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We are confidently told that religious tests have never been used in determining who gets into America and therefore America must take in any Muslim not currently wearing a suicide bomb vest. Or something.

But a reader points out the U.S. State Department’s Religious Minorities refugee program under the Lautenberg Amendment.

From State.gov:

Refugee Admissions Program for Europe and Central Asia

Fact Sheet
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
Washington, DC
January 9, 2013

Background

Since 1975, the U.S. has resettled over 900,000 refugees from Europe and Central Asia. Approximately two-thirds of this number came from the countries of the former Soviet Union, and the balance from other parts of Europe. Since 1989, the U.S. has admitted more than 440,000 refugees processed according to standards of the Lautenberg Amendment, which applies to members of specified religious minorities (Jews, Evangelicals, and certain members of the Ukrainian Catholic or Ukrainian Orthodox Churches) from the countries of the former Soviet Union. In FY 2012, the U.S. admitted 1,129 refugees from 11 countries in Europe and Central Asia, including those under the Lautenberg Amendment in-country processing program.

The reader writes:

This is the program most akin to what should be done for Syrian “refugees,” if there are any. The Iranian Religious Minorities Program allowed only those who were just that, religious minorities (non-Muslims) to come to the US through the program. Most of those who benefited were Armenian Christians, Assyrian/Chaldean Christian, Jews, Zoroastrians, Bahais. … and only … two or three actual Persian Moslems who took advantage of it, and they were married to minorities.

There are a couple of interesting angles to this controversy that are indicative of The Way We Think Now.

The first is that many naive people sense a massive distinction between discriminating for some religious groups and discriminating against some religious groups. But of course the hullabaloo on campus during the Black Autumn is supposed to sensitize us to how we must be on the warpath against that kind of logic by crushing all White Privilege favoritism toward whites. From the federal government’s preferred disparate impact perspective, to discriminate in favor of, say, Bahais is to discriminate against Muslims.

The second is that most domestic rhetoric these days is about protecting minority rights rather than about benefiting the majority under utilitarian greatest good for the greatest number test. The not very controversial Lautenberg Amendment extends that pro-minority bias to refugee programs. Obama could have called for making the dollop of refugees he wants to bring in from Syria be religious minorities, who, after all, are now often being violently persecuted by the Sunni Muslim majority far more than most of the groups benefiting from the Lautenberg Amendment are being persecuted in Iran or Russia. He could have applied the explicit “religious minorities” framework of Lautenberg to Syria.

But instead Obama has made clear he rejects focusing on helping minorities from Syria and wants the majority of the refugees to be from the majority on the grounds that to help Christians and the like would be discrimination against Muslims.

After all there are 1.6 billion Muslims (or whatever) and we better not make them sore at us!

If you are looking for an Occam’s Razor explanation for this seemingly contradictory thicket of reasoning, well, how about good old Who? Whom?

 
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  1. This should put to bed the ridiculous anti-Trump wailing, but we all know it won’t. They will probably shoot him in order to ensure he doesn’t get the GOP nomination.

  2. The trouble in Syria is that the ruling party is a minority group. Since US policy in Syria is basically only “Assad delenda est,” letting in only minorities would be tricky.

  3. “France’s Jewish leaders call for a ‘civic uprising’ against Marine Le Pen’s National Front after far-Right group’s record election results ”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3350660/Rise-against-hate-France-s-Jewish-leaders-call-civic-uprising-against-Marine-Le-Pen-s-National-far-Right-group-s-record-election-results.html

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “France’s Jewish leaders call for a ‘civic uprising’ against Marine Le Pen’s National Front after far-Right group’s record election results ”

     

    Talk about self-loathing.
  4. Cheap grace when you don’t have to live with the consequences of your policies.

  5. The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    A casual search at Google will show that the topic of treatment of minorities in Islamic Iran, religious or otherwise, is full of usual Zionist propaganda lies. Iranian regime has been accused of persecution of women – while Amnesty International’s various ‘Fact Sheets’ mention – for example (2001), a woman is raped every six minute in the USA, over 50,000 women added each year to its prostitute industry, and a woman is battered every 15 seconds – while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.

    http://rehmat1.com/2008/10/14/minorities-in-islamic-iran/

    • Replies: @snorlax
    If you like Iran so much, why don't you move there?

    Oh, wait...
    , @North Carolina Resident
    @Rehmat
    Will you provide evidence for your statement - "while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery."
    , @MEH 0910

    The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.
     
    I thought Bahai's weren't recognized because of the Muslim belief that Muhammad was the last prophet of God. What are you doing trying to hide behind this 'western colonialist' excuse?
  6. This has to be a joke.

    Not only is gender ‘fluid’ but so is age apparently.

    Trans-age-ism must be the new thing.

    http://www.mrctv.org/blog/52-year-old-father-lives-6-year-old-girl

  7. Importing minorities from “over there”, is believing that they will be minorities over here, and thus able to contribute to the “coalition of the fringes”.

    Importing minorities from over there like say, Afrikaner Calvinists, and bringing them here, does not serve the interest of the state, as they will vote conservatively.

    Importing majorities, Sunni Arab Muslims, will become minorities here.

    Importing formerly empowered majorities, is less clear. I’m unsure on the status of say, Lebanese Christians as to refugee status. But those I’ve met recite typical Pan-Arabist tripe about Islamic terrorism being the fault of the eeevil Western Imperialism.

    • Replies: @Hail

    [Refugees are] able to contribute to the “coalition of the fringes”
     
    This is easy to see, so I can only wonder why all the big name Republicans line up to denounce Rand Paul's and Donald Trump's Muslim immigration moratorium proposal.

    Cowards.
  8. I found the next big thing for Sailer – transagerism.
    http://www.mrctv.org/blog/52-year-old-father-lives-6-year-old-girl

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    This validates me: for the past 30 years I have sexually identified as a 21-year-old male.
  9. Does all this hullabaloo boil down to the more diverse we are the less likely we can defend ourselves against the enemies off our shores? I mean, think about it. We have in this country a goodly supply of Chinese – how would they be treated in a war situation? Could they bring over their wives, husbands, sons, daughters, grandfathers, grandmothers, etc? Would they be perceived as a threat to the homeland?

    The same situation with the Muslims could apply to any number of minority groups in this country. I don’t think “This is not who we are” and “This doesn’t reflect American values” were meant to apply in these situations. Anyway, the chief word is ‘American’ values, not ‘world’ values or Muslim values.

  10. Interestingly, the Israelis made sure that not too many Soviet/Russian Jews actually went to the USA:

    Between 1968 and 1973, almost all Soviet Jewish emigres resettled in Israel. By 1975-1976, however, a near majority favored resettlement in the United States. While the government of Israel wanted all emigres to resettle in Israel, many American Jewish leaders supported “freedom of choice” — the right of Soviet Jewish emigres to choose their country of resettlement. In 1989, however, when Mikhail Gorbachev allowed free emigration for Soviet Jews and over 90 percent preferred to come to the United States, American Jewish leaders supported their government’s policy to limit the entry of Soviet Jews as political refugees.

    Even before the monthly dropout [dropouts being Jewish refugees who were opting not to go to Israel] figure rose above 50 percent in March 1976, the situation alarmed the Israeli government. The Israelis and their supporters argued that Israel needed these highly skilled and well-educated potential immigrants for its survival. They could make an important contribution to Israel’s economic development and help in the demographic struggle between a declining Jewish majority and very fertile Arab minority.1

    In the confrontation over dropouts, all parties assumed that most Soviet Jewish emigres would prefer to settle in Israel. Understated was a position articulated later by Gitelman, Salitan, and others that most emigres after 1973 preferred the United States with its perceived greater economic opportunities. Gitelman suggests that those Soviet Jews with stronger Jewish identities from the Baltics, Moldavia, and Georgia went to Israel, while more assimilated Jews from the Soviet heartland preferred the West. Most Soviet Jewish Zionists who only wanted to immigrate to Israel had done so by 1973. The overwhelming majority leaving after 1973 were motivated more by economic betterment than by Zionist ideology. They saw Israel as a very small market with fewer opportunities.

    At the meeting on July 15, 1976, Max Fisher, Chairman of the Board of Governors, presented an American position which recommended that Soviet emigres who exited on Israel visas and dropped out should not be aided in Vienna. This policy would go into effect once Soviet Jews had sufficient time to learn about the new policy. Those not wanting to go to Israel would have to apply in the Soviet Union for visas to other countries on the basis of family reunification. American Jewish organizations would pressure their government for visas for family reunification and provide aid to the refugees coming to the United States. They would discourage non-Jewish American refugee support organizations from helping dropouts.

    The Israelis may have influenced Douglas’s thinking on Soviet Jewish refugees. He met with Raphael Kotlowitz, head of the Immigration and Absorption Department of the Jewish Agency, and also discussed “dropouts” with Yehuda Lapidot, head of the Liaison Bureau. Rather than request a change in U.S. policy, Lapidot explained to Douglas the Israeli policy of invitations, which involved a commitment to absorb them and to give them citizenship. He also explained that the same policy existed for Romanian Jews who also arrived as immigrants to Israel. He asked Douglas why the United States did not consider them refugees too. Why was American policy different vis-a-vis Jews from the Soviet Union? Realizing that Soviet Jews had the alternative of immigrating to Israel in the context of an overburdened American refugee load may have led Douglas to reconsider the American policy of granting all Soviet Jewish emigres refugee status. He came to believe that it was in the best interest of both the United States and Israel to have the maximum number of Soviet Jews resettle in Israel.

    At a dinner in November 1988, Undersecretary of State Richard Schifter suggested that the “United States may one day limit entry of Jews from the Soviet Union.” He emphasized that this was due to the large number of those being let out and “particularly when there is another country of refuge — Israel.” He also noted that much of the financial burden for resettling Soviet Jews would rest with American Jewry. Whereas Ambassador Douglas had suggested a similar policy in the early 1980s and met insurmountable opposition from American Jewish organizations, in 1989 the American Jewish establishment would support the new American restrictions on refugee status for most Soviet Jews. It would abandon freedom of choice.

    Finally, in contrast to the 1970s, the American Jewish establishment in 1989 was more willing to support the Israeli demand that Soviet Jews be resettled in Israel. Many felt Israel needed them and that Israel provided a better opportunity for them to remain Jewish and part of the Jewish people. Costs were also less and it was easier to raise money among American Jews to resettle Soviet Jews in Israel than in the United States.

    In recalling this period many years later, several Jewish lay leaders and professionals argued that they and the majority of American Jewry remained committed to freedom of choice; that Soviet Jews were entitled to choose where they wanted to live. We may prefer that they go to Israel, they argued, but we cannot decide for them. To a great extent, however, by 1989 the CJF leadership and the American Jewish establishment had qualified and then abandoned their support for freedom of choice.

    Soviet Jews exiting after November 6, 1989, would not be allowed to apply for visas as refugees at American Embassies in Europe. In addition, aid for dropouts in Europe from HIAS and JDC would be curtailed. This “ended” the dropout phenomena. According to Rabbi Israel Miller, the dropout problem “was resolved by the United States Government by creating a quota.”

    This arrangement of a two-track system in Moscow resulted in Israel becoming, “by default, the destination for the vast majority of Jews seeking refuge.” With the opening of the gates in 1989, most Soviet Jewish emigres chose to go to Israel. Almost 400,000 did so between 1989 and 1992. Far fewer went to the United States.

    For the time being, the Soviets did not allow direct flights to Israel. To make sure that Soviet Jewish emigres did not drop out, Israel took the precaution of flying them via Eastern European countries. These countries did not allow emigrants to stay and agreed not to raise issues of freedom of choice. The Jewish Agency and Liaison Bureau set up transit sites in Bucharest, Warsaw, and Budapest. By the 1980s the American Jewish establishment supported “direct flights” via Communist countries. They were aware that this denied all participants the option of dropping out on their way to Israel.

    http://cis.org/RefugeeResettlement-SovietJewry

  11. I think the real issue with refugees now is that everyone has lost the ability to articulate why anyone should be excluded from or denied anything. Both common Americans and elites–any kind of crisis either of private or public nature elicits only a very narrow range of responses consisting of giving people things or making their lives easier. There are a few exceptions such as alcoholism, but basically this is why Caplan favors open borders and Americans are silent.

  12. What the liberals need to realize is, it is not so much a religion as a theocratic government that concerns us, with adherents outside their territorial domain.

  13. IS AN IMMIGRATION BAN ON MUSLIMS UNCONSTITUTIONAL?

    Probably not, argues Eric Posner: http://goo.gl/yFTDik

  14. @Rehmat
    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    A casual search at Google will show that the topic of treatment of minorities in Islamic Iran, religious or otherwise, is full of usual Zionist propaganda lies. Iranian regime has been accused of persecution of women – while Amnesty International’s various ‘Fact Sheets’ mention – for example (2001), a woman is raped every six minute in the USA, over 50,000 women added each year to its prostitute industry, and a woman is battered every 15 seconds – while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.

    http://rehmat1.com/2008/10/14/minorities-in-islamic-iran/

    If you like Iran so much, why don’t you move there?

    Oh, wait…

  15. And the United States gives preferences to Cuban refugees over say ones from Haiti.

    Two island nations in the Caribbean-Cuban and Haiti-sent floods of refugees to the United States in the 1980s and 1990s. The United States had long had a policy of accepting all refugees from Cuba. Because its people were fleeing a communist dictatorship, it considered them victims of political oppression. It had returned most Haitian refugees, because it regarded them as fleeing poverty and not political repression.”

    It would seem that we should want to accept Christian refugees from the Near East opposed to Moslems, as Christians are endangered of being exterminated, and Moslems are doing fine. But the modern Left is so reflexive in its hatred toward Christianity that they are probably smiling on the inside hoping these ancient communities are eradicated. So much for the left caring about the indigenous religion of the Near East.

    p.s. Is Israel taking in any Christian refugees? We know how sympathetic the Jews are to people being massacred.

    • Replies: @Rehmat
    "Is Israel taking in any Christian refugees?"

    If you steady Israeli historian Dr. Israel Shahak, you may get your answer: "Israeli Jews love to spit on priests' faces."

    "The very name Jesus was for Jews a symbol of all that is abominable, and this popular tradition still persists. The Gospels are equally detested, and they are not allowed to be quoted, let alone taught, even in modern Israeli Jewish schools," wrote late professor Israel Shahak.

    Before the creation of the state of Israel, Christians made 14-16% of Palestinian population. Now, Israel is home to 0.9% Christians, while 1.9% Christians call Hamas-ruled Gaza their home.

    Two months ago, Netanyahu said Israel refuses to take any refugee from Syria, but he was proud to admit that Israel is providing medial treatment to wounded ISIS cut-throats.

    http://rehmat1.com/2012/05/07/plight-of-christians-in-jewish-occupied-palestine/
  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Trump is winning this argument. Murdoch mostly supports. Everyone now getting acquainted with the history of immigration filters that have been put into action in the past.

    Trump is a real estate shark. These types are future oriented ie always calculating values into the future and not fixated on the landscape status today. So he calculated that ISIS will of course continue attacking throughout the campaign and staked out the only safe political ground for this environment. No other candidate was able to make this simple calculation.

  17. The first responsibility of any government is to protect the people already in the country. Even in this age of an entitlement mentality, no one in a foreign country is entitled to be in America if the American people don’t want them here.

    Obama’s talk about how we should not make religious distinctions might make sense if we were talking about handing out entitlements. But we are talking about distinguishing between different populations posing different levels of danger to the American people.

    —Thomas Sowell, “The President’s Speech”

    http://townhall.com/columnists/thomassowell/2015/12/08/the-presidents-speech-n2090510/page/full

  18. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini
    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach, rabbi and partner with Michael Jackson in charity, “Heal the Kids”
    Persian Zoroastrian: the incomparable Freddie Mercury

    • Replies: @Lot

    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach
     
    Only half persian jew. He has 9 kids and in 2012 was the winner of the GOP primary in a NJ congressional district, then lost to a Democrat incumbent.

    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini
     
    That a guy a libertine? Seems too dour, sure would kill my buzz at least.
    , @granesperanzablanco
    Freddie Mercury had Indian Parsis parents
    , @Clifford Brown
    Roubini is a smart guy, but a bit of a creep.

    Boteach is at heart a hack and even he knows it.

    As for Freddie, NOW we're talking. Complete and utter Rock God. Along with my beloved Druze, I am kind of obsessed with Zoroastrians. For a people that are allegedly going extinct, I have somehow managed to have three Zoroastrian friends in my life. How is that even possible? What kind of circles am I running in?

    Freddie was actually born in Zanzibar which explains in part how he eventually ended up in Great Britain. Freddie's people, while originally from Iran, settled in the more tolerant waters of India centuries ago so his Persian links are somewhat tenuous.

    Anyway, I am a fan of Ahura Mazda. Thus Spoke Zarathustra and all that. The whole Towers of Silence thing is admittedly downright creepy. Google it. Thankfully, not a tradition among Zoroastrians stateside as far as I can determine. Zoroastrians are actually a great example of how a more sophisticated civilization is sublimated by more passionate and violent ideologies and just slowly dies out despite remaining relatively affluent in the process.

    SEVEN SEAS OF RHYE by QUEEN would make a pretty great Trump Theme Song. Not that I am complaining about Twisted Sister's perennial classic "We're Not Gonna Take It" that Trump blasts at many of his rallies. Just that it's always a good idea to mix things up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4Z6gaa3xqY
  19. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Instead of encouraging the historical Christian communities of the east to flee as refugees and thus extinguishing their presence there the US should defend them and ensure their survival. Give them the support they need to stay where they’ve always been. Bomb their enemies, send supplies, help them financially. If Assad is the one protecting them then prop him up. Send volunteers if needed. Now that might be a cause Americans can relate to.

  20. I would like to see Trump respond to the critics of his immigration policy by pointing out how they support affirmative action policies that discriminate against whites.

    Hammer on the hypocrisy of those who claim to oppose discrimination.

  21. @Anonymous

    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.
     
    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini
    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach, rabbi and partner with Michael Jackson in charity, "Heal the Kids"
    Persian Zoroastrian: the incomparable Freddie Mercury

    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach

    Only half persian jew. He has 9 kids and in 2012 was the winner of the GOP primary in a NJ congressional district, then lost to a Democrat incumbent.

    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini

    That a guy a libertine? Seems too dour, sure would kill my buzz at least.

  22. @Maj. Kong
    Importing minorities from "over there", is believing that they will be minorities over here, and thus able to contribute to the "coalition of the fringes".

    Importing minorities from over there like say, Afrikaner Calvinists, and bringing them here, does not serve the interest of the state, as they will vote conservatively.

    Importing majorities, Sunni Arab Muslims, will become minorities here.

    Importing formerly empowered majorities, is less clear. I'm unsure on the status of say, Lebanese Christians as to refugee status. But those I've met recite typical Pan-Arabist tripe about Islamic terrorism being the fault of the eeevil Western Imperialism.

    [Refugees are] able to contribute to the “coalition of the fringes”

    This is easy to see, so I can only wonder why all the big name Republicans line up to denounce Rand Paul’s and Donald Trump’s Muslim immigration moratorium proposal.

    Cowards.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    They work for the donor class, and their philosophy if it exists is neoconservatism rather than traditionalism. Or worse, in the case of Paul "Ayn" Ryan. Neither group likes the current Republican base, but the base can end their careers. What they are hoping for is to get enough immigrants into the country that will vote for them, and still keep the base vote, but through fear.

    Think of it like the situation in Quebec. The English speaking minority has no real political friends, but they can't vote for the separatists. Thus, the Liberal Party which does nothing to advance the interests of English speakers, still gets all their votes because the alternative is so unpalatable. Meanwhile, whenever the QLP is in government, it becomes a graft machine for its Francophone donors.
  23. After all there are 1.6 billion Muslims (or whatever) and we better not make them sore at us!

    This one has been popping up all over the MSM now. A talking head will say something like, “There are umpteen billion Muslims and we need them on our side, to fight the blah blah blah, so we dare not exclude them!”

    This submissive bleating reminds me of, “We need to give amnesty to illegal Mexicans, or they won’t vote for us!”

    Pathetic.

    Submission, indeed.

  24. @Hail

    [Refugees are] able to contribute to the “coalition of the fringes”
     
    This is easy to see, so I can only wonder why all the big name Republicans line up to denounce Rand Paul's and Donald Trump's Muslim immigration moratorium proposal.

    Cowards.

    They work for the donor class, and their philosophy if it exists is neoconservatism rather than traditionalism. Or worse, in the case of Paul “Ayn” Ryan. Neither group likes the current Republican base, but the base can end their careers. What they are hoping for is to get enough immigrants into the country that will vote for them, and still keep the base vote, but through fear.

    Think of it like the situation in Quebec. The English speaking minority has no real political friends, but they can’t vote for the separatists. Thus, the Liberal Party which does nothing to advance the interests of English speakers, still gets all their votes because the alternative is so unpalatable. Meanwhile, whenever the QLP is in government, it becomes a graft machine for its Francophone donors.

  25. Obama doesn’t want to help Syrian Christian refugees because they’re likely to become Republicans, like the Vietnamese boat people and the anti-Castro Cubans before them. Syrian Muslims, on the other hand, are more likely to become reliable Democrats

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Religious minorities in Arab countries have normally backed the party line of the dictatorship 101%, were they to come here, they could form a diaspora lobby arguing in favor of friendly relations with Russia. That would be real headache for the foreign policy establishment, as there is currently more of an "Iran lobby" than a "Russia lobby".
  26. Is all this really about not wanting to tick off Saudi Arabia?

    I suspect if the majority of migrants were Shiites, the powers that be would have no problems using religious criteria to disqualify ethnic or religious majorities.

    Another chapter in a long story of Anglophone hatred of Shiia and Eastern Orthodox and love affair with Sunnis.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The energy companies and big civil engineering firms where Republican cabinet officials rusticate when the GOP loses the White House do a ton of business with Oil Arabs.
    , @Maj. Kong
    The same Anglophones that propped up the Shah rather than see those Shia live under the Czar or Communism.

    The same Shia that destroyed the only state the Arab Christians had.
  27. @Victor
    Obama doesn't want to help Syrian Christian refugees because they're likely to become Republicans, like the Vietnamese boat people and the anti-Castro Cubans before them. Syrian Muslims, on the other hand, are more likely to become reliable Democrats

    Religious minorities in Arab countries have normally backed the party line of the dictatorship 101%, were they to come here, they could form a diaspora lobby arguing in favor of friendly relations with Russia. That would be real headache for the foreign policy establishment, as there is currently more of an “Iran lobby” than a “Russia lobby”.

  28. Who? Whom?

    I always imagine that this Sailerism puzzles new readers.

    “Who, Whom?” Wiki entry.

    Who, whom? (Russian: кто кого?) is a Bolshevist principle or slogan which was formulated by Lenin in 1921. […]

    Весь вопрос — кто кого опередит?
    “The whole question is — who will overtake whom?”

    Leon Trotsky used the shortened “who whom” formulation in his 1925 article, “Towards Capitalism or Towards Socialism?”

    The shortened form was invoked by Joseph Stalin in 1929 […] :

    “The fact is, we live according to Lenin’s formula: Kto-Kovo?: will we knock them, the capitalists, flat and give them (as Lenin expresses it) the final, decisive battle, or will they knock us flat? “.

    It came to be used as a formula describing the inevitability of class struggle, i.e. who (which of two antagonists) will dominate the other. In this view, all compromises and promises between enemies are just expedients — tactical manoeuvres in the struggle for mastery.

    The concept expressed in the Italian “Cui bono?” is similar, I think, except that “Cui bono” has more a conspiratorial feel, i.e. implying that given events are being orchestrated by a shadowy cabal, like a mafia. “Who, Whom?” is more an analyst’s tool to cut through the haze (which is probably why Steve uses it so much) applicable to broader competing groups.

    So, as I understand the terms, “Cui Bono” might be (and has been) used by 9/11 conspiracy theorists — Many will recall some of these people saying Israel benefited as 9/11 allowed Bush to take out anti-Israel Saddam. “Who, Whom?” is used by Steve Sailer and others to mean “In a world of group-based competition of all sorts, look beyond the talking points and figure out what different groups are really pushing for to advance their own perceived interests.”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    In other words, life is a zero-sum game.
  29. @Rehmat
    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    A casual search at Google will show that the topic of treatment of minorities in Islamic Iran, religious or otherwise, is full of usual Zionist propaganda lies. Iranian regime has been accused of persecution of women – while Amnesty International’s various ‘Fact Sheets’ mention – for example (2001), a woman is raped every six minute in the USA, over 50,000 women added each year to its prostitute industry, and a woman is battered every 15 seconds – while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.

    http://rehmat1.com/2008/10/14/minorities-in-islamic-iran/


    Will you provide evidence for your statement – “while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.”

  30. @Anonymous
    "France's Jewish leaders call for a 'civic uprising' against Marine Le Pen's National Front after far-Right group's record election results "

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3350660/Rise-against-hate-France-s-Jewish-leaders-call-civic-uprising-against-Marine-Le-Pen-s-National-far-Right-group-s-record-election-results.html

    “France’s Jewish leaders call for a ‘civic uprising’ against Marine Le Pen’s National Front after far-Right group’s record election results ”

    Talk about self-loathing.

  31. @Hail

    Who? Whom?
     
    I always imagine that this Sailerism puzzles new readers.

    "Who, Whom?" Wiki entry.


    Who, whom? (Russian: кто кого?) is a Bolshevist principle or slogan which was formulated by Lenin in 1921. [...]

    Весь вопрос — кто кого опередит?
    "The whole question is — who will overtake whom?"

    Leon Trotsky used the shortened "who whom" formulation in his 1925 article, "Towards Capitalism or Towards Socialism?"

    The shortened form was invoked by Joseph Stalin in 1929 [...] :

    "The fact is, we live according to Lenin's formula: Kto-Kovo?: will we knock them, the capitalists, flat and give them (as Lenin expresses it) the final, decisive battle, or will they knock us flat? ".

    It came to be used as a formula describing the inevitability of class struggle, i.e. who (which of two antagonists) will dominate the other. In this view, all compromises and promises between enemies are just expedients — tactical manoeuvres in the struggle for mastery.
     

    The concept expressed in the Italian "Cui bono?" is similar, I think, except that "Cui bono" has more a conspiratorial feel, i.e. implying that given events are being orchestrated by a shadowy cabal, like a mafia. "Who, Whom?" is more an analyst's tool to cut through the haze (which is probably why Steve uses it so much) applicable to broader competing groups.

    So, as I understand the terms, "Cui Bono" might be (and has been) used by 9/11 conspiracy theorists -- Many will recall some of these people saying Israel benefited as 9/11 allowed Bush to take out anti-Israel Saddam. "Who, Whom?" is used by Steve Sailer and others to mean "In a world of group-based competition of all sorts, look beyond the talking points and figure out what different groups are really pushing for to advance their own perceived interests."

    In other words, life is a zero-sum game.

  32. @anowow
    Is all this really about not wanting to tick off Saudi Arabia?

    I suspect if the majority of migrants were Shiites, the powers that be would have no problems using religious criteria to disqualify ethnic or religious majorities.

    Another chapter in a long story of Anglophone hatred of Shiia and Eastern Orthodox and love affair with Sunnis.

    The energy companies and big civil engineering firms where Republican cabinet officials rusticate when the GOP loses the White House do a ton of business with Oil Arabs.

    • Replies: @anowow
    Exactly,

    Whenever discussing GOP motives, always consider venality. Oil money, not high-minded constitutionalism, is the motivator here. The GOP establishment has no problems with tossing the constitution aside otherwise. It might not even be direct inducements, but rather the sense that nobody wants to tick off Uncle Saudi Sugar.

  33. So it turns out we’ve included religious tests in our immigration laws for at least the past 25 years. You’d think that kind of knowledge would provide some useful perspective in having an informed debate about the political developments of the past week. Yet somehow google can find only one news article that mentions both trump and lautenberg. (And the solitary “tea party” spokesman who does bring it up seemingly can’t wait to drop the matter in favor of more pressing concerns, like next summer’s republican convention.)
    It’s almost like the media doesn’t want WtP to have all the facts. And I suppose it better stay that way or Steve might wind up like those Boy Ranger kids who get run off the road by that no-good Taylor mob.

  34. The energy companies and big civil engineering firms where Republican cabinet officials rusticate…

    Rusticate, or masticate?

  35. @anowow
    Is all this really about not wanting to tick off Saudi Arabia?

    I suspect if the majority of migrants were Shiites, the powers that be would have no problems using religious criteria to disqualify ethnic or religious majorities.

    Another chapter in a long story of Anglophone hatred of Shiia and Eastern Orthodox and love affair with Sunnis.

    The same Anglophones that propped up the Shah rather than see those Shia live under the Czar or Communism.

    The same Shia that destroyed the only state the Arab Christians had.

  36. Who? Obama? Whom? Muslims. Any more questions?

  37. @Anonymous

    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.
     
    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini
    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach, rabbi and partner with Michael Jackson in charity, "Heal the Kids"
    Persian Zoroastrian: the incomparable Freddie Mercury

    Freddie Mercury had Indian Parsis parents

  38. @Anonymous

    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.
     
    Persian Jew: libertine economist Nouriel Roubini
    Persian Jew: Smuley Boteach, rabbi and partner with Michael Jackson in charity, "Heal the Kids"
    Persian Zoroastrian: the incomparable Freddie Mercury

    Roubini is a smart guy, but a bit of a creep.

    Boteach is at heart a hack and even he knows it.

    As for Freddie, NOW we’re talking. Complete and utter Rock God. Along with my beloved Druze, I am kind of obsessed with Zoroastrians. For a people that are allegedly going extinct, I have somehow managed to have three Zoroastrian friends in my life. How is that even possible? What kind of circles am I running in?

    Freddie was actually born in Zanzibar which explains in part how he eventually ended up in Great Britain. Freddie’s people, while originally from Iran, settled in the more tolerant waters of India centuries ago so his Persian links are somewhat tenuous.

    Anyway, I am a fan of Ahura Mazda. Thus Spoke Zarathustra and all that. The whole Towers of Silence thing is admittedly downright creepy. Google it. Thankfully, not a tradition among Zoroastrians stateside as far as I can determine. Zoroastrians are actually a great example of how a more sophisticated civilization is sublimated by more passionate and violent ideologies and just slowly dies out despite remaining relatively affluent in the process.

    SEVEN SEAS OF RHYE by QUEEN would make a pretty great Trump Theme Song. Not that I am complaining about Twisted Sister’s perennial classic “We’re Not Gonna Take It” that Trump blasts at many of his rallies. Just that it’s always a good idea to mix things up.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    "Not that I am complaining about Twisted Sister’s perennial classic “We’re Not Gonna Take It”.

    Well, Twisted Sister's song may be a perennial classic, and has an admittedly catchy beat, but The Who got there firstest with the mostest (yes I'm showing my age).

    https://youtu.be/ZqmC1T9rukk
  39. @neutral
    I found the next big thing for Sailer - transagerism.
    http://www.mrctv.org/blog/52-year-old-father-lives-6-year-old-girl

    This validates me: for the past 30 years I have sexually identified as a 21-year-old male.

  40. @Clifford Brown
    Roubini is a smart guy, but a bit of a creep.

    Boteach is at heart a hack and even he knows it.

    As for Freddie, NOW we're talking. Complete and utter Rock God. Along with my beloved Druze, I am kind of obsessed with Zoroastrians. For a people that are allegedly going extinct, I have somehow managed to have three Zoroastrian friends in my life. How is that even possible? What kind of circles am I running in?

    Freddie was actually born in Zanzibar which explains in part how he eventually ended up in Great Britain. Freddie's people, while originally from Iran, settled in the more tolerant waters of India centuries ago so his Persian links are somewhat tenuous.

    Anyway, I am a fan of Ahura Mazda. Thus Spoke Zarathustra and all that. The whole Towers of Silence thing is admittedly downright creepy. Google it. Thankfully, not a tradition among Zoroastrians stateside as far as I can determine. Zoroastrians are actually a great example of how a more sophisticated civilization is sublimated by more passionate and violent ideologies and just slowly dies out despite remaining relatively affluent in the process.

    SEVEN SEAS OF RHYE by QUEEN would make a pretty great Trump Theme Song. Not that I am complaining about Twisted Sister's perennial classic "We're Not Gonna Take It" that Trump blasts at many of his rallies. Just that it's always a good idea to mix things up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4Z6gaa3xqY

    “Not that I am complaining about Twisted Sister’s perennial classic “We’re Not Gonna Take It”.

    Well, Twisted Sister’s song may be a perennial classic, and has an admittedly catchy beat, but The Who got there firstest with the mostest (yes I’m showing my age).

  41. @Steve Sailer
    The energy companies and big civil engineering firms where Republican cabinet officials rusticate when the GOP loses the White House do a ton of business with Oil Arabs.

    Exactly,

    Whenever discussing GOP motives, always consider venality. Oil money, not high-minded constitutionalism, is the motivator here. The GOP establishment has no problems with tossing the constitution aside otherwise. It might not even be direct inducements, but rather the sense that nobody wants to tick off Uncle Saudi Sugar.

  42. @tanabear
    And the United States gives preferences to Cuban refugees over say ones from Haiti.

    "Two island nations in the Caribbean-Cuban and Haiti-sent floods of refugees to the United States in the 1980s and 1990s. The United States had long had a policy of accepting all refugees from Cuba. Because its people were fleeing a communist dictatorship, it considered them victims of political oppression. It had returned most Haitian refugees, because it regarded them as fleeing poverty and not political repression."

    It would seem that we should want to accept Christian refugees from the Near East opposed to Moslems, as Christians are endangered of being exterminated, and Moslems are doing fine. But the modern Left is so reflexive in its hatred toward Christianity that they are probably smiling on the inside hoping these ancient communities are eradicated. So much for the left caring about the indigenous religion of the Near East.

    p.s. Is Israel taking in any Christian refugees? We know how sympathetic the Jews are to people being massacred.

    “Is Israel taking in any Christian refugees?”

    If you steady Israeli historian Dr. Israel Shahak, you may get your answer: “Israeli Jews love to spit on priests’ faces.”

    “The very name Jesus was for Jews a symbol of all that is abominable, and this popular tradition still persists. The Gospels are equally detested, and they are not allowed to be quoted, let alone taught, even in modern Israeli Jewish schools,” wrote late professor Israel Shahak.

    Before the creation of the state of Israel, Christians made 14-16% of Palestinian population. Now, Israel is home to 0.9% Christians, while 1.9% Christians call Hamas-ruled Gaza their home.

    Two months ago, Netanyahu said Israel refuses to take any refugee from Syria, but he was proud to admit that Israel is providing medial treatment to wounded ISIS cut-throats.

    http://rehmat1.com/2012/05/07/plight-of-christians-in-jewish-occupied-palestine/

  43. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Still not entirely sure how a discrimination against immigration law would be written given we only apparently have precedent for discrimination for.

    The key variable you’re ignoring, Steve, is that all previous discriminatory immigration law has been based around the premise of increasing/incentivizing immigration. Unless Trump plans to decrease Islamic immigration by increasing Christian immigration I don’t see these precedents offering much help.

    And in any case, the original Trump plan was to ban Muslims from “entering” the US. That’s actually a much more important point, given how easy it is to cross the border for all sorts of short-term purposes (tourism, school, business trips, etc). And a short-term trip is all they need.

  44. Will you provide evidence for your statement – “while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.”

    Israel’s known for its human trafficking:

    Human Trafficking to Israel Has Been Beaten. Let’s Now Tackle Prostitution

    From the early 1990s until the mid-2000s, the Israeli sex industry was based on the trafficking of women from the former Soviet Union. Not until a 2001 U.S. State Department report on human trafficking, in which Israel ranked at the third and lowest level, did the state begin taking serious steps to suppress the industry. Otherwise Israel could have lost vital economic aid.

    Human trafficking in Israel – Wikipedia – mostly a Hasbara piece that should be titled “what Israel finally did about its epic Human Trafficking problem when threatened by the USA,” but still useful.

  45. Trump cracking up and leaving is a definite possibility (but what are “they” going to do, that they haven’t already? Put on a second wig and set that one on fire, too?). As is his health failing – he’s 69, after all. And he obviously isn’t perfect.

    There are no guarantees in life.

    He’s still the best choice, by far.

  46. @Rehmat
    The Iranian religious divide within its 65 million population is – 98% Muslims (93% Shias and 5% Sunnis), and the remaining 2% are Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and Bahai communities. Under Iranian Constitution, these communities, are recognized as ‘religious minorities’ and allocated ‘reserved’ representation (seats) in the 275-member Majlis (Parliament). The Christians have two seats, while Jews and Zoroastrian have one seat each. The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    A casual search at Google will show that the topic of treatment of minorities in Islamic Iran, religious or otherwise, is full of usual Zionist propaganda lies. Iranian regime has been accused of persecution of women – while Amnesty International’s various ‘Fact Sheets’ mention – for example (2001), a woman is raped every six minute in the USA, over 50,000 women added each year to its prostitute industry, and a woman is battered every 15 seconds – while Israel being one of the few world countries, where thousands of White Christian women are sold into sex-slavery.

    http://rehmat1.com/2008/10/14/minorities-in-islamic-iran/

    The Bahai community is not recognized as a ‘minority’ but a deviant cult created by the western colonialist, similar to the Qadianis (Ahmedis) in British India.

    I thought Bahai’s weren’t recognized because of the Muslim belief that Muhammad was the last prophet of God. What are you doing trying to hide behind this ‘western colonialist’ excuse?

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