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Terry Teachout, RIP
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The conservative arts critic Terry Teachout has died at age 65. He had congestive heart failure 17 years ago, but recovered to have a fine second act. Here’s his friend Richard Brookhiser’s quick obituary in National Review.

 
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  1. Anonymous[134] • Disclaimer says:

    Teachout died in his sleep on January 13, 2022, at the age of 65.[32]

    That’s exactly how Bob Saget died, 4 days prior. At exactly the same age of 65.

    Did Teachout take the vaccine? Saget had taken the vaccines and had recently gotten the booster shot.

  2. Tarr says:

    I’ve read Mr. Teachout over many years, back in the day, in Commentary, New Criterion and the old American Spectator. He also edited a great edition of
    Whittaker Chambers’ journalism. RIP.

  3. knew Terry–liked him a lot but he got Wokey Woke (not overmuch but enough to make him annoying)

  4. I enjoyed Teachout’s biography on Mencken because he shared the Sage of Baltimore’s passion for music and could therefore speak with some authority about Mencken’s sideline interest in the art.

    • Replies: @Neutral Observer
  5. I’m a bit embarrassed to admit that I only came to Terry’s criticism via his participation in the spectacular music podcast “Political Beats” where he discussed his enduring love for The Band’s first two albums:

    https://www.stitcher.com/show/political-beats/episode/episode-29-terry-teachout-the-band-53939982

    The man had humble but spectacular taste (and following him as his wife died from cancer two years ago was kinda gut-wrenching).

    RIP

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Meretricious
  6. @Anonymous

    According to the CDC 99% of Americans over the age of 65 have been fully vaccinated. So it would be extremely unlikely that anyone over the age of 60 is not fully vaccinated.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  7. J.Ross says:
    @kimchilover

    Appropriate then that he dies as art and beauty and music are taken away from anyone who makes less than a hundred million dollars a year.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  8. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    That 99% vaccinated over age 65 figure of the CDC’s is obviously wrong. I don’t know what the true number is, but it’s not 99%.

  9. @Anonymous

    Did Teachout take the vaccine? Saget had taken the vaccines and had recently gotten the booster shot.

    Is this the sort of thing we may soon expect to see engraved onto people’s tombstones?

  10. @J.Ross

    Please elaborate. I would die without these things.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  11. @kimchilover

    kimchilover, I wish I could agree with you about Terry having spectacular taste. Case in point: he described Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn’s Far East Suite as a “masterpiece”–music critics with better ears–eg, Tim Page–would never have made that mistake in critical judgment. Terry was a talented, eclectic writer. RIP

  12. @Anonymous

    Wow a huge fat guy dying in his sleep? That never happened before a shape-shifting vaccine was created!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  13. LP5 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That 99% vaccinated over age 65 figure of the CDC’s is obviously wrong. I don’t know what the true number is, but it’s not 99%.

    There is a type of Zeno’s Paradox of Pharmaceuticals in play. One person’s Fully Vaccinated may be another’s Just had booster number X.

  14. Russ says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That 99% vaccinated over age 65 figure of the CDC’s is obviously wrong. I don’t know what the true number is, but it’s not 99%.

    Curiosity piqued, I checked: As of early Jan’22, US>65yrs at 95.0% for one jab and 87.7% for both jabs per CDC. Not 99% indeed, but still pretty high.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  15. Jack D says:
    @Longstreet

    The spike proteins caused his double chin to swell up and choked off his breathing.

    Who could imagine that I guy like this, who has had congestive heart failure for 17 years, would just up and die? If he hadn’t gotten the vax he would have surely lived to 116. From now on, every old person who has been vaxxed (which is most of them) and later dies (which is all of them, eventually) will have died because of the vax.

    • Replies: @Russ
  16. @Steve Sailer

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/alisondurkee/2021/11/11/stunning-vaccine-stat-985-of-us-seniors-have-had-shot/?sh=36868e905777

    A stunning 98.5% of seniors were vaccinated by November but only about 70% have been boosted with the third injection. How many seniors will get the new mRNA vaccine for Omicron? Should be available in March. Another 3 injections to maintain your fully vaxxed status.

  17. @Russ

    I’m sure the figure is high, it’s just that when practically anything is said to be 99%, you should wonder about the methodology.

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
  18. Russ says:

    I’m sure the figure is high, it’s just that when practically anything is said to be 99%, you should wonder about the methodology.

    A fair caveat. One wonders if 95% and 99% took on heft beyond the mere numerical due to their seminal roles in statistical significance via t-tests and the like. Perhaps “99%” is also a pseudo-quantitative metaphor for “most” or “almost all” or the like.

  19. Russ says:
    @Jack D

    From now on, every old person who has been vaxxed (which is most of them) and later dies (which is all of them, eventually) will have died because of the vax.

    Add my LOL. At the other extreme are that 28-yr old Tampa Bay bullpen catcher and those soccer players dropping ill or dead, from heart issues previously rare among such young male athletes. Would like to see harder data on that.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @AndrewR
  20. I never really knew anything about this guy, but I always thought that for an ostensible writer/critic/”intellectual” (if that still means anything anymore), he certainly had a great stage name.

    In any event requiescet in pace. (Yes, that is the subjunctive/volitional, not the declarative.)

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
  21. Icy Blast says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    “Bardon Kaldion”: You are the problem. You are the reason we have that shambling necrotic idiot in the White House. Thanks, Genius!

  22. @Pincher Martin

    I enjoyed Teachout’s biography on Mencken

    I attended a presentation by Terry Teachout of his bio Mencken book at the Cato Institute in DC back when it was released.

    Terry was really an engaging and interesting guy fronting for another engaging and interesting personality, H.L. Mencken.

    A Mencken analog on the comic side was Norm MacDonald. Real America needs both a lacerating Mencken and a calculating absurdist Norm MacDonald now to call a spade a spade against the parasitic Power Elite Delusionists.

    RIP to all three men.

    • Thanks: Pincher Martin
  23. @Steve Sailer

    … when practically anything is said to be 99%, you should wonder about the methodology.

    In general, yes. On this thread, however, as anyone with eyes to see and fingers and toes to count on, the Fauci-ite conformity and gullibility are running pretty darn close to 99 percent—certainly far too close for this man’s comfort.

    As for Terry Teachout, in the spirit of de mortuis nihil nisi bonum, it might fairly be said that he merited the offer of a desk in the Culture Gulch at today’s New York Times. That is to say, like everyone there since Walter Kerr left the drama desk and Donal Henahan left the music, Teachout never wrote a review that was so insightful as to be worth reading twice.

  24. HA says:
    @Russ

    “…and those soccer players dropping ill or dead, from heart issues previously rare among such young male athletes.”

    As far as soccer goes, we had a freakishly low-casualty year (2020, the year of lockdowns, with only 3 deaths) followed by a freakishly high year (2021, with 21 deaths, 6 of them in December). The last 2-year span with 24 or more deaths was six years earlier, as was the 2-year chunk beginning a year before that.

    That being said, 2021 was indeed a weirdly high year (though not so much for the NBA or NFL, which makes you wonder). And as I’ve noted earlier, according to a recent Oxford study, the myocarditis risks so far from the vaccine are observably lower than for COVID itself (at least with alpha and delta variants). Even at the start of the pandemic, doctors were puzzling over how readily COVID formed clots. I guess it really WASN’T just a flu, after all. Big surprise.

    Young males might be an exception in that the UK data (but not the US data, for some strange reason) indicates their myocrditis death rates, as low as they are, are worse after the vaccine than after the disease, but that is still undergoing peer review, and I suspect the teens who were first in like to get COVID vaccines were high-risk children, as was the case with the regular flu vaccine, and that kind of skew spuriously elevated the estimated vaccine risks for the young.

    • Thanks: Corvinus
  25. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    In any event requiescet in pace. (Yes, that is the subjunctive/volitional, not the declarative.)

    Alas, no, it isn’t; put otherwise, you are mistaken. As “requiescĕre” is a regular verb of the third conjugation, “requiescet” is the third-person-singular form of the future active indicative; thus “he will rest.” On the other hand, “requiescat” is the third-person-singular form of the present active subjunctive; thus “may he rest” or “let him rest.”

  26. Congrats, Steve, you got me to click a link to NR, something I hadn’t done in over five years.

  27. J.Ross says:
    @HammerJack

    Realize that mainstream popular culture does not exist and you’ll be fine.

    • Agree: sayless
  28. @Pierre de Craon

    Well, thanks for the correction, I defer to your far superior expertise. Duly noted. Also, I love it when people talk about grammar in the sort of very sophisticated terms you’re employing.

    On the other hand, some real-world advice: don’t interrupt a wise-ass when he’s just being a wise-ass.

    As some jerk once said: “Knowledge is recognizing that a tomato is literally a fruit and not a vegetable; but, wisdom is just knowing you’re not supposed to put tomatoes in a fruit salad.”

  29. It would be anything but wise for me to solicit or accept “real-world advice” from someone who first makes a boastful and ignorant error and then responds to correction with childishly bad grace.

  30. AndrewR says:
    @Russ

    Why would they let us see that data?

  31. I used to think the indispensable quality of a professional critic was taste; but now I am sure it is enthusiasm, which Terry, as Brookhiser pointed out in his obituary, had more of than any critic I have ever known. The critic gluts himself on art, most of it necessarily pretty bad. This exposes him to the twin dangers of scorning everything, like John Simon, or praising a lot of schlock, like most everyone else. Terry, despite his alarmingly prolific reviewing right up to the end, managed to do neither. Nothing could jade his iron palate.

    He was also exceptionally generous to my own writing despite having nothing whatever to gain, and I will always be deeply grateful to him for that.

    Incidentally, to answer a question upthread, he was triple-vaxxed, as he often noted on his Twitter feed. However, he was certainly not lacking in comorbidities.

  32. Tony says:

    Same birthplace as Rush Limbaugh. Thats only two people but maybe they do breed some good people out there.

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