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The climate change beat seems like a good gig in that if there isn’t a heat wave or a cold wave or a tornado or whatever happening today for you to write about, you can just thumb through the rest of the newspaper for inspiration and write a story about how climate change is affecting transgender youth or how climate change is related to school shootings or, in this case:

Is Cricket Sustainable Amid Climate Change?

The warming of the earth, combined with the exhausting nature of the game, is raising questions about the future of the second most popular sport in the world.

By Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh
Jeré Longman reported from Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; and Karan Deep Singh from New Delhi.

Aug. 4, 2022

 
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  1. I thought Cricket was a sport played in the English summer, traditionally, and played in winter in the Colonies, aside from an odd tournament or two.

  2. Problem number 999.

    Solution: 1. Play cricket during cooler weather
    2. Play in colder regions: U.K., Ireland, Canada, South Africa, Australia, parts of North India
    and Pakistan will continue to have cooler areas for at least rest of 21st Century.
    3. Play “indoors”; large, covered sports arenas are not impossible to construct.
    4. Invent a Virtual Reality version, where players can play virtually in smaller climate
    controlled arenas and the game can be broadcast to viewers who can watch it in
    Virtual Reality.

    • Replies: @Franz
    @epebble

    Exactly.

    A culture that creates AstroTurf can create a cricket bubble dome. My consulting fee is negotiable. Bitcoin or bullion preferred.

  3. Don’t know about the rest of you guys, but this humidity is completely wrecking my hairdo.

  4. Now, on to a problem that may rate slightly higher.

    Due to climate change, Nevada says goodbye to grass
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/due-to-climate-change-nevada-says-goodbye-to-grass/

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @epebble

    1. Why did anyone ever think it was acceptable to plant thick grass imported from the east in Las Vegas? This is a city that averages 4.2 in of rain annually.

    2. Why don't "journalists" write articles without going off on long tangents [and I'm using this word in a very charitable sense] about whichever politically charged topic they want to shoehorn down our throats this week?

    , @Jon
    @epebble


    We asked Neil deGrasse Tyson to lay it out for us
     

    Tyson, an astrophysicist
     
    A genius like his knows no bounds.

    Tyson added, "We are all the same race, the human race.
     
    Uh oh, spoke too soon - he's about to get cancelled.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  5. Climate change is definitely a lifetime employment opportunity.

    The climate beat should be sort of like teaching algebra. Once you’ve done it once or twice and have some good lesson plans, you can keep using the same material over and over and over again. And you don’t even have to deal with the twitchy adolescents or do any grading. Just phone it in!

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    Since Steve's post will inevitably get the commentariat's gears turning, I'll throw in my two cents.

    -- With coal and oil humans have dramatically driven up atmospheric CO2--about 1/3 from 300ppm to 400+ppm--over the last century.

    -- There's a pretty good argument to be made that biological life on earth resulted in carbon deposition and a reduction in CO2 levels. Perhaps even helping to bring on the ice age pattern we've been in the past few millions years. So dumping some of this back was probably meritorious. (We really do not want to go back into an ice age. The holocene is really, really nice but is long in the tooth. We want to stay in it.)

    -- Progressively more CO2 will tend to have a lesser effect, as the CO2 absorption band saturates. (I haven't seen good data/discussion on this, but it's pretty obviously an issue. There is not going to be a linear effect.)

    -- All of the above said, it is probably a good idea to not keep dumping more CO2 into the atmosphere. I don't have any confidence in these climate models ... but that's sort of the point. We really don't know exactly all the factors involved. And some of them--like the solar wind--are extra-planetary.

    -- Finally, if you really believe this is an existential crisis then you should be pushing for nuclear energy. Yes you can do plenty of stuff on the edges with solar, wind, hydro, maybe even geothermal. But if you aren't doing nukes, then you really can not replace fossil fuels and replicate anything like our civilization any time soon. That's just reality.

    Anyone who blathers about the crisis of "climate change" but is not for nuclear energy is openly a fraud with some other agenda.

    Replies: @Clyde, @epebble

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    Climate change is definitely a lifetime employment opportunity.
     
    It's been going on for 4.5 billion years. The story has legs!
  6. I’m glad you have not been suckered, even part-ways, from what I gather, into thinking there is a Climate Crisis™ that is important compared to the actual crises of our era. It’s just an excuse for more government control, one that had taken a back seat to that provided by the Kung Flu PanicFest. I really thought it might not return, but, alas, I guess we’ll be seeing Greta some more after all.

    As for the sport of cricket, could one solution be more TV time-outs? See, I don’t get paid for this, but you’d think Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh could think of something.

    Yes, it’s a good gig, as you say. In this case, for Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh, there may have been some travel involved, or at least expensed hot dogs and beer. This is Journalism, man!

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't think the heat will stop cricket, though it might result in fewer mad dogs. The real tragedy would be if we all woke up one morning to plaid sweaters.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    It’s just an excuse for more government control...
     
    To me the proof of this is both the lack of interest in
    a) immigration control and
    b) nukes.

    If you believe there is an existential crisis, then you would
    a) immediately stop immigration into the 1st world
    b) immediately get to work building nukes; address the nuke safety issue by picking solid gen 3 designs and lavishly funding gen 4 R+D, but get building

    You have a different energy source, but people can pretty much go about their business, with minimal interference.

    Needless to say this is not the push we've seen.
  7. Steve writes about cricket, but that’s not really what he’s worried about.

    • Replies: @meh
    @Hangnail Hans


    Steve writes about cricket, but that’s not really what he’s worried about.
     
    Well it's a good proxy. Cricket spergs go on and on about pitch preparation every bit as much as golf fans sperg about golf course design.
    , @Bragadocious
    @Hangnail Hans

    But he hasn't had one post dedicated to insurgent tour LIV. Disappointing to say the least, cos I have opinions!

    , @AnotherDad
    @Hangnail Hans

    That's a bio-methanol solar-energy-capture facility. Steve will be fine.

  8. @AnotherDad
    Climate change is definitely a lifetime employment opportunity.

    The climate beat should be sort of like teaching algebra. Once you've done it once or twice and have some good lesson plans, you can keep using the same material over and over and over again. And you don't even have to deal with the twitchy adolescents or do any grading. Just phone it in!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar

    Since Steve’s post will inevitably get the commentariat’s gears turning, I’ll throw in my two cents.

    — With coal and oil humans have dramatically driven up atmospheric CO2–about 1/3 from 300ppm to 400+ppm–over the last century.

    — There’s a pretty good argument to be made that biological life on earth resulted in carbon deposition and a reduction in CO2 levels. Perhaps even helping to bring on the ice age pattern we’ve been in the past few millions years. So dumping some of this back was probably meritorious. (We really do not want to go back into an ice age. The holocene is really, really nice but is long in the tooth. We want to stay in it.)

    — Progressively more CO2 will tend to have a lesser effect, as the CO2 absorption band saturates. (I haven’t seen good data/discussion on this, but it’s pretty obviously an issue. There is not going to be a linear effect.)

    — All of the above said, it is probably a good idea to not keep dumping more CO2 into the atmosphere. I don’t have any confidence in these climate models … but that’s sort of the point. We really don’t know exactly all the factors involved. And some of them–like the solar wind–are extra-planetary.

    Finally, if you really believe this is an existential crisis then you should be pushing for nuclear energy. Yes you can do plenty of stuff on the edges with solar, wind, hydro, maybe even geothermal. But if you aren’t doing nukes, then you really can not replace fossil fuels and replicate anything like our civilization any time soon. That’s just reality.

    Anyone who blathers about the crisis of “climate change” but is not for nuclear energy is openly a fraud with some other agenda.

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Clyde
    @AnotherDad

    Now you are bolding for max impact in Steve's glorified chat room. You stole bolding from me, just like Achmed Von Neuman. Anyways, you used the word "existential" (though what isn't these days) so all is forgiven temporarily, maybe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levelized_cost_of_electricity#/media/File:20201019_Levelized_Cost_of_Energy_(LCOE,_Lazard)_-_renewable_energy.svg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Gamecock, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

  9. If that’s how climate change will affect cricket, think of what it’ll do to the Winter Olympics. “And now for the swimming, formerly known as ice skating”.

  10. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm glad you have not been suckered, even part-ways, from what I gather, into thinking there is a Climate Crisis™ that is important compared to the actual crises of our era. It's just an excuse for more government control, one that had taken a back seat to that provided by the Kung Flu PanicFest. I really thought it might not return, but, alas, I guess we'll be seeing Greta some more after all.

    As for the sport of cricket, could one solution be more TV time-outs? See, I don't get paid for this, but you'd think Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh could think of something.

    Yes, it's a good gig, as you say. In this case, for Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh, there may have been some travel involved, or at least expensed hot dogs and beer. This is Journalism, man!

    Replies: @James Speaks, @AnotherDad

    I don’t think the heat will stop cricket, though it might result in fewer mad dogs. The real tragedy would be if we all woke up one morning to plaid sweaters.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  11. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm glad you have not been suckered, even part-ways, from what I gather, into thinking there is a Climate Crisis™ that is important compared to the actual crises of our era. It's just an excuse for more government control, one that had taken a back seat to that provided by the Kung Flu PanicFest. I really thought it might not return, but, alas, I guess we'll be seeing Greta some more after all.

    As for the sport of cricket, could one solution be more TV time-outs? See, I don't get paid for this, but you'd think Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh could think of something.

    Yes, it's a good gig, as you say. In this case, for Jeré Longman and Karan Deep Singh, there may have been some travel involved, or at least expensed hot dogs and beer. This is Journalism, man!

    Replies: @James Speaks, @AnotherDad

    It’s just an excuse for more government control…

    To me the proof of this is both the lack of interest in
    a) immigration control and
    b) nukes.

    If you believe there is an existential crisis, then you would
    a) immediately stop immigration into the 1st world
    b) immediately get to work building nukes; address the nuke safety issue by picking solid gen 3 designs and lavishly funding gen 4 R+D, but get building

    You have a different energy source, but people can pretty much go about their business, with minimal interference.

    Needless to say this is not the push we’ve seen.

    • Agree: Gordo, Chrisnonymous
  12. OT — (I give Gladwell credit for being a very accomplished runner for his age group these days)

    Teary-eyed Malcolm Gladwell slams remote work saying it’s ‘hurting society’ – despite the fact he’s written from home for YEARS: Editors even resorted to corresponding with him via couriers due to his ‘aversion’ to The New Yorker’s Manhattan office

    Canadian author Malcolm Gladwell has made clear his thoughts on working from home during an interview with The Diary Of A CEO podcast (center), outlining his belief that the trend is ‘hurting society’ and that any future recession will likely force employees back into the office. But Gladwell, who has written six bestsellers, has long spoken of his own personal work-from-home routine (pictured right) –

    and for more than a decade has been seen out and about working remotely in New York cafes and restaurants. The sheer hypocrisy of Gladwell opining about the lack of enthusiasm of returning to an office while hardly frequenting one himself was not lost on social media users (inset). ‘Presumably it was a different Malcolm Gladwell (twin brother?) who wrote enthusiastically and often about working from coffee shops,’ wrote Martin Robbins.

    A former co-worker at The New Yorker even weighed in, saying ‘I didn’t once see him at his desk or in the office.’

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11086337/Malcolm-Gladwell-slams-employees-work-home-saying-concept-hurting-society.html

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Clyde

    All quotes from people who aren't as competent as Malcolm Gladwell.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Clyde


    A former co-worker at The New Yorker even weighed in, saying ‘I didn’t once see him at his desk or in the office.’
     
    Given Gladwell's startling physical appearance, I expect this former co-worker is damned thankful he didn't once see Gladwell at the office.

    Jesus.

    Seeing a mere photograph of Mr. Gladwell in the DM was quite enough for me. I cannot imagine what it would be like seeing him in the flesh, but my guess is it would be no great improvement.

    Speaking of thankfulness, Gladwell should be thanking his lucky stars he has obtained a career as a writer. I hope he stays with it, because the only other "career" I can see him in is that of a carnival geek who earns his living by biting the heads off chickens.

    Are the books he writes the sort that are more talked about than read? The topics he selects, at least, have always sounded like lightweight piffle to me. However, it is obvious someone believes they are worth buying, even if I have not yet felt compelled to purchase a single one.
  13. @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    Since Steve's post will inevitably get the commentariat's gears turning, I'll throw in my two cents.

    -- With coal and oil humans have dramatically driven up atmospheric CO2--about 1/3 from 300ppm to 400+ppm--over the last century.

    -- There's a pretty good argument to be made that biological life on earth resulted in carbon deposition and a reduction in CO2 levels. Perhaps even helping to bring on the ice age pattern we've been in the past few millions years. So dumping some of this back was probably meritorious. (We really do not want to go back into an ice age. The holocene is really, really nice but is long in the tooth. We want to stay in it.)

    -- Progressively more CO2 will tend to have a lesser effect, as the CO2 absorption band saturates. (I haven't seen good data/discussion on this, but it's pretty obviously an issue. There is not going to be a linear effect.)

    -- All of the above said, it is probably a good idea to not keep dumping more CO2 into the atmosphere. I don't have any confidence in these climate models ... but that's sort of the point. We really don't know exactly all the factors involved. And some of them--like the solar wind--are extra-planetary.

    -- Finally, if you really believe this is an existential crisis then you should be pushing for nuclear energy. Yes you can do plenty of stuff on the edges with solar, wind, hydro, maybe even geothermal. But if you aren't doing nukes, then you really can not replace fossil fuels and replicate anything like our civilization any time soon. That's just reality.

    Anyone who blathers about the crisis of "climate change" but is not for nuclear energy is openly a fraud with some other agenda.

    Replies: @Clyde, @epebble

    Now you are bolding for max impact in Steve’s glorified chat room. You stole bolding from me, just like Achmed Von Neuman. Anyways, you used the word “existential” (though what isn’t these days) so all is forgiven temporarily, maybe.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Clyde

    I've been doing bolding for like forever, Clyde, but I did start using the word "existential" only at the beginning of my blog. Before that, I thought only guys with goatees at the coffee shops were allowed to use the word.

    Replies: @Clyde

  14. @Clyde
    OT --- (I give Gladwell credit for being a very accomplished runner for his age group these days)

    Teary-eyed Malcolm Gladwell slams remote work saying it's 'hurting society' - despite the fact he's written from home for YEARS: Editors even resorted to corresponding with him via couriers due to his 'aversion' to The New Yorker's Manhattan office

    Canadian author Malcolm Gladwell has made clear his thoughts on working from home during an interview with The Diary Of A CEO podcast (center), outlining his belief that the trend is 'hurting society' and that any future recession will likely force employees back into the office. But Gladwell, who has written six bestsellers, has long spoken of his own personal work-from-home routine (pictured right) -

    and for more than a decade has been seen out and about working remotely in New York cafes and restaurants. The sheer hypocrisy of Gladwell opining about the lack of enthusiasm of returning to an office while hardly frequenting one himself was not lost on social media users (inset). 'Presumably it was a different Malcolm Gladwell (twin brother?) who wrote enthusiastically and often about working from coffee shops,' wrote Martin Robbins.

    A former co-worker at The New Yorker even weighed in, saying 'I didn't once see him at his desk or in the office.'

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11086337/Malcolm-Gladwell-slams-employees-work-home-saying-concept-hurting-society.html

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Luddite in Chief

    All quotes from people who aren’t as competent as Malcolm Gladwell.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    Malcolm Gladwell is really good at writing magazine articles.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  15. Humans have had to deal with climate change before; it’s just that our ancestors were racist, sexist, etc.. So they deserved it, unlike our morally superior post-modern selves.

  16. I heard a podcast by James Corbett in which he claimed that it is not surprising that the UN’s IPCC consistently finds that “climate change” is caused by human activity, as the IPCC’s charter, as written by Canadian “Environmentalist” (and oil-company executive) Maurice Strong, specifically charged the IPCC with looking only at anthropogenic causes of climate change. I have not found corroborating information along these lines yet, but I will continue looking; Corbett is usually pretty careful in what he says.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    I heard the interview Corbett did back in his early years so 2010? with a Scientist of Renown, whose name escapes me of course, who had been selected as head of the IPCC, wot, you remember voting for him?, who turned the job down specifically because the Position required ignoring or minimizing any causes other than me.

    Corbett is NOT "Pretty careful" he is excellent. He nearly always posts sources and I've not caught him in factual error in over a decade, and my wife assures me frequently that I am a picky bastard. Corbett's site is a mess and I was pissed that he recently hired a video editor to make his shit look prettier rather that a Site Manager to make the thousands of invaluable pieces more accessible.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    Corbett looked at Strong a couple of times.

    https://www.corbettreport.com/meet-maurice-strong-globalist-oiligarch-environmentalist/

    https://www.corbettreport.com/interview-1131-elaine-dewar-on-maurice-strongs-cloak-of-green/

    The links to this now Youtubed video are interesting.


    https://www.corbettreport.com/maurice-strong-is-dead/

    2002

    https://www.taxtyranny.ca/images/HTML/Maurice-Strong/article1.html

  17. @epebble
    Problem number 999.

    Solution: 1. Play cricket during cooler weather
    2. Play in colder regions: U.K., Ireland, Canada, South Africa, Australia, parts of North India
    and Pakistan will continue to have cooler areas for at least rest of 21st Century.
    3. Play "indoors"; large, covered sports arenas are not impossible to construct.
    4. Invent a Virtual Reality version, where players can play virtually in smaller climate
    controlled arenas and the game can be broadcast to viewers who can watch it in
    Virtual Reality.

    Replies: @Franz

    Exactly.

    A culture that creates AstroTurf can create a cricket bubble dome. My consulting fee is negotiable. Bitcoin or bullion preferred.

  18. From personal experience, the hotter the weather, the more beer that needs to be drunk.

    We’ll be fine.

  19. @Clyde
    OT --- (I give Gladwell credit for being a very accomplished runner for his age group these days)

    Teary-eyed Malcolm Gladwell slams remote work saying it's 'hurting society' - despite the fact he's written from home for YEARS: Editors even resorted to corresponding with him via couriers due to his 'aversion' to The New Yorker's Manhattan office

    Canadian author Malcolm Gladwell has made clear his thoughts on working from home during an interview with The Diary Of A CEO podcast (center), outlining his belief that the trend is 'hurting society' and that any future recession will likely force employees back into the office. But Gladwell, who has written six bestsellers, has long spoken of his own personal work-from-home routine (pictured right) -

    and for more than a decade has been seen out and about working remotely in New York cafes and restaurants. The sheer hypocrisy of Gladwell opining about the lack of enthusiasm of returning to an office while hardly frequenting one himself was not lost on social media users (inset). 'Presumably it was a different Malcolm Gladwell (twin brother?) who wrote enthusiastically and often about working from coffee shops,' wrote Martin Robbins.

    A former co-worker at The New Yorker even weighed in, saying 'I didn't once see him at his desk or in the office.'

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11086337/Malcolm-Gladwell-slams-employees-work-home-saying-concept-hurting-society.html

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Luddite in Chief

    A former co-worker at The New Yorker even weighed in, saying ‘I didn’t once see him at his desk or in the office.’

    Given Gladwell’s startling physical appearance, I expect this former co-worker is damned thankful he didn’t once see Gladwell at the office.

    Jesus.

    Seeing a mere photograph of Mr. Gladwell in the DM was quite enough for me. I cannot imagine what it would be like seeing him in the flesh, but my guess is it would be no great improvement.

    Speaking of thankfulness, Gladwell should be thanking his lucky stars he has obtained a career as a writer. I hope he stays with it, because the only other “career” I can see him in is that of a carnival geek who earns his living by biting the heads off chickens.

    Are the books he writes the sort that are more talked about than read? The topics he selects, at least, have always sounded like lightweight piffle to me. However, it is obvious someone believes they are worth buying, even if I have not yet felt compelled to purchase a single one.

    • LOL: Lurker
  20. @Redneck farmer
    @Clyde

    All quotes from people who aren't as competent as Malcolm Gladwell.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Malcolm Gladwell is really good at writing magazine articles.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    Hope he sees this, bro

  21. Cricket is the only major sport in Australia that doesn’t have it’s hand out for government funding.

    All the rest;

    WogBall, Thugby, Tennis [titter], Basketball, Netball, they’re over once the Government teat

    is removed.

  22. @Hangnail Hans
    Steve writes about cricket, but that's not really what he's worried about.


    https://www.1golf.eu/images/golfclubs/headfort-golf-club_018368_full.jpg

    Replies: @meh, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    Steve writes about cricket, but that’s not really what he’s worried about.

    Well it’s a good proxy. Cricket spergs go on and on about pitch preparation every bit as much as golf fans sperg about golf course design.

  23. if there isn’t a heat wave or a cold wave or a tornado or whatever happening today for you to write about

    Every day, there’s somewhere on the planet experiencing noteworthy weather. Part of the climate change hustle is to track down those events and blow them out of proportion.

  24. @epebble
    Now, on to a problem that may rate slightly higher.

    Due to climate change, Nevada says goodbye to grass
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/due-to-climate-change-nevada-says-goodbye-to-grass/

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jon

    1. Why did anyone ever think it was acceptable to plant thick grass imported from the east in Las Vegas? This is a city that averages 4.2 in of rain annually.

    2. Why don’t “journalists” write articles without going off on long tangents [and I’m using this word in a very charitable sense] about whichever politically charged topic they want to shoehorn down our throats this week?

  25. Why is Occam’s Butterknife (e.g., solar panels, electric cars, etc.) being used to come up with solutions to the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Really, doesn’t it make more sense to apply Occam’s Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders. I would be more confident in global population modelling than “greenhouse gas” modelling and I believe population modelling finds a world human population of under two billion to be optimal.

    It’s interesting that those who are the truest believers in AGW are among the strongest supporters of open borders.

    Is the real issue that “big oil” is considered to be too powerful by globalist megalomaniacs thus the ridiculous (and anti-fossil fuel) work-arounds for the hypothetical case of AGW?

    • Agree: Rob McX, Adam Smith
    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Coemgen

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills and make them freely available, more accessible than even sugar and salt. Once done that, no woman would like to have more than one or two kids (and many would have none) and all problems, not just climate, will go away in a generation or two. The fact that no respectable entity, government or private, advocates that, shows the bankruptcy of creativity or the fear of thinking wrong.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Legba

    , @AnotherDad
    @Coemgen


    Really, doesn’t it make more sense to apply Occam’s Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders.
     
    Bingo.

    Again and again, what they say and what they do.
    , @Jack D
    @Coemgen

    If you take a person from a 3rd world village and move him to an advanced Western society, then even if he has some menial low paying (by Western standards) job in the West you are going to increase his energy footprint by some very large factor. Energy usage and income/consumption are highly correlated - if you consume more, then you are going to use more energy. If you make $2,000/yr then the MOST energy you can consume is $2,000 worth (and in fact a lot less). But if you move to El Norte and now you make $20,000/yr, you are going to consume a lot more energy - you'll own or at least ride in cars, you'll have air conditioning, etc.

    If evil Big Corporations were bringing in millions of people from the 3rd world to the US (let's say to work as indentured servants), Leftist environmentalists would have no problem understanding this and would be crying bloody murder about how we are never going to get our energy usage under control so long as ADM or whomever keeps bringing more people here. But as it is, crickets.

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @Coemgen

    Close the borders, and if ignorant peasants in Third World Shit Holes insist on continuing their habit of breeding like rats, that will be their problem. Let them stew in their own stink. India, China, Bangladesh, Nigeria..the whole lot of 'em can go straight to Hell. They seem to like it that way so who am I..or any other American...to stand in their way?

    Replies: @epebble, @Art Deco

  26. 100% off topic, but does anyone here know anything about automating geolocation?

    In other words, finding from a photograph or webcam view exactly where the picture was taken or the webcam is?

    For example, I posted the other day a webcam picture from Bakhmut, Ukraine, but I don’t know where exactly the pic was taken and a quick look (a few minutes) at the town centre satellite image didn’t help.

    Is there some software about, perhaps on github or similar, that will scan an area of satellite images and try to match with a photo? It must surely exist in GCHQ/Langley, but anything for ordinary folk?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I think that building in the upper right corner is the city council. Red Roof with a Dome ought to be easy to ID.

    , @Peter Lund
    @YetAnotherAnon

    It's taken from Svobody Street (Freedom Street) between Myru Street (Peace Street) and Vulytsya Nezalezhnosti (Independence Street).

    The building with the red roof and the copula is the "Cultural Palace" (Cultural Center). The house in the foreground is a pharmacy.

    The dome is at 48°35'19.9"N 38°00'07.8"E.

    , @Stan Adams
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I did a reverse image search:

    https://smallseotools.com/reverse-image-search/

    …that led me to this:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oHvIAj-TQo4

    It’s Freedom Square.

    https://i.ibb.co/HxCKcNQ/F679-F8-CD-A1-F4-4971-AC34-B52-A9-C4-A3-A88.png

  27. @epebble
    Now, on to a problem that may rate slightly higher.

    Due to climate change, Nevada says goodbye to grass
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/due-to-climate-change-nevada-says-goodbye-to-grass/

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jon

    We asked Neil deGrasse Tyson to lay it out for us

    Tyson, an astrophysicist

    A genius like his knows no bounds.

    Tyson added, “We are all the same race, the human race.

    Uh oh, spoke too soon – he’s about to get cancelled.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Jon


    Tyson added, “We are all the same race, the human race.
     
    Remember when it was the brotherhood of man?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhUcvFP_Tas


    Remember when diversity was an Italian and a woman?

    (It ain’t over ‘til the fat lady sings)

  28. @Clyde
    @AnotherDad

    Now you are bolding for max impact in Steve's glorified chat room. You stole bolding from me, just like Achmed Von Neuman. Anyways, you used the word "existential" (though what isn't these days) so all is forgiven temporarily, maybe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve been doing bolding for like forever, Clyde, but I did start using the word “existential” only at the beginning of my blog. Before that, I thought only guys with goatees at the coffee shops were allowed to use the word.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Your past posts here do not show much bolding. Your blog does.

  29. (Pro tip: when India and Pakistan are no longer able to play cricket test matches, it’s time to head to your survivalist cabin…)

    Well, at least Australia multi-tasks…australian rules football is played on a cricket oval during cricket’s off-season…

  30. Speaking of a sticky wicket, the racist Brits allowed a COVID-test-positive Aussie babe to play cricket against India at the Commonwealth Games, despite having barred a COVID-test-positive Indian gent from the para discus event at the same games:

    “If We Get Covid, So Be It”: Cries of Hypocrisy as Australia Allows Covid-Positive Cricketer to Play Despite Deporting Djokovic Over Vaccine

    She had woken up with mild symptoms yesterday morning and then returned a positive test. However, she was still selected in the Aussies’ XI after tournament organisers approved her participation following consultations before the toss, which was delayed.

    But critics have said she should not have been allowed to play. Many Indian supporters felt the decision was ‘racist’ and that India would have been ruled out of the final if the shoe was on the other foot. There was also anger because Indian para discus athlete Aneesh Kumar Pillai was banned from his Commonwealth final in Birmingham after testing positive for COVID-19. The virus was picked up by a random swab – and he was asymptomatic – but the Commonwealth Games Federation said he couldn’t take part.

    source: https://dailysceptic.org/2022/08/08/if-we-get-covid-so-be-it-cries-of-hypocrisy-as-australia-allows-covid-positive-cricketer-to-play-despite-deporting-djokovic-over-vaccine/

  31. @Hangnail Hans
    Steve writes about cricket, but that's not really what he's worried about.


    https://www.1golf.eu/images/golfclubs/headfort-golf-club_018368_full.jpg

    Replies: @meh, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    But he hasn’t had one post dedicated to insurgent tour LIV. Disappointing to say the least, cos I have opinions!

  32. @Jon
    @epebble


    We asked Neil deGrasse Tyson to lay it out for us
     

    Tyson, an astrophysicist
     
    A genius like his knows no bounds.

    Tyson added, "We are all the same race, the human race.
     
    Uh oh, spoke too soon - he's about to get cancelled.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Tyson added, “We are all the same race, the human race.

    Remember when it was the brotherhood of man?

    Remember when diversity was an Italian and a woman?

    (It ain’t over ‘til the fat lady sings)

  33. Solution: more G&T breaks during the game.

  34. @YetAnotherAnon
    100% off topic, but does anyone here know anything about automating geolocation?

    In other words, finding from a photograph or webcam view exactly where the picture was taken or the webcam is?

    For example, I posted the other day a webcam picture from Bakhmut, Ukraine, but I don't know where exactly the pic was taken and a quick look (a few minutes) at the town centre satellite image didn't help.

    https://i.postimg.cc/X7R2VZxT/bakhmut.jpg

    Is there some software about, perhaps on github or similar, that will scan an area of satellite images and try to match with a photo? It must surely exist in GCHQ/Langley, but anything for ordinary folk?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Peter Lund, @Stan Adams

    I think that building in the upper right corner is the city council. Red Roof with a Dome ought to be easy to ID.

  35. The basic premise of the Left is summed up by the famous fake headline, “World Ends – Women and Minorities Hit Hardest”. So this cricket story is an exception.

    The go-to template for climate change stories is going to be “The Impact of “Climate Change Event” (e.g. typical summer hurricane) X on Minority Group Y. Oh, there’s been some flooding in Miami – send down a reporter to write about how this has affected the Haitian community.

    The new Democrat Pork Barrel Inflation Reduction Bill takes this into account and allocated billions to alleviate climate change in “underserved communities” (i.e. where black people live).

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  36. @YetAnotherAnon
    100% off topic, but does anyone here know anything about automating geolocation?

    In other words, finding from a photograph or webcam view exactly where the picture was taken or the webcam is?

    For example, I posted the other day a webcam picture from Bakhmut, Ukraine, but I don't know where exactly the pic was taken and a quick look (a few minutes) at the town centre satellite image didn't help.

    https://i.postimg.cc/X7R2VZxT/bakhmut.jpg

    Is there some software about, perhaps on github or similar, that will scan an area of satellite images and try to match with a photo? It must surely exist in GCHQ/Langley, but anything for ordinary folk?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Peter Lund, @Stan Adams

    It’s taken from Svobody Street (Freedom Street) between Myru Street (Peace Street) and Vulytsya Nezalezhnosti (Independence Street).

    The building with the red roof and the copula is the “Cultural Palace” (Cultural Center). The house in the foreground is a pharmacy.

    The dome is at 48°35’19.9″N 38°00’07.8″E.

  37. @YetAnotherAnon
    100% off topic, but does anyone here know anything about automating geolocation?

    In other words, finding from a photograph or webcam view exactly where the picture was taken or the webcam is?

    For example, I posted the other day a webcam picture from Bakhmut, Ukraine, but I don't know where exactly the pic was taken and a quick look (a few minutes) at the town centre satellite image didn't help.

    https://i.postimg.cc/X7R2VZxT/bakhmut.jpg

    Is there some software about, perhaps on github or similar, that will scan an area of satellite images and try to match with a photo? It must surely exist in GCHQ/Langley, but anything for ordinary folk?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Peter Lund, @Stan Adams

    I did a reverse image search:

    https://smallseotools.com/reverse-image-search/

    …that led me to this:

    It’s Freedom Square.

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  38. Hugely impressed that an American knows what a Sticky Wicket is.

  39. Ideally the Earth will continue to warm until we approach the temperatures observed during the Roman Climate Optimum when temperatures were several degrees warmer than today. The Roman Optimum was called ‘Optimum’ because the effects of the climate were better than preceding and following colder climates. Better for agriculture. Better for transportation. Better for health and prosperity.

    The Roman warm period is amply documented by numerous analyzes of sediments, tree rings, ice cores and pollen. Additionally, it has been documented by ancient authors and historical events. Locating vineyards and olive trees is also a good indicator of climate. During the culmination of the Roman warm period olive trees grew in the Rhine Valley in Germany. Citrus trees and grapes were cultivated in England as far north as Hadrian’s Wall near Newcastle.

    Unfortunately the Earth has barely warmed over the past 30 years. And 100% of the observed warming has been nighttime temperatures, with daytime temperatures unchanged. So far there is little evidence to suggest that CO2 is causing any problems with our climate, and may be helping extend crop yields and prolong the growing seasons in Canada,

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    At current rates of warming it will take us 180 years of global warming to reach the Climate Optimum which the Romans experienced 2,000 years ago. How were the Romans able to create such a warm climate without burning coal? Maybe worshipping the Sun had warming benefits.

    Do the leftists really want the Earth to cool and have another little ice-age so the Thames will freeze over every winter? There is a good reason we always described the Roman climate as being the optimum for humans so why would we spend billions to make the planet cooler ? Seems insane. Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble, @BB753

  40. I won’t believe it’s real until I read the headline “Pride Parade Cancelled Due to Climate Change”.

    • LOL: Hypnotoad666
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Rob McX

    Fortunately, this chestnut is left over from the last century, to remind us of "The Way [They] Were":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rW8XRLt_Kw8

  41. Sitting in the stands, watching a cricket match has always been tortuously boring.

    Climate change won’t change that.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  42. I’m still struck by the statement “second most popular sport” in the world. How does one estimate that? Do they add up the total population of nations that follow cricket—thus India alone pushes up the scale considerably? Clearly it’s not the number of nations, nor the geographic scope, since cricket seems to be wholly confined to places the British established tea service while running an empire.

  43. @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    Since Steve's post will inevitably get the commentariat's gears turning, I'll throw in my two cents.

    -- With coal and oil humans have dramatically driven up atmospheric CO2--about 1/3 from 300ppm to 400+ppm--over the last century.

    -- There's a pretty good argument to be made that biological life on earth resulted in carbon deposition and a reduction in CO2 levels. Perhaps even helping to bring on the ice age pattern we've been in the past few millions years. So dumping some of this back was probably meritorious. (We really do not want to go back into an ice age. The holocene is really, really nice but is long in the tooth. We want to stay in it.)

    -- Progressively more CO2 will tend to have a lesser effect, as the CO2 absorption band saturates. (I haven't seen good data/discussion on this, but it's pretty obviously an issue. There is not going to be a linear effect.)

    -- All of the above said, it is probably a good idea to not keep dumping more CO2 into the atmosphere. I don't have any confidence in these climate models ... but that's sort of the point. We really don't know exactly all the factors involved. And some of them--like the solar wind--are extra-planetary.

    -- Finally, if you really believe this is an existential crisis then you should be pushing for nuclear energy. Yes you can do plenty of stuff on the edges with solar, wind, hydro, maybe even geothermal. But if you aren't doing nukes, then you really can not replace fossil fuels and replicate anything like our civilization any time soon. That's just reality.

    Anyone who blathers about the crisis of "climate change" but is not for nuclear energy is openly a fraud with some other agenda.

    Replies: @Clyde, @epebble

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.
     
    Not going to get into this, but the obvious.

    -- You need base load and the ability to handle "sun don't shine and wind don't blow".
    -- Nuclear is naturally more expensive than hydrocarbons largely due to upfront capital costs, but mostly because of regulatory issues. Settle on safe standard designs and build, and train, for those. (The French aren't going bankrupt.)
    -- Solar and wind are also high upfront capital costs. The payoffs are long down the road. (Their advantage is that you can do piecemeal. No giant multi-billion capital cost at one time.)
    -- The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke. First off it should be reprocessed. Secondly the waste volume is tiny. (The whole point of nuclear is it is a little bit of material creating a tremendous amount of energy--high energy density.) It is completely a made up enviro scare and regulatory issue. "Mix into glass and drop into the Cascade subduction zone"--there i just solved it for you.

    Again, this is basically a test of seriousness. If you really want a non-fossil fuel economy anytime soon, then you deal with the issues and build some nukes, while you ramp up and improve other stuff. (Everyone having solar on their roofs and a battery in their garage is great .... but we don't have that now.) You can deal with reality or have little fantasies of rainbows and happy trees.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Jack D, @epebble

    , @Gamecock
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now
     
    [citation needed]

    Wind and solar can never be more than supplemental.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @epebble

    Wind and solar are far more expensive than using coal or natural gas. Even in ideal locations Solar and wind not available half the time and requires coal or natural gas power plants to back them up.

    This is why China, India and even the Germans are still building coal plants. Coal is less costly and more reliable and we have enough coal reserves to last another 500 years.

  44. Love this, even if Iris Murdoch slyly referred to it as “some dreary panegyric of British Imperialism”. Well, she would, wouldn’t she?

    Vitai Lampada
    THERE’S a breathless hush in the Close to-night –
    Ten to make and the match to win –
    A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
    An hour to play and the last man in.
    And it’s not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
    Or the selfish hope of a season’s fame,
    But his Captain’s hand on his shoulder smote
    “Play up! play up! and play the game!”

    The sand of the desert is sodden red, –
    Red with the wreck of a square that broke; –
    The Gatling’s jammed and the colonel dead,
    And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
    The river of death has brimmed his banks,
    And England’s far, and Honour a name,
    But the voice of schoolboy rallies the ranks,
    “Play up! play up! and play the game!”

    This is the word that year by year
    While in her place the School is set
    Every one of her sons must hear,
    And none that hears it dare forget.
    This they all with a joyful mind
    Bear through life like a torch in flame,
    And falling fling to the host behind –
    “Play up! play up! and play the game!”

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  45. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    Malcolm Gladwell is really good at writing magazine articles.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Hope he sees this, bro

  46. @AnotherDad
    Climate change is definitely a lifetime employment opportunity.

    The climate beat should be sort of like teaching algebra. Once you've done it once or twice and have some good lesson plans, you can keep using the same material over and over and over again. And you don't even have to deal with the twitchy adolescents or do any grading. Just phone it in!

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar

    Climate change is definitely a lifetime employment opportunity.

    It’s been going on for 4.5 billion years. The story has legs!

    • LOL: Rob McX
  47. @Coemgen
    Why is Occam's Butterknife (e.g., solar panels, electric cars, etc.) being used to come up with solutions to the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Really, doesn't it make more sense to apply Occam's Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders. I would be more confident in global population modelling than "greenhouse gas" modelling and I believe population modelling finds a world human population of under two billion to be optimal.

    It's interesting that those who are the truest believers in AGW are among the strongest supporters of open borders.

    Is the real issue that "big oil" is considered to be too powerful by globalist megalomaniacs thus the ridiculous (and anti-fossil fuel) work-arounds for the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Replies: @epebble, @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @VivaLaMigra

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills and make them freely available, more accessible than even sugar and salt. Once done that, no woman would like to have more than one or two kids (and many would have none) and all problems, not just climate, will go away in a generation or two. The fact that no respectable entity, government or private, advocates that, shows the bankruptcy of creativity or the fear of thinking wrong.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @epebble


    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills
     
    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just stop feeding the third world.

    ftfy

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Legba
    @epebble

    Maybe you could get everyone to take some kind of shot or something. The shot could kill some people slowly and destroy the other's ability to reproduce. I don't see how you could pull it off, though

  48. Cricket takes up an awful lot of space in very crowded countries such as England, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. It’s pitch is seen at 1:09, after baseball’s, soccer’s, and rugby’s:

    But well before Epsom Downs and Talladega.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's insignificant compared to many other uses - about 5 acres for a cricket ground. A golf course is around 150 acres. The average farm in the UK is around 200 acres. Greenwich Park in London is about 180 acres so the cricket ground just takes up one little section.

  49. https://nypost.com/2022/08/07/nyc-says-structural-racism-makes-heat-waves-more-dangerous-for-black-people/

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @MEH 0910

    Yet again, for the 1000th time, "women, minorities, hardest hit".

  50. @Coemgen
    Why is Occam's Butterknife (e.g., solar panels, electric cars, etc.) being used to come up with solutions to the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Really, doesn't it make more sense to apply Occam's Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders. I would be more confident in global population modelling than "greenhouse gas" modelling and I believe population modelling finds a world human population of under two billion to be optimal.

    It's interesting that those who are the truest believers in AGW are among the strongest supporters of open borders.

    Is the real issue that "big oil" is considered to be too powerful by globalist megalomaniacs thus the ridiculous (and anti-fossil fuel) work-arounds for the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Replies: @epebble, @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @VivaLaMigra

    Really, doesn’t it make more sense to apply Occam’s Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders.

    Bingo.

    Again and again, what they say and what they do.

  51. @Hangnail Hans
    Steve writes about cricket, but that's not really what he's worried about.


    https://www.1golf.eu/images/golfclubs/headfort-golf-club_018368_full.jpg

    Replies: @meh, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    That’s a bio-methanol solar-energy-capture facility. Steve will be fine.

    • LOL: BB753
  52. @Coemgen
    Why is Occam's Butterknife (e.g., solar panels, electric cars, etc.) being used to come up with solutions to the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Really, doesn't it make more sense to apply Occam's Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders. I would be more confident in global population modelling than "greenhouse gas" modelling and I believe population modelling finds a world human population of under two billion to be optimal.

    It's interesting that those who are the truest believers in AGW are among the strongest supporters of open borders.

    Is the real issue that "big oil" is considered to be too powerful by globalist megalomaniacs thus the ridiculous (and anti-fossil fuel) work-arounds for the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Replies: @epebble, @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @VivaLaMigra

    If you take a person from a 3rd world village and move him to an advanced Western society, then even if he has some menial low paying (by Western standards) job in the West you are going to increase his energy footprint by some very large factor. Energy usage and income/consumption are highly correlated – if you consume more, then you are going to use more energy. If you make \$2,000/yr then the MOST energy you can consume is \$2,000 worth (and in fact a lot less). But if you move to El Norte and now you make \$20,000/yr, you are going to consume a lot more energy – you’ll own or at least ride in cars, you’ll have air conditioning, etc.

    If evil Big Corporations were bringing in millions of people from the 3rd world to the US (let’s say to work as indentured servants), Leftist environmentalists would have no problem understanding this and would be crying bloody murder about how we are never going to get our energy usage under control so long as ADM or whomever keeps bringing more people here. But as it is, crickets.

  53. @Reg Cæsar
    Cricket takes up an awful lot of space in very crowded countries such as England, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. It's pitch is seen at 1:09, after baseball's, soccer's, and rugby's:


    https://youtu.be/BJ2efNF18ag


    But well before Epsom Downs and Talladega.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s insignificant compared to many other uses – about 5 acres for a cricket ground. A golf course is around 150 acres. The average farm in the UK is around 200 acres. Greenwich Park in London is about 180 acres so the cricket ground just takes up one little section.

  54. @MEH 0910
    https://nypost.com/2022/08/07/nyc-says-structural-racism-makes-heat-waves-more-dangerous-for-black-people/
    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1556140114979557376

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Yet again, for the 1000th time, “women, minorities, hardest hit”.

  55. yeah ok, but no comment from Steve on his favorite and yet most wasteful human endeavor, building golf courses.

  56. @Mr. Anon
    I heard a podcast by James Corbett in which he claimed that it is not surprising that the UN's IPCC consistently finds that "climate change" is caused by human activity, as the IPCC's charter, as written by Canadian "Environmentalist" (and oil-company executive) Maurice Strong, specifically charged the IPCC with looking only at anthropogenic causes of climate change. I have not found corroborating information along these lines yet, but I will continue looking; Corbett is usually pretty careful in what he says.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    I heard the interview Corbett did back in his early years so 2010? with a Scientist of Renown, whose name escapes me of course, who had been selected as head of the IPCC, wot, you remember voting for him?, who turned the job down specifically because the Position required ignoring or minimizing any causes other than me.

    Corbett is NOT “Pretty careful” he is excellent. He nearly always posts sources and I’ve not caught him in factual error in over a decade, and my wife assures me frequently that I am a picky bastard. Corbett’s site is a mess and I was pissed that he recently hired a video editor to make his shit look prettier rather that a Site Manager to make the thousands of invaluable pieces more accessible.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Bill Jones

    I agree about the excellence of Corbett's work. He is one of the best independent citizen-journalists out there, and certainly the most articulate.

    I haven't had any problem with his website. It has a search bar, and I'm able to find most anything I'm looking for with a little effort. But perhaps that's because I'm already familiar with what he has done.

  57. @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levelized_cost_of_electricity#/media/File:20201019_Levelized_Cost_of_Energy_(LCOE,_Lazard)_-_renewable_energy.svg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Gamecock, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    Not going to get into this, but the obvious.

    — You need base load and the ability to handle “sun don’t shine and wind don’t blow”.
    — Nuclear is naturally more expensive than hydrocarbons largely due to upfront capital costs, but mostly because of regulatory issues. Settle on safe standard designs and build, and train, for those. (The French aren’t going bankrupt.)
    — Solar and wind are also high upfront capital costs. The payoffs are long down the road. (Their advantage is that you can do piecemeal. No giant multi-billion capital cost at one time.)
    — The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke. First off it should be reprocessed. Secondly the waste volume is tiny. (The whole point of nuclear is it is a little bit of material creating a tremendous amount of energy–high energy density.) It is completely a made up enviro scare and regulatory issue. “Mix into glass and drop into the Cascade subduction zone”–there i just solved it for you.

    Again, this is basically a test of seriousness. If you really want a non-fossil fuel economy anytime soon, then you deal with the issues and build some nukes, while you ramp up and improve other stuff. (Everyone having solar on their roofs and a battery in their garage is great …. but we don’t have that now.) You can deal with reality or have little fantasies of rainbows and happy trees.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad

    The anti-nuclear crowd is like a cancer patient who refuses chemotherapy in favor of "natural" remedies because chemo is toxic. We all know how that works out in the end.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This goes with the idea that "I'll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious." For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious.

    Well, I have new for you buddy. Our elites are fundamentally unserious people and are NEVER going to act in a serious way. You have a better chance of Bozo the Clown acting in a serious, adult way than say Kamala Harris.

    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn't handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years - he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke

    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.

    Cost to taxpayers to clean up nuclear waste jumps $100 billion in a year


    WASHINGTON — The estimated cost of cleaning up America's nuclear waste has jumped more than $100 billion in just one year, according to a DOE report — and a watchdog warns the cost may climb still higher.

    The Energy Department's projected cost for cleanup jumped from $383.78 billion in 2017 to $493.96 billion in a financial report issued in December 2018.

    A government watchdog and DOE expert said the new total may still underestimate the full cost of cleanup, which is expected to last another 50 years. "We believe the number is growing and we believe the number is understated," said David Trimble, director of the Government Accountability Office's Natural Resources and Environment team.
     
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/all/cost-taxpayers-clean-nuclear-waste-jumps-100-billion-year-n963586

    The Yucca Mountain repository is still in works, and it will be decades before anything is stored there.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  58. @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levelized_cost_of_electricity#/media/File:20201019_Levelized_Cost_of_Energy_(LCOE,_Lazard)_-_renewable_energy.svg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Gamecock, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now

    [citation needed]

    Wind and solar can never be more than supplemental.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Gamecock

    That little doohickey below my comment [43] is a graph of various costs.

    Replies: @Gamecock

  59. @Mr. Anon
    I heard a podcast by James Corbett in which he claimed that it is not surprising that the UN's IPCC consistently finds that "climate change" is caused by human activity, as the IPCC's charter, as written by Canadian "Environmentalist" (and oil-company executive) Maurice Strong, specifically charged the IPCC with looking only at anthropogenic causes of climate change. I have not found corroborating information along these lines yet, but I will continue looking; Corbett is usually pretty careful in what he says.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    • Thanks: BB753
  60. @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.
     
    Not going to get into this, but the obvious.

    -- You need base load and the ability to handle "sun don't shine and wind don't blow".
    -- Nuclear is naturally more expensive than hydrocarbons largely due to upfront capital costs, but mostly because of regulatory issues. Settle on safe standard designs and build, and train, for those. (The French aren't going bankrupt.)
    -- Solar and wind are also high upfront capital costs. The payoffs are long down the road. (Their advantage is that you can do piecemeal. No giant multi-billion capital cost at one time.)
    -- The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke. First off it should be reprocessed. Secondly the waste volume is tiny. (The whole point of nuclear is it is a little bit of material creating a tremendous amount of energy--high energy density.) It is completely a made up enviro scare and regulatory issue. "Mix into glass and drop into the Cascade subduction zone"--there i just solved it for you.

    Again, this is basically a test of seriousness. If you really want a non-fossil fuel economy anytime soon, then you deal with the issues and build some nukes, while you ramp up and improve other stuff. (Everyone having solar on their roofs and a battery in their garage is great .... but we don't have that now.) You can deal with reality or have little fantasies of rainbows and happy trees.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Jack D, @epebble

    The anti-nuclear crowd is like a cancer patient who refuses chemotherapy in favor of “natural” remedies because chemo is toxic. We all know how that works out in the end.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Chrisnonymous

    Right, Steve Jobs. How could someone so smart be so dumb?

    Replies: @The Real World

  61. @epebble
    @Coemgen

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills and make them freely available, more accessible than even sugar and salt. Once done that, no woman would like to have more than one or two kids (and many would have none) and all problems, not just climate, will go away in a generation or two. The fact that no respectable entity, government or private, advocates that, shows the bankruptcy of creativity or the fear of thinking wrong.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Legba

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just stop feeding the third world.

    ftfy

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Bill Jones

    That would be cruel; What is humane is to stick a pack of Norgestrel with every bag of flour or loaf of bread, like the plastic toys that come with a McDonald's Happy Meal. For enhanced effect, the blister pack may be labelled Poverty Reducing Medicine for Women. Take One Daily. Like magic, all problems will vanish in a generation.

    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/image/imgsrv.fcgi?cid=4542&t=l

  62. @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.
     
    Not going to get into this, but the obvious.

    -- You need base load and the ability to handle "sun don't shine and wind don't blow".
    -- Nuclear is naturally more expensive than hydrocarbons largely due to upfront capital costs, but mostly because of regulatory issues. Settle on safe standard designs and build, and train, for those. (The French aren't going bankrupt.)
    -- Solar and wind are also high upfront capital costs. The payoffs are long down the road. (Their advantage is that you can do piecemeal. No giant multi-billion capital cost at one time.)
    -- The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke. First off it should be reprocessed. Secondly the waste volume is tiny. (The whole point of nuclear is it is a little bit of material creating a tremendous amount of energy--high energy density.) It is completely a made up enviro scare and regulatory issue. "Mix into glass and drop into the Cascade subduction zone"--there i just solved it for you.

    Again, this is basically a test of seriousness. If you really want a non-fossil fuel economy anytime soon, then you deal with the issues and build some nukes, while you ramp up and improve other stuff. (Everyone having solar on their roofs and a battery in their garage is great .... but we don't have that now.) You can deal with reality or have little fantasies of rainbows and happy trees.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Jack D, @epebble

    This goes with the idea that “I’ll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious.” For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious.

    Well, I have new for you buddy. Our elites are fundamentally unserious people and are NEVER going to act in a serious way. You have a better chance of Bozo the Clown acting in a serious, adult way than say Kamala Harris.

    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn’t handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years – he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.

    • Agree: David In TN
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn’t handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years – he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.
     
    I'd say all completed engineering projects can fail under scenarios no one planned for. And in some cases, large-scale loss of life ensued. For instance, no one in China planned for the kind of earthquake that killed an estimated 300,000 people.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1976_Tangshan_earthquake

    Should they all live in tents or away from the earthquake zone because of that particular disaster? What man has traditionally done is build back better(TM) so as to avoid the problems encountered previously, and hopefully incorporate more onerous worst case scenarios in both the designs and the materials used for reconstruction.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D


    "“I’ll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious.” For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious."
     
    Or for example Obama's purchase of a large seafront spread at Martha's Vineyard. He believes global warming isn't a serious threat to his property, whatever he might say.

    When seafront property prices start to collapse I might take them seriously.

    Replies: @epebble

  63. Don’t know about cricket, but the katydids are doing fine in the heat here. August is when they make their noise, and they are as loud as during any previous year.

    They start making their loud, rasping sound after sundown. It sounds like there are thousands of them. It’s pretty funny, and amazing actually.

    However, as John Derbyshire of Long Island wrote recently, other bugs like mosquitoes are fewer in number this year. They are not missed.

    We do have a few crickets. They are sweet-sounding but drowned out by the katydids.

  64. @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.
     
    Not going to get into this, but the obvious.

    -- You need base load and the ability to handle "sun don't shine and wind don't blow".
    -- Nuclear is naturally more expensive than hydrocarbons largely due to upfront capital costs, but mostly because of regulatory issues. Settle on safe standard designs and build, and train, for those. (The French aren't going bankrupt.)
    -- Solar and wind are also high upfront capital costs. The payoffs are long down the road. (Their advantage is that you can do piecemeal. No giant multi-billion capital cost at one time.)
    -- The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke. First off it should be reprocessed. Secondly the waste volume is tiny. (The whole point of nuclear is it is a little bit of material creating a tremendous amount of energy--high energy density.) It is completely a made up enviro scare and regulatory issue. "Mix into glass and drop into the Cascade subduction zone"--there i just solved it for you.

    Again, this is basically a test of seriousness. If you really want a non-fossil fuel economy anytime soon, then you deal with the issues and build some nukes, while you ramp up and improve other stuff. (Everyone having solar on their roofs and a battery in their garage is great .... but we don't have that now.) You can deal with reality or have little fantasies of rainbows and happy trees.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Jack D, @epebble

    The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke

    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.

    Cost to taxpayers to clean up nuclear waste jumps \$100 billion in a year

    WASHINGTON — The estimated cost of cleaning up America’s nuclear waste has jumped more than \$100 billion in just one year, according to a DOE report — and a watchdog warns the cost may climb still higher.

    The Energy Department’s projected cost for cleanup jumped from \$383.78 billion in 2017 to \$493.96 billion in a financial report issued in December 2018.

    A government watchdog and DOE expert said the new total may still underestimate the full cost of cleanup, which is expected to last another 50 years. “We believe the number is growing and we believe the number is understated,” said David Trimble, director of the Government Accountability Office’s Natural Resources and Environment team.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/all/cost-taxpayers-clean-nuclear-waste-jumps-100-billion-year-n963586

    The Yucca Mountain repository is still in works, and it will be decades before anything is stored there.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.
     
    You really going to continue with this?

    Hanford was a nuclear weapons production facility, and has a bunch of stuff that was done "worry about it later" while building the bomb. There are some genuine bad situation there--which are unlikely anything from civilization nuclear power. But still these ridiculous budgets and estimates come from gold plating everything. It's out in the middle of Eastern Washington desert and literally you could deal with it by doing almost nothing. But you certainly could deal with it very effectively without spending 100s of billions.

    Yucca Mountain is the same sort of government regulatory boondoggle. If you want to drill into a stable geological formation and store waste there you can do it. It is not that complicated. It's the kind of thing America used to be able to do. Yucca goes one and one because people want it to go on and on. Make their living off lawyering it or consulting it or bureaucratizing it or whining about it.

    I hate to break it to you, but radioactivity is all around you. Nuclear power creates a lot of short term radioisotopes in place of longer term radiioisotopes (U235 and some 238). I don't know the exactly crossing point but hang onto the stuff for a couple hundred years and you could dump it back in the mine and have less radioactivity than you started with.

    The world is big and the amount of material we are talking about here is very, very small.

    Replies: @epebble

  65. Constraints On The Electricity Grid | Semiconductor Engineering
    https://semiengineering.com/constraints-on-the-electricity-grid/

    “I recently wrote about Moss Landing, the biggest grid battery storage operation in the world. I discovered from talking to a friend recently that most people have no idea what constraints the electricity grid operates under. I think most politicians are the same, and they assume that if we build enough windmills and solar panels then we can live in some sort of eco-nirvana. But that’s not going to happen, and this post will explain why. …”

    Solar panels are a pain to recycle. These companies are trying to fix that. | MIT Technology Review
    https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/08/19/1032215/solar-panels-recycling/

    “… Millions of solar panels have been installed in the last two decades—and since they typically last between 25 and 30 years, many will soon be ready for retirement and probably headed to a landfill. But new efforts to recycle these panels could reduce both the amount of waste and the new material that needs to be mined.

    Only about 10% of panels in the US are recycled—it isn’t mandated by federal regulations, and recycling the devices is currently much more expensive than just discarding them. …”

  66. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Clyde

    I've been doing bolding for like forever, Clyde, but I did start using the word "existential" only at the beginning of my blog. Before that, I thought only guys with goatees at the coffee shops were allowed to use the word.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Your past posts here do not show much bolding. Your blog does.

  67. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This goes with the idea that "I'll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious." For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious.

    Well, I have new for you buddy. Our elites are fundamentally unserious people and are NEVER going to act in a serious way. You have a better chance of Bozo the Clown acting in a serious, adult way than say Kamala Harris.

    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn't handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years - he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @YetAnotherAnon

    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn’t handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years – he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.

    I’d say all completed engineering projects can fail under scenarios no one planned for. And in some cases, large-scale loss of life ensued. For instance, no one in China planned for the kind of earthquake that killed an estimated 300,000 people.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1976_Tangshan_earthquake

    Should they all live in tents or away from the earthquake zone because of that particular disaster? What man has traditionally done is build back better(TM) so as to avoid the problems encountered previously, and hopefully incorporate more onerous worst case scenarios in both the designs and the materials used for reconstruction.

  68. @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now (thanks mostly to Asian Engineering and Manufacturing). Nuclear is very expensive, beside its PR problem, even before considering spent fuel problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levelized_cost_of_electricity#/media/File:20201019_Levelized_Cost_of_Energy_(LCOE,_Lazard)_-_renewable_energy.svg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Gamecock, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Wind and solar are far more expensive than using coal or natural gas. Even in ideal locations Solar and wind not available half the time and requires coal or natural gas power plants to back them up.

    This is why China, India and even the Germans are still building coal plants. Coal is less costly and more reliable and we have enough coal reserves to last another 500 years.

  69. @Bill Jones
    @epebble


    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills
     
    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just stop feeding the third world.

    ftfy

    Replies: @epebble

    That would be cruel; What is humane is to stick a pack of Norgestrel with every bag of flour or loaf of bread, like the plastic toys that come with a McDonald’s Happy Meal. For enhanced effect, the blister pack may be labelled Poverty Reducing Medicine for Women. Take One Daily. Like magic, all problems will vanish in a generation.

    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/image/imgsrv.fcgi?cid=4542&t=l

  70. @Rob McX
    I won't believe it's real until I read the headline "Pride Parade Cancelled Due to Climate Change".

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Fortunately, this chestnut is left over from the last century, to remind us of “The Way [They] Were”:

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  71. @Travis
    Ideally the Earth will continue to warm until we approach the temperatures observed during the Roman Climate Optimum when temperatures were several degrees warmer than today. The Roman Optimum was called ‘Optimum’ because the effects of the climate were better than preceding and following colder climates. Better for agriculture. Better for transportation. Better for health and prosperity.

    The Roman warm period is amply documented by numerous analyzes of sediments, tree rings, ice cores and pollen. Additionally, it has been documented by ancient authors and historical events. Locating vineyards and olive trees is also a good indicator of climate. During the culmination of the Roman warm period olive trees grew in the Rhine Valley in Germany. Citrus trees and grapes were cultivated in England as far north as Hadrian’s Wall near Newcastle.

    Unfortunately the Earth has barely warmed over the past 30 years. And 100% of the observed warming has been nighttime temperatures, with daytime temperatures unchanged. So far there is little evidence to suggest that CO2 is causing any problems with our climate, and may be helping extend crop yields and prolong the growing seasons in Canada,

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    At current rates of warming it will take us 180 years of global warming to reach the Climate Optimum which the Romans experienced 2,000 years ago. How were the Romans able to create such a warm climate without burning coal? Maybe worshipping the Sun had warming benefits.

    Do the leftists really want the Earth to cool and have another little ice-age so the Thames will freeze over every winter? There is a good reason we always described the Roman climate as being the optimum for humans so why would we spend billions to make the planet cooler ? Seems insane. Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    It is really hard to compare a world of 8+ billion with what was probably a world of a few million. If, say, New Orleans, Houston and Miami go underwater, that would probably be more than all the Roman Empire of 100 A.D.

    , @epebble
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    True, but those living in low lying areas and flood plains will not like it. Warmer air can hold more moisture and that means heavier rainfall.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @BB753
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    It's not only leftists who bitch about global warming: it's all the big corporations. Now, what's the point of totally de-industrializing the West and make almost everybody poorer and miserable, just to make temperatures drop by .5 degrees Celsius ( luckily)? It doesn't make sense, does it? Well, it does for our overlords because they want to implement the carbon tax, which is the greatest scam in history.
    It all started here :
    https://www.clubofrome.org/publication/the-limits-to-growth/


    I'll believe we are in an existential threat when rich people start selling their Malibu Mansions on the cheap and when billionaires stop buying beach front properties.

  72. @epebble
    @Coemgen

    The absolutely cheapest way to solve the climate crisis is easy: Just produce unlimited supply of birth control pills and make them freely available, more accessible than even sugar and salt. Once done that, no woman would like to have more than one or two kids (and many would have none) and all problems, not just climate, will go away in a generation or two. The fact that no respectable entity, government or private, advocates that, shows the bankruptcy of creativity or the fear of thinking wrong.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Legba

    Maybe you could get everyone to take some kind of shot or something. The shot could kill some people slowly and destroy the other’s ability to reproduce. I don’t see how you could pull it off, though

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  73. @Gamecock
    @epebble


    Solar and Wind are the most economical energy sources now
     
    [citation needed]

    Wind and solar can never be more than supplemental.

    Replies: @epebble

    That little doohickey below my comment [43] is a graph of various costs.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @epebble

    I'm not looking up your reply. You look it up and post anything pertinent.

    BTW, don't leave out the cost of backup for your ultra low priced spread. Incredibly cheap wind/solar are not paying for their backup.

    They can only be supplemental.

  74. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    At current rates of warming it will take us 180 years of global warming to reach the Climate Optimum which the Romans experienced 2,000 years ago. How were the Romans able to create such a warm climate without burning coal? Maybe worshipping the Sun had warming benefits.

    Do the leftists really want the Earth to cool and have another little ice-age so the Thames will freeze over every winter? There is a good reason we always described the Roman climate as being the optimum for humans so why would we spend billions to make the planet cooler ? Seems insane. Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble, @BB753

    It is really hard to compare a world of 8+ billion with what was probably a world of a few million. If, say, New Orleans, Houston and Miami go underwater, that would probably be more than all the Roman Empire of 100 A.D.

  75. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    At current rates of warming it will take us 180 years of global warming to reach the Climate Optimum which the Romans experienced 2,000 years ago. How were the Romans able to create such a warm climate without burning coal? Maybe worshipping the Sun had warming benefits.

    Do the leftists really want the Earth to cool and have another little ice-age so the Thames will freeze over every winter? There is a good reason we always described the Roman climate as being the optimum for humans so why would we spend billions to make the planet cooler ? Seems insane. Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble, @BB753

    Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    True, but those living in low lying areas and flood plains will not like it. Warmer air can hold more moisture and that means heavier rainfall.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @epebble

    We have some odd weather in the UK atm, but hasn't that always been the case? When I was a small child we had a big freeze, 1976 we had a big heat, this summer has been six weeks without serious rain - great for cricket.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06P0RdZyjT4

    VICTORY CALYPSO - Egbert Moore ("Lord Beginner")

    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord's where I saw it;
    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord's where I saw it;
    Yardley tried his best
    But Goddard won the test.
    They gave the crowd plenty fun;
    Second Test and West Indies won.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    The King was there well attired,
    So they started with Rae and Stollmeyer;
    Stolly was hitting balls around the boundary;
    But Wardle stopped him at twenty.
    Rae had confidence,
    So he put up a strong defence;
    He saw the King was waiting to see,
    So he gave him a century.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies first innings total was three-twenty-six
    Just as usual
    When Bedser bowled Christiani
    The whole thing collapsed quite easily;
    England then went on,
    And made one-hundred-fifty-one;
    West Indies then had two-twenty lead
    And Goddard said, "That's nice indeed."

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    Yardley wasn't broken-hearted
    When the second innings started;
    Jenkins was like a target
    Getting the first five in his basket.
    But Gomez broke him down,
    While Walcott licked them around;
    He was not out for one-hundred and sixty-eight,
    Leaving Yardley to contemplate.

    Chorus:The bowling was superfine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies was feeling homely,
    Their audience had them happy.
    When Washbrook's century had ended,
    West Indies voices all blended.
    Hats went in the air.
    They jumped and shouted without fear;
    So at Lord's was the scenery
    Bound to go down in history.

    Chorus:After all was said and done
    Second Test and the West Indies won!

    Replies: @Kylie

  76. @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    The nuclear waste issue is a complete joke

    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.

    Cost to taxpayers to clean up nuclear waste jumps $100 billion in a year


    WASHINGTON — The estimated cost of cleaning up America's nuclear waste has jumped more than $100 billion in just one year, according to a DOE report — and a watchdog warns the cost may climb still higher.

    The Energy Department's projected cost for cleanup jumped from $383.78 billion in 2017 to $493.96 billion in a financial report issued in December 2018.

    A government watchdog and DOE expert said the new total may still underestimate the full cost of cleanup, which is expected to last another 50 years. "We believe the number is growing and we believe the number is understated," said David Trimble, director of the Government Accountability Office's Natural Resources and Environment team.
     
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/all/cost-taxpayers-clean-nuclear-waste-jumps-100-billion-year-n963586

    The Yucca Mountain repository is still in works, and it will be decades before anything is stored there.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.

    You really going to continue with this?

    Hanford was a nuclear weapons production facility, and has a bunch of stuff that was done “worry about it later” while building the bomb. There are some genuine bad situation there–which are unlikely anything from civilization nuclear power. But still these ridiculous budgets and estimates come from gold plating everything. It’s out in the middle of Eastern Washington desert and literally you could deal with it by doing almost nothing. But you certainly could deal with it very effectively without spending 100s of billions.

    Yucca Mountain is the same sort of government regulatory boondoggle. If you want to drill into a stable geological formation and store waste there you can do it. It is not that complicated. It’s the kind of thing America used to be able to do. Yucca goes one and one because people want it to go on and on. Make their living off lawyering it or consulting it or bureaucratizing it or whining about it.

    I hate to break it to you, but radioactivity is all around you. Nuclear power creates a lot of short term radioisotopes in place of longer term radiioisotopes (U235 and some 238). I don’t know the exactly crossing point but hang onto the stuff for a couple hundred years and you could dump it back in the mine and have less radioactivity than you started with.

    The world is big and the amount of material we are talking about here is very, very small.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    I am not arguing that nuclear waste disposal is scientifically impossible, just that all evidence shows it is politically impossible.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  77. @AnotherDad
    @epebble


    Just the cost of cleanup for Hanford site in Eastern Washington may reach a Trillion and go on till year 2100.
     
    You really going to continue with this?

    Hanford was a nuclear weapons production facility, and has a bunch of stuff that was done "worry about it later" while building the bomb. There are some genuine bad situation there--which are unlikely anything from civilization nuclear power. But still these ridiculous budgets and estimates come from gold plating everything. It's out in the middle of Eastern Washington desert and literally you could deal with it by doing almost nothing. But you certainly could deal with it very effectively without spending 100s of billions.

    Yucca Mountain is the same sort of government regulatory boondoggle. If you want to drill into a stable geological formation and store waste there you can do it. It is not that complicated. It's the kind of thing America used to be able to do. Yucca goes one and one because people want it to go on and on. Make their living off lawyering it or consulting it or bureaucratizing it or whining about it.

    I hate to break it to you, but radioactivity is all around you. Nuclear power creates a lot of short term radioisotopes in place of longer term radiioisotopes (U235 and some 238). I don't know the exactly crossing point but hang onto the stuff for a couple hundred years and you could dump it back in the mine and have less radioactivity than you started with.

    The world is big and the amount of material we are talking about here is very, very small.

    Replies: @epebble

    I am not arguing that nuclear waste disposal is scientifically impossible, just that all evidence shows it is politically impossible.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @epebble

    The Feds have spent $8 billion on Yucca Mountain and have got what to show for it. I thought the opposition (mostly Nevada) would subside once Harry Reid retired.

    Replies: @epebble

  78. Anonymous[233] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad

    The anti-nuclear crowd is like a cancer patient who refuses chemotherapy in favor of "natural" remedies because chemo is toxic. We all know how that works out in the end.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Right, Steve Jobs. How could someone so smart be so dumb?

    • Replies: @The Real World
    @Anonymous

    Because Steve Jobs did not really have cancer. He had HIV.

    One of the many things revealed by the hackings of Julian Assange was a letter from the Doctor of Jobs revealing to him that he had HIV. I've seen an online copy of it from the trove released by Assange some years back.

    Jobs was not so dumb; he pulled a ruse about why he was ill.

    Replies: @BB753

  79. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This goes with the idea that "I'll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious." For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious.

    Well, I have new for you buddy. Our elites are fundamentally unserious people and are NEVER going to act in a serious way. You have a better chance of Bozo the Clown acting in a serious, adult way than say Kamala Harris.

    On nuclear, I have very mixed feelings because of what happened at Fukushima. The Japanese in general are pretty serious people. For example they have (1) an enviable system of high speed trains and (2) and enviable safety record on that system. Trains have been zipping millions of people around Japan at 200 mph for 50 years and there have been zero serious accidents. And yet when push came to shove, they couldn't handle it.

    A nuclear reactor is like a wild beast. That Roy guy worked with tigers every day for 40 years - he was as good as anybody on earth in handling tigers, the #1 expert and one day, boom, the tiger got him.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @YetAnotherAnon

    ““I’ll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious.” For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious.”

    Or for example Obama’s purchase of a large seafront spread at Martha’s Vineyard. He believes global warming isn’t a serious threat to his property, whatever he might say.

    When seafront property prices start to collapse I might take them seriously.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Nearly Half of Americans Who Plan to Move Say Natural Disasters, Extreme Temperatures Factored Into Their Decision to Relocate

    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-migration-survey/

    1 in 5 Americans Believes Climate Change Is Hurting Home Values In Their Area
    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-impact-home-values-survey/

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  80. @epebble
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    True, but those living in low lying areas and flood plains will not like it. Warmer air can hold more moisture and that means heavier rainfall.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    We have some odd weather in the UK atm, but hasn’t that always been the case? When I was a small child we had a big freeze, 1976 we had a big heat, this summer has been six weeks without serious rain – great for cricket.

    VICTORY CALYPSO – Egbert Moore (“Lord Beginner”)

    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord’s where I saw it;
    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord’s where I saw it;
    Yardley tried his best
    But Goddard won the test.
    They gave the crowd plenty fun;
    Second Test and West Indies won.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    The King was there well attired,
    So they started with Rae and Stollmeyer;
    Stolly was hitting balls around the boundary;
    But Wardle stopped him at twenty.
    Rae had confidence,
    So he put up a strong defence;
    He saw the King was waiting to see,
    So he gave him a century.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies first innings total was three-twenty-six
    Just as usual
    When Bedser bowled Christiani
    The whole thing collapsed quite easily;
    England then went on,
    And made one-hundred-fifty-one;
    West Indies then had two-twenty lead
    And Goddard said, “That’s nice indeed.”

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    Yardley wasn’t broken-hearted
    When the second innings started;
    Jenkins was like a target
    Getting the first five in his basket.
    But Gomez broke him down,
    While Walcott licked them around;
    He was not out for one-hundred and sixty-eight,
    Leaving Yardley to contemplate.

    Chorus:The bowling was superfine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies was feeling homely,
    Their audience had them happy.
    When Washbrook’s century had ended,
    West Indies voices all blended.
    Hats went in the air.
    They jumped and shouted without fear;
    So at Lord’s was the scenery
    Bound to go down in history.

    Chorus:After all was said and done
    Second Test and the West Indies won!

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Victory Calls" was the best popular cricket reference you could come up with? Seriously?

    We already know popular culture is loaded with references to blacks crowing about beating whites at their own game. So unsportsmanlike, among other things.

    Try reading "At Lord's".

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  81. Cricket? pfffft. Climate Change can even bail out The Jab, especially when it tag-teams with Hydrotrioxides…

    “Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is the number one cause of death worldwide. A new study shows that the risk of suffering a heat-induced heart attack has increased significantly in recent years. During the same period of time, no comparable changes in cold weather heart attack risks have been recorded.”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190312123645.htm

    “Far, far away in the distant reaches of Earth’s atmosphere, scientists have finally homed in on a possible cause of the sudden rise in heart attacks around the world: space chemicals…According to an article from Daily Mail, scientists have identified an entirely new class of chemical compounds that form in Earth’s atmosphere called hydrotrioxides.”

    https://www.naturalblaze.com/2022/05/scientists-blame-space-chemicals-for-rise-in-heart-attacks.html

  82. @Coemgen
    Why is Occam's Butterknife (e.g., solar panels, electric cars, etc.) being used to come up with solutions to the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Really, doesn't it make more sense to apply Occam's Razor? The simplest solution is population control which appears to be occurring naturally in most advanced (high fossil fuel usage) cultures but is being confounded by unnaturally open borders. I would be more confident in global population modelling than "greenhouse gas" modelling and I believe population modelling finds a world human population of under two billion to be optimal.

    It's interesting that those who are the truest believers in AGW are among the strongest supporters of open borders.

    Is the real issue that "big oil" is considered to be too powerful by globalist megalomaniacs thus the ridiculous (and anti-fossil fuel) work-arounds for the hypothetical case of AGW?

    Replies: @epebble, @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @VivaLaMigra

    Close the borders, and if ignorant peasants in Third World Shit Holes insist on continuing their habit of breeding like rats, that will be their problem. Let them stew in their own stink. India, China, Bangladesh, Nigeria..the whole lot of ’em can go straight to Hell. They seem to like it that way so who am I..or any other American…to stand in their way?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @VivaLaMigra

    Only Nigeria at TFR 4.62 is "breeding like rats". India at 2.10 and Bangladesh at 2.09 are about right, though can go down since they are crowded. China at 1.45 is already in Nirvana. The "rats" problem is mainly in Africa.

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/field/total-fertility-rate/country-comparison

    , @Art Deco
    @VivaLaMigra

    The Latin American country with the highest total fertility rate is Guatemala, whose rate is 2.7 children per woman per lifetime, similar to that of the United States in 1969. Latin Americans are not breeding like rats. India reproduces at the replacement rate. China and Bangladesh at below that rate. Nigeria is the only country on your list with high fertility. About 3.5% of the foreign born population of the U.S. is from Tropical or Southern Africa.

  83. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D


    "“I’ll believe its serious when our elites start acting like its really serious.” For example, not flying around on private jets when there are plenty of commercial flights and 1st class is quite luxurious."
     
    Or for example Obama's purchase of a large seafront spread at Martha's Vineyard. He believes global warming isn't a serious threat to his property, whatever he might say.

    When seafront property prices start to collapse I might take them seriously.

    Replies: @epebble

    Nearly Half of Americans Who Plan to Move Say Natural Disasters, Extreme Temperatures Factored Into Their Decision to Relocate

    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-migration-survey/

    1 in 5 Americans Believes Climate Change Is Hurting Home Values In Their Area
    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-impact-home-values-survey/

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @epebble

    "Nearly Half of Americans Who Plan to Move Say Natural Disasters, Extreme Temperatures Factored Into Their Decision to Relocate"

    I wonder how much of that is virtue-signalling. A lot, I imagine. What people say and what they do are different. Give me a shout if you detect house prices falling in seaside properties.

    If you are asked the question, you'll probably give the approved answers.

    After all, there are natural disaster risks all over the place - but what is the likelihood? Where I live was subject to geologic rifting - the neighbouring hills moved 35 miles and then my area was submerged for a long time. But this was 145 million years ago, so I'm not too worried.

  84. @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    I heard the interview Corbett did back in his early years so 2010? with a Scientist of Renown, whose name escapes me of course, who had been selected as head of the IPCC, wot, you remember voting for him?, who turned the job down specifically because the Position required ignoring or minimizing any causes other than me.

    Corbett is NOT "Pretty careful" he is excellent. He nearly always posts sources and I've not caught him in factual error in over a decade, and my wife assures me frequently that I am a picky bastard. Corbett's site is a mess and I was pissed that he recently hired a video editor to make his shit look prettier rather that a Site Manager to make the thousands of invaluable pieces more accessible.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I agree about the excellence of Corbett’s work. He is one of the best independent citizen-journalists out there, and certainly the most articulate.

    I haven’t had any problem with his website. It has a search bar, and I’m able to find most anything I’m looking for with a little effort. But perhaps that’s because I’m already familiar with what he has done.

  85. @YetAnotherAnon
    @epebble

    We have some odd weather in the UK atm, but hasn't that always been the case? When I was a small child we had a big freeze, 1976 we had a big heat, this summer has been six weeks without serious rain - great for cricket.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06P0RdZyjT4

    VICTORY CALYPSO - Egbert Moore ("Lord Beginner")

    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord's where I saw it;
    Cricket lovely Cricket,
    At Lord's where I saw it;
    Yardley tried his best
    But Goddard won the test.
    They gave the crowd plenty fun;
    Second Test and West Indies won.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    The King was there well attired,
    So they started with Rae and Stollmeyer;
    Stolly was hitting balls around the boundary;
    But Wardle stopped him at twenty.
    Rae had confidence,
    So he put up a strong defence;
    He saw the King was waiting to see,
    So he gave him a century.

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies first innings total was three-twenty-six
    Just as usual
    When Bedser bowled Christiani
    The whole thing collapsed quite easily;
    England then went on,
    And made one-hundred-fifty-one;
    West Indies then had two-twenty lead
    And Goddard said, "That's nice indeed."

    Chorus:With those two little pals of mine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    Yardley wasn't broken-hearted
    When the second innings started;
    Jenkins was like a target
    Getting the first five in his basket.
    But Gomez broke him down,
    While Walcott licked them around;
    He was not out for one-hundred and sixty-eight,
    Leaving Yardley to contemplate.

    Chorus:The bowling was superfine
    Ramadhin and Valentine.

    West Indies was feeling homely,
    Their audience had them happy.
    When Washbrook's century had ended,
    West Indies voices all blended.
    Hats went in the air.
    They jumped and shouted without fear;
    So at Lord's was the scenery
    Bound to go down in history.

    Chorus:After all was said and done
    Second Test and the West Indies won!

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Victory Calls” was the best popular cricket reference you could come up with? Seriously?

    We already know popular culture is loaded with references to blacks crowing about beating whites at their own game. So unsportsmanlike, among other things.

    Try reading “At Lord’s”.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Kylie

    I just thought it was a good song.

    If you want a good description of cricket, Neville Cardus and John Arlott are pretty good. I have a soft spot for the village cricket match in "England, Their England", written by a Scotsman.

    https://www.gutenberg.ca/ebooks/macdonellag-englandtheirengland/macdonellag-englandtheirengland-00-h.html


    The first ball he received he lashed at wildly and hit straight up in the air to an enormous height. It went up and up and up, until it became difficult to focus it properly against the deep, cloudless blue of the sky, and it carried with it the hopes and fears of an English village. Up and up it went and then at the top it seemed to hang motionless in the air, poised like a hawk, fighting, as it were, a heroic but forlorn battle against the chief invention of Sir Isaac Newton, and then it began its slow descent.

    In the meanwhile things were happening below, on the terrestrial sphere. Indeed, the situation was rapidly becoming what the French call mouvementé. In the first place, the blacksmith forgot his sprained ankle and set out at a capital rate for the other end, roaring in a great voice as he went, "Come on, Joe!" The baker, who was running on behalf of the invalid, also set out, and he also roared "Come on, Joe!" and side by side, like a pair of high-stepping hackneys, the pair cantered along. From the other end Joe set out on his mission, and he roared "Come on, Bill!" So all three came on. And everything would have been all right, so far as the running was concerned, had it not been for the fact that Joe, very naturally, ran with his head thrown back and his eyes goggling at the hawk-like cricket-ball. And this in itself would not have mattered if it had not been for the fact that the blacksmith and the baker, also very naturally, ran with their heads turned not only upwards but also backwards as well, so that they too gazed at the ball, with an alarming sort of squint and a truly terrific kink in their necks. Half-way down the pitch the three met with a magnificent clang, reminiscent of early, happy days in the tournament-ring at Ashby-de-la-Zouche, and the hopes of the village fell with the resounding fall of their three champions.

    But what of the fielding side? Things were not so well with them. If there was doubt and confusion among the warriors of Fordenden, there was also uncertainty and disorganization among the ranks of the invaders. Their main trouble was the excessive concentration of their forces in the neighbourhood of the wicket. Napoleon laid it down that it was impossible to have too many men upon a battlefield, and he used to do everything in his power to call up every available man for a battle. Mr. Hodge, after a swift glance at the ascending ball and a swift glance at the disposition of his troops, disagreed profoundly with the Emperor's dictum. He had too many men, far too many. And all except the youth in the blue silk jumper, and the mighty Boone, were moving towards strategical positions underneath the ball, and not one of them appeared to be aware that any of the others existed. Boone had not moved because he was more or less in the right place, but then Boone was not likely to bring off the catch, especially after the episode of the last ball. Major Hawker, shouting "Mine, mine!" in a magnificently self-confident voice, was coming up from the bowler's end like a battle-cruiser. Mr. Harcourt had obviously lost sight of the ball altogether, if indeed he had ever seen it, for he was running round and round Boone and giggling foolishly. Livingstone and Southcott, the two cracks, were approaching competently. Either of them would catch it easily. Mr. Hodge had only to choose between them and, coming to a swift decision, he yelled above the din; "Yours, Livingstone!" Southcott, disciplined cricketer, stopped dead. Then Mr. Hodge made a fatal mistake. He remembered Livingstone's two missed sitters, and he reversed his decision and roared "Yours, Bobby!" Mr. Southcott obediently started again, while Livingstone, who had not heard the second order, went straight on. Captain Hodge had restored the status quo.

     

    Thanks for the poem idea btw

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  86. @VivaLaMigra
    @Coemgen

    Close the borders, and if ignorant peasants in Third World Shit Holes insist on continuing their habit of breeding like rats, that will be their problem. Let them stew in their own stink. India, China, Bangladesh, Nigeria..the whole lot of 'em can go straight to Hell. They seem to like it that way so who am I..or any other American...to stand in their way?

    Replies: @epebble, @Art Deco

    Only Nigeria at TFR 4.62 is “breeding like rats”. India at 2.10 and Bangladesh at 2.09 are about right, though can go down since they are crowded. China at 1.45 is already in Nirvana. The “rats” problem is mainly in Africa.

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/field/total-fertility-rate/country-comparison

  87. @epebble
    @Gamecock

    That little doohickey below my comment [43] is a graph of various costs.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    I’m not looking up your reply. You look it up and post anything pertinent.

    BTW, don’t leave out the cost of backup for your ultra low priced spread. Incredibly cheap wind/solar are not paying for their backup.

    They can only be supplemental.

  88. @VivaLaMigra
    @Coemgen

    Close the borders, and if ignorant peasants in Third World Shit Holes insist on continuing their habit of breeding like rats, that will be their problem. Let them stew in their own stink. India, China, Bangladesh, Nigeria..the whole lot of 'em can go straight to Hell. They seem to like it that way so who am I..or any other American...to stand in their way?

    Replies: @epebble, @Art Deco

    The Latin American country with the highest total fertility rate is Guatemala, whose rate is 2.7 children per woman per lifetime, similar to that of the United States in 1969. Latin Americans are not breeding like rats. India reproduces at the replacement rate. China and Bangladesh at below that rate. Nigeria is the only country on your list with high fertility. About 3.5% of the foreign born population of the U.S. is from Tropical or Southern Africa.

  89. @Anonymous
    @Chrisnonymous

    Right, Steve Jobs. How could someone so smart be so dumb?

    Replies: @The Real World

    Because Steve Jobs did not really have cancer. He had HIV.

    One of the many things revealed by the hackings of Julian Assange was a letter from the Doctor of Jobs revealing to him that he had HIV. I’ve seen an online copy of it from the trove released by Assange some years back.

    Jobs was not so dumb; he pulled a ruse about why he was ill.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @The Real World

    Did Jobs get AIDS from a blood transfusion or was he gay on the side?

  90. @epebble
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Nearly Half of Americans Who Plan to Move Say Natural Disasters, Extreme Temperatures Factored Into Their Decision to Relocate

    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-migration-survey/

    1 in 5 Americans Believes Climate Change Is Hurting Home Values In Their Area
    https://www.redfin.com/news/climate-change-impact-home-values-survey/

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Nearly Half of Americans Who Plan to Move Say Natural Disasters, Extreme Temperatures Factored Into Their Decision to Relocate”

    I wonder how much of that is virtue-signalling. A lot, I imagine. What people say and what they do are different. Give me a shout if you detect house prices falling in seaside properties.

    If you are asked the question, you’ll probably give the approved answers.

    After all, there are natural disaster risks all over the place – but what is the likelihood? Where I live was subject to geologic rifting – the neighbouring hills moved 35 miles and then my area was submerged for a long time. But this was 145 million years ago, so I’m not too worried.

  91. @Kylie
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Victory Calls" was the best popular cricket reference you could come up with? Seriously?

    We already know popular culture is loaded with references to blacks crowing about beating whites at their own game. So unsportsmanlike, among other things.

    Try reading "At Lord's".

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    I just thought it was a good song.

    If you want a good description of cricket, Neville Cardus and John Arlott are pretty good. I have a soft spot for the village cricket match in “England, Their England”, written by a Scotsman.

    [MORE]

    https://www.gutenberg.ca/ebooks/macdonellag-englandtheirengland/macdonellag-englandtheirengland-00-h.html

    The first ball he received he lashed at wildly and hit straight up in the air to an enormous height. It went up and up and up, until it became difficult to focus it properly against the deep, cloudless blue of the sky, and it carried with it the hopes and fears of an English village. Up and up it went and then at the top it seemed to hang motionless in the air, poised like a hawk, fighting, as it were, a heroic but forlorn battle against the chief invention of Sir Isaac Newton, and then it began its slow descent.

    In the meanwhile things were happening below, on the terrestrial sphere. Indeed, the situation was rapidly becoming what the French call mouvementé. In the first place, the blacksmith forgot his sprained ankle and set out at a capital rate for the other end, roaring in a great voice as he went, “Come on, Joe!” The baker, who was running on behalf of the invalid, also set out, and he also roared “Come on, Joe!” and side by side, like a pair of high-stepping hackneys, the pair cantered along. From the other end Joe set out on his mission, and he roared “Come on, Bill!” So all three came on. And everything would have been all right, so far as the running was concerned, had it not been for the fact that Joe, very naturally, ran with his head thrown back and his eyes goggling at the hawk-like cricket-ball. And this in itself would not have mattered if it had not been for the fact that the blacksmith and the baker, also very naturally, ran with their heads turned not only upwards but also backwards as well, so that they too gazed at the ball, with an alarming sort of squint and a truly terrific kink in their necks. Half-way down the pitch the three met with a magnificent clang, reminiscent of early, happy days in the tournament-ring at Ashby-de-la-Zouche, and the hopes of the village fell with the resounding fall of their three champions.

    But what of the fielding side? Things were not so well with them. If there was doubt and confusion among the warriors of Fordenden, there was also uncertainty and disorganization among the ranks of the invaders. Their main trouble was the excessive concentration of their forces in the neighbourhood of the wicket. Napoleon laid it down that it was impossible to have too many men upon a battlefield, and he used to do everything in his power to call up every available man for a battle. Mr. Hodge, after a swift glance at the ascending ball and a swift glance at the disposition of his troops, disagreed profoundly with the Emperor’s dictum. He had too many men, far too many. And all except the youth in the blue silk jumper, and the mighty Boone, were moving towards strategical positions underneath the ball, and not one of them appeared to be aware that any of the others existed. Boone had not moved because he was more or less in the right place, but then Boone was not likely to bring off the catch, especially after the episode of the last ball. Major Hawker, shouting “Mine, mine!” in a magnificently self-confident voice, was coming up from the bowler’s end like a battle-cruiser. Mr. Harcourt had obviously lost sight of the ball altogether, if indeed he had ever seen it, for he was running round and round Boone and giggling foolishly. Livingstone and Southcott, the two cracks, were approaching competently. Either of them would catch it easily. Mr. Hodge had only to choose between them and, coming to a swift decision, he yelled above the din; “Yours, Livingstone!” Southcott, disciplined cricketer, stopped dead. Then Mr. Hodge made a fatal mistake. He remembered Livingstone’s two missed sitters, and he reversed his decision and roared “Yours, Bobby!” Mr. Southcott obediently started again, while Livingstone, who had not heard the second order, went straight on. Captain Hodge had restored the status quo.

    Thanks for the poem idea btw

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    A little vignette - an American visiting scholar is playing for the visiting team, his first ever game.


    Mr. Pollock stepped up to the wicket in the lively manner of his native mustang, refused to take guard, on the ground that he wouldn't know what to do with it when he had got it, and, striking the first ball he received towards square leg, threw down his bat, and himself set off at a great rate in the direction of cover-point. There was a paralysed silence. The rustics on the bench rubbed their eyes. On the field no one moved. Mr. Pollock stopped suddenly, looked round, and broke into a genial laugh.

    "Darn me——" he began, and then he pulled himself up and went on in refined English, "Well, well! I thought I was playing baseball." He smiled disarmingly round.

    "Baseball is a kind of rounders, isn't it, sir?" said cover-point sympathetically.

    Donald thought he had never seen an expression change so suddenly as Mr. Pollock's did at this harmless, and true, statement. A look of concentrated, ferocious venom obliterated the disarming smile. Cover-point, simple soul, noticed nothing, however, and Mr. Pollock walked back to the wicket in silence and was out next ball.
     

  92. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Kylie

    I just thought it was a good song.

    If you want a good description of cricket, Neville Cardus and John Arlott are pretty good. I have a soft spot for the village cricket match in "England, Their England", written by a Scotsman.

    https://www.gutenberg.ca/ebooks/macdonellag-englandtheirengland/macdonellag-englandtheirengland-00-h.html


    The first ball he received he lashed at wildly and hit straight up in the air to an enormous height. It went up and up and up, until it became difficult to focus it properly against the deep, cloudless blue of the sky, and it carried with it the hopes and fears of an English village. Up and up it went and then at the top it seemed to hang motionless in the air, poised like a hawk, fighting, as it were, a heroic but forlorn battle against the chief invention of Sir Isaac Newton, and then it began its slow descent.

    In the meanwhile things were happening below, on the terrestrial sphere. Indeed, the situation was rapidly becoming what the French call mouvementé. In the first place, the blacksmith forgot his sprained ankle and set out at a capital rate for the other end, roaring in a great voice as he went, "Come on, Joe!" The baker, who was running on behalf of the invalid, also set out, and he also roared "Come on, Joe!" and side by side, like a pair of high-stepping hackneys, the pair cantered along. From the other end Joe set out on his mission, and he roared "Come on, Bill!" So all three came on. And everything would have been all right, so far as the running was concerned, had it not been for the fact that Joe, very naturally, ran with his head thrown back and his eyes goggling at the hawk-like cricket-ball. And this in itself would not have mattered if it had not been for the fact that the blacksmith and the baker, also very naturally, ran with their heads turned not only upwards but also backwards as well, so that they too gazed at the ball, with an alarming sort of squint and a truly terrific kink in their necks. Half-way down the pitch the three met with a magnificent clang, reminiscent of early, happy days in the tournament-ring at Ashby-de-la-Zouche, and the hopes of the village fell with the resounding fall of their three champions.

    But what of the fielding side? Things were not so well with them. If there was doubt and confusion among the warriors of Fordenden, there was also uncertainty and disorganization among the ranks of the invaders. Their main trouble was the excessive concentration of their forces in the neighbourhood of the wicket. Napoleon laid it down that it was impossible to have too many men upon a battlefield, and he used to do everything in his power to call up every available man for a battle. Mr. Hodge, after a swift glance at the ascending ball and a swift glance at the disposition of his troops, disagreed profoundly with the Emperor's dictum. He had too many men, far too many. And all except the youth in the blue silk jumper, and the mighty Boone, were moving towards strategical positions underneath the ball, and not one of them appeared to be aware that any of the others existed. Boone had not moved because he was more or less in the right place, but then Boone was not likely to bring off the catch, especially after the episode of the last ball. Major Hawker, shouting "Mine, mine!" in a magnificently self-confident voice, was coming up from the bowler's end like a battle-cruiser. Mr. Harcourt had obviously lost sight of the ball altogether, if indeed he had ever seen it, for he was running round and round Boone and giggling foolishly. Livingstone and Southcott, the two cracks, were approaching competently. Either of them would catch it easily. Mr. Hodge had only to choose between them and, coming to a swift decision, he yelled above the din; "Yours, Livingstone!" Southcott, disciplined cricketer, stopped dead. Then Mr. Hodge made a fatal mistake. He remembered Livingstone's two missed sitters, and he reversed his decision and roared "Yours, Bobby!" Mr. Southcott obediently started again, while Livingstone, who had not heard the second order, went straight on. Captain Hodge had restored the status quo.

     

    Thanks for the poem idea btw

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    A little vignette – an American visiting scholar is playing for the visiting team, his first ever game.

    Mr. Pollock stepped up to the wicket in the lively manner of his native mustang, refused to take guard, on the ground that he wouldn’t know what to do with it when he had got it, and, striking the first ball he received towards square leg, threw down his bat, and himself set off at a great rate in the direction of cover-point. There was a paralysed silence. The rustics on the bench rubbed their eyes. On the field no one moved. Mr. Pollock stopped suddenly, looked round, and broke into a genial laugh.

    “Darn me——” he began, and then he pulled himself up and went on in refined English, “Well, well! I thought I was playing baseball.” He smiled disarmingly round.

    “Baseball is a kind of rounders, isn’t it, sir?” said cover-point sympathetically.

    Donald thought he had never seen an expression change so suddenly as Mr. Pollock’s did at this harmless, and true, statement. A look of concentrated, ferocious venom obliterated the disarming smile. Cover-point, simple soul, noticed nothing, however, and Mr. Pollock walked back to the wicket in silence and was out next ball.

  93. @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    I am not arguing that nuclear waste disposal is scientifically impossible, just that all evidence shows it is politically impossible.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    The Feds have spent \$8 billion on Yucca Mountain and have got what to show for it. I thought the opposition (mostly Nevada) would subside once Harry Reid retired.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Jim Don Bob

    They have dug the hole. That was easy. They never planned on how to transport the waste! Nobody wants it hauled by road or rail. I wonder why this was not thought of before. My suspicion is this was a giant pork project similar to another hole that was dug in Texas to build an accelerator and abandoned after spending a few billion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_Mountain_nuclear_waste_repository

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_Super_Collider

  94. @The Real World
    @Anonymous

    Because Steve Jobs did not really have cancer. He had HIV.

    One of the many things revealed by the hackings of Julian Assange was a letter from the Doctor of Jobs revealing to him that he had HIV. I've seen an online copy of it from the trove released by Assange some years back.

    Jobs was not so dumb; he pulled a ruse about why he was ill.

    Replies: @BB753

    Did Jobs get AIDS from a blood transfusion or was he gay on the side?

  95. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    At current rates of warming it will take us 180 years of global warming to reach the Climate Optimum which the Romans experienced 2,000 years ago. How were the Romans able to create such a warm climate without burning coal? Maybe worshipping the Sun had warming benefits.

    Do the leftists really want the Earth to cool and have another little ice-age so the Thames will freeze over every winter? There is a good reason we always described the Roman climate as being the optimum for humans so why would we spend billions to make the planet cooler ? Seems insane. Humans benefit from a warmer planet, and plants and crops thrive with higher CO2 levels.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble, @BB753

    It’s not only leftists who bitch about global warming: it’s all the big corporations. Now, what’s the point of totally de-industrializing the West and make almost everybody poorer and miserable, just to make temperatures drop by .5 degrees Celsius ( luckily)? It doesn’t make sense, does it? Well, it does for our overlords because they want to implement the carbon tax, which is the greatest scam in history.
    It all started here :
    https://www.clubofrome.org/publication/the-limits-to-growth/

    I’ll believe we are in an existential threat when rich people start selling their Malibu Mansions on the cheap and when billionaires stop buying beach front properties.

  96. @Jim Don Bob
    @epebble

    The Feds have spent $8 billion on Yucca Mountain and have got what to show for it. I thought the opposition (mostly Nevada) would subside once Harry Reid retired.

    Replies: @epebble

    They have dug the hole. That was easy. They never planned on how to transport the waste! Nobody wants it hauled by road or rail. I wonder why this was not thought of before. My suspicion is this was a giant pork project similar to another hole that was dug in Texas to build an accelerator and abandoned after spending a few billion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_Mountain_nuclear_waste_repository

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_Super_Collider

  97. Anon[258] • Disclaimer says:

    The surface area of the Earth is roughly 1000x larger than the surface area of Spain. So some place the size of Spain ought have a “one in a thousand year” weather event each year. Then times that by the number of potentially noteworthy weather events…floods, droughts, snowfall, lack of snowfall, storms, heatwaves, cold spells, tornadoes, avalanches, cold mornings, hot nights, etc etc etc …..and you end up with a whole lot of “one in a thousand year” weather events, if you care to look.

    And they all get pinned on manmade global warming. Dishonestly.

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