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St. George Floyd Day Gets Off to a Culturally Appropriate Start with a Bang, But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind
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Meanwhile, it’s never too early to be prepping for Gay Pride Day (Week? Month? Eternity?) by setting your children on the road to diabetic non-binaryness by buying them the latest offerings of Woke Capital, such as Kelloggs’ Non-Binary Froot Loops.

From Metro Weekly:

Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

The “Together” cereal features rainbow hearts and edible glitter

By Rhuaridh Marr on April 19, 2021 @rhuaridh

If you’re looking for amore thematically appropriate way to start your day during Pride Month, Kellogg’s might have the answer: its new “Together with Pride” cereal, launched in collaboration with GLAAD.

Resembling heart-shaped Froot Loops, the berry-flavored cereal has an edible glitter coating to really heighten the LGBTQ-ness of it all — because apparently nothing says Pride quite like fruity glitter.

With a box showing a number of Kellogg’s cereal characters — including Tony the Tiger, Snap, Crackle, and Pop, and the Frosted Mini-Wheats mascot waving a Pride flag — the rainbow-hued cereal will hit stores in May for $3.99, just ahead of Pride Month in June. …

Kellogg’s will donate $3 from each box sold to LGBTQ media advocacy organization GLAAD, provided people upload their receipt to Kellogg’s website.

 
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  1. there were so many gunshots, I thought a George Floyd remembrance was nearby

    • LOL: El Dato
    • Replies: @Richard B
    @bomag


    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind
     
    No pun intended. Or was it?

    Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride
     
    Oh brother!

    Let's see if we can guess which letter of the LGBTQ colition wrote that headline.
    , @George
    @bomag

    Reimagining memorial day as a BLM holiday would be a great excuse for a second fireworks holiday to kick off summer.

  2. Hey libtards,you need to worship your pets from afar…..old white-hair fool ,that means you.

    • Replies: @anon
    @tyrone

    Hey libtards,you need to worship your pets from afar

    No. More of them, in fact all of them, should get as close as possible.

    Think of it as evolution in action.

  3. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

    • Replies: @Stan D Mute
    @Anonymous


    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

     

    He’s my doppelgänger, just barely holding back his laughter at the hijinx of those affable Africans.
    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.
     
    He must have known that Sailer's Law will keep him at minimal risk.

    Replies: @duncsbaby

  4. Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123


    “The president doesn’t feel that reconciliation is the preferred path forward for moving these priority areas for immigration forward. … We should move things forward in a bipartisan manner."
     
    What does that mean (ok, it's psakinoise but...)? Also talk of "bipartisanship" is suspect; probably means they pulled the tail in but why.

    Replies: @Keypusher

    , @Joe Magarac
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).
     
    Back to the policy of keeping them here but keeping them illegal?

    That was the de facto bipartisan policy under Bush II and Obama.

    , @Batman
    @JohnnyWalker123

    People would mock a white supremacist Turner-Diaries-wannabe writer if he named the open borders immigration lawyer character "Charles Kuck," but here we are. We've got to be living in a simulation that is designed to keep on getting weirder until we all notice.

    , @Desiderius
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Luckily for the Kucks of the world the R pols that exist bear absolutely no resemblance whatsoever to the R monsters you've constructed in your minds as hate objects. If anything Rs are chomping at the bit to import cheap labor even more than the Kucks are to import cheap votes.

    , @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Arizona senators were never going to go for it anyway. Quite a few Dems are hiding behind the filibuster.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  5. It’s not funny, but come on. It’s so African.

    • Agree: Just another serf, bruce county
    • Replies: @Ronnie Waters
    @northeast

    But, wait a minute! Aren't we whites supposed to be the violent haters? Those darn black people are culturally appropriating our hate filled culture!

  6. #SPIRITDAY?

    Multicolored Fruit Loops?

    Fill your mouth with Pride?

    Really?

    I this was some Hollywood movie, now I would be the doomed boomer wondering aloud whether there is satanism or worse going on in Whitetopia village.

    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @anon
    @El Dato

    Fill your mouth with Pride?

    Really?

    Really.

    They do enjoy rubbing everyone's face in it as much as possible.

    , @Charon
    @El Dato

    What's weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos. Does any other group do that? Okay, one weird thing about homos.


    nothing says Pride quite like fruity glitter
     

    Replies: @Dissident, @stillCARealist

  7. Gay Pride Month Is Coming Up from Behind.

    I see what you did there! Did you?

    .

    Nah, I’ll pass on another new sugary cereal. As a prepper, I’m all stocked up on Fruit Loops.

    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In honor of Gay Pride Month, I propose a toast.

    Bottoms up!

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Swamp Fox

    , @Mike Tre
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Gay Pride Month Is Coming Up from Behind."

    Steve has flushed less suggestive comments of mine...

  8. Froot Loops .

    They are trolling.

    • Disagree: El Dato
    • LOL: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Doktor Jeep

    I prefer this brand. With four proofs of purchase, I can get my Strom Thurmond decoder ring, just pay $4.99 for shipping and handling.

    https://world.openfoodfacts.org/product/22141781/white-flakes-knusperone

    , @Daniel H
    @Doktor Jeep


    Fruit Loops .

    They are trolling.
     

    Ha, ha, ha. Know hope. There are a few of us on the inside.
    , @clifford brown
    @Doktor Jeep

    At least it is still not Trix Are For Kids........ for now.

  9. RIP, William Shakespeare.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "Brevity is the soul of COVID"

    , @Cortes
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Golden lads and girls all must
    As chimney sweepers come to dust.

    Like St George.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @JohnnyWalker123


    RIP, William Shakespeare.
     
    As Dillon said in Alien^3:

    "It's starting..."

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    , @Dissident
    @JohnnyWalker123

    [Tangential relation to original thread topic noted beyond break.]


    RIP, William Shakespeare.
     
    Believe it or not*, in 1956 none other than the Bard of Avon himself granted a radio interview to USC English Professor Frank C. Baxter.

    (*And while few would believe it, our estimable Mr. Johnny Walker would surely be among the very last I would expect to believe any wild, implausible claims or conjecture.)

    How could that even have been possible, you wonder? Through the magic of The CBS Radio Workshop, a project that was "dedicated to man's imagination, the theater of the mind".

    Colloquy #1- Interview with William Shakespeare (Alternatively, file #5 on page at first link above).

    In the course of the interview, Mr. Shakespeare decisively dismisses both the claims that he was not the actual and sole author of the works attributed to him, as well as the scurrilous accusations of pederasty that have been leveled against him. (And perhaps other rumors as well; it's been some time I listened. I do distinctly recall finding the interview highly enjoyable, however, and highly recommend it.)
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @JohnnyWalker123

    To be jabbed or not to be jabbed, that is the question.
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    the slings and arrows of outrageous bloggers,
    or to take it in the arm against a sea of troubles
    and by opposing, end them: to die, to sleep;

    , @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

  10. @Achmed E. Newman

    Gay Pride Month Is Coming Up from Behind.
     
    I see what you did there! Did you?

    .


    Nah, I'll pass on another new sugary cereal. As a prepper, I'm all stocked up on Fruit Loops.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mike Tre

    In honor of Gay Pride Month, I propose a toast.

    Bottoms up!

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Fifty per cent of the participants will have that "surprised look."

    , @Swamp Fox
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Chin, chin!

  11. @tyrone
    Hey libtards,you need to worship your pets from afar.....old white-hair fool ,that means you.

    Replies: @anon

    Hey libtards,you need to worship your pets from afar

    No. More of them, in fact all of them, should get as close as possible.

    Think of it as evolution in action.

  12. “Cereal” that amounts to candy for breakfast is bad for children, even without the sodomy. /snicker

    • Replies: @DextersLabRat
    @Joe Magarac

    Really this. If you're dumb enough to give this garbage to your children then pronouns are the least of their worries.

  13. @El Dato
    #SPIRITDAY?

    Multicolored Fruit Loops?

    Fill your mouth with Pride?

    Really?

    I this was some Hollywood movie, now I would be the doomed boomer wondering aloud whether there is satanism or worse going on in Whitetopia village.

    Replies: @anon, @Charon

    Fill your mouth with Pride?

    Really?

    Really.

    They do enjoy rubbing everyone’s face in it as much as possible.

  14. All blacks should honor Saint Meganose by snorking 3 times the lethal limit of fentanyl, just like the Holy One.

    It’s perfectly safe since Meanie Chauvin is locked up.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Sick of Orcs

    I wish I had enough Black Privilege to score some real pain killers. My doc says just take Advil and stop bothering me already.

  15. @JohnnyWalker123
    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    https://twitter.com/ckuck/status/1397140095094906881

    Replies: @El Dato, @Joe Magarac, @Batman, @Desiderius, @Ed

    “The president doesn’t feel that reconciliation is the preferred path forward for moving these priority areas for immigration forward. … We should move things forward in a bipartisan manner.”

    What does that mean (ok, it’s psakinoise but…)? Also talk of “bipartisanship” is suspect; probably means they pulled the tail in but why.

    • Replies: @Keypusher
    @El Dato

    Because he wants Republican cover.

  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    “Brevity is the soul of COVID”

  17. Meanwhile, over in Africa, black lives continue to matter as much as they usually do.

    https://www.amren.com/commentary/2021/05/vigilante-justice-necklacing-returns-to-south-africa/

  18. Grooming cereal. Repeat this.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @sayless
    @Hodag

    Do kids still read the cereal box while they're eating? I wonder what that box says.

  19. To vax, or not to vax. That is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer the seasonal jabs of outrageous quality, or to take up trolling against a sea of maskers, and by opposing trigger them.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @BenKenobi

    Crap, Ben, I just wrote my version below before I saw this. I could still remove it, but, nah.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s0AE3kGyhbQ

    Replies: @Bill B.

  20. @Doktor Jeep
    Froot Loops .

    They are trolling.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Daniel H, @clifford brown

    I prefer this brand. With four proofs of purchase, I can get my Strom Thurmond decoder ring, just pay $4.99 for shipping and handling.

    https://world.openfoodfacts.org/product/22141781/white-flakes-knusperone

  21. You have my vote for headline of the year haha! Bravo Mr. Sailer.

  22. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    Golden lads and girls all must
    As chimney sweepers come to dust.

    Like St George.

  23. Didn’t Lucky Charms beat them to the punch by introducing rainbows a few years back? I just bought a box of Frosted Mini-Wheats today, damn. I can give up Tony The Tiger and I always thought Snap-Crackle & Pop might have been on the DL anyway, but I have to have my Frosted Mini-Wheats. I hope Krispy Kreme will have a special on vanilla cremes during White Pride Day. Oh sheeit, we don’t have White Pride Day or White Boy Day in the USA. Two vanilla cremes and one black coffee to go sung to the tune of Ice Ice Baby. Word to your mother.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Trinity

    Regarding those Lucky Charms, with the rainbow having been there since the 1970s, we've known that Leprechauns are gay for a long time. Even the kids too young to properly chew the cereal knew that. No offense, of course, to Leprechauns, Irishmen, or sugary cereal lovers.

    , @Dnought
    @Trinity

    Just buy a different brand of shredded wheat. I eat shredded wheat in the morning, but I started boycottting Kellogg last year because they now have a history of this type of advertising behavior:


    https://affirmativeright.blogspot.com/p/altright-bds-page.html

    https://twitter.com/PopTartsUS/status/1192187523415465985?s=20

    Buy the Post Cereals equivalent or the store brand instead. They're just as good. And you can get them unsweetened if you so choose.

  24. @Doktor Jeep
    Froot Loops .

    They are trolling.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Daniel H, @clifford brown

    Fruit Loops .

    They are trolling.

    Ha, ha, ha. Know hope. There are a few of us on the inside.

  25. Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

    Well, I have never heard it called that before.

    • LOL: Stan D Mute
  26. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    As Dillon said in Alien^3:

    “It’s starting…”

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    "Alien 3"

    The David Fincher cut is the one to watch.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  27. @Doktor Jeep
    Froot Loops .

    They are trolling.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Daniel H, @clifford brown

    At least it is still not Trix Are For Kids…….. for now.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Disagree: Stan D Mute
    • LOL: Old Prude
  28. “Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride”

    But I would imagine that the LGBTQI+++crowd would really rather fill their mouths with something a little more “organic,” either some C or C or (for the bi-crowd) both??

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @CCZ

    It won't affect regular people. Those sugary cereals are disgusting and unhealthy. The nanny in me says they are as bad for Americans as drugs and far more sinister. They're racist! Let's ban them!

    Honestly, I see all those colorful boxes on the shelves at Walmart, but I never see them in anybody's cart. They wouldn't stock stuff that doesn't sell, so... who buys it?

  29. @JohnnyWalker123
    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    https://twitter.com/ckuck/status/1397140095094906881

    Replies: @El Dato, @Joe Magarac, @Batman, @Desiderius, @Ed

    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    Back to the policy of keeping them here but keeping them illegal?

    That was the de facto bipartisan policy under Bush II and Obama.

    • Agree: Charon
  30. John Harvey Kellogg recommended “the cool enema…the application of blisters and other irritants to the sensitive parts of the sexual organs, the removal of the clitoris and nymphae…” as a masturbation preventative. He also recommended covering young people’s genitals with “patented cages” to put them out of reach of their owners’ lecherous hands. It’s funny how grotesque sexual mutilation has come the full circle from pathological prudery to LGBTQ+ wokeness.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Rob McX

    There's a great scene in Kinsey where his weeping dad tells him about the grandparents locking up his junk because he was beating off too much.

    Joe Rogan on NoFap

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMD7K-kTKvg

    This is false advertising though. They talk far more about fap than NoFap. Nothing says quality media like Duncan Trussel and Joe Rogan talking about masturbation.


    Breakfast cereal is not food.

    , @anon
    @Rob McX

    Kellogg also was a big proponent of circumcising boys & men without any anesthetic, in order to protect them from the scourge of masturbation. It became a "medical fact" that every doctor knew. I believe his campaign was a major factor in the mainstreaming of circumcision in the late 19th and early 20th century US.

    He was also enthused about boring, vegetative diets for young men, to "cool them". Today he'd be a vegan, as well as an all-around crank and frankly boring old fool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Harvey_Kellogg

    https://danny97.medium.com/john-harvey-kellogg-and-his-anti-masturbation-cereals-832440cd0f5b

    Replies: @Bill P

  31. What about Count Chocula? Is he woke?

  32. • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Ragno
    @Change that Matters

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E2PO8etWUAIiz8Q.jpg

    Attention Peter Max and Sheppard Fairey: your latest "lithograph scam" has arrived.

    How many money-for-nothing lefties would gladly plunk down five or ten grand apiece for a genuine original St George - in your choice of Pride colors? Only 5000 genuine originals will be sold!

  33. I was and remain adamant that there was some sort of Black Magick/ Occult forces behind much of the George Floyd worship weirdness of last June. It was all so over the top.

    This video implies perhaps God or at least the trickster spirit Loki is pushing back one year in. Deals with The Devil seldom work out as planned.

    • Replies: @Paul Rise
    @clifford brown

    Google Kek - you may be closer to the mark than anyone is willing to believe.

  34. I have always associated Gay Pride Parades with a sexualized atmosphere, but apparently Gay Pride Parades are for The Kiddies, at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    Times sure change fast.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @clifford brown

    at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?

    To me Vauch sounds like a fool trying to appear intellectual by speaking an odd word salad and acting arrogantly. Also, I cannot believe that he is 27.

    Who takes him seriously ?

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Dissident

  35. I guess the gunshots didn’t come during the 9 1/2 minutes of silence. That would have been too perfect.

    I am so sick of hearing about this f-ing guy, and I am so sick of all these people.

  36. Gay cereal for your four-year-old at the breakfast table?

    I’m not a Bible thumper by any means, but it’s become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation. I started out life as a flag-waving conservative — but today this country absolutely sickens me.

    It can’t implode soon enough.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Dr. X

    Don't despair.

    The Spirit blows where it will. Revival is always possible. We have reached a point at which it's increasingly obvious that prayer is more effective than politics.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Dr. X

    I’m not a Bible thumper by any means, but it’s become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation.

    I used to find it hilarious when the Ayatollah called us the Great Satan, but as things now stand, I think we have to give him that one.

    Replies: @Charon

    , @BB753
    @Dr. X

    The number of "trans-kids" or drag queen kids or non-binary kids whose parents aren't in jail for abuse certainly proves your assertion.

    https://youtu.be/I5P3Z_TW-O4

    https://youtu.be/f3mxPnilJOM

    https://youtu.be/V8SbrGSaBo0

    https://youtu.be/CTTYwhZ7948

  37. @northeast
    It's not funny, but come on. It's so African.

    Replies: @Ronnie Waters

    But, wait a minute! Aren’t we whites supposed to be the violent haters? Those darn black people are culturally appropriating our hate filled culture!

  38. @Rob McX
    John Harvey Kellogg recommended "the cool enema...the application of blisters and other irritants to the sensitive parts of the sexual organs, the removal of the clitoris and nymphae..." as a masturbation preventative. He also recommended covering young people's genitals with "patented cages" to put them out of reach of their owners' lecherous hands. It's funny how grotesque sexual mutilation has come the full circle from pathological prudery to LGBTQ+ wokeness.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @anon

    There’s a great scene in Kinsey where his weeping dad tells him about the grandparents locking up his junk because he was beating off too much.

    Joe Rogan on NoFap

    This is false advertising though. They talk far more about fap than NoFap. Nothing says quality media like Duncan Trussel and Joe Rogan talking about masturbation.

    Breakfast cereal is not food.

  39. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    [Tangential relation to original thread topic noted beyond break.]

    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    Believe it or not*, in 1956 none other than the Bard of Avon himself granted a radio interview to USC English Professor Frank C. Baxter.

    (*And while few would believe it, our estimable Mr. Johnny Walker would surely be among the very last I would expect to believe any wild, implausible claims or conjecture.)

    How could that even have been possible, you wonder?

    [MORE]
    Through the magic of The CBS Radio Workshop, a project that was “dedicated to man’s imagination, the theater of the mind”.

    Colloquy #1- Interview with William Shakespeare (Alternatively, file #5 on page at first link above).

    In the course of the interview, Mr. Shakespeare decisively dismisses both the claims that he was not the actual and sole author of the works attributed to him, as well as the scurrilous accusations of pederasty that have been leveled against him. (And perhaps other rumors as well; it’s been some time I listened. I do distinctly recall finding the interview highly enjoyable, however, and highly recommend it.)

  40. LGBTQWTFLOLBBQ was always about raping children. Always.

    🏳️‍🌈Celebrate Child Sex Abuse!🏳️‍🌈

  41. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    OK, there’s no way that could have been real.

    That has to be an “Onion” or some Monty Python comedy sketch.

    This super serious Brit accent guy, with gun shots going off – that was super funny as good as the John Cleese MP sketch where he’s the Brit army self defense instructor preparing his men to defend themselves against a banana, or some other fresh fruit.

    That was brilliant.

    But there’s no way that could have been real.

    J Ryan
    The Political Cesspool Cultural Correspondent
    Left Behind outside of Chicago

  42. The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.

    • Replies: @Currahee
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yeah, he was such a good dad.

    , @anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    I always thought the US Marine dress uniform looks rather, well...

    Gay

    Like some toy soldier...

    It doesn't inspire respect for the colored masses in our empires.

    , @SaneClownPosse
    @Dave Pinsen

    Couldn't find a black jarhead to stand at the door on St. George Floyd Day?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

    , @Corvinus
    @Dave Pinsen

    "The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment."

    According to Who/Whom?

  43. In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa. First they will stop by the gutted pay phone stand where George rolled his first blunt of the day. Next they will pace back and forth in front of the convenience store where the Meth kicked in. After that they will walk the aisles of the store in a mysterious sequence of turns and reversals, then pause at the counter where George counted his crumpled bills not twice, not thrice, but a whole bunch of times. They will pause to view the cash register where the Levantine shop keeper identified George’s counterfeit 20, and though there are several bills devotees claim is the real fake 20, the original fake may indeed be lost to history. Then it’s back outside where George swallowed the rest of his fentanyl stash and struggled with the Roman sold- sorry, Minneapolis PD. There is a dark patch on the bitumen where George is said to have breathed his last, only a few minutes after he said he couldn’t breathe. Moving. I hope the locals are busy carving olive wood miniatures of his giant head.

    • Thanks: Cortes, Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I like where you're going with this. It raises the question, did anyone think to gather the sacred relics associated with Floyd at the time? What a shame it is if they didn't. That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail and threads from the trousers Derek Chauvin wore while kneeling on Floyd's neck would be like splinters of the True Cross.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pericles, @Rob McX

    , @Rob McX
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Look on the bright side - at least he didn't rise from the dead.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Like Harry Baldwin, I like where you're going with this, but I think that between the mob, the modern pharisees and the magistrates, it is Chauvin who is getting crucified, not Floyd. At best, Floyd has the Judas role: feckless suicide whose moral depravity condemns a better man.

    , @James Forrestal
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa.
     
    The first juror picked for the trial [the jew chemist] literally admitted to making a pilgrimage to "George Floyd Square"* with his fiance. Seriously. But he claimed that he averted his eyes from the video, so...

    *Personally, I think "Cup Foods Corner" scans better, but "the people" have spoken on that one, and their choice is final.
  44. anon[176] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX
    John Harvey Kellogg recommended "the cool enema...the application of blisters and other irritants to the sensitive parts of the sexual organs, the removal of the clitoris and nymphae..." as a masturbation preventative. He also recommended covering young people's genitals with "patented cages" to put them out of reach of their owners' lecherous hands. It's funny how grotesque sexual mutilation has come the full circle from pathological prudery to LGBTQ+ wokeness.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @anon

    Kellogg also was a big proponent of circumcising boys & men without any anesthetic, in order to protect them from the scourge of masturbation. It became a “medical fact” that every doctor knew. I believe his campaign was a major factor in the mainstreaming of circumcision in the late 19th and early 20th century US.

    He was also enthused about boring, vegetative diets for young men, to “cool them”. Today he’d be a vegan, as well as an all-around crank and frankly boring old fool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Harvey_Kellogg

    https://danny97.medium.com/john-harvey-kellogg-and-his-anti-masturbation-cereals-832440cd0f5b

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @anon

    Sounds like projection. He was probably a repressed pederast. Bummer for him, but nobody should have taken him seriously. Circumcision is a religious mandate for some people, and who am I to condemn their faith if it doesn't concern me? But for everyone else, needlessly putting your little boy under the knife should be repulsive.

    Replies: @bruce county

  45. @Dave Pinsen
    The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1397332942930710528?s=21

    Replies: @Currahee, @anonymous, @SaneClownPosse, @Corvinus

    Yeah, he was such a good dad.

    • Agree: ic1000
  46. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1397332942930710528?s=21

    Replies: @Currahee, @anonymous, @SaneClownPosse, @Corvinus

    I always thought the US Marine dress uniform looks rather, well…

    Gay

    Like some toy soldier…

    It doesn’t inspire respect for the colored masses in our empires.

    • Troll: GeneralRipper
  47. Along with the comments, this has to be the most bizarre article you have ever posted.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Anon


    Along with the comments, this has to be the most bizarre article you have ever posted.
     
    iSteve just comments on the world he lives in. And it's not getting any saner...
  48. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    A white Tennessee man appears to have died about a year ago under circumstances similar to those of George Floyd’s death.

    A man who died after being pinned to the floor by law enforcement at a Tennessee jail last year repeatedly told officers he couldn’t breathe, according to video obtained by CBS Nashville station WTVF. But officers continued to restrain the man after he was prone and handcuffed, a federal civil rights lawsuit alleges, and after he pleaded that he couldn’t breathe, a deputy responded: “You shouldn’t be able to breathe, you stupid [expletive.]”

    https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/you-shouldnt-be-able-to-breathe-officer-tells-man-before-he-dies

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Anonymous

    A lot of the times when the cops shoot white guys, the guys aren't even suspected of having committed any crimes. Never makes headlines. You'll never know their names.

  49. Together cereal…..just add milk and they eat each other

  50. @El Dato
    #SPIRITDAY?

    Multicolored Fruit Loops?

    Fill your mouth with Pride?

    Really?

    I this was some Hollywood movie, now I would be the doomed boomer wondering aloud whether there is satanism or worse going on in Whitetopia village.

    Replies: @anon, @Charon

    What’s weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos. Does any other group do that? Okay, one weird thing about homos.

    nothing says Pride quite like fruity glitter

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Charon


    What’s weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos.
     
    It certainly seems that way.

    The LGBTQ lobby insists that those whom they represent are, except for the limited area of the subjects of their sexual interests/ their gender identity, etc., just like everyone else. No less competent to be parents, or to hold any position in society, etc. Of no less wholesome moral character than those with bourgeois sexual mores, etc.

    This, while assaulting society-at-large with the lurid and even obscene spectacles that are the "Pride" events. Has there been even one that did not prominently exhibit both abject lewdness, as well as abject self-caricature? To say nothing of the perennial indoctrination and conditioning campaigns targeted at children and adolescents (often in public schools, and otherwise with the blessings and funding of the State).

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @stillCARealist
    @Charon

    The whole "be yourself" mantra that everybody seeks to live by has some pernicious consequences. What if the "real you" is a pervert? What if it's a scared little child? Or a man/woman-hater?

    In some ways it's best not to find the real you because that person may be awful. Aspire to be better than the real you and actually accomplish something important. We used to call this Growing Up.

  51. @Sick of Orcs
    All blacks should honor Saint Meganose by snorking 3 times the lethal limit of fentanyl, just like the Holy One.

    It's perfectly safe since Meanie Chauvin is locked up.

    Replies: @Charon

    I wish I had enough Black Privilege to score some real pain killers. My doc says just take Advil and stop bothering me already.

  52. $3 from each box that sells for $3.99? Wtf? Seems like defrauding your shareholders

  53. @Dr. X
    Gay cereal for your four-year-old at the breakfast table?

    I'm not a Bible thumper by any means, but it's become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation. I started out life as a flag-waving conservative -- but today this country absolutely sickens me.

    It can't implode soon enough.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    Don’t despair.

    The Spirit blows where it will. Revival is always possible. We have reached a point at which it’s increasingly obvious that prayer is more effective than politics.

  54. @Anonymous
    A white Tennessee man appears to have died about a year ago under circumstances similar to those of George Floyd’s death.

    A man who died after being pinned to the floor by law enforcement at a Tennessee jail last year repeatedly told officers he couldn't breathe, according to video obtained by CBS Nashville station WTVF. But officers continued to restrain the man after he was prone and handcuffed, a federal civil rights lawsuit alleges, and after he pleaded that he couldn't breathe, a deputy responded: "You shouldn't be able to breathe, you stupid [expletive.]"
     
    https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/you-shouldnt-be-able-to-breathe-officer-tells-man-before-he-dies

    Replies: @Charon

    A lot of the times when the cops shoot white guys, the guys aren’t even suspected of having committed any crimes. Never makes headlines. You’ll never know their names.

  55. @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123


    “The president doesn’t feel that reconciliation is the preferred path forward for moving these priority areas for immigration forward. … We should move things forward in a bipartisan manner."
     
    What does that mean (ok, it's psakinoise but...)? Also talk of "bipartisanship" is suspect; probably means they pulled the tail in but why.

    Replies: @Keypusher

    Because he wants Republican cover.

  56. OT: And then they came for Fielding Yost, legendary football coach at the University of Michigan.

    https://amp.freep.com/amp/7415789002

    Yost died in 1947, but he just wasn’t woke enough.

    In a related story, campus buildings named after Yost are now open for naming after big donors…

  57. @anon
    @Rob McX

    Kellogg also was a big proponent of circumcising boys & men without any anesthetic, in order to protect them from the scourge of masturbation. It became a "medical fact" that every doctor knew. I believe his campaign was a major factor in the mainstreaming of circumcision in the late 19th and early 20th century US.

    He was also enthused about boring, vegetative diets for young men, to "cool them". Today he'd be a vegan, as well as an all-around crank and frankly boring old fool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Harvey_Kellogg

    https://danny97.medium.com/john-harvey-kellogg-and-his-anti-masturbation-cereals-832440cd0f5b

    Replies: @Bill P

    Sounds like projection. He was probably a repressed pederast. Bummer for him, but nobody should have taken him seriously. Circumcision is a religious mandate for some people, and who am I to condemn their faith if it doesn’t concern me? But for everyone else, needlessly putting your little boy under the knife should be repulsive.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Bill P


    Circumcision is a religious mandate for some people, and who am I to condemn their faith if it doesn’t concern me? But for everyone else, needlessly putting your little boy under the knife should be repulsive.
     
    Sorry Billy.. Women prefer the German helmet. I thank my mom and dad for mine...And the wife likes to hug it... ALOT. LOL
  58. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In honor of Gay Pride Month, I propose a toast.

    Bottoms up!

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Swamp Fox

    Fifty per cent of the participants will have that “surprised look.”

  59. I’d boycott Kellogg’s, but I don’t use any of their products as it is.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @MBlanc46

    You’ve discovered the causality here. Wokelism is downmarket and if you’re stuck making buggy whips downmarket is all you’ve got.

    , @Desiderius
    @MBlanc46

    You’ve discovered the causality here. Wokelism is downmarket and if you’re stuck making buggy whips downmarket is all you’ve got.

    See also Raytheon.

  60. I haven’t yet come across the YouTube commercial for this delightful cereal. But once it appears, one thing I am certain of, it will be all Black.

    I’m rapidly approaching full on accelerationist. All this cannot continue and simply must end in a horribly violent, fiery collapse.

  61. I’m trying to imagine who would buy this for their children. Someone with the culinary tastes of the Jerry Springer audience and the political tastes of The New York Times op-ed audience?

    In other words, about ten people in the United States.

    Apologies, don’t remember who, but another commenter here pointed out the mechanism of get woke/go broke business decisions. Applies to NBA, Oscars, MLB, Super Bowl, Star Wars, all those tv commercials that don’t look like America, etc. You’re in the planning meeting, and someone proposes making transgender Froot Loops. 9 of the 11 people there know it’s a sure loser. But no one can be the first to object. The can’t-be-the-first-to-stop-applauding-Stalin problem also applies during product performance review.

    What they need to do is vote by secret ballot. Millions of dollars lying on the sidewalk…

    • Replies: @Dnought
    @New Dealer

    You would probably be surprised how many people with "the political tastes of The New York Times op-ed audience" would buy anything their kid wants just to shut them up.

    And what makes you think a good chunk of "the Jerry Springer audience", isn't all in on this sort of nonsense?

    , @Whiskey
    @New Dealer

    Money printer go brrr for those corporate entities. So they will be just fine.

    Disney does not care if White y does not watch. Biden will pay for ever black person to get Disney Plus at 75 a month. Reparations.

    By contrast there is no money to be made off White people save their forced labor. Which is coming.

  62. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @JohnnyWalker123


    RIP, William Shakespeare.
     
    As Dillon said in Alien^3:

    "It's starting..."

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Alien 3”

    The David Fincher cut is the one to watch.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SunBakedSuburb


    “Alien 3”
     
    Man, I even got the quote wrong!


    https://youtu.be/Ipv1y-Phi7A?t=27


    This whole aging thing sucks.
  63. @Achmed E. Newman

    Gay Pride Month Is Coming Up from Behind.
     
    I see what you did there! Did you?

    .


    Nah, I'll pass on another new sugary cereal. As a prepper, I'm all stocked up on Fruit Loops.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mike Tre

    “Gay Pride Month Is Coming Up from Behind.”

    Steve has flushed less suggestive comments of mine…

  64. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    To be jabbed or not to be jabbed, that is the question.
    Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    the slings and arrows of outrageous bloggers,
    or to take it in the arm against a sea of troubles
    and by opposing, end them: to die, to sleep;

  65. @BenKenobi
    To vax, or not to vax. That is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer the seasonal jabs of outrageous quality, or to take up trolling against a sea of maskers, and by opposing trigger them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Reg Cæsar

    Crap, Ben, I just wrote my version below before I saw this. I could still remove it, but, nah.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No big deal. Also: I could have sworn I made a targeted reply to JW123's post. Oh well.

  66. @Charon
    @El Dato

    What's weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos. Does any other group do that? Okay, one weird thing about homos.


    nothing says Pride quite like fruity glitter
     

    Replies: @Dissident, @stillCARealist

    What’s weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos.

    It certainly seems that way.

    The LGBTQ lobby insists that those whom they represent are, except for the limited area of the subjects of their sexual interests/ their gender identity, etc., just like everyone else. No less competent to be parents, or to hold any position in society, etc. Of no less wholesome moral character than those with bourgeois sexual mores, etc.

    This, while assaulting society-at-large with the lurid and even obscene spectacles that are the “Pride” events. Has there been even one that did not prominently exhibit both abject lewdness, as well as abject self-caricature? To say nothing of the perennial indoctrination and conditioning campaigns targeted at children and adolescents (often in public schools, and otherwise with the blessings and funding of the State).

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Dissident

    The "events" are also part of the alphabet soup recruiting and indoctrination effort.

  67. @Trinity
    Didn't Lucky Charms beat them to the punch by introducing rainbows a few years back? I just bought a box of Frosted Mini-Wheats today, damn. I can give up Tony The Tiger and I always thought Snap-Crackle & Pop might have been on the DL anyway, but I have to have my Frosted Mini-Wheats. I hope Krispy Kreme will have a special on vanilla cremes during White Pride Day. Oh sheeit, we don't have White Pride Day or White Boy Day in the USA. Two vanilla cremes and one black coffee to go sung to the tune of Ice Ice Baby. Word to your mother.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dnought

    Regarding those Lucky Charms, with the rainbow having been there since the 1970s, we’ve known that Leprechauns are gay for a long time. Even the kids too young to properly chew the cereal knew that. No offense, of course, to Leprechauns, Irishmen, or sugary cereal lovers.

  68. Something tells me that the Gay Pride Crowd doesn’t mind bringing up the rear.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @JohnnyD


    Something tells me that the Gay Pride Crowd doesn’t mind bringing up the rear.
     
    Often, that depends, at least in large part, on which side of it one is/would be on. Elaboration, for the interested reader, may be found across numerous posts in my comment archive.
  69. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:

    Off topic, but white cornerback alert. Troy Apke getting reps at CB in Redski…I mean Washington OTAs.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Troy Apke ran a 4.34 second 40 yard dash at the draft combine.

  70. Rhuaridh

    Isn’t that Tony’s line?

    Rhuaridh Marr:

  71. @Dave Pinsen
    The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1397332942930710528?s=21

    Replies: @Currahee, @anonymous, @SaneClownPosse, @Corvinus

    Couldn’t find a black jarhead to stand at the door on St. George Floyd Day?

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @SaneClownPosse


    Couldn’t find a black jarhead to stand at the door on St. George Floyd Day?
     
    I’m sure they enjoyed the photo of a white Marine standing at attention to the spawn of that worthless P.O.S.
  72. @BenKenobi
    To vax, or not to vax. That is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer the seasonal jabs of outrageous quality, or to take up trolling against a sea of maskers, and by opposing trigger them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Reg Cæsar

    • Replies: @Bill B.
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is strange. I used, a couple of decades ago, to think Woody Allen was hilarious and, of course, sophisticated. Nowadays I find him unbearable. Like an overpraised child who thinks he is adorable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  73. That was the best headline I’ve seen since the NYP’s “Headless Body Found in Topless Bar.”

  74. @bomag
    ...there were so many gunshots, I thought a George Floyd remembrance was nearby

    Replies: @Richard B, @George

    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    No pun intended. Or was it?

    Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

    Oh brother!

    Let’s see if we can guess which letter of the LGBTQ colition wrote that headline.

  75. @Anonymous
    Off topic, but white cornerback alert. Troy Apke getting reps at CB in Redski...I mean Washington OTAs.

    https://twitter.com/john_keim/status/1397193865187241991

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Troy Apke ran a 4.34 second 40 yard dash at the draft combine.

  76. @Achmed E. Newman
    @BenKenobi

    Crap, Ben, I just wrote my version below before I saw this. I could still remove it, but, nah.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    No big deal. Also: I could have sworn I made a targeted reply to JW123’s post. Oh well.

  77. @JohnnyWalker123
    RIP, William Shakespeare.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1397288962176262147

    Replies: @El Dato, @Cortes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Dissident, @Achmed E. Newman, @Stan Adams

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day – May 25 – with death.

    [MORE]

    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer’s and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn’t forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn’t want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors’ journey westward across the Atlantic. His father’s forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: “You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations.”

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories – the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories – of which there are some, to be sure – out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother’s death. I’ve known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma’s long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls – my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I’ve felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don’t have to worry about those calls right now. The call I’ve been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected – permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Stan Adams

    Condolences on the passing of your grandmother, Stan.

    This is good stuff:


    He was trying to send me a message: “You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations.”
     
    Well put and important to remember.

    The minoritarians have--endlessly--pissed all over the accomplishments and character of the people who settled this land and made America free and prosperous--which, of course, they are only too happy to exploit.

    We must answer with a big FU--by never forgetting and never ceasing to be proud of whom we came from and honoring what they gave us with our own accomplishments.

    I wish you the best as patriarch of your family. I hope you are blessed with a loving wife and many children ready to carry on after you.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Stan Adams

    May you be comforted.

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @Stan Adams

    My condolences; may you be comforted at this time. You're wise for trying to mend fences with difficult family members, if only out of a realization that, as you nailed it, "life is too short." Grudges take too much energy.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Stan Adams

    My condolences, Stan.

    It's also good to hear that you were able to let go of some of the anger you were feeling about your family members.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Stan Adams

    Condolences.

    As for those who remain behind, as Adam Smith might have observed, there is great deal of ruin in a nation—and in a family. I've observed it in my own. And, perhaps like you, I've found myself as the last living one looking beyond the present generation. Maybe in a century or two we'll know if we succeed.


    Grandma’s long journey had finally reached its completion.
     
    If I may presume a bit upon your melancholy, it sounds like her mortal journey had completed some years ago, but lingered in the long twilight of modern medical subventions.

    Gracefully, now her post-mortal—or immortal—journey can begin—or resume.

    I'm not being metaphorical, and

    I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad.
     
    I think you're right. Not only that, I think that

    I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories
     
    you are providing her with sustenance to nourish her on her further journey.

    I'm sure she is grateful.
    , @PiltdownMan
    @Stan Adams

    My sincere condolences on the passing of your grandmother. May she rest in peace.

    , @Bill P
    @Stan Adams

    My oldest uncle died a couple days ago, quite suddenly. That leaves me as the oldest male descendant of my paternal grandfather (my father died in 2010), and the only one with sons.

    Whether I want to be or not, I am the family patriarch now.

    My uncle, born in 1941, was old but lucid. I didn't expect him to die for a while, and wanted to visit him again. It was very sad to hear the news, because suddenly I felt very alone as the last man in the family with a close connection to my grandfather.

    In this barbarous new age, these old ties of blood and affection are taking on new life. Our patrimony, when it isn't being outright stolen, is being degraded and insulted, but when it comes down to it that's about all we have of any value.

    Now that I think of it, my uncle reminded me of this not too long ago. He made sure I understood that my sons were the only boys in the family who carried on the family name, and that I had a special responsibility because of that.

    So looks like we're in a similar position now, Stan. Isn't it odd how you find yourself suddenly in this role through an act of grace? It's almost like being born in that you never asked for it, but here you are. For my part it was very emotionally painful to hear about my uncle's death. Knowing he was still around playing golf in Arizona comforted me, and suddenly that comfort of his presence was gone, leaving only memories and the unknown future.

    , @JMcG
    @Stan Adams

    May Eternal Light Shine Upon Her. I’m very sorry for your trouble.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Stan Adams

    My condolences.

  78. fruit loops

    lol

    Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

    nice

    Suck on some Pride

    Swallow your Pride

    Get yourself a hot load of Pride

    Guy with a milk moustache: got Pride?

    etc

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/af/29/3e/af293e8ce93fa511ce03c82159d480f6.jpg


    We once had a Loblaw's in our county. So we were among those rare few Americans lucky enough to have access to this.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

  79. @SaneClownPosse
    @Dave Pinsen

    Couldn't find a black jarhead to stand at the door on St. George Floyd Day?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

    Couldn’t find a black jarhead to stand at the door on St. George Floyd Day?

    I’m sure they enjoyed the photo of a white Marine standing at attention to the spawn of that worthless P.O.S.

  80. @Dr. X
    Gay cereal for your four-year-old at the breakfast table?

    I'm not a Bible thumper by any means, but it's become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation. I started out life as a flag-waving conservative -- but today this country absolutely sickens me.

    It can't implode soon enough.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    I’m not a Bible thumper by any means, but it’s become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation.

    I used to find it hilarious when the Ayatollah called us the Great Satan, but as things now stand, I think we have to give him that one.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri, BB753
    • LOL: Dnought, AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Charon
    @Harry Baldwin

    I agreed with him back then. Look at what Hollywood turns out and tell me we're not a sickening, depraved culture. Look at what this nation's kids watch on TV every day.

  81. @clifford brown
    I have always associated Gay Pride Parades with a sexualized atmosphere, but apparently Gay Pride Parades are for The Kiddies, at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    Times sure change fast.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wQh4OWGHF4

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?

    To me Vauch sounds like a fool trying to appear intellectual by speaking an odd word salad and acting arrogantly. Also, I cannot believe that he is 27.

    Who takes him seriously ?

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @AKAHorace


    Who takes him seriously ?
     
    The Youtube algorithm unfortunately.

    Just a few years back, Youtube had a right wing bent, or at least tolerated right wing speakers. All right wing content was abolished and now Youtube promotes Libertarian Socialism.

    Libertarian Socialism is total nonsense which is why The System now promotes it relentlessly.

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    , @Dissident
    @AKAHorace


    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?
     
    Excerpt below from Understanding Power: The Indispensable Chomsky (2002, New Press) Republished at Chomsky on libertarianism and Murray Rothbard:

    Man: What's the difference between "libertarian" and "anarchist," exactly?

    Chomsky: There's no difference, really. I think they're the same thing. But you see, "libertarian" has a special meaning in the United States. The United States is off the spectrum of the main tradition in this respect: what's called "libertarianism" here is unbridled capitalism. Now, that's always been opposed in the European libertarian tradition, where every anarchist has been a socialist—because the point is, if you have unbridled capitalism, you have all kinds of authority: you have extreme authority.
     

    Excerpt below from interview published at Noam Chomsky: The Kind of Anarchism I Believe in, and What's Wrong with Libertarians


    Chomsky: Well what’s called libertarian in the United States, which is a special U. S. phenomenon, it doesn’t really exist anywhere else — a little bit in England — permits a very high level of authority and domination but in the hands of private power: so private power should be unleashed to do whatever it likes. The assumption is that by some kind of magic, concentrated private power will lead to a more free and just society.
    [...]
    that kind of libertarianism, in my view, in the current world, is just a call for some of the worst kinds of tyranny, namely unaccountable private tyranny.
     
    Final excerpt, below, from transcript of 1970 lecture by Chomsky Government in the Future:

    Writing in the 1780's and early 1790's, Humboldt had no conception of the forms that industrial capitalism would take. Consequently, in this classic of classical liberalism, he stresses the problem of limiting state power, and he is not overly concerned with the dangers of private power. The reason is that he believes in and speaks of the essential equality of condition of private citizens, and of course he has no idea, writing in 1790, of the ways in which the notion of private person would come to be reinterpreted in the era of corporate capitalism.
     
  82. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa. First they will stop by the gutted pay phone stand where George rolled his first blunt of the day. Next they will pace back and forth in front of the convenience store where the Meth kicked in. After that they will walk the aisles of the store in a mysterious sequence of turns and reversals, then pause at the counter where George counted his crumpled bills not twice, not thrice, but a whole bunch of times. They will pause to view the cash register where the Levantine shop keeper identified George’s counterfeit 20, and though there are several bills devotees claim is the real fake 20, the original fake may indeed be lost to history. Then it’s back outside where George swallowed the rest of his fentanyl stash and struggled with the Roman sold- sorry, Minneapolis PD. There is a dark patch on the bitumen where George is said to have breathed his last, only a few minutes after he said he couldn’t breathe. Moving. I hope the locals are busy carving olive wood miniatures of his giant head.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @James Forrestal

    I like where you’re going with this. It raises the question, did anyone think to gather the sacred relics associated with Floyd at the time? What a shame it is if they didn’t. That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail and threads from the trousers Derek Chauvin wore while kneeling on Floyd’s neck would be like splinters of the True Cross.

    • LOL: northeast
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Harry Baldwin

    This clip has already taken on mythic status:

    https://twitter.com/e1aphos/status/1395540231311568898?s=20

    , @Pericles
    @Harry Baldwin


    That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail

     

    Miraculously, it had become a real $20, but the authorities were too blind to see.
    , @Rob McX
    @Harry Baldwin

    There could well be a brisk trade in Floydiana in the coming years. I hope his grave is safely sealed from relic hunters. I remember reading about some mediaeval relic dealers who boiled the body of a recently deceased holy man so that they could more easily extract the bones.

  83. Did anyone do the Chris Rock bit about violence on Martin Luther King Boulevard?

  84. The last time I checked (long ago), all the products, on the supermarket cereal aisle, contained added-sugar.

    I’m surprised that Bloomberg didn’t declare war on them.

    What’s the toy prize inside the box?

  85. Sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference between YT-basing and White Supremacy. Both sides agree on a lot of stuff:

    https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/1397301559390662657/photo/1

    https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/1397301559390662657

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @syonredux

    YT-bashing IS White Supremacy.

    Nobody bothers to bash the powerless and hapless - that would be in bad taste.

  86. @JohnnyWalker123
    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    https://twitter.com/ckuck/status/1397140095094906881

    Replies: @El Dato, @Joe Magarac, @Batman, @Desiderius, @Ed

    People would mock a white supremacist Turner-Diaries-wannabe writer if he named the open borders immigration lawyer character “Charles Kuck,” but here we are. We’ve got to be living in a simulation that is designed to keep on getting weirder until we all notice.

    • Agree: northeast
  87. @Trinity
    Didn't Lucky Charms beat them to the punch by introducing rainbows a few years back? I just bought a box of Frosted Mini-Wheats today, damn. I can give up Tony The Tiger and I always thought Snap-Crackle & Pop might have been on the DL anyway, but I have to have my Frosted Mini-Wheats. I hope Krispy Kreme will have a special on vanilla cremes during White Pride Day. Oh sheeit, we don't have White Pride Day or White Boy Day in the USA. Two vanilla cremes and one black coffee to go sung to the tune of Ice Ice Baby. Word to your mother.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Dnought

    Just buy a different brand of shredded wheat. I eat shredded wheat in the morning, but I started boycottting Kellogg last year because they now have a history of this type of advertising behavior:

    https://affirmativeright.blogspot.com/p/altright-bds-page.html

    Buy the Post Cereals equivalent or the store brand instead. They’re just as good. And you can get them unsweetened if you so choose.

  88. “Meanwhile, it’s never too early to be prepping for Gay Pride Day (Week? Month? Eternity?) by setting your children on the road to diabetic non-binaryness by buying them the latest offerings of Woke Capital, such as Kelloggs’ Non-Binary Froot Loops.”

    “gay pride” is cumming from behind every minute (sure, why not come out of the closet & just say it instead of suggesting); but this is an extremely serious matter when a major corp. with a previously wholesome image foists this sewage on unsuspecting children & their hapless parents. It shows just how far down the road of dissolution this country has traveled in a short time. Why doesn’t Kelloggs just go the final immoral mile & donate the proceeds to NAMBA? This would never happen in a sane society like Russia. In 2013, the Duma unanimously passed & Pres. Putin signed, legislation outlawing,“spreading information aimed at forming non- traditional sexual behavior among children, suggesting this behavior is attractive, and making a false statement about the socially equal nature of traditional and non-traditional relationships”; i.e. the homo propaganda bill. Mr. Putin said at the time, in a comment directed at Western critics, “Some countries…think that there is no need to protect children from this. We do.” Good advice.

    • Agree: Dissident
    • Replies: @Dissident
    @unwoke


    This would never happen in a sane society like Russia. In 2013, the Duma unanimously passed & Pres. Putin signed, legislation outlawing,“spreading information aimed at forming non- traditional sexual behavior among children, suggesting this behavior is attractive, and making a false statement about the socially equal nature of traditional and non-traditional relationships”; i.e. the homo propaganda bill. Mr. Putin said at the time, in a comment directed at Western critics, “Some countries…think that there is no need to protect children from this. We do.” Good advice.
     
    Strongly agree.

    Excerpt below from relevant comment of mine from a month ago.

    [An attempt to explain the complacency, indifference and even support for the wrong side among so many, when it comes to this area.]
    - (2-a) Those who think "Not my boy; no son of mine would ever-- could ever-- be a 'fag'".

    - (2-b) Those who accept both the doctrinaire assertion that homosexuality is invariably both innate as well as immutable, and the complete conflation between involuntary feelings and voluntary behaviors (and between homoerotic behavior, per se, and the specific, objectively unwholesome behaviors outlined in my previous comment). Based upon such beliefs, said individuals take the fatalistic and absolutist view that if a child of theirs (or a child in their ward, or anyone else) is or should turn-out to be "Gay", any attempt to prevent him from buggering and embracing the accompanying degenerate lifestyle would not only be futile but even harmful, cruel and immoral.
     
  89. @New Dealer
    I'm trying to imagine who would buy this for their children. Someone with the culinary tastes of the Jerry Springer audience and the political tastes of The New York Times op-ed audience?

    In other words, about ten people in the United States.

    Apologies, don't remember who, but another commenter here pointed out the mechanism of get woke/go broke business decisions. Applies to NBA, Oscars, MLB, Super Bowl, Star Wars, all those tv commercials that don't look like America, etc. You're in the planning meeting, and someone proposes making transgender Froot Loops. 9 of the 11 people there know it's a sure loser. But no one can be the first to object. The can't-be-the-first-to-stop-applauding-Stalin problem also applies during product performance review.

    What they need to do is vote by secret ballot. Millions of dollars lying on the sidewalk...

    Replies: @Dnought, @Whiskey

    You would probably be surprised how many people with “the political tastes of The New York Times op-ed audience” would buy anything their kid wants just to shut them up.

    And what makes you think a good chunk of “the Jerry Springer audience”, isn’t all in on this sort of nonsense?

  90. @JohnnyWalker123
    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    https://twitter.com/ckuck/status/1397140095094906881

    Replies: @El Dato, @Joe Magarac, @Batman, @Desiderius, @Ed

    Luckily for the Kucks of the world the R pols that exist bear absolutely no resemblance whatsoever to the R monsters you’ve constructed in your minds as hate objects. If anything Rs are chomping at the bit to import cheap labor even more than the Kucks are to import cheap votes.

  91. @syonredux
    Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference between YT-basing and White Supremacy. Both sides agree on a lot of stuff:

    https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/1397301559390662657/photo/1


    https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/1397301559390662657

    Replies: @Desiderius

    YT-bashing IS White Supremacy.

    Nobody bothers to bash the powerless and hapless – that would be in bad taste.

  92. @New Dealer
    I'm trying to imagine who would buy this for their children. Someone with the culinary tastes of the Jerry Springer audience and the political tastes of The New York Times op-ed audience?

    In other words, about ten people in the United States.

    Apologies, don't remember who, but another commenter here pointed out the mechanism of get woke/go broke business decisions. Applies to NBA, Oscars, MLB, Super Bowl, Star Wars, all those tv commercials that don't look like America, etc. You're in the planning meeting, and someone proposes making transgender Froot Loops. 9 of the 11 people there know it's a sure loser. But no one can be the first to object. The can't-be-the-first-to-stop-applauding-Stalin problem also applies during product performance review.

    What they need to do is vote by secret ballot. Millions of dollars lying on the sidewalk...

    Replies: @Dnought, @Whiskey

    Money printer go brrr for those corporate entities. So they will be just fine.

    Disney does not care if White y does not watch. Biden will pay for ever black person to get Disney Plus at 75 a month. Reparations.

    By contrast there is no money to be made off White people save their forced labor. Which is coming.

  93. Screw reading your post Steve. I am giving you mega-kudos for your headline: “(fags) coming from behind.”

    If I had a blog, and if I had your readership, I could absolutely do no better than this.

    Bravo!

  94. @Harry Baldwin
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I like where you're going with this. It raises the question, did anyone think to gather the sacred relics associated with Floyd at the time? What a shame it is if they didn't. That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail and threads from the trousers Derek Chauvin wore while kneeling on Floyd's neck would be like splinters of the True Cross.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pericles, @Rob McX

    This clip has already taken on mythic status:

    https://twitter.com/e1aphos/status/1395540231311568898?s=20

  95. @Anonymous
    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

    Replies: @Stan D Mute, @Anonymous

    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

    He’s my doppelgänger, just barely holding back his laughter at the hijinx of those affable Africans.

  96. Need i point out to you, yet again, that this emanates from the HBD Mitten?

    Kellogg? Battle Creek. It’s not ambiguous nor is it amberlamps.

    It’s all about the Mitten!

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Stan D Mute

    I noticed recently that Michigan license plates have a subtle DNA hologram motif running down the center. That combined with the new(?) state slogan of "PURE Michigan" written across the plates ... it's like they're trying to tell us something ... something about genetic purity ...

    DNA license plates, PURE Michigan, Kellogg, Ford, ... is Michigan secretly the most based state?

  97. Good Lord. This really happened. To celebrate the Feast of St.George.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Charon


    an external bad actor...
     
    Schwarzenegger? Redford? Travolta?
    , @Almost Missouri
    @Charon

    https://twitter.com/FaeceSocietatis/status/1396971904192368644

  98. @Harry Baldwin
    @Dr. X

    I’m not a Bible thumper by any means, but it’s become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation.

    I used to find it hilarious when the Ayatollah called us the Great Satan, but as things now stand, I think we have to give him that one.

    Replies: @Charon

    I agreed with him back then. Look at what Hollywood turns out and tell me we’re not a sickening, depraved culture. Look at what this nation’s kids watch on TV every day.

    • Agree: BB753
  99. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    Condolences on the passing of your grandmother, Stan.

    This is good stuff:

    He was trying to send me a message: “You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations.”

    Well put and important to remember.

    The minoritarians have–endlessly–pissed all over the accomplishments and character of the people who settled this land and made America free and prosperous–which, of course, they are only too happy to exploit.

    We must answer with a big FU–by never forgetting and never ceasing to be proud of whom we came from and honoring what they gave us with our own accomplishments.

    I wish you the best as patriarch of your family. I hope you are blessed with a loving wife and many children ready to carry on after you.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  100. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    May you be comforted.

  101. LOL on the Floyd “celebration”–appropriate and awesome!

    But the Fruit Loops thing is very sad. What the hell happened to my nation?

  102. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    fruit loops

    lol

    Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

    nice

    Suck on some Pride

    Swallow your Pride

    Get yourself a hot load of Pride

    Guy with a milk moustache: got Pride?

    etc

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    We once had a Loblaw’s in our county. So we were among those rare few Americans lucky enough to have access to this.

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Reg Cæsar

    One pound fer a pack of six, sorted

    Btw how you embed picture

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  103. Lileks today mentions that he drove past George Floyd Square just half an hour or so before the gunplay broke out, the shots rang out, the violence erupted, etc., etc.

    He posted a memorial ‘artwork’ depicting George Floyd that’s hung from the bell tower of a nearby church. As you can see, all it needs is some ‘-ity’ suffixes to achieve its full Derbyshirean expression:

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Lileks drove past the sacred square a half hour AFTER the shots rang out. He witnessed a bus being towed away which had it's tires shot out. His point was he drove by and everything seemed to be somewhat normal other than a bus getting towed. When he got to the office he found out he drove by after the place was shot up.

    Tbh, Lileks came awfully close to saying something not nice about St. George. Must be wanting to get out of his Strib contract. (JK, he loves that gig.)

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @Prester John
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Some wag said the shots were meant to be the equivalent of a 21-gun salute to St. George but the shooters couldn't count that high.

    Replies: @bruce county

  104. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    My condolences; may you be comforted at this time. You’re wise for trying to mend fences with difficult family members, if only out of a realization that, as you nailed it, “life is too short.” Grudges take too much energy.

    • Agree: Dissident
  105. @Charon
    Good Lord. This really happened. To celebrate the Feast of St.George.

    https://i.ibb.co/Qm3d73B/Capture-2021-05-26-01-07-20-2.png

    https://i.ibb.co/3stHctt/Capture-2021-05-26-01-08-08-2.png

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Almost Missouri

    an external bad actor…

    Schwarzenegger? Redford? Travolta?

  106. Pride is, of course, the foremost of the seven deadly sins.

    “Also known as hubris (from ancient Greek ὕβρις), or futility, it is identified as dangerously corrupt selfishness, the putting of one’s own desires, urges, wants, and whims before the welfare of other people.” (Wikipedia)

    Well, the shoe fits.

  107. Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride

    Maybe not seasonally appropriate but the spirit is there:

    I like the Thee Headcoatees version as well:

  108. @Reg Cæsar
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/af/29/3e/af293e8ce93fa511ce03c82159d480f6.jpg


    We once had a Loblaw's in our county. So we were among those rare few Americans lucky enough to have access to this.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    One pound fer a pack of six, sorted

    Btw how you embed picture

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Faggots and peas are my favorite meat dish. But you never see them on the menus of the most British of pubs here. The Hope and Anchor in Loves Park outside Rockford used to list it, but removed it. However, they still whipped up some for me last time I was there. They do offer Smothered Cock, Crispy Buff Cock, and Buff Cock Salad, so if you're looking for faggots, they'll be the patrons.


    Btw how you embed picture
     
    Just copy and paste the URL, as long as it ends in .jpg, .jpeg, .png, or .gif. If there are numbers or other codes following those extensions, you might have to erase them for the picture to show automatically. Otherwise it's text that the reader will have to click on-- and most won't. Post, then edit, then refresh, till you get it right.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

  109. @Stan D Mute
    Need i point out to you, yet again, that this emanates from the HBD Mitten?

    Kellogg? Battle Creek. It’s not ambiguous nor is it amberlamps.

    It’s all about the Mitten!

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I noticed recently that Michigan license plates have a subtle DNA hologram motif running down the center. That combined with the new(?) state slogan of “PURE Michigan” written across the plates … it’s like they’re trying to tell us something … something about genetic purity …

    DNA license plates, PURE Michigan, Kellogg, Ford, … is Michigan secretly the most based state?

    • Agree: Stan D Mute
  110. But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to “Following too closely.”

    • LOL: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Ralph L

    "Following too closely"? That's hilarious. Beats "doing 69 in a 36 zone."

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Ralph L


    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to “Following too closely.”
     
    https://www.azquotes.com/quote/230766
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Ralph L

    https://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-i-once-had-a-large-gay-following-but-i-ducked-into-an-alleyway-and-lost-him-emo-philips-23-7-0766.jpg

    , @Bill Jones
    @Ralph L

    I thought what went on the police report (for insurance purposes) was "rear-ended".

  111. @Harry Baldwin
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I like where you're going with this. It raises the question, did anyone think to gather the sacred relics associated with Floyd at the time? What a shame it is if they didn't. That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail and threads from the trousers Derek Chauvin wore while kneeling on Floyd's neck would be like splinters of the True Cross.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pericles, @Rob McX

    That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail

    Miraculously, it had become a real $20, but the authorities were too blind to see.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  112. @JohnnyD
    Something tells me that the Gay Pride Crowd doesn't mind bringing up the rear.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Something tells me that the Gay Pride Crowd doesn’t mind bringing up the rear.

    Often, that depends, at least in large part, on which side of it one is/would be on. Elaboration, for the interested reader, may be found across numerous posts in my comment archive.

  113. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    My condolences, Stan.

    It’s also good to hear that you were able to let go of some of the anger you were feeling about your family members.

  114. @Charon
    Good Lord. This really happened. To celebrate the Feast of St.George.

    https://i.ibb.co/Qm3d73B/Capture-2021-05-26-01-07-20-2.png

    https://i.ibb.co/3stHctt/Capture-2021-05-26-01-08-08-2.png

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Almost Missouri

    • LOL: El Dato
  115. Teen says she’ll sue her school district for $2m after they refused to publish her sonnet about George Floyd.

    That Minneapolis fentanyl death must have generated the greatest transfer of wealth ever.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Rob McX

    "Everybody shall have prices" never was good educational strategy.

  116. @Rob McX
    Teen says she'll sue her school district for $2m after they refused to publish her sonnet about George Floyd.

    That Minneapolis fentanyl death must have generated the greatest transfer of wealth ever.

    Replies: @El Dato

    “Everybody shall have prices” never was good educational strategy.

  117. @Ralph L
    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to "Following too closely."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    “Following too closely”? That’s hilarious. Beats “doing 69 in a 36 zone.”

  118. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa. First they will stop by the gutted pay phone stand where George rolled his first blunt of the day. Next they will pace back and forth in front of the convenience store where the Meth kicked in. After that they will walk the aisles of the store in a mysterious sequence of turns and reversals, then pause at the counter where George counted his crumpled bills not twice, not thrice, but a whole bunch of times. They will pause to view the cash register where the Levantine shop keeper identified George’s counterfeit 20, and though there are several bills devotees claim is the real fake 20, the original fake may indeed be lost to history. Then it’s back outside where George swallowed the rest of his fentanyl stash and struggled with the Roman sold- sorry, Minneapolis PD. There is a dark patch on the bitumen where George is said to have breathed his last, only a few minutes after he said he couldn’t breathe. Moving. I hope the locals are busy carving olive wood miniatures of his giant head.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @James Forrestal

    Look on the bright side – at least he didn’t rise from the dead.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Rob McX

    Yet. He might still get around to it. You're forgetting about C.P.T.

  119. @Harry Baldwin
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I like where you're going with this. It raises the question, did anyone think to gather the sacred relics associated with Floyd at the time? What a shame it is if they didn't. That counterfeit $20 would be equivalent to the Holy Grail and threads from the trousers Derek Chauvin wore while kneeling on Floyd's neck would be like splinters of the True Cross.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pericles, @Rob McX

    There could well be a brisk trade in Floydiana in the coming years. I hope his grave is safely sealed from relic hunters. I remember reading about some mediaeval relic dealers who boiled the body of a recently deceased holy man so that they could more easily extract the bones.

  120. Anonymous[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

    Replies: @Stan D Mute, @Anonymous

    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.

    He must have known that Sailer’s Law will keep him at minimal risk.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @Anonymous

    Armed only w/his White Privilege and sure knowledge of Sailer's Law, the Ubermensch strode manfully into the midwest ghetto squalor.

  121. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:

    Who ‘p*ssed all over your cornflakes’ this morning, Steve?

  122. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:

    Fun Fact:

    The phrase ” To get one’s oats ” is an archaic – and somewhat inexplicable ancient Cockney, (the vanishing culture, accent and argot of the indigenous working class Londoners), slang euphemism for the performance of the conjugal act.

  123. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    Condolences.

    As for those who remain behind, as Adam Smith might have observed, there is great deal of ruin in a nation—and in a family. I’ve observed it in my own. And, perhaps like you, I’ve found myself as the last living one looking beyond the present generation. Maybe in a century or two we’ll know if we succeed.

    Grandma’s long journey had finally reached its completion.

    If I may presume a bit upon your melancholy, it sounds like her mortal journey had completed some years ago, but lingered in the long twilight of modern medical subventions.

    Gracefully, now her post-mortal—or immortal—journey can begin—or resume.

    I’m not being metaphorical, and

    I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad.

    I think you’re right. Not only that, I think that

    I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories

    you are providing her with sustenance to nourish her on her further journey.

    I’m sure she is grateful.

  124. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Reg Cæsar

    One pound fer a pack of six, sorted

    Btw how you embed picture

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Faggots and peas are my favorite meat dish. But you never see them on the menus of the most British of pubs here. The Hope and Anchor in Loves Park outside Rockford used to list it, but removed it. However, they still whipped up some for me last time I was there. They do offer Smothered Cock, Crispy Buff Cock, and Buff Cock Salad, so if you’re looking for faggots, they’ll be the patrons.

    Btw how you embed picture

    Just copy and paste the URL, as long as it ends in .jpg, .jpeg, .png, or .gif. If there are numbers or other codes following those extensions, you might have to erase them for the picture to show automatically. Otherwise it’s text that the reader will have to click on– and most won’t. Post, then edit, then refresh, till you get it right.

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thank'ee kindly

  125. @Ralph L
    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to "Following too closely."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to “Following too closely.”

    https://www.azquotes.com/quote/230766

  126. @Ralph L
    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to "Following too closely."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

  127. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa. First they will stop by the gutted pay phone stand where George rolled his first blunt of the day. Next they will pace back and forth in front of the convenience store where the Meth kicked in. After that they will walk the aisles of the store in a mysterious sequence of turns and reversals, then pause at the counter where George counted his crumpled bills not twice, not thrice, but a whole bunch of times. They will pause to view the cash register where the Levantine shop keeper identified George’s counterfeit 20, and though there are several bills devotees claim is the real fake 20, the original fake may indeed be lost to history. Then it’s back outside where George swallowed the rest of his fentanyl stash and struggled with the Roman sold- sorry, Minneapolis PD. There is a dark patch on the bitumen where George is said to have breathed his last, only a few minutes after he said he couldn’t breathe. Moving. I hope the locals are busy carving olive wood miniatures of his giant head.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @James Forrestal

    Like Harry Baldwin, I like where you’re going with this, but I think that between the mob, the modern pharisees and the magistrates, it is Chauvin who is getting crucified, not Floyd. At best, Floyd has the Judas role: feckless suicide whose moral depravity condemns a better man.

    • Agree: duncsbaby, Calvin Hobbes
  128. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    My sincere condolences on the passing of your grandmother. May she rest in peace.

  129. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Lileks today mentions that he drove past George Floyd Square just half an hour or so before the gunplay broke out, the shots rang out, the violence erupted, etc., etc.

    He posted a memorial 'artwork' depicting George Floyd that's hung from the bell tower of a nearby church. As you can see, all it needs is some '-ity' suffixes to achieve its full Derbyshirean expression:

    http://lileks.com/bleats/archive/21/0521/4/misc/floyd.jpg

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @Prester John

    Lileks drove past the sacred square a half hour AFTER the shots rang out. He witnessed a bus being towed away which had it’s tires shot out. His point was he drove by and everything seemed to be somewhat normal other than a bus getting towed. When he got to the office he found out he drove by after the place was shot up.

    Tbh, Lileks came awfully close to saying something not nice about St. George. Must be wanting to get out of his Strib contract. (JK, he loves that gig.)

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @duncsbaby


    Lileks drove past the sacred square a half hour AFTER the shots rang out. He witnessed a bus being towed away which had it’s tires shot out. His point was he drove by and everything seemed to be somewhat normal other than a bus getting towed. When he got to the office he found out he drove by after the place was shot up.

     

    You're right; I misread it.

    Tbh, Lileks came awfully close to saying something not nice about St. George.

     

    Posting that photo of Big Art Icon George may have helped Lileks release some of his free-floating and heretofore pent-up rage.
  130. ‘Coming from behind’… or, as Jonathan Meades puts it “the love that dare not speak its name because its mouth is full”. Obviously with Kelloggs fruity tributes. Obviously.

  131. @bomag
    ...there were so many gunshots, I thought a George Floyd remembrance was nearby

    Replies: @Richard B, @George

    Reimagining memorial day as a BLM holiday would be a great excuse for a second fireworks holiday to kick off summer.

  132. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Look at the tall European guy (Dutchman?), arms folded, trying to ascertain the situation. Wow.
     
    He must have known that Sailer's Law will keep him at minimal risk.

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Armed only w/his White Privilege and sure knowledge of Sailer’s Law, the Ubermensch strode manfully into the midwest ghetto squalor.

  133. @Ralph L
    But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind

    Back when it was still illegal, good lawyer could get your sodomy charge reduced to "Following too closely."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    I thought what went on the police report (for insurance purposes) was “rear-ended”.

  134. @duncsbaby
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Lileks drove past the sacred square a half hour AFTER the shots rang out. He witnessed a bus being towed away which had it's tires shot out. His point was he drove by and everything seemed to be somewhat normal other than a bus getting towed. When he got to the office he found out he drove by after the place was shot up.

    Tbh, Lileks came awfully close to saying something not nice about St. George. Must be wanting to get out of his Strib contract. (JK, he loves that gig.)

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Lileks drove past the sacred square a half hour AFTER the shots rang out. He witnessed a bus being towed away which had it’s tires shot out. His point was he drove by and everything seemed to be somewhat normal other than a bus getting towed. When he got to the office he found out he drove by after the place was shot up.

    You’re right; I misread it.

    Tbh, Lileks came awfully close to saying something not nice about St. George.

    Posting that photo of Big Art Icon George may have helped Lileks release some of his free-floating and heretofore pent-up rage.

  135. @Reg Cæsar
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Faggots and peas are my favorite meat dish. But you never see them on the menus of the most British of pubs here. The Hope and Anchor in Loves Park outside Rockford used to list it, but removed it. However, they still whipped up some for me last time I was there. They do offer Smothered Cock, Crispy Buff Cock, and Buff Cock Salad, so if you're looking for faggots, they'll be the patrons.


    Btw how you embed picture
     
    Just copy and paste the URL, as long as it ends in .jpg, .jpeg, .png, or .gif. If there are numbers or other codes following those extensions, you might have to erase them for the picture to show automatically. Otherwise it's text that the reader will have to click on-- and most won't. Post, then edit, then refresh, till you get it right.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Thank’ee kindly

  136. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    My oldest uncle died a couple days ago, quite suddenly. That leaves me as the oldest male descendant of my paternal grandfather (my father died in 2010), and the only one with sons.

    Whether I want to be or not, I am the family patriarch now.

    My uncle, born in 1941, was old but lucid. I didn’t expect him to die for a while, and wanted to visit him again. It was very sad to hear the news, because suddenly I felt very alone as the last man in the family with a close connection to my grandfather.

    In this barbarous new age, these old ties of blood and affection are taking on new life. Our patrimony, when it isn’t being outright stolen, is being degraded and insulted, but when it comes down to it that’s about all we have of any value.

    Now that I think of it, my uncle reminded me of this not too long ago. He made sure I understood that my sons were the only boys in the family who carried on the family name, and that I had a special responsibility because of that.

    So looks like we’re in a similar position now, Stan. Isn’t it odd how you find yourself suddenly in this role through an act of grace? It’s almost like being born in that you never asked for it, but here you are. For my part it was very emotionally painful to hear about my uncle’s death. Knowing he was still around playing golf in Arizona comforted me, and suddenly that comfort of his presence was gone, leaving only memories and the unknown future.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  137. @JohnnyWalker123
    Amnesty is dead for the rest of this year (and perhaps for the rest of the Biden administration).

    https://twitter.com/ckuck/status/1397140095094906881

    Replies: @El Dato, @Joe Magarac, @Batman, @Desiderius, @Ed

    Arizona senators were never going to go for it anyway. Quite a few Dems are hiding behind the filibuster.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Ed

    Sinema and Manchin saved us from amnesty by refusing to break the filibuster.

  138. @clifford brown
    I was and remain adamant that there was some sort of Black Magick/ Occult forces behind much of the George Floyd worship weirdness of last June. It was all so over the top.

    This video implies perhaps God or at least the trickster spirit Loki is pushing back one year in. Deals with The Devil seldom work out as planned.

    Replies: @Paul Rise

    Google Kek – you may be closer to the mark than anyone is willing to believe.

  139. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    May Eternal Light Shine Upon Her. I’m very sorry for your trouble.

  140. @MBlanc46
    I’d boycott Kellogg’s, but I don’t use any of their products as it is.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Desiderius

    You’ve discovered the causality here. Wokelism is downmarket and if you’re stuck making buggy whips downmarket is all you’ve got.

  141. @MBlanc46
    I’d boycott Kellogg’s, but I don’t use any of their products as it is.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Desiderius

    You’ve discovered the causality here. Wokelism is downmarket and if you’re stuck making buggy whips downmarket is all you’ve got.

    See also Raytheon.

  142. @Hodag
    Grooming cereal. Repeat this.

    Replies: @sayless

    Do kids still read the cereal box while they’re eating? I wonder what that box says.

  143. @Dr. X
    Gay cereal for your four-year-old at the breakfast table?

    I'm not a Bible thumper by any means, but it's become quite evident to me that America is a Satanic nation. I started out life as a flag-waving conservative -- but today this country absolutely sickens me.

    It can't implode soon enough.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    The number of “trans-kids” or drag queen kids or non-binary kids whose parents aren’t in jail for abuse certainly proves your assertion.

  144. @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s0AE3kGyhbQ

    Replies: @Bill B.

    It is strange. I used, a couple of decades ago, to think Woody Allen was hilarious and, of course, sophisticated. Nowadays I find him unbearable. Like an overpraised child who thinks he is adorable.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill B.


    It is strange. I used, a couple of decades ago, to think Woody Allen was hilarious and, of course, sophisticated. Nowadays I find him unbearable. Like an overpraised child who thinks he is adorable.

     

    Bob Denver retired on his residuals because he said his type of character wouldn't be as viable after age forty. Though that didn't stop Don Knotts. (Knotts grew up in West Virginia, and Denver retired there.)

    Perhaps this is why Allen went serious and directorial. Hell, he already looked like an old man at 35.
  145. Damn, I hate when loud noises “break the quiet”. That’s as bad as when “shots ring out”. Won’t someone do something about all this noise pollution?

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
    @West reanimator

    Of course. And that happened because "the gun went off." And so on. Typically alternating with the passive voice: "shots were fired," "the quiet was broken." Next up: "holes appeared in his body," then "blood flowed out."

    The basic rule here is that when a non-White is the apparent perpetrator, any moral agency involved automatically inheres to the nearest inanimate object, sound, related abstract concept, etc.

    Conversely, when the alleged perpetrator is a White goy, moral agency is immediately and irrevocably ascribed to him -- hence he is the subject of the accusatory sentence. And the motive is typically assumed to be some sort of openly-heretical "hatred" [---phobia/ ---ism/ etc.] directed at an intersectionally-privileged Other.

    The exact rule is probably spelled out in the AP Stylebook somewhere.

  146. Can’t anyone other than iSteve fans see how contrived all of this is?

  147. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Lileks today mentions that he drove past George Floyd Square just half an hour or so before the gunplay broke out, the shots rang out, the violence erupted, etc., etc.

    He posted a memorial 'artwork' depicting George Floyd that's hung from the bell tower of a nearby church. As you can see, all it needs is some '-ity' suffixes to achieve its full Derbyshirean expression:

    http://lileks.com/bleats/archive/21/0521/4/misc/floyd.jpg

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @Prester John

    Some wag said the shots were meant to be the equivalent of a 21-gun salute to St. George but the shooters couldn’t count that high.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Prester John


    Some wag said the shots were meant to be the equivalent of a 21-gun salute to St. George but the shooters couldn’t count that high.
     
    Well now... It all makes sense.
  148. @CCZ

    "Kellogg’s new LGBTQ cereal wants to fill your mouth with Pride"
     
    But I would imagine that the LGBTQI+++crowd would really rather fill their mouths with something a little more "organic," either some C or C or (for the bi-crowd) both??

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    It won’t affect regular people. Those sugary cereals are disgusting and unhealthy. The nanny in me says they are as bad for Americans as drugs and far more sinister. They’re racist! Let’s ban them!

    Honestly, I see all those colorful boxes on the shelves at Walmart, but I never see them in anybody’s cart. They wouldn’t stock stuff that doesn’t sell, so… who buys it?

  149. @Charon
    @El Dato

    What's weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos. Does any other group do that? Okay, one weird thing about homos.


    nothing says Pride quite like fruity glitter
     

    Replies: @Dissident, @stillCARealist

    The whole “be yourself” mantra that everybody seeks to live by has some pernicious consequences. What if the “real you” is a pervert? What if it’s a scared little child? Or a man/woman-hater?

    In some ways it’s best not to find the real you because that person may be awful. Aspire to be better than the real you and actually accomplish something important. We used to call this Growing Up.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  150. I really think Kellogs should be punished for this. Is there any other brand of corn-flakes, one that Kellogs makes no money off of at all?

  151. bruce county says:
    @Bill P
    @anon

    Sounds like projection. He was probably a repressed pederast. Bummer for him, but nobody should have taken him seriously. Circumcision is a religious mandate for some people, and who am I to condemn their faith if it doesn't concern me? But for everyone else, needlessly putting your little boy under the knife should be repulsive.

    Replies: @bruce county

    Circumcision is a religious mandate for some people, and who am I to condemn their faith if it doesn’t concern me? But for everyone else, needlessly putting your little boy under the knife should be repulsive.

    Sorry Billy.. Women prefer the German helmet. I thank my mom and dad for mine…And the wife likes to hug it… ALOT. LOL

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  152. @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Arizona senators were never going to go for it anyway. Quite a few Dems are hiding behind the filibuster.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Sinema and Manchin saved us from amnesty by refusing to break the filibuster.

    • Agree: Ed
  153. @Stan Adams
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My grandmother died early this morning. As long as I live, I will associate this day - May 25 - with death.



    Having witnessed her steady decline over the last decade, watching helplessly as Alzheimer's and other assorted health crises robbed her of her memory, her mobility, and (ultimately) her dignity, tonight I have no more tears left to shed. The person I knew in my youth with died years ago. What was left at the end was a broken-down shell of a human being. In her final weeks she could not even open her eyes or speak a single intelligible word. Whether she was still able to dream, I do not know, and I never will know. I hope so.

    I spent the morning with my mother and the afternoon with my cousin and my aunt. (Yes, I was royally pissed off at them a couple of weeks ago. The anger faded pretty quickly. I didn't forgive them so much as I realized the triviality and futility of nursing a petty grudge. Life is too short.) I made a few phone calls.

    I am the last person in my family who is on speaking terms with my uncle. No one else wants to talk to him and he doesn't want to talk to anyone else. Today I called him to tell him that his mother had died. He thanked me for keeping him in the loop over the last few years. I told him I knew it was what my grandparents would have wanted.

    Not long before he died of lung cancer, my grandfather sat me down and told me the entire history of his side of the family, relating our ancestors' journey westward across the Atlantic. His father's forefathers landed in Virginia in the seventeenth century; over the next two hundred years, they migrated as far west as Kansas. His mother was a native of Tampa, making me a fourth-generation Floridian.

    I was a bit too young to be able to remember more than a handful of the names and dates that he recited, but I suspect that he never wanted or expected me to memorize a bunch of historical trivia. He was trying to send me a message: "You come from a long lineage, a proud tradition, and it is your privilege and your duty to do justice to the memory of those who have lived and died so that you can be here today. You must be worthy of the collective sacrifices of a thousand generations."

    To the extent that I am the only person in my family who seems to recognize the importance of this sense of continuity, I am the patriarch. I am the only one making even a token effort to keep the flame of familial unity from dissipating forever. My grandfather embraced his role as family leader with relish; my uncle, his namesake and his ostensible heir, refused it with disgust. I have assumed it reluctantly, with great humility, out of a sense of obligation to the dead. No one else wants the job, or even regards it as something worth doing.

    Grandma is dead, but I am not sad because I know that she would not want me to be sad. She would want me to focus on the happy times. So I will honor her memory by cherishing the good memories - the birthdays and Thanksgivings and Christmases straight out of old Norman Rockwell paintings; the lazy summer afternoons running through her yard and climbing her trees and swimming in her pool; the long weekend nights watching old movies. I will do my best to put the bad memories - of which there are some, to be sure - out of my mind.

    It is almost midnight here in the Eastern time zone. For the last few weeks, I have gone to bed every night around this time knowing that my slumber might be interrupted by the dreaded phone call bringing news of my grandmother's death. I've known for quite a few years now that one day I would have to take that call, and I would have to absorb the news that Grandma's long journey had finally reached its completion. Early this morning it finally happened.

    In a sense it is comforting to know that I will never have to spend another minute of my life waiting for that call. There will be other calls - my mother is not in great shape, and I am not optimistic that she will make it to 80, let alone 90. Lately I've felt a strong compulsion to try to locate my father, due to a disquieting sense that things are not going particularly well for him.

    But I don't have to worry about those calls right now. The call I've been dreading about Grandma has been made, and answered, and that particular number has been disconnected - permanently. Her struggle is finally over. Her soul is finally at peace.

    Sweet dreams.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @kaganovitch, @Gary in Gramercy, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri, @PiltdownMan, @Bill P, @JMcG, @JohnnyWalker123

    My condolences.

  154. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In honor of Gay Pride Month, I propose a toast.

    Bottoms up!

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Swamp Fox

    Chin, chin!

  155. bruce county says:
    @Prester John
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Some wag said the shots were meant to be the equivalent of a 21-gun salute to St. George but the shooters couldn't count that high.

    Replies: @bruce county

    Some wag said the shots were meant to be the equivalent of a 21-gun salute to St. George but the shooters couldn’t count that high.

    Well now… It all makes sense.

  156. @Change that Matters
    https://twitter.com/TGHalk/status/1397187851096309769

    Replies: @Ragno


    Attention Peter Max and Sheppard Fairey: your latest “lithograph scam” has arrived.

    How many money-for-nothing lefties would gladly plunk down five or ten grand apiece for a genuine original St George – in your choice of Pride colors? Only 5000 genuine originals will be sold!

    • Agree: Change that Matters
  157. @Bill B.
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is strange. I used, a couple of decades ago, to think Woody Allen was hilarious and, of course, sophisticated. Nowadays I find him unbearable. Like an overpraised child who thinks he is adorable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It is strange. I used, a couple of decades ago, to think Woody Allen was hilarious and, of course, sophisticated. Nowadays I find him unbearable. Like an overpraised child who thinks he is adorable.

    Bob Denver retired on his residuals because he said his type of character wouldn’t be as viable after age forty. Though that didn’t stop Don Knotts. (Knotts grew up in West Virginia, and Denver retired there.)

    Perhaps this is why Allen went serious and directorial. Hell, he already looked like an old man at 35.

  158. “Together” cereal, now with puberty blockers!

  159. @Anon
    Along with the comments, this has to be the most bizarre article you have ever posted.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Along with the comments, this has to be the most bizarre article you have ever posted.

    iSteve just comments on the world he lives in. And it’s not getting any saner…

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  160. ‘St. George Floyd Day Gets Off to a Culturally Appropriate Start with a Bang, But Gay Pride Month Is Coming from Behind’

    Do you have to work to come up with these — or do they just spring to mind unbidden?

  161. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa. First they will stop by the gutted pay phone stand where George rolled his first blunt of the day. Next they will pace back and forth in front of the convenience store where the Meth kicked in. After that they will walk the aisles of the store in a mysterious sequence of turns and reversals, then pause at the counter where George counted his crumpled bills not twice, not thrice, but a whole bunch of times. They will pause to view the cash register where the Levantine shop keeper identified George’s counterfeit 20, and though there are several bills devotees claim is the real fake 20, the original fake may indeed be lost to history. Then it’s back outside where George swallowed the rest of his fentanyl stash and struggled with the Roman sold- sorry, Minneapolis PD. There is a dark patch on the bitumen where George is said to have breathed his last, only a few minutes after he said he couldn’t breathe. Moving. I hope the locals are busy carving olive wood miniatures of his giant head.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @James Forrestal

    In the future pilgrims will walk George Floyd’s Via Dolorosa.

    The first juror picked for the trial [the jew chemist] literally admitted to making a pilgrimage to “George Floyd Square”* with his fiance. Seriously. But he claimed that he averted his eyes from the video, so…

    *Personally, I think “Cup Foods Corner” scans better, but “the people” have spoken on that one, and their choice is final.

  162. @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    "Alien 3"

    The David Fincher cut is the one to watch.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    “Alien 3”

    Man, I even got the quote wrong!

    This whole aging thing sucks.

  163. @Dissident
    @Charon


    What’s weird about homos is how readily they embrace the most pernicious stereotypes about homos.
     
    It certainly seems that way.

    The LGBTQ lobby insists that those whom they represent are, except for the limited area of the subjects of their sexual interests/ their gender identity, etc., just like everyone else. No less competent to be parents, or to hold any position in society, etc. Of no less wholesome moral character than those with bourgeois sexual mores, etc.

    This, while assaulting society-at-large with the lurid and even obscene spectacles that are the "Pride" events. Has there been even one that did not prominently exhibit both abject lewdness, as well as abject self-caricature? To say nothing of the perennial indoctrination and conditioning campaigns targeted at children and adolescents (often in public schools, and otherwise with the blessings and funding of the State).

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    The “events” are also part of the alphabet soup recruiting and indoctrination effort.

  164. @West reanimator
    Damn, I hate when loud noises "break the quiet". That's as bad as when "shots ring out". Won't someone do something about all this noise pollution?

    Replies: @James Forrestal

    Of course. And that happened because “the gun went off.” And so on. Typically alternating with the passive voice: “shots were fired,” “the quiet was broken.” Next up: “holes appeared in his body,” then “blood flowed out.”

    The basic rule here is that when a non-White is the apparent perpetrator, any moral agency involved automatically inheres to the nearest inanimate object, sound, related abstract concept, etc.

    Conversely, when the alleged perpetrator is a White goy, moral agency is immediately and irrevocably ascribed to him — hence he is the subject of the accusatory sentence. And the motive is typically assumed to be some sort of openly-heretical “hatred” [—phobia/ —ism/ etc.] directed at an intersectionally-privileged Other.

    The exact rule is probably spelled out in the AP Stylebook somewhere.

    • Agree: photondancer, Dissident
  165. Remember a decade ago when Glee was popular, “Born This Way” was on the radio, gay marriage was headed to the Supreme Court? I thought that was kind of it. As a gay man, I was happy that it finally seemed that culture had really changed and it wasn’t going to be a problem anymore. I’d be able to be out at work with no issue, get married if I wanted and pay a little less taxes, retire comfortably and just live life without having to second guess how “out” I could be. That we’d just become part of the new normal and that would be that. I really didn’t think there was any merit to the “slippery slope, this is just the beginning” argument.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
    @DextersLabRat


    Remember a decade ago when Glee was popular, “Born This Way” was on the radio, gay marriage was headed to the Supreme Court? I thought that was kind of it. As a gay man...
     
    But now it's the current year, and that phrase amounts to strategic essentialism, as the currently-hegemonic ideology on this topic, "queer theory", would put it:

    Following social constructivist developments in sociology, queer theorists are often critical of ssentialist views of sexuality and gender

    But whereas the terms 'homosexual', ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ which they used signified particular identities with stable referents (i.e to a certain cultural form, historical context, or political agenda whose meanings can be analysed sociologically), the word ‘queer’ is instead defined in relation to a range of practices, behaviours and issues that have meaning only in their shared contrast to categories which are alleged to be 'normal'. Such a focus highlights the indebtedness of queer theory to the concept of normalisation found in the sociology of deviance, particularly through the work of Michel Foucault, who studied the normalisation of heterosexuality in his seminal work The History of Sexuality

    Fundamentally, queer theory does not construct or defend any particular identity, but instead, grounded in post-structuralism and deconstruction, it works to actively critique heteronormativity, exposing and breaking down traditional assumptions that sexual and gender identities are presumed to be heterosexual or cisgender.

    So the goal is constant subversion of whatever the current "normal" is -- bordering on ontological nihilism. See also:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power-knowledge#Foucault's_contributions

    Deconstructing and Reconstructing Identity: How Queer Liberation Organizations Deploy Collective Identities

    https://literariness.org/2018/03/11/key-theories-of-judith-butler/

    https://everydayfeminism.com/2015/11/queer-not-born-this-way/

    Etc. The main target for the past couple of years [other than the remnants of normal society in general] seems to be White radical feminists/ "TERFS" -- 2nd wave feminist style "gender essentialism" is incompatible with the transsexualist narrative. Of course, the feminists try to turn it around and claim that the "male brain in a female body" trope is the real biological essentialism, but that works about as well for them as "Dems R da REAL 'racists!" does for conservatards.

    Next target: White male "sexual orientation essentialists?" Hmm...
  166. @Joe Magarac
    "Cereal" that amounts to candy for breakfast is bad for children, even without the sodomy. /snicker

    Replies: @DextersLabRat

    Really this. If you’re dumb enough to give this garbage to your children then pronouns are the least of their worries.

  167. Not to be out done, General Mills is coming out with Queerios. You pour them into a bowl, and they eat each other.

  168. @AKAHorace
    @clifford brown

    at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?

    To me Vauch sounds like a fool trying to appear intellectual by speaking an odd word salad and acting arrogantly. Also, I cannot believe that he is 27.

    Who takes him seriously ?

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Dissident

    Who takes him seriously ?

    The Youtube algorithm unfortunately.

    Just a few years back, Youtube had a right wing bent, or at least tolerated right wing speakers. All right wing content was abolished and now Youtube promotes Libertarian Socialism.

    Libertarian Socialism is total nonsense which is why The System now promotes it relentlessly.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @clifford brown


    Libertarian Socialism is total nonsense which is why The System now promotes it relentlessly.
     
    Well Libertarianism is popular and cool. And Socialism is popular and cool. Just combine them right ?

    Have you watched Vaush. I am fascinated, he has nothing important to say, but he always says it with this perfect gravitas.
  169. @Rob McX
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Look on the bright side - at least he didn't rise from the dead.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Yet. He might still get around to it. You’re forgetting about C.P.T.

  170. @AKAHorace
    @clifford brown

    at least according to VAUSH, the King of Autistic Anarcho-Communist Libertarian Youtube.

    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?

    To me Vauch sounds like a fool trying to appear intellectual by speaking an odd word salad and acting arrogantly. Also, I cannot believe that he is 27.

    Who takes him seriously ?

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Dissident

    What is Libertarian Socialism ? How is that supposed to work ?

    Excerpt below from Understanding Power: The Indispensable Chomsky (2002, New Press) Republished at Chomsky on libertarianism and Murray Rothbard:

    Man: What’s the difference between “libertarian” and “anarchist,” exactly?

    Chomsky: There’s no difference, really. I think they’re the same thing. But you see, “libertarian” has a special meaning in the United States. The United States is off the spectrum of the main tradition in this respect: what’s called “libertarianism” here is unbridled capitalism. Now, that’s always been opposed in the European libertarian tradition, where every anarchist has been a socialist—because the point is, if you have unbridled capitalism, you have all kinds of authority: you have extreme authority.

    [MORE]

    Excerpt below from interview published at Noam Chomsky: The Kind of Anarchism I Believe in, and What’s Wrong with Libertarians

    Chomsky: Well what’s called libertarian in the United States, which is a special U. S. phenomenon, it doesn’t really exist anywhere else — a little bit in England — permits a very high level of authority and domination but in the hands of private power: so private power should be unleashed to do whatever it likes. The assumption is that by some kind of magic, concentrated private power will lead to a more free and just society.
    […]
    that kind of libertarianism, in my view, in the current world, is just a call for some of the worst kinds of tyranny, namely unaccountable private tyranny.

    Final excerpt, below, from transcript of 1970 lecture by Chomsky Government in the Future:

    Writing in the 1780’s and early 1790’s, Humboldt had no conception of the forms that industrial capitalism would take. Consequently, in this classic of classical liberalism, he stresses the problem of limiting state power, and he is not overly concerned with the dangers of private power. The reason is that he believes in and speaks of the essential equality of condition of private citizens, and of course he has no idea, writing in 1790, of the ways in which the notion of private person would come to be reinterpreted in the era of corporate capitalism.

    • Thanks: AKAHorace
  171. @unwoke
    "Meanwhile, it’s never too early to be prepping for Gay Pride Day (Week? Month? Eternity?) by setting your children on the road to diabetic non-binaryness by buying them the latest offerings of Woke Capital, such as Kelloggs’ Non-Binary Froot Loops."

    "gay pride" is cumming from behind every minute (sure, why not come out of the closet & just say it instead of suggesting); but this is an extremely serious matter when a major corp. with a previously wholesome image foists this sewage on unsuspecting children & their hapless parents. It shows just how far down the road of dissolution this country has traveled in a short time. Why doesn't Kelloggs just go the final immoral mile & donate the proceeds to NAMBA? This would never happen in a sane society like Russia. In 2013, the Duma unanimously passed & Pres. Putin signed, legislation outlawing,“spreading information aimed at forming non- traditional sexual behavior among children, suggesting this behavior is attractive, and making a false statement about the socially equal nature of traditional and non-traditional relationships”; i.e. the homo propaganda bill. Mr. Putin said at the time, in a comment directed at Western critics, “Some countries...think that there is no need to protect children from this. We do.” Good advice.

    Replies: @Dissident

    This would never happen in a sane society like Russia. In 2013, the Duma unanimously passed & Pres. Putin signed, legislation outlawing,“spreading information aimed at forming non- traditional sexual behavior among children, suggesting this behavior is attractive, and making a false statement about the socially equal nature of traditional and non-traditional relationships”; i.e. the homo propaganda bill. Mr. Putin said at the time, in a comment directed at Western critics, “Some countries…think that there is no need to protect children from this. We do.” Good advice.

    Strongly agree.

    Excerpt below from relevant comment of mine from a month ago.

    [An attempt to explain the complacency, indifference and even support for the wrong side among so many, when it comes to this area.]
    – (2-a) Those who think “Not my boy; no son of mine would ever– could ever– be a ‘fag’”.

    – (2-b) Those who accept both the doctrinaire assertion that homosexuality is invariably both innate as well as immutable, and the complete conflation between involuntary feelings and voluntary behaviors (and between homoerotic behavior, per se, and the specific, objectively unwholesome behaviors outlined in my previous comment). Based upon such beliefs, said individuals take the fatalistic and absolutist view that if a child of theirs (or a child in their ward, or anyone else) is or should turn-out to be “Gay”, any attempt to prevent him from buggering and embracing the accompanying degenerate lifestyle would not only be futile but even harmful, cruel and immoral.

  172. @Dave Pinsen
    The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1397332942930710528?s=21

    Replies: @Currahee, @anonymous, @SaneClownPosse, @Corvinus

    “The responses to the Evan Vucci tweet make one question the 19th Amendment.”

    According to Who/Whom?

  173. @DextersLabRat
    Remember a decade ago when Glee was popular, "Born This Way" was on the radio, gay marriage was headed to the Supreme Court? I thought that was kind of it. As a gay man, I was happy that it finally seemed that culture had really changed and it wasn't going to be a problem anymore. I'd be able to be out at work with no issue, get married if I wanted and pay a little less taxes, retire comfortably and just live life without having to second guess how "out" I could be. That we'd just become part of the new normal and that would be that. I really didn't think there was any merit to the "slippery slope, this is just the beginning" argument.

    Replies: @James Forrestal

    Remember a decade ago when Glee was popular, “Born This Way” was on the radio, gay marriage was headed to the Supreme Court? I thought that was kind of it. As a gay man…

    But now it’s the current year, and that phrase amounts to strategic essentialism, as the currently-hegemonic ideology on this topic, “queer theory”, would put it:

    Following social constructivist developments in sociology, queer theorists are often critical of ssentialist views of sexuality and gender

    But whereas the terms ‘homosexual’, ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ which they used signified particular identities with stable referents (i.e to a certain cultural form, historical context, or political agenda whose meanings can be analysed sociologically), the word ‘queer’ is instead defined in relation to a range of practices, behaviours and issues that have meaning only in their shared contrast to categories which are alleged to be ‘normal’. Such a focus highlights the indebtedness of queer theory to the concept of normalisation found in the sociology of deviance, particularly through the work of Michel Foucault, who studied the normalisation of heterosexuality in his seminal work The History of Sexuality

    Fundamentally, queer theory does not construct or defend any particular identity, but instead, grounded in post-structuralism and deconstruction, it works to actively critique heteronormativity, exposing and breaking down traditional assumptions that sexual and gender identities are presumed to be heterosexual or cisgender.

    So the goal is constant subversion of whatever the current “normal” is — bordering on ontological nihilism. See also:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power-knowledge#Foucault’s_contributions

    Deconstructing and Reconstructing Identity: How Queer Liberation Organizations Deploy Collective Identities

    https://literariness.org/2018/03/11/key-theories-of-judith-butler/

    https://everydayfeminism.com/2015/11/queer-not-born-this-way/

    Etc. The main target for the past couple of years [other than the remnants of normal society in general] seems to be White radical feminists/ “TERFS” — 2nd wave feminist style “gender essentialism” is incompatible with the transsexualist narrative. Of course, the feminists try to turn it around and claim that the “male brain in a female body” trope is the real biological essentialism, but that works about as well for them as “Dems R da REAL ‘racists!” does for conservatards.

    Next target: White male “sexual orientation essentialists?” Hmm…

  174. @clifford brown
    @AKAHorace


    Who takes him seriously ?
     
    The Youtube algorithm unfortunately.

    Just a few years back, Youtube had a right wing bent, or at least tolerated right wing speakers. All right wing content was abolished and now Youtube promotes Libertarian Socialism.

    Libertarian Socialism is total nonsense which is why The System now promotes it relentlessly.

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    Libertarian Socialism is total nonsense which is why The System now promotes it relentlessly.

    Well Libertarianism is popular and cool. And Socialism is popular and cool. Just combine them right ?

    Have you watched Vaush. I am fascinated, he has nothing important to say, but he always says it with this perfect gravitas.

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