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Spain's "Elena Ferrante" Turns Out to be Three Amigos
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Carmen Mola

Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women. On the other hand, a lot of the fiction talent is still male, so we are seeing increasing numbers of cases like this from The Guardian:

Female Spanish thriller writer Carmen Mola revealed to be three men

Trio step out from behind pseudonym marketed as ‘Spain’s Elena Ferrante’ to accept €1m prize

Emma Graham-Harrison and Sam Jones
Sat 16 Oct 2021 18.37 EDT

A million euro literary prize has lured three Spanish men out of anonymity, to reveal that they are behind ultra-violent Spanish crime thrillers marketed as the work of “Spain’s Elena Ferrante”

The men had published under the pseudonym Carmen Mola, which roughly translates as “Carmen’s cool”.

When one of their books won the lucrative Planeta prize, the trio went public to pick up the cheque at a glitzy ceremony attended by the Spanish king.

Agustín Martínez, Jorge Díaz and Antonio Mercero had published novels and worked as scriptwriters under their real names before coming together to write as Mola. Credits include work on TV series “Central Hospital” and “Blind Date”.

Their lead character in the Carmen Mola novels is detective Elena Blanco, a “peculiar and solitary woman, who loves grappa, karaoke, classic cars and sex in SUVs”, according to publisher Penguin Random House.

… They had previously claimed in interviews and on their own website that Mola was a professor in her late 40s, telling Spanish ABC newspaper three years ago that they needed anonymity to “protect a settled life that has nothing to do with literature”.

Spanish media noted that publicity for the books had played off the tensions between the apparent creator’s life and “her” creations.

“It hasn’t escaped anyone’s notice that the idea of a university professor and mother of three, who taught algebra classes in the morning then wrote ultra-violent, macabre novels in scraps of free time in the afternoon, made for a great marketing operation,” Spanish paper El Mundo noted in an interview with the authors.

Beatriz Gimeno, a feminist, writer, activist – and former head of one of Spain’s national equality bodies, the Women’s Institute – attacked the men for creating a female persona in their publicity for Carmen Mola books, over several years.

“Quite apart from using a female pseudonym, these guys have spent years doing interviews. It’s not just the name – it’s the fake profile that they’ve used to take in readers and journalists. They are scammers,” she said on Twitter.

They are professional storytellers. They have apparently made up multiple levels of stories to entertain audiences.

Their agent’s website features a photo of a woman, looking away from the camera, on the author profile page, above a flattering comparison with Italian literary sensation Ferrante.

That raises the question of who will Italy’s “Elana Ferrante” turn out to be.

Of course, the bestselling Italian writer of women’s books Elena Ferrante doesn’t, technically speaking, exist, either.

One possibility is she is a professional translator who lost work when her favorite German author died, so she started, in middle age, making up her own novels. That seems not unreasonable.

On the other hand, that translator’s husband Domenico Starnone, is one of Italy’s most prominent men of letters. So the idea that the husband has at least a hand in these novels seems pretty plausible.

Most literary novels are written by one person, but much of dialogue-heavy commercial fiction, such as screenplays, plays, and TV shows are written by more than one in some kind of working relationship.

 
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  1. Mystery writing would seem to be suited to teamwork. Dick Francis was a jockey turned mystery novelist whose bestselling books were collaborations between with his wife. He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @S Johnson


    He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.
     
    I guess that means his wife preferred Dick? Good for him!

    Replies: @Rob

    , @SFG
    @S Johnson

    Or perhaps he thinks it'll look good to his audience. Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband's permission to run for office?

    Replies: @S Johnson, @Art Deco

    , @Dradder
    @S Johnson

    Under the pseudonym Ellery Queen, cousins Frederic Dannay and Manfred Bennington Lee basically created the modern American mystery novel.

  2. “Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women.”

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn’t change a word.)

    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @JimDandy

    Yep. Steve got cause and effect confused. The publishing industry today has a lot of women in major roles, and is heavily oriented towards a female audience (as is most of TV, Netflix, etc). So it's not surprising that, just like before George Sand had to use a man's name to be published, now some men have to pretend to be women to be published. And it's a good marketing gimmick too.

    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn't Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Nico

    , @El Dato
    @JimDandy

    Yeah but there is only so much you can read. Who reads all those stacks of

    1) novels about women involved in bizarre criminal contingencies
    2) novels about women being treated badly
    3) novels about immigrants being treated badly
    3b) novels about soon-to-be-immigrants being treated badly in their country
    4) novels about women fighting to improve their life under the patriarchy
    5) women being witches and possibly fighting/loving vampires and stuff (I dunno)

    And also

    6) hagiographies of various politicians as indistinguishable as pieces of swiss raclette chesse coming out of the grill
    7) various books moaning about greenery

    When I leave the bookshop, everybody seems to be mainly absorbed by their mobile terminals.

    I don't even get through my stack of "required reading". Before the Internet one had at least a chance to keep up.

    , @IHTG
    @JimDandy

    This is cope tbh

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @SFG
    @JimDandy

    I mean, there's a lot of truth to that (and it's one of the reasons I never tried to write a book), but I'd hate to underestimate the role of video games in male recreation. They are a really big deal.

    I mean, why read a description of a guy wrestling an alligator when you can watch your avatar do on a giant flat-screen TV in gloriously rendered CGI?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Herp McDerp
    @JimDandy

    ... and don't get me started on modern Young Adult fiction, which seems to be oriented toward troubled teenage lesbians of color ...

    No Heinleinesque competent heroes allowed!

  3. “the idea of a university professor and mother of three, who taught algebra classes in the morning then wrote ultra-violent, macabre novels in scraps of free time in the afternoon”

    So….. glad to hear that Shirley Jackson is alive and well, and living in Spain!

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Some people might think having to learn algebra is violently macabre by itself?

  4. Men would not be ghostwriting or writing only novels with female protagonists, if males read books instead of playing video games for recreation.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Anon


    Men would not be ghostwriting or writing only novels with female protagonists, if males read books instead of playing video games for recreation.
     
    Is the Delicious Tacos guy any good as a writer?
    , @Alexander Turok
    @Anon

    From the subject matter, I'd bet the audience is going to be primarily male. They chose a female pseudonym for two reasons:

    1. Better chance at winning prizes.
    2. Appeal to men who like gory novels but want to feel smug and superior to "the rubes" they associate with the genre.

  5. The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Kgaard

    That's basically true. There are other occasional exceptions--the fairly recent Cherry, various Cormac McCarthy books, a novel that probably sucks called Phucboi written by a total douchebag will be coming out soon----but, yeah, basically what you said.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Kgaard

    I agree with you about the "with any impact" part, meaning either (or both) popular with a broad section of the male reading audience, or having a major influence on other male novelists. These seem rare as hen's teeth.

    But there are still good male writers whose hunting ground is male inner life and male experience. One is William T. Vollmann, who mostly does this in his excellent short stories and novellas, but his crazy experimental novel "The Rifles," which is partly about the Franklin expedition in the Arctic, is really quite good on this, but it's also quite weird.

    Other good ones: TC Boyle (I'm not a fan, but he fits the bill), Raymond Carver, and there's a whole crop of very good literary crime writers like Richard Price and James Ellroy.

    , @Anonymous
    @Kgaard

    https://d1w7fb2mkkr3kw.cloudfront.net/assets/images/book/lrg/9780/0994/9780099479024.jpg
    "the true nature of the inner male psyche"
    great book, no joke

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Kgaard

    I've recently read Treasure Coast by Tom E. Kakonis (Michigan Roll - another great book by him). Treasure Coast is a crime novel but even more so it is a group portrait of a handful of people, some of them on the fringe, others more MOR (and at times those are quite scary too).

    Sadly, the great crime writer Tom E. Kakonis passed away in August

    http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/2018/10/kakonis-ends-his-roll.html

    Replies: @Set

    , @xxxeliss
    @Kgaard

    fight club is literally about the gay cruising scene before the 2000s , read the book again is filled with gay sex analogies

  6. Beatriz Gimeno, a feminist, writer, activist – and former head of one of Spain’s national equality bodies, the Women’s Institute – attacked the men for creating a female persona in their publicity for Carmen Mola books, over several years.

    Maybe Western women could try doing more of the one thing they are unequivocally better than men at.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad

    What evidence is there that Western men want large families?

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK&Denmark. The study found that women desired more children than men. Women desired roughly 2.2 children, while the men wanted 1.8 children.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098488/

    Interestingly, the fertility rate in these countries is ~1.7 children. Closer to what men desire.

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families, families will remain small. I'm not sure where you get the idea that it's exclusively Western women who want small families. The last time I checked, the average White guy doesn't want to pay for more 1-2 kids (if that). He'd rather spend the money on a big SUV, vacation house, boat, sports balls tickets, and a big screen tv. He doesn't want to deal with another crying infant who needs milk, clothes, medical care, etc.

    By the way, didn't you once claim your daughter is unmarried and decided to attend medical school? That'll take her out of the breeding game until at least her early 30s, probably limiting her to (at most) 1-2 kids - and only IF she gets married. If you can't get your own daughter to take your advice, are you really in a position to be criticizing these other women who have similar professional & academic ambition?

    Raising Western fertility is something that'd take significant sacrifices from Western women AND Western men. It'd also take sacrifices from parents, who'd have to throw water on their daughter's ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving. I'm not against raising fertility, but don't pretend like it's easy and simple. In reality, people will have to sacrifice. Nothing happens without sacrifices being made.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

  7. My friend is an Australian novelist. He says it is extremely difficult to get past the gatekeepers at the big publishers of fiction, who are almost entirely young 20-something women who are on the whole very feminist and very progressive. For a man, it is very difficult indeed. (If you scan the new books on Amazon or at the local bookseller you will see today’s dominance of female novelists). So I am not the slightest surprised these three amigos resorted to an imaginary author…

    • Agree: Dumbo, Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Hans Tholstrup

    The deceased Harold Covington wrote this about his experiences in the late nineteen nineties:


    I have a couple of interesting personal observations to indicate which vicious little minority seems to be winning the culture wars within the left-wing elitist establishment, at least since the Clintons took power.

    As some of you know, I also write fiction, and as a kind of hobby I try to market it, mostly to collect and analyze the rejection slips. Needless to say, all my stuff is far too politically incorrect to be published, but some of the responses are suggestive and revealing. The Jews, of course, maintain overall business and financial control of the world publishing industry through the five or six major conglomerates, but what I begin to find fascinating is the editorial aspect of it, where The Agenda is most visible.

    My Civil War murder mystery novel has, of course, always been rejected, usually with great frankness by editors who admit that they cannot publish a book with a Confederate hero. (Perhaps significantly, they always say that they cannot publish a pro-Southern book, not that they will not.) But lately it seems as if the radical feminists have taken over the editorial boards of most publishers. The determination to publish or not has moved away from race to an author’s politically correct (or otherwise) treatment of his female fictional characters.

    [...]

    My first encounter with this phenomenon was in my historical novel Vindictus, which has as its protagonist a character who must certainly have existed at some stage in real history – the first gunfighter. It’s set in the Cromwell period and features a former Royalist soldier who comes home and finds that he’s been royally screwed (no pun intended) by his Puritan neighbors who chose the winning side, and he decides to return the favor. I had one female editor reject it on the grounds that my main character, Denzil, “...has a cavalier attitude towards women.”

    “Cavalier attitude.” Get it? I don’t think the silly woman realized the atrocious pun she was making. But the fact is that what she was demanding, essentially, was that I make a character who supposedly existed in the 1650s into a sensitive 90s-kind-of-guy, which is even more absurd. In other words, she wanted me to re-write history, which I won’t do.

    Some time ago I wrote a piece of pure hackwork, a ghost story along the Stephen King line. (I won’t give the title because I’ve got another agent nibbling at it at the moment.) Without getting overly conceited, I am simply stating a fact when I say that as horror/supernatural stories go, this book is at least as good as 90% of the pure crap that is being published in that genre today. This book makes no pretense to be great literature and is chiefly interesting for the fact that it’s the only one I have ever written with a female protagonist. About a year ago I had a very strong nibble from an agency, run by women of course, who claimed that they wanted to offer me a contract, but... there just had to be a few teensy-weensy changes made....

    “Here it comes,” I said to myself with a grin, reading their fax. “Always those few changes.” Which I usually won’t do because they always want to gut the whole novel, whatever it is, and make it stomach-churningly politically correct. I figured in this case the changes would involve the fact that my heroine, Amy, is a fundamentalist Christian. But no. Explained the head of the agency, I had to rewrite the whole ending of the book, because the female protagonist was perceived by their staff as being “Too much of a victim. Only fiction showing women as strong and independent people in their own right who control their own destinies and triumph over all odds is acceptable in today’s market.”

    The lady didn’t say acceptable to whom or why, nor did I ask. The fact that this is a horror story and the protagonist might reasonably be expected to come to a sticky end made no difference at all. Sticky ends in supernatural horror novels are apparently okay for all kinds of White males in the pulp paperbacks, on up to Stephen King’s Jack Torrance in The Shining; I’m positive if my protagonist had been male there would have been no problem with my book’s plot line.

    But not for les femmes. The fact that the classic of the whole genre, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting Of Hill House, also has a female protagonist who comes to a sticky end is beside the point, apparently. Shirley Jackson was writing in 1960 under classical Judaic literary Stalinism, before this particular brand of political correctness had set in. It’s ironic that Stalinist liberalism controlled by Jewish men of the day actually left American writers with more intellectual freedom than modern-day feminism controlled by Jewish women; in 1960 so long as you didn’t criticize the Soviet Union you had a good chance of being published in New York.
     

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    , @SFG
    @Hans Tholstrup

    I've been thinking about ways around it. I have a 30-40 year life expectancy (given age, sex, spare tire) and roughly 30-35x annual expenses saved so I should theoretically be able to survive cancellation as long as I don't do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they'll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).

    Amazon leans left but they so far are selling Bronze Age Pervert and Delicious Tacos' books. Zero HP Lovecraft's got some really interesting fiction but it's less 'average guy's experience' and more 'surreal internet horror'. I suspect you won't get on the NYT bestseller list, but if you have the wherewithal it's probably worth trying. I would imagine you'd have to find and cultivate the proper audience, which I have no clue how to do.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  8. In today’s world, there is no reason three men cannot be one woman.

    This is the next step (along with children in arranged marriages with goats.)

    This story prompted my wife and me to have a conversation about this. To unpack this, as one might say.

    We have realised that together we are a Black, Jewish Lesbian. Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as “Hey You!”

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Indeed. Why shouldn’t these three men be allowed to identify as a woman?

    The hounding (pun intended) of this “woman” is a clear example of what I will henceforth call “cerberophobia”, after the mythical 3-headed dog Cerberus.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as “Hey You!”
     
    Sorry, Buzz, that one has already been taken by the 3 Amigos Bachman, Turner, and Overdrive:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNba2ZQ3JOs

    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets - see Fun with Pronouns. "Hey Yu!" "Hu, mei?"

    The world has been turned upside down in half a century.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Adam Smith

  9. My wife watched a lifetime or Hallmark movie with that plot. A woman was doing the public appearances for a male romance writer.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @SF

    Wifetime movies are emotion-porn for women. They are psychologically disturbing. Block the channel, remove your wife's shoes, and lock her in the kitchen. It's for her own good.

  10. • Replies: @Hibernian
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Maybe a little heavy handed, interspersing the baptism with multiple assassinations, including one of a woman, and one on the steps of (another) church.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  11. @Buzz Mohawk
    In today's world, there is no reason three men cannot be one woman.

    This is the next step (along with children in arranged marriages with goats.)

    This story prompted my wife and me to have a conversation about this. To unpack this, as one might say.

    We have realised that together we are a Black, Jewish Lesbian. Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as "Hey You!"

    Replies: @Anon, @Achmed E. Newman

    Indeed. Why shouldn’t these three men be allowed to identify as a woman?

    The hounding (pun intended) of this “woman” is a clear example of what I will henceforth call “cerberophobia”, after the mythical 3-headed dog Cerberus.

    • Agree: fish
    • LOL: kaganovitch
  12. In the Woke dystopian future (i.e. 3 years from now), all writers will have to have a government-issued ID photo on their work and only use the name, sex, and sexual orientation they use in every day life.

    On pain of death.

    Can’t let all these pesky white men keep winning awards by subverting the Holy Quota System with fake names and biographies.

    J.T. Leroy was bad enough, but at least she was biological woman, even if she was faking being a tranny male (who are Real Women, you TERF haters!). And ugly sewer troll Lena Dunham may have not written or run Girls as she and HBO claimed, but at least her Jewish mother did.

    Totally unrelated:

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @R.G. Camara


    In the Woke dystopian future (i.e. 3 years from now)
     
    Three years, as long as that? I find your optimism heartening.
  13. …along with children in arranged marriages with goats.

    Normally I prefer the word children in writing, but in this case kids would be more appropriate.

    • LOL: Charlotte
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    Preadolescent goats are too young for marriage. You have a filthy mind.

    (LOL. You found my Easter egg.)

  14. @AnotherDad

    Beatriz Gimeno, a feminist, writer, activist – and former head of one of Spain’s national equality bodies, the Women’s Institute – attacked the men for creating a female persona in their publicity for Carmen Mola books, over several years.
     
    Maybe Western women could try doing more of the one thing they are unequivocally better than men at.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    What evidence is there that Western men want large families?

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK&Denmark. The study found that women desired more children than men. Women desired roughly 2.2 children, while the men wanted 1.8 children.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098488/

    Interestingly, the fertility rate in these countries is ~1.7 children. Closer to what men desire.

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families, families will remain small. I’m not sure where you get the idea that it’s exclusively Western women who want small families. The last time I checked, the average White guy doesn’t want to pay for more 1-2 kids (if that). He’d rather spend the money on a big SUV, vacation house, boat, sports balls tickets, and a big screen tv. He doesn’t want to deal with another crying infant who needs milk, clothes, medical care, etc.

    By the way, didn’t you once claim your daughter is unmarried and decided to attend medical school? That’ll take her out of the breeding game until at least her early 30s, probably limiting her to (at most) 1-2 kids – and only IF she gets married. If you can’t get your own daughter to take your advice, are you really in a position to be criticizing these other women who have similar professional & academic ambition?

    Raising Western fertility is something that’d take significant sacrifices from Western women AND Western men. It’d also take sacrifices from parents, who’d have to throw water on their daughter’s ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving. I’m not against raising fertility, but don’t pretend like it’s easy and simple. In reality, people will have to sacrifice. Nothing happens without sacrifices being made.

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    LOL Johnny all that from my quip?

    FYI--i'm not the least deluded about the complexity of the fertility crisis. I've probably commented on it as much or more than any other commenter here. After the immigration crisis--that's overwhelmingly #1--it's job #2. (And like immigration there's a certain mathy "you can't keep doing this" element to it.)

    Like much of our current crisis multiple elements reinforce each other--but potentially in fixing it as well. One of the things i think would dramatically help is a renewal of a sense of nation and civilization. Getting healthy and productive young couples to think having 3 or 4 instead of 1 or 2 is not just a personal "lifestyle" decision but something that is socially positive for the civilization they live in. They are a part of something bigger.

    But obviously you have to address all the economic and lifestyle barriers.

    All that said ... Western fertility (varies obviously by nation) has fallen from something around replacement to 1.5ish during the last 50 years. (Spain from >2.5 to 1.3!) If your analysis, looking at the culture around you, is that's that's been driven--even semi-significantly- by changes in male fertility preference and behavior ... i just can't help you.

    ~~

    My quip stands. Across the range of "thingy" fields--including the world of ideas--men are generally as good as or better than women. (More orientation to things; more variance so more high end talent; more drive to do, create, achieve.) But there is one--absolutely life critical--thing that men simply can not do.

    Fortunately for me, AnotherMom understood that dichotomy.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK & Denmark...

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families...
     

    The only genders in Denmark and Sweden are common and neuter:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_in_Danish_and_Swedish

    In the UK, gender is only found in the fringe of the Fringe:

    Scottish Gaelic grammar Wiki: Gender

    Gaelic Algorithmic Research Group: Predicting Grammatical Gender in Scottish Gaelic with Machine Learning

    How to remember the gender of Welsh nouns and when it matters

    , @kaganovitch
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It’d also take sacrifices from parents, who’d have to throw water on their daughter’s ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving.

    In what sense is that a sacrifice on the parent's side? Both of my daughters and most of my nieces were married before they went to graduate school. As I can attest, having lot's of grandchildren(18 and 2 in the oven, ble"h) when you are still young enough to enjoy them is one of life's great pleasures. I don't for a moment think my daughters are worse off because they won't climb the greasy pole all the way to the top. Perpetuating your People/Civilization is a lot more rewarding in every sense - excepting financial of course - than making your numbers for the quarter. Why making your numbers is "self-actualizing" while making your children isn't, is a mystery to me.

  15. In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan


    I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.
     
    There is always the worry that they might not have been of the trans faith, or had a less than worshipful opinion of foreigners. Best to remain in ignorance, just in case.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @PiltdownMan

    Or maybe Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell?

    https://www.annebronte.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Poems-by-Currer-Ellis-and-Acton-Bell.jpg

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @PiltdownMan

    You do get the odd namecheck for Radclyffe Hall, invariably in the context of the unbearable oppression (a.k.a. "nobody GAF; this is outrageous! need more attention, now") of being lesbian, or any of the other 57 varieties.

    , @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I don't think it's ignorance so much as desire to obscure the fact that we've moved from a society that discriminates against women to one that discriminates against men, and not the happy equality were were promised when this transformation first began.

    (Similar logic applies to race relations of course.)

    , @Kratoklastes
    @PiltdownMan

    I was going to mention that men can collectively tu quoque the shit out of this because of George Eliot... and also to remind everyone that as I recall it, G.K. Chesterton was an amphibious assault craft and Ibrahim X Kendi appears to be some sort of shaved ape.

    So y'know... switch-hitting in the literary game is hardly news.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  16. @R.G. Camara
    In the Woke dystopian future (i.e. 3 years from now), all writers will have to have a government-issued ID photo on their work and only use the name, sex, and sexual orientation they use in every day life.

    On pain of death.

    Can't let all these pesky white men keep winning awards by subverting the Holy Quota System with fake names and biographies.

    J.T. Leroy was bad enough, but at least she was biological woman, even if she was faking being a tranny male (who are Real Women, you TERF haters!). And ugly sewer troll Lena Dunham may have not written or run Girls as she and HBO claimed, but at least her Jewish mother did.

    Totally unrelated:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMrjBLwn8

    Replies: @Lurker

    In the Woke dystopian future (i.e. 3 years from now)

    Three years, as long as that? I find your optimism heartening.

    • LOL: R.G. Camara
  17. I don’t understand the need for fiction these days. Does not current reality surpass even the most vivid imaginations across all possible genres?

  18. That could be a new joke:

    Q: How many men does it takes to do the job of one woman?

    A: three.

    It’s funny you see because there were three of them… oh, never mind 🙂

    • LOL: Lurker
    • Replies: @raga10
    @raga10


    How many men does it takes
     
    LOL, see what I mean? If there were three of me, perhaps one of us would've spotted that typo before posting!
  19. @raga10
    That could be a new joke:

    Q: How many men does it takes to do the job of one woman?

    A: three.

    It's funny you see because there were three of them... oh, never mind :)

    Replies: @raga10

    How many men does it takes

    LOL, see what I mean? If there were three of me, perhaps one of us would’ve spotted that typo before posting!

  20. Anon[264] • Disclaimer says:

    There are a lot of women writing in men’s genre fiction either under mens names or using initials rather than a given name. This is fraud! I count on author names to help steer me away from chick lit with page after page of relationship BS. But even male authors are writing like that now, either at the behest of their editors, or because of low testosterone and epidemic metrosexuslism.

  21. @JimDandy
    "Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women."

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn't change a word.)


    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    Replies: @Dumbo, @El Dato, @IHTG, @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    Yep. Steve got cause and effect confused. The publishing industry today has a lot of women in major roles, and is heavily oriented towards a female audience (as is most of TV, Netflix, etc). So it’s not surprising that, just like before George Sand had to use a man’s name to be published, now some men have to pretend to be women to be published. And it’s a good marketing gimmick too.

    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn’t Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo

    The Bronte brothers originally published their novels under their real names Acton, Ellis, and Currer Bell, but found that they sold better when they used the pseudonyms of Anne, Emily, and Charlotte Bronte.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Nico
    @Dumbo


    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn’t Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?
     
    She’s certainly one of the most famous but that doesn’t mean she wrote good mystery novels. Her work is fun to read because of the terrific characters and settings she drew up but as *mystery* goes she was using the old bait-and-switch. Her detective always has some critical information the reader doesn’t, so it’s really something of a cheat.
  22. @Kgaard
    The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Dieter Kief, @xxxeliss

    That’s basically true. There are other occasional exceptions–the fairly recent Cherry, various Cormac McCarthy books, a novel that probably sucks called Phucboi written by a total douchebag will be coming out soon—-but, yeah, basically what you said.

    • Agree: Thea
  23. @Kgaard
    The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Dieter Kief, @xxxeliss

    I agree with you about the “with any impact” part, meaning either (or both) popular with a broad section of the male reading audience, or having a major influence on other male novelists. These seem rare as hen’s teeth.

    But there are still good male writers whose hunting ground is male inner life and male experience. One is William T. Vollmann, who mostly does this in his excellent short stories and novellas, but his crazy experimental novel “The Rifles,” which is partly about the Franklin expedition in the Arctic, is really quite good on this, but it’s also quite weird.

    Other good ones: TC Boyle (I’m not a fan, but he fits the bill), Raymond Carver, and there’s a whole crop of very good literary crime writers like Richard Price and James Ellroy.

  24. Why don’t they just say they’re going to get gender reassignment surgery?

  25. @Buzz Mohawk
    In today's world, there is no reason three men cannot be one woman.

    This is the next step (along with children in arranged marriages with goats.)

    This story prompted my wife and me to have a conversation about this. To unpack this, as one might say.

    We have realised that together we are a Black, Jewish Lesbian. Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as "Hey You!"

    Replies: @Anon, @Achmed E. Newman

    Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as “Hey You!”

    Sorry, Buzz, that one has already been taken by the 3 Amigos Bachman, Turner, and Overdrive:

    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets – see Fun with Pronouns. “Hey Yu!” “Hu, mei?”

    The world has been turned upside down in half a century.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ah Achmed.

    In furtherance of your interesting review of "The Mandibles", you may be interested in this article, in case you haven't come across it yet:

    Hyperinflation and Hyperreality: Thomas Mann in Light of Austrian Economics (1994) by Paul A. Cantor.

    It's about this book:

    https://i.postimg.cc/9Mw9qD5V/unordnung-und-fr-hes-leid.jpg

    Not to be confused with Hypernormalization


    The word hypernormalization was coined by Alexei Yurchak, a professor of anthropology who was born in Leningrad and later went to teach in the United States. He introduced the word in his book Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation (2006), which describes paradoxes of Soviet life during the 1970s and 1980s. He says that everyone in the Soviet Union knew the system was failing, but no one could imagine an alternative to the status quo, and politicians and citizens alike were resigned to maintaining the pretense of a functioning society. Over time, this delusion became a self-fulfilling prophecy and the fakeness was accepted by everyone as real, an effect that Yurchak termed hypernormalisation.
     
    https://i.postimg.cc/GpFw3Q91/everything-was-forever.jpg

    Sadly I have never found time to read Mann, but I have Everything Was Forever on my to read list. Arrr.

    , @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Good morning Mr. Newman,

    Happy Monday to you and yours.
    I hope this message finds you well.


    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets...
     
    While I do agree with what you're saying, I also find it interesting that you didn't mention China's imploding real estate market...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om6b0_ffyFQ

    China’s Property Sector Has Bigger Problems Than Evergrande

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  26. Spain still has a king ? How much does that asshole make a year ?

    • Replies: @CCG
    @anonymous

    Yes, the Spanish King is a 6'6" (197 cm) giant who comes with a Queen Consort and two princesses.
    https://youtu.be/-UE8LhGx3ns

    His salary in 2015 was 234,204 euros.
    https://www.cnbc.com/2015/02/13/king-felipe-vi-cuts-his-royal-salary-by-66000.html

  27. “peculiar and solitary woman, who loves grappa, karaoke, classic cars and sex in SUVs”

    Living the dream of the strong woman HR lady.

    “Quite apart from using a female pseudonym, these guys have spent years doing interviews. It’s not just the name – it’s the fake profile that they’ve used to take in readers and journalists. They are scammers,” she said on Twitter.

    How dare they get under my skin! Women are inscrutable, I tell you! I will tell daddy!

  28. They be transliterary.

    Their hands be female.

  29. @Kgaard
    The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Dieter Kief, @xxxeliss


    “the true nature of the inner male psyche”
    great book, no joke

  30. @JimDandy
    "Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women."

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn't change a word.)


    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    Replies: @Dumbo, @El Dato, @IHTG, @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    Yeah but there is only so much you can read. Who reads all those stacks of

    1) novels about women involved in bizarre criminal contingencies
    2) novels about women being treated badly
    3) novels about immigrants being treated badly
    3b) novels about soon-to-be-immigrants being treated badly in their country
    4) novels about women fighting to improve their life under the patriarchy
    5) women being witches and possibly fighting/loving vampires and stuff (I dunno)

    And also

    6) hagiographies of various politicians as indistinguishable as pieces of swiss raclette chesse coming out of the grill
    7) various books moaning about greenery

    When I leave the bookshop, everybody seems to be mainly absorbed by their mobile terminals.

    I don’t even get through my stack of “required reading”. Before the Internet one had at least a chance to keep up.

  31. These three dudes wrote as a Spanish woman. I don’t know about you, but i expect a bit more honesty from my fiction than that.

    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting

    • LOL: R.G. Camara, Lurker
    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Rob

    A humorous urban legend about Laurie's audition for House was how when he showed up the creators were aggravated because all the previous actors trying out were doing horrible accents . Then Laurie showed up and did his tryout from start to finish in his American fake accent and the creators were all like, " See? This is a real American accent by an American." because none of them knew Laurie was British.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Feryl
    @Rob

    High Laurie looked so British that the accent was incongruous.

    Replies: @Rob

    , @Lurker
    @Rob


    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting
     
    Limey reporting . . . tbf the evidence was alwas there online, IMDb, videos etc. Hidden in plain view.
  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as “Hey You!”
     
    Sorry, Buzz, that one has already been taken by the 3 Amigos Bachman, Turner, and Overdrive:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNba2ZQ3JOs

    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets - see Fun with Pronouns. "Hey Yu!" "Hu, mei?"

    The world has been turned upside down in half a century.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Adam Smith

    Ah Achmed.

    In furtherance of your interesting review of “The Mandibles”, you may be interested in this article, in case you haven’t come across it yet:

    Hyperinflation and Hyperreality: Thomas Mann in Light of Austrian Economics (1994) by Paul A. Cantor.

    It’s about this book:

    Not to be confused with Hypernormalization

    The word hypernormalization was coined by Alexei Yurchak, a professor of anthropology who was born in Leningrad and later went to teach in the United States. He introduced the word in his book Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation (2006), which describes paradoxes of Soviet life during the 1970s and 1980s. He says that everyone in the Soviet Union knew the system was failing, but no one could imagine an alternative to the status quo, and politicians and citizens alike were resigned to maintaining the pretense of a functioning society. Over time, this delusion became a self-fulfilling prophecy and the fakeness was accepted by everyone as real, an effect that Yurchak termed hypernormalisation.


    Sadly I have never found time to read Mann, but I have Everything Was Forever on my to read list. Arrr.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  33. @Rob
    These three dudes wrote as a Spanish woman. I don’t know about you, but i expect a bit more honesty from my fiction than that.

    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Feryl, @Lurker

    A humorous urban legend about Laurie’s audition for House was how when he showed up the creators were aggravated because all the previous actors trying out were doing horrible accents . Then Laurie showed up and did his tryout from start to finish in his American fake accent and the creators were all like, ” See? This is a real American accent by an American.” because none of them knew Laurie was British.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Hugh Laurie was the perfect Bertie Wooster.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  34. May I suggest that if you refuse to suspend disbelief, you have no business criticizing works if fiction.

    As to the marketing, wasn’t this case a bit of legal puffery?

    Wasn’t there an acclaimed book on guisha girls written by a man a decade or so ago? Feminists loved it.

  35. @Kgaard
    The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Dieter Kief, @xxxeliss

    I’ve recently read Treasure Coast by Tom E. Kakonis (Michigan Roll – another great book by him). Treasure Coast is a crime novel but even more so it is a group portrait of a handful of people, some of them on the fringe, others more MOR (and at times those are quite scary too).

    Sadly, the great crime writer Tom E. Kakonis passed away in August

    http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/2018/10/kakonis-ends-his-roll.html

    • Replies: @Set
    @Dieter Kief

    Kakonis was awesome

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  36. @Rob
    These three dudes wrote as a Spanish woman. I don’t know about you, but i expect a bit more honesty from my fiction than that.

    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Feryl, @Lurker

    High Laurie looked so British that the accent was incongruous.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Feryl

    No one would have believed House was so undiplomatic and impolite if he’d had a high-end British accent, but no one would have believed someone with a lower-class accent was a star physician. They were in a pickle, or, as Hugh Laurie would say, a sticky wicket.

  37. Men must pretend to be women to get published, probably because of the patriarchy.

    Here a funny one I remember from the 80s:

    https://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/virago-press-history-bite-apple-lennie-goodings-review

    Basically Virago, a female only publisher, was publishing books by a British-Asian woman called Rahila, the the hard left BBC was airing her radio plays. Turns out Rahila was a White English Church of England vicar called Toby.

    I laughed. Virago didn’t, they had all the books recalled and pulped.

    • LOL: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Gordo

    Vicar in a tutu/He's not strange/He just wants to live his life this way

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ke2nucbxP1E

  38. Anonymous[165] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @YetAnotherAnon, @Expletive Deleted, @Anonymous, @Kratoklastes

    I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    There is always the worry that they might not have been of the trans faith, or had a less than worshipful opinion of foreigners. Best to remain in ignorance, just in case.

  39. OT: Cascading problems from nowhere are now everyhwere!

    Pandemonium looms for the world as the ‘Everything Shortage’ meets a ‘Dark Winter’ thanks to collapsing global supply chains

    I guess the key phrase is “phase change in economic networks”.

    Let’s see whether we have learnt something since the Great Depression and whether politicians can keep their hands off the dead-weight pilot’s stick. Odds are slim.

    It is quite ironic that pilots must get inoculated in order to ferry the aristocrats of the New Normal who are exempted from such trivialities. If critical staff shortages persist in the airline industry, accompanied by one or two aviation disasters, the global supply chain may simply fold.

    The biblical-scale woes do not end here, however. Experts and leaders are regurgitating the prospects of a “very dark winter” ahead. The solution, predictably, is mass vaccination and booster shots. Now, that should solve our global coal crisis, mass floods, growing hunger, real estate bubbles, shoplifting sprees and even climate change ad nauseam.

  40. If they all put on dresses the problem would be solved.

  41. A quick look at the Goodreads reviews on the first “Carmen Mola” novel shows a fairly even split between those who think it’s a dreadful mishmash of cliches and the rest whose admiration for this daring pushing against the boundaries by a dynamic new female writer verges on religious fervour.

    The string of cliches/religious fervour division makes me wonder if the “perps” weren’t consciously going all out to mock and exploit the whole gay/feminist cultural mafia which has ruled the roost in Madrid since the death of Franco. The nom de plume chosen is quite close to the name of one of flamboyant filmmaker Pedro Almodovar’s usual collaborators, Carmen Maura. * It might be entertaining to compare the professional newspaper and magazine reviews of the novels on publication with the reactions to the revelation of the authors’ identities.

    * https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmen_Maura

  42. @PiltdownMan
    In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @YetAnotherAnon, @Expletive Deleted, @Anonymous, @Kratoklastes

    Or maybe Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell?

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
  43. The wheel comes full circle, or maybe is at 180 degrees from its starting point.
    Can never get these analogies right.
    George Eliot, anyone?

  44. No! What next? I bet soon they will discover that 90% of the Internet commentariat with female names are actually men…

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Dumbo

    Time to update that rare funny New Yorker cartoon:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/comic-riffs/post/nobody-knows-youre-a-dog-as-iconic-internet-cartoon-turns-20-creator-peter-steiner-knows-the-joke-rings-as-relevant-as-ever/2013/07/31/73372600-f98d-11e2-8e84-c56731a202fb_blog.html

    "On the internet, nobody knows you're three men."

  45. The Elena Ferrante books sell well at Amazon USA. I can see this by the thousands of reviews they get.

  46. @Dumbo
    @JimDandy

    Yep. Steve got cause and effect confused. The publishing industry today has a lot of women in major roles, and is heavily oriented towards a female audience (as is most of TV, Netflix, etc). So it's not surprising that, just like before George Sand had to use a man's name to be published, now some men have to pretend to be women to be published. And it's a good marketing gimmick too.

    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn't Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Nico

    The Bronte brothers originally published their novels under their real names Acton, Ellis, and Currer Bell, but found that they sold better when they used the pseudonyms of Anne, Emily, and Charlotte Bronte.

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Jonathan Mason

    It was a bit difficult for women to publish novels under their own names at the time, because they could not legally sign contracts with publishers.

  47. @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo

    The Bronte brothers originally published their novels under their real names Acton, Ellis, and Currer Bell, but found that they sold better when they used the pseudonyms of Anne, Emily, and Charlotte Bronte.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It was a bit difficult for women to publish novels under their own names at the time, because they could not legally sign contracts with publishers.

  48. I can see writers having to use subtle parables to get past the publisher ladies, like Soviet writers getting past the censors. Perhaps the truth can be put in the mouths of a character, while a sassy black feminist refutes him. If written well, the book will slip through, while the general reader would understand it.

  49. I think if I were in need of a pen name to indicate a female author I might use George Sand.

  50. Ah I nearly forgot!

  51. Steve – isn’t this the period when Obama’s stepfather was in Indonesia?

    Warning – it’s the Guardian, so the Brits are the Machiavellian villains and the Indonesian Army are their helpless dupes.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/oct/17/revealed-how-uk-spies-incited-mass-of-indonesias-communists

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/oct/17/slaughter-in-indonesia-britains-secret-propaganda-war

    “the newsletter carefully itemises accounts of isolated incidents of PKI brutality but makes no explicit mention of the army’s killings”

    Just as everyone knows George Floyd’s name today but no one knows Channon Christian’s, or (in the UK) Stephen Lawrence as opposed to Kriss Donald.

  52. @Hans Tholstrup
    My friend is an Australian novelist. He says it is extremely difficult to get past the gatekeepers at the big publishers of fiction, who are almost entirely young 20-something women who are on the whole very feminist and very progressive. For a man, it is very difficult indeed. (If you scan the new books on Amazon or at the local bookseller you will see today's dominance of female novelists). So I am not the slightest surprised these three amigos resorted to an imaginary author...

    Replies: @Ray P, @SFG

    The deceased Harold Covington wrote this about his experiences in the late nineteen nineties:

    I have a couple of interesting personal observations to indicate which vicious little minority seems to be winning the culture wars within the left-wing elitist establishment, at least since the Clintons took power.

    As some of you know, I also write fiction, and as a kind of hobby I try to market it, mostly to collect and analyze the rejection slips. Needless to say, all my stuff is far too politically incorrect to be published, but some of the responses are suggestive and revealing. The Jews, of course, maintain overall business and financial control of the world publishing industry through the five or six major conglomerates, but what I begin to find fascinating is the editorial aspect of it, where The Agenda is most visible.

    My Civil War murder mystery novel has, of course, always been rejected, usually with great frankness by editors who admit that they cannot publish a book with a Confederate hero. (Perhaps significantly, they always say that they cannot publish a pro-Southern book, not that they will not.) But lately it seems as if the radical feminists have taken over the editorial boards of most publishers. The determination to publish or not has moved away from race to an author’s politically correct (or otherwise) treatment of his female fictional characters.

    […]

    My first encounter with this phenomenon was in my historical novel Vindictus, which has as its protagonist a character who must certainly have existed at some stage in real history – the first gunfighter. It’s set in the Cromwell period and features a former Royalist soldier who comes home and finds that he’s been royally screwed (no pun intended) by his Puritan neighbors who chose the winning side, and he decides to return the favor. I had one female editor reject it on the grounds that my main character, Denzil, “…has a cavalier attitude towards women.”

    “Cavalier attitude.” Get it? I don’t think the silly woman realized the atrocious pun she was making. But the fact is that what she was demanding, essentially, was that I make a character who supposedly existed in the 1650s into a sensitive 90s-kind-of-guy, which is even more absurd. In other words, she wanted me to re-write history, which I won’t do.

    Some time ago I wrote a piece of pure hackwork, a ghost story along the Stephen King line. (I won’t give the title because I’ve got another agent nibbling at it at the moment.) Without getting overly conceited, I am simply stating a fact when I say that as horror/supernatural stories go, this book is at least as good as 90% of the pure crap that is being published in that genre today. This book makes no pretense to be great literature and is chiefly interesting for the fact that it’s the only one I have ever written with a female protagonist. About a year ago I had a very strong nibble from an agency, run by women of course, who claimed that they wanted to offer me a contract, but… there just had to be a few teensy-weensy changes made….

    “Here it comes,” I said to myself with a grin, reading their fax. “Always those few changes.” Which I usually won’t do because they always want to gut the whole novel, whatever it is, and make it stomach-churningly politically correct. I figured in this case the changes would involve the fact that my heroine, Amy, is a fundamentalist Christian. But no. Explained the head of the agency, I had to rewrite the whole ending of the book, because the female protagonist was perceived by their staff as being “Too much of a victim. Only fiction showing women as strong and independent people in their own right who control their own destinies and triumph over all odds is acceptable in today’s market.”

    The lady didn’t say acceptable to whom or why, nor did I ask. The fact that this is a horror story and the protagonist might reasonably be expected to come to a sticky end made no difference at all. Sticky ends in supernatural horror novels are apparently okay for all kinds of White males in the pulp paperbacks, on up to Stephen King’s Jack Torrance in The Shining; I’m positive if my protagonist had been male there would have been no problem with my book’s plot line.

    But not for les femmes. The fact that the classic of the whole genre, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting Of Hill House, also has a female protagonist who comes to a sticky end is beside the point, apparently. Shirley Jackson was writing in 1960 under classical Judaic literary Stalinism, before this particular brand of political correctness had set in. It’s ironic that Stalinist liberalism controlled by Jewish men of the day actually left American writers with more intellectual freedom than modern-day feminism controlled by Jewish women; in 1960 so long as you didn’t criticize the Soviet Union you had a good chance of being published in New York.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Ray P

    Daniel Woodrell wrote a Civil War novel called "Woe To Live On" which was broadly sympathetic to the Southern cause. A pretty good movie was made out of it, called "Ride With the Devil", but the movie got canned when the NAACP complained about the movie having a black Confederate in it.

  53. @JimDandy
    "Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women."

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn't change a word.)


    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    Replies: @Dumbo, @El Dato, @IHTG, @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    This is cope tbh

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @IHTG

    Your youthful shorthand slang went right over my head, much like the bird which is the Bald Eagle.

  54. The dead giveaway was the 3 children. Even the King of Spain only has 2.

    Can 3 women collaborate long enough to complete a novel? Would any man want to read it? We’ll watch the 10,000 female detectives on TV because there’s little other option.

    IIRC, Jane Austen’s first novel was published as “by a lady;” her second as “by the author of Sense and Sensibility.” Her brother negotiated (and presumably signed) the contracts for her early novels, which lost her considerable royalties as she sold the rights, since she didn’t have the capital to self-publish.

  55. @Anon
    Men would not be ghostwriting or writing only novels with female protagonists, if males read books instead of playing video games for recreation.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Alexander Turok

    Men would not be ghostwriting or writing only novels with female protagonists, if males read books instead of playing video games for recreation.

    Is the Delicious Tacos guy any good as a writer?

  56. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1449379631572955144

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Pf8BkFLBRw

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Maybe a little heavy handed, interspersing the baptism with multiple assassinations, including one of a woman, and one on the steps of (another) church.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Hibernian

    I think it was a deliberate choice by Francis Ford Coppola. Mario Puzo wrote the best selling novel in a deliberately heavy-handed style, as a Silician peasant immigrant might have written it.

  57. Has everyone forgotten the Naked came the stranger that was sold as having been written by a woman but was actually written by 24 men who worked for Newsday.

    From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_Came_the_Stranger

    Naked Came the Stranger is a 1969 novel written as a literary hoax poking fun at the American literary culture of its time. Though credited to “Penelope Ashe,” it was in fact written by a group of twenty-four journalists led by Newsday columnist Mike McGrady.

    McGrady’s intention was to write a book that was both deliberately terrible and contained a lot of descriptions of sex, to illustrate the point that popular American literary culture had become mindlessly vulgar. The book fulfilled the authors’ expectations and became a bestseller in 1969; they revealed the hoax later that year, further spurring the book’s popularity.

  58. The Christian liturgy has been standardized for a long time it’s not confusing. However the tenants of wokism are difficult to understand. If three male writers create a female pseudonym it’s a sin, but if said men get an operation, take hormones to transition, not only is it not a sin, they’ve obtained a higher state of grace.

    • Agree: Cato
  59. @S Johnson
    Mystery writing would seem to be suited to teamwork. Dick Francis was a jockey turned mystery novelist whose bestselling books were collaborations between with his wife. He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @SFG, @Dradder

    He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.

    I guess that means his wife preferred Dick? Good for him!

    • Replies: @Rob
    @slumber_j

    And he was kind enough to oblige her. At least in writing, which was probably not as satisfying.

  60. VS Naipaul famously/notoriously said that he could read a few paragraphs of a writer and discern whether it was written by a man or a woman. I believe this is true for newspaper columnists that I read. Sometimes I think I can tell that a Jewish writer is writing a letter to the editor, before I get to the name at the bottom. Age can be discerned, very often.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @SafeNow

    Richard Ingrams wrote in his Observer column in 2003: “I have developed a habit when confronted by letters to the editor in support of the Israeli government to look at the signature to see if the writer has a Jewish name. If so, I tend not to read it.” Amazingly, he wasn't sacked or cancelled.

  61. This is the classic take on this phenomenon:

  62. The clue was right there in the name.

    Carmen Mola = C. Mola ar men.

  63. OT

    Lecturer sacked for looking at his students the wrong way.

    https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/north-wales-lecturer-staring-students-21868343

    During an all-girl English GCSE resit class that month, a group of students as young as 17 complained of Mr Taylor behaving ‘inappropriately’ towards them.

    One student said she saw her teacher ‘look at [another student]’s breasts’ and that he ‘looked at [another student]’s bottom’ as she was walking out of class.

    The tribunal heard: “The students [said] that during the afternoon class [Mr Jones] had behaved inappropriately towards them by entering their ‘personal space’ and staring at their tops and cleavage.

    Isn’t the point of cleavage to make people look?

    “They also said that they had seen [him] looking at their bottoms as they left the room for a break part way through the lesson. “The students described how [Mr Jones] set them work and then went around the class, appearing to look at their work but looking down their tops instead.”

    When you walk round a class to look at students work you have to look down – because their work is on the desk! And how on earth can they tell where he’s looking when someone leaves?

    Students also complained about how their teacher was ‘making students fail’, and another complained about his poor ‘appearance and hygiene’.

    A disciplinary meeting was held the following month, during which Mr Jones denied staring inappropriately at students.

    He’d been teaching 23 years and was diabetic. I wonder if the things no one worries about when you’re 26 become an issue when you’re 53. I also wonder if the zeitgeist has changed in that failing an exam seems to be unacceptable now.

    “CD-roms belonging to Mr Jones and found amongst his personal belongings at the college were also found to contain ‘5,000 glamour images’ of two ‘young female celebrities’, some of which ‘showed them posing in underwear or swimwear’.”

    Case proved! Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift? Poor bugger. Since when did a non-police investigation involve rummaging through someone’s personal belongings?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That's Bruce Edwards Ivins level of perversion, that is!

    https://i.postimg.cc/5NZmD4sX/stare-at-goats.jpg

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift?
     
    Miss Swift has become an issue in the Virginia gubernatorial race. Christa McAuliffe never made it into space, but Terry McAuliffe is firmly into orbit.

    Replies: @El Dato

  64. Intentamos llegar a consensos, que a los tres nos guste todo siempre, como una buena democracia. Aunque en ocasiones ha habido que recurrir a la intimidación”, bromea Mercero.

    That’s the really interesting part of this, the group effort involved in literature, not some tedious, feminist bleating. (Trying to reach a satisfactory consensus, occasionally resorting to intimidation to get things done.). The team Bacon as Shakespeare theorizing is some brilliant stuff. Of course if evidence turned up that Shakespeare’s wife was ‘Shakespeare’, that would be irrelevant and intrusive.

  65. @Feryl
    @Rob

    High Laurie looked so British that the accent was incongruous.

    Replies: @Rob

    No one would have believed House was so undiplomatic and impolite if he’d had a high-end British accent, but no one would have believed someone with a lower-class accent was a star physician. They were in a pickle, or, as Hugh Laurie would say, a sticky wicket.

  66. @JimDandy
    "Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women."

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn't change a word.)


    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    Replies: @Dumbo, @El Dato, @IHTG, @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    I mean, there’s a lot of truth to that (and it’s one of the reasons I never tried to write a book), but I’d hate to underestimate the role of video games in male recreation. They are a really big deal.

    I mean, why read a description of a guy wrestling an alligator when you can watch your avatar do on a giant flat-screen TV in gloriously rendered CGI?

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @SFG

    For sure, but there are many new-media competitors for women's time and interest as well. The big publishers stopped looking at literary fiction as a money-maker a long time ago, so it became a boutique playground for rich white (disproportionately Jewish, of course) women who evolved into their own elite unit of the Woke Wine Mom revolution. Yes, men like the idea of wrestling with an alligator (not me, but I agree with your point) but they like other things, too, like wrestling with women and even wrestling with the human condition--witness, The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos, which melds both of the wrestling examples I just gave. For disaffected young white men disgusted with contemporary culture, there are Mika Ma's novels. These are books have done really well in the dyi realm, but they would be national best sellers if they got pushed by the establishment book world.

    https://www.countere.com/home/writer-delicious-tacos-interview

    Replies: @SFG

  67. @slumber_j
    @S Johnson


    He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.
     
    I guess that means his wife preferred Dick? Good for him!

    Replies: @Rob

    And he was kind enough to oblige her. At least in writing, which was probably not as satisfying.

  68. @Hans Tholstrup
    My friend is an Australian novelist. He says it is extremely difficult to get past the gatekeepers at the big publishers of fiction, who are almost entirely young 20-something women who are on the whole very feminist and very progressive. For a man, it is very difficult indeed. (If you scan the new books on Amazon or at the local bookseller you will see today's dominance of female novelists). So I am not the slightest surprised these three amigos resorted to an imaginary author...

    Replies: @Ray P, @SFG

    I’ve been thinking about ways around it. I have a 30-40 year life expectancy (given age, sex, spare tire) and roughly 30-35x annual expenses saved so I should theoretically be able to survive cancellation as long as I don’t do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they’ll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).

    Amazon leans left but they so far are selling Bronze Age Pervert and Delicious Tacos’ books. Zero HP Lovecraft’s got some really interesting fiction but it’s less ‘average guy’s experience’ and more ‘surreal internet horror’. I suspect you won’t get on the NYT bestseller list, but if you have the wherewithal it’s probably worth trying. I would imagine you’d have to find and cultivate the proper audience, which I have no clue how to do.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @SFG


    as long as I don’t do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they’ll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).
     
    Our current "culture" and education system is going to propagandize your kids. That's a given.

    But it isn't all that difficult to push back simply by injecting truth. (HBD--genetics is critical and not all groups are the same--is an easy entry point.) You kids aren't going to see everything your way--they are different people!--but you have the advantage that as they roll on into adulthood, reality will keep affirming what you've told them, not what Big Sister told them.

    I'd never suggest that people who do not want children have them. (The fertility crisis solution is more on the other side--raising the norm for those who are healthy and productive who do.)

    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it--while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)

    Replies: @Anonymous

  69. @S Johnson
    Mystery writing would seem to be suited to teamwork. Dick Francis was a jockey turned mystery novelist whose bestselling books were collaborations between with his wife. He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @SFG, @Dradder

    Or perhaps he thinks it’ll look good to his audience. Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband’s permission to run for office?

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @SFG

    The contention was that Francis, who didn’t seem particularly intellectual, came up with ideas and plots and his wife did most of the actual writing, but that the books were marketed under his name because they were masculine in orientation and he was already famous as a sportsman.

    Replies: @S Johnson

    , @Art Deco
    @SFG

    Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband’s permission to run for office?

    He had a multi-site counseling practice which employed nearly 20 people, she had a tax law practice, and about two dozen foster children had had stints in their home over the years. They were stretched thin. Yes, I think if he told her they couldn't handle it, she'd have refrained. A local pol I once knew told a prospective candidate, "you have to have spousal support...".

  70. “peculiar and solitary woman, who loves grappa, karaoke, classic cars and sex in SUVs”…….in other words ,a man’s dream woman…….I would only add ,can cook and doesn’t talk too much….oh,oh and is easy on the eyes.

  71. @PiltdownMan
    In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @YetAnotherAnon, @Expletive Deleted, @Anonymous, @Kratoklastes

    You do get the odd namecheck for Radclyffe Hall, invariably in the context of the unbearable oppression (a.k.a. “nobody GAF; this is outrageous! need more attention, now”) of being lesbian, or any of the other 57 varieties.

  72. Let us know when the Spanish Ferrante teams up with the Portuguese Teicher. Here are the original F&T, flyover country boys, doing the theme from a film condemned by the Legion of Decency, if not the Index Librorum Prohibirum:

  73. I wonder why people read fiction at all.

    I’ve skimmed through Cambridge Companion to Creativity (disappointing) & to heal my boredom I’ve read a passage from Harold Bloom’s “How to Read and Why” (Bloom relaxes me).

    The chapters on Dostoevsky and Proust were great; “Hamlet” – not quite. But then, I asked myself- why would anyone in his 80s still read new fiction books, as Bloom did? He, when around 80, read novels authored by thirtysomethings.

    I find this difficult to grasp ….

  74. By the way- who reads those Carmen novels?

    Men or women? Or- “mixed” …

  75. @S Johnson
    Mystery writing would seem to be suited to teamwork. Dick Francis was a jockey turned mystery novelist whose bestselling books were collaborations between with his wife. He disliked to take full credit and said that “Dick Francis” was the name of the writing team as he preferred to called Richard.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @SFG, @Dradder

    Under the pseudonym Ellery Queen, cousins Frederic Dannay and Manfred Bennington Lee basically created the modern American mystery novel.

    • Thanks: S Johnson
  76. In the last 3 years, all 18 nominations in the Hugo Awards most coveted best novel category went to women (actually, 17 + 1 trans). Science fiction has gone woke to the point of being as entertaining as the communist manifesto.

  77. For anyone who has seen Blackadder:

    B: Gertrude Perkins?

    E: Yes, I gave myself a female pseudonym. Everybody’s doing it these days:
    Mrs. Ratcliffe, Jane Austen–

    B: What, Jane Austen’s a man?

    E: Of course — a huge Yorkshireman with a beard like a rhododendron bush.

    B: Oh, quite a small one, then?

    E: Well, compared to Dorothy Wordsworth’s, certainly. James Boswell is the
    only real woman writing at the moment, and that’s just because she
    wants to get inside Johnson’s britches

  78. OFF TOPIC:

    Why so many shootouts? Pretty simple answer, experts say.
    More people carrying guns. Plus: loss of faith?

    By DAVE ORRICK | [email protected] | St. Paul Pioneer Press
    October 16, 2021 at 11:53 p.m.

    Innocent bystanders are getting shot in troubling numbers in the Twin Cities.

    In the past three years, shootouts in crowded gatherings — often bustling public businesses like bars — have injured more than 60 people in the metro, and the vast majority of them appear to be unconnected to the gunmen, according to a Pioneer Press compilation of shootings.

    Who’s shooting?

    FERGUSON EFFECT’ AND MORE

    A spike in shootings following a questionable high-profile killing, especially of a Black man, has become increasingly observed by criminologists. It’s often known as “the Ferguson effect” — although those studying the matter say it’s not solely the idea of police reluctant to pursue violent suspects, but also a lack of witnesses calling or cooperating with police. Bottom line: Violent cycles break out and continue.

    But there’s another lack of confidence that emerges: Those of business owners, bystanders and, yes, white people. The killing of Damond, for example — a white woman shot by a cop after calling police to report an assault — and the destruction of property following riots, arson and looting can erode confidence across a whole swath of demographics.

    If memory serves, weren’t the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul almost burned to the ground by angry Australians.

    “What do you do if you can’t call police? Sociologists call it self-help,” [Prof. Gary] LaFree said. “You take matters into your own hands. What lack of legitimacy does is it ratchets up this vigilante spirit.”

    Cast that on top of a nation fractured along divisive political messages — including lack of confidence in the elections system by supporters of former President Donald Trump, who lost to President Joe Biden. (Several experts noted that it doesn’t matter whether a particular shooting was justified — or whether there is any actual evidence that the election wasn’t accurate; what matters is the perception people have.)

    Creeping iSteve-ism in the press?

  79. @SFG
    @S Johnson

    Or perhaps he thinks it'll look good to his audience. Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband's permission to run for office?

    Replies: @S Johnson, @Art Deco

    The contention was that Francis, who didn’t seem particularly intellectual, came up with ideas and plots and his wife did most of the actual writing, but that the books were marketed under his name because they were masculine in orientation and he was already famous as a sportsman.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @S Johnson

    From Wikipedia:

    Francis, the son of a jockey and stable manager, left school at 15 without any qualifications. In October 1945, he met Mary, who had earned a degree in English from the University of London aged 19, published two short stories and worked as a publisher’s reader.

    Of course, now the situation would likely be reversed with Dick’s contributions overlooked and the novels published under Mary’s name.

  80. @S Johnson
    @SFG

    The contention was that Francis, who didn’t seem particularly intellectual, came up with ideas and plots and his wife did most of the actual writing, but that the books were marketed under his name because they were masculine in orientation and he was already famous as a sportsman.

    Replies: @S Johnson

    From Wikipedia:

    Francis, the son of a jockey and stable manager, left school at 15 without any qualifications. In October 1945, he met Mary, who had earned a degree in English from the University of London aged 19, published two short stories and worked as a publisher’s reader.

    Of course, now the situation would likely be reversed with Dick’s contributions overlooked and the novels published under Mary’s name.

  81. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @YetAnotherAnon, @Expletive Deleted, @Anonymous, @Kratoklastes

    I don’t think it’s ignorance so much as desire to obscure the fact that we’ve moved from a society that discriminates against women to one that discriminates against men, and not the happy equality were were promised when this transformation first began.

    (Similar logic applies to race relations of course.)

  82. I don’t understand the hubbub. Wikipedia says there are at least 940 Pseudonymous women writers with at least 200 deserving a Wikipedia page all for themselves. If a handful of men decide to write some women’s fiction under Pseudonymous women’s name, it seems most unnewsworthy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Pseudonymous_women_writers

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @epebble


    If a handful of men decide to write some women’s fiction under Pseudonymous women’s name
     
    Quite a few genre romance writers with florid feminine names are actually men. I asked someone in this business if it was possible to tell by reading, and she said no. Makes sense. It's a competitive field.
  83. @SFG
    @Hans Tholstrup

    I've been thinking about ways around it. I have a 30-40 year life expectancy (given age, sex, spare tire) and roughly 30-35x annual expenses saved so I should theoretically be able to survive cancellation as long as I don't do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they'll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).

    Amazon leans left but they so far are selling Bronze Age Pervert and Delicious Tacos' books. Zero HP Lovecraft's got some really interesting fiction but it's less 'average guy's experience' and more 'surreal internet horror'. I suspect you won't get on the NYT bestseller list, but if you have the wherewithal it's probably worth trying. I would imagine you'd have to find and cultivate the proper audience, which I have no clue how to do.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    as long as I don’t do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they’ll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).

    Our current “culture” and education system is going to propagandize your kids. That’s a given.

    But it isn’t all that difficult to push back simply by injecting truth. (HBD–genetics is critical and not all groups are the same–is an easy entry point.) You kids aren’t going to see everything your way–they are different people!–but you have the advantage that as they roll on into adulthood, reality will keep affirming what you’ve told them, not what Big Sister told them.

    I’d never suggest that people who do not want children have them. (The fertility crisis solution is more on the other side–raising the norm for those who are healthy and productive who do.)

    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it–while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad


    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it–while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)
     
    What is the relevance of the “while you hit the gym” comment?

    Replies: @SFG

  84. @Kgaard
    The last male novelist with any impact wax Tom Wolfe. After him it became impossible for male novelists to present anything approximating the true nature of the inner male psyche. So no more novels that men cared about were published subsequently. Except perhaps Fight Club.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Dieter Kief, @xxxeliss

    fight club is literally about the gay cruising scene before the 2000s , read the book again is filled with gay sex analogies

  85. @Anon
    Men would not be ghostwriting or writing only novels with female protagonists, if males read books instead of playing video games for recreation.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Alexander Turok

    From the subject matter, I’d bet the audience is going to be primarily male. They chose a female pseudonym for two reasons:

    1. Better chance at winning prizes.
    2. Appeal to men who like gory novels but want to feel smug and superior to “the rubes” they associate with the genre.

  86. @SFG
    @JimDandy

    I mean, there's a lot of truth to that (and it's one of the reasons I never tried to write a book), but I'd hate to underestimate the role of video games in male recreation. They are a really big deal.

    I mean, why read a description of a guy wrestling an alligator when you can watch your avatar do on a giant flat-screen TV in gloriously rendered CGI?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    For sure, but there are many new-media competitors for women’s time and interest as well. The big publishers stopped looking at literary fiction as a money-maker a long time ago, so it became a boutique playground for rich white (disproportionately Jewish, of course) women who evolved into their own elite unit of the Woke Wine Mom revolution. Yes, men like the idea of wrestling with an alligator (not me, but I agree with your point) but they like other things, too, like wrestling with women and even wrestling with the human condition–witness, The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos, which melds both of the wrestling examples I just gave. For disaffected young white men disgusted with contemporary culture, there are Mika Ma’s novels. These are books have done really well in the dyi realm, but they would be national best sellers if they got pushed by the establishment book world.

    https://www.countere.com/home/writer-delicious-tacos-interview

    • Replies: @SFG
    @JimDandy

    I read The Pussy. I wasn't that huge a fan, though the bit about the different unnatural hair colors was pretty funny. I also laughed at the bit about girls into video games never putting out--well, it's supply and demand, but it's still a nice observation. I thought his best was Finally, Some Good News--having an overarching story helped give him some discipline, otherwise it just tends to be 'I f***ed this Asian chick. I am unhappy'. I mean, I get that it shows that endlessly sleeping around without settling down and marrying is bad but he kind of hits you over the head with it. Zero HP Lovecraft is pretty good but I don't think I'm up with the latest tech trends enough--I avoid social media, for instance.

    Amazon recommended me Mike Ma, maybe I'll take a look at that. I'll probably buy it just to give the guy money. I got distracted reading other things after finishing Tacos.

    There's also the ancestry issue in my case, though Yarvin got around it, so it's evidently not insuperable. Now, being intellectually attracted to the alt-right (I really hate what's happened to the West in the past 40 years) but not being able to join is actually the sort of Angst that fuels lots of writers, though I'm kind of worried it would shrink the potential audience to near-zero. I kind of feel like the alt-right-adjacent Mike Ma/Tacos/BAP-style audience and the Scott Alexander-rationalist-type audience don't really overlap all that much--people wind up going to one group or the other. And I think my T-level's too high to really be a rationalist, I want to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and hear the lamentations of their women, not decrease Third World malaria rates by 10% or prevent the AI apocalypse (about which I am skeptical). I mean, I'm not claiming I'm Gigachad or BAP, I just don't think I can be one of those rationalist guys.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  87. @AnotherDad
    @SFG


    as long as I don’t do anything dumb like marry or breed (come on, you really want more quarter-Jews running around? they’ll go support social justice just to rebel against their dad).
     
    Our current "culture" and education system is going to propagandize your kids. That's a given.

    But it isn't all that difficult to push back simply by injecting truth. (HBD--genetics is critical and not all groups are the same--is an easy entry point.) You kids aren't going to see everything your way--they are different people!--but you have the advantage that as they roll on into adulthood, reality will keep affirming what you've told them, not what Big Sister told them.

    I'd never suggest that people who do not want children have them. (The fertility crisis solution is more on the other side--raising the norm for those who are healthy and productive who do.)

    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it--while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)

    Replies: @Anonymous

    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it–while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)

    What is the relevance of the “while you hit the gym” comment?

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anonymous

    I'm not sure, but he's right!

    Replies: @Anonymous

  88. @SFG
    @S Johnson

    Or perhaps he thinks it'll look good to his audience. Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband's permission to run for office?

    Replies: @S Johnson, @Art Deco

    Do you really think Michele Bachmann asked her husband’s permission to run for office?

    He had a multi-site counseling practice which employed nearly 20 people, she had a tax law practice, and about two dozen foster children had had stints in their home over the years. They were stretched thin. Yes, I think if he told her they couldn’t handle it, she’d have refrained. A local pol I once knew told a prospective candidate, “you have to have spousal support…”.

  89. @epebble
    I don't understand the hubbub. Wikipedia says there are at least 940 Pseudonymous women writers with at least 200 deserving a Wikipedia page all for themselves. If a handful of men decide to write some women's fiction under Pseudonymous women's name, it seems most unnewsworthy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Pseudonymous_women_writers

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If a handful of men decide to write some women’s fiction under Pseudonymous women’s name

    Quite a few genre romance writers with florid feminine names are actually men. I asked someone in this business if it was possible to tell by reading, and she said no. Makes sense. It’s a competitive field.

  90. Most women can’t write very well, because they are not good observers of human nature, nor good storytellers. They are instead preachy and Mary Sue-ish, with social dogma interspersed with stories of how awesome the Mary Sue character is, and how attractive she is to the hunky bad boy object of most novels.

    This stuff is just awful, but does sell to women. The Twilight series, Fifty Shades of Bondage, etc. The Harry Potter stuff appealed to young women. Get an A in school and you get an A in life. Stupid.

    • Agree: Jack Armstrong
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Whiskey

    Disagree. There are quite a few outstanding female writers.

    Lionel Shriver is a favorite around here, but if you're looking for a good crime thriller novelist, try Gillian Flynn, who wrote Gone Girl. Some critics say she's a misogynist, but you know, some critics are misanthropes.

    Or, if you want old school, Josephine Tey (Elizabeth MacKintosh). Her protagonist is male. Daughter of Time is a masterpiece of the genre.

  91. I responded to a comment on another iSteve post about Julian May and her Galactic Milieu novels. I read them back in the 80s, and wanted to read them again. I was able to find them, not at Amazon, but Thriftbooks.com.

    Here’s May’s Wiki bio. Check the pseudonyms.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_May

  92. @Reg Cæsar

    ...along with children in arranged marriages with goats.
     
    Normally I prefer the word children in writing, but in this case kids would be more appropriate.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Preadolescent goats are too young for marriage. You have a filthy mind.

    (LOL. You found my Easter egg.)

  93. @SF
    My wife watched a lifetime or Hallmark movie with that plot. A woman was doing the public appearances for a male romance writer.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Wifetime movies are emotion-porn for women. They are psychologically disturbing. Block the channel, remove your wife’s shoes, and lock her in the kitchen. It’s for her own good.

  94. I don’t think that male authors, especially novelists, are endangered species.

    Just, from purely financial, cultural & sociological standpoint, it makes sense that females now dominate the fiction:

    a) book clubs are big thing in the civilized world now

    b) book clubs- 90+% female: https://reedsy.com/discovery/blog/book-clubs

    c) they read contemporary rubbish; they’re “progressive”; they don’t read “classics” & when they do, it’s mostly female authors like Charlotte Bronte or Toni Morrison (additional points for race)

    d) without book clubs, at least 20-40% of fiction writers would be out, chopping wood or cooking meals

    So, it’s the economy, after all ….

  95. @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad

    What evidence is there that Western men want large families?

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK&Denmark. The study found that women desired more children than men. Women desired roughly 2.2 children, while the men wanted 1.8 children.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098488/

    Interestingly, the fertility rate in these countries is ~1.7 children. Closer to what men desire.

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families, families will remain small. I'm not sure where you get the idea that it's exclusively Western women who want small families. The last time I checked, the average White guy doesn't want to pay for more 1-2 kids (if that). He'd rather spend the money on a big SUV, vacation house, boat, sports balls tickets, and a big screen tv. He doesn't want to deal with another crying infant who needs milk, clothes, medical care, etc.

    By the way, didn't you once claim your daughter is unmarried and decided to attend medical school? That'll take her out of the breeding game until at least her early 30s, probably limiting her to (at most) 1-2 kids - and only IF she gets married. If you can't get your own daughter to take your advice, are you really in a position to be criticizing these other women who have similar professional & academic ambition?

    Raising Western fertility is something that'd take significant sacrifices from Western women AND Western men. It'd also take sacrifices from parents, who'd have to throw water on their daughter's ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving. I'm not against raising fertility, but don't pretend like it's easy and simple. In reality, people will have to sacrifice. Nothing happens without sacrifices being made.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

    LOL Johnny all that from my quip?

    FYI–i’m not the least deluded about the complexity of the fertility crisis. I’ve probably commented on it as much or more than any other commenter here. After the immigration crisis–that’s overwhelmingly #1–it’s job #2. (And like immigration there’s a certain mathy “you can’t keep doing this” element to it.)

    Like much of our current crisis multiple elements reinforce each other–but potentially in fixing it as well. One of the things i think would dramatically help is a renewal of a sense of nation and civilization. Getting healthy and productive young couples to think having 3 or 4 instead of 1 or 2 is not just a personal “lifestyle” decision but something that is socially positive for the civilization they live in. They are a part of something bigger.

    But obviously you have to address all the economic and lifestyle barriers.

    All that said … Western fertility (varies obviously by nation) has fallen from something around replacement to 1.5ish during the last 50 years. (Spain from >2.5 to 1.3!) If your analysis, looking at the culture around you, is that’s that’s been driven–even semi-significantly- by changes in male fertility preference and behavior … i just can’t help you.

    ~~

    My quip stands. Across the range of “thingy” fields–including the world of ideas–men are generally as good as or better than women. (More orientation to things; more variance so more high end talent; more drive to do, create, achieve.) But there is one–absolutely life critical–thing that men simply can not do.

    Fortunately for me, AnotherMom understood that dichotomy.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @AnotherDad

    It's both sexes, honestly.

    On the female side, they all want to have careers first, which delays childbearing. Not to mention at least some of them get distracted by the lesbian propaganda.

    On the male side, there's video games to distract you and divorce-rape to discourage you.

    On both sides, it's harder and harder to make enough to support a family, and the kids have a lot more debt coming out than they used to.

    Much like the immigration situation, both parties have contributed--the Dems by encouraging feminism that tells women men and childbearing are bad, the GOP by moving jobs overseas (Dems helped with that) and helping break up the unions. And they both colluded to increase immigration, which drives up competition for housing and thus prices at the same time it increases the supply of labor and decreases wages.

  96. @Dieter Kief
    @Kgaard

    I've recently read Treasure Coast by Tom E. Kakonis (Michigan Roll - another great book by him). Treasure Coast is a crime novel but even more so it is a group portrait of a handful of people, some of them on the fringe, others more MOR (and at times those are quite scary too).

    Sadly, the great crime writer Tom E. Kakonis passed away in August

    http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/2018/10/kakonis-ends-his-roll.html

    Replies: @Set

    Kakonis was awesome

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Set


    Kakonis was awesome
     
    Tom Kakonis's very low status as a writer in the US is something I don't get because I too had the impression, that quite a few of his books - not least Michigan Roll and Treasure Coast are awesome.

    Tom Kakonis's books - (I've read all of them) - are what you'd like to read - they give you the perspective (the ideas/ the feelings) of people you would not know otherwise - - - and thus insights, that are - not least very interesting. - The way he delivered them was - technically (=stylewise) great. - What else would you want to ask from a writer? -

    His recognition in Germany was a tad higher than in the US because he once was awarded the second place in the prestigious German Krimi-Price.
  97. In celebration, the three fronts sing a rousing, audacious version of Macarena. Complete with hip wiggles and butt slaps.

  98. @Dumbo
    @JimDandy

    Yep. Steve got cause and effect confused. The publishing industry today has a lot of women in major roles, and is heavily oriented towards a female audience (as is most of TV, Netflix, etc). So it's not surprising that, just like before George Sand had to use a man's name to be published, now some men have to pretend to be women to be published. And it's a good marketing gimmick too.

    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn't Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Nico

    That said, there are probably women who can write good mystery novels. Wasn’t Agatha Christie the most famous mystery novel writer ever?

    She’s certainly one of the most famous but that doesn’t mean she wrote good mystery novels. Her work is fun to read because of the terrific characters and settings she drew up but as *mystery* goes she was using the old bait-and-switch. Her detective always has some critical information the reader doesn’t, so it’s really something of a cheat.

    • Agree: Jack Armstrong
  99. @JimDandy
    @SFG

    For sure, but there are many new-media competitors for women's time and interest as well. The big publishers stopped looking at literary fiction as a money-maker a long time ago, so it became a boutique playground for rich white (disproportionately Jewish, of course) women who evolved into their own elite unit of the Woke Wine Mom revolution. Yes, men like the idea of wrestling with an alligator (not me, but I agree with your point) but they like other things, too, like wrestling with women and even wrestling with the human condition--witness, The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos, which melds both of the wrestling examples I just gave. For disaffected young white men disgusted with contemporary culture, there are Mika Ma's novels. These are books have done really well in the dyi realm, but they would be national best sellers if they got pushed by the establishment book world.

    https://www.countere.com/home/writer-delicious-tacos-interview

    Replies: @SFG

    I read The Pussy. I wasn’t that huge a fan, though the bit about the different unnatural hair colors was pretty funny. I also laughed at the bit about girls into video games never putting out–well, it’s supply and demand, but it’s still a nice observation. I thought his best was Finally, Some Good News–having an overarching story helped give him some discipline, otherwise it just tends to be ‘I f***ed this Asian chick. I am unhappy’. I mean, I get that it shows that endlessly sleeping around without settling down and marrying is bad but he kind of hits you over the head with it. Zero HP Lovecraft is pretty good but I don’t think I’m up with the latest tech trends enough–I avoid social media, for instance.

    Amazon recommended me Mike Ma, maybe I’ll take a look at that. I’ll probably buy it just to give the guy money. I got distracted reading other things after finishing Tacos.

    There’s also the ancestry issue in my case, though Yarvin got around it, so it’s evidently not insuperable. Now, being intellectually attracted to the alt-right (I really hate what’s happened to the West in the past 40 years) but not being able to join is actually the sort of Angst that fuels lots of writers, though I’m kind of worried it would shrink the potential audience to near-zero. I kind of feel like the alt-right-adjacent Mike Ma/Tacos/BAP-style audience and the Scott Alexander-rationalist-type audience don’t really overlap all that much–people wind up going to one group or the other. And I think my T-level’s too high to really be a rationalist, I want to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and hear the lamentations of their women, not decrease Third World malaria rates by 10% or prevent the AI apocalypse (about which I am skeptical). I mean, I’m not claiming I’m Gigachad or BAP, I just don’t think I can be one of those rationalist guys.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @SFG

    I agree with your assessment of The Pussy, and I think being forced to operate outside of the system also creates "discipline" problems--sensitivity readers and uber-woke agents/editors/etc. are poison, but that process of going through an experienced, literary pre-pub audience can lead to dynamic new drafts before it's actually typeset.

    I'm not sure what you mean by this:

    "There’s also the ancestry issue in my case, though Yarvin got around it, so it’s evidently not insuperable. Now, being intellectually attracted to the alt-right (I really hate what’s happened to the West in the past 40 years) ...

    Sounds like the Proud Boys community, literate Trumpers, and many others would like your work. The actual orthodox Alt-right (by your definition) is pretty tiny.

  100. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad


    But i will say, that nothing you do will be as rewarding as raising your own children. (Think about it–while you hit the gym and look for a good woman.)
     
    What is the relevance of the “while you hit the gym” comment?

    Replies: @SFG

    I’m not sure, but he’s right!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @SFG


    I’m not sure, but he’s right!
     
    Right about what?
  101. @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    LOL Johnny all that from my quip?

    FYI--i'm not the least deluded about the complexity of the fertility crisis. I've probably commented on it as much or more than any other commenter here. After the immigration crisis--that's overwhelmingly #1--it's job #2. (And like immigration there's a certain mathy "you can't keep doing this" element to it.)

    Like much of our current crisis multiple elements reinforce each other--but potentially in fixing it as well. One of the things i think would dramatically help is a renewal of a sense of nation and civilization. Getting healthy and productive young couples to think having 3 or 4 instead of 1 or 2 is not just a personal "lifestyle" decision but something that is socially positive for the civilization they live in. They are a part of something bigger.

    But obviously you have to address all the economic and lifestyle barriers.

    All that said ... Western fertility (varies obviously by nation) has fallen from something around replacement to 1.5ish during the last 50 years. (Spain from >2.5 to 1.3!) If your analysis, looking at the culture around you, is that's that's been driven--even semi-significantly- by changes in male fertility preference and behavior ... i just can't help you.

    ~~

    My quip stands. Across the range of "thingy" fields--including the world of ideas--men are generally as good as or better than women. (More orientation to things; more variance so more high end talent; more drive to do, create, achieve.) But there is one--absolutely life critical--thing that men simply can not do.

    Fortunately for me, AnotherMom understood that dichotomy.

    Replies: @SFG

    It’s both sexes, honestly.

    On the female side, they all want to have careers first, which delays childbearing. Not to mention at least some of them get distracted by the lesbian propaganda.

    On the male side, there’s video games to distract you and divorce-rape to discourage you.

    On both sides, it’s harder and harder to make enough to support a family, and the kids have a lot more debt coming out than they used to.

    Much like the immigration situation, both parties have contributed–the Dems by encouraging feminism that tells women men and childbearing are bad, the GOP by moving jobs overseas (Dems helped with that) and helping break up the unions. And they both colluded to increase immigration, which drives up competition for housing and thus prices at the same time it increases the supply of labor and decreases wages.

  102. @Ray P
    @Hans Tholstrup

    The deceased Harold Covington wrote this about his experiences in the late nineteen nineties:


    I have a couple of interesting personal observations to indicate which vicious little minority seems to be winning the culture wars within the left-wing elitist establishment, at least since the Clintons took power.

    As some of you know, I also write fiction, and as a kind of hobby I try to market it, mostly to collect and analyze the rejection slips. Needless to say, all my stuff is far too politically incorrect to be published, but some of the responses are suggestive and revealing. The Jews, of course, maintain overall business and financial control of the world publishing industry through the five or six major conglomerates, but what I begin to find fascinating is the editorial aspect of it, where The Agenda is most visible.

    My Civil War murder mystery novel has, of course, always been rejected, usually with great frankness by editors who admit that they cannot publish a book with a Confederate hero. (Perhaps significantly, they always say that they cannot publish a pro-Southern book, not that they will not.) But lately it seems as if the radical feminists have taken over the editorial boards of most publishers. The determination to publish or not has moved away from race to an author’s politically correct (or otherwise) treatment of his female fictional characters.

    [...]

    My first encounter with this phenomenon was in my historical novel Vindictus, which has as its protagonist a character who must certainly have existed at some stage in real history – the first gunfighter. It’s set in the Cromwell period and features a former Royalist soldier who comes home and finds that he’s been royally screwed (no pun intended) by his Puritan neighbors who chose the winning side, and he decides to return the favor. I had one female editor reject it on the grounds that my main character, Denzil, “...has a cavalier attitude towards women.”

    “Cavalier attitude.” Get it? I don’t think the silly woman realized the atrocious pun she was making. But the fact is that what she was demanding, essentially, was that I make a character who supposedly existed in the 1650s into a sensitive 90s-kind-of-guy, which is even more absurd. In other words, she wanted me to re-write history, which I won’t do.

    Some time ago I wrote a piece of pure hackwork, a ghost story along the Stephen King line. (I won’t give the title because I’ve got another agent nibbling at it at the moment.) Without getting overly conceited, I am simply stating a fact when I say that as horror/supernatural stories go, this book is at least as good as 90% of the pure crap that is being published in that genre today. This book makes no pretense to be great literature and is chiefly interesting for the fact that it’s the only one I have ever written with a female protagonist. About a year ago I had a very strong nibble from an agency, run by women of course, who claimed that they wanted to offer me a contract, but... there just had to be a few teensy-weensy changes made....

    “Here it comes,” I said to myself with a grin, reading their fax. “Always those few changes.” Which I usually won’t do because they always want to gut the whole novel, whatever it is, and make it stomach-churningly politically correct. I figured in this case the changes would involve the fact that my heroine, Amy, is a fundamentalist Christian. But no. Explained the head of the agency, I had to rewrite the whole ending of the book, because the female protagonist was perceived by their staff as being “Too much of a victim. Only fiction showing women as strong and independent people in their own right who control their own destinies and triumph over all odds is acceptable in today’s market.”

    The lady didn’t say acceptable to whom or why, nor did I ask. The fact that this is a horror story and the protagonist might reasonably be expected to come to a sticky end made no difference at all. Sticky ends in supernatural horror novels are apparently okay for all kinds of White males in the pulp paperbacks, on up to Stephen King’s Jack Torrance in The Shining; I’m positive if my protagonist had been male there would have been no problem with my book’s plot line.

    But not for les femmes. The fact that the classic of the whole genre, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting Of Hill House, also has a female protagonist who comes to a sticky end is beside the point, apparently. Shirley Jackson was writing in 1960 under classical Judaic literary Stalinism, before this particular brand of political correctness had set in. It’s ironic that Stalinist liberalism controlled by Jewish men of the day actually left American writers with more intellectual freedom than modern-day feminism controlled by Jewish women; in 1960 so long as you didn’t criticize the Soviet Union you had a good chance of being published in New York.
     

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    Daniel Woodrell wrote a Civil War novel called “Woe To Live On” which was broadly sympathetic to the Southern cause. A pretty good movie was made out of it, called “Ride With the Devil”, but the movie got canned when the NAACP complained about the movie having a black Confederate in it.

  103. @Dumbo
    No! What next? I bet soon they will discover that 90% of the Internet commentariat with female names are actually men...

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  104. @SFG
    @Anonymous

    I'm not sure, but he's right!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I’m not sure, but he’s right!

    Right about what?

  105. @SafeNow
    VS Naipaul famously/notoriously said that he could read a few paragraphs of a writer and discern whether it was written by a man or a woman. I believe this is true for newspaper columnists that I read. Sometimes I think I can tell that a Jewish writer is writing a letter to the editor, before I get to the name at the bottom. Age can be discerned, very often.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Richard Ingrams wrote in his Observer column in 2003: “I have developed a habit when confronted by letters to the editor in support of the Israeli government to look at the signature to see if the writer has a Jewish name. If so, I tend not to read it.” Amazingly, he wasn’t sacked or cancelled.

  106. @IHTG
    @JimDandy

    This is cope tbh

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Your youthful shorthand slang went right over my head, much like the bird which is the Bald Eagle.

  107. The next thing you’re going to tell me is that Blanche Knott didn’t really write all of those Truly Tasteless Jokes books.

    [MORE]
    Actually written by Ashton Applewhite

  108. @SFG
    @JimDandy

    I read The Pussy. I wasn't that huge a fan, though the bit about the different unnatural hair colors was pretty funny. I also laughed at the bit about girls into video games never putting out--well, it's supply and demand, but it's still a nice observation. I thought his best was Finally, Some Good News--having an overarching story helped give him some discipline, otherwise it just tends to be 'I f***ed this Asian chick. I am unhappy'. I mean, I get that it shows that endlessly sleeping around without settling down and marrying is bad but he kind of hits you over the head with it. Zero HP Lovecraft is pretty good but I don't think I'm up with the latest tech trends enough--I avoid social media, for instance.

    Amazon recommended me Mike Ma, maybe I'll take a look at that. I'll probably buy it just to give the guy money. I got distracted reading other things after finishing Tacos.

    There's also the ancestry issue in my case, though Yarvin got around it, so it's evidently not insuperable. Now, being intellectually attracted to the alt-right (I really hate what's happened to the West in the past 40 years) but not being able to join is actually the sort of Angst that fuels lots of writers, though I'm kind of worried it would shrink the potential audience to near-zero. I kind of feel like the alt-right-adjacent Mike Ma/Tacos/BAP-style audience and the Scott Alexander-rationalist-type audience don't really overlap all that much--people wind up going to one group or the other. And I think my T-level's too high to really be a rationalist, I want to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and hear the lamentations of their women, not decrease Third World malaria rates by 10% or prevent the AI apocalypse (about which I am skeptical). I mean, I'm not claiming I'm Gigachad or BAP, I just don't think I can be one of those rationalist guys.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    I agree with your assessment of The Pussy, and I think being forced to operate outside of the system also creates “discipline” problems–sensitivity readers and uber-woke agents/editors/etc. are poison, but that process of going through an experienced, literary pre-pub audience can lead to dynamic new drafts before it’s actually typeset.

    I’m not sure what you mean by this:

    “There’s also the ancestry issue in my case, though Yarvin got around it, so it’s evidently not insuperable. Now, being intellectually attracted to the alt-right (I really hate what’s happened to the West in the past 40 years) …

    Sounds like the Proud Boys community, literate Trumpers, and many others would like your work. The actual orthodox Alt-right (by your definition) is pretty tiny.

  109. @Rob
    These three dudes wrote as a Spanish woman. I don’t know about you, but i expect a bit more honesty from my fiction than that.

    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Feryl, @Lurker

    This reminds me of learning that Hugh Laurie is British. All those years, House was a Limey being a jerk to Americans. Disgusting

    Limey reporting . . . tbf the evidence was alwas there online, IMDb, videos etc. Hidden in plain view.

  110. Elena Ferrante is jewish and I believe not even italian. I could bother with her novels but remember the hype. I’ll find the article and link tomorrow.

  111. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "the idea of a university professor and mother of three, who taught algebra classes in the morning then wrote ultra-violent, macabre novels in scraps of free time in the afternoon"

    So..... glad to hear that Shirley Jackson is alive and well, and living in Spain!

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    Some people might think having to learn algebra is violently macabre by itself?

  112. @JimDandy
    "Males don’t read much fiction these days, so publishers increasingly prefer novels for women."

    Just a minor edit suggestion, Steve. (I swear, I didn't change a word.)


    Publishers increasingly prefer novels for women, so males don’t read much fiction these days

    Replies: @Dumbo, @El Dato, @IHTG, @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    … and don’t get me started on modern Young Adult fiction, which seems to be oriented toward troubled teenage lesbians of color …

    No Heinleinesque competent heroes allowed!

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, JimDandy
  113. @Hibernian
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Maybe a little heavy handed, interspersing the baptism with multiple assassinations, including one of a woman, and one on the steps of (another) church.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I think it was a deliberate choice by Francis Ford Coppola. Mario Puzo wrote the best selling novel in a deliberately heavy-handed style, as a Silician peasant immigrant might have written it.

  114. @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad

    What evidence is there that Western men want large families?

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK&Denmark. The study found that women desired more children than men. Women desired roughly 2.2 children, while the men wanted 1.8 children.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098488/

    Interestingly, the fertility rate in these countries is ~1.7 children. Closer to what men desire.

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families, families will remain small. I'm not sure where you get the idea that it's exclusively Western women who want small families. The last time I checked, the average White guy doesn't want to pay for more 1-2 kids (if that). He'd rather spend the money on a big SUV, vacation house, boat, sports balls tickets, and a big screen tv. He doesn't want to deal with another crying infant who needs milk, clothes, medical care, etc.

    By the way, didn't you once claim your daughter is unmarried and decided to attend medical school? That'll take her out of the breeding game until at least her early 30s, probably limiting her to (at most) 1-2 kids - and only IF she gets married. If you can't get your own daughter to take your advice, are you really in a position to be criticizing these other women who have similar professional & academic ambition?

    Raising Western fertility is something that'd take significant sacrifices from Western women AND Western men. It'd also take sacrifices from parents, who'd have to throw water on their daughter's ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving. I'm not against raising fertility, but don't pretend like it's easy and simple. In reality, people will have to sacrifice. Nothing happens without sacrifices being made.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK & Denmark…

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families…

    The only genders in Denmark and Sweden are common and neuter:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_in_Danish_and_Swedish

    In the UK, gender is only found in the fringe of the Fringe:

    Scottish Gaelic grammar Wiki: Gender

    Gaelic Algorithmic Research Group: Predicting Grammatical Gender in Scottish Gaelic with Machine Learning

    How to remember the gender of Welsh nouns and when it matters

  115. There is so much good fiction written up to about 1940 — more than you could read in a normal lifetime — that there is no reason or need to read anything more recent, with a handful of exceptions.

    And you can get most of it free or close to free with a kindle or other device.

    The average, no longer remembered Victorian novelist is better than 99% of what’s published now. And there are many hundreds of these novels.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Peterike

    But, as a Victorian novelist noted, there is inherent interest in "The Way We Live Now."

  116. @Peterike
    There is so much good fiction written up to about 1940 — more than you could read in a normal lifetime — that there is no reason or need to read anything more recent, with a handful of exceptions.

    And you can get most of it free or close to free with a kindle or other device.

    The average, no longer remembered Victorian novelist is better than 99% of what’s published now. And there are many hundreds of these novels.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    But, as a Victorian novelist noted, there is inherent interest in “The Way We Live Now.”

  117. @PiltdownMan
    In an earlier era, the journalists at the Guardian would have made at least passing mention of George Eliot, but I doubt if any 19th century English novelists have been taught in British schools in a couple of decades.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @YetAnotherAnon, @Expletive Deleted, @Anonymous, @Kratoklastes

    I was going to mention that men can collectively tu quoque the shit out of this because of George Eliot… and also to remind everyone that as I recall it, G.K. Chesterton was an amphibious assault craft and Ibrahim X Kendi appears to be some sort of shaved ape.

    So y’know… switch-hitting in the literary game is hardly news.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Kratoklastes

    G.K. Chesterton looked quite different as a 17 year old.

    https://i.imgur.com/hAHIrFl.jpg?1

  118. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT

    Lecturer sacked for looking at his students the wrong way.

    https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/north-wales-lecturer-staring-students-21868343


    During an all-girl English GCSE resit class that month, a group of students as young as 17 complained of Mr Taylor behaving 'inappropriately' towards them.

    One student said she saw her teacher 'look at [another student]'s breasts' and that he 'looked at [another student]'s bottom' as she was walking out of class.

    The tribunal heard: "The students [said] that during the afternoon class [Mr Jones] had behaved inappropriately towards them by entering their 'personal space' and staring at their tops and cleavage.
     

    Isn't the point of cleavage to make people look?

    "They also said that they had seen [him] looking at their bottoms as they left the room for a break part way through the lesson. "The students described how [Mr Jones] set them work and then went around the class, appearing to look at their work but looking down their tops instead."
     
    When you walk round a class to look at students work you have to look down - because their work is on the desk! And how on earth can they tell where he's looking when someone leaves?

    Students also complained about how their teacher was 'making students fail', and another complained about his poor 'appearance and hygiene'.

    A disciplinary meeting was held the following month, during which Mr Jones denied staring inappropriately at students.

     

    He'd been teaching 23 years and was diabetic. I wonder if the things no one worries about when you're 26 become an issue when you're 53. I also wonder if the zeitgeist has changed in that failing an exam seems to be unacceptable now.

    "CD-roms belonging to Mr Jones and found amongst his personal belongings at the college were also found to contain '5,000 glamour images' of two 'young female celebrities', some of which 'showed them posing in underwear or swimwear'."
     
    Case proved! Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift? Poor bugger. Since when did a non-police investigation involve rummaging through someone's personal belongings?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar

    That’s Bruce Edwards Ivins level of perversion, that is!

  119. @Kratoklastes
    @PiltdownMan

    I was going to mention that men can collectively tu quoque the shit out of this because of George Eliot... and also to remind everyone that as I recall it, G.K. Chesterton was an amphibious assault craft and Ibrahim X Kendi appears to be some sort of shaved ape.

    So y'know... switch-hitting in the literary game is hardly news.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    G.K. Chesterton looked quite different as a 17 year old.

  120. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT

    Lecturer sacked for looking at his students the wrong way.

    https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/north-wales-lecturer-staring-students-21868343


    During an all-girl English GCSE resit class that month, a group of students as young as 17 complained of Mr Taylor behaving 'inappropriately' towards them.

    One student said she saw her teacher 'look at [another student]'s breasts' and that he 'looked at [another student]'s bottom' as she was walking out of class.

    The tribunal heard: "The students [said] that during the afternoon class [Mr Jones] had behaved inappropriately towards them by entering their 'personal space' and staring at their tops and cleavage.
     

    Isn't the point of cleavage to make people look?

    "They also said that they had seen [him] looking at their bottoms as they left the room for a break part way through the lesson. "The students described how [Mr Jones] set them work and then went around the class, appearing to look at their work but looking down their tops instead."
     
    When you walk round a class to look at students work you have to look down - because their work is on the desk! And how on earth can they tell where he's looking when someone leaves?

    Students also complained about how their teacher was 'making students fail', and another complained about his poor 'appearance and hygiene'.

    A disciplinary meeting was held the following month, during which Mr Jones denied staring inappropriately at students.

     

    He'd been teaching 23 years and was diabetic. I wonder if the things no one worries about when you're 26 become an issue when you're 53. I also wonder if the zeitgeist has changed in that failing an exam seems to be unacceptable now.

    "CD-roms belonging to Mr Jones and found amongst his personal belongings at the college were also found to contain '5,000 glamour images' of two 'young female celebrities', some of which 'showed them posing in underwear or swimwear'."
     
    Case proved! Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift? Poor bugger. Since when did a non-police investigation involve rummaging through someone's personal belongings?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar

    Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift?

    Miss Swift has become an issue in the Virginia gubernatorial race. Christa McAuliffe never made it into space, but Terry McAuliffe is firmly into orbit.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar


    "Did you know that Republican candidate for governor, Glenn Youngkin, helped buy Taylor Swift’s masters out from under her when he was co-CEO of the Carlyle Group?"
     
    The Carlyle Group is really evil. Make money off Iraq, but Miss Taylor's master... probably big in vaxx business.

    But now I am picturing Taylor Swift saying something along the lines of "my master!". Begone, brain interference.

  121. @Reg Cæsar
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Why do I think one of them HAD to be Taylor Swift?
     
    Miss Swift has become an issue in the Virginia gubernatorial race. Christa McAuliffe never made it into space, but Terry McAuliffe is firmly into orbit.

    Replies: @El Dato

    “Did you know that Republican candidate for governor, Glenn Youngkin, helped buy Taylor Swift’s masters out from under her when he was co-CEO of the Carlyle Group?”

    The Carlyle Group is really evil. Make money off Iraq, but Miss Taylor’s master… probably big in vaxx business.

    But now I am picturing Taylor Swift saying something along the lines of “my master!”. Begone, brain interference.

  122. @Gordo
    Men must pretend to be women to get published, probably because of the patriarchy.

    Here a funny one I remember from the 80s:

    https://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/virago-press-history-bite-apple-lennie-goodings-review

    Basically Virago, a female only publisher, was publishing books by a British-Asian woman called Rahila, the the hard left BBC was airing her radio plays. Turns out Rahila was a White English Church of England vicar called Toby.

    I laughed. Virago didn't, they had all the books recalled and pulped.

    Replies: @Ray P

    Vicar in a tutu/He’s not strange/He just wants to live his life this way

  123. @Set
    @Dieter Kief

    Kakonis was awesome

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Kakonis was awesome

    Tom Kakonis’s very low status as a writer in the US is something I don’t get because I too had the impression, that quite a few of his books – not least Michigan Roll and Treasure Coast are awesome.

    Tom Kakonis’s books – (I’ve read all of them) – are what you’d like to read – they give you the perspective (the ideas/ the feelings) of people you would not know otherwise – – – and thus insights, that are – not least very interesting. – The way he delivered them was – technically (=stylewise) great. – What else would you want to ask from a writer? –

    His recognition in Germany was a tad higher than in the US because he once was awarded the second place in the prestigious German Krimi-Price.

  124. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Henceforth you will address us, together or individually, as “Hey You!”
     
    Sorry, Buzz, that one has already been taken by the 3 Amigos Bachman, Turner, and Overdrive:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNba2ZQ3JOs

    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets - see Fun with Pronouns. "Hey Yu!" "Hu, mei?"

    The world has been turned upside down in half a century.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Adam Smith

    Good morning Mr. Newman,

    Happy Monday to you and yours.
    I hope this message finds you well.

    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets…

    While I do agree with what you’re saying, I also find it interesting that you didn’t mention China’s imploding real estate market…

    China’s Property Sector Has Bigger Problems Than Evergrande

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    Except for business needs, I was totally off the web for the day, Adam, and am kind of proud of myself, haha, so sorry for the late reply.

    Yes, the Chinese economy has its own BIG flaws (not to even mention the Orwellian political trends). I really thought about 10 years back that the Chinese gov't/CCP would have been content to just go about their corruption and leave the Chinese people to do well, but nope they had to do that Central Planning thing. Imagine the Chinese free to do that big engineering, IP theft, and hard work without the Central Planning.

    The main thing is, they had their Cult-Rev over there, and they most be laughing with their pop-rice over there watching ours (and encouraging it too).

    Thanks for the video too. That'd have been quite a sight from one of those other apartment buildings, if THEY had anyone living in them.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  125. At least they didn’t pretend to be a married lesbian living in Syria and start a kidnapping hoax. That dude played it for all it was worth

  126. Meanwhile, Pete & Chasten Buttigieg have given birth to twins. And they’re so busy looking after their (no doubt non-binary) offspring that Pete can’t be bothered with the customary duties of the Secretary of Transportation.

  127. @anonymous
    Spain still has a king ? How much does that asshole make a year ?

    Replies: @CCG

    Yes, the Spanish King is a 6’6″ (197 cm) giant who comes with a Queen Consort and two princesses.

    His salary in 2015 was 234,204 euros.
    https://www.cnbc.com/2015/02/13/king-felipe-vi-cuts-his-royal-salary-by-66000.html

  128. @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Good morning Mr. Newman,

    Happy Monday to you and yours.
    I hope this message finds you well.


    While Americans work on new pronouns during Cultural Revolution 2.0, the Chinese build amazing new roads, tunnels, bridges, and now hypersonic rockets...
     
    While I do agree with what you're saying, I also find it interesting that you didn't mention China's imploding real estate market...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om6b0_ffyFQ

    China’s Property Sector Has Bigger Problems Than Evergrande

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Except for business needs, I was totally off the web for the day, Adam, and am kind of proud of myself, haha, so sorry for the late reply.

    Yes, the Chinese economy has its own BIG flaws (not to even mention the Orwellian political trends). I really thought about 10 years back that the Chinese gov’t/CCP would have been content to just go about their corruption and leave the Chinese people to do well, but nope they had to do that Central Planning thing. Imagine the Chinese free to do that big engineering, IP theft, and hard work without the Central Planning.

    The main thing is, they had their Cult-Rev over there, and they most be laughing with their pop-rice over there watching ours (and encouraging it too).

    Thanks for the video too. That’d have been quite a sight from one of those other apartment buildings, if THEY had anyone living in them.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No need for sorrow Achmed,
    I too am proud of you for avoiding the interweb.

  129. @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad

    What evidence is there that Western men want large families?

    Here’s a fertility preference study conducted on residents of the UK&Denmark. The study found that women desired more children than men. Women desired roughly 2.2 children, while the men wanted 1.8 children.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098488/

    Interestingly, the fertility rate in these countries is ~1.7 children. Closer to what men desire.

    I found similar results from another study done on students in Sweden.

    As long as both genders desire small families, families will remain small. I'm not sure where you get the idea that it's exclusively Western women who want small families. The last time I checked, the average White guy doesn't want to pay for more 1-2 kids (if that). He'd rather spend the money on a big SUV, vacation house, boat, sports balls tickets, and a big screen tv. He doesn't want to deal with another crying infant who needs milk, clothes, medical care, etc.

    By the way, didn't you once claim your daughter is unmarried and decided to attend medical school? That'll take her out of the breeding game until at least her early 30s, probably limiting her to (at most) 1-2 kids - and only IF she gets married. If you can't get your own daughter to take your advice, are you really in a position to be criticizing these other women who have similar professional & academic ambition?

    Raising Western fertility is something that'd take significant sacrifices from Western women AND Western men. It'd also take sacrifices from parents, who'd have to throw water on their daughter's ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving. I'm not against raising fertility, but don't pretend like it's easy and simple. In reality, people will have to sacrifice. Nothing happens without sacrifices being made.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

    It’d also take sacrifices from parents, who’d have to throw water on their daughter’s ambitions and encourage her to marry young instead of self-actualizing/achieving.

    In what sense is that a sacrifice on the parent’s side? Both of my daughters and most of my nieces were married before they went to graduate school. As I can attest, having lot’s of grandchildren(18 and 2 in the oven, ble”h) when you are still young enough to enjoy them is one of life’s great pleasures. I don’t for a moment think my daughters are worse off because they won’t climb the greasy pole all the way to the top. Perpetuating your People/Civilization is a lot more rewarding in every sense – excepting financial of course – than making your numbers for the quarter. Why making your numbers is “self-actualizing” while making your children isn’t, is a mystery to me.

  130. @R.G. Camara
    @Rob

    A humorous urban legend about Laurie's audition for House was how when he showed up the creators were aggravated because all the previous actors trying out were doing horrible accents . Then Laurie showed up and did his tryout from start to finish in his American fake accent and the creators were all like, " See? This is a real American accent by an American." because none of them knew Laurie was British.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Hugh Laurie was the perfect Bertie Wooster.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Ectually, Dudley Moore was the perfect "Bertie Wooster".

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  131. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Hugh Laurie was the perfect Bertie Wooster.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Ectually, Dudley Moore was the perfect “Bertie Wooster”.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Ectually, Dudley Moore was the perfect “Bertie Wooster”.

    I think there is a certain low-key basic 'decency' to the Wooster character that Laurie captures better than Moore.

  132. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Ectually, Dudley Moore was the perfect "Bertie Wooster".

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Ectually, Dudley Moore was the perfect “Bertie Wooster”.

    I think there is a certain low-key basic ‘decency’ to the Wooster character that Laurie captures better than Moore.

  133. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    Except for business needs, I was totally off the web for the day, Adam, and am kind of proud of myself, haha, so sorry for the late reply.

    Yes, the Chinese economy has its own BIG flaws (not to even mention the Orwellian political trends). I really thought about 10 years back that the Chinese gov't/CCP would have been content to just go about their corruption and leave the Chinese people to do well, but nope they had to do that Central Planning thing. Imagine the Chinese free to do that big engineering, IP theft, and hard work without the Central Planning.

    The main thing is, they had their Cult-Rev over there, and they most be laughing with their pop-rice over there watching ours (and encouraging it too).

    Thanks for the video too. That'd have been quite a sight from one of those other apartment buildings, if THEY had anyone living in them.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    No need for sorrow Achmed,
    I too am proud of you for avoiding the interweb.

  134. ‘Remington Steele’ was a show about a female PI who invents a male boss because nobody will take her seriously.

    The show was co-created by Robert Butler and Michael Gleason.

  135. @Whiskey
    Most women can't write very well, because they are not good observers of human nature, nor good storytellers. They are instead preachy and Mary Sue-ish, with social dogma interspersed with stories of how awesome the Mary Sue character is, and how attractive she is to the hunky bad boy object of most novels.

    This stuff is just awful, but does sell to women. The Twilight series, Fifty Shades of Bondage, etc. The Harry Potter stuff appealed to young women. Get an A in school and you get an A in life. Stupid.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Disagree. There are quite a few outstanding female writers.

    Lionel Shriver is a favorite around here, but if you’re looking for a good crime thriller novelist, try Gillian Flynn, who wrote Gone Girl. Some critics say she’s a misogynist, but you know, some critics are misanthropes.

    Or, if you want old school, Josephine Tey (Elizabeth MacKintosh). Her protagonist is male. Daughter of Time is a masterpiece of the genre.

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