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Yesterday I reflected upon the paradox that leftist opinion magazines, such as The Nation, traditionally garnered more big money sponsors than rightist opinion outlets, which tend to have pretty low-rent advertisers.

In contrast, it’s interesting to look at advertising for a TV broadcast where nobody ever mentions politics but virtually every American on screen is a Republican: the Masters golf tournament, which has the classiest, most CEO-level advertising of any show on television. From Reuters in 2016:

At the Masters, which this week celebrates its 80th edition, sponsors are limited to five: global sponsors AT&T, IBM, and Mercedes-Benz, and international partners UPS and Rolex.

All five are estimated to pay upwards of $6 million annually to have zero signage in view on property, share a combined four minutes of ads per broadcast hour, and follow extremely stringent, narrow rules about how their association with the world’s most exclusive golf tournament can be promoted.

Golf broadcast advertising can be hilariously targeted: I recall the Boeing ads about why the next fleet of airliners you buy should be Boeings.

It would be pretty amusing to actually hear the stars of The Masters discuss politics: e.g., a 90 minute debate between Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson over which one of them hates Democrats the most. That would probably get pretty good ratings, but it wouldn’t get Mercedes-Benz to sponsor it.

 
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  1. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    At the Masters, which this week celebrates its 80th edition, sponsors are limited to five: global sponsors AT&T, IBM, and Mercedes-Benz, and international partners UPS and Rolex.

    The enduring legacy of Peter Ueberroth, who cut through the sponsorship underbrush with a machete for the profitable 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and allowed only a small number of large corporations to participate, by paying the big bucks.

    • Replies: @Barnard
  2. IHTG says:

    advertising for a TV broadcast where nobody ever mentions politics but virtually every American on screen is a Republican

    How’s the advertising on NASCAR

  3. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    A pet peeve of mine is incorrect reporting of “deported from the airport” stories, stories about a foreign national who arrives at a U.S. international airport and is interrogated and then summarily put on a plane back to his country by jackbooted nazis working for the Fascist States of America. (By the way, this isn’t “deportation”; it’s called “denial of entry”; The NY Post got this wrong.)

    These cases, when the truth comes out, never are as originally reported. Almost all of them could have been spiked from day one had the reporter asked the simple question, “What is your visa? Could you read me the words on your visa that the U.S. consular official stamped into your passport?”

    Most of the remaining cases involve the airport immigration staff discovering that the traveller lied about or withheld information from the consular official or from a form, but the airport official finds about it on the internet, in materials brought by the traveller, or in an interview where ther nervous traveller suddenly tells the truth.

    Do you remember this from a week or two ago?:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/27/us/harvard-student-ismail-ajjawi.html

    “A Palestinian student from Lebanon who was set to begin his freshman year at Harvard was denied entry to the United States after immigration officials objected to his friends’ social media posts, he said this week ….”

    Now this, less widely reported:

    The 17-year-old Palestinian student arrived Monday in Cambridge after he was barred from entering the US at Boston Logan International Airport on Aug. 23 following a search of his phone and laptop by a Customs and Border Protection officer, the Harvard Crimson reported. “The last 10 days have been difficult and anxiety filled, but we are most grateful for the thousands of messages of support ….”

    What changed, in just 10 days?

    The US Embassy in Beirut reissued Ajjawi’s visa after reviewing his case.

    The government does not comment on such cases, but here are some things that are pretty certain:

    — Media and social media uproar had nothing to do with it

    — Democratic politicians complaining to the State Department had nothing to do with it

    — 7,000 signatures on an online petition had noting to do with it

    — Dropping friend links to radical Facebook friends had nothing to do with it

    What might have happened? The U.S. consular corps and U.S. border immigration officials are refreshingly apolitical, believe it or not. If he was let in a mere 10 days later with a new visa, it was probably a documentation lapse on his part that he fixed.

    A guess that comports with the facts: You have to report all your social media accounts in visa applications these days. The consular official would have told him that. He’s 17 and stupid and reckless. He didn’t report everything.

    The airport officials have a very simple, mechanical job. They cannot help you fix your visa. You have to go back to the U.S. embassy and do that. So I imagine that they went through his phone and found unreported social media accounts, and sent him home because his visa depended on the underlying application forms being accurate. The consular official then gave him a dressing down (“You remember I told you to report everything? You remember the list of services I gave you, which I said wasn’t complete, but which does include Facebook? Go home and spend a week remembering every service you have ever used in your life on the internet, active or not. Come back. We’ll then give you a new visa and you’ll get one more chance.”)

    The airport immigration officials may have asked him questions about his Facebook friends and their postings, but they would not have been the problem if he got in within 10 days of being bounced.

    We’ll never hear the full story. The kid probably didn’t even tell his parents the whole truth. Being “deported” because of social justice Facebook friends is the “MAGA put a noose on me” of anti-Israel Lebanese foreign students. It’s better than being raped and carrying a mattress around for year. Street cred from being in the New York Times.

  4. a 90 minute debate between Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson over which one of them hates Democrats the most (…) wouldn’t get Mercedes-Benz to sponsor it.

    Don’t worry, I’ve got just the guy:

  5. To put it extra dry in sociological terms: Neither sports nor TV is an appropriate medium to cognitively integrate a society. Sports and TV can act as integrative mediums, but just not on the basis of sound reasons = as reasonable discourse.

    PS

    The same is true for movies. They for sure have a function, but it’s rather on the emotional side of the public sphere.

    Novels are open to the cognitive side of society-building – cf. The Magic Mountain, Dr. Faustus, The Corrections, Freedom, Back to Blood (the latter resonating maybe most in my head lately, not least, because in it Tom Wolfe shows via a strikingly telling example, how confusing even short news clips are and how hard it is to make – a clear-minded, sober use of them.

    The other big gap, which sucks up reason and which is shown by Wolfe at work, so to speak, is the divide between upper-middle-class ideals, not least poststructuralist ones… – and the centrifugal powers of the misery of the black lower class in Florida.

  6. @Anon

    ffs bruh next time slap your anon OT tldr under a MORE tag k thx bye

  7. iffen says:

    to cognitively integrate a society. Sports and TV can act as integrative mediums, but just not on the basis of sound reasons = as reasonable discourse.

    Does this mean that The UR, including its comments, is cognitively integrating society? We are doing sound reasoning and discourse, right?

  8. Anon[142] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    McKinsey is getting into the Chetty business.

    White Americans’ Hold on Wealth Is Old, Deep, and Nearly Unshakeable
    https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/09/racial-wealth-gap-history-slavery-black-white-family-income/597100/

    The McKinsey report identifies four components that perpetuate this gap—family wealth, family income, family savings, and community context (a community’s collective public and private assets).

    They seem to get right up to the brink of rediscovering Gregory Clark’s Son Also Rises insights, but then blank slatism reasserts control:

    “We think the most likely explanation for the rapid recovery of slaveholders’ sons is that slaveholding families were embedded in social networks that facilitated adjustments to wartime losses.

    The households targeted and toppled by Sherman’s troops lost considerable wealth, on top of losing their slaveholding assets. But by 1880, those same ransacked families had financially recuperated. By that year, their wealth had even surpassed that of the wealthy families of neighboring counties that Sherman did not invade.

    “Results suggest that even destroying the capital stock or temporarily expropriating the land of wealthy households would not have been enough to prevent their sons from experiencing full recovery in a generation,” reads the study.

    It’s so weird that the same families that were on the top of the heap before the Civil War had everything they owned wiped out, and yet they were back on top in a generation! It must have been some sort of ineffable “social networking” and “community context,” irregardless of ability!

    The study seems to want to be about the currently trendy black-white wealth gap, but actually seems to be more about the 1 percent – 99 percent gap among the white population. You wouldn’t expect black slaves to rise very far, very fast, but it’s no surprise the that the more talented white families made short work of rising back above the less talented white families, even when starting from scratch. The study mentions the mysterious factor that these families managed to secure credit, when other families had a harder time. Well … do you lend money to a known winner with no collateral after the war, or to a known loser with …

    [MORE]

    well, no collateral either before or after the war?

    • Replies: @Anon
  9. In contrast, it’s interesting to look at advertising for a TV broadcast where nobody ever mentions politics but virtually every American on screen is a Republican: the Masters golf tournament, which has the classiest, most CEO-level advertising of any show on television.

    It is risky to assume most in the C-Suite of major companies are Republican.

  10. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He made a nice jerk of a President in 24, but I think I’d prefer Anna Devane.

  11. JMcG says:
    @IHTG

    NASCAR just announced they’ll no longer accept gun advertising.

  12. M_Young says:

    I seem to remember Archer Daniels Midland advertising on golf or tennis or some such….you know, just in case you were in the market for 2M bushels of winter wheat.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  13. A golf-related company, which will remain nameless and no longer exists, hired me to produce a TV commercial and buy air time for them. I did. My spot aired for a short time during various tournaments around the country. They didn’t pay me. I sued and won. They had no money to pay me with, so I was not able to collect anything. I found out then that they owed hundreds of thousands of unpaid dollars to others in front of me.

    The US Open tennis tournament ends today with the men’s final. Yesterday Queen Serena got beat by a Romanian Canadian girl, while the Queen’s friend, Princess Megan watched from the sidelines.

    There was a big Benz star on each end of the net, as there will be today. They pay their bills, because their customers pay their own handsomely.

    Patrons at the Tennis open are a mixed bag ranging from people like Donald and Melania in the past to flaming lefties and SJWs across the board. It’s mostly a left-leaning racket.

  14. Semi-Hemi says:
    @IHTG

    I quit watching NASCAR 25 years ago because of the boredom and stupidity of it all. I can’t be alone in that opinion given how empty the stands seem on tv. Their lame attemts to fix the boredom with rule changes all seem like desperation to me.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  15. Barnard says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It is interesting that tennis fans, while still wealthy are much more likely to be liberals than golf fans. There is a fair amount of overlap between the two sports, but I woild like to see polling on it.

    • Replies: @prosa123
  16. @IHTG

    How’s the advertising on NASCAR

    Saw the NASCAR races for a bit Saturday afternoon (yesterday) at Indy, the place was empty of fans. Dunno if there’s a Sunday race event this being Week1 NFL, but they were really racing and crashing, heh. The cars are festooned with ads, such as it is, it’s on TV. Bet advertisers are staring to chafe. The gleam is off the NASCAR rose. Or something. The cars seem capped at 195, maybe a deuce. Even the crashes are a snooze-fest. Indy and F-1 is much more to my taste. And bikes at Isle of Mann and World Superbike. NASCAR? Ha!

    • Replies: @mmack
    , @Barnard
  17. Barnard says:
    @Anon

    The Masters allows for no corporate branding. At the course, you can buy a Snickers bar and it comes in a white wrapper that says candy bar. You get a Coke and drink it out of a cup with the Masters logo on it. The members who all work or own other brands are obsseive about only promoting the tournament that week.

  18. mmack says:
    @IHTG

    In one word: struggling. The NASCAR juggernaut of ratings and money ran out of steam some time back and the series went from:
    – A Tobacco Sponsor (Winston) with pretty much bottomless pockets to
    – A Cellular Phone Company (Sprint) to
    – An Energy Drink Company (Monster)

    With reduced funding at each sponsor change. Unlike ball and stick sports, American auto racing (NASCAR, IndyCar, Sports Cars, Drag Racing) usually have been relying on corporate sponsorship since the 1970’s to pay the bills at the sanctioning body level. With the decline in interest in some forms of auto racing the sponsors change every few years as corporations wonder what benefits are we getting from doing this?

    Here’s a list of NASCAR’s corporate sponsors: https://m.nascar.com/officialsponsors

    Not bad, but 15 – 20 years ago there were a lot more high profile names and companies lining up to get their names on that list.

    The other big change in NASCAR and IndyCar is sponsorship for the teams. As you may have seen racing cars look like rolling billboards and the sponsors are the ones paying the bills for the teams. With the level of technology in racing today and the costs, winning races pays jack squat. Oh the driver may make a nice payday (especially winning the Indy 500), but for the team winning races doesn’t pay the bills. So having a sweetheart sponsor is vital. These days only the top teams have sponsors already lined up (Penske, Andretti Autosports, Chip Ganassi Racing, Roush-Fenway, Stewart-Haas, Gibbs), other teams need the driver to bring a sponsor to the team. And many long time, big name sponsors have left over the years (Target, STP, Lowe’s) or scaled back their sponsorship to part of the season, which means cars often change colors and sponsorship from race to race.

    Bottom line (TL/DR): NASCAR and IndyCar are suffering from declines in viewership and attendance (theories why are another post) and that has affected the levels of sponsorship and the types of sponsors participating.

  19. mmack says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz,

    Sponsors not paying their bills because they have no money leaving you scrambling? Sounds like auto racing. 😒

  20. “The U.S. consular corps . . . .are refreshingly apolitical, believe it or not.”

    You have no idea what you’re talking about. Half of illegal aliens in the USA are visa overstays. Whose fault do you think it is that these people got visas in the first place?

    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
  21. Kyle says:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/abc7.com/amp/sister-of-la-clippers-star-suspect-in-temecula-murder/5522862/
    “Sister of LA Clippers Player Suspect in Murder of Woman Found Unconscious at Pechanga Casino”

    Los Angles Clippers star Kawhi Leonard is the brother of one of the women accused of murdering a woman…

    Kimesha Monae Williams

    She looks to be hormonally abnormal. Here is the victim, 84 year old Afaf Anis Assad.

    God bless her.

  22. slumber_j says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Patrons at the Tennis open are a mixed bag ranging from people like Donald and Melania in the past to flaming lefties and SJWs across the board. It’s mostly a left-leaning racket.

    Yeah, there were a lot of tight shots of fired-up rich white ladies (and men) baying for their imaginary Sassy Black Overdog Friend to crush the upstart during yesterday’s match. As usual, it was an ultra-douchey crowd over in Flushing, rendered even more repellent by all the ginned-up hysteria.

  23. Back before the internet Noam Chomsky said he paid something like $2500 to get the international subscription to the Toronto Globe & Mail because he had scheduled a radio interview there 18 months in the future and wanted to be prepared for any Canada specific questions.

    He said the advertising inserts were hilarious because the only people paying thousands of dollars for a Canadian paper were CEOs and investors who had millions of dollars at stake in multi-national Canadian corporations that might have been doing mining in Nigeria or whatever.

    Chomsky also used to say that the Wall Street Journal had better reporting than the liberal NYT because people who read the WSJ needed to know what was *actually* going on (in Nigeria or wherever) without ideological bullshit. So if you knew to avoid the “insane” Op-Ed page, the WSJ was probably the best paper in the world.

  24. Anon[510] • Disclaimer says:
    @IHTG

    How’s the advertising on NASCAR

    Part-time Indy Car driver Conor Daly was about to break into the more lucrative (but less sophisticated) NASCAR as a driver. But it was discovered that 35 years ago— 11 years before Conor was born— his father, a native Irishman, used the n- word. Derek Daly, himself a race car driver (Formula One and Indy Car), used the n- word in a non-racial context not knowing its racial context in the U.S. After he learned that it is a derogatory racial term in the U.S. he stopped using it. So, Conor Daly’s sponsor, Lilly Diabetes, pulled its sponsorship because his father used the n- word in a non-racial context 11 years before Conor was born.

    https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nascar/news/nascar-conor-daly-loses-sponsorship-father-racial-slur-derek-daly-road-america-xfinity-series-roush-fenway-racing-motorsport-news/yuntk8ua8t261332gw0f94zkg

    NASCAR Xfinity driver Conor Daly loses sponsorship after father admits to using racial slur decades ago

    NASCAR Xfinity Series driver Conor Daly lost his sponsorship with Lilly Diabetes for Saturday’s race at Road America after his father admitted to using a racially insensitive remark in the early 1980s.
    Lilly Diabetes released a statement announcing the sponsorship change a day after Conor’s father, Derek Daly, said he had used a racial slur during a live radio interview nearly 11 years before his son was born.

    • Replies: @prosa123
  25. @Buzz Mohawk

    True story —

    A little over 30 years ago, I went with a friend to some US Open games. In those days they had the #2 court right next to the main court. We decided to see a late evening game in the #2 court.

    For the peons, the tickets allowed a reserved seat in the #1 court (and the seat was pretty bad), as well as the rights to sit almost anywhere for most of the rest of the matches. The #2 court had a number of seats with the names of the seat’s owners on them.

    Being a very late game, the reserved seats were almost empty. On one side of the court, the usher was chasing peons away from the reserved seats. So we went to the other side.

    I decided to play a little game. I would find the most famous person’s seats I could find, and then sit in their seats to watch the match.

    So we watched the match in Donald Trump’s seats.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  26. Polynikes says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A “golf-related company” is likely a manufacturer or marketer of equipment, right? There are a lot of fly by the night operations making stuff for golf because the patrons spend so much on it. Much of it is overpriced, and the margins are huge. On the other hand, I would find it hard to believe that any legit tournament or course couldn’t come up with the money to pay you any more so than a tennis tournament or club.

  27. @Anon

    Karl Kasarda at Inrangetv makes the argument that you should NEVER use use any bio-recognition on your devices because the government could physically force the machine recognition.

    So while the traveler in question could have simply refused to unlike his phone (assuming it was locked) and ignorantly opened up a can of worms, imagine if it were a USA citizen in a hostile country with similar visa requirements.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
  28. Farenheit says:

    My nieces used to participate in the horse show thing at a pretty high level. At one of the shows my brother snapped a picture of an advertisement on a bus type bench at the riding center selling “affordable” leases for private jets. Despite my encouragement he didn’t go for it.

  29. mmack says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Really shows you how far NASCAR has strayed/ fallen. Remington used to be a sponsor for race teams:

  30. That would probably get pretty good ratings, but it wouldn’t get Mercedes-Benz to sponsor it.

    Foreign corporations sponsoring politics in the US sounds like a terrible idea. However, it may be among the few options we have left to get out message across.

  31. Danindc says:

    “Golf broadcast advertising can be hilariously targeted: I recall the Boeing ads about why the next fleet of airliners you buy should be Boeings.”

    Lol classic Sailer.

    Do you ever try to write funny material or do you just let it happen organically?

    Does your family think you’re funny?

    Were you a funny guy in high school/college?

    #asksteve – you should do #asksteve once a month on Twitter. People would love it.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  32. Yesterday I reflected upon the paradox that leftist opinion magazines, such as The Nation, traditionally garnered more big money sponsors than rightist opinion outlets, which tend to have pretty low-rent advertisers.

    Speaking of ‘rightist opinion outlets’, bored identity stumbled upon this informative video with The Epoch Times interviewer and his guest slaloming casually between Jeffrey Epstein, Imran Awan, & Jackson Cosko :

    The Epoch Times, being a part of Spy vs. Spy Universe, obviously has some other sponsors besides nominally claimed Falun Gülen Gong Gang

  33. @IHTG

    Nascar sold out over 15 years ago when they allowed themselves to be shaken down by Jessie Jackson over not enough negro drivers or whatever.

  34. Anonymous[536] • Disclaimer says:

    You will appreciate this as as a Chicago area marketing guy. Story told to me by an ad exec in Chi-town. We were having dinner in late 90s.

    I mentioned how you had started to hear radio ads on WMAL in DC pitching defense contractors or even actual programs. Never had that much direct blatant advertising for government business in the 80s or before. (Maybe an airplane ad in Proceedings, but not WMAL drive time adverts.)

    He told me…I’m a big part of the reason that started. Some time in the 80s, he had the job to help advertise for some defense contractor that was up for a big contract. And there was one key decision maker. (Can’t recall if executive or legislative branch…but a big kahoona…name you’d have heard of.)

    So my wily Chi-town guy asked me…”how do you think I advertised for that? It was so different from any normal advertising for a brand or the like…just targeting one guy?

    I was all..I donno…trade show? radio on WMAL? Direct mail? Cute blondes? He’s like NO! He had a small budget and had to hit one guy. The answer was TV.

    I wuz like what? He said…cable TV!

    You see, there are a certain percent of the ads on various shows that are local versus network. And with cable TV, you can actually narrowcast them down to a zip code. So the spend is not outrageous.

    And (rest of the Paul Harvey story)…the connection to your article is that this decision maker loved golf. So they targeted the golf channel. And just HAMMERED this guy with ads for the new, not noteworthy defcon. Turned out that it totally worked. The target said “I guess they must be a big player…see them on TV all the time.” And the client won their contract.

    Maybe that’s old school to you. But I was pretty intrigued by this wily Chitown ad exec. Sort of looked like and had the mannerisms of Alan Alda in What Women Want.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  35. Marty T says:
    @slumber_j

    It was so delicious watching all those leftist elitists go home unhappy. And the conservative Margaret Court is still number 1.

  36. @Kyle

    And:…..

    Jail records list Williams as being 6-foot-2 and 320 pounds, and Townsel as being 5-foot-4 and 195 pounds.

    That’s bigger than Art Donovan…..

    https://www.ocregister.com/2019/09/07/casino-murder-defendant-is-sister-of-clippers-star-kawhi-leonard/

  37. mmack says:
    @Jim Christian

    Jim,

    There is a NASCAR race today at IMS. It’s what used to be the Brickyard 400. To show you how far NASCAR has fallen ponder this:.

    The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has roughly 250K permanent seats. The Indy 500 used to fill all of them, but now I’d say the stands are 85 – 90% full on Indy 500 race day. That gets balanced out by a ballpark (my) estimate of 75 – 100k people in the infield on Indy 500 race day paying $20 / person to sit or stand in the grass and try to see the race, or party in the Snake Pit to electronic dance music. So let’s say Indy 500 race day there are 300 – 350K people attending.

    NASCAR or IMS never allowed fans in the infield for the Brickyard 400 but in 1994 for the first NASCAR race every seat was sold. So that’s 250K fans. People talked that the Brickyard 400 was a tougher ticket to get than the Indy 500 and that some day the Brickyard 400 would surpass the Indy 500.

    The reality for today’s race is NASCAR will be lucky to pull 70K at IMS. There were probably more people at the Florida-Georgia Line concert at IMS last night. That you asked if there was a NASCAR race today says volumes.

  38. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    At least regular people buy gold. So in addition to ads aimed at potential Boeing jet-buyers……

    I remember seeing ads on CNBC about which software you should buy for your enterprise-wide IT systems.

    That would seem to be a pretty narrow and limited market.

  39. prosa123 says:
    @Barnard

    It is interesting that tennis fans, while still wealthy are much more likely to be liberals than golf fans. There is a fair amount of overlap between the two sports, but I woild like to see polling on it.

    It may tie together a couple things previously mentioned here. Women’s sports seem to attract a more liberal fan base than men’s sports, and major tennis tournaments feature women’s matches as well as men’s matches. Indeed, the women may be the bigger draw.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  40. prosa123 says:
    @Anon

    I’d surmise that the issue arose because a disproportionately high percentage of Lilly Diabetes’ customer base is minority. That’s something that should concern Social Justice Warriors much more than some 35 year old racial comment.

  41. Anon[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    According to the study, “Nor was the recovery owed to an inheritance of entrepreneurial skills, which the study ruled out because of the drastic transition of the economy from agricultural-based to industrial-based.”

    That seems blatantly wrong. The South did not industrialize that fast. Besides, entrepreneurial skills come from the creative toolkit in your brain, and they do not come out of your particular mode of chosen industry. Another moronic study that tries to avoid admitting how important high IQ is.

    What were the data they used to determine the accumulation of material wealth? This is very dubious in the days before income tax could be used to determine what your income level is. A national income tax did not exist back then. Unless they have access to a large body of income records, and I really doubt they do, this data is junk.

  42. Bubba says:

    I remember the movie “Fierce Creatures” had the zoo employees uniform’s splattered with sponsors. Kinda funny and based on a Rupert Murdoch character…

  43. MEH 0910 says:

  44. Anon[103] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Fall River Mayor Jasiel Correia Arrested Again, Accused Of Extorting Marijuana Companies In ‘Pay-To-Play’ Corruption

    It’s the ‘again’ part that’s the kicker.

    https://boston.cbslocal.com/2019/09/06/fall-river-mayor-jasiel-correia-arrested-marijuana-extortion/

    Stupid Massachusetts people, went and elected a pol from outside the local WASP bloodlines, got a corrupt piece of garbage AS USUAL when they do that. Practically every pol without WASP blood WORLDWIDE is corrupt.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    , @Justvisiting
  45. Anon[103] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kyle

    The black parents might have been taking masculinizing hormones or steroids with the hope of producing black children capable of professional sports, and this is why their daughter is such a freak. Either that, or sissie is also stealing her brother’s steroids along with old ladies’ purses.

  46. OT.
    Sailer, you should hie over to Taki and update some of the Bio/link spoor that you’ve left there.

    https://www.takimag.com/contributor/Steve%20Sailer/6/

  47. Alfa158 says:
    @Semi-Hemi

    What killed NASCAR was when they dropped racing actual stock cars because they wanted the races to be as close as possible. The last NASCAR race I attended was in the 70’s and the second half of the race consisted of the eventual winner in a Hemi Dodge Daytona eventually putting a lap on the second place finisher. But at least there was a sense that the better car and driver won versus a parade of cars drafting on each other and executing 48 artificially induced lead changes.
    I stopped following the sport completely when the first cars appeared that used decals to simulate the grill and headlights. The cars today are essentially identical purpose-built funny cars that are forced to conform to the same body templates and differ mainly by the labels stuck on them that identify them as a Toyota Camry versus a Ford Fusion. Win in Sunday, sell on Monday is dead. Try walking into a car dealership and asking to buy one of them there Camrys or Fusions you saw on Sunday with rear drive and a pushrod V8.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Jack D
  48. Barnard says:
    @Jim Christian

    I flipped it over to today’s race to see, it is sponsored by Big Machine Vodka and the stands look almost empty. I would expect to see a decline in prize money the next time the TV contracts get renewed.

  49. Alfa158 says:
    @Danindc

    I can see a tenuous connection where Boeing wants consumers to have a preference for airlines that use Boeings, as in “if it ain’t Boeing, I ain’t going”.
    What was weirder were the ads by defense contractors. Not even Billionaires who own private jets get a choice of whether they should buy an F-16 versus an F-15.

  50. @IHTG

    Auto racing isn’t a real sport, it’s just dudes driving around and around in a car. You could youtube a couple of ordinary citizens doing essentially the same thing on the highway (albeit at a lesser quality gas).

    Sport involves working the body, where aerobic and/or anaerobic fitness benefits accrue to the participants. What fitness benefits does a person receive from driving around in a car? None. At least in cycling the person has to work their lower bodies by pedaling.

    There isn’t even any contact between the drivers. Between the cars, yes, but between actual people, no. No fights, no tackling, nothing.

    Crashes are cool, but they aren’t as reliable to occur as often as in the past since safety technology has steadily improved.

    All in all, it’s a pretty boring sport to watch on TV for an afternoon. Golf is more interesting. And the players are actually getting some fitness benefits (e.g. walking the course, and upper/lower muscles when driving the ball).

    It will be interesting to survey the kind of sponsors of MMA/UFC fights. Now that is exciting, and requires top physical conditioning. MMA is poised to pass heavyweight boxing in ratings soon, so it can easily attract more fans than NASCAR. It’s raw and it’s real.

  51. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @M_Young

    The post and comments here remind me of the old Rob Long column, pondering just why ADM was always pitching him so relentlessly during “This Week w/ David Brinkley”

  52. BenKenobi says:

    I used to (quite often) listen to Andrew Wilkow on Sirius’ Patriot channel.

    The ads and live-reads were all for crap like MyPillow, Roku Box, Super Beets and male-vitality pills.

  53. @anonymous2space

    And this would be interesting because…..?

    • Replies: @iffen
  54. @One Who Knows

    National Review published the visa applications for the 9/11 hijackers back in 2001 – they were a travesty. I don’t recall any State Dept. staffers being rebuked for their errors of judgment which subsequently cost 3000 people their lives. The hijackers were all overstayers, needless to say.

  55. Altai says:

    OT: Steve, I discovered the best version of Sailer’s first law. Guardian US was always going to be embarrassing but this is amazing. The authors name is, no joke, Dream McClinton. At least she doesn’t blame her hair.

    Why dark-skinned black girls like me aren’t getting married
    Black women in the US marry less than others – and the numbers are even lower for darker skinned black women. Is colorism – favoring lighter skin – to blame? Dream McClinton puts herself on the line to report

    I take a deep breath and ready my fingers. I admonish myself for being theatrical about something so mundane. Another deep breath.

    “Here we go,” I mutter, pressing enter.

    My profile has been created. It seems simple enough: swipe left to dismiss, swipe right to express interest.

    The first eligible bachelor appears – not my type, I swipe left. Then another follows – too young, I swipe left again. Ten swipes in, and I find myself texting my eldest sister this was a bad idea. A feeling of vexation settles over me.

    Jesus, is she 10 swipes into Tinder or diffusing a bomb?

    I’ve spent so much time trying to understand what is so unattractive about me that men shun me. At first, I thought it was because I was intimidating – a word I’ve heard used to describe me. For a while, I concluded I was “not that interesting,” a line I subsequently used as my biography on social media. But those explanations won’t do.

    The real issue is staring me right in the face: my deep mahogany skin.

    I have many memories of being degraded because of my complexion, the most piercing is from middle school: two girls giggled in my Georgia history class during the showing of a documentary about slavery. As the film explained the origins of skin tone prejudice, one girl – biracial, hazel-eyed and the only other black girl in class – whispered that she would have been a house slave, but that I would have been a field slave. As the famous image of whipped Peter played on screen, I sank down in my chair, silently greeting the weight of oppression on my 12-year-old shoulders.

    So reducing your identity to slavery and somebody like you talking this up is what gave you your most emotionally scarring experience? (That amounts to not very much at all)

    Jasmine Turner, owner of BlackMatchMade, a Chicago-based matchmaking company, agrees this affects all black women. “Honestly, I think black women tend to lower their standards because they’re finding challenges in dating. Now I’m finding that black women are like ‘You know what, as long as he has a good job and he’s a good person …’ No matter how successful they are, they’re open to dating him.”

    How awful! Those basic black guys that are good people deserve to be alone!

    His research shows that a scarcity in available “high-status” husbands (defined as higher levels of education, not growing up on public assistance, coming from neighborhoods that had less crime), effectively leave black men in control of the dating selection process. His data concluded 55% of light-skinned women were married while only 23% of dark-skinned women had jumped the broom.

    “[Black men] have unnatural power within marriage markets that enables them to bid up cursory characteristics like skin shade,” Hamilton told me over the phone. In other words, the lighter the female, the higher the probability of marriage. “One of the results that we found was that [darker-complexioned] black women who have ‘higher status’ faced a greater penalty in marriage markets than those with a lower socioeconomic status.”

    According to his research, I am the epitome of the “high-status” option. College educated, familial middle class background, age 16-30, able-bodied. But according to the equation, I haven’t the “social capital” (read: skin tone) to seek a quality match.

    ‘Systematic racism is the only reason black men are kept down, they’re just as good as whites’. ‘Eww, I don’t want some black guy without the same education level or income as me, even if he is a good person. I deserve better’.

    https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:yxSPGpeb30AJ:https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/apr/08/dark-skinned-black-girls-dont-get-married+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ie&client=firefox-b-d

    Of course finding a partner is very important to life. I’d be completely open to people talking more about how important it is and problems thereof. But the asymmetry and lack of awareness from female authors who do this is astonishing.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
  56. @Alfa158

    I actually see a reason for defense contractors.

    For example, the Madison AF reserve base, which defends Chicago against sneak attacks from Canada, is trying to upgrade to F-35 planes. Many of the neighbors object because noise.

    So a defense contractor may want to keep their reputation solid.

  57. Marty T says:

    It’s likely the vast majority of golfers, white NFL players and white MLB players are Republican. But almost none of them are public about it, so what good does that do?

  58. Anonymous[380] • Disclaimer says:

    Bottom line (TL/DR): NASCAR and IndyCar are suffering from declines in viewership and attendance (theories why are another post) and that has affected the levels of sponsorship and the types of sponsors participating.

    Both decline and feminization of white males is a big reason is my guess. Along with too many other distractions. White boys grow up today with computers and video games and spend time indoors. When I was a kid in the 1970’s-80’s we built go-karts from scratch (we had junkyards) and went to vacant parking lots to race radio-controlled cars. All without parental supervision or sponsorship. Nowadays similar hobbies require money and help from parents as everything is controlled and expensive.

    In my 50’s now I still follow Indy Car and IMSA (not so much F-1 because it’s not competitive and really just a fast parade). The last race of the Indy Car 20q9 season is out at Laguna Seca in Salinas, CA on September 22nd. I would love to go but I’m in Boston working. I wish Sailer go watch it and give a report on it.

    https://www.weathertechraceway.com/ticket-information

    • Replies: @bored identity
    , @mmack
  59. @Paleo Liberal

    Today is the anniversary of the Williams sisters’ match at the 2001 U.S. Open. Coincidentally (or not), the Gospel reading this week was Luke 14:25-33, in which Jesus tells his listeners they must hate their families to follow him. So, to put this into context, Father A. worked the girls into his sermon. The sisters had to “hate” each other during the match to make it legitimate, but then hugged afterwards.

    No mention of their defaulted match earlier that year.

    http://baseline.tennis.com/article/60857/throwback-thursday-all-williams-200-us-open-final

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_sisters#Boycott_of_the_Indian_Wells_Masters

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  60. prosa123 says:
    @kaganovitch

    It has been mentioned here that “uninvited party guests” is a major cause of homicides. Biles frere seems to be one of those cases.

  61. @Reg Cæsar

    I’m waiting for one of our subcontinental saintlies to work cricket into a homily, but it hasn’t happened yet. And they’re too far south for polo.

  62. @prosa123

    Urban vs. suburban, as well. You can live in Manhattan and play tennis every weekend on an unspectacular upper middle class income, but playing golf every weekend requires a summer house in the Hamptons or the like.

  63. @Altai

    According to his research, I am the epitome of the “high-status” option. College educated, familial middle class background …

    People need to stop telling young women that this kind of thing matters to men. I would happily date a friendless illiterate from skid row if she were slender and feminine.

    If anything, a college education (such as it is) is a turn-off for me, since it probably means the chick is in debt and desires a career of some kind (probably making spreadsheets in a office).

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  64. @Barnard

    I’ve been. I hate corporate advertising and logos, so it was heavenly for me. It’s really, really a beautiful few days.

    • Agree: Barnard
  65. @Steve Sailer

    The nature of the game can’t be discounted as well. Golf is quiter, slower-moving, takes more patience, is more introspective, etc. Tennis players really seem to relish beating their opponents on each point. Can it be a coincidence that in politics the tennis people hate, hate, hate the other side, or is it a facet of the tennis personality.

    I’ve always hated tennis and been unable to relate to people’s love of the game.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @anon
  66. Flagship mainstream media organizations such as the NYT and CNN have only one real option left for survival. Their only hope is if they can form a joint partnership with the social media giants and become a more literate junior partner, much the same way Greece was or Rome and England for the US.

    The social media companies are becoming so distrusted that they cannot produce their own content so they need to seem as if they are using independent third sources for their material. They need to keep the renegades and upstarts news sites at bay so it behooves them to keep these formerly respected organizations alive. At the same time, the mass media companies will not withstand the disintermediation that is occurring and will otherwise lose all authority that they have left. It is match made in hell.

  67. Hunsdon says:
    @Joe Stalin

    Man, I thought I loved Uncle Joe Stalin before I knew he was a follower of both Karl Kasarfa and Steve Sailer!

  68. @mmack

    Nascar’s peak was the 2001 Daytona 500 in which Dale Earnhardt was killed.

  69. @mmack

    Nascar’s peak was the 2001 Daytona 500 in which Dale Earnhardt was killed. That was dramatic.

    • Replies: @mmack
  70. prosa123 says:
    @Anon

    Fall River hasn’t been WASP in many decades. Along with neighboring New Bedford it’s heavily Portuguese.

  71. @Anonymous

    When I was a kid in the 1970’s-80’s we built go-karts from scratch (we had junkyards) and went to vacant parking lots to race radio-controlled cars.

    All without parental supervision or sponsorship.

    Nowadays similar hobbies require money and help from parents as everything is controlled and expensive.

    bored identity has a couple of reactionary thoughts about what went wrong:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7436575/Lawyer-mother-reveals-works-time-prostitute.html

  72. mmack says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    I’d definitely agree with you. Dale Earnhardt, Sr’s death shown on live TV at Daytona would be the equivalent of AJ Foyt or Mario Andretti dying in a crash during the Indianapolis 500. I saw it happen and sadly had seen enough drivers die since I first started following racing in the 1980’s to know he was dead when the track safety crews got to the car.

    I only attended one Brickyard 400, back in 2003, and by that time (less than ten years after the first one in 1994) tickets were much easier to get than I was lead to believe.

  73. dfordoom says: • Website

    Yesterday I reflected upon the paradox that leftist opinion magazines, such as The Nation, traditionally garnered more big money sponsors than rightist opinion outlets

    You don’t think that might be because leftist opinion magazines aren’t really left-wing in any meaningful sense?

    • Agree: Paleo Liberal
  74. mmack says:
    @Anonymous

    The decline of racing attendance is part of a larger theme Steve could address, if it’s a subject that interests him. As a marketing man who is trained to notice trends and extrapolate them, I’d ask him what is the future not just for auto racing, but spectator sports in general? With:

    – More single parent homes (usually single moms)
    – Reduced birthrate, especially among Caucasians
    – Reduced participation in “Traditional American” ball and stick sports from Caucasians
    – Increased ¡Vibrant! immigration from areas that don’t play “Traditional American” ball and stick sports
    – Increased interest in virtual worlds of video games and the internet

    Can spectator sports survive and thrive? Should I go long on soccer league stocks? What sports do which sponsors target and why?

    And Steve, we’ll probably have a ticket free for the 2020 Indianapolis 500, if you’re interested. Remember the Brickyard Crossing is a part of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and at least three holes are in the infield at IMS. So you get a two-fer on posts: one on demographics and marketing for auto racing fans, the other on golf course architecture. It’s a win-win, what do you say?

    • Replies: @iffen
  75. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158

    The winning new racing series would be replica vintage cars with narrow tires and fat drivers. Real vintage racing isn’t racing because the cars are too expensive and the drivers all stuck up rich cunts.

    Divisions for 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s NASCAR style full roll cage cars, sports cars and open wheel cars like sixties Formula cars-no or minimal wings, minimum 4 to 6 inch ground clearance.

    Everyone runs a stock block type engine. Naturally aspirated, as cast intake and exhaust ports, carbs or mechanical continuous flow FI. Or better yet everyone runs CNG or LPG. No microprocessors, no EFI, no ABS, no traction control. Full cage cars use a nine inch ford rear, open diff, full floater. Transmission has to be off the shelf or a commonly sold deal like a Richmond Gear.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  76. @slumber_j

    Yeah, there were a lot of tight shots of fired-up rich white ladies (and men) baying for their imaginary Sassy Black Overdog Friend to crush the upstart during yesterday’s match. As usual, it was an ultra-douchey crowd over in Flushing, rendered even more repellent by all the ginned-up hysteria.

    There is something seriously wrong with white people.

    I sure hope there’s an anti-dote to this kool-aid. But probably not. Probably those resistant will just have to fight and make a go of it on their own.

  77. Dan Hayes says:
    @slumber_j

    slumber_j:

    The Open’s final results deviated from the looney lefty / SJW playbook. The Black testosterone-addled goddess was ignominiously derailed. The Russian finalist, although loseing, started as a Central Casting heavy but ended up as a crowd favorite.

    • Agree: slumber_j
  78. iffen says:
    @Twodees Partain

    And this would be interesting because…..?

    It is interesting to people who like to get quality professional reporting, which is of course dwindling day by day. (interested people and reporting)

  79. Prosa123 says:

    I just heard, in a business news report, that the US Tennis Open does so well with corporate sponsorships because it’s one of the very few major sporting events that appeals equally to men and women.

  80. iffen says:
    @mmack

    If you had a US Open on the same day as the Indy 500 and required the golfers to complete the course or be barred from golf for life might pack in the fans.

  81. global sponsors AT&T, IBM, and Mercedes-Benz, and international partners UPS and Rolex.

    What’s the difference between a global sponsor and an international partner?

  82. @Buzz Mohawk

    It’s mostly a left-leaning racket.

    I’ve always felt tennis was a racket.

  83. @Chrisnonymous

    I’ve always hated tennis and been unable to relate to people’s love of the game.

    I always found it interesting the Johnny Carson moved The Tonight Show from NYC to LA specifically so he could play tennis year-round.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  84. Whenever I listen to Rush Limbaugh, I am always struck by how low-brow his sponsors are.

  85. @Anon

    Stupid Massachusetts people, went and elected a pol from outside the local WASP bloodlines,

    The demographics of Fall River explain it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_River,_Massachusetts

    “In percentage terms Fall River has the largest Portuguese American population in the United States.”

    The “bloodlines” are Portugese and Cape Verdian–and these are not the Portugese that ruled half the world in the 1500s–these are the lower classes.

    Look at the per capital incomes.

    Fall River is one big slum.

  86. Dissident says:
    @anonymous2space

    Chomsky also used to say that the Wall Street Journal had better reporting than the liberal NYT because people who read the WSJ needed to know what was *actually* going on (in Nigeria or wherever) without ideological bullshit. So if you knew to avoid the “insane” Op-Ed page, the WSJ was probably the best paper in the world.

    I have also heard that the Wall Street Journal had excellent reporting and that it was a rather stark contrast from their predictably pro-corporate editorials. My late father was a subscriber and, like many WSJ readers, was dismayed upon learning that Rupert Murdoch would be taking it over. Sometime after the takeover, however, I asked my father whether he had noticed a decline in the quality of the WSJ and he responded by telling me that not only had there not been a decline, but that he actually found it had improved. I know that my father continued to read the WSJ at least occasionally up until his death but I cannot recall whether or not he mentioned at any point eventually noticing a decline in the content.

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @Jack D
  87. iffen says:
    @Dissident

    In a place and time far away, I was required to get a student subscription to the WSJ for one of my classes, I still remember my profound shock at discovering the quality of the journalism. In a side note, I recently conned myself into a discounted introductory subscription to the Jew York Times, and have been pleasantly surprised to find some old style journalism. Of course it seems to be completely overwhelmed by the propaganda features and content.

  88. @Steve Sailer

    but playing golf every weekend requires a summer house in the Hamptons or the like.

    Absolutely untrue. There are nice Golf courses in the Bronx (Van Cortlandt,Pelham Bay/Split Rock as well as Trump’s Ferry Point), Queens (Forest Park Golf Course,Douglaston Golf Course,Kissena Golf Course) Brooklyn (Marine Park). Most of these are 20-30 minutes from the Upper East Side. Additionally there are many courses right over the GW bridge in North Jersey, also 30 minutes or so.

  89. anon[398] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    The awful truth is that Tennis is a game that appeals to poofters and lesbians.

  90. Jack D says:
    @Alfa158

    In addition to wanting to keep the races close, they also wanted to keep the body count down. The’ve cut the HP down to 550 HP with a restrictor plate. If they were running 840 HP stock Dodge Challengers there would be a lot more dead. When the Hudson Hornet had 145 HP the speeds were a LOT lower.

    I agree with you though that NASCAR is a joke. They completely lost sight of their original mission. This is a cautionary tale for any business or government institution – if you don’t keep your eye on the ball of your original mission statement, it’s possible to end up doing the exact opposite. The SC in NASCAR stands for STOCK CAR (i.e. a that you can purchase from a dealer’s stock, not a purpose built race car) and the cars that they run are the diametric opposite of stock cars. It would be like a Christian church advocating for homosexuality and other sins that are expressly prohibited by the Bible – oh, wait we have those too.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  91. Jack D says:
    @Dissident

    For the most part (and if you stay away from the Op-Ed page or any ideological third rail – unfortunately there seem to be more of these every day) the quality of the reporting is still pretty good on both papers. Reporters switch jobs from the NY Times to the WSJ and vice versa more often than you might think so it’s hard to say that one has consistently better reporters than the other, given that they are basically choosing from the same talent pool.

  92. Jack D says:
    @ScarletNumber

    What a shame that there are no indoor tennis courts in NY.

  93. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    These might be interesting racing series with some appeal (though I doubt enough to be commercially viable) but the original appeal of NASCAR was that you could see cars that you could actually buy at your local dealer being raced. If that Hudson Hornet impressed you, you could go out the next day and buy the same STOCK car. And, supposedly, the manufacturers applied the lessons that they learned on the race track to their production cars and this helped make production cars better, faster, safer, more reliable, more streamlined, etc. What you propose doesn’t reconnect the factory to the racetrack to the consumer at all. I don’t know whether such a circle is even possible anymore but what you propose sure doesn’t do it.

    What I’d like to see is a race series with the Pur Sang Bugatti and other 1920s replicas from Argentina:

    https://autoweek.com/article/drive-reviews/we-drive-pur-sang-type-35-beautiful-bugatti-way-argentina

    These things are slower than a modern 4 cyl Honda Accord but they LOOK like they are going fast. I don’t know what the point would be, but I’d enjoy watching it anyway.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  94. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Yes, it would be delightful except for the carnage, the death toll in racing those things was high. And the cost of a major overhaul on that delightful roller bearing straight eight every two or three races.

    To do a valve job on a type 35 Bugatti you started by removing the rear axle, so you could remove the driveshaft so you could remove the transmission so you could remove the engine, so you could pull the crankshaft and all the pistons, naturally.

    I can remember watching old fat Italian guys work on the old Indy Offy engine as a kid, it was an evolutionary relative of the Bugatti (Ettore copied Harry Miller, whose miller marine engine evolved into the Meyer Drake Offenhauser Indy and midget engines0. At least the block came off the crankcase on those.

  95. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    These might be interesting racing series with some appeal (though I doubt enough to be commercially viable) but the original appeal of NASCAR was that you could see cars that you could actually buy at your local dealer being raced. If that Hudson Hornet impressed you, you could go out the next day and buy the same STOCK car.

    Other than the fact Smokey Yunick reversed the direction of engine rotation, flipped the rear end over to compensate, acid dipped the body and strategically reinforced everything. also took about ten pounds of metal off the block

    SCCA Showroom stock was the closest thing to actual “stock” car racing ever. No spectator interest to speak of.

  96. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous

    Defense contractor ads show up in neocon publications such as National review.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  97. Dan Hayes says:
    @Hibernian

    Hibernian:

    Even more bizarre were defense contractor ads appearing Commentary magazine. Although on second thought, maybe not so bizarre.

  98. Brutusale says:
    @Jack D

    Robert Conquest’s Second Law: Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.

  99. @Barnard

    A buddy of mine who went says a cheese sandwich at the Master is $2 and a coke something like $1.50. These guys are so rich, they don’t even try to screw you on the food, unlike the NFL owners who charge $10 for a 12 ounce Bud in their taxpayer funded stadiums.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  100. @Jim Don Bob

    I’ve heard a story, perhaps apocryphal, about an exchange between an Augusta member and a guest of a second member. It seems talking about your money is frowned upon.

    So the member is playing in a group with another member and the second member’s guest. The guest makes frequent references to his wealth. After the round, as they’re eating lunch, the first member says “I take it from your comments that you’re a wealthy guy”? The guest confirmed that indeed he is. The member says “how much would you say you’re worth”? The guest thinks for a minute then says “plus or minus, about 70 million”. The member gestures to a waiter and asks for a deck of cards. When cards arrive, he opens the deck, then says to the guest “how about we cut for it”?

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