    Hey, this one even has some overt fascist iconography.
     
    Black-and-red is a good color scheme if you want to project strength, and it's well suited to the long-standing hipster love of black (and Black - from afar and through screens, anyway). It's a good way for leftists to aesthetically "in before" the dissident right.

    I don’t believe the nonsense that the Nazis were really leftists, which has become a popular belief among lumpen-conservatives.
     
    Sigh. It's depressing. "Hi, I'm a cuckservative; I hate leftists' enemies way more than leftists do; I'm more passionate about anti-White and homosexualist politics than the leftists are! Notice me (((sempai))), notice me!"

    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists. We can talk about "no true Scotsman/socialist/communist/fascist/jevv" until the cows come home, but the truth is that the Nazi/fascist popular appeal was third positionist; left-wing economics plus nationalism. Socialism without that horrible globalist aftertaste.


    Here is a clue: Nazi is short for National SOCIALIST. It’s right there in the name.
     
    Yeah and the "National" means NATIONALIST. It's right there in the name. Hence, a Third Position, orthogonal to left/right.

    LoL.

    Using "socialist" as a wordy dird strikes me as pretty boomer. Like saying "duh, yeah, you're lucky we won, or you'd be speaking German right now." Quelle horreur! Homogeneous huwhite and German-speaking???

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Mr. Anon

    But I think Nazis and fascists were basically orthogonal to left-right; third positionists.

    Partially so, I would agree. But not entirely orthogonal. They still have a strong projection on the “Right” axis.

    For me, the central distinction between right and left is how you view your own culture and people (do you like them or not?) and how important to you is tradition and organic society.

  270. anon[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor
    @anon


    Post the URL or retract the claim. Your choice.
     
    Contrary to what you may have learned from judaism, the goyim are not here to serve you.

    Replies: @anon

    Contrary to what you may have learned from judaism, the goyim are not here to serve you.

    lol, dude, either adl.org has the page Alden claims or it doesn’t. Facts are what they are. Go look for yourself, it’s not there. She’s either stupid and got fooled by a fake or she’s telling a really, really stupid lie.

    Don’t live by lies.

  271. @Hibernian
    @Alden

    They didn't (although some of their people did as guerillas) and the Germans were generally pro-Union.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    The Battle of Pea Ridge, in northern Arkansas pretty much ended the rebels’ chances of bringing MO into the rebellion.

  272. @J.Ross
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    https://postimg.cc/1V3v7QGp

    Replies: @MB

  273. @Escher
    @PhysicistDave

    Or better quality teachers can be recruited by paying them higher salaries and incentivizing them through performance based bonuses.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Yea, right, the teacher’s unions will really go for those performance based bonuses.

  274. @vhrm
    @vhrm

    To continue... it looks like the cops have gone from "was armed" to
    "was armed and had drawn the weapon".

    At this point it sounds pretty unlikely that he shot at them, or they would have said so.

    From a WSJ article this evening even the "drawn" sounds ... questionable:


    Law-enforcement officials said Mr. Reinoehl, 48 years old, was armed with a handgun and had drawn the weapon, which led our members of the task force to open fire as he tried to drive away. They shot at him again as he ditched the car and attempted to flee on foot, the officials said. He eventually collapsed in the street and was pronounced dead at the scene.
     
    (https://www.wsj.com/articles/attorney-general-praises-law-enforcement-after-pursuit-killing-of-michael-reinoehl-11599245921?mod=business_minor_pos4 )

    How was he threatening them "as he tried to drive away" and then later got out of the car and attempted to flee on foot and CONTINUED to threaten them but during this whole time but he never got around to shooting at them?

    I really hope there's video of this that shows them to have been reasonably threatened, because so far it's sounding pretty sad for the police side. Even if t was legal, this was a pretty crappy apprehension. A multi-agency "violent perpetrator" (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise...

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hibernian, @PhysicistDave

    The absolute rule that cops can shoot a fleeing felon is gone, but if the fleeing felon:

    Is wanted for at least Murder 2,

    Has a firearm, and

    Has very recently pointed the firearm at the cops,

    I’d call it a good shoot.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Hibernian


    I’d call it a good shoot.
     
    My feeling (based on the limited info thus far) is that it's a rash but not illegal shoot.
    As you well laid out it's the "drawn weapon" that prob carries it across that line of legality/Constitutionality. The officers and departments making that clarification yesterday would be well aware of that too. I have no way to know if it's true or not, but it certainly raises the stakes.

    Moving on to today's "news": some more and slightly different details from a Fox News article (https://www.foxnews.com/us/new-details-shooting-portland-michael-reinoehl )


    Law enforcement officers from a federal task force led by the FBI and U.S Marshal Service were conducting surveillance outside an apartment complex in Lacey, Wash., roughly 120 miles north of the Oregon city, when 48-year-old Reinoehl left the building at approximately 7:30 p.m. local time Thursday, officials and law enforcement sources told Fox News.

    A Washington-based law enforcement source told Fox News four members had learned that Reinoehl was inside an apartment located within the complex and were waiting for a SWAT team to arrive to arrest Reinoehl when he came out of the house and got into a car. The officers decided to immediately make a traffic stop, the source said.

    As they did so, Reinoehl moved a short distance, before stopping and exiting his vehicle, according to the source.

    Thurston County Sheriff’s Lt. Ray Brady said the suspect, identified by sources as Reinoehl, said officers initially shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him.
    ...
    As Reinoehl fled on foot, he allegedly pulled out a gun, Brady said in a press release. Officers then shot at and struck Reinoehl, who was pronounced dead at the scene.Two witnesses told The Olympian they saw two sports utility vehicles pull up to a man, believed to be Reinoehl, who was inside a car.
    ...
     

    Let me recast it like this:
    1) this guy gets into his car
    2) two unmarked SUVs box him in [i'm assuming unmarked because you don't do surveillance in squad cars]
    3) guys not in uniform [again. surveillance prob not in uniform] point guns at him.
    4) said guys " shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him. "
    5) he gets out of the car and runs

    NOW he draws the gun (?)

    6) guys keep shooting at him or shoot at him again.

    AND there's no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him. The warrant had just been issued that day and the first i'd heard of it was that he was dead. Is there any evidence that he was even a fugitive?

    I think it's even odds whether this guy even knew they were cops (or LEOs of whatever stripe) trying to arrest him. It's equally likely he thought he was being executed by "right wing extremists" taking revenge.

    From this report the cops shot at him well before he drew his weapon and probably before they even saw he had one.
    Right now it was "to stop him". I won't be surprised if they later trot out the old "a car is a deadly weapon and he assaulted them with his car" saw which _can_ be true, but actually isn't the vast majority of the times it is charged.

    If all this is true, it may well still be within the letter of the law, because once they yelled 'police you're under arrest' (which i'm sure they'll claim they did) he technically he became a fugitive for a violent crime and thus you can say he was eligible for being shot to prevent his escape...
    but it sounds like an especially poor showing that practically invites the "execution for revenge or cover-up" label from both the Left and the Right.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  275. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anonymous

    The quarter kraut in me wants to join a Waffen SS division and render Portland, NYC, and especially DC to ash. The three-quarters mick wants to set off bombs in antifa crashpads, specifically targeting the black-clad soft bodies whilst mitigating any collateral damage. The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go. Unleash the Hun for the big stuff.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @PV van der Byl

    The IRA urban guerrilla is probably the way to go.

    Yup.

  276. @Hippopotamusdrome
    @duncsbaby



    Why wasn’t this guy in jail?!

     

    Possibly because he was made a deal that he wouldn't have to go to prison if he would agree to become an "asset". I suspect most of Antifa members work this way too. Doubtful skid row druggies are so strongly interested in politics and even if they were that they would gravitate to such a stupidly ridiculous ideology.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

    Possibly because he was made a deal that he wouldn’t have to go to prison if he would agree to become an “asset”.

    That would make sense if the local prosecutors, Portland mayor, and Portland police chief intended to round all the Antifas up at the end of some moderate period of time.

    Can you see any evidence of that? I certainly can’t.

    Everything I have seen and heard from the pathetic Ted Wheeler tells me he lacks the stomach to offer Antifa/BLM the least bit of resistance. Apparently, he has recently fled Portland. And his only political challenger for mayor is actually a memeber of Antifa and BLM herself.

  277. @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Digital Samizdat

    Not carefully enough. He didn't die under the knee, but in the hospital well after his arrest.

    Still, it's not as sloppy as those reports mentioning the "killing of George Floyd." He wasn't killed. He died of a fentanyl overdose despite efforts of those cops to save his life.

    At least they're not throwing around the incendiary "murder" word any more.

    Replies: @Gordo

    At least they’re not throwing around the incendiary “murder” word any more.

    Perhaps because editors took a little Valium and finally sought legal advice, Chauvin will be a millionaire many times over once he cleans up in libel court.

  278. @Art Deco
    @Torn and Frayed

    Kind of reminds me of Lee Harvey Oswald’s untimely demise.

    It shouldn't. Jack Ruby was a garrulous and impetuous man who mixed it up with people routinely. The one sentimental attachment he had was to his dog, who was waiting in the car while he went to buy some money orders.

    Replies: @Sparkon, @Gordo

    Jack Rubinstein was an ‘antifa’ activist against the Chicago Silvershirts in the 1930s.

    Pure coincidence of course.

  279. @istevelurker
    @D. K.


    ‘Jay’ maced the killer because the killer already had pointed his illicit weapon at ‘Jay’ and his friend
     
    No, this is wrong and Steve is giving the benefit of the doubt to the shooter. Danielson's friend Chandler Pappas was alongside him when he was killed. Told Tucker Carlson last night that he and the victim were caught completely off guard and were attacked without provocation. The killer's bullet went through Danielson's can of bear spray. Pappas and Danielson were unarmed and carried the spray for self-defense.

    See: https://www.foxnews.com/media/friend-of-portland-shooting-victim-aaron-danielson-speaks-out-us-needs-a-lot-of-healing.

    Replies: @D. K., @D. K., @D. K.

    ***

    Several witnesses told police they saw Danielson holding a can of mace or bear spray and then heard two shots, the affidavit said.

    Police found damage to the bear spray canister that was retrieved from the street, leading investigators to believe it was struck by the first of two bullets fired by Reinoehl.

    Police slowed down video captured by a livestreamer of the shooting and said it appeared that a shot was fired, followed by an explosion of the chemical and then a quick second gunshot, the affidavit said. Danielson stumbled two or three steps before collapsing in the street.

    ***

    https://www.oregonlive.com/crime/2020/09/arrest-warrant-against-michael-reinoehl-for-2nd-degree-murder-unlawful-use-of-a-firearm-unsealed.html

  280. @Hibernian
    @vhrm

    The absolute rule that cops can shoot a fleeing felon is gone, but if the fleeing felon:

    Is wanted for at least Murder 2,

    Has a firearm, and

    Has very recently pointed the firearm at the cops,

    I'd call it a good shoot.

    Replies: @vhrm

    I’d call it a good shoot.

    My feeling (based on the limited info thus far) is that it’s a rash but not illegal shoot.
    As you well laid out it’s the “drawn weapon” that prob carries it across that line of legality/Constitutionality. The officers and departments making that clarification yesterday would be well aware of that too. I have no way to know if it’s true or not, but it certainly raises the stakes.

    Moving on to today’s “news”: some more and slightly different details from a Fox News article (https://www.foxnews.com/us/new-details-shooting-portland-michael-reinoehl )

    Law enforcement officers from a federal task force led by the FBI and U.S Marshal Service were conducting surveillance outside an apartment complex in Lacey, Wash., roughly 120 miles north of the Oregon city, when 48-year-old Reinoehl left the building at approximately 7:30 p.m. local time Thursday, officials and law enforcement sources told Fox News.

    A Washington-based law enforcement source told Fox News four members had learned that Reinoehl was inside an apartment located within the complex and were waiting for a SWAT team to arrive to arrest Reinoehl when he came out of the house and got into a car. The officers decided to immediately make a traffic stop, the source said.

    As they did so, Reinoehl moved a short distance, before stopping and exiting his vehicle, according to the source.

    Thurston County Sheriff’s Lt. Ray Brady said the suspect, identified by sources as Reinoehl, said officers initially shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him.

    As Reinoehl fled on foot, he allegedly pulled out a gun, Brady said in a press release. Officers then shot at and struck Reinoehl, who was pronounced dead at the scene.Two witnesses told The Olympian they saw two sports utility vehicles pull up to a man, believed to be Reinoehl, who was inside a car.

    Let me recast it like this:
    1) this guy gets into his car
    2) two unmarked SUVs box him in [i’m assuming unmarked because you don’t do surveillance in squad cars]
    3) guys not in uniform [again. surveillance prob not in uniform] point guns at him.
    4) said guys ” shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him. ”
    5) he gets out of the car and runs

    NOW he draws the gun (?)

    6) guys keep shooting at him or shoot at him again.

    AND there’s no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him. The warrant had just been issued that day and the first i’d heard of it was that he was dead. Is there any evidence that he was even a fugitive?

    I think it’s even odds whether this guy even knew they were cops (or LEOs of whatever stripe) trying to arrest him. It’s equally likely he thought he was being executed by “right wing extremists” taking revenge.

    From this report the cops shot at him well before he drew his weapon and probably before they even saw he had one.
    Right now it was “to stop him”. I won’t be surprised if they later trot out the old “a car is a deadly weapon and he assaulted them with his car” saw which _can_ be true, but actually isn’t the vast majority of the times it is charged.

    If all this is true, it may well still be within the letter of the law, because once they yelled ‘police you’re under arrest’ (which i’m sure they’ll claim they did) he technically he became a fugitive for a violent crime and thus you can say he was eligible for being shot to prevent his escape…
    but it sounds like an especially poor showing that practically invites the “execution for revenge or cover-up” label from both the Left and the Right.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @vhrm


    AND there’s no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him.
     
    Maybe he thought the Tony Soprano of Antifa had put out a contract on him,

    Replies: @vhrm

  281. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave


    Well, there is literally nothing I have learned in a physics classroom that I could not have learned from a book and usually learned faster and more easily.
     
    Dude, just the other day you were talking up things like Coursera instead of the traditional college route. But Coursera courses are lectures by university professors, albeit free or cheap. Now you’re advocating plain old books for real learning.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Anon[149] wrote to me:

    Dude, just the other day you were talking up things like Coursera instead of the traditional college route. But Coursera courses are lectures by university professors, albeit free or cheap. Now you’re advocating plain old books for real learning.

    Well, dude, you are just a wee bit deprived in terms of gray matter, aren’t you?

    First and most obviously, Coursera, edX, or the Teaching Company all have one radical difference from sitting in a classroom: the student can move at his own pace. My best friend in grade school, a guy named Mike, was a really nice fellow who functioned fine in normal life (we were not only classmates but also in Cub Scouts together). But Mike just could not absorb academic material quite as fast as most kids. It was quite horrifying seeing this kid who was quite normal out on the playground turned into a sort of zombie in the classroom.

    On the other hand, I could have moved at about twice the pace that the teacher was going.

    Both Mike and I were ill-served by the schools.

    Second, Coursera, edX, and the Teaching Company can find the very best teachers from across the country. Obviously, it is logically impossible for all schools to have the very best teachers (the Lake Woebegon fallacy).

    Finally, yeah, I myself do prefer books. But lots of people do not. So I mentioned contemporary alternatives like Coursera and edX for such folks.

    Now, do you get it, dude??? (No, of course not, because you were eddicated in the publick skoolz!)

  282. @vhrm
    @vhrm

    To continue... it looks like the cops have gone from "was armed" to
    "was armed and had drawn the weapon".

    At this point it sounds pretty unlikely that he shot at them, or they would have said so.

    From a WSJ article this evening even the "drawn" sounds ... questionable:


    Law-enforcement officials said Mr. Reinoehl, 48 years old, was armed with a handgun and had drawn the weapon, which led our members of the task force to open fire as he tried to drive away. They shot at him again as he ditched the car and attempted to flee on foot, the officials said. He eventually collapsed in the street and was pronounced dead at the scene.
     
    (https://www.wsj.com/articles/attorney-general-praises-law-enforcement-after-pursuit-killing-of-michael-reinoehl-11599245921?mod=business_minor_pos4 )

    How was he threatening them "as he tried to drive away" and then later got out of the car and attempted to flee on foot and CONTINUED to threaten them but during this whole time but he never got around to shooting at them?

    I really hope there's video of this that shows them to have been reasonably threatened, because so far it's sounding pretty sad for the police side. Even if t was legal, this was a pretty crappy apprehension. A multi-agency "violent perpetrator" (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise...

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hibernian, @PhysicistDave

    vhrm asked skeptically:

    A multi-agency “violent perpetrator” (or whatever) taskforce tries to effect a politically sensitive arrest on a lone target and they lose their shit and start blasting away at the sight of a handgun?

    He had already confessed in the interview with Vice to the murder.

    Yeah, if I had been a cop, at the sight of his handgun, I would have started shooting. You wouldn’t have? Really?

    vhrm also wrote:

    They had superior numbers, superior weapons, they were prob all wearing vests, they picked the time and place, they had the element of surprise…

    Do vests protect against a head shot? I think the cops wanted to spend the night with their families, not lying on a slab in the morgue.

  283. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who knows how to read English can teach someone else how to read English by “sounding it out”: we call it “phonics” now, but it is just obvious in any written language based on an alphabet.
     
    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn't.

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought - explain those to me using phonics.

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically. If you really read by phonics it would take you all day to painstakingly sound out every word and even then you'd get it wrong half the time unless you memorized all the crazy exceptions. The list of rules and exceptions is almost as long as the number of basic words you need to memorize so you might as well memorize the words themselves. Eventually you will do just that whether you intend to or not. Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read - humans, even average ones, have prodigious ability to memorize things). Now the ability to provide such hints right there in the symbol for each word (rhymes with ford - oops no it doesn't) is very valuable so it's easier to teach an alphabetic language but phonics is just one piece of the puzzle.

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual - some kids respond better to one technique or another. But our educational establishment goes for "one size fits all" because it's easier that way - no thinking required.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Hibernian, @Reg Cæsar, @PhysicistDave

    Jack D wrote to me:

    First of all, not all parents know how to read English. Mine didn’t.

    Sure, but should we construct a huge dysfunctional national system to serve a small minority of children? That would be like outlawing peanut butter because some kids are allergic to peanuts.

    I am not advocating a one-size-fits-all educational system. Quite the contrary. Most American parents can teach their kids the three Rs, and that is the obvious way to do it, at least if we can eliminate the parasitic verbalist overclass so that one paycheck is adequate for most families.

    But I am not trying to pass a law requiring homeschooling! Indeed, even homeschoolers usually hire someone from outside the family to teach violin or dance or whatever.

    A sane approach to education would have as many variations as there are families. It is doubtful that any of those variations would look that much like the current public schools.

    By the way, I know a Chinese woman who came to the States at age 7, not speaking English. She spent a year watching American television to learn English and then went to school — was top of her class in English as well as math. She ended up graduating from Berkeley with a degree in Comp Sci/EE. Her English is better than most American adults’.

    Jack D also wrote:

    2nd, English is actually far from phonetic. Relying only on phonics will quickly lead you into a wilderness of mirrors when it comes to English spelling. Rough, through, thorough, thought – explain those to me using phonics.

    You seem to know nothing about phonics. Systematic phonics programs go into all that, show how “a” has many different sounds in different environments, have lists of the common exceptions to the rules, etc. If you are really interested, I can give you some references.

    But, the truth is, that is really not necessary. My Mom, without systematic training in phonics, taught me how to sound out simple words, I got the hang of it, and I learned to sound out words for myself. For centuries, millions of people have had the same experience. It is actually quite easy, if you are patient.

    Jack D also wrote:

    In reality, we read mostly by recognizing words that you already know and have memorized. Phonics provides you with a clue as to how those words are pronounced so that you can trigger your memory of what word that set of symbols actually stands for but no one actually reads English purely phonetically.

    Indeed, But both systematic studies and historical experience shows that some sort of phonetic approach is the way to learn to read. Our alphabet is basically phonetically based, despite all the oddities and exceptions.

    Jack D also wrote:

    Chinese lacks the ability to provide such hints so the Chinese have no choice but to memorize the symbol for every word (and yet they still learn to read

    I know some Chinese and have looked into details as to how long it takes Chinese kids to learn to read. For obvious reasons, they learn much more slowly, in terms of developing reading vocabulary, than American kids. The alphabet is a godsend.

    Jack D also wrote:

    People who become elementary school teachers are usually not that smart and tend to fall for academic fads and academic fads tend to be absolutist. So in one era they will teach ONLY phonics and then in some other era they will teach ONLY whole word and NO phonics, etc. But the reality is that you need a combination of approaches and that the approach that you use has to be tailored to the individual

    No, you do not need a combination. Teach the kids to sound out words and acquire a significant reading vocabulary and they automatically start reading faster and faster and, yes, starting to recognize the common words as wholes. It’s like walking or riding a bike: eventually it becomes automatic.

    The problem is how to get the process started, and, in languages that use an alphabet, some sort of phonetic approach is the way to do that.

    I know a bit of Russian (which has an alphabet) and a bit of Chinese: again, an alphabet is a godsend.

  284. @vhrm
    @Hibernian


    I’d call it a good shoot.
     
    My feeling (based on the limited info thus far) is that it's a rash but not illegal shoot.
    As you well laid out it's the "drawn weapon" that prob carries it across that line of legality/Constitutionality. The officers and departments making that clarification yesterday would be well aware of that too. I have no way to know if it's true or not, but it certainly raises the stakes.

    Moving on to today's "news": some more and slightly different details from a Fox News article (https://www.foxnews.com/us/new-details-shooting-portland-michael-reinoehl )


    Law enforcement officers from a federal task force led by the FBI and U.S Marshal Service were conducting surveillance outside an apartment complex in Lacey, Wash., roughly 120 miles north of the Oregon city, when 48-year-old Reinoehl left the building at approximately 7:30 p.m. local time Thursday, officials and law enforcement sources told Fox News.

    A Washington-based law enforcement source told Fox News four members had learned that Reinoehl was inside an apartment located within the complex and were waiting for a SWAT team to arrive to arrest Reinoehl when he came out of the house and got into a car. The officers decided to immediately make a traffic stop, the source said.

    As they did so, Reinoehl moved a short distance, before stopping and exiting his vehicle, according to the source.

    Thurston County Sheriff’s Lt. Ray Brady said the suspect, identified by sources as Reinoehl, said officers initially shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him.
    ...
    As Reinoehl fled on foot, he allegedly pulled out a gun, Brady said in a press release. Officers then shot at and struck Reinoehl, who was pronounced dead at the scene.Two witnesses told The Olympian they saw two sports utility vehicles pull up to a man, believed to be Reinoehl, who was inside a car.
    ...
     

    Let me recast it like this:
    1) this guy gets into his car
    2) two unmarked SUVs box him in [i'm assuming unmarked because you don't do surveillance in squad cars]
    3) guys not in uniform [again. surveillance prob not in uniform] point guns at him.
    4) said guys " shot at the vehicle in an attempt to stop him. "
    5) he gets out of the car and runs

    NOW he draws the gun (?)

    6) guys keep shooting at him or shoot at him again.

    AND there's no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him. The warrant had just been issued that day and the first i'd heard of it was that he was dead. Is there any evidence that he was even a fugitive?

    I think it's even odds whether this guy even knew they were cops (or LEOs of whatever stripe) trying to arrest him. It's equally likely he thought he was being executed by "right wing extremists" taking revenge.

    From this report the cops shot at him well before he drew his weapon and probably before they even saw he had one.
    Right now it was "to stop him". I won't be surprised if they later trot out the old "a car is a deadly weapon and he assaulted them with his car" saw which _can_ be true, but actually isn't the vast majority of the times it is charged.

    If all this is true, it may well still be within the letter of the law, because once they yelled 'police you're under arrest' (which i'm sure they'll claim they did) he technically he became a fugitive for a violent crime and thus you can say he was eligible for being shot to prevent his escape...
    but it sounds like an especially poor showing that practically invites the "execution for revenge or cover-up" label from both the Left and the Right.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    AND there’s no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him.

    Maybe he thought the Tony Soprano of Antifa had put out a contract on him,

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Hibernian

    Possibly, but i assume he'd be more concerned with the Tony Soprano of Patriot Prayer or whatever "fascist" group(s) the antifa people think they're fighting against.

    ---
    After some more googling i'm disappointed to find out that there's not likely to be any video:

    "Lt. Ray Brady of the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office said he was not aware of any video footage of the shooting, including from body cameras."
    ( https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/04/us/portland-shooting-michael-reinoehl.html )

    The Thurston County Sheriff's office is the group in charge of investigating the shooting. (1)

    Because yeah... why would 4 guys on a "fugitive apprehension team" trailing a target as part of a "violent offender task force" bother with audio or video recording equipment. That stuff's for chumps!

    (i'm refraining from posting a Rosco P. Coltrane and Enos Strate clip here. (2) )

    ---
    1) as described in one of the earlier articles
    https://www.theolympian.com/news/local/crime/article245485220.html


    Thurston County sheriff’s Lt. Ray Brady said the Pierce County sheriff’s fugitive apprehension team, working as part of the U.S. Marshals Service Pacific Northwest Violent Offender Task Force
    ...
    The five-county Region 3 Critical Incident Investigation Team is investigating the shooting, led by Thurston County Sheriff’s Office. No officers from the departments on the investigative team were at the scene at the time of the shooting, according to Brady.
     
    2) TIL that there was a short lived Enos spin-off where he became an LAPD officer
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enos_(TV_series)
  285. @Hibernian
    @vhrm


    AND there’s no indication this guy even knew that the police wanted to arrest him.
     
    Maybe he thought the Tony Soprano of Antifa had put out a contract on him,

    Replies: @vhrm

    Possibly, but i assume he’d be more concerned with the Tony Soprano of Patriot Prayer or whatever “fascist” group(s) the antifa people think they’re fighting against.


    After some more googling i’m disappointed to find out that there’s not likely to be any video:

    “Lt. Ray Brady of the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office said he was not aware of any video footage of the shooting, including from body cameras.”
    ( https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/04/us/portland-shooting-michael-reinoehl.html )

    The Thurston County Sheriff’s office is the group in charge of investigating the shooting. (1)

    Because yeah… why would 4 guys on a “fugitive apprehension team” trailing a target as part of a “violent offender task force” bother with audio or video recording equipment. That stuff’s for chumps!

    (i’m refraining from posting a Rosco P. Coltrane and Enos Strate clip here. (2) )


    1) as described in one of the earlier articles
    https://www.theolympian.com/news/local/crime/article245485220.html

    Thurston County sheriff’s Lt. Ray Brady said the Pierce County sheriff’s fugitive apprehension team, working as part of the U.S. Marshals Service Pacific Northwest Violent Offender Task Force

    The five-county Region 3 Critical Incident Investigation Team is investigating the shooting, led by Thurston County Sheriff’s Office. No officers from the departments on the investigative team were at the scene at the time of the shooting, according to Brady.

    2) TIL that there was a short lived Enos spin-off where he became an LAPD officer
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enos_(TV_series)

  286. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote to me:


    No middle ages without monasteries, Eckhart, Occkam, Seuse, etc.
     
    You haven't figured out that I, and most of our contemporaries, are not real big on the Middle Ages??

    Bubonic plague, no flush toilets, no anesthesia, the hunts for heretics, and a not-exactly-inviting attitude towards the scientific method (to be a scientist is to be s skeptic) -- thanks, but I think I prefer the Enlightenment.

    Dieter also wrote:

    the wine and spirits (Eckart had been read – clandestine – in Basel by Carthusians – and they, later on, made the best liquor I know of – – the Chartreuse (green (40%) and yellow (50%)), which is still produced in – the biggest liquor factory in the Alps in large quantities...
     
    If I understand you correctly, you seem to be promulgating a theory that alcoholism is the root of human progress.

    Sorry, but I am an old-fashioned guy: I think alcoholism is bad.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Think of Schopenhauer now, and Freud, Hegel (who cherished mysticism), and Kant, Wittgenstein...
     
    Do I have to think about those guys? Do I really, really have to?

    No, thankfully, I don't.

    I think instead I will think about Locke and Hume and Newton and Maxwell and Gauss and Riemann... and, well, you get the idea.

    You are giving us a very nice picture of how a true decadent views the civilization whose wreckage he now lives in.

    And for that, I thank you, Dieter.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I see, Physicist Dave – what you’re after ist the virginity of the artistic production. – It shall follow the harshest (or purest) moral guidelines – yours? (cf. Jonathan Franzen’s novels Freedom (not least about Bob Dylan) and – Purity – about exactly that – purity as a moral guideline through modern lives).

    I’d hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin and confusion (Dosstojewski, Thomas Mann), dirt, honor, madness and outrage (The Illiad, Iggy Pop, Shakespeare’s History Plays, Francois Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel), Rainer Maria Rilke – cf. Collected Poems ed. C. F. McIntyre – the best English Rilke ever). Add to this list Wagner, Beethoven, – and Bach, as well as Joni Mitchell, John Coltrane, Phil Glass and Wayne Shorter.

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for – geometry without contradictions/distractions (= problems, dirt). 

    But Gauß arrived at this goal via a simple declaration: That for him a straight in “physical geometry”, as he put it, was straight because he would only be interested in the definition of it as long as this definition was free of empirical hindrances: Let’s imagine, he (with the refreshing openness and straightforwardness of the Brunswick Welf, he indeed was) claimed, that points of light form a straight by perfectly alining one after another, because in the – hypothesized room I am looking at, there’d be no distractions). –

    – All right, you get this kind of purity if you imagine a physical world without distractions – he himself said so! Imagine conditions, under which there are no distractions. – In other words – if you look upon physical reality as an ideal realm.

    So – Gauß’s theoretical purity should rather not be understood as a proposition of the real world. To do that would be the mistake, the early Wittgenstein made in his Tractatus. And that was the very mistake which the later Wittgenstein used to call a – grammatical – error.

    The late Wittgenstein argued throughout, that formal systems cannot help us out as soon as inner-worldly (human) problems arise because these are of a different nature than the ones we can solve with formal tools like logic or algebra. He showed that tirelessly – example after example in his Notebooks and in his Remarks and in On Certainty.

    I still see your point, Physicist Dave, to live without drugs (sins?). And I can quite easily respect this form of asceticism. 

    I’d just conclude from the above, that your ascetic world is definitely not the world of the artist, for example – or that of Meister Eckhart and his  – dirty (=worldly) God. A God within the turmoils of the everyday world and within each and every – sinner’s – soul.

    – Now, have a look at – Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/”rips” (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, – made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheimer Altar or Renoir or August Sander/ Daido Moriyama / Ansel Adams (Hockney, Warhol, Picasso, Hopper) – or listen to Johann Sebastian Bach in this – twilight – or, hehe, Let it Be.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    I see, :Physicist Dave – what you’re after ist the virginity of the artistic production.
     
    I am? Or maybe I just think that soaking your brain in drugs produces people like you. And that is not good.

    Dieter also wrote:

    I’d hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin...
     
    I am an atheist, Dieter -- don't believe in sin.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for – geometry without contradictions...
     
    Math without contradictions? Yeah, that's nice.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Now, have a look at – Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/”rips” (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, – made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheimer Altar...
     
    Do I have to have a look at these guys?

    No, I don't.

    You see, Dieter, you may have chosen to soak your brain in drugs, and it certainly does seem to have done a great deal of damage.

    But, fortunately, sane people do not have to follow your example.

    You are certainly what Americans used to call "a piece of work"!

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  287. This incident should be a Final Warning for patriots about the direction in which America is heading. Anyone who thinks that just voting Republican every couple of years will solve things is a f … is an uncurable optimist.

    History doesn’t repeat itself, but a study of Weimer Germany is instructive, except that then, the courts were sympathetic to the Right and went easy on its members convicted of violence. Now things have reversed.

    We have to organize in an appropriate way. The ‘militia movement’ has turned out to be right after all, despite the dubious origins of some of it. We need something of equivalent strength, but a broader mission, which can appeal to middle America.

    Some of us are trying to create that, at https://www.HQ.CivilianDefenseForce.org . Please join us.

  288. @PhysicistDave
    @Ron Mexico

    Ron Mexico wrote to me:


    Federal funds? Civil Rights issues arise.
    State and local funds? Federalism….
    Your solution is too simplistic.
     
    No civil rights issues arise: I want to abolish the schools for all races.

    Of course, under federalism, the states have to abolish the schools separately. Nothing happens overnight.

    Your objections are simplistic: Almost no public schools existed in 1800. By 1900, they were nation-wide. It's reversible: no reason they cannot be abolished before 2100.

    The brick-and-mortar business model for schools no longer makes any sense at all. They are dinosaurs. Inertia rules short-term, but the logic of the situation will eventually prevail.

    The only issue is will responsible people keep their eyes on what is necessary for the children. The discrediting of schools due to Covid gives us a chance to quick-start the inevitable.

    Defund the schools!

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    Defund the schools!

    The Taliban agree with you.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Grahamsno(G64) wrote: to me


    [Dave] Defund the schools!

    [GG] The Taliban agree with you.
     
    Unfortunately, they do not. They use schools as you would like -- to control and brainwash impressionable youth.

    Schools are means by which the ruling elite inculcates the next generation.

    I want to end all that.

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Turn them all into janitors. Aside from the ones that need to go to jail.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Malla
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    And Boko Haram.

  289. @Mike_from_SGV
    @Anonymous

    Harris is openly a BLM agent, so this election will reveal just how twisted (or not) the Sub Moms are.

    Replies: @lavoisier

    Harris is openly a BLM agent, so this election will reveal just how twisted (or not) the Sub Moms are.

    They are not twisted, they are generally ill-informed and not particularly engaged by political considerations.

    Plus, the siren call of liberalism is particularly enticing to the many empty headed Suburban Moms.

  290. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    Careful there, Another Dad. You are sounding like a Libertarian here. Ixnay on the onstitutionCay, or something... I never got a handle on Pig Latin.

    I could see Trump using that wording "parasite party" and so on, as you say. As far as actually standing on any principles, or describing things as you do here, based on how this country is supposed to work, don't count on that one. He doesn't have a principled bone in his body. That's not why I voted for him though.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Ixnay on the onstitutionCay…
    I never got a handle on Pig Latin.

    Eemssay ikelay ouyay avehay ayay inefay aspgray ofyay ethay igpay atinlay indkay irsay.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  291. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ignatiev is indeed usually a Russian name rather than a Jewish one - there must be some story about how his family got this name. Although Ignatiev means Ignatious it doesn't refer to Ignatius Loyola, who means nothing to the Orthodox Russians (or the Jews for that matter).

    As for his first name, I have never been able to find the actual item but I am convinced that there must have been a baby name list for Yiddish speakers looking to give their kids English names that corresponded to their Hebrew names (and calling your kid Shmuel or Shlomo on his birth certificate was unthinkable in those days - the registrar probably wouldn't have accepted it even if you tried) and whoever wrote the list was a little bit out of touch with (then) modern culture and came up with a list of names that had been popular in the 19th century like Seymour and Irving and Isadore so that most of the people in the 20th century who carried those names were Jewish. Maybe Noel was on that list instead of Yoel or Noach.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Matt Buckalew

    Generally when the name is preceded by an “of” it’s a warning to perceptive non-Christians that there are probably two saints with that name. I think you’ll find the of Antioch one pretty damn meaningful to all Christianity’s branches.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Matt Buckalew

    I agree. Reg was the one who said that Noel Ignatiev's name refers to Loyola, which it doesn't.

  292. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @PhysicistDave

    You would have taken great delight at my 12th grade sociology teacher's attempt to bamboozle me with her Boasian blank slate blatherings about how humans didn't have any instincts whatsoever, that they had to be taught everything.

    The Blue Lagoon was the hit movie at the time, so I asked her how English first cousins Richard and Emmeline (whose last contact with human instruction of any kind was at age seven, in times which sexuality was only discussed in taverns and brothels) knew how to get it on at age fifteen and make a baby. I phrased it in somewhat more coarse terms, as I am, to this day, quite prone to do. The whole class erupted in gut busting guffaws at my devastating deconstruction of her "lesson plan" that no doubt was programmed into her little noggin by our betters in the con-ed educracy. The teacher was not some young recent university graduate, but into her sixties and ready for a fully vested retirement, which made it all the more remarkable.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    I enjoyed that.

  293. @Matt Buckalew
    @Jack D

    Generally when the name is preceded by an “of” it’s a warning to perceptive non-Christians that there are probably two saints with that name. I think you’ll find the of Antioch one pretty damn meaningful to all Christianity’s branches.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I agree. Reg was the one who said that Noel Ignatiev’s name refers to Loyola, which it doesn’t.

  294. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    I see, Physicist Dave - what you're after ist the virginity of the artistic production. - It shall follow the harshest (or purest) moral guidelines - yours? (cf. Jonathan Franzen's novels Freedom (not least about Bob Dylan) and - Purity - about exactly that - purity as a moral guideline through modern lives).


    I'd hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin and confusion (Dosstojewski, Thomas Mann), dirt, honor, madness and outrage (The Illiad, Iggy Pop, Shakespeare's History Plays, Francois Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel), Rainer Maria Rilke - cf. Collected Poems ed. C. F. McIntyre - the best English Rilke ever). Add to this list Wagner, Beethoven, - and Bach, as well as Joni Mitchell, John Coltrane, Phil Glass and Wayne Shorter.

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for - geometry without contradictions/distractions (= problems, dirt). 

    But Gauß arrived at this goal via a simple declaration: That for him a straight in "physical geometry", as he put it, was straight because he would only be interested in the definition of it as long as this definition was free of empirical hindrances: Let's imagine, he (with the refreshing openness and straightforwardness of the Brunswick Welf, he indeed was) claimed, that points of light form a straight by perfectly alining one after another, because in the - hypothesized room I am looking at, there'd be no distractions). -

    - All right, you get this kind of purity if you imagine a physical world without distractions - he himself said so! Imagine conditions, under which there are no distractions. - In other words - if you look upon physical reality as an ideal realm.

    So - Gauß's theoretical purity should rather not be understood as a proposition of the real world. To do that would be the mistake, the early Wittgenstein made in his Tractatus. And that was the very mistake which the later Wittgenstein used to call a - grammatical - error.

    The late Wittgenstein argued throughout, that formal systems cannot help us out as soon as inner-worldly (human) problems arise because these are of a different nature than the ones we can solve with formal tools like logic or algebra. He showed that tirelessly - example after example in his Notebooks and in his Remarks and in On Certainty.


    I still see your point, Physicist Dave, to live without drugs (sins?). And I can quite easily respect this form of asceticism. 

    I'd just conclude from the above, that your ascetic world is definitely not the world of the artist, for example - or that of Meister Eckhart and his  - dirty (=worldly) God. A God within the turmoils of the everyday world and within each and every - sinner's - soul.
    -

    - Now, have a look at - Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/"rips" (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, - made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald's Isenheimer Altar or Renoir or August Sander/ Daido Moriyama / Ansel Adams (Hockney, Warhol, Picasso, Hopper) - or listen to Johann Sebastian Bach in this - twilight - or, hehe, Let it Be.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:

    I see, :Physicist Dave – what you’re after ist the virginity of the artistic production.

    I am? Or maybe I just think that soaking your brain in drugs produces people like you. And that is not good.

    Dieter also wrote:

    I’d hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin…

    I am an atheist, Dieter — don’t believe in sin.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for – geometry without contradictions…

    Math without contradictions? Yeah, that’s nice.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Now, have a look at – Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/”rips” (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, – made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheimer Altar…

    Do I have to have a look at these guys?

    No, I don’t.

    You see, Dieter, you may have chosen to soak your brain in drugs, and it certainly does seem to have done a great deal of damage.

    But, fortunately, sane people do not have to follow your example.

    You are certainly what Americans used to call “a piece of work”!

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Physicist Dave, you seem to believe in physics and love to listen to Bach. I have nothing against that. But Bach - believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots 'n' lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn't.

    Whereas Carl Friedrich Gauß (you brought him up, didn't you?) clearly and openly was idealizing (abstracting from the physical "detractions" of reality in his physical geometry; which is why he is great as a Mathematician, but at the same time, his thinking does not work when applied to life outside mathematics. - That is, what Ludwig Wittgenstein's ´philosophy after the Tractatus is about. - Physics, mathematics, and formal logic are no models for language, music, and art. Beauty and wisdom are not calculable. And reason is not reducible to formal systems without sacrificing the most important part of its power.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  295. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @PhysicistDave


    Defund the schools!
     
    The Taliban agree with you.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Malla

    Grahamsno(G64) wrote: to me

    [Dave] Defund the schools!

    [GG] The Taliban agree with you.

    Unfortunately, they do not. They use schools as you would like — to control and brainwash impressionable youth.

    Schools are means by which the ruling elite inculcates the next generation.

    I want to end all that.

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Turn them all into janitors. Aside from the ones that need to go to jail.

    • Replies: @anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Cool. Got plan? Or just talk.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  296. @PhysicistDave
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Grahamsno(G64) wrote: to me


    [Dave] Defund the schools!

    [GG] The Taliban agree with you.
     
    Unfortunately, they do not. They use schools as you would like -- to control and brainwash impressionable youth.

    Schools are means by which the ruling elite inculcates the next generation.

    I want to end all that.

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Turn them all into janitors. Aside from the ones that need to go to jail.

    Replies: @anon

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Cool. Got plan? Or just talk.

    • LOL: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @anon

    anon[425] wrote to me:


    [Dave] I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    [anon] Cool. Got plan? Or just talk.
     
    Thought -- and usually talk -- necessarily precedes action, my young friend.

    We cannot abolish the parasitic verbalist overclass until enough people understand how vicious that overclass is.

    Which means talk.
  297. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    I see, :Physicist Dave – what you’re after ist the virginity of the artistic production.
     
    I am? Or maybe I just think that soaking your brain in drugs produces people like you. And that is not good.

    Dieter also wrote:

    I’d hold, that art is an earthly matter. It stems from sin...
     
    I am an atheist, Dieter -- don't believe in sin.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Oh yeah, Carl Friedrich Gauß seemed to enable what you are longing for – geometry without contradictions...
     
    Math without contradictions? Yeah, that's nice.

    Dieter also wrote:

    Now, have a look at – Caspar David Friedrich (he suffered so much from his inner turmoils/”rips” (Hegel) and cracks (Leonard Cohen), that he more than once, – made attempts to kill himself), or Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheimer Altar...
     
    Do I have to have a look at these guys?

    No, I don't.

    You see, Dieter, you may have chosen to soak your brain in drugs, and it certainly does seem to have done a great deal of damage.

    But, fortunately, sane people do not have to follow your example.

    You are certainly what Americans used to call "a piece of work"!

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Physicist Dave, you seem to believe in physics and love to listen to Bach. I have nothing against that. But Bach – believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots ‘n’ lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn’t.

    Whereas Carl Friedrich Gauß (you brought him up, didn’t you?) clearly and openly was idealizing (abstracting from the physical “detractions” of reality in his physical geometry; which is why he is great as a Mathematician, but at the same time, his thinking does not work when applied to life outside mathematics. – That is, what Ludwig Wittgenstein’s ´philosophy after the Tractatus is about. – Physics, mathematics, and formal logic are no models for language, music, and art. Beauty and wisdom are not calculable. And reason is not reducible to formal systems without sacrificing the most important part of its power.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    But Bach – believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots ‘n’ lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn’t.
     
    You mean Bach was not a disembodied spirit?? You mean he had to eat and sleep like other mere mortals???

    Dieter, young fella, all those drugs you took have really diminished your mental functioning.

    I think it is a bad idea for human beings to drench their brains in mind-altering drugs.

    You seem to think that because I think that I must then think that human beings should be angels.

    You are a very silly young person.

    There is a middle ground between being an angel and being a drug addict.

    That is, you could try being a serious human being who tries to develop all of his potential as a rational animal in pursuit of excellence.

    Which does not require being a drug addict.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  298. @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Physicist Dave, you seem to believe in physics and love to listen to Bach. I have nothing against that. But Bach - believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots 'n' lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn't.

    Whereas Carl Friedrich Gauß (you brought him up, didn't you?) clearly and openly was idealizing (abstracting from the physical "detractions" of reality in his physical geometry; which is why he is great as a Mathematician, but at the same time, his thinking does not work when applied to life outside mathematics. - That is, what Ludwig Wittgenstein's ´philosophy after the Tractatus is about. - Physics, mathematics, and formal logic are no models for language, music, and art. Beauty and wisdom are not calculable. And reason is not reducible to formal systems without sacrificing the most important part of its power.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:

    But Bach – believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots ‘n’ lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn’t.

    You mean Bach was not a disembodied spirit?? You mean he had to eat and sleep like other mere mortals???

    Dieter, young fella, all those drugs you took have really diminished your mental functioning.

    I think it is a bad idea for human beings to drench their brains in mind-altering drugs.

    You seem to think that because I think that I must then think that human beings should be angels.

    You are a very silly young person.

    There is a middle ground between being an angel and being a drug addict.

    That is, you could try being a serious human being who tries to develop all of his potential as a rational animal in pursuit of excellence.

    Which does not require being a drug addict.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @PhysicistDave

    Physicist Dave - Bach clearly was a drug addict. As were an awful lot of geniuses throughout history, which just did not care for your middle ground. Wittgenstein clearly was no drug addict though - and he did help to build that fortress of a three-parted scientific, moral and aesthetic discourse, which Emil Lask and Max Weber founded in sorting out the three value spheres of the scientific, moral, and aesthetic kinds of public discourse. Pointing out, that all three of them need specific kinds of reasons and reasoning as their foundation. Something the utterly pragmatic (for the last time) Carl Friedrich Gauß would have appreciated with great joy, I'm sure. My hint at his self-reflective methodological remarks in his Physical Geography indeed showed this.

    PS

    Are you aware, Physicist Dave, that you - from a position of anonymity - did indeed make personal remarks about me, who comments under his correct name. Remarks, which are over the top. Not least by neglecting what I had said about me in person. Let me refer to just one more scientist - - Buffon, and his remark, which is very dear to us Old style Europeans, and which reads in my paraphrase: It's the style, which makes us human. In his original French: Le style - c'est l'homme!

    Except for these quibbles, I did indeed enjoy our conversation.

  299. @anon
    @PhysicistDave

    I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    Cool. Got plan? Or just talk.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    anon[425] wrote to me:

    [Dave] I want to abolish our parasitic verbalist overclass.

    [anon] Cool. Got plan? Or just talk.

    Thought — and usually talk — necessarily precedes action, my young friend.

    We cannot abolish the parasitic verbalist overclass until enough people understand how vicious that overclass is.

    Which means talk.

  300. @PhysicistDave
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kef wrote to me:


    But Bach – believe it or not, was a historical figure with lots ‘n’ lots of bodily needs and desires. You want him pure like an angel or a virgin, while he clearly wasn’t.
     
    You mean Bach was not a disembodied spirit?? You mean he had to eat and sleep like other mere mortals???

    Dieter, young fella, all those drugs you took have really diminished your mental functioning.

    I think it is a bad idea for human beings to drench their brains in mind-altering drugs.

    You seem to think that because I think that I must then think that human beings should be angels.

    You are a very silly young person.

    There is a middle ground between being an angel and being a drug addict.

    That is, you could try being a serious human being who tries to develop all of his potential as a rational animal in pursuit of excellence.

    Which does not require being a drug addict.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Physicist Dave – Bach clearly was a drug addict. As were an awful lot of geniuses throughout history, which just did not care for your middle ground. Wittgenstein clearly was no drug addict though – and he did help to build that fortress of a three-parted scientific, moral and aesthetic discourse, which Emil Lask and Max Weber founded in sorting out the three value spheres of the scientific, moral, and aesthetic kinds of public discourse. Pointing out, that all three of them need specific kinds of reasons and reasoning as their foundation. Something the utterly pragmatic (for the last time) Carl Friedrich Gauß would have appreciated with great joy, I’m sure. My hint at his self-reflective methodological remarks in his Physical Geography indeed showed this.

    PS

    Are you aware, Physicist Dave, that you – from a position of anonymity – did indeed make personal remarks about me, who comments under his correct name. Remarks, which are over the top. Not least by neglecting what I had said about me in person. Let me refer to just one more scientist – – Buffon, and his remark, which is very dear to us Old style Europeans, and which reads in my paraphrase: It’s the style, which makes us human. In his original French: Le style – c’est l’homme!

    Except for these quibbles, I did indeed enjoy our conversation.

  301. Dieter Kef wrote to me:A

    re you aware, Physicist Dave, that you – from a position of anonymity

    I have said many, many times that my name is Dave Miller: I sued to routinely sign my comments here “Dave Miller in Sacramento.”

    After a while, I decided I had done it so often that everyone who has been around here very often knew my name.

    And, there are so many “Dave Millers” in the world (quite a few other physicists named Dave Miller, though none of the others seem to live in Sacramento), that it turns out that the screen name “PhysicistDave” is more distinctive.

    Dieter also wrote to me:

    Bach clearly was a drug addict. As were an awful lot of geniuses throughout history, which just did not care for your middle ground.

    Hmmm…. I have studied under, worked for, or met a number of Nobel laureates. I did not notice that they were generally drug addicts.

    You have not actually shown a single genius to have been a drug addict. No doubt at some point in history there was one genius who was a drug addict, but it is surely doubtful that drug addiction contributed to his genius. Rather the contrary.

    What is going on here is mainly that you are extolling as “geniuses” guys whom I would consider to be slightly dumber than George W. Bush (a remarkably low bar). If I call Gauss or Einstein a genius, there are objective measures by which I can justify that claim: they worked out difficult things that no one else had been able to solve.

    Your idea of “genius” seems largely to be people who validate your drug-induced fantasies. Like the “bank” of a river vs. a “bank” that holds money, you and I are using “genius” with radically different meanings.

    In any case, you chose to start this conversation by extolling public schools because they helped induce you to do drugs.

    If that is the best argument that you proponents of public schools can come up with… well, I just wish you could make that clear to the general public. I think that would be the end of the public schools.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    I'd distinguish between addicts and recreational users. Even people who abuse substances heavily are not necessarily addicts. Addiction is what happens when your body or neural circuitry rewires so that you rely on the substance to function and end up abusing it even when you genuinely don't want to. That sort of thing tends to interfere with the sheer level of concentration and effort it takes to be a Nobel-tier physicist or Fields winning mathematician.

    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts. Paul Erdős used amphetamines regularly, but that doesn't mean he was addicted to them. Quite the opposite, he won a bet from a colleague who was concerned and dared him not to use them for a month. Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn't mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.

    >What is going on here is mainly that you are extolling as “geniuses” guys whom I would consider to be slightly dumber than George W. Bush (a remarkably low bar).

    Ouch, man.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  302. @PhysicistDave
    Dieter Kef wrote to me:A

    re you aware, Physicist Dave, that you – from a position of anonymity
     
    I have said many, many times that my name is Dave Miller: I sued to routinely sign my comments here "Dave Miller in Sacramento."

    After a while, I decided I had done it so often that everyone who has been around here very often knew my name.

    And, there are so many "Dave Millers" in the world (quite a few other physicists named Dave Miller, though none of the others seem to live in Sacramento), that it turns out that the screen name "PhysicistDave" is more distinctive.

    Dieter also wrote to me:

    Bach clearly was a drug addict. As were an awful lot of geniuses throughout history, which just did not care for your middle ground.
     
    Hmmm.... I have studied under, worked for, or met a number of Nobel laureates. I did not notice that they were generally drug addicts.

    You have not actually shown a single genius to have been a drug addict. No doubt at some point in history there was one genius who was a drug addict, but it is surely doubtful that drug addiction contributed to his genius. Rather the contrary.

    What is going on here is mainly that you are extolling as "geniuses" guys whom I would consider to be slightly dumber than George W. Bush (a remarkably low bar). If I call Gauss or Einstein a genius, there are objective measures by which I can justify that claim: they worked out difficult things that no one else had been able to solve.

    Your idea of "genius" seems largely to be people who validate your drug-induced fantasies. Like the "bank" of a river vs. a "bank" that holds money, you and I are using "genius" with radically different meanings.

    In any case, you chose to start this conversation by extolling public schools because they helped induce you to do drugs.

    If that is the best argument that you proponents of public schools can come up with... well, I just wish you could make that clear to the general public. I think that would be the end of the public schools.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I’d distinguish between addicts and recreational users. Even people who abuse substances heavily are not necessarily addicts. Addiction is what happens when your body or neural circuitry rewires so that you rely on the substance to function and end up abusing it even when you genuinely don’t want to. That sort of thing tends to interfere with the sheer level of concentration and effort it takes to be a Nobel-tier physicist or Fields winning mathematician.

    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts. Paul Erdős used amphetamines regularly, but that doesn’t mean he was addicted to them. Quite the opposite, he won a bet from a colleague who was concerned and dared him not to use them for a month. Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn’t mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.

    >What is going on here is mainly that you are extolling as “geniuses” guys whom I would consider to be slightly dumber than George W. Bush (a remarkably low bar).

    Ouch, man.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    I’d distinguish between addicts and recreational users.
     
    There is, I would think, a continuum.

    nebulafox also wrote:


    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts...
    Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn’t mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.
     
    Yeah. I was pushing on the addicts issue with our friend Dieter because he was so insistent that drug use was integral to the creative achievements of certain "geniuses."

    I think there is overwhelming reason to doubt that Dieter is correct in STEM subjects and, as you suggest, good reason to doubt that, even in the case of the arts, drugs were a strong positive contribution.

    I myself think that even ethanol is more dangerous than people often acknowledge. But, of course, I am not claiming that no creative person can have a glass of wine once a week, or even once a day.

    But to attribute works of genius to sufficient consumption of drugs that the drugs themselves alter mental functioning so as to dramatically enhance the genius's achievements... well, that is almost certainly not true in STEM and doubtful in any other area.

    Of course, part of what is going on here is the phenomenon of people using drugs and thinking that they have a profound insight while high, even though the insight turns out to be, at best, pedestrian when they come down from the high.

    And then the main point is that Dieter views as works of genius various works that I think are of no value at all.

    So what is the right word for people who use drugs so much that it does influence their work dramatically, whether positively as Dieter claims or negatively as I think is rather obvious?

    Perhaps "addict" is not quite the right word, but I am not sure "recreational user" works either.

    In any case, I think they would be wise to reduce their consumption!

    Replies: @nebulafox

  303. @El Dato
    @Jack D

    Isn't this a Prussian/Polish thing?

    Afer WWI, didn't Foch propose to have everything West of the Rhine annexed as he wanted the Germans separated into the "good ones" and the "bad ones"?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >Isn’t this a Prussian/Polish thing?

    Prussia was no liberal dream, but it was remarkably religiously tolerant in the context of its time period, nor was its foreign policy out of the common European standard. Moreover, the emphasis on the military was the rational reaction of a state with no defensible frontiers and a memory of the Thirty Year’s War.

    >Afer WWI, didn’t Foch propose to have everything West of the Rhine annexed as he wanted the Germans separated into the “good ones” and the “bad ones”?

    By that point, German identity was far too entrenched for that to be realistic, but he wasn’t wrong about underlying regional views Germans from that time period had of each other. Whenever Adenauer headed east, he always ordered the train curtains closed. “Here comes Asia.”

    That being said, the totalitarian nature of the Nazi years did much to lessen regional distinctions for the war generation, along with much else. It took the postwar years to fully solidify these changes, but they got started in 1933.

  304. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    I'd distinguish between addicts and recreational users. Even people who abuse substances heavily are not necessarily addicts. Addiction is what happens when your body or neural circuitry rewires so that you rely on the substance to function and end up abusing it even when you genuinely don't want to. That sort of thing tends to interfere with the sheer level of concentration and effort it takes to be a Nobel-tier physicist or Fields winning mathematician.

    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts. Paul Erdős used amphetamines regularly, but that doesn't mean he was addicted to them. Quite the opposite, he won a bet from a colleague who was concerned and dared him not to use them for a month. Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn't mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.

    >What is going on here is mainly that you are extolling as “geniuses” guys whom I would consider to be slightly dumber than George W. Bush (a remarkably low bar).

    Ouch, man.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    nebulafox wrote to me:

    I’d distinguish between addicts and recreational users.

    There is, I would think, a continuum.

    nebulafox also wrote:

    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts…
    Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn’t mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.

    Yeah. I was pushing on the addicts issue with our friend Dieter because he was so insistent that drug use was integral to the creative achievements of certain “geniuses.”

    I think there is overwhelming reason to doubt that Dieter is correct in STEM subjects and, as you suggest, good reason to doubt that, even in the case of the arts, drugs were a strong positive contribution.

    I myself think that even ethanol is more dangerous than people often acknowledge. But, of course, I am not claiming that no creative person can have a glass of wine once a week, or even once a day.

    But to attribute works of genius to sufficient consumption of drugs that the drugs themselves alter mental functioning so as to dramatically enhance the genius’s achievements… well, that is almost certainly not true in STEM and doubtful in any other area.

    Of course, part of what is going on here is the phenomenon of people using drugs and thinking that they have a profound insight while high, even though the insight turns out to be, at best, pedestrian when they come down from the high.

    And then the main point is that Dieter views as works of genius various works that I think are of no value at all.

    So what is the right word for people who use drugs so much that it does influence their work dramatically, whether positively as Dieter claims or negatively as I think is rather obvious?

    Perhaps “addict” is not quite the right word, but I am not sure “recreational user” works either.

    In any case, I think they would be wise to reduce their consumption!

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Well... at risk of getting personal, I come from a family with a prominent addictive streak and was possibly an alcoholic (seriously, when you get to the point when you feel sick when you do NOT drink, your body is telling you something) at certain points of my commenting career here, so yeah, trust me, I am aware of how it can jack you up as bad as any drug. I am not going to preach, but people really underestimate what booze can to you.

    I never did it to get any profound insights into life, but I lived around enough artist types to know people who did. Even when I was intoxicated or blitzed myself, I could tell they were idiots. Using drugs for performance enhancement instead of creativity, by contrast, is rather common in the tech world, at least in my generation, but IMO, that is playing with fire and in a weird way, making your life too much about your job. If you are snorting coke to get a stupid app out a week faster, time to revaluate.

    (Strangely enough, during the worst of it, I always had a dimmer view of smack addicts and potheads because I did not like how those drugs seemed to make you relaxed and contemplative and just... slower, I guess. I am the weirdo who drunkenly rereads baby electrodynamics texts in Southeast Asian strip clubs instead of engaging the nubile women, though, so... anyway, to this day, I have never done either. Junkie snobbery. Ain't that cute? I suppose the difference is I know I am an honest reprobate, not someome with delusions of genuis.)

    But my own word would be addict, TBH, if it does profoundly effect your work. If you cannot do something or function properly without a substance... that's the litmus test for me. Of course, not all addicts have it impact their work. But they tend to be talented people whose lives just happen to be messes outside their field (Beethoven) vs. those making the field as an excuse to blast themselves, which would be Woodstock.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  305. @PhysicistDave
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote to me:


    I’d distinguish between addicts and recreational users.
     
    There is, I would think, a continuum.

    nebulafox also wrote:


    More to the point, I suspect this is one of the things that differ from field to field. I cannot think of any of the greats in science or math who were addicts...
    Music is a different story: under any reasonable definition of the term, Beethoven probably was an alcoholic. That doesn’t mean he defined himself through booze, for Chrissakes.
     
    Yeah. I was pushing on the addicts issue with our friend Dieter because he was so insistent that drug use was integral to the creative achievements of certain "geniuses."

    I think there is overwhelming reason to doubt that Dieter is correct in STEM subjects and, as you suggest, good reason to doubt that, even in the case of the arts, drugs were a strong positive contribution.

    I myself think that even ethanol is more dangerous than people often acknowledge. But, of course, I am not claiming that no creative person can have a glass of wine once a week, or even once a day.

    But to attribute works of genius to sufficient consumption of drugs that the drugs themselves alter mental functioning so as to dramatically enhance the genius's achievements... well, that is almost certainly not true in STEM and doubtful in any other area.

    Of course, part of what is going on here is the phenomenon of people using drugs and thinking that they have a profound insight while high, even though the insight turns out to be, at best, pedestrian when they come down from the high.

    And then the main point is that Dieter views as works of genius various works that I think are of no value at all.

    So what is the right word for people who use drugs so much that it does influence their work dramatically, whether positively as Dieter claims or negatively as I think is rather obvious?

    Perhaps "addict" is not quite the right word, but I am not sure "recreational user" works either.

    In any case, I think they would be wise to reduce their consumption!

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Well… at risk of getting personal, I come from a family with a prominent addictive streak and was possibly an alcoholic (seriously, when you get to the point when you feel sick when you do NOT drink, your body is telling you something) at certain points of my commenting career here, so yeah, trust me, I am aware of how it can jack you up as bad as any drug. I am not going to preach, but people really underestimate what booze can to you.

    I never did it to get any profound insights into life, but I lived around enough artist types to know people who did. Even when I was intoxicated or blitzed myself, I could tell they were idiots. Using drugs for performance enhancement instead of creativity, by contrast, is rather common in the tech world, at least in my generation, but IMO, that is playing with fire and in a weird way, making your life too much about your job. If you are snorting coke to get a stupid app out a week faster, time to revaluate.

    (Strangely enough, during the worst of it, I always had a dimmer view of smack addicts and potheads because I did not like how those drugs seemed to make you relaxed and contemplative and just… slower, I guess. I am the weirdo who drunkenly rereads baby electrodynamics texts in Southeast Asian strip clubs instead of engaging the nubile women, though, so… anyway, to this day, I have never done either. Junkie snobbery. Ain’t that cute? I suppose the difference is I know I am an honest reprobate, not someome with delusions of genuis.)

    But my own word would be addict, TBH, if it does profoundly effect your work. If you cannot do something or function properly without a substance… that’s the litmus test for me. Of course, not all addicts have it impact their work. But they tend to be talented people whose lives just happen to be messes outside their field (Beethoven) vs. those making the field as an excuse to blast themselves, which would be Woodstock.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @nebulafox

    Comment timed out, but I did meet a few sad souls in physics who seemed to want to do it because they wanted to feel like they were genuises rather than just being highly intelligent. (I did not go to Caltech and I was not around in the 1970s, so I dunno, different for you?) I am not bashing that altogether because the desire to prove your worth is a normal young male thing to want, but if that is all that is pushing you, holy hell, you will be miserable. And what a hollow life to have it revolve solely around others perceptions of you. Also, you miss out on the fact that... well, this stuff *is* pretty damn cool and fun, and if it is not, why are you doing it?

    Reason I bring this up is that this is the same dynamic on a much lower intellect level. Lowliest peasant and highest lord, indeed. I wonder how much of the problems managerial America foists on the rest of society stems from a desperate desire to force others to acknowledge their wisdom. I suppose what I am trying to say is that I might be nothing special, but at least I am not gonna piss any more of my life on those games.

    Have a nice one, Dave. Good luck with your daughter.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  306. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    Well... at risk of getting personal, I come from a family with a prominent addictive streak and was possibly an alcoholic (seriously, when you get to the point when you feel sick when you do NOT drink, your body is telling you something) at certain points of my commenting career here, so yeah, trust me, I am aware of how it can jack you up as bad as any drug. I am not going to preach, but people really underestimate what booze can to you.

    I never did it to get any profound insights into life, but I lived around enough artist types to know people who did. Even when I was intoxicated or blitzed myself, I could tell they were idiots. Using drugs for performance enhancement instead of creativity, by contrast, is rather common in the tech world, at least in my generation, but IMO, that is playing with fire and in a weird way, making your life too much about your job. If you are snorting coke to get a stupid app out a week faster, time to revaluate.

    (Strangely enough, during the worst of it, I always had a dimmer view of smack addicts and potheads because I did not like how those drugs seemed to make you relaxed and contemplative and just... slower, I guess. I am the weirdo who drunkenly rereads baby electrodynamics texts in Southeast Asian strip clubs instead of engaging the nubile women, though, so... anyway, to this day, I have never done either. Junkie snobbery. Ain't that cute? I suppose the difference is I know I am an honest reprobate, not someome with delusions of genuis.)

    But my own word would be addict, TBH, if it does profoundly effect your work. If you cannot do something or function properly without a substance... that's the litmus test for me. Of course, not all addicts have it impact their work. But they tend to be talented people whose lives just happen to be messes outside their field (Beethoven) vs. those making the field as an excuse to blast themselves, which would be Woodstock.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Comment timed out, but I did meet a few sad souls in physics who seemed to want to do it because they wanted to feel like they were genuises rather than just being highly intelligent. (I did not go to Caltech and I was not around in the 1970s, so I dunno, different for you?) I am not bashing that altogether because the desire to prove your worth is a normal young male thing to want, but if that is all that is pushing you, holy hell, you will be miserable. And what a hollow life to have it revolve solely around others perceptions of you. Also, you miss out on the fact that… well, this stuff *is* pretty damn cool and fun, and if it is not, why are you doing it?

    Reason I bring this up is that this is the same dynamic on a much lower intellect level. Lowliest peasant and highest lord, indeed. I wonder how much of the problems managerial America foists on the rest of society stems from a desperate desire to force others to acknowledge their wisdom. I suppose what I am trying to say is that I might be nothing special, but at least I am not gonna piss any more of my life on those games.

    Have a nice one, Dave. Good luck with your daughter.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @nebulafox

    Johann Sebastian Bach drank quite a bit. By today's standards an addict. He used to drink all day - beer and / or brandy. While composing, he often took a bottle of brandy with him in his closet.
    "Especially, since it now appears that he had alcohol in his blood from the time he got up in the morning until he went to bed", an - oh - Bach-addict writes:  http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Topics/Drink.htm

      Then there's Berlioz and - Chopin (opium, of course - if anybody ever wondered what was so strange about Chopin's music, I'd start with opium).  

    Then there's Bruckner - just one more example: The late Bruckner, while working on his 9th symphony, drank 13 to 17 Seidel beer per evening plus a few drinks - and he smoked big cigars - and he never - never ever - exercised - - - ah - one seidel being 0,36 liter. Doctors later wondered, how he survived. And don't talk lowly about Bruckner, please. - When in doubt, ask Old Palo Altan. Anton Bruckner did not only drink, he also ate a lot and - suffered from severe depression and all kinds of neuroses (paranoia, fear, panic attacks...). 

    https://www.brucknertage.at/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Salzburger_Nachrichten_Klaus_PDF.pdf

    I don't care if people don't estimate art. But if somebody likes the fine arts, it is quite likely, that he understands that The Isenheimer Altar is an artwork that ranks quite high (seen from a worldwide perspective). The same is true for Hieronymus Bosch. Or - on a slightly lesser scale Rodin, Sisley, Pissarro... - and none of them was too sober. All it takes is - a look.

    (I'm leaving out the 20th-century ff. for clarity).

  307. @nebulafox
    @nebulafox

    Comment timed out, but I did meet a few sad souls in physics who seemed to want to do it because they wanted to feel like they were genuises rather than just being highly intelligent. (I did not go to Caltech and I was not around in the 1970s, so I dunno, different for you?) I am not bashing that altogether because the desire to prove your worth is a normal young male thing to want, but if that is all that is pushing you, holy hell, you will be miserable. And what a hollow life to have it revolve solely around others perceptions of you. Also, you miss out on the fact that... well, this stuff *is* pretty damn cool and fun, and if it is not, why are you doing it?

    Reason I bring this up is that this is the same dynamic on a much lower intellect level. Lowliest peasant and highest lord, indeed. I wonder how much of the problems managerial America foists on the rest of society stems from a desperate desire to force others to acknowledge their wisdom. I suppose what I am trying to say is that I might be nothing special, but at least I am not gonna piss any more of my life on those games.

    Have a nice one, Dave. Good luck with your daughter.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Johann Sebastian Bach drank quite a bit. By today’s standards an addict. He used to drink all day – beer and / or brandy. While composing, he often took a bottle of brandy with him in his closet.
    “Especially, since it now appears that he had alcohol in his blood from the time he got up in the morning until he went to bed”, an – oh – Bach-addict writes:  http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Topics/Drink.htm

      Then there’s Berlioz and – Chopin (opium, of course – if anybody ever wondered what was so strange about Chopin’s music, I’d start with opium).  

    Then there’s Bruckner – just one more example: The late Bruckner, while working on his 9th symphony, drank 13 to 17 Seidel beer per evening plus a few drinks – and he smoked big cigars – and he never – never ever – exercised – – – ah – one seidel being 0,36 liter. Doctors later wondered, how he survived. And don’t talk lowly about Bruckner, please. – When in doubt, ask Old Palo Altan. Anton Bruckner did not only drink, he also ate a lot and – suffered from severe depression and all kinds of neuroses (paranoia, fear, panic attacks…). 

    https://www.brucknertage.at/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Salzburger_Nachrichten_Klaus_PDF.pdf

    I don’t care if people don’t estimate art. But if somebody likes the fine arts, it is quite likely, that he understands that The Isenheimer Altar is an artwork that ranks quite high (seen from a worldwide perspective). The same is true for Hieronymus Bosch. Or – on a slightly lesser scale Rodin, Sisley, Pissarro… – and none of them was too sober. All it takes is – a look.

    (I’m leaving out the 20th-century ff. for clarity).

  308. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @PhysicistDave


    Defund the schools!
     
    The Taliban agree with you.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Malla

    And Boko Haram.

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