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After cataract surgery on both eyes, I now have 20-20 distance vision for the first time since first grade. (In second grade I cheated on the school eye exam by memorizing the eye chart while the line snaked close to front wall, but in third grade they’d caught on to my tricks and I was nailed.)

Cataracts, however, cloud eyesight rather than distort it, and are uncorrectable by glasses or contact lenses. But they now have an amazing surgical technique to implant artificial lenses in your eyeballs. This both solves for cataracts and the myopia I’ve had since I started reading.

This used to be a hideous operation. I see from the Wikipedia article about Patrick Bronte, the father of Charlotte (Jane Eyre) and Emily Bronte (Wuthering Heights):

In August 1846, Brontë travelled to Manchester, accompanied by Charlotte, to undergo surgery on his eyes. On 28 August he was operated upon, without anaesthetic, to remove cataracts. Surgeons did not yet know how to use stitches to hold the incision in the eye together and as a consequence the patient was required to lie quietly in a darkened room, for weeks after the operation. Charlotte used her time in Manchester to begin writing Jane Eyre, the book which was to make her famous.

In contrast, I was up blogging away the evening after each surgery. A friend points out that your eyeballs are an ideal interface between your inside and outside, so surgery on them, as horrifying as it may sound, is less intrusive than surgery that cuts through your skin.

The downside of my new internal single focus lenses is that while they fix my distance vision remarkably — I can imagine a comedy movie with Vince Vaughn and Will Ferrell as middle-aged businessmen whose only failure in life has been in Little League baseball where they couldn’t see well enough to hit pitches or catch flyballs, who decide, after cataract surgery, that they are going Back to Baseball — is that they don’t do anything for my presbytopian far-sightedness.

During my late 50s, my progressive multifocal glasses stopped working for allowing me to read in the 10 inch to 36 inch range. I rectified this by buying a giant 43″ computer monitor that I station about 43″ away. And when reading books, I took off my glasses and held the page about 10″ away.

But my new artificial eye lenses can’t deal with anything closer than about 37″. Unfortunately, I’m not particularly long-armed for my height, wearing a 34/35 sleeve. I feel like if my arms were a few inches longer like Jerry West or Scottie Pippen, I could hold text out at arm’s length and read it fine, but my arms are not quite long enough.

You can get implanted complex multi-focal artificial lenses that allow for perfect vision at all distances … if they work. But when I consulted the top cataract eye surgeon at UCLA, he said he didn’t want to do that because some times they don’t work, and then patients nag him about it.

So I went with simple single focus distance correction implants because I really like seeing landscapes. Coming back on the 405 freeway from UCLA over the Sepulveda Pass with both eyes last week, I was struck by how nice the San Fernando Valley looks. And driving at night has become a pleasure.

Fortunately, simple 2.0 correction reading glasses you can buy cheap at the drug store work fine for reading books. It’s a little annoying having to remember to drag with me both sunglasses and reading glasses, so I figure I’ll probably get progressive multifocal glasses that automatically tint to sunglasses in the sun and wear those all the time. It’s a bit of a drag to wear glasses, but, on the other hand, it’s fantastic to be able to see perfectly, so why complain?

Thanks to everybody who contributed to my being able to see.

I’m carrying on my August fundraiser. Here are ten ways for you to contribute:

First: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Zelle contributions are not tax deductible.

Second: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Third, Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Fourth: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Fifth: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

I have no idea why somebody carefully hung this empty picture frame from a tree alongside the Fryman Canyon hiking trail, but I appreciate it, like I appreciate your support.

Sixth: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

This is not to say that you shouldn’t click on John’s fund too, but, please, make sure there’s a blue dot next to my name.

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Eight: You can send me Bitcoin. Bitcoin payments are not tax deductible.

Here’s my Bitcoin address:

1EkuvRNR86uJzpopquxdnmF23iA3vzdDuc

Here’s the OCR

Please let me know if this works, ideally by sending me Bitcoin. Or let me know what else you’d like to send me.

If you’re sending to a crypto address that belongs to another Coinbase user who has opted into Instant sends in their privacy settings, you can send your funds instantly to them with no transaction fees. This transaction will not be sent on chain, and is similar to sending to an email address.

Learn more about sending and receiving crypto.

Send off-chain funds

Mobile

  1. Tap at the bottom
  2. Tap Send
  3. Tap your selected asset and enter the amount of crypto you’d like to send
  4. Enter the Receiver’s crypto address or scan their crypto QR code to see if the address belongs to a Coinbase user

Computer

  1. Sign into Coinbase.com

  2. Click Send at the top right

  3. Click your selected asset and enter the amount of crypto you’d like to send

  4. Enter the Receiver’s crypto address or scan their crypto QR code to see if the address belongs to a Coinbase user

Obsolete: Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. But these don’t work anymore. I will try to fix them. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Ninth: I added Square [which is now Block] as a fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

Tenth: Venmo: https://account.venmo.com/u/SteveSailer

 
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  1. Great news, I’m glad everything worked out right for you.

    • Agree: AnotherDad, Not Raul, Russ
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    So I went with simple single focus distance correction implants because I really like seeing landscapes. Coming back on the 405 freeway from UCLA over the Sepulveda Pass with both eyes last week, I was struck by how nice the San Fernando Valley looks. And driving at night has become a pleasure.
     
    With Rob--great this worked out for you.

    And I really think you made the right choice on lens. Seeing "the World" out there is what is cool and amazing.

    My dad grew up not realizing that you were supposed to be able to see leaves on trees and that the distance wasn't supposed to be a blur. It wasn't until he joined the Navy that he was squared away.

    I grew up with great vision--while all my family had glasses--and am visual oriented. Old age has taken the usual toll on near vision. But I just have a passel of these $5 glasses from Walmart, mostly 150s now--come with a little sleeve--and have them everywhere--by my chair here, in the kitchen drawer with "the stuff", in the desk, glovebox of the minivans--for in both houses and a couple in my flight bag. Recommend the simple/cheap "flood the zone" approach.

    Good you can see the world--and enjoy seeing the world--again.

    Only downside is what you might "notice".

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    , @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    Too bad Steve doesn’t care that much about his own people.


    But when I consulted the top cataract eye surgeon at UCLA, he said he didn’t want to do that
     
    How does one consult with the top cataract surgeon? Interesting how Steve works hard to take care of himself and work those networks. But throws his own people under the bus to maintain credibility with the Establishment.
  2. Success: I Can See!

    Heck yeah! So happy for you. And good details about what was going on with your vision—I was wondering what choice you would make. Looks like you made the right one.

  3. I can imagine a comedy movie with Vince Vaughn and Will Ferrell as middle-aged businessmen whose only failure in life has been in Little League baseball where they couldn’t see well enough to hit pitches or catch flyballs, who decide, after cataract surgery, that they are going Back to Baseball

    Weird. A good friend of mine is a university professor in SoCal who–even now, in his sixties–plays baseball in an amateur league. When he got Lasik surgery to correct for nearsightedness maybe a decade ago, his surgeon asked where he wanted his best focus–assuming my friend like most of his fellow academics on whom this guy operates would want it set for reading. My friend said no: he’d like it set at 60′-6″.

    I did point out to him that a better option would be at the typical release point for a pitcher or maybe even a little closer, but by the time we were discussing it the die was already cast. Anyway, congratulations on your improved eyesight–not a minor improvement I imagine.

  4. Would it be better if you got the surgery 20 years ago, so you could have an extra 20 years of 100% vision?

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @George


    Would it be better if you got the surgery 20 years ago, so you could have an extra 20 years of 100% vision?
     
    You don't get cataract surgery until you develop cataracts. Before that (assuming all else is okay) you don't need it. Getting new lenses in your eyes isn't minor surgery.

    Most of this develops in your 60s or later.

    You don't get cancer surgery until you get cancer...
  5. The real intelligence test is people who realized they could ^!%# with school authorities, and those who did what they were told.

    • Replies: @Guest007
    @J.Ross

    The intelligence of people who defy authority has much more statistical variation than those who do not. For the few people who succeed despite being defiant types, many more people fail and have a miserable life due to being defiant of authority.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Nicholas Stix

  6. Congratulations, Steve. May your refurbished eyes bring you (and us) many more years of clear-sightedness.

  7. I am glad for you, Steve. Medical progress has been amazing.

    I am curious of how the symptoms came up. Was it something long-term that you finally realized or an eye doctor noticed, or did things get cloudy pretty quickly?

    .

    PS: As a kid, like your story, when I changed schools at one point, I just started keeping the glasses I was supposed to wear for nearsightedness in my pocket. If anything, my eyes got better after that.

  8. Clearly the new car needs be a looker!

  9. Glad to hear it. I’ve been surprised at how little the two surgeries have impacted your output. I’m still not entirely convinced we haven’t been haunted on a couple of days.

  10. I got far vision in the right and reading length in the left, and needed progressive lenses to make them equal and also handle midrange work. But I can drive and see TV without them.

    Steve don’t forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.

    Same for UV radiation.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Carol


    Steve don’t forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.
     
    I remember reading a letter in a gun magazine decades ago where a guy decided to go shooting a .22LR rifle and a spent shell exited the ejection port and turned itself around with the case mouth facing the eyes. The shell cut his cornea leaving him with permanent effects. There's a reason all those Russkie invaders wear protective googles; they've observed US soldiers using protective eyeware in all our recent military activities and decided it's a very good idea.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Anonymous
    @Carol


    Same for UV radiation.
     
    Aren’t the eyes evolved to handle UV radiation?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  11. It is kind of amazing that a healthy younger person has lenses that can flex to focus on either very distant objects or very near ones, while all klutzy man can reliably do is make lenses that can rigidly focus at a certain distance. Evolution is amazing.

    There’s an analogy in the progress of 3D printing, or additive manufacturing. Engineers are excited because this technology will allow them to design metal parts the way nature has designed complex structures such as the human skeleton, that is, in the shapes best fitted for the functions they will perform, with minimum wasted weight or volume. Up to now, engineers have to design such complex structures in lots of individual parts, so that they can be made by the few crude manufacturing methods we know, casting, forging, cutting or grinding.

    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    @Henry Canaday

    On the other hand, we can make eyedrops that make the old stiff natural lenses soft again. UNR844 is in phase 2 trials at the moment and it clearly works and it clearly doesn't have any common short-term bad side effects. What we don't know yet is how long the effect lasts or the best way to dose it (that's what the current trial is for) -- or if there are any rare but nasty side effects or any long-term side effects (that's what phase 3 is for). Looks like presbyopia will soon be a thing of the past!

  12. I figure I’ll probably get progressive multifocal glasses that automatically tint to sunglasses in the sun and wear those all the time.

    I was laughing out loud, thinking that certainly the tinted lens is a joke. But, is it? Technology is moving along faster than my imagination sometimes. Still I hope it’s a joke. I’m not ready for the world of designer lenses. Unless they can see through clothing. That’s what the teenaged boy in me wishes for

    Very happy for you, Steve. Mozel tov!

  13. @Henry Canaday
    It is kind of amazing that a healthy younger person has lenses that can flex to focus on either very distant objects or very near ones, while all klutzy man can reliably do is make lenses that can rigidly focus at a certain distance. Evolution is amazing.

    There’s an analogy in the progress of 3D printing, or additive manufacturing. Engineers are excited because this technology will allow them to design metal parts the way nature has designed complex structures such as the human skeleton, that is, in the shapes best fitted for the functions they will perform, with minimum wasted weight or volume. Up to now, engineers have to design such complex structures in lots of individual parts, so that they can be made by the few crude manufacturing methods we know, casting, forging, cutting or grinding.

    Replies: @Peter Lund

    On the other hand, we can make eyedrops that make the old stiff natural lenses soft again. UNR844 is in phase 2 trials at the moment and it clearly works and it clearly doesn’t have any common short-term bad side effects. What we don’t know yet is how long the effect lasts or the best way to dose it (that’s what the current trial is for) — or if there are any rare but nasty side effects or any long-term side effects (that’s what phase 3 is for). Looks like presbyopia will soon be a thing of the past!

  14. “presbytopian”
    That should be “presbyopian”, Steve.
    “Presbytopia(n)” must be some place where there’s lots of presbytarians.
    (There’s a book apparently: “Presbytopia; what it means to be a presbytarian”)

  15. Steve, I’ve been through the same operation and enjoyed the remarkable results. Having to have reading glasses with me at all times was not too high price to pay. I buy the three-packs of them at CVS as I lose or break them regularly. I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them. I prefer the plastic-framed models as they’re more comfortable and the arms squeeze in slightly, holding them more securely to my head. Best of luck!

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Harry Baldwin

    Get them for a buck at the dollar store. I prefer them to reading with progressive lenses or contacts. With progressives I'm always tilting my head to read through the lower lens.

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Baldwin


    I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them.
     
    Rather than buying t-shirts with pockets (I am assuming they cost more), have you tried that trick where you tuck an arm of your glasses into the collar of your t-shirt?

    (As an added bonus, the feel of the arm against your chest is a constant reminder of where your glasses are.)

    Replies: @Clyde

  16. Glad to hear that you can see clearly again. Had the same thing done several years ago. The results are nothing short of miraculous.

  17. Skip to one minute, or to 1:20 to see how Donald Sutherland does it in Space Cowboys (2000).

    It must be a relief to see better.

  18. Congrats from all of us 😉

    • Disagree: SunBakedSuburb
  19. I’m not against using cataract surgery to improve vision but it has a much more promising future to destroy human vision!

    Imagine a courtroom where a criminal is facing years in prison. Not only is he still a risk to other inmates, correctional officers, healthcare providers etc. it is expensive to imprison people. The judge, instead of giving the man 10 or 20 years in prison,. simply has the man taken to an opthamologists clinic where opaque cataracts are implanted in his eyes. He is then released into the custody of his next of kin or, if he has no family that wants him ( that would be a real eye opener for the criminal) he is taken to a WW2 style army barracks facility where he can stay, eat WFP style refugee rations, and learn to use a long white cane.

    After just 5 or 10 years the cataracts are removed with the warning ”screw up again” and its darkness forever!

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Unit472

    This is literally a Byzantine punishment. Blinding rendered rivals unable to reign.

  20. I was diagnosed with a 20/9 vision in the military (19 in the French system). I never suspected I had an eagle sight. Now, I am still 20/12 15 years later.

    The ophtalmologist told me that my sight was better than any activ jet fighter pilot. I have motion sickness and scared by plane, so I disappointed them.

    I don’t see any advantage in that kind of sight despite being at a > 4 sd level.

    On top of that , I have aphantasia and Sdam so I can’t use my sight to build up imagination nor memories.

    I also have grounds to believe I see 100 M colours instead of the 1 M average one. It probably makes my vision experience a Waou thing if I could get a feeling of what’s being an average Joe in that regard and come back to my normal self while keeping the previous feelings, wich I know I couldn’t do because not only it doesn’t exist, but I have Sdam, so I don’t keep memories, just knowledge about the past

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Bruno

    "I have aphantasia and Sdam so I can't use my sight to build imagination nor memories."

    Yet you were still able to sell your script.

    , @Anon
    @Bruno

    You should marry a tetrachromat.

    Replies: @Bruno

  21. I had the operation after my eye dr. told me my lenses were fogging and I would see colors better after getting them out. She was right, the snow is bright white, the trees and grass are vibrant green. So nice.

    Fashion at the time was to correct one eye for near vision and the other eye for distance and the brain would sort it out so both were clear. Did not work that well for me so I just wear progressive lenses all the time. If I were doing it over I would just correct for distance and wear reading glasses when needed.

  22. Monofocal was the right choice, for the reason your doctor explained. The KISS method is best when it comes to the eyes, especially surgery upon them.

    Bifocal sunglasses work fine. Like blue light filtering glasses, they feel funny at first, but you don’t notice them after five minutes. Conversely, the automatically – tinting (photochromic) sunglasses you’re considering are more expensive and don’t look as cool (especially indoors).

    More importantly, because the change in the photochromics from light to dark dark is a thermal reaction caused by a halide (usually. silver chloride) within the glass, the lens won’t become that dark at higher temperatures.

    Thus, they’re much less useful during hot summers. I hear that it can get hot where you live.

  23. Enjoy your relatively efficient health care while it lasts, white Americans. As the country overflows with incompetent and lazy diversity trash, the health care you took for granted will disappear from the market, except for a wealthy elite.

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @Dan Kurt
    @advancedatheist

    The future of Medicine in the USA is bleak. Read The Corruption of Medicine--
    Guardians of the profession discard merit in order to alter the demographics of their field by
    Heather Mac Donald:
    https://www.city-journal.org/the-corruption-of-medicine

    Dan Kurt

  24. Congratulations! I’m very happy for you. After I had my cataract surgeries done in 2016, I was able to see into the distance clearly for the first time in over 50 years. It was amazing. I still run outside to look at the moon.

    I don’t see quite as well as you do and I have developed scarring on my right eye. But the improvement is just thrilling.

    I was given little cards saying I have intraocular lens in. If you got those, don’t forget to put them in your wallet.

  25. Congratulations Steve! Hopefully, you will be able to continue to work your magic, with essentially unfettered vision, for many, many more years at the Unz Review and Taki Magazine.

    By the way, I vaguely recall reading an article many years ago that said something to the effect that cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about \$10,000 and cataract surgery in Canada had a total billing cost of something like \$800 (I do not remember the costs cited exactly, but the numbers I used are a decent representation from what I remember reading).

    So your cataract surgery added, say, about \$10,000 to the US GDP. Whereas, the same cataract surgery in Canada would have added about \$800 to Canada’s GDP. Which kinda points out the folly of GDP.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @EddieSpaghetti

    cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about $10,000

    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original. This is why the uninsured get hit with huge bills. I'm not certain which number gets into the GDP, but I suspect the smaller.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

  26. @J.Ross
    The real intelligence test is people who realized they could ^!%# with school authorities, and those who did what they were told.

    Replies: @Guest007

    The intelligence of people who defy authority has much more statistical variation than those who do not. For the few people who succeed despite being defiant types, many more people fail and have a miserable life due to being defiant of authority.

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Guest007

    Anyone who succeeds within a system is not only less intelligent as a matter of definition than anyone who succeeded outside it but is also missing some of his own success.

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Guest007

    There's another category you guys are missing: Those who attract the ire of authority, especially educational authorities, without trying to.

  27. Fortunately, simple 2.0 correction reading glasses you can buy cheap at the drug store work fine for reading books.

    No, go to Dollar Tree. \$1.25 each. I keep breaking or losing them, so I buy 5 a year. The 1.50 correction is perfect for my 24″ LED screen. I am reading text most of the time. I have a 32″ 4K monitor and a 27″ monitor that I have previously hooked up to me Windows 11 desktop. I arrived at 24″ IPS being the best. Especially at night, who wants a monster LED screen staring back at me.

    At night I dampen the LED monitor’s blue light levels. Also known as red shifting. Within Windows 11 there is an option for this, under display. There is also a tiny program called flu.x that also red shifts. I use both at the same time at night.

    I am glad your eye operation came out great. Was it done via robotics? These operations must be getting better every year. Downsides and mistakes get reduced.

    If you/anyone buys a laptop and wants to hook up an external monitor. My advice is 24″ FHD IPS HP is good enough. \$119 at Amazoo — https://www.amazon.com/HP-V24i-23-8-inch-Diagonal-Computer/dp/B08G5R5LM3 — Ebay new and make an offer \$109 —https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=HP+V24i+&_sacat=0&_sop=15

  28. @Carol
    I got far vision in the right and reading length in the left, and needed progressive lenses to make them equal and also handle midrange work. But I can drive and see TV without them.

    Steve don't forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.

    Same for UV radiation.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous

    Steve don’t forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.

    I remember reading a letter in a gun magazine decades ago where a guy decided to go shooting a .22LR rifle and a spent shell exited the ejection port and turned itself around with the case mouth facing the eyes. The shell cut his cornea leaving him with permanent effects. There’s a reason all those Russkie invaders wear protective googles; they’ve observed US soldiers using protective eyeware in all our recent military activities and decided it’s a very good idea.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Joe Stalin

    I had an eye accident from chopping down a tree.

    A splinter flew out and went right in my eye.

    It hit it hard enough to where I couldn't see out of it.

    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.

    I've also had some ricochets bounce back when shooting. Like whiz a few yards by me which is quite unnerving.

    The odds of that happening goes up massively when you shoot in random places like the woods. Interestingly it is much more likely to be a problem with slower ammo. Fast rounds like 223 normally break apart if they hit a rock. It's much more likely with older big bore rounds like 30 cal. I'm a lot more careful when shooting anything like that.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  29. About Bronte, that clears up (hee hee!) something I read about Guido von List, the “rune master” of Ariosophy. He had a cataract operation in 1905, which I already thought was pretty early. And indeed, he had to lie in a darkened room for six months, although no explanation was given in my source.

    It was mentioned because apparently it was while in this enforced darkness that the “secret of the runes” came to him (along with the information that he belonged to the hereditary Kristian (sic) priesthood of the Aryans, and that their mission was to exterminate the Jews).

    Eventually, this produced Hitler.

    So Steve, be careful.

  30. >says he has perfect vision
    >lists things wrong with his vision

  31. Good news on your surgery.

    Mine, a few years ago, also went well.

    Other than I now see a lot more floaters than before. But a small issue for not wearing glasses.

    Be sure to wear sunglasses outdoors now, since I’m told that post surgery your eyes will be more vulnerable to certain kinds of UV radiation caused cancers.

    The odd part was, at first, reaching out upon awakening for those trusty eyeglasses. Not there any more…

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Muggles

    "Other than I now see a lot more floaters than before."

    Are you sure they're not fairies?

    , @Anon
    @Muggles

    It’s highly likely that the intense California sun caused his cataracts in the first place. Was Steve-o forgetful of his shades for so many years?

  32. In fifth grade, I sensed that the woman giving us our eye exams was having an internal debate about whether to send me home with a note. She chose not to, to my great relief. In sixth grade, my luck ran out– so I threw the note away, as soon as I got home! Somehow, I was able to avoid getting glasses until the middle of tenth grade. They certainly did wonders for my vision, but they made me even more self-conscious than I always had been– especially since I had buyer’s remorse about the frames that I had chosen. Now, in my dotage, my left eye has gone bad, vis-a-vis the right one, and I suspect that cataract surgery is up next….

  33. @Rob McX
    Great news, I'm glad everything worked out right for you.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    So I went with simple single focus distance correction implants because I really like seeing landscapes. Coming back on the 405 freeway from UCLA over the Sepulveda Pass with both eyes last week, I was struck by how nice the San Fernando Valley looks. And driving at night has become a pleasure.

    With Rob–great this worked out for you.

    And I really think you made the right choice on lens. Seeing “the World” out there is what is cool and amazing.

    My dad grew up not realizing that you were supposed to be able to see leaves on trees and that the distance wasn’t supposed to be a blur. It wasn’t until he joined the Navy that he was squared away.

    I grew up with great vision–while all my family had glasses–and am visual oriented. Old age has taken the usual toll on near vision. But I just have a passel of these \$5 glasses from Walmart, mostly 150s now–come with a little sleeve–and have them everywhere–by my chair here, in the kitchen drawer with “the stuff”, in the desk, glovebox of the minivans–for in both houses and a couple in my flight bag. Recommend the simple/cheap “flood the zone” approach.

    Good you can see the world–and enjoy seeing the world–again.

    Only downside is what you might “notice”.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @AnotherDad


    It wasn’t until he joined the Navy that he was squared away.
     
    "Sir, the private does not see any leaves, Sir!"

    "Private Pyle, you had best square your ass away and start shitting me Tiffany cuff links or I will definitely fuck you up." -- Sgt Hartman
  34. “to lie quietly in a darkened room, for weeks”

    With the room temperature at 68 degrees that’d be the perfect vacation.

  35. @Muggles
    Good news on your surgery.

    Mine, a few years ago, also went well.

    Other than I now see a lot more floaters than before. But a small issue for not wearing glasses.

    Be sure to wear sunglasses outdoors now, since I'm told that post surgery your eyes will be more vulnerable to certain kinds of UV radiation caused cancers.

    The odd part was, at first, reaching out upon awakening for those trusty eyeglasses. Not there any more...

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon

    “Other than I now see a lot more floaters than before.”

    Are you sure they’re not fairies?

  36. Steve, I’m very happy for you!

  37. @Bruno
    I was diagnosed with a 20/9 vision in the military (19 in the French system). I never suspected I had an eagle sight. Now, I am still 20/12 15 years later.

    The ophtalmologist told me that my sight was better than any activ jet fighter pilot. I have motion sickness and scared by plane, so I disappointed them.

    I don’t see any advantage in that kind of sight despite being at a > 4 sd level.

    On top of that , I have aphantasia and Sdam so I can’t use my sight to build up imagination nor memories.

    I also have grounds to believe I see 100 M colours instead of the 1 M average one. It probably makes my vision experience a Waou thing if I could get a feeling of what’s being an average Joe in that regard and come back to my normal self while keeping the previous feelings, wich I know I couldn’t do because not only it doesn’t exist, but I have Sdam, so I don’t keep memories, just knowledge about the past

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon

    “I have aphantasia and Sdam so I can’t use my sight to build imagination nor memories.”

    Yet you were still able to sell your script.

  38. anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:

    A Polish man goes to the eye doctor in the UK. The bottom line of the eye chart has the letters:
    C z y n q s t a s z
    The optometrist asks, ‘Can you read the bottom line?’
    ‘Read it?’, the Pole replies, ‘I know the guy!’

    Comment referring to our host Steve on another site:

    A great running observation of Steve Sailer is that today’s Leftists fully embody the classic communist formula of ‘Who? Whom?’, i.e., how everything in propaganda or even the legal system itself, turns simply on who you want to win, or whom you want to be destroyed.

    This formula – in Russian, Kto? Kogo? – came from Lenin himself (1921), then Trotsky (1925) and Stalin (1929).

    Regrettably, the undermining of classic USA ‘rule of law’ – treating all defendants impartially and fairly – dates back to the Christian-led disaster of Prohibition, turning the average ‘normie’ into a criminal, and making mafias of Jews, Italians, and Irish into ‘populist heroes’. Some of today’s boomers will still happily tell you how their grandpa was a whisky-smuggler or rum-runner during 1920-33.

    Ever since Prohibition, there’s been an American admiration for deviousness about the law, which is now ruthlessly expanded by a totally Machiavellian ‘Left’.

    Left vs Right ‘lawfare’ is an old story in Israel, where globalist vs Zionist Jews go at each other’s throats, so Netanyahu is threatened with indictments etc, in the same kind of ‘Who? Whom?’ lawfare we see in the US by Left against Right.

    The failed right-wing Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork long ago observed that Jews have been slowly using the ‘Israeli model’ to poison USA politics as well (see ‘Borked’ by late Israeli dissident Barry Chamish).

    Tho even today, US Jews in the two camps of globalists (Soros, the larger US Jewish group tied to Biden) vs nationalist Zionists (Netanyahu, smaller USA Jewish group tied to Trump), avoid attacking each other directly inside the USA, but only do so via proxies like Trump … whereas in Israel, they hit each other directly and personally.

  39. I had the cataract operation some years ago. There aren’t many benefits to growing old, but the improved vision from that procedure was certainly one. I haven’t been able to see this well since I was about nine. My health has been generally good over the years, with nothing life-threatening that only modern medical science could treat, so allowing for the usual hazards of past eras (war, famine, bad sanitation), I might well have reached my present age even if I had been born a hundred or even two hundred years earlier — but I’d be effectively blind from cataracts. It made me wonder how common cataract blindness was in the past, before the lens implant surgery was common. I was reading a girls’ series book from 1910 in which one of the high-school aged girls takes on a job reading to a wealthy old lady and handling her correspondence because the old lady’s eyes are said to be “dimming,” which sounds like cataracts to me.

  40. @Harry Baldwin
    Steve, I've been through the same operation and enjoyed the remarkable results. Having to have reading glasses with me at all times was not too high price to pay. I buy the three-packs of them at CVS as I lose or break them regularly. I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them. I prefer the plastic-framed models as they're more comfortable and the arms squeeze in slightly, holding them more securely to my head. Best of luck!

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @Luddite in Chief

    Get them for a buck at the dollar store. I prefer them to reading with progressive lenses or contacts. With progressives I’m always tilting my head to read through the lower lens.

  41. Steve, I’ve been putting off cataract surgery because I don’t know how to find a good surgeon. Could you please tell me how you identified “the top cataract eye surgeon at UCLA”? And if you feel comfortable doing so, would you tell me that doctor’s name? Thank you.

  42. When he was 5, they asked my brother to read the E chart, and he said What chart? An idiot dr. put me in bifocals at 7 because I couldn’t focus more than a few inches past my nose. They told me 6 years ago I have a slight cataract in one eye, but it doesn’t seem any worse–yet.

    That fired FBI cretin McCabe wore those hideous clear-bottomed frames that everyone wore in the 60s before wire-rims came in. I knew he had to be a crook, despite being handsome for DC.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ralph L


    When he was 5, they asked my brother to read the E chart, and he said What chart?
     
    I cheat by using my brain as well as my eyes. What is it likely to be?
  43. Pfizer’s COVAIDS vaccine [sic] is unsafe and defective, but at least their blood money bought you a fresh pair of eyes!

    Hopefully there’s enough coronabonu\$ left over for your new car too!

    And hopefully Pfizer didn’t require you to get injected with their poison in exchange for shill “”donations”””. 😉😉😉

  44. “Thanks to everybody who contributed to my being able to see.”

    Come on, man, don’t be coy! Here, I’ll dox ’em for you:

    A round of applause please for Steve’s donors:

    1) Twat Would Be Shilling ((roar!))

    2) HA ((ROARRR!!))

    3) utu ((polite applause))

    Just kidding, these were all barely disguised cutouts for Pfizer ((RRROOOOOOAARRRRRRRRRRRR!!!))

  45. [2:44]

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Joe Stalin

    My personal take, the Dr. Strangelove character--especially the Nazi crap with his arm--is the weakest--lamest--bit in the movie. If the whole movie were like that it would just be over the top lame and stupid.

    The best stuff to me is the characters who are broadly drawn but not complete cartoons.

    George C. Scott to me actually kills it, almost steals the movie. Just a good horny American guy who's proud of what his boys can do. But Slim Pickens--a guy could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with this--is great as well. Sterling Hayden does an excellent job. Keenan Winn's bit as the straight up army guy is good. In think Sellers is best as Group Captain Lionel Mandrake trying to get Sterling Hayden to tune in to reality.

    Definitely the funniest movie to come out of the Cold War.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  46. @Bruno
    I was diagnosed with a 20/9 vision in the military (19 in the French system). I never suspected I had an eagle sight. Now, I am still 20/12 15 years later.

    The ophtalmologist told me that my sight was better than any activ jet fighter pilot. I have motion sickness and scared by plane, so I disappointed them.

    I don’t see any advantage in that kind of sight despite being at a > 4 sd level.

    On top of that , I have aphantasia and Sdam so I can’t use my sight to build up imagination nor memories.

    I also have grounds to believe I see 100 M colours instead of the 1 M average one. It probably makes my vision experience a Waou thing if I could get a feeling of what’s being an average Joe in that regard and come back to my normal self while keeping the previous feelings, wich I know I couldn’t do because not only it doesn’t exist, but I have Sdam, so I don’t keep memories, just knowledge about the past

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon

    You should marry a tetrachromat.

    • Replies: @Bruno
    @Anon

    Too late. But I am probably one else I don’t see how I could have such a colour vision. Except if I have 400 colour base instead of 100 in each sort of cone,

    My wife is a physician (anaesthesiologist) so I will ask her if she knows.

  47. Excellent, Steve!

    Getting radial keratotomy in 1985 was an experience. They gave me a nice dose of Valium before surgery, because I had to be awake with my eyes open, and they didn’t want me freaking out. I could see the shapes and shadows moving, feel the pressure on my eye, and hear the surgeon talking to the nurses.

    The procedure took me from -7 diopters (very nearsighted) to perfect, but then it regressed to about -3. The doctor re-did the procedure a few months later, opening up the same incisions. At one point he seemed to struggle, and I heard him say to the nurse, “I don’t want to damage him.”

    Thanks, Doc.

    After all that — sixteen radial incisions in each cornea, twice — I still ended up around -3, but my eyes slowly improved. Finally they did settle in at 20/20 about 15 years ago, and I haven’t worn glasses since. The early improvement was also good anyway, because vision without glasses was at least useable at times like waking up in the morning and being able to recognize who I went to bed with the night before.

    Recently, I had an eye exam with a new doctor. He of course noticed the RK, and I asked him if I need to worry about complications. He said my corneas have settled in and he does not forsee any problems. He also reassured me that if I ever need cataract surgery in the future, there is a procedure for idiots like me who were early adopters of corrective eye surgery.

    Just visible on the cornea here, sixteen RK incisions like mine

  48. @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    So I went with simple single focus distance correction implants because I really like seeing landscapes. Coming back on the 405 freeway from UCLA over the Sepulveda Pass with both eyes last week, I was struck by how nice the San Fernando Valley looks. And driving at night has become a pleasure.
     
    With Rob--great this worked out for you.

    And I really think you made the right choice on lens. Seeing "the World" out there is what is cool and amazing.

    My dad grew up not realizing that you were supposed to be able to see leaves on trees and that the distance wasn't supposed to be a blur. It wasn't until he joined the Navy that he was squared away.

    I grew up with great vision--while all my family had glasses--and am visual oriented. Old age has taken the usual toll on near vision. But I just have a passel of these $5 glasses from Walmart, mostly 150s now--come with a little sleeve--and have them everywhere--by my chair here, in the kitchen drawer with "the stuff", in the desk, glovebox of the minivans--for in both houses and a couple in my flight bag. Recommend the simple/cheap "flood the zone" approach.

    Good you can see the world--and enjoy seeing the world--again.

    Only downside is what you might "notice".

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    It wasn’t until he joined the Navy that he was squared away.

    “Sir, the private does not see any leaves, Sir!”

    “Private Pyle, you had best square your ass away and start shitting me Tiffany cuff links or I will definitely fuck you up.” — Sgt Hartman

  49. @advancedatheist
    Enjoy your relatively efficient health care while it lasts, white Americans. As the country overflows with incompetent and lazy diversity trash, the health care you took for granted will disappear from the market, except for a wealthy elite.

    Replies: @Dan Kurt

    The future of Medicine in the USA is bleak. Read The Corruption of Medicine–
    Guardians of the profession discard merit in order to alter the demographics of their field by
    Heather Mac Donald:
    https://www.city-journal.org/the-corruption-of-medicine

    Dan Kurt

  50. @Anon
    @Bruno

    You should marry a tetrachromat.

    Replies: @Bruno

    Too late. But I am probably one else I don’t see how I could have such a colour vision. Except if I have 400 colour base instead of 100 in each sort of cone,

    My wife is a physician (anaesthesiologist) so I will ask her if she knows.

  51. I had the surgery over two years ago. I went with both lenses set to far sighted.

    I needed 2.25 readers, which were not available off the rack locally. I ordered a pack of five online. I have readers wherever I might need them.

    Last year’s eye exam in November revealed that my right eye is regressing to slightly near sighted, left eye is still 20-20 and right eye is 20-30. I’m left eye dominant so it works out okay.

    The eye doc told me the eyeball keeps changing shape. Don’t expect that what you have now to be forever.

  52. Anonymous[889] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX
    Great news, I'm glad everything worked out right for you.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    Too bad Steve doesn’t care that much about his own people.

    But when I consulted the top cataract eye surgeon at UCLA, he said he didn’t want to do that

    How does one consult with the top cataract surgeon? Interesting how Steve works hard to take care of himself and work those networks. But throws his own people under the bus to maintain credibility with the Establishment.

    • Disagree: YetAnotherAnon
  53. Best wishes for your cyborg future.

  54. @EddieSpaghetti
    Congratulations Steve! Hopefully, you will be able to continue to work your magic, with essentially unfettered vision, for many, many more years at the Unz Review and Taki Magazine.

    By the way, I vaguely recall reading an article many years ago that said something to the effect that cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about $10,000 and cataract surgery in Canada had a total billing cost of something like $800 (I do not remember the costs cited exactly, but the numbers I used are a decent representation from what I remember reading).

    So your cataract surgery added, say, about $10,000 to the US GDP. Whereas, the same cataract surgery in Canada would have added about $800 to Canada's GDP. Which kinda points out the folly of GDP.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about \$10,000

    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original. This is why the uninsured get hit with huge bills. I’m not certain which number gets into the GDP, but I suspect the smaller.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ralph L

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor's office too. You can't let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) "Full" amount. Start writing checks for $5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    Regarding the GDP, I agree with Mr. Spaghetti. Everything counts. For example if 20% of the staff is the billing department* all that phone-calling, emailing and arguing of any sort is, guess what, ker-Ching!, part of the Gross Domestic Product.

    .

    * As it was in a friend of mine's doctor business of 50 employees.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Ralph L


    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original.
     
    That's not surprising. I am fairly sure insurance companies have their own fee structure for medical care and it is considerably lower than the "going rate."

    At one time, a clever friend pointed out it was possible to do a deal with insurers whereby you could pay them, not to insure you, but solely for the purpose of getting access to their special rates.

    (Needless to say, the ability to do that went away with Obamacare.)
  55. @Ralph L
    @EddieSpaghetti

    cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about $10,000

    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original. This is why the uninsured get hit with huge bills. I'm not certain which number gets into the GDP, but I suspect the smaller.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor’s office too. You can’t let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) “Full” amount. Start writing checks for \$5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    Regarding the GDP, I agree with Mr. Spaghetti. Everything counts. For example if 20% of the staff is the billing department* all that phone-calling, emailing and arguing of any sort is, guess what, ker-Ching!, part of the Gross Domestic Product.

    .

    * As it was in a friend of mine’s doctor business of 50 employees.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor’s office too. You can’t let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) “Full” amount. Start writing checks for $5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    That would only piss them off for wasting their time.

    They will stop letting you see a specialist until you pay the full amount.

    You can talk down a bill a bit or get on a payment program but they will expect you to pay most of it. If you become a real pain then they will claim there are no openings.

    There is a shortage of specialists and they aren't going to play any games. Insurance companies can often bring down prices but not always. If the price is market rate then there isn't much they can do. What the insurance companies are good at is catching extra fees and garbage that hospitals try to pull. Average citizens don't know what to look for.

    Being uninsured in America is a bad deal all around. But our doofus conservatives think it is the True American Way that our workers have to deal with. Cause doing anything else would be Evil Socialism even though the rest of the world is capitalist and doesn't deal with this crap.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  56. @George
    Would it be better if you got the surgery 20 years ago, so you could have an extra 20 years of 100% vision?

    Replies: @Muggles

    Would it be better if you got the surgery 20 years ago, so you could have an extra 20 years of 100% vision?

    You don’t get cataract surgery until you develop cataracts. Before that (assuming all else is okay) you don’t need it. Getting new lenses in your eyes isn’t minor surgery.

    Most of this develops in your 60s or later.

    You don’t get cancer surgery until you get cancer…

  57. Remember Kung Fu?
    Grasshopper is sad because Master Po cannot see.
    Master PO says that race is real.
    Grasshopper says,” Master,how is it that you can see that a race is like an extended family that is inbred to some degree?”
    PO replies,” Oh Grasshopper,how is it that you cannot?”

  58. @Harry Baldwin
    Steve, I've been through the same operation and enjoyed the remarkable results. Having to have reading glasses with me at all times was not too high price to pay. I buy the three-packs of them at CVS as I lose or break them regularly. I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them. I prefer the plastic-framed models as they're more comfortable and the arms squeeze in slightly, holding them more securely to my head. Best of luck!

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @Luddite in Chief

    I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them.

    Rather than buying t-shirts with pockets (I am assuming they cost more), have you tried that trick where you tuck an arm of your glasses into the collar of your t-shirt?

    (As an added bonus, the feel of the arm against your chest is a constant reminder of where your glasses are.)

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Luddite in Chief


    Rather than buying t-shirts with pockets (I am assuming they cost more), have you tried that trick where you tuck an arm of your glasses into the collar of your t-shirt?
     
    Out of the house I do this. In the house dork style is OK, on top of my head. Steve took the right option. Where he has to wear cheapo 2.0x glasses sometimes. I call them communist eyeglasses. I buy them (1.5x) too. They are CCP/PLA approved and 700 million Chinamen can't be wrong.
  59. General rule in medicine:

    Advances in Medicine – Good

    More Drugs – Bad

  60. @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Baldwin


    I only buy t-shirts with pockets so I have a place to keep them.
     
    Rather than buying t-shirts with pockets (I am assuming they cost more), have you tried that trick where you tuck an arm of your glasses into the collar of your t-shirt?

    (As an added bonus, the feel of the arm against your chest is a constant reminder of where your glasses are.)

    Replies: @Clyde

    Rather than buying t-shirts with pockets (I am assuming they cost more), have you tried that trick where you tuck an arm of your glasses into the collar of your t-shirt?

    Out of the house I do this. In the house dork style is OK, on top of my head. Steve took the right option. Where he has to wear cheapo 2.0x glasses sometimes. I call them communist eyeglasses. I buy them (1.5x) too. They are CCP/PLA approved and 700 million Chinamen can’t be wrong.

  61. @Guest007
    @J.Ross

    The intelligence of people who defy authority has much more statistical variation than those who do not. For the few people who succeed despite being defiant types, many more people fail and have a miserable life due to being defiant of authority.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Nicholas Stix

    Anyone who succeeds within a system is not only less intelligent as a matter of definition than anyone who succeeded outside it but is also missing some of his own success.

  62. @Unit472
    I'm not against using cataract surgery to improve vision but it has a much more promising future to destroy human vision!

    Imagine a courtroom where a criminal is facing years in prison. Not only is he still a risk to other inmates, correctional officers, healthcare providers etc. it is expensive to imprison people. The judge, instead of giving the man 10 or 20 years in prison,. simply has the man taken to an opthamologists clinic where opaque cataracts are implanted in his eyes. He is then released into the custody of his next of kin or, if he has no family that wants him ( that would be a real eye opener for the criminal) he is taken to a WW2 style army barracks facility where he can stay, eat WFP style refugee rations, and learn to use a long white cane.

    After just 5 or 10 years the cataracts are removed with the warning ''screw up again'' and its darkness forever!

    Replies: @Anon

    This is literally a Byzantine punishment. Blinding rendered rivals unable to reign.

  63. @Muggles
    Good news on your surgery.

    Mine, a few years ago, also went well.

    Other than I now see a lot more floaters than before. But a small issue for not wearing glasses.

    Be sure to wear sunglasses outdoors now, since I'm told that post surgery your eyes will be more vulnerable to certain kinds of UV radiation caused cancers.

    The odd part was, at first, reaching out upon awakening for those trusty eyeglasses. Not there any more...

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Anon

    It’s highly likely that the intense California sun caused his cataracts in the first place. Was Steve-o forgetful of his shades for so many years?

  64. @Joe Stalin
    @Carol


    Steve don’t forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.
     
    I remember reading a letter in a gun magazine decades ago where a guy decided to go shooting a .22LR rifle and a spent shell exited the ejection port and turned itself around with the case mouth facing the eyes. The shell cut his cornea leaving him with permanent effects. There's a reason all those Russkie invaders wear protective googles; they've observed US soldiers using protective eyeware in all our recent military activities and decided it's a very good idea.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    I had an eye accident from chopping down a tree.

    A splinter flew out and went right in my eye.

    It hit it hard enough to where I couldn’t see out of it.

    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.

    I’ve also had some ricochets bounce back when shooting. Like whiz a few yards by me which is quite unnerving.

    The odds of that happening goes up massively when you shoot in random places like the woods. Interestingly it is much more likely to be a problem with slower ammo. Fast rounds like 223 normally break apart if they hit a rock. It’s much more likely with older big bore rounds like 30 cal. I’m a lot more careful when shooting anything like that.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @John Johnson


    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.
     
    Spot on. Amazing the crap we used to do--and people still do.

    I was doing some work with my cousin's hubby in Iowa back in June and he (big strong guy) inadvertently put a load on me (average sized old guy) and gave my back a tweak. I happened to be working today--with eye protection--and going up and down some back deck stairs where I'd taken a bad fall a few years back. The combo had me thinking about "Dad Advice" on this to me kids.

    To me it's the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Bill P, @J.Ross

  65. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ralph L

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor's office too. You can't let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) "Full" amount. Start writing checks for $5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    Regarding the GDP, I agree with Mr. Spaghetti. Everything counts. For example if 20% of the staff is the billing department* all that phone-calling, emailing and arguing of any sort is, guess what, ker-Ching!, part of the Gross Domestic Product.

    .

    * As it was in a friend of mine's doctor business of 50 employees.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor’s office too. You can’t let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) “Full” amount. Start writing checks for \$5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    That would only piss them off for wasting their time.

    They will stop letting you see a specialist until you pay the full amount.

    You can talk down a bill a bit or get on a payment program but they will expect you to pay most of it. If you become a real pain then they will claim there are no openings.

    There is a shortage of specialists and they aren’t going to play any games. Insurance companies can often bring down prices but not always. If the price is market rate then there isn’t much they can do. What the insurance companies are good at is catching extra fees and garbage that hospitals try to pull. Average citizens don’t know what to look for.

    Being uninsured in America is a bad deal all around. But our doofus conservatives think it is the True American Way that our workers have to deal with. Cause doing anything else would be Evil Socialism even though the rest of the world is capitalist and doesn’t deal with this crap.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    There's way too much wrong in this comment. Just as with the car discussion, you don't know what you think you know.

    Look, I'm usually not worried about going back - if it were something regular, I'd have found a fair price already. The idea is to negotiate ahead of time, but when you're talking emergency room charges, I've already been through this.

    A doctor friend told me that these offices can't start collection (not like I'm worried about my credit rating anyway), if you pay ANY regular payment monthly. Now, I wasn't planning on stiffing them altogether, just paying a fair price - I had payed down $300 or $400 already of a ridiculous $1,300 charge for my wife being behind the counter for 1/2 an hour.* As I told the billing guy on the phone "I can't pay for the 5 illegal aliens that were in there with us." Yes, he got offended, and no, I didn't care, and that was the last I paid them.

    They won't play "games', but they WILL deal with you, especially if you'll pay cash ahead of time. We did that with a pregnancy, and I did that for one special check-up (got ahead of everyone else in line too!). Doctors aren't stupid.

    I don't recommend being uninsured, but for a healthy young man, it's not the worst thing. I did that for over a decade. When I got in an accident, I paid for everything, but I didn't get the recommended cat-scan, as I was pretty sure that was not necessary, and I wasn't up for giving away $1,200. (See, I asked the price, because it wasn't a Socialist system. Get it?)

    You have a moronic definition of Conservatism - regarding healthcare and insurance, any real conservative would be all for private insurance, NOT as regulated to death by governments of all sizes. You get the government out of it, and everything works again. It's a matter of whether you would rather spend your hard-earned money for healthcare and insurance for you and your family rather than for illegal aliens and other deadbeats. It sounds like you would rather do the latter, which is kind of cucky, IMO.

    .

    * I paid the Doc his $300 for the 15 minutes of his time, but his office would have settled for less too, thinking in hindsight.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  66. @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9ihKq34Ozc
    [2:44]

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    My personal take, the Dr. Strangelove character–especially the Nazi crap with his arm–is the weakest–lamest–bit in the movie. If the whole movie were like that it would just be over the top lame and stupid.

    The best stuff to me is the characters who are broadly drawn but not complete cartoons.

    George C. Scott to me actually kills it, almost steals the movie. Just a good horny American guy who’s proud of what his boys can do. But Slim Pickens–a guy could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with this–is great as well. Sterling Hayden does an excellent job. Keenan Winn’s bit as the straight up army guy is good. In think Sellers is best as Group Captain Lionel Mandrake trying to get Sterling Hayden to tune in to reality.

    Definitely the funniest movie to come out of the Cold War.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @AnotherDad


    a guy could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with this
     
    Ironically, the original line said Dallas, not Vegas. But because the movie was released in January 1964 it was thought best to change it. The original survives in foreign subtitled prints.
  67. Sailer done seen the light!

  68. @John Johnson
    @Joe Stalin

    I had an eye accident from chopping down a tree.

    A splinter flew out and went right in my eye.

    It hit it hard enough to where I couldn't see out of it.

    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.

    I've also had some ricochets bounce back when shooting. Like whiz a few yards by me which is quite unnerving.

    The odds of that happening goes up massively when you shoot in random places like the woods. Interestingly it is much more likely to be a problem with slower ammo. Fast rounds like 223 normally break apart if they hit a rock. It's much more likely with older big bore rounds like 30 cal. I'm a lot more careful when shooting anything like that.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.

    Spot on. Amazing the crap we used to do–and people still do.

    I was doing some work with my cousin’s hubby in Iowa back in June and he (big strong guy) inadvertently put a load on me (average sized old guy) and gave my back a tweak. I happened to be working today–with eye protection–and going up and down some back deck stairs where I’d taken a bad fall a few years back. The combo had me thinking about “Dad Advice” on this to me kids.

    To me it’s the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Bernard
    @AnotherDad


    To me it’s the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

     

    Forgot a big one, probably near the top, protect your ears.
    , @Bill P
    @AnotherDad

    Protecting your back is also about avoiding overuse, not just overweight. Heavy loads every once in a while are not as bad as medium loads all the time in my extensive experience.

    , @J.Ross
    @AnotherDad

    Sorry, what's the German for?

  69. @Ralph L
    @EddieSpaghetti

    cataract surgery in the US had a total billing cost of about $10,000

    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original. This is why the uninsured get hit with huge bills. I'm not certain which number gets into the GDP, but I suspect the smaller.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    I had a large hospital bill knocked down by Blue Cross to 13% of the original.

    That’s not surprising. I am fairly sure insurance companies have their own fee structure for medical care and it is considerably lower than the “going rate.”

    At one time, a clever friend pointed out it was possible to do a deal with insurers whereby you could pay them, not to insure you, but solely for the purpose of getting access to their special rates.

    (Needless to say, the ability to do that went away with Obamacare.)

  70. @Ralph L
    When he was 5, they asked my brother to read the E chart, and he said What chart? An idiot dr. put me in bifocals at 7 because I couldn't focus more than a few inches past my nose. They told me 6 years ago I have a slight cataract in one eye, but it doesn't seem any worse--yet.

    That fired FBI cretin McCabe wore those hideous clear-bottomed frames that everyone wore in the 60s before wire-rims came in. I knew he had to be a crook, despite being handsome for DC.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    When he was 5, they asked my brother to read the E chart, and he said What chart?

    I cheat by using my brain as well as my eyes. What is it likely to be?

  71. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, but someone who is uninsured can do plenty of wheeler-dealing with the hospital/doctor’s office too. You can’t let them snow you into paying the (highly-inflated) “Full” amount. Start writing checks for $5 each month, for example, and then call and see what they are willing to do.

    That would only piss them off for wasting their time.

    They will stop letting you see a specialist until you pay the full amount.

    You can talk down a bill a bit or get on a payment program but they will expect you to pay most of it. If you become a real pain then they will claim there are no openings.

    There is a shortage of specialists and they aren't going to play any games. Insurance companies can often bring down prices but not always. If the price is market rate then there isn't much they can do. What the insurance companies are good at is catching extra fees and garbage that hospitals try to pull. Average citizens don't know what to look for.

    Being uninsured in America is a bad deal all around. But our doofus conservatives think it is the True American Way that our workers have to deal with. Cause doing anything else would be Evil Socialism even though the rest of the world is capitalist and doesn't deal with this crap.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    There’s way too much wrong in this comment. Just as with the car discussion, you don’t know what you think you know.

    Look, I’m usually not worried about going back – if it were something regular, I’d have found a fair price already. The idea is to negotiate ahead of time, but when you’re talking emergency room charges, I’ve already been through this.

    A doctor friend told me that these offices can’t start collection (not like I’m worried about my credit rating anyway), if you pay ANY regular payment monthly. Now, I wasn’t planning on stiffing them altogether, just paying a fair price – I had payed down \$300 or \$400 already of a ridiculous \$1,300 charge for my wife being behind the counter for 1/2 an hour.* As I told the billing guy on the phone “I can’t pay for the 5 illegal aliens that were in there with us.” Yes, he got offended, and no, I didn’t care, and that was the last I paid them.

    They won’t play “games’, but they WILL deal with you, especially if you’ll pay cash ahead of time. We did that with a pregnancy, and I did that for one special check-up (got ahead of everyone else in line too!). Doctors aren’t stupid.

    I don’t recommend being uninsured, but for a healthy young man, it’s not the worst thing. I did that for over a decade. When I got in an accident, I paid for everything, but I didn’t get the recommended cat-scan, as I was pretty sure that was not necessary, and I wasn’t up for giving away \$1,200. (See, I asked the price, because it wasn’t a Socialist system. Get it?)

    You have a moronic definition of Conservatism – regarding healthcare and insurance, any real conservative would be all for private insurance, NOT as regulated to death by governments of all sizes. You get the government out of it, and everything works again. It’s a matter of whether you would rather spend your hard-earned money for healthcare and insurance for you and your family rather than for illegal aliens and other deadbeats. It sounds like you would rather do the latter, which is kind of cucky, IMO.

    .

    * I paid the Doc his \$300 for the 15 minutes of his time, but his office would have settled for less too, thinking in hindsight.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    There’s way too much wrong in this comment. Just as with the car discussion, you don’t know what you think you know.

    I used to know someone that operated a private clinic. How do you think I know so much about race and medicine?

    Sending a clinic $5 a month is a joke and terrible advice. You don't know anything.

    A private practice doesn't have to take anyone. It's the hospitals that have to take you in regardless of ability to pay. A private practice is no different than a lawyer. Would you send a lawyer $5 a month?

    A doctor friend told me that these offices can’t start collection (not like I’m worried about my credit rating anyway), if you pay ANY regular payment monthly.

    That's a myth. They can send it to collections at any time.

    You have a moronic definition of Conservatism – regarding healthcare and insurance, any real conservative would be all for private insurance, NOT as regulated to death by governments of all sizes.

    I didn't define conservatism. I said our doofus conservatives think this system is the True American Way.

    Private insurance fails because the market naturally prioritizes profit over coverage.

    but I didn’t get the recommended cat-scan, as I was pretty sure that was not necessary, and I wasn’t up for giving away $1,200. (See, I asked the price, because it wasn’t a Socialist system. Get it?)

    So if someone gets 100k in medical debt from an accident they just need to shop around? Get it?

    It’s a matter of whether you would rather spend your hard-earned money for healthcare and insurance for you and your family rather than for illegal aliens and other deadbeats.

    More boneheaded conservatism. The system in fact favors deadbeats over workers. You've been duped into defending the status quo. Deadbeats and illegals are more likely to get government healthcare than middle class Whites out of work. The GOP doesn't press to change that aspect of the system. They just blindly defend the status quo and look like dopes in any healthcare related debate which is what happened to Trump. It's a political liability that just favors Democrats. Republicans look like total morons in healthcare debates. Democrats exploit that weakness and then push for illegals and whatever faggotry they come up with when in office. It's a losing issue but our Republicans would rather lose than admit the system is deeply flawed and cannot be saved by cutting regulation.

    It sounds like you would rather do the latter, which is kind of cucky, IMO.

    Ah so I am a cuck because I don't think White workers should get 100k in medical debt from a car accident.

  72. This chart is kind of blurry, but quite readable thanks to color. Foie Gras is produced in the blue jurisdictions, and banned in the red:


    Quels aliments sont populaires en France mais interdits dans certains pays ?

    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    @Reg Cæsar

    Your map got the colours swapped relative to the original map at the link.

    It would be a bit daft if it were illegal to make fois gras in France, wouldn't it? Especially when the title of your link is "Which foods are popular in France but forbidden in certain countries?"...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SFG
    @Reg Cæsar

    Great old school imperial gag, but note that the UK is blue here.

    Were there other imperial colors as widely understood as red for Britain and blue for France?

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Foie Gras: forbidden in Greenland. Hilarious. No walrus shall know the taste.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  73. @AnotherDad
    @Joe Stalin

    My personal take, the Dr. Strangelove character--especially the Nazi crap with his arm--is the weakest--lamest--bit in the movie. If the whole movie were like that it would just be over the top lame and stupid.

    The best stuff to me is the characters who are broadly drawn but not complete cartoons.

    George C. Scott to me actually kills it, almost steals the movie. Just a good horny American guy who's proud of what his boys can do. But Slim Pickens--a guy could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with this--is great as well. Sterling Hayden does an excellent job. Keenan Winn's bit as the straight up army guy is good. In think Sellers is best as Group Captain Lionel Mandrake trying to get Sterling Hayden to tune in to reality.

    Definitely the funniest movie to come out of the Cold War.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    a guy could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with this

    Ironically, the original line said Dallas, not Vegas. But because the movie was released in January 1964 it was thought best to change it. The original survives in foreign subtitled prints.

    • Thanks: kaganovitch
  74. @Guest007
    @J.Ross

    The intelligence of people who defy authority has much more statistical variation than those who do not. For the few people who succeed despite being defiant types, many more people fail and have a miserable life due to being defiant of authority.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Nicholas Stix

    There’s another category you guys are missing: Those who attract the ire of authority, especially educational authorities, without trying to.

  75. @Reg Cæsar
    This chart is kind of blurry, but quite readable thanks to color. Foie Gras is produced in the blue jurisdictions, and banned in the red:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG/1200px-Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG

    Quels aliments sont populaires en France mais interdits dans certains pays ?

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @SFG, @J.Ross

    Your map got the colours swapped relative to the original map at the link.

    It would be a bit daft if it were illegal to make fois gras in France, wouldn’t it? Especially when the title of your link is “Which foods are popular in France but forbidden in certain countries?”…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Peter Lund

    Oops. I saw the map in my French Quora.com feed, but it wouldn't post here, at least not as a picture. So I found the same map elsewhere, not noticing that les couleurs had been inversées.

    What's French for mea culpa? Google says ma faute.

  76. Sight Improves: Noticing Intensifies…

  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    There's way too much wrong in this comment. Just as with the car discussion, you don't know what you think you know.

    Look, I'm usually not worried about going back - if it were something regular, I'd have found a fair price already. The idea is to negotiate ahead of time, but when you're talking emergency room charges, I've already been through this.

    A doctor friend told me that these offices can't start collection (not like I'm worried about my credit rating anyway), if you pay ANY regular payment monthly. Now, I wasn't planning on stiffing them altogether, just paying a fair price - I had payed down $300 or $400 already of a ridiculous $1,300 charge for my wife being behind the counter for 1/2 an hour.* As I told the billing guy on the phone "I can't pay for the 5 illegal aliens that were in there with us." Yes, he got offended, and no, I didn't care, and that was the last I paid them.

    They won't play "games', but they WILL deal with you, especially if you'll pay cash ahead of time. We did that with a pregnancy, and I did that for one special check-up (got ahead of everyone else in line too!). Doctors aren't stupid.

    I don't recommend being uninsured, but for a healthy young man, it's not the worst thing. I did that for over a decade. When I got in an accident, I paid for everything, but I didn't get the recommended cat-scan, as I was pretty sure that was not necessary, and I wasn't up for giving away $1,200. (See, I asked the price, because it wasn't a Socialist system. Get it?)

    You have a moronic definition of Conservatism - regarding healthcare and insurance, any real conservative would be all for private insurance, NOT as regulated to death by governments of all sizes. You get the government out of it, and everything works again. It's a matter of whether you would rather spend your hard-earned money for healthcare and insurance for you and your family rather than for illegal aliens and other deadbeats. It sounds like you would rather do the latter, which is kind of cucky, IMO.

    .

    * I paid the Doc his $300 for the 15 minutes of his time, but his office would have settled for less too, thinking in hindsight.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    There’s way too much wrong in this comment. Just as with the car discussion, you don’t know what you think you know.

    I used to know someone that operated a private clinic. How do you think I know so much about race and medicine?

    Sending a clinic \$5 a month is a joke and terrible advice. You don’t know anything.

    A private practice doesn’t have to take anyone. It’s the hospitals that have to take you in regardless of ability to pay. A private practice is no different than a lawyer. Would you send a lawyer \$5 a month?

    A doctor friend told me that these offices can’t start collection (not like I’m worried about my credit rating anyway), if you pay ANY regular payment monthly.

    That’s a myth. They can send it to collections at any time.

    You have a moronic definition of Conservatism – regarding healthcare and insurance, any real conservative would be all for private insurance, NOT as regulated to death by governments of all sizes.

    I didn’t define conservatism. I said our doofus conservatives think this system is the True American Way.

    Private insurance fails because the market naturally prioritizes profit over coverage.

    but I didn’t get the recommended cat-scan, as I was pretty sure that was not necessary, and I wasn’t up for giving away \$1,200. (See, I asked the price, because it wasn’t a Socialist system. Get it?)

    So if someone gets 100k in medical debt from an accident they just need to shop around? Get it?

    It’s a matter of whether you would rather spend your hard-earned money for healthcare and insurance for you and your family rather than for illegal aliens and other deadbeats.

    More boneheaded conservatism. The system in fact favors deadbeats over workers. You’ve been duped into defending the status quo. Deadbeats and illegals are more likely to get government healthcare than middle class Whites out of work. The GOP doesn’t press to change that aspect of the system. They just blindly defend the status quo and look like dopes in any healthcare related debate which is what happened to Trump. It’s a political liability that just favors Democrats. Republicans look like total morons in healthcare debates. Democrats exploit that weakness and then push for illegals and whatever faggotry they come up with when in office. It’s a losing issue but our Republicans would rather lose than admit the system is deeply flawed and cannot be saved by cutting regulation.

    It sounds like you would rather do the latter, which is kind of cucky, IMO.

    Ah so I am a cuck because I don’t think White workers should get 100k in medical debt from a car accident.

  78. Congratulations!!!

  79. @Reg Cæsar
    This chart is kind of blurry, but quite readable thanks to color. Foie Gras is produced in the blue jurisdictions, and banned in the red:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG/1200px-Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG

    Quels aliments sont populaires en France mais interdits dans certains pays ?

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @SFG, @J.Ross

    Great old school imperial gag, but note that the UK is blue here.

    Were there other imperial colors as widely understood as red for Britain and blue for France?

  80. OK, none of this refutes or acknowledges any of the points* I’ve made about dealing with and without insurance companies, John. In general, I’ve agreed with you on all issues but the Kung Flu panic, so I’ll just drop this. As with the other thread, it’s becoming entirely too Corvinesque.

    .

    * Except for the small monthly payments part. I’ve known this guy my whole life, and he’s been a doctor for a long time. I’ll take his word on it.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.

    Any White worker can wake up tomorrow from a car accident and have 100k in medical bills. The government doesn't give a flying f and will shrug if you can't afford surgery.

    That is the system you defend. It isn't a merit based system that your doofus conservative leaders have sold you on.

    It's gays getting free Prep and HIV meds while uninsured White workers suffer.

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That's what you are defending.

    I know how stupid this system is because I have seen it first hand. Both race denial and "get the best market price for ur back surgery" Randian idiocy. The European right doesn't want anything to do with this system so think about that for a while. MUST BE SOCIALIST THEN DERP

    Replies: @Kylie, @Achmed E. Newman, @Peter D. Bredon

  81. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, none of this refutes or acknowledges any of the points* I've made about dealing with and without insurance companies, John. In general, I've agreed with you on all issues but the Kung Flu panic, so I'll just drop this. As with the other thread, it's becoming entirely too Corvinesque.

    .

    * Except for the small monthly payments part. I've known this guy my whole life, and he's been a doctor for a long time. I'll take his word on it.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.

    Any White worker can wake up tomorrow from a car accident and have 100k in medical bills. The government doesn’t give a flying f and will shrug if you can’t afford surgery.

    That is the system you defend. It isn’t a merit based system that your doofus conservative leaders have sold you on.

    It’s gays getting free Prep and HIV meds while uninsured White workers suffer.

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That’s what you are defending.

    I know how stupid this system is because I have seen it first hand. Both race denial and “get the best market price for ur back surgery” Randian idiocy. The European right doesn’t want anything to do with this system so think about that for a while. MUST BE SOCIALIST THEN DERP

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @John Johnson

    "I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could."

    Nowadays gays can take the PrEP drug so they can continue to do drugs and have buttsecks. The government requires most insurance company to cover the cost of this very expensive drug. Those who thought clean needles and Narcan for junkies was bad ought to read about Truvada.

    https://www.webmd.com/hiv-aids/how-much-truvada-for-prep-costs

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson


    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That’s what you are defending.
     
    If you would read with comprehension, you would see that I'm NOT defending "this dumb system". It's not just dumb. We are all being cuckolded, as with all the Socialist Welfare State, by being made to take care of others vs. our own. Isn't this freaking obvious?

    You get the Government OUT, completely OUT, and then you will see a system in which you don't see the stupidity. Stupidity doesn't pay. Socialists will always end up as losers. Enjoy what you've wrought!
    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @John Johnson

    If strong borders and "socialized" medicine were good enough for Bismarck and Hitler, and good enough for Israel, it's good enough for us.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  82. Here you go from a bankruptcy firm:

    Many people have heard an old wives’ tale that you can just pay \$5 per month, \$10 per month, or any other minimum monthly payment on your medical bills and as long as you are paying something, the hospital must leave you alone.

    But there is no law for a minimum monthly payment on medical bills. If that were true, hardly anyone would need to file bankruptcy for medical debts.

    https://www.therollinsfirm.com/what-is-the-minimum-monthly-payment-on-medical-bills/

    I have friends in medicine. I wish I didn’t because then I could be blissfully ignorant like Fox News hosts and other Republicans that defend this stupid system.

    May goddess Rand bless all your market delusions

  83. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.

    Any White worker can wake up tomorrow from a car accident and have 100k in medical bills. The government doesn't give a flying f and will shrug if you can't afford surgery.

    That is the system you defend. It isn't a merit based system that your doofus conservative leaders have sold you on.

    It's gays getting free Prep and HIV meds while uninsured White workers suffer.

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That's what you are defending.

    I know how stupid this system is because I have seen it first hand. Both race denial and "get the best market price for ur back surgery" Randian idiocy. The European right doesn't want anything to do with this system so think about that for a while. MUST BE SOCIALIST THEN DERP

    Replies: @Kylie, @Achmed E. Newman, @Peter D. Bredon

    “I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.”

    Nowadays gays can take the PrEP drug so they can continue to do drugs and have buttsecks. The government requires most insurance company to cover the cost of this very expensive drug. Those who thought clean needles and Narcan for junkies was bad ought to read about Truvada.

    https://www.webmd.com/hiv-aids/how-much-truvada-for-prep-costs

  84. Reminds me of the P.J. O’Rourke quip about how when you think about the good old days just remember: modern dentistry or something to that effect. Be glad you don’t live in the time of GF Handel or JS Bach. Their eye “surgeon” mutilated them and only made matters worse.

  85. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.

    Any White worker can wake up tomorrow from a car accident and have 100k in medical bills. The government doesn't give a flying f and will shrug if you can't afford surgery.

    That is the system you defend. It isn't a merit based system that your doofus conservative leaders have sold you on.

    It's gays getting free Prep and HIV meds while uninsured White workers suffer.

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That's what you are defending.

    I know how stupid this system is because I have seen it first hand. Both race denial and "get the best market price for ur back surgery" Randian idiocy. The European right doesn't want anything to do with this system so think about that for a while. MUST BE SOCIALIST THEN DERP

    Replies: @Kylie, @Achmed E. Newman, @Peter D. Bredon

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That’s what you are defending.

    If you would read with comprehension, you would see that I’m NOT defending “this dumb system”. It’s not just dumb. We are all being cuckolded, as with all the Socialist Welfare State, by being made to take care of others vs. our own. Isn’t this freaking obvious?

    You get the Government OUT, completely OUT, and then you will see a system in which you don’t see the stupidity. Stupidity doesn’t pay. Socialists will always end up as losers. Enjoy what you’ve wrought!

  86. In 1988, I had Radial Keratonomy (RK) done on my right eye, and it greatly improved my distance and night vision. By 1998, the benefit had dissipated and I had Lasik done on both eyes. Again, great distance and night vision improvement (I did not notice any decline to close up reading); but by ten years later the benefit was gone.

  87. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I know someone that worked with HIV gays and the government covered their meds while they were doing drugs and continuing to take part in buttsecs. One was actually saving up for a trip to Asia. He was going to butsecs as many Asians as he could.

    Any White worker can wake up tomorrow from a car accident and have 100k in medical bills. The government doesn't give a flying f and will shrug if you can't afford surgery.

    That is the system you defend. It isn't a merit based system that your doofus conservative leaders have sold you on.

    It's gays getting free Prep and HIV meds while uninsured White workers suffer.

    Go f-ck yourself and this dumb system. Whites in the future will look back and view both liberal race denial and Con Inc backed private insurance as part of the age of stupidity. That's what you are defending.

    I know how stupid this system is because I have seen it first hand. Both race denial and "get the best market price for ur back surgery" Randian idiocy. The European right doesn't want anything to do with this system so think about that for a while. MUST BE SOCIALIST THEN DERP

    Replies: @Kylie, @Achmed E. Newman, @Peter D. Bredon

    If strong borders and “socialized” medicine were good enough for Bismarck and Hitler, and good enough for Israel, it’s good enough for us.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Peter D. Bredon


    If strong borders and “socialized” medicine were good enough for Bismarck and Hitler, and good enough for Israel, it’s good enough for us.
     
    Single payer = single piper. 19th-century Germans and 21st-century Israelis could trust their leaders. We cannot.
  88. @Peter Lund
    @Reg Cæsar

    Your map got the colours swapped relative to the original map at the link.

    It would be a bit daft if it were illegal to make fois gras in France, wouldn't it? Especially when the title of your link is "Which foods are popular in France but forbidden in certain countries?"...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Oops. I saw the map in my French Quora.com feed, but it wouldn’t post here, at least not as a picture. So I found the same map elsewhere, not noticing that les couleurs had been inversées.

    What’s French for mea culpa? Google says ma faute.

  89. @Peter D. Bredon
    @John Johnson

    If strong borders and "socialized" medicine were good enough for Bismarck and Hitler, and good enough for Israel, it's good enough for us.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If strong borders and “socialized” medicine were good enough for Bismarck and Hitler, and good enough for Israel, it’s good enough for us.

    Single payer = single piper. 19th-century Germans and 21st-century Israelis could trust their leaders. We cannot.

  90. @AnotherDad
    @John Johnson


    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.
     
    Spot on. Amazing the crap we used to do--and people still do.

    I was doing some work with my cousin's hubby in Iowa back in June and he (big strong guy) inadvertently put a load on me (average sized old guy) and gave my back a tweak. I happened to be working today--with eye protection--and going up and down some back deck stairs where I'd taken a bad fall a few years back. The combo had me thinking about "Dad Advice" on this to me kids.

    To me it's the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Bill P, @J.Ross

    To me it’s the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    Forgot a big one, probably near the top, protect your ears.

  91. @AnotherDad
    @John Johnson


    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.
     
    Spot on. Amazing the crap we used to do--and people still do.

    I was doing some work with my cousin's hubby in Iowa back in June and he (big strong guy) inadvertently put a load on me (average sized old guy) and gave my back a tweak. I happened to be working today--with eye protection--and going up and down some back deck stairs where I'd taken a bad fall a few years back. The combo had me thinking about "Dad Advice" on this to me kids.

    To me it's the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Bill P, @J.Ross

    Protecting your back is also about avoiding overuse, not just overweight. Heavy loads every once in a while are not as bad as medium loads all the time in my extensive experience.

  92. @AnotherDad
    @John Johnson


    No permanent damage but I now wear eye protection when doing any type of yard or tree work.
     
    Spot on. Amazing the crap we used to do--and people still do.

    I was doing some work with my cousin's hubby in Iowa back in June and he (big strong guy) inadvertently put a load on me (average sized old guy) and gave my back a tweak. I happened to be working today--with eye protection--and going up and down some back deck stairs where I'd taken a bad fall a few years back. The combo had me thinking about "Dad Advice" on this to me kids.

    To me it's the big four:

    1) Protect your eyes. Always eye protection doing anything. (Absolutely including shooting.)

    2) Protect your brain. Helmut for any speed activity or exposure.

    3) Protect your back. Rock solid on lifting with your legs, avoiding cantilevered weight, avoiding slip/falls (protection on heights) and care working with others and making sure lifting/taking weight is all on the same page.

    4) Protect your lungs. Mask for staining, painting, cement, dust, etc.

    Really easy with not a lot of effort, to avoid most serious avoidably hazards.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Bill P, @J.Ross

    Sorry, what’s the German for?

  93. @Reg Cæsar
    This chart is kind of blurry, but quite readable thanks to color. Foie Gras is produced in the blue jurisdictions, and banned in the red:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG/1200px-Foie_gras_ilegal_Mapa.PNG

    Quels aliments sont populaires en France mais interdits dans certains pays ?

    Replies: @Peter Lund, @SFG, @J.Ross

    Foie Gras: forbidden in Greenland. Hilarious. No walrus shall know the taste.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    Foie Gras: forbidden in Greenland. Hilarious. No walrus shall know the taste.
     
    That might reflect Danish law. Then again, French Guiana isn't shown, and that's more integral to France than Greenland is to Denmark.
  94. @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Foie Gras: forbidden in Greenland. Hilarious. No walrus shall know the taste.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Foie Gras: forbidden in Greenland. Hilarious. No walrus shall know the taste.

    That might reflect Danish law. Then again, French Guiana isn’t shown, and that’s more integral to France than Greenland is to Denmark.

  95. @Carol
    I got far vision in the right and reading length in the left, and needed progressive lenses to make them equal and also handle midrange work. But I can drive and see TV without them.

    Steve don't forget to protect your eyes. My husband forgot to wear any protection in his shop after his implants and had a near miss of fragment hitting an eye from his table saw.

    Same for UV radiation.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous

    Same for UV radiation.

    Aren’t the eyes evolved to handle UV radiation?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Anonymous


    Aren’t the eyes evolved to handle UV radiation?
     
    Good question.

    Phototoxicity is a current vision health concern and there is evidence that UV and blue-violet light may cause adverse effects to the eye. Blue-violet light sources include the sun, but also the widespread light-emitting diode (LED) technologies, resulting in around-the-clock exposure. Chronic exposure to blue-violet light, among other factors, may contribute to retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), or speed-up AMD progression after cataract surgery, because of increased transmission of short-wavelength light. This link has not been definitively proven, due to a lack of clinical trials. Nevertheless, it has been shown that photoprotective measures such as blue-blocking IOLs or spectacles with blue-violet filtering lenses have no detrimental effects, making them a sensible choice in high-risk patients or patients with a longer pseudophakic life.

    https://www.pointsdevue.com/article/retinal-light-exposure-after-cataract-surgery-what-are-risks

     


    Implants made from pig skin have restored sight to 20 people with diseased corneas, in an exciting pilot clinical trial. Many of the patients were blind before receiving the help of this bioengineered tissue.

    Incredibly, after two years, all 14 of those blind people had their vision restored and three of them, and three of them now have perfect 20/20 vision.

    "This gets us around the problem of [a] shortage of donated corneal tissue and access to other treatments for eye diseases," says Linköping University ophthalmology researcher Neil Lagali.

    While around 12.7 million people suffer vision loss due to problems with their corneas, only 1 in 70 manage to receive a cornea transplant – the only way to restore their vision.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/clinical-trial-restored-sight-to-20-people-with-corneas-made-from-an-unlikely-source
     
    https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2022/08/PreAndPostOpImageOfEyesShowingCornealThickness.jpg
  96. @Anonymous
    @Carol


    Same for UV radiation.
     
    Aren’t the eyes evolved to handle UV radiation?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Aren’t the eyes evolved to handle UV radiation?

    Good question.

    Phototoxicity is a current vision health concern and there is evidence that UV and blue-violet light may cause adverse effects to the eye. Blue-violet light sources include the sun, but also the widespread light-emitting diode (LED) technologies, resulting in around-the-clock exposure. Chronic exposure to blue-violet light, among other factors, may contribute to retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), or speed-up AMD progression after cataract surgery, because of increased transmission of short-wavelength light. This link has not been definitively proven, due to a lack of clinical trials. Nevertheless, it has been shown that photoprotective measures such as blue-blocking IOLs or spectacles with blue-violet filtering lenses have no detrimental effects, making them a sensible choice in high-risk patients or patients with a longer pseudophakic life.

    https://www.pointsdevue.com/article/retinal-light-exposure-after-cataract-surgery-what-are-risks

    Implants made from pig skin have restored sight to 20 people with diseased corneas, in an exciting pilot clinical trial. Many of the patients were blind before receiving the help of this bioengineered tissue.

    Incredibly, after two years, all 14 of those blind people had their vision restored and three of them, and three of them now have perfect 20/20 vision.

    “This gets us around the problem of [a] shortage of donated corneal tissue and access to other treatments for eye diseases,” says Linköping University ophthalmology researcher Neil Lagali.

    While around 12.7 million people suffer vision loss due to problems with their corneas, only 1 in 70 manage to receive a cornea transplant – the only way to restore their vision.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/clinical-trial-restored-sight-to-20-people-with-corneas-made-from-an-unlikely-source

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