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Students Object to Yale Honoring Slave-Owning White Male Ben Franklin
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Some background: Yale undergraduates live in glorified dormitories known as “colleges.” The incredibly rich university is finally building two new colleges, the first since 1961, after keeping its class size the same for many decades. Yale announced in April that its two new dorms will be named after Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin.

Who was Pauli Murray, you may ask?

She is perfect for The Current Year: a Talented Tenth lesbian transgender black studies professor / Episcopalian priest. From Wikipedia:

In 1973, Murray left academia for the Episcopal Church, becoming an ordained priest in 1977, among the first generation of women priests. Murray struggled in her adult life with issues related to her sexual and gender identity, describing herself as having an “inverted sex instinct”. She had a brief, annulled marriage to a man and several deep relationships with women. In her younger years, she occasionally passed as a teenage boy. …

Murray struggled with her sexual and gender identity through much of her life. Her marriage as a teenager ended almost immediately with the realization that “when men try to make love to me, something in me fights”.[58] Though acknowledging the term “homosexual” in describing others, Murray preferred to describe herself as having an “inverted sex instinct” that caused her to behave as a man attracted to women. She wanted a “monogamous married life”, but one in which she was the man.[59] The majority of her relationships were with women whom she described as “extremely feminine and heterosexual”.[4] In her younger years, Murray would often be devastated by the end of these relationships, to the extent that she was twice hospitalized for psychiatric treatment, in 1937 and in 1940.[4]

Murray wore her hair short and preferred pants to skirts; due to her slight build, there was a time in her life when she was often able to pass as a teenage boy.[58] In her twenties, she shortened her name from Pauline to the more androgynous Pauli.[60] Murray pursued hormone treatments in the 1940s to correct what she saw as a personal imbalance,[27] and even requested abdominal surgery to test if she had “submerged” male sex organs.[61]

Of course, the highly problematical dorm name is not Pauli Murray, but Benjamin Franklin. From the Yale Daily News:

For some, college name impacts transfer choice
JINGYI CUI & BRITTON O’DALY OCT 18, 2016

Student response to the recent announcement that transfers into the two new residential colleges will be randomly placed into either Pauli Murray or Benjamin Franklin college has shown that Yale’s campus is not of one mind on the significance of a college’s name to its community.

When its name was announced last April, Pauli Murray College — which honors civil rights activist and 20th century intellectual Anna Pauline Murray LAW ’65 — became the first residential college named after a woman or a person of color. Under the shadow of a yearlong debate over the name of Calhoun College, the decision to pair Murray with Benjamin Franklin drew condemnation from students who were both confused by the choice to recognize an individual who did not attend the University and disappointed by the Yale Corporation’s decision to honor another slave-owning white male.

Admittedly, late in life Franklin became an abolitionist activist.

But Franklin was still a white male. And that’s what can never be forgiven.

Though the two new colleges are comparable in terms of both size and facilities, their namesakes are different enough that students interviewed disagreed over the relative merits of the two colleges, with some preferring placement in Murray over Benjamin Franklin — a preference that will not be taken into account, per an Oct. 13 email from Yale College Dean Jonathan Holloway regarding the transfer process.

While Holloway acknowledged last week that some students may prefer to live in Murray over Benjamin Franklin, both Holloway and Head of Benjamin Franklin College Charles Bailyn ’81 said Franklin’s legacy makes him a good role model for Yale students.

But of 21 students interviewed, only one told the News they would prefer to be placed into [Bemjamin] Franklin over Murray. Nine students reported a preference for Pauli Murray College, and 11 students reported they would have no preference for either college were they to transfer. Furthermore, as the placement by lottery in the new colleges will be nonbinding, some students told the News they would opt out of the transfer process if placed into Benjamin Franklin.

“If it turns out that some people, when they discover they are in Franklin rather than in Murray, are unhappy about that, part of my job is to talk them into it,” said Bailyn, a professor of astronomy and physics. “I hope that we would be able to persuade people that it is going to be a really exciting experience whichever college you end up in.” …

Yet many students who said they favor Murray College over Benjamin Franklin College pointed to the importance of Murray’s identity as the primary reason they would want to join the college.

“She is an important figure for visibility for queer women of color, and I think that’s important for Yale, more so than Franklin, who is similar to a lot of the other honorees of other buildings and Yale events,” said Sara Harris ’19.

Yale has not had to deal with the issue of transfers to new residential colleges since 1961, when upperclassmen helped fill in the ranks of the newly opened Ezra Stiles and Morse colleges. But despite the familiar position, the controversy over placement preference is new.

Richard Holbrook ’63, who transferred from Saybrook into Morse in 1961, said he never encountered anything similar to the current naming complexities surrounding the new residential colleges.

“I just thought it would be interesting to join the new colleges. I didn’t have any preference whether it was Morse or Stiles,” said Holbrook. “I think we were just out to try something new and expand our acquaintanceships among other students.”

Yale’s cultural climate and the issues pertinent to the student body have shifted since the early 1960s.

“In those days, of course, there were just men in the colleges … We didn’t have girls, so the whole subject [of social issues] began 10 years later,” said David Rosenberg ’63 LAW ’73, who transferred into the newly founded Morse College from Davenport College. He added that transferring into Morse entailed a “straightforward, simple application process.”

Rosenberg noted that although he had been “perceived back then as very liberal, almost radical, for Yale terms,” due to his involvement in the 1961 and 1962 sit-ins in the American South, he said that as an older alumnus he was “oblivious” to the current naming controversies surrounding Benjamin Franklin College.

Part of the controversy stems from the fact that Charles Johnson ’54, who in 2013 donated $250 million toward the construction of both new residential colleges, requested that one college be named Benjamin Franklin out of his own admiration for Franklin.

Similarly, the single student interviewed who said he would prefer to be placed in Benjamin Franklin cited the Founding Father as a role model.

“I personally regard Franklin as one of my role models in many ways, [as] he is a historical figure that I really respect, and, to be honest, I don’t know that much about Murray,” the student, who asked to remain anonymous, said. “I don’t know too much about the controversy. I wasn’t here last year. I was in the military and I just came back, so I’m one of the unusual cases.”

Obviously, this Franklin-respecting veteran is irredeemably deplorable.

Current students said they would rather be in Murray to avoid the emotionally taxing dialogue about slavery, racism and naming they expect will happen regularly in Benjamin Franklin.

After all, what did Ben Franklin ever do for America?

P.S., this Charles B. Johnson who gave a quarter of a billion dollars to build these two dorms and had the racist insolence to ask to have one named after Ben Franklin is your classic college donor: a straight white male Republican jock veteran alumnus. From Wikipedia:

Johnson attended Montclair High School, and then Yale College, where he graduated in 1954. At Yale he played offensive guard for the football team and waited dining hall tables as a scholarship student. An ROTC cadet, he later served as a lieutenant in the United States Army stationed in Germany.

With his brother Rupert Johnson, Jr., Charles served as Chairman at Franklin Resources, a mutual fund company started by Rupert Sr. in 1947. Johnson is currently principal owner of the MLB San Francisco Giants…

Johnson is one of his alma mater’s largest benefactors, having given considerable sums to athletic and student facilities at Yale. Johnson Field, used for field hockey, was opened in 2001. In 2005, he was the principal donor to a renovation of the Yale Bowl. Johnson has also funded academic programs, including the Johnson Center for the Study of American Diplomacy and Brady–Johnson Program in Grand Strategy.

In September 2013, Yale President Peter Salovey announced that Johnson had given $250 million to support the construction of two new residential colleges costing $400 million. The gift was the largest in Yale’s history in nominal terms. One of the new colleges has been named for Benjamin Franklin, a personal hero of Johnson’s whose name is borne by the family investment firm. This decision has been met with criticism by some Yale students, as Benjamin Franklin, who owned slaves, neither attended nor taught at Yale.

Johnson is one of the largest donors to Republican and Tea-Party-backed political campaigns. Since 2000, he has contributed over $900,000 to the campaigns of Mitt Romney, John Boehner, and Ben Quayle. In 2015, Johnson donated $1 million to a Super PAC supporting the presidential candidacy of Jeb Bush.

That’s the problem with Deplorables: you tell them over and over that you hate them for being who they are, and then they still turn around and give you $250,000,000.00.

 
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  1. I don’t suppose they’re going to give up using Benjamins to score their drugs, eh?

  2. It seemed impossible until recently, but the Ivy League just might jump the shark.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Grumpy

    Yep. It seems that the higher the level of the university, the more insane they become, at least the non-STEM professors/students.

    It's one thing to be smart with a worthless degree. It's another to be smart with a worthless degree and full of anti-white male vitriol. I can train the former. The latter is not only untrainable but a lawsuit risk.

    Show me an Ivy Leaguer with a humanities degree, and I'll pass. Indeed, I'm a tad suspect of any Ivy Leaguer, regardless of major. If they believe even a tenth of what I'm viewing from those campuses, they're not worth the risk.

    Give me a finance major from the University of Kansas. Now, that's a kid I can work with.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Grumpy

    China already has the best supercomputers in the world, and its scientific output will surpass the US in the near future. At some point, they will start spending money to recruit the top academic talent out of the US and Europe. Followed by graduate students, followed by undergrads. When that happens, US universities will be reduced to centers for the study of identity politics. They will continue on the basis of the proceeds from their intellectual property rights, but they won't be respected anymore.

    Replies: @Mokiki

    , @namae nanka
    @Grumpy

    It jumped with the Larry Summers fiasco. The other professor getting the vapors was from MIT. I thought it was a big exaggeration when my college senior told me that their weekly lab sessions were equivalent to whole month projects in MIT, I still think it's an exaggeration but not as big as I thought back then.

  3. After all, what did Ben Franklin ever do for America?

    But what did he do for Yale?

    I mean, Franklin’s fine, but he belongs in Philly or Boston, not New Haven. Is there a hall for Cole Porter? How about Eli Whitney? At least he was from Connecticut.

    Come to think of it, Eli Whitney and Pauli Murray do have something in common: an interest in interchangeable parts.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Right, it is kind of in poor taste to name the building after a prominent person who isn't affiliated with the university, even if it is the venerable Ben Franklin. The general practice is to name things after the benefactor or people connected or affiliated with the institution. It's considered bad form because it opens up the naming to the whims of the benefactors. Naming something after Pauli Murray is kind of embarrassing, but she has some connection to the university. Imagine if they insisted on naming it after RuPaul instead.

    Franklin was one of the founders of the University of Pennsylvania. I think he has a bunch of stuff named after him there.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Grumpy

    , @Lot
    @Reg Cæsar

    LOL is not enough for you sir, only a ROLFCOPTOR will do

    http://imgur.com/a/ypkYL

  4. I suspect that most students actually favor Franklin. The majority, even in college are not liberal nuts. Perhaps the parents and alumni can persuade the faculty to be more rational by mentioning that they can take their Benjamins somewhere else.

    • Replies: @artichoke
    @Anonymous

    Indeed, do the students dare to say they would prefer Franklin? The guy back from the Army can get a pass on not having gone thru the brainwashing of last year, which included Shrieking Girl and someone even worse berating the Christakis' in public -- causing them to leave the university faculty in disgust (after receiving no support from the administration.)

    The donor did a good thing by forcing one of the names to be non-PC. Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.

    Pauli Murray will be hard to think of as a charming eccentricity. I hope I live to see the day that college is renamed for someone more deserving.

    Replies: @Anonymous Yale PhD embarrassed by his university

  5. @Grumpy
    It seemed impossible until recently, but the Ivy League just might jump the shark.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Chrisnonymous, @namae nanka

    Yep. It seems that the higher the level of the university, the more insane they become, at least the non-STEM professors/students.

    It’s one thing to be smart with a worthless degree. It’s another to be smart with a worthless degree and full of anti-white male vitriol. I can train the former. The latter is not only untrainable but a lawsuit risk.

    Show me an Ivy Leaguer with a humanities degree, and I’ll pass. Indeed, I’m a tad suspect of any Ivy Leaguer, regardless of major. If they believe even a tenth of what I’m viewing from those campuses, they’re not worth the risk.

    Give me a finance major from the University of Kansas. Now, that’s a kid I can work with.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    All the smartest kids are going to Honors Colleges at State U's, and getting massive merit money from what Ivies & Co. sneer at: "Third Tier" colleges/universities. But guess whose getting hired in the highest paying jobs? If you want to be an entrepreneur or just plain rich, go to Penn State or something. The Ivies are starting to worry since the Boomers are the richest generation, but not as rich as the "Greatest Generation", who are dying. Gen Y & X are not gonna be the big givers when they're seniors. They can barely afford living in Brooklyn and SV/Bay Area. And, rich Texans, stick to Texas U's, or at least, The South. All this indentitarian stuff is going to backfire on the Ivies. They are losing boys by huge amounts. Tons of girls, not enough boys. But, that's what they wanted. The state U's are so delighted to have the top 5%ters, and, with Big 10 football, those alumni will give plenty every year. In fact, all the State U's have gotten more selective in admissions since so many families don't want their kids to have debt (the ones who earn more than 130K - cut off for FAFSA) and they are applying to state U's more than ever.

    Replies: @SFG

  6. They could make a compromise and name the dorm after Alexander Hamilton…

  7. I wonder how the tearing down of icons like Franklin, and of other massively creative white males, ultimately will affect the careers of today’s young intellectual elite.

    Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?

    Societies really do go through periods of relative effeteness and decay — is, say, American science of the next generation doomed to relative mediocrity?

    • Replies: @JW Bell
    @candid_observer

    I suspect American science is already on the decline. East Asian is on the increase, the world's top super computer is Chinese.

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Anon7
    @candid_observer

    I agree. I wonder if there has ever been a thriving (or even surviving) country that not only failed to maximumize the potential of its males but actually discouraged them and advanced women instead.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @candid_observer

    "Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?"

    Those ambitious young men can always aspire to be lesbian episcopal priests.

    , @artichoke
    @candid_observer

    American science is not being properly promoted. We'll still get our 0.5% ers who are able to do whatever they want, some will want to start off in science because it's interesting to study. But we need the top 5%. We need technicians and technical sales, and coders. We need the whole technical infrastructure.

    And we're not getting that. We're pushing them out, discriminating against them, and replacing them with affirmative action, foreigners and offshoring.

    It can be quite difficult to get a science or engineering degree from an Ivy. Quite a few kids go there, thrilled to get into Yale or whatever, and end up with an easier major because basically they flunked out of STEM there due to the world-class competition. These kids could have done just fine at a state university and had any major they wanted. But the world-class competition, the level of cleverness needed at the Ivies / MIT / Stanford etc. is too much for them. The problem sets can be really really hard.

    It's not just the black kids who are overmatched at these schools. It happens to whites and Asians too in the STEM majors. And then they aren't even in the mix when it comes time for grad school and jobs.

  8. I draw the line at Ben Franklin.

    You start trashing Ben, and I’ll speak up. Damn the consequences. At some point, you have to show some balls. Otherwise, what’s the point of being alive.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    At some point, you have to show some balls.
     
    Anglican priest lady apparently arrived at the same conclusion.

    Murray pursued hormone treatments in the 1940s to correct what she saw as a personal imbalance,[27]
     

    Mhm.

    and even requested abdominal surgery to test if she had “submerged” male sex organs.[61]
     
    But why stop there?

    Demand surgery to see if you have a "submerged" rumen.

    Demand surgery to see if you have "submerged" tentacles or paired pectoral or pelvic fins.

    Or "submerged" chloroplasts.

    Hell, we've only BEGUN to crash-dive our way into the Batguano-Marianas of evolutionary confusion.


    “when men try to make love to me, something in me fights”.
     
    A comment just begging for unpacking of its Darwinian connotations.

    But I won't.

  9. Well, let’s see. Here’s the choice:

    On the one hand there’s the fellow who 1) signed the Declaration of Independence, 2) the Treaty of Alliance with France, 3) the Treaty of Paris and 4) the Constitution. The only chap to sign all four. And these are just some of his obvious achievements.

    On the other hand, a confused black lesbian of whom no-one has ever heard.

    Clearly it requires an Ivy League education to pick the sable carpet muncher.

    Well, Sam Francis warned you all about this. Once they’d got rid of the Confederate symbols the Founding Fathers would be next…

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @celt darnell

    At this point the Founders are -- as Hillary would put it -- "fundamentally un-American."

    , @jake
    @celt darnell

    Yes, ole Sam did warn everyone about that. And the vast majority of 'conservative' northerners and westerners who heard the warning from Francis, and others, remained certain it was all poppycock. No such thing could ever happen, those non-Southern 'conservatives' felt certain.

    Without the Confederate Battle Flag, Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, John C. Calhoun, etc., there is no 'conservatism' in America worth much when facing Marxism or PC/Cultural Marxism.

  10. An example of what the late Paul Johnson would have called “the higher humbug.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Connecticut Famer

    "the late Paul Johnson"

    I think the Paul Johnson who died recently was L.A. Channel 4 traffic reporter Paul Johnson, not the 87 year old English historian Paul Johnson.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  11. We are all born ignorant but one must work hard to remain stupid.

  12. Talking to two recent Yale grads in my family, one of them now at the medical school, let’s just say Yale kids know how to answer this sort of question Correctly.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Yes, it seems to be so much Fashionable Nonsense. But the undergrads know how the game is played.

    Even after the Wiki article, I have no clue what the Pauli Girl accomplished in her life to merit her name attached to a residential college. (I couldn't possibly suggest the residential college was named in her honor--for what is so honorable in her accomplishments and contributions?)

    But it marks the vanity-signaling of the cult of identity.

  13. @Connecticut Famer
    An example of what the late Paul Johnson would have called "the higher humbug."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “the late Paul Johnson”

    I think the Paul Johnson who died recently was L.A. Channel 4 traffic reporter Paul Johnson, not the 87 year old English historian Paul Johnson.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Perhaps the traffic reporter had a way with words.

  14. I guess $250 million dollars and a request didn’t guarantee Mr. Johnson anything, other than the fact Yale gladly accepted his donation.

  15. @celt darnell
    Well, let's see. Here's the choice:

    On the one hand there's the fellow who 1) signed the Declaration of Independence, 2) the Treaty of Alliance with France, 3) the Treaty of Paris and 4) the Constitution. The only chap to sign all four. And these are just some of his obvious achievements.

    On the other hand, a confused black lesbian of whom no-one has ever heard.

    Clearly it requires an Ivy League education to pick the sable carpet muncher.

    Well, Sam Francis warned you all about this. Once they'd got rid of the Confederate symbols the Founding Fathers would be next...

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @jake

    At this point the Founders are — as Hillary would put it — “fundamentally un-American.”

  16. Yale itself was named after a slave trader, Elihu Yale:

    “The records of this period mention a flourishing slave trade in Madras, a trade in which Yale participated. He enforced a law that at least ten slaves should be carried on every ship bound for Europe. In his capacity as judge he also on several occasions sentenced so-called “black criminals” to whipping and enslavement. When the demand began to increase rapidly, the English merchants even began to kidnap young children and deport them to distant parts of the world, very much against their will. ”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elihu_Yale

    • Replies: @habits of liberty
    @BB753

    This. All the virtuous world-beaters complaining about Cecil Rhodes monuments wouldn't accept a scholarship by another name (or renamed from Fulbright if that one retains counter-Establishment cachet). Ezra Cornell was a Quaker so plausibly may have avoided making money off slavery, thus escaping another stupid debate in bad faith; the Browns had one abolitionist to offset their one slaver, so nary a young meritocrat had to test his conscience by foregoing admission to such a problematic institution. BTW I hear Leland Stanford Jr.'s father was a piece of work too.

  17. “I personally regard Franklin as one of my role models in many ways, [as] he is a historical figure that I really respect, and, to be honest, I don’t know that much about Murray,” the student, who asked to remain anonymous, said.

    It’s going to get to the stage where students who prefer dead white men will need something equivalent to a witness protection programme.

  18. @candid_observer
    I wonder how the tearing down of icons like Franklin, and of other massively creative white males, ultimately will affect the careers of today's young intellectual elite.

    Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?

    Societies really do go through periods of relative effeteness and decay -- is, say, American science of the next generation doomed to relative mediocrity?

    Replies: @JW Bell, @Anon7, @Mr. Anon, @artichoke

    I suspect American science is already on the decline. East Asian is on the increase, the world’s top super computer is Chinese.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @JW Bell

    Don't believe the hype. Back when I was in grad school I read my fair share of "Chinese copy papers:" lift whole parts of a reputable paper out of, say, Phys. Rev. A, change a couple things about it and describe your "contribution" in jarringly poor English compared to the lifted grafs.

  19. I wonder what Yale regrets more as an institution allowing in women or blacks? Personally I think they erred with women. Qualified black men wouldn’t engage in this nonsense.

  20. I can’t think of anything more trivial than to be concerned about who the building you are living is named after. I think I would be more concerned about living in a college with a name that was easy to spell and remember. Samardzija College is out.

    On the other hand, I don’t really like the idea of selling naming rights to buildings, because that’s essentially what this is about. This gets back to the old Foster Wallace riff about the months of the years being named after their corporate sponsors, Pampers, Glad Wrap, Purina, etc.

    It’s also valid to suggest that if $250 MM is the going rate for naming rights, what is to stop some wealthy person from renaming Yale University after Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Hussein, Benjamin Netanyahu, or — just to offend everyone — Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin? I mean, I don’t think the latter three had a Yale University connection, but money is money.

    $250 MM is a lot of money. That’s almost the size of Clayton Kershaw’s contract. For that much, Charles Johnson would have a right to make Professor Christakis and his wife pitch in the bottom of the ninth in Game 7. But I don’t think they work at Yale anymore. However, if it is unseemly for wealthy people to attempt the purchase of naming rights for $250 MM, perhaps Mr Johnson can take back his money and invest it in the Giants, which, TBH, is where I’d rather see it invested anyway.

    As to the rest of the controversy and the rending of garments and gnashing of teeth it has engendered, I think the growing contempt for the Ivy League is entirely justified, and that’s not something I should really be happy about, for various reasons.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @SPMoore8

    Milo is there on Saturday!!! Wonder if there will be riots?

  21. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    I draw the line at Ben Franklin.

    You start trashing Ben, and I'll speak up. Damn the consequences. At some point, you have to show some balls. Otherwise, what's the point of being alive.

    Replies: @Olorin

    At some point, you have to show some balls.

    Anglican priest lady apparently arrived at the same conclusion.

    Murray pursued hormone treatments in the 1940s to correct what she saw as a personal imbalance,[27]

    Mhm.

    and even requested abdominal surgery to test if she had “submerged” male sex organs.[61]

    But why stop there?

    Demand surgery to see if you have a “submerged” rumen.

    Demand surgery to see if you have “submerged” tentacles or paired pectoral or pelvic fins.

    Or “submerged” chloroplasts.

    Hell, we’ve only BEGUN to crash-dive our way into the Batguano-Marianas of evolutionary confusion.

    “when men try to make love to me, something in me fights”.

    A comment just begging for unpacking of its Darwinian connotations.

    But I won’t.

  22. Classic high low dynamic here, the college only listens to the donors and the noisy minority groups. Sort of like the democratic party. I’m sure there’s a person who is actually associated with Yale (sorry Ben Franklin), and isn’t some obscure oppression olympics gold medalist, who is worth naming a building after. Bart Giamatti college, anyone? I’m surprised they didn’t go with Grace Hopper who got a Ph.D from Yale and would have been an obvious compromise.

    It’s pretty funny though: Pauli Murray, really? That seems like a stretch…

  23. In the new UMass/Odyssey poll of 18 to 35 year olds 39% “would prefer” Obama staying on as El Presidente Maximal for life.

  24. Yale is private, but at public universities, radical liberal progressive social justice warrior professors indoctrinate students using the tax dollars of the people they label and dismiss as racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, islamaphobic, deplorable, and despicable and who they want to erase as reparations for the oppressive, patriarchal, genocidal, colonial, imperialist character of America before the arrival of the celebrate diversity multi-culturalists. Tax subsidized indoctrination certainly sounds like lots more fun than what I studied in college.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @CCZ

    Deplorable dood, it's called Wealth Transfer. Get with the program.

  25. Forget about this symbolic stuff about naming buildings. The real question should be: Why are they still admitting white students to Yale? Haven’t whites been privileged enough? Don’t they come from families that have enjoyed generations of privilege?

    Race-based affirmative action in school admissions is the law of the land; when will our elite institutions begin doing their bit and reserve all their class positions for members of historically underprivileged groups? What would be a better form of reparations for America’s historic wrongs than a minority monopoly on Ivy League credentials?

    Yale and it’s sister Ivies are the very definition of multi-generational white privilege. It’s time for that to change: for Yale to look like America. Surely its overwhelmingly white faculty would welcome the chance to live and work in this anticipation of the new America they’ve been promoting. Isn’t that who they are?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @ChrisZ

    my mother's prediction: it will backfire. The graduates just will not be producing like the alumni of state U's in the future. Test scores do matter. Once Yale doesn't have enough alumni that don't become millionaires, they'll wake-up...but by then, kids are gonna feel like New Haven sucks...why not go south to warm weather, go close to the beach, go to ski-country...this is how my sons think :)!

  26. New Haven is kind of a hole (“inverted” perhaps?) so it wouldn’t matter which building you lived in. I’d request Franklin, of course, because he is one of my heroes.

    For those who ask why a building at Yale should be named for Ben Franklin, I’d answer “because the guy who donated a quarter of a billion dollars wants it that way.” Furthermore, without Ben, neither Connecticut nor any other colony would be a state.

    All-in-all, if I were of college age now, I’d seriously consider doing something else. What’s the point of checking into an asylum if you’re not insane?

    Thank God I graduated when things were only slightly crazy. Things were starting down the slippery slope, though: Student protestors forced my university to rename a dorm. Apparently the founder it was named after had killed some Indians. So they renamed the building after the tribes he attacked.

    Fair enough, because reportedly what he did amounted to a massacre.

    Riding a horse all night to Denver with a last-minute offer to the legislature, which convinced them to build the new state’s university in one of the most beautiful places around, wasn’t enough to atone. Nevertheless, if not for that man’s all-night ride, my college might have been built in a pit like New Haven. I am grateful.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Your alma mater currently has signs up at the health clinic sign-in desk reminding students to let the staff know which pronoun they prefer to be addressed by, including "xim" and "zhe". Furthermore, the mandatory student health insurance will cover 100% of the cost of sex reassignment surgery.

    I don't know when you left but it's a madhouse now.

    Replies: @Forbes

  27. Naturally, J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI amassed a thick file on Pauli Murray (as I suspected): “in addition to membership in the Communist Party of America in the 1930s and employment by a number of communist front organizations, she has been associated with numerous persons with communist front affiliations.” It gets better: “In 1940, she was found wandering in Providence, Rhode Island, and was returned to New York City by a probation officer who recalled that Murray was dressed in men’s clothing, claimed she was a homosexual, and had been taking hormone treatments at Bellevue Hospital as she wanted to change her sex to be a man. Bellevue records show she was released after two days and diagnosed as schizophrenic.” Ah, the glorious psych-ward history of transgendered America – from padded rooms to Yale classrooms, one might say.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Marie


    from padded rooms to Yale classrooms, one might say
     
    From the nut house to the school house.
  28. @BB753
    Yale itself was named after a slave trader, Elihu Yale:

    "The records of this period mention a flourishing slave trade in Madras, a trade in which Yale participated. He enforced a law that at least ten slaves should be carried on every ship bound for Europe. In his capacity as judge he also on several occasions sentenced so-called "black criminals" to whipping and enslavement. When the demand began to increase rapidly, the English merchants even began to kidnap young children and deport them to distant parts of the world, very much against their will. "
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elihu_Yale

    Replies: @habits of liberty

    This. All the virtuous world-beaters complaining about Cecil Rhodes monuments wouldn’t accept a scholarship by another name (or renamed from Fulbright if that one retains counter-Establishment cachet). Ezra Cornell was a Quaker so plausibly may have avoided making money off slavery, thus escaping another stupid debate in bad faith; the Browns had one abolitionist to offset their one slaver, so nary a young meritocrat had to test his conscience by foregoing admission to such a problematic institution. BTW I hear Leland Stanford Jr.’s father was a piece of work too.

  29. Something very similar is going on in Oxford where there is a campaign to remove the statue of Cecil Rhodes, a major benefactor and founder of the Rhodes scholarship for US students.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    @Philip Owen

    Somebody should tell the protestors Cecil Rhodes was the namesake of Cecil the Lion, and therefore good, or at least not deplorable.

  30. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    After all, what did Ben Franklin ever do for America?
     
    But what did he do for Yale?

    I mean, Franklin's fine, but he belongs in Philly or Boston, not New Haven. Is there a hall for Cole Porter? How about Eli Whitney? At least he was from Connecticut.

    Come to think of it, Eli Whitney and Pauli Murray do have something in common: an interest in interchangeable parts.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot

    Right, it is kind of in poor taste to name the building after a prominent person who isn’t affiliated with the university, even if it is the venerable Ben Franklin. The general practice is to name things after the benefactor or people connected or affiliated with the institution. It’s considered bad form because it opens up the naming to the whims of the benefactors. Naming something after Pauli Murray is kind of embarrassing, but she has some connection to the university. Imagine if they insisted on naming it after RuPaul instead.

    Franklin was one of the founders of the University of Pennsylvania. I think he has a bunch of stuff named after him there.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Anonymous

    Also a nice sculpture on Locust Walk.

    http://www.top10rankings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Top-Ten-Colleges-and-Universities-in-the-US.jpg

    You have to walk all around it to catch the Darwinian humor of it: Ben and the plump urban descendant of velociraptors, exchanging cordial and curious glances there in the middle of Wharton and the Annenberg School.

    Most people miss it.

    He's elsewhere on campus, but that one's my favorite.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

    , @Grumpy
    @Anonymous

    Steve Sailer was a resident of Sid Richardson College at Rice. Sid Richardson probably had about as much to do with Rice as Ben Franklin had to do with Yale.

  31. @Grumpy
    It seemed impossible until recently, but the Ivy League just might jump the shark.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Chrisnonymous, @namae nanka

    China already has the best supercomputers in the world, and its scientific output will surpass the US in the near future. At some point, they will start spending money to recruit the top academic talent out of the US and Europe. Followed by graduate students, followed by undergrads. When that happens, US universities will be reduced to centers for the study of identity politics. They will continue on the basis of the proceeds from their intellectual property rights, but they won’t be respected anymore.

    • Replies: @Mokiki
    @Chrisnonymous

    If Hillary has her way our universities will become green card mills.

    Replies: @Jan Rogozinski

  32. • Replies: @Olorin
    @Lord Jeff Sessions

    "Lifting us up. Moving us forward." Sounds like a failed marketing hook for the WonderBra.

    (Which 1960s boulder holster was it that was advertised as "lifts and separates"?)

    Replies: @2Mintzin1

    , @Harold
    @Lord Jeff Sessions

    “Putting America to work for you.”

    lol

    “Progress for the rest of us.”

    When Apple released the Macintosh their slogan was famously, “The computer for the rest of us”. When they released a new thin form factor iMac they used the slogan, “More Power. Thinly disguised.” I think this would be more appropriate for Hillary.

  33. Are there any men enrolled at Yale besides that one veteran?

  34. Franklin was against immigration. That makes him public enemy#1 these days.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Anonymous

    True. As Steve Sailer has pointed out, he believed in low-cost land and high-cost labour.

  35. The current crop of Yalevard students is going to be running the country in a couple decades.

    Are there any betting markets that will let me buy long-dated put options on the existence of the United States as a single country?

    • Replies: @SFG
    @ATX Hipster

    You'd probably want to short their long-term bonds, which I imagine one of the financial people can tell you how to do.

    Still, where else are you going to stick your money? Europe? I support them de-integrating somewhat to preserve their cultural identity and keep from getting swamped by immigration, but there is going to be a financial cost as barriers spring up. So the nationalist resurgence might be good for actual Europeans, but I don't know if I'd invest there. (You might want to buy Hungarian bonds as a moral statement in favor of Orban, for example, but I don't know if that's a good investment.) China? They rip off foreigners, from what I've heard. Russia? Way too dependent on the price of oil. Japan? Their population's in free-fall.

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Connecticut Famer

    "the late Paul Johnson"

    I think the Paul Johnson who died recently was L.A. Channel 4 traffic reporter Paul Johnson, not the 87 year old English historian Paul Johnson.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Perhaps the traffic reporter had a way with words.

  37. @Philip Owen
    Something very similar is going on in Oxford where there is a campaign to remove the statue of Cecil Rhodes, a major benefactor and founder of the Rhodes scholarship for US students.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

    Somebody should tell the protestors Cecil Rhodes was the namesake of Cecil the Lion, and therefore good, or at least not deplorable.

  38. Marty [AKA "coot veal or cot deal"] says:

    Steve, there’s more to say here. The Giants are possibly the most politically correct franchise in baseball. In 1997 they released an (admittedly marginal) relief pitcher named Mark Dewey because, like Kramer, he refused to wear an AIDS ribbon. Three years ago they released another relief pitcher, Chad Gaudin, who’d had a very good year, when he got into some off-season sexual harassment trouble. They have LGBT night, Filipino night, Chabad night, you name it. They stump for just about every “progressive” charity or cause imaginable, they’ve broadcast in Spanish for 35 years. Since ’98, they’ve had a woman PA announcer. Their President, Larry Baer, goes on sports radio and makes joshing fun of Republicans along with the leftist sports columnists. In other words, this guy Johnson has bent over backwards to accommodate all the crackpots, and this is the thanks he gets.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Marty

    The guy donated a million bucks to Jeb Bush? What an idiot. I hope at least that Bush's campaign advisers drank Johnson's health while they lived it up on his money. I guess I don't have much sympathy for him.

  39. Straight white men have done much damage – like Charles B Johnson giving $250m to an institution that’s packed with people who despise him and his kind. He’d have done less harm if piled the money up in his backyard and burned it. Think of how much he could have helped Donald Trump’s campaign with that kind of money – now that would atone for some sins of white privileged men.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Rob McX

    this bugs me: why don't these billionaires just give their money to the land-grant public U to the state they love? To me, that's philanthropy. The money really is critical for the students, programs, professors, and academics at public U's. I think it is so dumb to give to Ivies or any U's, which already have billion $$$ endowments, just because you're an alumus. Give it to the Public U's. I wrote a personal thank you note to the multi-millionaire that gave a ton of money to my son's public U. Next year, another couple gave another multi-million amount. Public U's need the money as so many of them are getting less from their state.

  40. @Buzz Mohawk
    New Haven is kind of a hole ("inverted" perhaps?) so it wouldn't matter which building you lived in. I'd request Franklin, of course, because he is one of my heroes.

    For those who ask why a building at Yale should be named for Ben Franklin, I'd answer "because the guy who donated a quarter of a billion dollars wants it that way." Furthermore, without Ben, neither Connecticut nor any other colony would be a state.

    All-in-all, if I were of college age now, I'd seriously consider doing something else. What's the point of checking into an asylum if you're not insane?

    Thank God I graduated when things were only slightly crazy. Things were starting down the slippery slope, though: Student protestors forced my university to rename a dorm. Apparently the founder it was named after had killed some Indians. So they renamed the building after the tribes he attacked.

    Fair enough, because reportedly what he did amounted to a massacre.

    Riding a horse all night to Denver with a last-minute offer to the legislature, which convinced them to build the new state's university in one of the most beautiful places around, wasn't enough to atone. Nevertheless, if not for that man's all-night ride, my college might have been built in a pit like New Haven. I am grateful.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

    Your alma mater currently has signs up at the health clinic sign-in desk reminding students to let the staff know which pronoun they prefer to be addressed by, including “xim” and “zhe”. Furthermore, the mandatory student health insurance will cover 100% of the cost of sex reassignment surgery.

    I don’t know when you left but it’s a madhouse now.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @ATX Hipster

    It's been a madhouse for a very long time.

  41. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @JW Bell
    @candid_observer

    I suspect American science is already on the decline. East Asian is on the increase, the world's top super computer is Chinese.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Don’t believe the hype. Back when I was in grad school I read my fair share of “Chinese copy papers:” lift whole parts of a reputable paper out of, say, Phys. Rev. A, change a couple things about it and describe your “contribution” in jarringly poor English compared to the lifted grafs.

  42. Anonymous [AKA "Anonymous Yale Employee"] says:

    Those two new colleges may be the most expensive student housing ever made:

    http://www.courant.com/new-haven-living/features/hc-nh-new-colleges-new-haven-20160625-story.html

    But the real scandal is that there is not an increase in faculty or facilities corresponding to the increase in student population. They are diluting the brand.

  43. Pauli Murray was a saint, I tell you. A saint.

    https://today.duke.edu/2012/07/saintmurray

    No, I mean really.

  44. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Grumpy

    Yep. It seems that the higher the level of the university, the more insane they become, at least the non-STEM professors/students.

    It's one thing to be smart with a worthless degree. It's another to be smart with a worthless degree and full of anti-white male vitriol. I can train the former. The latter is not only untrainable but a lawsuit risk.

    Show me an Ivy Leaguer with a humanities degree, and I'll pass. Indeed, I'm a tad suspect of any Ivy Leaguer, regardless of major. If they believe even a tenth of what I'm viewing from those campuses, they're not worth the risk.

    Give me a finance major from the University of Kansas. Now, that's a kid I can work with.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    All the smartest kids are going to Honors Colleges at State U’s, and getting massive merit money from what Ivies & Co. sneer at: “Third Tier” colleges/universities. But guess whose getting hired in the highest paying jobs? If you want to be an entrepreneur or just plain rich, go to Penn State or something. The Ivies are starting to worry since the Boomers are the richest generation, but not as rich as the “Greatest Generation”, who are dying. Gen Y & X are not gonna be the big givers when they’re seniors. They can barely afford living in Brooklyn and SV/Bay Area. And, rich Texans, stick to Texas U’s, or at least, The South. All this indentitarian stuff is going to backfire on the Ivies. They are losing boys by huge amounts. Tons of girls, not enough boys. But, that’s what they wanted. The state U’s are so delighted to have the top 5%ters, and, with Big 10 football, those alumni will give plenty every year. In fact, all the State U’s have gotten more selective in admissions since so many families don’t want their kids to have debt (the ones who earn more than 130K – cut off for FAFSA) and they are applying to state U’s more than ever.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Lagertha

    You want to work on Wall Street, an Ivy is still by far your best choice. Or for being a White House intern.

    There is going to be a lot more PC forced down our throats as these 'safe space' special snowflakes graduate and enter the halls of power. Let's just say the next 50 years are going to suck.

  45. Charles & Rupert johnson family sound like Clinton supporters, therefore not deplorables.

  46. @Rob McX
    Straight white men have done much damage - like Charles B Johnson giving $250m to an institution that's packed with people who despise him and his kind. He'd have done less harm if piled the money up in his backyard and burned it. Think of how much he could have helped Donald Trump's campaign with that kind of money - now that would atone for some sins of white privileged men.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    this bugs me: why don’t these billionaires just give their money to the land-grant public U to the state they love? To me, that’s philanthropy. The money really is critical for the students, programs, professors, and academics at public U’s. I think it is so dumb to give to Ivies or any U’s, which already have billion $$$ endowments, just because you’re an alumus. Give it to the Public U’s. I wrote a personal thank you note to the multi-millionaire that gave a ton of money to my son’s public U. Next year, another couple gave another multi-million amount. Public U’s need the money as so many of them are getting less from their state.

  47. Thanks to Jeopardy, I learned today that Ben donated his salary as postmaster general to disabled war veterans. That monster.

  48. I think I heard of the other guy, the one with a bifocals…

    That jerk plagiarized some important declaration from some tiny gullible mouse with an echo bounded name – Amos.

    No wonder his name rings with a controversy – naming prestigious institution such as Yale after some deviant mouse-molester is the last thing a decent person would do.

    I just Petitioned the White House on the Issues that Matter to Me.

    https://s15-us2.ixquick.com/cgi-bin/serveimage?url=https%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FtLICJqGlCI0%2Fmaxresdefault.jpg&sp=66189095fd0786e0351f1bdb37a1cd7d

  49. PITY – Steve Sailer has a lousy memory when it comes to White race.

    In 2014 YALE fired White padre Bruce Shipman over a three sentence letter to the editor of The Jew York Times in which he blamed Zionist regime’s inhuman policies for the rise in Europeans hatred toward Jews.

    https://rehmat1.com/2014/09/09/yale-christian-chaplain-chased-by-jewish-lobby/

  50. In the Current Year, Ben Franklin is the Devil!

  51. @ChrisZ
    Forget about this symbolic stuff about naming buildings. The real question should be: Why are they still admitting white students to Yale? Haven't whites been privileged enough? Don't they come from families that have enjoyed generations of privilege?

    Race-based affirmative action in school admissions is the law of the land; when will our elite institutions begin doing their bit and reserve all their class positions for members of historically underprivileged groups? What would be a better form of reparations for America's historic wrongs than a minority monopoly on Ivy League credentials?

    Yale and it's sister Ivies are the very definition of multi-generational white privilege. It's time for that to change: for Yale to look like America. Surely its overwhelmingly white faculty would welcome the chance to live and work in this anticipation of the new America they've been promoting. Isn't that who they are?

    Replies: @Lagertha

    my mother’s prediction: it will backfire. The graduates just will not be producing like the alumni of state U’s in the future. Test scores do matter. Once Yale doesn’t have enough alumni that don’t become millionaires, they’ll wake-up…but by then, kids are gonna feel like New Haven sucks…why not go south to warm weather, go close to the beach, go to ski-country…this is how my sons think :)!

  52. Out, Steve, Out.

    He he he.

  53. @SPMoore8
    I can't think of anything more trivial than to be concerned about who the building you are living is named after. I think I would be more concerned about living in a college with a name that was easy to spell and remember. Samardzija College is out.

    On the other hand, I don't really like the idea of selling naming rights to buildings, because that's essentially what this is about. This gets back to the old Foster Wallace riff about the months of the years being named after their corporate sponsors, Pampers, Glad Wrap, Purina, etc.

    It's also valid to suggest that if $250 MM is the going rate for naming rights, what is to stop some wealthy person from renaming Yale University after Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Hussein, Benjamin Netanyahu, or -- just to offend everyone -- Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin? I mean, I don't think the latter three had a Yale University connection, but money is money.

    $250 MM is a lot of money. That's almost the size of Clayton Kershaw's contract. For that much, Charles Johnson would have a right to make Professor Christakis and his wife pitch in the bottom of the ninth in Game 7. But I don't think they work at Yale anymore. However, if it is unseemly for wealthy people to attempt the purchase of naming rights for $250 MM, perhaps Mr Johnson can take back his money and invest it in the Giants, which, TBH, is where I'd rather see it invested anyway.

    As to the rest of the controversy and the rending of garments and gnashing of teeth it has engendered, I think the growing contempt for the Ivy League is entirely justified, and that's not something I should really be happy about, for various reasons.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    Milo is there on Saturday!!! Wonder if there will be riots?

    • Agree: SPMoore8
  54. @CCZ
    Yale is private, but at public universities, radical liberal progressive social justice warrior professors indoctrinate students using the tax dollars of the people they label and dismiss as racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, islamaphobic, deplorable, and despicable and who they want to erase as reparations for the oppressive, patriarchal, genocidal, colonial, imperialist character of America before the arrival of the celebrate diversity multi-culturalists. Tax subsidized indoctrination certainly sounds like lots more fun than what I studied in college.

    Replies: @Olorin

    Deplorable dood, it’s called Wealth Transfer. Get with the program.

  55. @Anonymous
    Franklin was against immigration. That makes him public enemy#1 these days.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    True. As Steve Sailer has pointed out, he believed in low-cost land and high-cost labour.

  56. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Right, it is kind of in poor taste to name the building after a prominent person who isn't affiliated with the university, even if it is the venerable Ben Franklin. The general practice is to name things after the benefactor or people connected or affiliated with the institution. It's considered bad form because it opens up the naming to the whims of the benefactors. Naming something after Pauli Murray is kind of embarrassing, but she has some connection to the university. Imagine if they insisted on naming it after RuPaul instead.

    Franklin was one of the founders of the University of Pennsylvania. I think he has a bunch of stuff named after him there.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Grumpy

    Also a nice sculpture on Locust Walk.

    You have to walk all around it to catch the Darwinian humor of it: Ben and the plump urban descendant of velociraptors, exchanging cordial and curious glances there in the middle of Wharton and the Annenberg School.

    Most people miss it.

    He’s elsewhere on campus, but that one’s my favorite.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    @Olorin

    I like the seated Franklin, too, but prefer the statue in front of College Hall:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Pennsylvania#/media/File:Benjamin_Franklin_statue_in_front_of_College_Hall.JPG

  57. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    https://twitter.com/lachlan/status/788815210941329408

    Replies: @Olorin, @Harold

    “Lifting us up. Moving us forward.” Sounds like a failed marketing hook for the WonderBra.

    (Which 1960s boulder holster was it that was advertised as “lifts and separates”?)

    • Replies: @2Mintzin1
    @Olorin

    Playtex, my friend.

    Always liked the name. Easy to unhook with your left hand.

  58. After all, what did Ben Franklin ever do for America?

    And not just America. Last time I checked, the lightning rod was beneficial to the entire world. Not to mention theoretical things like conservation of charge:

    it is now discovered and demonstrated, both here and in Europe, that the Electrical Fire is a real Element, or Species of Matter, not created by the Friction, but collected only.
    — Benjamin Franklin, Letter to Cadwallader Colden, 5 June 1747

    But who cares about stuff like that these days?

  59. Chuckles Johnson is a perfect example of a cuck.

  60. @Olorin
    @Anonymous

    Also a nice sculpture on Locust Walk.

    http://www.top10rankings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Top-Ten-Colleges-and-Universities-in-the-US.jpg

    You have to walk all around it to catch the Darwinian humor of it: Ben and the plump urban descendant of velociraptors, exchanging cordial and curious glances there in the middle of Wharton and the Annenberg School.

    Most people miss it.

    He's elsewhere on campus, but that one's my favorite.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

    I like the seated Franklin, too, but prefer the statue in front of College Hall:

  61. @Reg Cæsar

    After all, what did Ben Franklin ever do for America?
     
    But what did he do for Yale?

    I mean, Franklin's fine, but he belongs in Philly or Boston, not New Haven. Is there a hall for Cole Porter? How about Eli Whitney? At least he was from Connecticut.

    Come to think of it, Eli Whitney and Pauli Murray do have something in common: an interest in interchangeable parts.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot

    LOL is not enough for you sir, only a ROLFCOPTOR will do

    View post on imgur.com

  62. I’m a white working class man born in 1944. Nobody I know or have ever known gives a dirty word what happens at Yale.

    I attended two grade schools. Polk and Garfield. I had no idea those were the names of presidents. Junior high and high school were Franklin and Washington.

    This stuff is merely decadence as it manifests in academia. Decadence is the last stage of the life of a society. These snow flakes will melt in the spring.

    They should name the new colleges Tweedledum and Tweedledee.

  63. This is an obvious ploy to get this guy to contribute more money to build another building. You see, even a black female transgender choice isn’t enough to counterbalance an irretrievably deplorable white man. Obviously, another building is needed to achieve the necessary balance; I’d suggest using the name of an entire Muslim immigrant family with an assortment of disabilities related to 1,000 years of first cousin marriage. You could name the common room after Razib Khan, who got around all the laws to get them into the US.

  64. @candid_observer
    I wonder how the tearing down of icons like Franklin, and of other massively creative white males, ultimately will affect the careers of today's young intellectual elite.

    Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?

    Societies really do go through periods of relative effeteness and decay -- is, say, American science of the next generation doomed to relative mediocrity?

    Replies: @JW Bell, @Anon7, @Mr. Anon, @artichoke

    I agree. I wonder if there has ever been a thriving (or even surviving) country that not only failed to maximumize the potential of its males but actually discouraged them and advanced women instead.

  65. What in the hell is an “emotionally taxing dialogue?”

    Are things getting Bad Crazy now, or am I too sensitive?

    This is the most tumultuous year I can remember, since 1969.

  66. @Olorin
    @Lord Jeff Sessions

    "Lifting us up. Moving us forward." Sounds like a failed marketing hook for the WonderBra.

    (Which 1960s boulder holster was it that was advertised as "lifts and separates"?)

    Replies: @2Mintzin1

    Playtex, my friend.

    Always liked the name. Easy to unhook with your left hand.

  67. This is highly problematic. What will Muslim students think about Yale naming a dorm after a priest?

  68. “[S]tudents interviewed disagreed over the relative merits of the two colleges, with some preferring placement in Murray over Benjamin Franklin — a preference that will not be taken into account…”

    I wish they did take it into account. This kind of physical sorting (segregation?) of students into the SJW and the non-SJW tribes is all to the good.

  69. “… a woman or a person of color.”

    So which is it? A woman of color? Or a person of color? 😀 😀 😀

  70. Anna Pauline Murray LAW ’65 — became the first residential college named after a woman or a person of color.

    Since Murray desperately wanted to be man, it seems a bit cruel to refer to the person as a woman. Murray is also credited as the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. As a child, Murray lived with relatives who identified as white. I’m sure if lighter skinned, Murray would have done the same. Blackness was forced on Murray.

    Murray pursued hormone treatments in the 1940s to correct what she saw as a personal imbalance, and even requested abdominal surgery to test if she had “submerged” male sex organs.

    After seeing all of the competitors at the Rio Olympics with undescended testicles, Murray sounds quite sane.

    Murray complained about sexism or “Jane Crow” at Howard Law School. Murray will be happy to know that Howard Law and the undergraduate college are both 65% female and 35% male and the black family has been completely destroyed thanks to the destruction of traditional gender roles.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Triumph104

    Wow! A mulatto lesbian transgender. A trifecta of diversity!

  71. “I attended two grade schools. Polk and Garfield. I had no idea those were the names of presidents. Junior high and high school were Franklin and Washington.”

    One of the great ironies of our times is that schools with names like Roosevelt and Garfield are 100% ‘Latino’ (at least here in California), while schools with names like Tesoro or Serra might even have a majority white population.

  72. This will probably get moderated away, but that’s fine, but I need to write it.

    I’ve had it. I’m tired, tired of trying to deal wth the endless juvenile self-absorption and obsession with identity to the exclusion of everything else, tired of finding logical or even snarky rhetorical responses to the proglodyte propaganda, tired even of laughing and raging in equal measure at the stupidity and illogic of the Slack Jawed Whiners. So, Sara Harris ’19 (or ’20 or ’25, however long it takes before she manages to detach from university unreality (if it ever happens)), I have this to say:

    Fuck ’em. Fuck ’em in the ear with a forked stick.

    Defund all universities now. Not another cent of tax money to these cesspits of unreason and infantile toy-tossing.

  73. Any new “college” at Yale as it presently stands is unworthy of the name of Benjamin Franklin. I hope the activists win. Let Yale name their colleges after misfits and sexual perverts.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
  74. This is the equivalent of a woman thinking “men have been pestering me since puberty, so I’ll dump my nice reliable husband for that hot biker dude and if that doesn’t work out who cares, I’ll be young and pretty forever!”

    Already Yale and the rest are eating the seed corn, as others noted Gen X and later won’t have the money that early Boomers and the Silent Generation had. All that influence and power requires capital spending — the future masters of the universe demand both a big social network of like minded elites, and very comfy surroundings.

    The most likely path is that Yale and the Ivies become over-run by various Lesbian women of color and such, and angry White male hating Latinas and Asian women (this already happened to Claremont McKenna where I went as undergrad). Gen X and later donors will be turned off; and the future donor base will be government apparatchiks for sure, but without great wealth and merely mid-level time servers. One jump above the Angry Black DMV lady, angry for being forced to work instead of watching the View. Real power will be held by grads of exclusive social clubs, and other off-campus networks like Davos retreats for the younger set. We are already seeing some of this in tech communities.

    And the elites running governments both State and Federal, will be various Angry Lesbian nutcase people of color. Not exactly brilliant technocrats. The Chinese have enough trouble with engineering grads running things, ditto the Japanese and South Koreans. We will be more like North Korea but likely with huge secessionist movements and regional crack ups. Imagine 20 years from now these Angry Lesbians of Color running everything. Not even the power will stay on because it will be time to rage against Whitey again. Meanwhile it will be a challenge for them to add to twenty without taking off their shoes.

    As for China, they have a Space Program. But as their President Xi Xinping put it, they cannot manufacture and entire ball point pen. The tiny ball point has to be precision machined and the Chinese manufacturers despite decades of trying cannot do it; the balls have to be imported from Germany, Switzerland, and the US, the only places able to manufacture them.

    China’s achilles heel is their nepotism, their corruption, their total lack of communal morality that leads to “sell poison baby formula, what a great idea, we will make a mint!” and the like. About 4 millenia of brutal corruption and dynastic rule after dynastic rule have convinced the Chinese that only a sucker is a patriot concerned about his fellow people.

  75. @candid_observer
    I wonder how the tearing down of icons like Franklin, and of other massively creative white males, ultimately will affect the careers of today's young intellectual elite.

    Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?

    Societies really do go through periods of relative effeteness and decay -- is, say, American science of the next generation doomed to relative mediocrity?

    Replies: @JW Bell, @Anon7, @Mr. Anon, @artichoke

    “Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?”

    Those ambitious young men can always aspire to be lesbian episcopal priests.

  76. @Marty
    Steve, there's more to say here. The Giants are possibly the most politically correct franchise in baseball. In 1997 they released an (admittedly marginal) relief pitcher named Mark Dewey because, like Kramer, he refused to wear an AIDS ribbon. Three years ago they released another relief pitcher, Chad Gaudin, who'd had a very good year, when he got into some off-season sexual harassment trouble. They have LGBT night, Filipino night, Chabad night, you name it. They stump for just about every "progressive" charity or cause imaginable, they've broadcast in Spanish for 35 years. Since '98, they've had a woman PA announcer. Their President, Larry Baer, goes on sports radio and makes joshing fun of Republicans along with the leftist sports columnists. In other words, this guy Johnson has bent over backwards to accommodate all the crackpots, and this is the thanks he gets.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The guy donated a million bucks to Jeb Bush? What an idiot. I hope at least that Bush’s campaign advisers drank Johnson’s health while they lived it up on his money. I guess I don’t have much sympathy for him.

  77. Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s, inventing the lightning rod and exploring electricity, among others. We could use another 100,000 of him. Yale humanities majors? Nope…..

    • Replies: @neutral
    @pyrrhus


    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s
     
    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?

    Replies: @syonredux

  78. Pauli Murray

    At least she’s not being put on the currency — how long Ben Franklin stays there is another question — homosexuality is aberrant — since it is certainly (primarily) genetic in nature, I would not say it is artificial — but veneration of homosexuals, for little/no other reason, is very artificial, a fad, and will one day end — I imagine that if they looked into the life of Yale’s namesake, as well as the life stories of its early (probably also latter) benefactors, they would find enough, in the minds of some, to justify razing the entire place — the legal concept of ex post facto seems to find no application in this kind of Kabuki morality theater — they know and show no restraint in — or consciousness of — applying their own absolutist modern mores and standards to those who lived in very different eras, and who are long dead and so cannot defend themselves.

    JINGYI CUI

    See my previous comment re this kind of thing.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @eah

    Homosexuality is not really genetic, identical twins have an over 70% discordance rate where one of them is homosexual.

    , @ATX Hipster
    @eah


    veneration of homosexuals, for little/no other reason, is very artificial, a fad, and will one day end
     
    The amusing thing about the SJWs is that they don't understand that simple fact. They seem to believe they're the vanguard of some kind of final enlightenment for mankind. Every generation regards as backwards or quaint many of the popular notions from the previous generation.

    The truly absurd part is that this cycle happens so quickly now you can watch it in real time - look how quickly World War T was won - but they still don't understand.
  79. @eah
    Pauli Murray

    At least she's not being put on the currency -- how long Ben Franklin stays there is another question -- homosexuality is aberrant -- since it is certainly (primarily) genetic in nature, I would not say it is artificial -- but veneration of homosexuals, for little/no other reason, is very artificial, a fad, and will one day end -- I imagine that if they looked into the life of Yale's namesake, as well as the life stories of its early (probably also latter) benefactors, they would find enough, in the minds of some, to justify razing the entire place -- the legal concept of ex post facto seems to find no application in this kind of Kabuki morality theater -- they know and show no restraint in -- or consciousness of -- applying their own absolutist modern mores and standards to those who lived in very different eras, and who are long dead and so cannot defend themselves.

    JINGYI CUI

    See my previous comment re this kind of thing.

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @ATX Hipster

    Homosexuality is not really genetic, identical twins have an over 70% discordance rate where one of them is homosexual.

  80. Sailer speaks of the talented tenth.

    Here are the real munbers to marvel at:

    ““She is an important figure for visibility for queer women of color”

    Canyon Yodeller’s constitute about 2% of the population- 1 in 50

    Persons of C.olor about 13%- 1 in 8

    We are talking abut one in four hundred, That’s what this bullshit is about.

  81. That’s the problem with Deplorables: you tell them over and over that you hate them for being who they are, and then they still turn around and give you $250,000,000.00.

    Sounds more cuck than deplorable.

    • Replies: @artichoke
    @Lurker

    He didn't do it for the SJW's. He did it for Yale.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

  82. @Marie
    Naturally, J. Edgar Hoover's FBI amassed a thick file on Pauli Murray (as I suspected): "in addition to membership in the Communist Party of America in the 1930s and employment by a number of communist front organizations, she has been associated with numerous persons with communist front affiliations." It gets better: "In 1940, she was found wandering in Providence, Rhode Island, and was returned to New York City by a probation officer who recalled that Murray was dressed in men's clothing, claimed she was a homosexual, and had been taking hormone treatments at Bellevue Hospital as she wanted to change her sex to be a man. Bellevue records show she was released after two days and diagnosed as schizophrenic." Ah, the glorious psych-ward history of transgendered America - from padded rooms to Yale classrooms, one might say.

    Replies: @Lurker

    from padded rooms to Yale classrooms, one might say

    From the nut house to the school house.

  83. @Lagertha
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    All the smartest kids are going to Honors Colleges at State U's, and getting massive merit money from what Ivies & Co. sneer at: "Third Tier" colleges/universities. But guess whose getting hired in the highest paying jobs? If you want to be an entrepreneur or just plain rich, go to Penn State or something. The Ivies are starting to worry since the Boomers are the richest generation, but not as rich as the "Greatest Generation", who are dying. Gen Y & X are not gonna be the big givers when they're seniors. They can barely afford living in Brooklyn and SV/Bay Area. And, rich Texans, stick to Texas U's, or at least, The South. All this indentitarian stuff is going to backfire on the Ivies. They are losing boys by huge amounts. Tons of girls, not enough boys. But, that's what they wanted. The state U's are so delighted to have the top 5%ters, and, with Big 10 football, those alumni will give plenty every year. In fact, all the State U's have gotten more selective in admissions since so many families don't want their kids to have debt (the ones who earn more than 130K - cut off for FAFSA) and they are applying to state U's more than ever.

    Replies: @SFG

    You want to work on Wall Street, an Ivy is still by far your best choice. Or for being a White House intern.

    There is going to be a lot more PC forced down our throats as these ‘safe space’ special snowflakes graduate and enter the halls of power. Let’s just say the next 50 years are going to suck.

  84. @ATX Hipster
    The current crop of Yalevard students is going to be running the country in a couple decades.

    Are there any betting markets that will let me buy long-dated put options on the existence of the United States as a single country?

    Replies: @SFG

    You’d probably want to short their long-term bonds, which I imagine one of the financial people can tell you how to do.

    Still, where else are you going to stick your money? Europe? I support them de-integrating somewhat to preserve their cultural identity and keep from getting swamped by immigration, but there is going to be a financial cost as barriers spring up. So the nationalist resurgence might be good for actual Europeans, but I don’t know if I’d invest there. (You might want to buy Hungarian bonds as a moral statement in favor of Orban, for example, but I don’t know if that’s a good investment.) China? They rip off foreigners, from what I’ve heard. Russia? Way too dependent on the price of oil. Japan? Their population’s in free-fall.

  85. If I was a rich benefactor, I would arrange for all my fellow rich white guys to insist that all of our donations to colleges go to buildings named after Andrew Jackson.

    Even better, maybe Aaron Burr. Because of the Hamilton nonsense, he might now be the featheriest feather trigger of all time. A cool statue of the duel would cause a nonstop fainting epidemic.

  86. There can be space made for Black America without having to encroach into a white America. Fwiw I think it’s a fantastic decision to name one after B. Franklin and the other after P. Murray; she does seem like a trailblazer.

    This Wikipedia on Murray seems to be going haywire with the grammar:

    “Murray graduated first in their class, but was denied the chance to do post-graduate work at Harvard University because of her gender.”

  87. @Anonymous
    I suspect that most students actually favor Franklin. The majority, even in college are not liberal nuts. Perhaps the parents and alumni can persuade the faculty to be more rational by mentioning that they can take their Benjamins somewhere else.

    Replies: @artichoke

    Indeed, do the students dare to say they would prefer Franklin? The guy back from the Army can get a pass on not having gone thru the brainwashing of last year, which included Shrieking Girl and someone even worse berating the Christakis’ in public — causing them to leave the university faculty in disgust (after receiving no support from the administration.)

    The donor did a good thing by forcing one of the names to be non-PC. Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.

    Pauli Murray will be hard to think of as a charming eccentricity. I hope I live to see the day that college is renamed for someone more deserving.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Yale PhD embarrassed by his university
    @artichoke

    "Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward."

    Actually, Yale gave Franklin an honorary MA in 1753, so the university counts him as an alumnus. That's the connection, however tenuous.

    Replies: @syonredux

  88. @candid_observer
    I wonder how the tearing down of icons like Franklin, and of other massively creative white males, ultimately will affect the careers of today's young intellectual elite.

    Generally, men of ambition and talent have been inspired by those who have come before them to achieve great things. What happens to that intent focus when the models are removed, or worse, disparaged?

    Societies really do go through periods of relative effeteness and decay -- is, say, American science of the next generation doomed to relative mediocrity?

    Replies: @JW Bell, @Anon7, @Mr. Anon, @artichoke

    American science is not being properly promoted. We’ll still get our 0.5% ers who are able to do whatever they want, some will want to start off in science because it’s interesting to study. But we need the top 5%. We need technicians and technical sales, and coders. We need the whole technical infrastructure.

    And we’re not getting that. We’re pushing them out, discriminating against them, and replacing them with affirmative action, foreigners and offshoring.

    It can be quite difficult to get a science or engineering degree from an Ivy. Quite a few kids go there, thrilled to get into Yale or whatever, and end up with an easier major because basically they flunked out of STEM there due to the world-class competition. These kids could have done just fine at a state university and had any major they wanted. But the world-class competition, the level of cleverness needed at the Ivies / MIT / Stanford etc. is too much for them. The problem sets can be really really hard.

    It’s not just the black kids who are overmatched at these schools. It happens to whites and Asians too in the STEM majors. And then they aren’t even in the mix when it comes time for grad school and jobs.

  89. @Lurker

    That’s the problem with Deplorables: you tell them over and over that you hate them for being who they are, and then they still turn around and give you $250,000,000.00.
     
    Sounds more cuck than deplorable.

    Replies: @artichoke

    He didn’t do it for the SJW’s. He did it for Yale.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    @artichoke

    Doing it for SJWs and doing it for Yale are the same thing in 2016.

  90. @Triumph104
    Anna Pauline Murray LAW ’65 — became the first residential college named after a woman or a person of color.

    Since Murray desperately wanted to be man, it seems a bit cruel to refer to the person as a woman. Murray is also credited as the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. As a child, Murray lived with relatives who identified as white. I'm sure if lighter skinned, Murray would have done the same. Blackness was forced on Murray.

    Murray pursued hormone treatments in the 1940s to correct what she saw as a personal imbalance, and even requested abdominal surgery to test if she had “submerged” male sex organs.

    After seeing all of the competitors at the Rio Olympics with undescended testicles, Murray sounds quite sane.

    Murray complained about sexism or "Jane Crow" at Howard Law School. Murray will be happy to know that Howard Law and the undergraduate college are both 65% female and 35% male and the black family has been completely destroyed thanks to the destruction of traditional gender roles.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Wow! A mulatto lesbian transgender. A trifecta of diversity!

  91. How did Mr Rosenberg attend Yale in the bad old days of WASP dominance, did he have to wear a yellow star in class?

  92. Ben Franklin wrote a funny (in today’s context for its moral obtuseness) essay that decried slavery, but with an “on the other hand” twist. Franklin acknowledged that the work you can wring, with great effort, from a recalcitrant slave will be substandard compared to the work from a paid laborer. The slave will lie, slack off, and steal from his master at every opportunity. And you’ve got to provide bed and board for the slave, and care for him when he gets sick, injured, or too old to work.

    On the other hand, once the hired free man whom you’ve trained and given experience has mastered his craft, he’ll often quit and set up his own business, sometimes in competition with yours. So despite the negatives, the slave system is the better option.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Mark Caplan


    Ben Franklin wrote a funny (in today’s context for its moral obtuseness)
     
    Sounds more like prescience to me.

    Our elites (sic) seem to have made just that calculation and have brought in the slaves while handicapping the potential competition at every turn.
  93. For such smart, rich man he sure is stupid to give that kind of dough to Yale.

    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @The preferred nomenclature is...

    It's his alma mater, and he might think it's the same institution he attended - the gift was before Yale Screeching Girl.

    But, yes it sucks. $200 million would have increased the endowment of Hillsdale by a third.

  94. @pyrrhus
    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s, inventing the lightning rod and exploring electricity, among others. We could use another 100,000 of him. Yale humanities majors? Nope.....

    Replies: @neutral

    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s

    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @neutral


    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s

    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?
     
    It would be more correct to describe Franklin as the most important figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s.
  95. @Grumpy
    It seemed impossible until recently, but the Ivy League just might jump the shark.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Chrisnonymous, @namae nanka

    It jumped with the Larry Summers fiasco. The other professor getting the vapors was from MIT. I thought it was a big exaggeration when my college senior told me that their weekly lab sessions were equivalent to whole month projects in MIT, I still think it’s an exaggeration but not as big as I thought back then.

  96. That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?

    Well, he was a mathematician. Up there, along with Gauss, but not a scientist.

    But Benjamin Franklin had some pretty serious competition in the second half of the 18th century.

    Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, Antoine Lavoisier, James Watt, Carl Linnaeus, William Herschel, Alessandro Volta, Edward Jenner…

    • Replies: @neutral
    @PiltdownMan

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can't get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.

    Replies: @syonredux, @PiltdownMan

    , @syonredux
    @PiltdownMan


    Well, he was a mathematician. Up there, along with Gauss, but not a scientist.

    But Benjamin Franklin had some pretty serious competition in the second half of the 18th century.

    Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, Antoine Lavoisier, James Watt, Carl Linnaeus, William Herschel, Alessandro Volta, Edward Jenner…
     
    As I pointed out elsewhere on the thread, it would be quite correct to describe Franklin as the most important figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s. He made fundamental contributions to the field (conservation of charge, coining such terms as battery, positive/plus, negative/minus, etc).

    And he also made significant contributions to demography ("Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc."), technology (the lightning rod, bifocals), and literature (the Autobiography).
  97. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Talking to two recent Yale grads in my family, one of them now at the medical school, let's just say Yale kids know how to answer this sort of question Correctly.

    Replies: @Forbes

    Yes, it seems to be so much Fashionable Nonsense. But the undergrads know how the game is played.

    Even after the Wiki article, I have no clue what the Pauli Girl accomplished in her life to merit her name attached to a residential college. (I couldn’t possibly suggest the residential college was named in her honor–for what is so honorable in her accomplishments and contributions?)

    But it marks the vanity-signaling of the cult of identity.

  98. @PiltdownMan

    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?
     
    Well, he was a mathematician. Up there, along with Gauss, but not a scientist.

    But Benjamin Franklin had some pretty serious competition in the second half of the 18th century.

    Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, Antoine Lavoisier, James Watt, Carl Linnaeus, William Herschel, Alessandro Volta, Edward Jenner...

    Replies: @neutral, @syonredux

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can’t get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @neutral


    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can’t get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.
     
    Actually, as I've pointed out elsewhere, Franklin was the preeminent figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s and did groundbreaking work (conservation of charge, developing key terms and concepts such as battery, positive and negative, etc).

    And he also did significant work in demography ("Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc," which influenced both Malthus and Darwin), technology (the lightning rod, bifocals, etc), and literature (the Autobiography)
    , @PiltdownMan
    @neutral


    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can’t get more sciency than that).
     
    Fair point.

    I think progress in astronomy (and more precisely, classical mechanics in physics) was inextricably linked with progress in mathematics back then. Many interesting problems in applied mathematics arose from that field, and a fair bit of mathematics was developed/invented to tackle the problems that arose in astronomy. The most famous example of course, was Newton's invention of calculus (in isolation from and in parallel with Leibniz) driven by his need to tackle problems in astronomy.

    I may be wrong, but I think that in the late 17th and through much of the 18th century, many things that were new and interesting in math outside of number theory were driven by physics.

    I'm no expert, but in my layperson recollection, Josiah Gibbs and Oliver Heaviside's invention of vector calculus and Ricci-Curbastro's development of tensor methods are more recent, 19th century, examples of math being 'invented' to solve problems in physics.

    It's true that mathematics and physics, including astrophysics, are still joined at the hip. But I think that, by and large, development in these fields for the last century, mostly, has used already existing mathematical methods .
  99. @neutral
    @pyrrhus


    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s
     
    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?

    Replies: @syonredux

    Ben Franklin was the most important scientist in the world in the 1750s

    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?

    It would be more correct to describe Franklin as the most important figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s.

  100. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    https://twitter.com/lachlan/status/788815210941329408

    Replies: @Olorin, @Harold

    “Putting America to work for you.”

    lol

    “Progress for the rest of us.”

    When Apple released the Macintosh their slogan was famously, “The computer for the rest of us”. When they released a new thin form factor iMac they used the slogan, “More Power. Thinly disguised.” I think this would be more appropriate for Hillary.

  101. “That’s the problem with Deplorables: you tell them over and over that you hate them for being who they are, and then they still turn around and give you $250,000,000.00.”

    That is indeed central to all our problems. We have donated fortunes and allowed Leftsit freaks and monsters to use that money to wage perpetual culture war against us.

    Mr. Charles B. Johnson is a damned fool.

    • Agree: Kylie
  102. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Right, it is kind of in poor taste to name the building after a prominent person who isn't affiliated with the university, even if it is the venerable Ben Franklin. The general practice is to name things after the benefactor or people connected or affiliated with the institution. It's considered bad form because it opens up the naming to the whims of the benefactors. Naming something after Pauli Murray is kind of embarrassing, but she has some connection to the university. Imagine if they insisted on naming it after RuPaul instead.

    Franklin was one of the founders of the University of Pennsylvania. I think he has a bunch of stuff named after him there.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Grumpy

    Steve Sailer was a resident of Sid Richardson College at Rice. Sid Richardson probably had about as much to do with Rice as Ben Franklin had to do with Yale.

  103. @ATX Hipster
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Your alma mater currently has signs up at the health clinic sign-in desk reminding students to let the staff know which pronoun they prefer to be addressed by, including "xim" and "zhe". Furthermore, the mandatory student health insurance will cover 100% of the cost of sex reassignment surgery.

    I don't know when you left but it's a madhouse now.

    Replies: @Forbes

    It’s been a madhouse for a very long time.

  104. @PiltdownMan

    That is going a bit far, you saying he was more important and had a bigger impact than Euler ?
     
    Well, he was a mathematician. Up there, along with Gauss, but not a scientist.

    But Benjamin Franklin had some pretty serious competition in the second half of the 18th century.

    Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, Antoine Lavoisier, James Watt, Carl Linnaeus, William Herschel, Alessandro Volta, Edward Jenner...

    Replies: @neutral, @syonredux

    Well, he was a mathematician. Up there, along with Gauss, but not a scientist.

    But Benjamin Franklin had some pretty serious competition in the second half of the 18th century.

    Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, Antoine Lavoisier, James Watt, Carl Linnaeus, William Herschel, Alessandro Volta, Edward Jenner…

    As I pointed out elsewhere on the thread, it would be quite correct to describe Franklin as the most important figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s. He made fundamental contributions to the field (conservation of charge, coining such terms as battery, positive/plus, negative/minus, etc).

    And he also made significant contributions to demography (“Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc.”), technology (the lightning rod, bifocals), and literature (the Autobiography).

  105. @celt darnell
    Well, let's see. Here's the choice:

    On the one hand there's the fellow who 1) signed the Declaration of Independence, 2) the Treaty of Alliance with France, 3) the Treaty of Paris and 4) the Constitution. The only chap to sign all four. And these are just some of his obvious achievements.

    On the other hand, a confused black lesbian of whom no-one has ever heard.

    Clearly it requires an Ivy League education to pick the sable carpet muncher.

    Well, Sam Francis warned you all about this. Once they'd got rid of the Confederate symbols the Founding Fathers would be next...

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @jake

    Yes, ole Sam did warn everyone about that. And the vast majority of ‘conservative’ northerners and westerners who heard the warning from Francis, and others, remained certain it was all poppycock. No such thing could ever happen, those non-Southern ‘conservatives’ felt certain.

    Without the Confederate Battle Flag, Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, John C. Calhoun, etc., there is no ‘conservatism’ in America worth much when facing Marxism or PC/Cultural Marxism.

    • Agree: celt darnell
  106. I bet they don’t bitch when they’re putting his old ugly face in their grubby wallet….

  107. @artichoke
    @Anonymous

    Indeed, do the students dare to say they would prefer Franklin? The guy back from the Army can get a pass on not having gone thru the brainwashing of last year, which included Shrieking Girl and someone even worse berating the Christakis' in public -- causing them to leave the university faculty in disgust (after receiving no support from the administration.)

    The donor did a good thing by forcing one of the names to be non-PC. Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.

    Pauli Murray will be hard to think of as a charming eccentricity. I hope I live to see the day that college is renamed for someone more deserving.

    Replies: @Anonymous Yale PhD embarrassed by his university

    “Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.”

    Actually, Yale gave Franklin an honorary MA in 1753, so the university counts him as an alumnus. That’s the connection, however tenuous.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Anonymous Yale PhD embarrassed by his university


    “Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.”

    Actually, Yale gave Franklin an honorary MA in 1753, so the university counts him as an alumnus. That’s the connection, however tenuous.
     
    Franklin also received honorary doctorates from St Andrews (1759) and Oxford (1762) in recognition of his groundbreaking work in electrical theory.

    Most honorary degrees are rubbish (unis searching out famous people to attend graduation ceremonies).Both Benjamin Franklin and Samuel Johnson, however, are significant departures from the norm, as they very much deserved their honorary doctorates.
  108. Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @LBD

    Franklin owned one or two household slaves in mid-life. Hamilton probably did too, a half century later, although through his wife. Franklin led an abolitionist society in the 1780s, which Hamilton never did.

    Replies: @Douglas Knight

    , @Jack D
    @LBD

    Because it was true. Before the Revolution, slavery existed in the North as well. Large plantations were uncommon but people might own a couple of slaves as household help. Or else they might have (usually Irish) indentured servants, which were pretty much the same thing but for a certain # of years rather than for life.


    Franklin was pretty old by the time of the Revolution - he had owned a few slaves in Philadelphia maybe 25 or more years before then. He became anti-slavery in the 1760s and by the time of the Revolution had freed his slaves.

    , @syonredux
    @LBD


    Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?
     
    Slavery was legal in both Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.However, as the climate was not conducive to plantations, slavery was never very important. For example, if memory serves, the slave population in MA peaked at roughly 2% of the population. Slavery in MA was ended via a series of court decisions in the 178os:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quock_Walker

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Freeman

    In PA, slavery was ended via legislation in 1780:

    In 1780 Pennsylvania passed the first state Abolition Act in the United States. It followed Vermont's abolition of slavery in its constitution of 1777. The Pennsylvania law ended slavery through gradual emancipation, saying:

    That all Persons, as well Negroes, and Mulattos, as others, who shall be born within this State, from and after the Passing of this Act, shall not be deemed and considered as Servants for Life or Slaves; and that all Servitude for Life or Slavery of Children in Consequence of the Slavery of their Mothers, in the Case of all Children born within this State from and after the passing of this Act as aforesaid, shall be, and hereby is, utterly taken away, extinguished and for ever abolished.
     

    The following table represents the growth in Pennsylvania's free black population and decline of its slave population


    Year Free Blacks Total Blacks Slaves Percentage of Blacks Free
    1790 6,537 10,274 3,737 63.62
    1810 22,492 23,287 795 96.58
    1820 30,202 30,413 211 99.31
    1840 47,854 47,918 64 99.87
    1860 56,949 56,949 0 100.00
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_slavery_in_Pennsylvania#Resistance_and_abolition

    As for Benjamin Franklin's personal involvement with slavery, it was quite minimal:

    Franklin owned two slaves, George and King, who worked as personal servants, and his newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette, commonly ran notices involving the sale or purchase of slaves and contracts for indentured laborers.

     

    http://www.pbs.org/benfranklin/l3_citizen_abolitionist.html
  109. @Mark Caplan
    Ben Franklin wrote a funny (in today's context for its moral obtuseness) essay that decried slavery, but with an "on the other hand" twist. Franklin acknowledged that the work you can wring, with great effort, from a recalcitrant slave will be substandard compared to the work from a paid laborer. The slave will lie, slack off, and steal from his master at every opportunity. And you've got to provide bed and board for the slave, and care for him when he gets sick, injured, or too old to work.

    On the other hand, once the hired free man whom you've trained and given experience has mastered his craft, he'll often quit and set up his own business, sometimes in competition with yours. So despite the negatives, the slave system is the better option.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Ben Franklin wrote a funny (in today’s context for its moral obtuseness)

    Sounds more like prescience to me.

    Our elites (sic) seem to have made just that calculation and have brought in the slaves while handicapping the potential competition at every turn.

  110. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    For such smart, rich man he sure is stupid to give that kind of dough to Yale.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle

    It’s his alma mater, and he might think it’s the same institution he attended – the gift was before Yale Screeching Girl.

    But, yes it sucks. $200 million would have increased the endowment of Hillsdale by a third.

  111. “That’s the problem with Deplorables: you tell them over and over that you hate them for being who they are, and then they still turn around and give you $250,000,000.00.”

    How much would The U.S GDP shrink if all White taxpayers dropped dead tomorrow? China would definitely eat America’s lunch if this country 100 percent depended on Hispanics and African Americans to help pay the bills and keep the lights on.

  112. One of the most important things that Benjamin Franklin tried to do for the young nation was to warn the other founders of the threat posed by the criminal Jews. Here’s what he had to say…

    “I fully agree with General Washington, that we must protect this young nation from an insidious influence and impenetration. The menace, gentlemen, is the Jews. In whatever country Jews have settled in any great numbers, they have lowered its moral tone; depreciated its commercial integrity; have segregated themselves and have not been assimilated; have sneered at and tried to undermine the Christian religion upon which that nation is founded by objecting to its restrictions; have built up a state within a state; and when opposed have tried to strangle that country to death financially, as in the case of Spain and Portugal.

    “For over 1700 years the Jews have been bewailing their sad fate in that they have been exiled from their homeland, they call Palestine. But, Gentlemen, should the world today give it to them in fee simple, they would at once find some cogent reason for not returning. Why? Because they are vampires, and vampires do not live on vampires. They cannot live only among themselves. They must subsist on Christians and other people not of their race.

    “If you do not exclude them from these United States, in this Constitution in less than 200 years they will have swarmed in such great numbers that they will dominate and devour the land, and change our form of government, for which we Americans have shed our blood, given our lives, our substance and jeopardized our liberty.

    “If you do not exclude them, in less than 200 years our descendants will be working in the fields to furnish them sustenance, while they will be in the counting houses rubbing their hands. I warn you, Gentlemen, if you do not exclude the Jews for all time, your children will curse you in your graves. Jews, Gentlemen, are Asiatics; let them be born where they will, or how many generations they are away from Asia, they will never be otherwise. Their ideas do not conform to an American’s, and will not even though they live among us ten generations. A leopard cannot change its spots.”

    Every thing Benjamin Franklin said has come to pass…why didn’t they listen?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Anonymous Smith

    Benjamin Franklin never said that:


    "The Franklin Prophecy", sometimes called "The Franklin Forgery", is an antisemitic speech falsely attributed to Benjamin Franklin, warning of the supposed dangers of admitting Jews to the nascent United States. The speech was purportedly transcribed by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney during the Constitutional Convention of 1787, but was unknown before its appearance in 1934 in the pages of William Dudley Pelley's Silver Legion pro-Nazi weekly magazine Liberation. No evidence exists for the document's authenticity, and some of the author's claims have actively been disproven.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_Prophecy
  113. @artichoke
    @Lurker

    He didn't do it for the SJW's. He did it for Yale.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

    Doing it for SJWs and doing it for Yale are the same thing in 2016.

  114. @eah
    Pauli Murray

    At least she's not being put on the currency -- how long Ben Franklin stays there is another question -- homosexuality is aberrant -- since it is certainly (primarily) genetic in nature, I would not say it is artificial -- but veneration of homosexuals, for little/no other reason, is very artificial, a fad, and will one day end -- I imagine that if they looked into the life of Yale's namesake, as well as the life stories of its early (probably also latter) benefactors, they would find enough, in the minds of some, to justify razing the entire place -- the legal concept of ex post facto seems to find no application in this kind of Kabuki morality theater -- they know and show no restraint in -- or consciousness of -- applying their own absolutist modern mores and standards to those who lived in very different eras, and who are long dead and so cannot defend themselves.

    JINGYI CUI

    See my previous comment re this kind of thing.

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @ATX Hipster

    veneration of homosexuals, for little/no other reason, is very artificial, a fad, and will one day end

    The amusing thing about the SJWs is that they don’t understand that simple fact. They seem to believe they’re the vanguard of some kind of final enlightenment for mankind. Every generation regards as backwards or quaint many of the popular notions from the previous generation.

    The truly absurd part is that this cycle happens so quickly now you can watch it in real time – look how quickly World War T was won – but they still don’t understand.

  115. @LBD
    Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @syonredux

    Franklin owned one or two household slaves in mid-life. Hamilton probably did too, a half century later, although through his wife. Franklin led an abolitionist society in the 1780s, which Hamilton never did.

    • Replies: @Douglas Knight
    @Steve Sailer

    Actually, Hamilton was one of the founders of the New York Manumission Society. All of its founders owned slaves.

  116. @LBD
    Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @syonredux

    Because it was true. Before the Revolution, slavery existed in the North as well. Large plantations were uncommon but people might own a couple of slaves as household help. Or else they might have (usually Irish) indentured servants, which were pretty much the same thing but for a certain # of years rather than for life.

    Franklin was pretty old by the time of the Revolution – he had owned a few slaves in Philadelphia maybe 25 or more years before then. He became anti-slavery in the 1760s and by the time of the Revolution had freed his slaves.

  117. i’m so out of touch with how things are today……all this time i thought college was about learning……..i guess not.

  118. @LBD
    Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @syonredux

    Where did they get the idea that Benjamin Franklin owned slaves? He lived in Boston and Philadelphia, where there was no slavery. He was an urbane printer and essayist, not a Virginia plantation owner. What would he have needed slaves for?

    Slavery was legal in both Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.However, as the climate was not conducive to plantations, slavery was never very important. For example, if memory serves, the slave population in MA peaked at roughly 2% of the population. Slavery in MA was ended via a series of court decisions in the 178os:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quock_Walker

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Freeman

    In PA, slavery was ended via legislation in 1780:

    In 1780 Pennsylvania passed the first state Abolition Act in the United States. It followed Vermont’s abolition of slavery in its constitution of 1777. The Pennsylvania law ended slavery through gradual emancipation, saying:

    That all Persons, as well Negroes, and Mulattos, as others, who shall be born within this State, from and after the Passing of this Act, shall not be deemed and considered as Servants for Life or Slaves; and that all Servitude for Life or Slavery of Children in Consequence of the Slavery of their Mothers, in the Case of all Children born within this State from and after the passing of this Act as aforesaid, shall be, and hereby is, utterly taken away, extinguished and for ever abolished.

    The following table represents the growth in Pennsylvania’s free black population and decline of its slave population

    Year Free Blacks Total Blacks Slaves Percentage of Blacks Free
    1790 6,537 10,274 3,737 63.62
    1810 22,492 23,287 795 96.58
    1820 30,202 30,413 211 99.31
    1840 47,854 47,918 64 99.87
    1860 56,949 56,949 0 100.00

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_slavery_in_Pennsylvania#Resistance_and_abolition

    As for Benjamin Franklin’s personal involvement with slavery, it was quite minimal:

    Franklin owned two slaves, George and King, who worked as personal servants, and his newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette, commonly ran notices involving the sale or purchase of slaves and contracts for indentured laborers.

    http://www.pbs.org/benfranklin/l3_citizen_abolitionist.html

  119. @Anonymous Yale PhD embarrassed by his university
    @artichoke

    "Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward."

    Actually, Yale gave Franklin an honorary MA in 1753, so the university counts him as an alumnus. That's the connection, however tenuous.

    Replies: @syonredux

    “Even so, it is sort of weird that he has no known association with Yale, but that can be one of the charming eccentricities of the place going forward.”

    Actually, Yale gave Franklin an honorary MA in 1753, so the university counts him as an alumnus. That’s the connection, however tenuous.

    Franklin also received honorary doctorates from St Andrews (1759) and Oxford (1762) in recognition of his groundbreaking work in electrical theory.

    Most honorary degrees are rubbish (unis searching out famous people to attend graduation ceremonies).Both Benjamin Franklin and Samuel Johnson, however, are significant departures from the norm, as they very much deserved their honorary doctorates.

  120. @neutral
    @PiltdownMan

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can't get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.

    Replies: @syonredux, @PiltdownMan

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can’t get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.

    Actually, as I’ve pointed out elsewhere, Franklin was the preeminent figure in the field of electricity in the 1750s and did groundbreaking work (conservation of charge, developing key terms and concepts such as battery, positive and negative, etc).

    And he also did significant work in demography (“Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc,” which influenced both Malthus and Darwin), technology (the lightning rod, bifocals, etc), and literature (the Autobiography)

  121. @Steve Sailer
    @LBD

    Franklin owned one or two household slaves in mid-life. Hamilton probably did too, a half century later, although through his wife. Franklin led an abolitionist society in the 1780s, which Hamilton never did.

    Replies: @Douglas Knight

    Actually, Hamilton was one of the founders of the New York Manumission Society. All of its founders owned slaves.

  122. @Chrisnonymous
    @Grumpy

    China already has the best supercomputers in the world, and its scientific output will surpass the US in the near future. At some point, they will start spending money to recruit the top academic talent out of the US and Europe. Followed by graduate students, followed by undergrads. When that happens, US universities will be reduced to centers for the study of identity politics. They will continue on the basis of the proceeds from their intellectual property rights, but they won't be respected anymore.

    Replies: @Mokiki

    If Hillary has her way our universities will become green card mills.

    • Replies: @Jan Rogozinski
    @Mokiki

    Sadly true. But most of them already are. Why are the people of the USA giving them so much money to destroy our civilization.

  123. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    As many African-Americans as there have been with either Benjamin or Franklin in their names, one would think at least a few would feel some kind of connection to the man. If nothing else, the guy had a reputation for wooing French chicks and for horsing around with lightning. That’s gotta mean something to the BLM crowd. If only burgers and the saxophone had been around back then, he could have had some of the Bill Clinton aura of popularity with black folks.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous


    If nothing else, the guy had a reputation for wooing French chicks and for horsing around with lightning.
     


    Benjamin Franklin was definitely lucky to have been spared almost certain electrocution. A number of attempts to replicate his experiment ended in tragedy.

    Come to think of it, he was lucky to have survived the former. Syphilis is fatal in the long term.

    Great men take great risks, I guess.
  124. @neutral
    @PiltdownMan

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can't get more sciency than that). Now compare that to what Franklin produced, he was the type that showed interest in things, but nowhere near in the depth and insight and lasting legacy. There is a reason there is no such thing as the Franklin equation or the Franklin methodology, he was a tinkerer with some clever inventions, but to say he was the greatest is flat out wrong.

    Replies: @syonredux, @PiltdownMan

    Euler was not just a mathematician, he produced significant works in both astromy and physics (can’t get more sciency than that).

    Fair point.

    I think progress in astronomy (and more precisely, classical mechanics in physics) was inextricably linked with progress in mathematics back then. Many interesting problems in applied mathematics arose from that field, and a fair bit of mathematics was developed/invented to tackle the problems that arose in astronomy. The most famous example of course, was Newton’s invention of calculus (in isolation from and in parallel with Leibniz) driven by his need to tackle problems in astronomy.

    I may be wrong, but I think that in the late 17th and through much of the 18th century, many things that were new and interesting in math outside of number theory were driven by physics.

    I’m no expert, but in my layperson recollection, Josiah Gibbs and Oliver Heaviside’s invention of vector calculus and Ricci-Curbastro’s development of tensor methods are more recent, 19th century, examples of math being ‘invented’ to solve problems in physics.

    It’s true that mathematics and physics, including astrophysics, are still joined at the hip. But I think that, by and large, development in these fields for the last century, mostly, has used already existing mathematical methods .

  125. @Anonymous
    As many African-Americans as there have been with either Benjamin or Franklin in their names, one would think at least a few would feel some kind of connection to the man. If nothing else, the guy had a reputation for wooing French chicks and for horsing around with lightning. That's gotta mean something to the BLM crowd. If only burgers and the saxophone had been around back then, he could have had some of the Bill Clinton aura of popularity with black folks.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    If nothing else, the guy had a reputation for wooing French chicks and for horsing around with lightning.

    Benjamin Franklin was definitely lucky to have been spared almost certain electrocution. A number of attempts to replicate his experiment ended in tragedy.

    Come to think of it, he was lucky to have survived the former. Syphilis is fatal in the long term.

    Great men take great risks, I guess.

  126. American education is beyond repair. Yale students and the faulty are supposed to be intelligent. Yet neither knows anything about American history. They do not even know that there was and is nothing immoral about slavery per se. Which is why it never was condemned by the Catholic, Orthodox, Lutheran, or Calvinist/reformed denominations.

    But, then, American students know as little about Christianity as they do about American history.

  127. @Mokiki
    @Chrisnonymous

    If Hillary has her way our universities will become green card mills.

    Replies: @Jan Rogozinski

    Sadly true. But most of them already are. Why are the people of the USA giving them so much money to destroy our civilization.

  128. @Anonymous Smith
    One of the most important things that Benjamin Franklin tried to do for the young nation was to warn the other founders of the threat posed by the criminal Jews. Here’s what he had to say…

    “I fully agree with General Washington, that we must protect this young nation from an insidious influence and impenetration. The menace, gentlemen, is the Jews. In whatever country Jews have settled in any great numbers, they have lowered its moral tone; depreciated its commercial integrity; have segregated themselves and have not been assimilated; have sneered at and tried to undermine the Christian religion upon which that nation is founded by objecting to its restrictions; have built up a state within a state; and when opposed have tried to strangle that country to death financially, as in the case of Spain and Portugal.

    “For over 1700 years the Jews have been bewailing their sad fate in that they have been exiled from their homeland, they call Palestine. But, Gentlemen, should the world today give it to them in fee simple, they would at once find some cogent reason for not returning. Why? Because they are vampires, and vampires do not live on vampires. They cannot live only among themselves. They must subsist on Christians and other people not of their race.

    “If you do not exclude them from these United States, in this Constitution in less than 200 years they will have swarmed in such great numbers that they will dominate and devour the land, and change our form of government, for which we Americans have shed our blood, given our lives, our substance and jeopardized our liberty.

    “If you do not exclude them, in less than 200 years our descendants will be working in the fields to furnish them sustenance, while they will be in the counting houses rubbing their hands. I warn you, Gentlemen, if you do not exclude the Jews for all time, your children will curse you in your graves. Jews, Gentlemen, are Asiatics; let them be born where they will, or how many generations they are away from Asia, they will never be otherwise. Their ideas do not conform to an American’s, and will not even though they live among us ten generations. A leopard cannot change its spots."

    Every thing Benjamin Franklin said has come to pass…why didn’t they listen?

    Replies: @syonredux

    Benjamin Franklin never said that:

    “The Franklin Prophecy”, sometimes called “The Franklin Forgery”, is an antisemitic speech falsely attributed to Benjamin Franklin, warning of the supposed dangers of admitting Jews to the nascent United States. The speech was purportedly transcribed by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney during the Constitutional Convention of 1787, but was unknown before its appearance in 1934 in the pages of William Dudley Pelley’s Silver Legion pro-Nazi weekly magazine Liberation. No evidence exists for the document’s authenticity, and some of the author’s claims have actively been disproven.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_Prophecy

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