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Soros in NYT: Zuckerberg Is Conspiring with Trump
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I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories, but the big shots — e.g., Trump, Hillary, Bezos, etc etc — all seem to believe in conspiracy theories about other big shots. For example, in the New York Times opinion section, George Soros presents his personal conspiracy theory: the Mark Zuckerberg-Donald Trump Conspiracy:

George Soros: Mark Zuckerberg Should Not Be in Control of Facebook
The social media company is going to get Trump re-elected — because it’s good for business.

By George Soros
Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

Jan. 31, 2020, 10:40 a.m. ET

At a dinner last week in Davos, Switzerland, I was asked if I thought Facebook was behaving more responsibly today than it did during the 2016 presidential election.

“Not at all,” I answered. “Facebook helped Trump to get elected and I am afraid that it will do the same in 2020.” …

I went on to say that there appears to be “an informal mutual assistance operation or agreement developing between Trump and Facebook” in which Facebook will help President Trump to get re-elected and Mr. Trump will, in turn, defend Facebook against attacks from regulators and the media.

… I believe that Mr. Trump and Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, realize that their interests are aligned — the president’s in winning elections, Mr. Zuckerberg’s in making money.

Let’s look at the evidence: In 2016, Facebook provided the Trump campaign with embedded staff who helped to optimize its advertising program. (Hillary Clinton’s campaign was also approached, but it declined to embed a Facebook team in her campaign’s operations.) Brad Parscale, the digital director of Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign and now his campaign manager for 2020, said that Facebook helped Mr. Trump and gave him the edge. This seems to have marked the beginning of a special relationship.

More recently, direct contact between the two men has raised serious questions. Mr. Zuckerberg met with Mr. Trump in the Oval Office on Sept. 19, 2019. We don’t know what was said. But from an interview on the sidelines at the World Economic Forum on Jan. 22, we do know what Mr. Trump said about the meeting: Mr. Zuckerberg “told me that I’m No. 1 in the world in Facebook.” …

Now that’s what I call proof.

I expressed my fear that with Facebook’s help, Mr. Trump will win the 2020 election. The recent hiring of a right-wing figure to help manage its news tab has reinforced those fears….

I repeat and reaffirm my accusation against Facebook under the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.

George Soros (@georgesoros) is the founder and chairman of the Open Society Foundations.

 
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  1. I think it’s silly to think Zuckerberg wanted anything to do with Trump in 2016. Zuckerberg might’ve belatedly realized that his company’s interests currently line up with Trump voters, but I bet he’s neither comfortable with that alignment nor is he seeking to exploit it in a strategic way. He’s just rolling with it until something better comes along and I bet he’s praying for that “something better” to come along sooner rather than later.

    Is an alignment of interests really a conspiracy?

    As for Soros what are we supposed to make of this accusation?

    I repeat and reaffirm my accusation against Facebook under the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.

    Yes, we clearly need to remove corporate leadership at our public companies when they seek to maximize profits instead of follow Soros’ political philosophy.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Pincher Martin

    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Tex

    , @Lagertha
    @Pincher Martin

    duh. 2% of humans are psychopaths. I have tangled with 3, and 'they' intruded in my life for some stages of my young adult life. I won't write movies about it because I educated myself about sociopaths, in the 80's - at least, they never hurt my pets or friends...killed random people connected to me.

    https://www.learning-mind.com/hare-psychopathology-checklist/

  2. While having grown older, Mr. Soros has not grown up. It’s not that he believes in any conspiracies. It’s just that, like a 14 year-old schoolgirl, Mr. Soros is jealous that President Trump is # on Facebook.

    He’s been seen crying in back of his Gulfstream due to his having only 0.001% of the number of Facebook Friends that Mr. Trump has. Listen, George, you make more friends promising to build walls on the southern border and ending US military aggression around the world than you do by ruining country’s economies with currency trading and inciting left-wing riots. It’s a damn shame his Mama never told him that.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I met George Soros at C Terminal at Reagan National Airport in D.C. in approximately 2008/09. I was in line behind him and his 30-ish female assistant. He smiled, said “hi”, and was very pleasant. He was flying coach on U.S. Air to WPB*. Crazy a mega-billionaire like Soros was flying commercial and in coach at that.

    *After getting through security I kind of spied on Soros at his gate. On the same flight was none other than Tom (“The World is Flat”) Friedman.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Lagertha
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Sorros is apoplectic. Trump knows the jig is up. https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/iceninekills/thejigisup.html

  3. Mr. Soros’s argument reads like a good comment on UR and nothing more. This means both that the comments here can be very good, and that Soros is no giant.

    He, a man as ugly as his own soul, is happy only when his own machinations work. Power for me and not for thee.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I remember trying to read The Alchemy of Finance back when I foolishly thought him another Havel. He can't string two coherent sentences together.

    , @NOTA
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Elites often turn out not to be so impressive when you see their thinking or logic on some day-to-day issue. Though what Soros writes for public consumption probably tells us little about what he actually believes--he's telling us what he wants *us* to believe. Or what he wants Zuckerberg to have to react to by being marginally more hostile to Trump.

  4. Wow, textbook sociopathy. Zuckerberg has something that Soros wants: Facebook. Soros tries to rationalize why Zuckerberg deserves to lose Facebook. What will Soros not do to to wrest it from Zuckerberg? More importantly, where is Bill Gates on this issue? Bill and Mark appear to be sympatico: both nebbish Harvard drop-outs who went on to control powerful business empires. Bill and Mark together may be able to withstand Soros. Btw, Zuckerberg’s wife had better not let Soros see her in a miniskirt. All sociopaths know that a woman in a miniskirt is looking for action …

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Coemgen


    Zuckerberg has something that Soros wants: Facebook
     
    Yes; he wants the influence he thinks Facebook has, so he can plunge the knife even deeper into the body politic in service to his hatred of the good.
  5. Anon[443] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s not Zuckerberg that’s “conspiring” with Trump, but rather Peter Thiel. Thiel is a board member of Facebook, one of its earliest investors, and a close advisor to Zuckerberg.

    Thiel is a Trump supporter and was instrumental in convincing Zuckerberg not to change its policy regarding targeted ads recently:

    https://newrepublic.com/article/156055/facebook-right-wing-company-part-one-million

    On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thiel, a longtime Facebook board member, has become Zuckerberg’s consigliere. With the company’s leadership under fire for its refusal to vet the veracity of political advertisements or limit advertisers’ ability to target ads—in contrast to Google and Twitter, which have taken steps to crack down on misleading content—Thiel has encouraged the embattled Facebook CEO “not to bow to public pressure.” The Journal noted that Thiel was “extending his influence while the company’s board and senior ranks are in flux.”

    Soros knows this. He’s going after Zuck as an indirect means to go after Thiel.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anon

    This is it, this makes sense. Zuck always was a cipher anyway.

    , @Forbes
    @Anon


    On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thiel, a longtime Facebook board member, has become Zuckerberg’s consigliere.
     
    Do the WSJ's editorial standards and style guide allow for calling someone a "consigliere"? Seems unlikely.

    I think it can be said The New Republic is peddling fake news.

    What Thiel is suggesting, if TNR is to be believed, is that FB should not engage in censorship. Seems prudent, and certainly consistent with Theil's libertarian leanings.
  6. Who ghostwrites for Soros? That’s a good gig. This is a blue on blue dealio and concussions will follow.

    • Replies: @DuanDiRen
    @Kibernetika

    I have a friend who ghostwrites at the CEO level, and the pay is good but not crazy. He used to do it freelance for the Soros types, but now switched to a megacorp where he writes speeches and op eds for all the master of the universe types.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Kibernetika


    Who ghostwrites for Soros?
     
    I imagine one of his sons. Who else could take him seriously?
  7. Anonymous[974] • Disclaimer says:

    The first rule of Trumpism is that he gets to say whatever he wants. He can tell Ihan Omar to go back, he can mock the looks of some bimbo reporter or starlet. He keeps his Twitter account, he keeps his blue checkmark.

    And you don’t. You get deleted. You get shadow-banned. He won’t lift a finger to help you. He had a “summit” on social media, then dis-invited Ben Garrison because the media thought his cartoons weren’t PC enough. Needless to say, the “summit” produced nothing of value.

  8. He’s not the only one.

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We’ll never kneel before the Hun!

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Lot
    @Desiderius

    I’ve watched that video 4 times so far in 2 days. Feels good!

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @International Jew
    @Desiderius

    In the last thirty seconds, that blonde chairlady gives us a glimpse of the highhandedness Farage was talking about.

    At the very end, she's starting to chastise him for using the word "hate". I would have liked to see where she took that.

    Great showmanship anyway. Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @eugyppius

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Desiderius

    Which reminds me of the great lines by the Bard:


    This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
    This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
    This other Eden, demi-paradise,
    This fortress built by Nature for her self
    Against infection and the hand of war,
    This happy breed of men, this little world,
    This precious stone set in a silver sea
    Which serves it in the office of a wall
    Or as a moat defensive to a house,
    Against the envy of less happier lands,
    This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England
     
    It is a day to celebrate. For better or for worse, I shall always be an American. But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.

    Perhaps there always will be an England.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @Desiderius

    Nigel Farage reminded us that what his parents had been told about the European Common Market 50 years ago (when they approved of it), and what it grew to become (European Union) is very telling.

    Farage warned us about the siren song of the global elite today:

    They will promise one, limited, thing (with economic benefits, doncha know!) and deliver something else (an undemocratic oligarchy, complete with its own military and laws that are irrevocable and eternal.)

    Screw the global elite, the "internationalists" in every country. They hate us.

    Soros is one of them - I hope his helicopter crashes and burns soon.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Semi-Hemi
    @Desiderius

    I am pretty sure Mr. Farage cuold be elected President. If only he had been born in Kenya.

    , @Lagertha
    @Desiderius

    I love Brexit!.

    , @Wilkey
    @Desiderius

    “Could you please remove your flags!,” commands the EU thug with an EU flag painted permanently on the wall behind her, as she cuts off an EU rep making a damn farewell speech.

    It’s ironic that a continent with so much to thank Britain for hates Britain so very much. It’s like the college kid who hates his parents while demanding his tuition money for the semester. And the EU is putting Britain to the rack on behalf of its ever faithful friend, Germany. The next time Britain has to save Europe from Germany it should insist on holding onto a little territory as a thank you. I would suggest some wine country in France, some ski slopes in Austria, and maybe a few hundred miles of coastline on the Mediterranean. Of course the next time Germany marches on the rest of Europe it will have to do so with a Muslim Wehrmacht, as none of the white people in Germany (or the rest of Europe) are bothering to have children.

    I was relieved that Farrage distinguished his contempt for the undemocratic EU from his love for the actual people of Europe, and that he reminded everyone of the way in which the EU deliberately undermines democratic representation by forcing countries to vote again when they vote the “wrong way,” or simply ignores the vote completely. He might also have reminded everyone that Cameron went to the EU and asked it to make reforms to its practices *before* the UK held the Brexit referendum, and the EU flatly refused.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Desiderius
    @Desiderius

    https://twitter.com/RafaeldeArizaga/status/1223985067980197888?s=20

  9. @Buzz Mohawk
    Mr. Soros's argument reads like a good comment on UR and nothing more. This means both that the comments here can be very good, and that Soros is no giant.

    He, a man as ugly as his own soul, is happy only when his own machinations work. Power for me and not for thee.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @NOTA

    I remember trying to read The Alchemy of Finance back when I foolishly thought him another Havel. He can’t string two coherent sentences together.

  10. “ …the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences”

    Sounds like antisemitic tropes to me.

    This is why the communist/neonazi Soros is banned from Israel!

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Lot

    Soros is about as fond of Netanyahu as he is of Mahathir, Trump, or Kaczyński, and only a little moreso than he is of Orban. He hates all nationalists, and particularly ones that give him the BadFeels for pointing out nasty truths about him.

  11. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    I’ve watched that video 4 times so far in 2 days. Feels good!

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Lot

    He’ll be at the SotU.

  12. Since so many people are eager to have a ‘national conversation’ about some trivial topic or other, allow me to propose a subject of inquiry. Let’s have a national conversation about ultra-wealthy people using foundations and fake-charity NGOs to buy political influence and do end-runs around democratic process. While we’re here, let’s make it a long, detailed conversation that really gets into ramifications of what such people seek to achieve and why. Maybe George can participate, since he’s so worried about authoritarianism.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @rational actor


    Let’s have a national conversation about ultra-wealthy people using foundations and fake-charity NGOs to buy political influence and do end-runs around democratic process.
     
    Major conservative groups revealed to be “selling out” to big money liberal groups.

    [Tucker] Carlson revealed that Google (which also owns YouTube) – the ultra-Left corporation which regularly censors, expels, and de-platforms conservatives – has been generously funding nearly two dozen right-wing groups.

    The list includes such conservative stalwarts as The American Conservative Union (which runs CPAC), The Federalist Society, The National Review Institute (publisher of National Review), American Enterprise Institute, and Heritage Action (part of the Heritage Foundation). The list is from Google’s voluntary disclosures of groups it says received “substantial” funding from it. (The actual amounts were not listed.)
     

    On several occasions in recent years other pro-family groups around the country have disparaged MassResistance for our aggressive approach and bold truth-telling. When I’ve talked to them about it, several of them have actually admitted that we were doing the right thing. So why don’t they do it, too, I would ask? Mainly because their big donors wouldn’t let them, they admitted.
     
  13. @Lot
    @Desiderius

    I’ve watched that video 4 times so far in 2 days. Feels good!

    Replies: @Desiderius

    He’ll be at the SotU.

  14. • Replies: @iffen
    @Thea

    CWT, wobble, wobble.

    , @Anon
    @Thea

    Yeah, but they got via back-migration from Europeans into Africa over 20K years. In other words, while Europeans gradually weeded down their percentage of DNA from Neanderthals, Africans kept it.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @BB753
    @Thea

    They say they sampled five African populations but not which ones.

  15. @Kibernetika
    Who ghostwrites for Soros? That's a good gig. This is a blue on blue dealio and concussions will follow.

    Replies: @DuanDiRen, @Reg Cæsar

    I have a friend who ghostwrites at the CEO level, and the pay is good but not crazy. He used to do it freelance for the Soros types, but now switched to a megacorp where he writes speeches and op eds for all the master of the universe types.

  16. Just like Bezos and the Saudis: it’s really a shame that they can’t both lose.

  17. @Lot
    “ ...the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences”

    Sounds like antisemitic tropes to me.

    This is why the communist/neonazi Soros is banned from Israel!

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Soros is about as fond of Netanyahu as he is of Mahathir, Trump, or Kaczyński, and only a little moreso than he is of Orban. He hates all nationalists, and particularly ones that give him the BadFeels for pointing out nasty truths about him.

  18. Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) …
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women’s fashions.
    But yeah Trump’s getting acquitted and we’re seeing meltdowns and fingerpointing. Apparently Kamala Harris started spontaneously laughing at a press conference like a crazy person. Cenk Uyghur proposed simply introducing a new set of phony caseless impeachment articles in the House. They don’t seem to have a Plan H.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women’s fashions.

     
    Mr Dahmer is a chocolatier. A master confectioner!

    https://11pt5z46nuudt9qxx2knwgff-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/AntiqueMKE__S0A1818_TylerYomantas.jpg
    , @ben tillman
    @J.Ross


    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) …
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
     
    But Manson was a guitarist. Soros is not a philanthropist. In fact, he's a misanthropist.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Ganderson
    @J.Ross

    Ed Gein reference- don’t see many of those! Well played!

    , @Morton's toes
    @J.Ross


    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
     
    If you read Nikolas Schreck's biography, Manson did have decent chops as a musician although his guitar playing was not up to the Wrecking Crew level.

    If you read Alston Chase's biography, Kazcynski's PhD thesis at U. Wisconsin was applauded as the latest greatest thing by Mathematicians across the world. He didn't get that tenure track slot at UC with his networking and interviewing skills.

    So you are kind of mixing apples and oranges a little.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Morton's toes

  19. @Anon
    It's not Zuckerberg that's "conspiring" with Trump, but rather Peter Thiel. Thiel is a board member of Facebook, one of its earliest investors, and a close advisor to Zuckerberg.

    Thiel is a Trump supporter and was instrumental in convincing Zuckerberg not to change its policy regarding targeted ads recently:

    https://newrepublic.com/article/156055/facebook-right-wing-company-part-one-million

    On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thiel, a longtime Facebook board member, has become Zuckerberg’s consigliere. With the company’s leadership under fire for its refusal to vet the veracity of political advertisements or limit advertisers’ ability to target ads—in contrast to Google and Twitter, which have taken steps to crack down on misleading content—Thiel has encouraged the embattled Facebook CEO “not to bow to public pressure.” The Journal noted that Thiel was “extending his influence while the company’s board and senior ranks are in flux.”
     
    Soros knows this. He's going after Zuck as an indirect means to go after Thiel.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Forbes

    This is it, this makes sense. Zuck always was a cipher anyway.

  20. istevefan says:

    “Facebook helped Trump to get elected and I am afraid that it will do the same in 2020.” …

    What he really meant to say was that Facebook did not do enough to prevent Trump from getting elected in 2016, and he doesn’t think they will do enough to defeat Trump in 2020. In his view not fully opposing Trump 100 percent is akin to helping Trump.

    … that their interests are aligned — the president’s in winning elections, Mr. Zuckerberg’s in making money.

    A guy who has a net worth of $77 billion is not interested in making money. He might be interested in power, becoming a 007 villain, or impregnating 10,000 willing women. But making more money is not on the list.

    • Agree: LondonBob
  21. Semi OT: more on the long reign of 1940s birth cohort.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Curb

    The last elected Republican Lt. Gov in California was born in Dec 1944 and elected at age 34 in 1978. He’s 76 now and nowhere near retired.

    Maybe he should run for President in 2024.

  22. Anon[134] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Now that “American Psycho” is the California governor, has there been any word on whether a new Jerry Brown gubernatorial portrait is in the works?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gubernatorial_portrait_of_Jerry_Brown

    Here’s the painter fron a couple of years ago:

    https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article155321379.html

    Bachardy said even he wasn’t so sure about his approach, the product of five sittings by Brown, who arrived at least twice after running along San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica and had to wash in the artist’s studio.

    The artist, now 84, is open to painting Brown again, but cannot imagine how he would go about it because he works off the presence of his sitter, and “how we interact, personally.”

    “I’ll be very surprised if Jerry Brown agrees to another sitting, because he found it very difficult,” he said. “And he couldn’t help wondering why it took me so long.”

    While there are several drawings and paintings from Brown’s first four sittings, each nearing four hours in length, the portrait is the product of the fifth and final sitting.

    “Everything was riding on that,” Bachardy recalled, “which made it all the more of a test, an excruciating test. Lots of pressure, and maybe that’s what helped me succeed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius, @SunBakedSuburb

  23. Two things are going on here. First, Soros is just naturally projecting his own motivations onto Zuckerberg. In other words, Soros knows that he would use his power to conspire and secretly manipulate the U.S. political process. So he naturally assumes Zuckerberg must be doing likewise.

    Second, this is also part of a long-running effort by the New York Times to bully social media platforms into working for the Left. They have been explicitly and implicitly threatening these platforms with bad publicity and smears about their data privacy violations, monopolistic practices, non-diverse workforce, enabling of Putin and white supremacists, blah, blah, blah, etc.

    The quid pro quo (as Adam Schiff would say) is that these problems won’t be problems for “respectable” NYT types, if Facebook gets on board with censoring “right wing” content and puts its thumb on the scale to ensure that 2016 “can’t happen again.”

    So far, the NYT and the SPLC have leveraged these threats into censorship “partnerships” in which they get to weigh in on what content social media encourages and discourages.

    But Facebook is the 800 lb. gorilla of social media and stands to make gazillions from Trump ad buys alone in this election cycle. So they have been more resistant to getting pushed around in this way.

    Attacking Big Social Media is tricky, however. If you threaten them just enough they may do your bidding to curry favor and avoid the attacks. If you go too far, however, they just might to decide to put their thumb on the scale to keep you out of power so you can’t carry out your threats.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666

    https://www.woldhek.nl/IMAGES/2593_144939443743336_54062.jpg

    Threatening Gaius Zuckerbergus too much... this could be interesting for the NYT lefties.

  24. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    In the last thirty seconds, that blonde chairlady gives us a glimpse of the highhandedness Farage was talking about.

    At the very end, she’s starting to chastise him for using the word “hate”. I would have liked to see where she took that.

    Great showmanship anyway. Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @International Jew


    Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.
     
    Exactly.

    Secret Weapon of Anglo-American culture: trial by mockery

    , @eugyppius
    @International Jew


    At the very end, she’s starting to chastise him for using the word “hate”. I would have liked to see where she took that.
     
    She took it basically nowhere. A hasty transcript:

    The word hate was used in the last contribution. And I really think, given what we listened to prior to this, that we should not hate anyone, or any nation, or any people.

     

    Source: https://youtu.be/LIgmfpHBiDw?t=295

    I don't know what the parliament had heard "prior to this", but Farage said his constituents hated the EU (the institution), not Europe (the nations, the people).
  25. Trump’s an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook “embed” a team inside his 2016 campaign.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @International Jew

    > Facebook provided the Trump campaign with embedded staff who helped to optimize its advertising program. (Hillary Clinton’s campaign was also approached, but it declined to embed a Facebook team in her campaign’s operations.) <

    Maybe? But the party that didn't "embed" lost.

    , @Lot
    @International Jew

    Nope, read up more if you want, it isn’t a big secret.

    Trump’s Facebook strategy in 2016 was brilliant.

    The “employee embed” is pretty normal for tech companies to their customers who spend tens of millions of dollars per year or more.

    It’s basically in-person full-time VIP tech support.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Tex
    @International Jew


    Trump’s an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook “embed” a team inside his 2016 campaign.
     
    If only Trump hadn't been such an idiot he might have won the 2016 election.
  26. @International Jew
    Trump's an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook "embed" a team inside his 2016 campaign.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Lot, @Tex

    > Facebook provided the Trump campaign with embedded staff who helped to optimize its advertising program. (Hillary Clinton’s campaign was also approached, but it declined to embed a Facebook team in her campaign’s operations.) <

    Maybe? But the party that didn't "embed" lost.

  27. They just don’t want conservatives or nationalists or Trump to have a platform from which to speak. It’s really not that complicated. I’m sure our distant ancestors wouldn’t let certain people make cave paintings.

    Hence, free speech is “hate speech,” “white supremacism,” or, and this is a novel one, “foreign interference.” As if you can stop a couple billion people with access to something called the Worldwide Web from putting out stuff about American politics on that web.

    One of my biggest problems with woke, SJW liberals is what I call the Michael Corleone problem: They insult my intelligence. And it makes me very angry.

  28. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences.

  29. @Kibernetika
    Who ghostwrites for Soros? That's a good gig. This is a blue on blue dealio and concussions will follow.

    Replies: @DuanDiRen, @Reg Cæsar

    Who ghostwrites for Soros?

    I imagine one of his sons. Who else could take him seriously?

  30. @International Jew
    Trump's an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook "embed" a team inside his 2016 campaign.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Lot, @Tex

    Nope, read up more if you want, it isn’t a big secret.

    Trump’s Facebook strategy in 2016 was brilliant.

    The “employee embed” is pretty normal for tech companies to their customers who spend tens of millions of dollars per year or more.

    It’s basically in-person full-time VIP tech support.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Lot


    It’s basically in-person full-time VIP tech support.
     
    Right. If you are a big IBM or Oracle customer, you have one of their guys at your place.
  31. @Pincher Martin
    I think it's silly to think Zuckerberg wanted anything to do with Trump in 2016. Zuckerberg might've belatedly realized that his company's interests currently line up with Trump voters, but I bet he's neither comfortable with that alignment nor is he seeking to exploit it in a strategic way. He's just rolling with it until something better comes along and I bet he's praying for that "something better" to come along sooner rather than later.

    Is an alignment of interests really a conspiracy?

    As for Soros what are we supposed to make of this accusation?

    I repeat and reaffirm my accusation against Facebook under the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.
     
    Yes, we clearly need to remove corporate leadership at our public companies when they seek to maximize profits instead of follow Soros' political philosophy.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Lagertha

    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Ron Mexico

    Soros can't handle the Millennials and Gen Z. No money (his dirty money) will buy them off because these young adults still know Right from Wrong. Killing them off, may be a problem, hhahhahaaaa. Why can't this awful person die already? My mother and MIL and countless people in their 90's-100's (still alive group) are such better, loving of humanity-people.

    , @Tex
    @Ron Mexico


    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.
     
    None, but he looks like he was old enough to read the Federalist Papers as they came off the presses.
  32. Yeah, yeah, but have you seen THIS?

    Witness Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Has No Balls and Appears to Have Vagina
    https://www.complex.com/life/2020/01/harvey-weinstein-accuser-claims-he-has-no-testicles

    • Replies: @Rob
    @JimDandy

    “Witness Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Has No Balls and Appears to Have Vagina”

    The summary of her testimony in that article made it seem so undamning that, we’re i prone to conspiracy theories, and if Weinstein actually had any history of conspiracy, I would say that she was paid to give poor testimony to impugn the others’ by association. Bonus points for Weinstein if the defense offers a picture of his genitals into evidence. Double bonus points if that picture leaks and the internet determines it has been altered in any way.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  33. By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    LOL.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @ben tillman

    The host of NPR's "On the Media" once described George Soros as "the billionaire with a heart of gold."

    Which put me in mind of the best James Bond title song ever:

    Goldfinger
    He's the man, the man with the Midas touch
    A spider's touch
    Such a cold finger
    Beckons you to enter his web of sin
    But don't go in

    Replies: @Lot, @Desiderius

    , @athEIst
    @ben tillman

    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @kaganovitch

  34. ‘… Hillary Clinton’s campaign was also approached, but it declined to embed a Facebook team in her campaign’s operations…’

    I take it that would be on account of Hillary Clinton’s highly developed sense of ethics.

    • LOL: Dan Hayes
  35. About the only thing that’s true here is that Facebook is too big — and therefore has too much power. It doesn’t really matter what it’s intentions or motives are; it’s just too damned big.

    It’s the same principle as with the nineteenth century railroads, or Standard Oil. Past a certain point, sheer size simply confers too much power on an organism.

    • Agree: animalogic
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Colin Wright

    This country should have a national legislature that could enact antitrust laws, to be enforced in a judicial forum by actions brought by lawyers in an executive branch.

    Wishful thinking ...

  36. Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    Yeah, sure.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  37. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    While having grown older, Mr. Soros has not grown up. It's not that he believes in any conspiracies. It's just that, like a 14 year-old schoolgirl, Mr. Soros is jealous that President Trump is # on Facebook.

    He's been seen crying in back of his Gulfstream due to his having only 0.001% of the number of Facebook Friends that Mr. Trump has. Listen, George, you make more friends promising to build walls on the southern border and ending US military aggression around the world than you do by ruining country's economies with currency trading and inciting left-wing riots. It's a damn shame his Mama never told him that.

    Replies: @Anon, @Lagertha

    I met George Soros at C Terminal at Reagan National Airport in D.C. in approximately 2008/09. I was in line behind him and his 30-ish female assistant. He smiled, said “hi”, and was very pleasant. He was flying coach on U.S. Air to WPB*. Crazy a mega-billionaire like Soros was flying commercial and in coach at that.

    *After getting through security I kind of spied on Soros at his gate. On the same flight was none other than Tom (“The World is Flat”) Friedman.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon

    Sorry, I meant to say he was flying to PBI (West Palm Beach).

  38. @ben tillman

    By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.
     
    LOL.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @athEIst

    The host of NPR’s “On the Media” once described George Soros as “the billionaire with a heart of gold.”

    Which put me in mind of the best James Bond title song ever:

    Goldfinger
    He’s the man, the man with the Midas touch
    A spider’s touch
    Such a cold finger
    Beckons you to enter his web of sin
    But don’t go in

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Harry Baldwin

    How dare you!

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D41XX_oXkAI_F0a.jpg

    Replies: @black sea, @kaganovitch

    , @Desiderius
    @Harry Baldwin


    The host of NPR’s “On the Media”
     
    You mispelled Foggy Bottom.
  39. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Obviously, some conspiracy theories have to be true, while others must be false.

    The real motivations of human beings are often odd and opaque, whether they are homeless bums on the street or kingmakers like George Soros. If there ever were a final call up yonder where everyone’s every deed were revealed, and what they were thinking at the time they did it, the real answers would be at turns unbelievable and all too mundane.

    The two errors with conspiracy theory are either to believe conspiracies are imaginary and don’t exist, or, that everything is a result of a carefully thought out conspiracy by often evil but usually rational actors. There is a lot of sheer randomness in the world, and a lot of obvious deals and design solutions never happen because of some petty grievance or obscure goal by some apparently insignificant player who turn out to wield immense power through any of several means.

    One reason the United States did so well during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was that the previous grievances of white people in Europe often got trampled under the capitalist and unregulated marketplace. If Frenchmen would not build a widget the best way because the inventor was a German, in America the German would be successful and hire everyone else and they would build it his way or be unemployed. The Chevrolet brothers wound up working as hourly employees at the company named after them. (And with very limited exceptions, white people are history’s actors.) The French were good engineers, almost as good as and occasionally better than the Germans, but being insufferable their best engineering went nowhere outside of France. The Velosolex motorized bicycle, the Stylophot pocket camera, and of course the hydraulic suspension of the Citroen car, none very popular outside France. The British tried their own idea at hydraulic suspensions but it was even less reliable than the French, despite being simpler. The French never built much electronics worth a damn, whereas the German Telefunken, Neumann, Rohde & Schwarz stuff was at least technically good if way overpriced. In America, you had a winner-take-all mess but at least the winner had to be somewhat good.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anonymous

    "the French never built much electronics worth a damn"

    French cars are great to drive, if only they'd get the Japanese to do the electrics. Our last French car had a 100% electronic screen dashboard. Driving through a city one day the whole thing goes blank - no speedo, no fuel gauge, can't tell if indicators are on. Only our own satnav, with its builtin speedo, saved us.

    Pity - great car in every other way, doors and floor full of useful compartments, huge low boot for the dog, very comfy seats, 50 mpg (Brit gallon). We replaced the dashboard, but when the (electric) power steering started cutting out intermittently (great fun on a roundabout, wife really appreciated it) we gave it up as a bad job.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The French domestic market was big enough that they never much cared about exports or about what furreners thought about their products.

    Post WWII W. Germany was poor at first - too poor for the Germans to buy their own stuff. After the war, BMW make Isetta microcars under license for their domestic market because Germans couldn't afford real cars anymore (and because their main factory got left behind in E. Germany). The manufacturers had to export if they wanted to sell and they had to listen to what their foreign distributors told them.

    The French attitude was always, "my way or the highway". If we brilliant French engineers decide to put the shifter on the dashboard and replace the brake pedal with a little button, we know what we are doing and if you American idiots don't like it, tant pis. We are not changing anyzing for you. Our main French customers love it just the way it is and we are not changing it in order to sell 200 cars in America. If we decide to use 25mm handlebar stems on our bikes when everyone else in the world uses 1 inch, that's our decision. Every bicycle shop IN FRANCE has 25mm parts so we don't care what you use in your lousy country with terrible cheese.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Reg Cæsar

  40. @Harry Baldwin
    @ben tillman

    The host of NPR's "On the Media" once described George Soros as "the billionaire with a heart of gold."

    Which put me in mind of the best James Bond title song ever:

    Goldfinger
    He's the man, the man with the Midas touch
    A spider's touch
    Such a cold finger
    Beckons you to enter his web of sin
    But don't go in

    Replies: @Lot, @Desiderius

    How dare you!

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Lot

    Is that Willie Nelson?

    , @kaganovitch
    @Lot

    Giddyap

  41. Mr Trump,

    That was “Soros”,

    not “Soleimani”.

    Please try again and get it right this time.

    • LOL: Momus
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anon

    Bond villain Soros flies around the world in a private jet that would be easy to track and target. Whoops! A sidewinder gets loose due to systems error. Western political elites mourn the loss of their puppeteer.

  42. I don’t really blame Soros.

    The internet really feeds into Henry Harpending’s theory about invisible hexes, and if you are 89 years old, then this must be true – times ten.

  43. @Harry Baldwin
    @ben tillman

    The host of NPR's "On the Media" once described George Soros as "the billionaire with a heart of gold."

    Which put me in mind of the best James Bond title song ever:

    Goldfinger
    He's the man, the man with the Midas touch
    A spider's touch
    Such a cold finger
    Beckons you to enter his web of sin
    But don't go in

    Replies: @Lot, @Desiderius

    The host of NPR’s “On the Media”

    You mispelled Foggy Bottom.

  44. @International Jew
    @Desiderius

    In the last thirty seconds, that blonde chairlady gives us a glimpse of the highhandedness Farage was talking about.

    At the very end, she's starting to chastise him for using the word "hate". I would have liked to see where she took that.

    Great showmanship anyway. Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @eugyppius

    Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.

    Exactly.

    Secret Weapon of Anglo-American culture: trial by mockery

  45. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Zuckerberg has a documented Octavian/Augustus obsession. His honeymoon photos were all posed in front of the statues in Italia. The emperor was not exactly antifa material. Not exactly on the same page as Karl Marx. Not a Bernie Bro. Wake up people.

    Hilarious that this guy Zuck is not recognized as a crypto right winger. I guess his various gestures toward the rabid dogs of woke are enough to give him cover. Seems obvious he’s just cynically making politicsl payoffs to powerful ruling class cartels. Meanwhile he remains Octavian at heart.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Anonymous

    I remember prior to the 2016 election cycle the Wikipedia entry on Zuckerberg sorta implied he might have been something of a crypto-rightist or conservative guy. Their sources were all fully SJW types, so I didn't know how much weight to give them, these people tend to think anyone not 100 percent with them is the enemy. However if Zuckerberg does really rely on Thiel for advice and counsel, maybe he really is.

    Replies: @IHTG

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    What about his sister Donna?

    Replies: @anon

  46. @Anon
    OT

    Now that "American Psycho" is the California governor, has there been any word on whether a new Jerry Brown gubernatorial portrait is in the works?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gubernatorial_portrait_of_Jerry_Brown

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/54/Gubernatorial_portrait_of_Jerry_Brown.jpg

    Here's the painter fron a couple of years ago:

    https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article155321379.html

    Bachardy said even he wasn’t so sure about his approach, the product of five sittings by Brown, who arrived at least twice after running along San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica and had to wash in the artist’s studio.

    The artist, now 84, is open to painting Brown again, but cannot imagine how he would go about it because he works off the presence of his sitter, and “how we interact, personally.”

    “I’ll be very surprised if Jerry Brown agrees to another sitting, because he found it very difficult,” he said. “And he couldn’t help wondering why it took me so long.”

    While there are several drawings and paintings from Brown’s first four sittings, each nearing four hours in length, the portrait is the product of the fifth and final sitting.

    “Everything was riding on that,” Bachardy recalled, “which made it all the more of a test, an excruciating test. Lots of pressure, and maybe that’s what helped me succeed.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    Same thing I’ve heard from people who have met him.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.
     
    And this one, the California voter-- now resident in Idaho, Montana, Arizona, Texas, Alaska...

    https://www.artsheaven.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/edvard-munch-the-scream-1-510x625.jpg


    But you can't beat Chicago for unofficial portraits:


    https://artontrial.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/picture2.gif

    https://cdn.trendhunterstatic.com/phpthumbnails/26/26503/26503_1_600.jpeg

    Replies: @animalogic

    , @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Eaten alive by anomie.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve Sailer

    Especially the eyes.

  47. @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I met George Soros at C Terminal at Reagan National Airport in D.C. in approximately 2008/09. I was in line behind him and his 30-ish female assistant. He smiled, said “hi”, and was very pleasant. He was flying coach on U.S. Air to WPB*. Crazy a mega-billionaire like Soros was flying commercial and in coach at that.

    *After getting through security I kind of spied on Soros at his gate. On the same flight was none other than Tom (“The World is Flat”) Friedman.

    Replies: @Anon

    Sorry, I meant to say he was flying to PBI (West Palm Beach).

  48. @Lot
    @Harry Baldwin

    How dare you!

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D41XX_oXkAI_F0a.jpg

    Replies: @black sea, @kaganovitch

    Is that Willie Nelson?

    • LOL: Lot
  49. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius, @SunBakedSuburb

    Same thing I’ve heard from people who have met him.

  50. @J.Ross
    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) ...
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women's fashions.
    But yeah Trump's getting acquitted and we're seeing meltdowns and fingerpointing. Apparently Kamala Harris started spontaneously laughing at a press conference like a crazy person. Cenk Uyghur proposed simply introducing a new set of phony caseless impeachment articles in the House. They don't seem to have a Plan H.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ben tillman, @Ganderson, @Morton's toes

    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women’s fashions.

    Mr Dahmer is a chocolatier. A master confectioner!

  51. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius, @SunBakedSuburb

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    And this one, the California voter– now resident in Idaho, Montana, Arizona, Texas, Alaska…

    But you can’t beat Chicago for unofficial portraits:

    • Replies: @animalogic
    @Reg Cæsar

    I find the portrait of the rifle very unconvincing. Though the live moose & the dead bear are nice touches.

  52. @J.Ross
    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) ...
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women's fashions.
    But yeah Trump's getting acquitted and we're seeing meltdowns and fingerpointing. Apparently Kamala Harris started spontaneously laughing at a press conference like a crazy person. Cenk Uyghur proposed simply introducing a new set of phony caseless impeachment articles in the House. They don't seem to have a Plan H.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ben tillman, @Ganderson, @Morton's toes

    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) …
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.

    But Manson was a guitarist. Soros is not a philanthropist. In fact, he’s a misanthropist.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @ben tillman


    But Manson was a guitarist.
     
    Albeit not a very good one.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

  53. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    Which reminds me of the great lines by the Bard:

    This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
    This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
    This other Eden, demi-paradise,
    This fortress built by Nature for her self
    Against infection and the hand of war,
    This happy breed of men, this little world,
    This precious stone set in a silver sea
    Which serves it in the office of a wall
    Or as a moat defensive to a house,
    Against the envy of less happier lands,
    This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England

    It is a day to celebrate. For better or for worse, I shall always be an American. But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.

    Perhaps there always will be an England.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @PhysicistDave


    But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.
     
    My favorite quote about England comes from Santayana:

    “Instinctively the Englishman is no missionary, no conqueror. He prefers the country to the town, and home to foreign parts. He is rather glad and relieved if only natives will remain natives and strangers strangers, and at a comfortable distance from himself. Yet outwardly he is most hospitable and accepts almost anybody for the time being; he travels and conquers without a settled design, because he has the instinct of exploration. His adventures are all external; they change him so little that he is not afraid of them. He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the deliriums of mankind. Never since the heroic days of Greece has the world had such a sweet, just, boyish master. It will be a black day for the human race when scientific blackguards, conspirators, churls, and fanatics manage to supplant him.”
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Desiderius

  54. @Hypnotoad666
    Two things are going on here. First, Soros is just naturally projecting his own motivations onto Zuckerberg. In other words, Soros knows that he would use his power to conspire and secretly manipulate the U.S. political process. So he naturally assumes Zuckerberg must be doing likewise.

    Second, this is also part of a long-running effort by the New York Times to bully social media platforms into working for the Left. They have been explicitly and implicitly threatening these platforms with bad publicity and smears about their data privacy violations, monopolistic practices, non-diverse workforce, enabling of Putin and white supremacists, blah, blah, blah, etc.

    The quid pro quo (as Adam Schiff would say) is that these problems won't be problems for "respectable" NYT types, if Facebook gets on board with censoring "right wing" content and puts its thumb on the scale to ensure that 2016 "can't happen again."

    So far, the NYT and the SPLC have leveraged these threats into censorship "partnerships" in which they get to weigh in on what content social media encourages and discourages.

    But Facebook is the 800 lb. gorilla of social media and stands to make gazillions from Trump ad buys alone in this election cycle. So they have been more resistant to getting pushed around in this way.

    Attacking Big Social Media is tricky, however. If you threaten them just enough they may do your bidding to curry favor and avoid the attacks. If you go too far, however, they just might to decide to put their thumb on the scale to keep you out of power so you can't carry out your threats.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Threatening Gaius Zuckerbergus too much… this could be interesting for the NYT lefties.

  55. I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories, but the big shots — e.g., Trump, Hillary, Bezos, etc etc — all seem to believe in conspiracy theories about other big shots.

    They’re people who got somewhere by plotting. 🙂

    They don’t want the public to think in those terms (they might catch on to their plots), but they naturally know the other players are on the make.

    But most “conspiracies”, that is plans, are carried out pretty openly. However, they often use codewords to disguise the full intent. Say, like promoting “diversity” rather than openly stating we need less White people.

  56. I’m sure that maximizing profits has never crossed Mr. Soros’ mind.

    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory. It really does seem like something will eventually have to give.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Mr. Blank


    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory.
     
    Agree. Except I don't know how Soros counts as one of "our" elites. I realize he somehow bought a piece of paper saying he's legally an American citizen. But the idea that he is a patriotic American, or has the best interests of America in mind, is laughable.

    Indeed, Soros himself would probably admit he sees himself as a "citizen of the world" and is merely "American" as a flag of convenience (presumably for tax and campaign finance law reasons).

    Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Corvinus

    , @Desiderius
    @Mr. Blank

    Soros hasn’t been able to afford self-awareness since he was fifteen. Minds come up with workarounds, often with sociopathic results.

  57. I just saw a very disturbing article on the Coronavirus that was posted on Zero Hedge.

    Zero Hedge just had their Twitter account suspended. Supposedly, the suspension was due to posting that article, but I can’t confirm whether that’s accurate.

    Here are some of the relevant portions of Zero Hedge’s article on the Coronavirus.

    Over the past few days, the mainstream press has vigorously pushed back against a theory about the origins of the coronavirus that has now infected as many as 70,000+ people in Wuhan alone (depending on whom you believe). The theory is that China obtained the coronavirus via a Canadian research program, and started molding it into a bioweapon at the Institute of Virology in Wuhan. Politifact pointed the finger at Zero Hedge, in particular, though the story was widely shared across independent-leaning media.

    The theory is that the virus, which was developed by infectious disease experts to function as a bio-weapon, originated in the Wuhan-based lab of Dr. Peng Zhou, China’s preeminent researcher of bat immune systems, specifically in how their immune systems adapt to the presence of viruses like coronavirus and other destructive viruses. Somehow, the virus escaped from the lab, and the Hunan fish market where the virus supposedly originated is merely a ruse.

    Now, a respected epidemiologist who recently caught flack for claiming in a twitter threat that the virus appeared to be much more contagious than initially believed is pointing out irregularities in the virus’s genome that suggests it might have been genetically engineered for the purposes of a weapon, and not just any weapon but the deadliest one of all.

    In “Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag”, Indian researchers are baffled by segments of the virus’s RNA that have no relation to other coronaviruses like SARS, and instead appear to be closer to HIV. The virus even responds to treatment by HIV medications.

    Why do the authors think the virus may be man-made? Because when looking at the above insertions which are not present in any of the closest coronavirus families, “it is quite unlikely for a virus to have acquired such unique insertions naturally in a short duration of time.” Instead, they can be found in cell identification and membrane binding proteins located in the HIV genome.

    But the ‘smoking gun’ in this case are pieces of the virus’s genetic code that Indian researchers, led by Prashant Pradhan at the Indian Institute of Technology, found may have been ’embedded’ from HIV, which belongs to an entirely different family of viruses.

    I have no particular expertise in genetics or biology, so I can’t make a judgement. If you click on this link, you can read more.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/coronavirus-contains-hiv-insertions-stoking-fears-over-artificially-created-bioweapon

    One aspect of this that I don’t understand is why, if the virus is not that serious, China seems to have taken such draconian measures to suppress this virus. Do they know something that we don’t? Why else would they mass quarantine people?

    https://twitter.com/BraveTheWorld/status/1223347380029968384

    https://twitter.com/DrEricDing/status/1223305946723704832

    Is there someone here with a scientific/genetic background who can offer an opinion on this?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/Yehoshua70/status/1223463240275038210

    https://twitter.com/PuffDragon11/status/1223442123761975296

    Should we be worried?

    Replies: @Lot

    , @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Dr. Eric posted a debunking of the HIV article.

    Nobody is saying this isn’t a big issue. WHO, Scott Gottlieb, etc all saying this a major disaster and the Chinese are badly underreporting.

    Best case is SARS x 10 in human impact, x 50-100 in economic impact.

    Worst case I think that’s reasonably possible: 50 million infected worldwide, ~1.5 million deaths (mostly people over 70 with other medical issues), wave of loan defaults and bankruptcies and supply chain disruptions in China cause something on the scale of the ‘08 recession worldwide.

    We’ll see on Sunday night USA time what the actual mainland chinese do when their stock markets reopen. The futures are guessing about -5%, which qualifies on its own as a crash. But if the people on the ground feel the situation is better or worse than outsiders, that will be a “democratic” tell. USA is down 3%, but that’s against a background of Apple and Amazon and others reporting very strong Q4 2019 numbers.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @eah
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Twitter account of ZH (@zerohedge), a website with a lot of traffic and some influence, is now suspended, reportedly due to tweeting about/a link to this coronavirus/bioweapon story (?).

    Trump is no doubt monitoring the situation.

    Replies: @eah

  58. @JohnnyWalker123
    I just saw a very disturbing article on the Coronavirus that was posted on Zero Hedge.

    Zero Hedge just had their Twitter account suspended. Supposedly, the suspension was due to posting that article, but I can't confirm whether that's accurate.

    https://twitter.com/DavidBCollum/status/1223406112763977728

    Here are some of the relevant portions of Zero Hedge's article on the Coronavirus.

    Over the past few days, the mainstream press has vigorously pushed back against a theory about the origins of the coronavirus that has now infected as many as 70,000+ people in Wuhan alone (depending on whom you believe). The theory is that China obtained the coronavirus via a Canadian research program, and started molding it into a bioweapon at the Institute of Virology in Wuhan. Politifact pointed the finger at Zero Hedge, in particular, though the story was widely shared across independent-leaning media.

    The theory is that the virus, which was developed by infectious disease experts to function as a bio-weapon, originated in the Wuhan-based lab of Dr. Peng Zhou, China's preeminent researcher of bat immune systems, specifically in how their immune systems adapt to the presence of viruses like coronavirus and other destructive viruses. Somehow, the virus escaped from the lab, and the Hunan fish market where the virus supposedly originated is merely a ruse.

    Now, a respected epidemiologist who recently caught flack for claiming in a twitter threat that the virus appeared to be much more contagious than initially believed is pointing out irregularities in the virus's genome that suggests it might have been genetically engineered for the purposes of a weapon, and not just any weapon but the deadliest one of all.

    In "Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag", Indian researchers are baffled by segments of the virus's RNA that have no relation to other coronaviruses like SARS, and instead appear to be closer to HIV. The virus even responds to treatment by HIV medications.
     

    Why do the authors think the virus may be man-made? Because when looking at the above insertions which are not present in any of the closest coronavirus families, "it is quite unlikely for a virus to have acquired such unique insertions naturally in a short duration of time." Instead, they can be found in cell identification and membrane binding proteins located in the HIV genome.

     


    But the 'smoking gun' in this case are pieces of the virus's genetic code that Indian researchers, led by Prashant Pradhan at the Indian Institute of Technology, found may have been 'embedded' from HIV, which belongs to an entirely different family of viruses.

     

    I have no particular expertise in genetics or biology, so I can't make a judgement. If you click on this link, you can read more.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/coronavirus-contains-hiv-insertions-stoking-fears-over-artificially-created-bioweapon

    One aspect of this that I don't understand is why, if the virus is not that serious, China seems to have taken such draconian measures to suppress this virus. Do they know something that we don't? Why else would they mass quarantine people?

    https://twitter.com/business/status/1221355951359516673

    https://twitter.com/BraveTheWorld/status/1223347380029968384

    https://twitter.com/DrEricDing/status/1223305946723704832

    Is there someone here with a scientific/genetic background who can offer an opinion on this?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Lot, @eah

    Should we be worried?

    • Replies: @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That Puff Dragon guy is a kook with his “Elliot Waves” predicting the stock market.

    ZH can be interesting, but no financial site on the whole history of the Internet has given more bad advice to more people. Sell sell sell, all through what’s been a once in a lifetime bull market in stocks, bonds, and real estate.

    They were bullish on gold at 2k and silver at 50, and have been warning about hyperinflation since they registered the domain.

  59. @ben tillman
    @J.Ross


    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) …
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
     
    But Manson was a guitarist. Soros is not a philanthropist. In fact, he's a misanthropist.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    But Manson was a guitarist.

    Albeit not a very good one.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Anonymous

    Manson did have a song recorded by The Beach Boys.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  60. @JohnnyWalker123
    I just saw a very disturbing article on the Coronavirus that was posted on Zero Hedge.

    Zero Hedge just had their Twitter account suspended. Supposedly, the suspension was due to posting that article, but I can't confirm whether that's accurate.

    https://twitter.com/DavidBCollum/status/1223406112763977728

    Here are some of the relevant portions of Zero Hedge's article on the Coronavirus.

    Over the past few days, the mainstream press has vigorously pushed back against a theory about the origins of the coronavirus that has now infected as many as 70,000+ people in Wuhan alone (depending on whom you believe). The theory is that China obtained the coronavirus via a Canadian research program, and started molding it into a bioweapon at the Institute of Virology in Wuhan. Politifact pointed the finger at Zero Hedge, in particular, though the story was widely shared across independent-leaning media.

    The theory is that the virus, which was developed by infectious disease experts to function as a bio-weapon, originated in the Wuhan-based lab of Dr. Peng Zhou, China's preeminent researcher of bat immune systems, specifically in how their immune systems adapt to the presence of viruses like coronavirus and other destructive viruses. Somehow, the virus escaped from the lab, and the Hunan fish market where the virus supposedly originated is merely a ruse.

    Now, a respected epidemiologist who recently caught flack for claiming in a twitter threat that the virus appeared to be much more contagious than initially believed is pointing out irregularities in the virus's genome that suggests it might have been genetically engineered for the purposes of a weapon, and not just any weapon but the deadliest one of all.

    In "Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag", Indian researchers are baffled by segments of the virus's RNA that have no relation to other coronaviruses like SARS, and instead appear to be closer to HIV. The virus even responds to treatment by HIV medications.
     

    Why do the authors think the virus may be man-made? Because when looking at the above insertions which are not present in any of the closest coronavirus families, "it is quite unlikely for a virus to have acquired such unique insertions naturally in a short duration of time." Instead, they can be found in cell identification and membrane binding proteins located in the HIV genome.

     


    But the 'smoking gun' in this case are pieces of the virus's genetic code that Indian researchers, led by Prashant Pradhan at the Indian Institute of Technology, found may have been 'embedded' from HIV, which belongs to an entirely different family of viruses.

     

    I have no particular expertise in genetics or biology, so I can't make a judgement. If you click on this link, you can read more.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/coronavirus-contains-hiv-insertions-stoking-fears-over-artificially-created-bioweapon

    One aspect of this that I don't understand is why, if the virus is not that serious, China seems to have taken such draconian measures to suppress this virus. Do they know something that we don't? Why else would they mass quarantine people?

    https://twitter.com/business/status/1221355951359516673

    https://twitter.com/BraveTheWorld/status/1223347380029968384

    https://twitter.com/DrEricDing/status/1223305946723704832

    Is there someone here with a scientific/genetic background who can offer an opinion on this?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Lot, @eah

    Dr. Eric posted a debunking of the HIV article.

    Nobody is saying this isn’t a big issue. WHO, Scott Gottlieb, etc all saying this a major disaster and the Chinese are badly underreporting.

    Best case is SARS x 10 in human impact, x 50-100 in economic impact.

    Worst case I think that’s reasonably possible: 50 million infected worldwide, ~1.5 million deaths (mostly people over 70 with other medical issues), wave of loan defaults and bankruptcies and supply chain disruptions in China cause something on the scale of the ‘08 recession worldwide.

    We’ll see on Sunday night USA time what the actual mainland chinese do when their stock markets reopen. The futures are guessing about -5%, which qualifies on its own as a crash. But if the people on the ground feel the situation is better or worse than outsiders, that will be a “democratic” tell. USA is down 3%, but that’s against a background of Apple and Amazon and others reporting very strong Q4 2019 numbers.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Lot

    So many loyal subjects of the globalist empire had such high hopes for the 2019-nCoV.


    https://www.businessinsider.com/wuhan-coronavirus-unnecessary-panic-experts-say-2020-1

    The Wuhan coronavirus seems to have a low fatality rate, and most patients make full recoveries. Experts reveal why it's causing panic anyway.

    So far, the virus does not seem to be as deadly as SARS, which killed 774 people from 2002 to 2003. SARS had a mortality rate of 9.6%, whereas about 2% of people infected with the new coronavirus have died. But the number of people infected after one month has already surpassed the SARS outbreak's eight-month total.

    Many patients with coronavirus have already made full recoveries. According to Chinese officials, most of those who've died were elderly or had other ailments that compromised their immune systems...

    Past outbreaks of Ebola, however, had much higher death rates than SARS and the new coronavirus: 25 to 90%. Worldwide, Ebola has killed more than 33,000 people since 1976.
     

    The hysteria and panic was cultivated by Deep State. The bio-weapon in Frederick, MD? China and the Chinese (in China and elsewhere) have gotten a glimpse of how future covert warfare will conducted against them and their country.
  61. Marginally on topic, a poll by “American Research Group, Inc.” (How’s that for generic anonymity? Give me a Zogby or Quinnipiac any day.)

    https://americanresearchgroup.com/pres2020/primary/dem/iadem.html

    Democratic candidates doing better with the opposite sex: VP Biden, Mayor Bloom, Mayor Humdinger, Next-Door Amy, and Exotic Tulsi

    Those doing better with their own sex: Bernie, Tom, Liz, Andy

    Bernie and Tulsi definitely appeal more to independents. (Or sneaky Republicans.) Liz and Amy, and to a lesser extent Joe, to party regulars.

    Joe and Amy, well-known figures, appeal to the old, Bernie (heavily) and Butt (slightly) to the young.

  62. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/Yehoshua70/status/1223463240275038210

    https://twitter.com/PuffDragon11/status/1223442123761975296

    Should we be worried?

    Replies: @Lot

    That Puff Dragon guy is a kook with his “Elliot Waves” predicting the stock market.

    ZH can be interesting, but no financial site on the whole history of the Internet has given more bad advice to more people. Sell sell sell, all through what’s been a once in a lifetime bull market in stocks, bonds, and real estate.

    They were bullish on gold at 2k and silver at 50, and have been warning about hyperinflation since they registered the domain.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Thanks: Dissident
  63. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Assistant: It’s your sister again. She needs more money for—-

    Zuck: Holy shit. I already told you to kill her. I’m serious. Just fucking do it.

    Assistant: Also Sen Schumer called about the white suprem—

    Zuck: Fuck that guy. So annoying. That’s a pushy fucking Jew right there. Tell him to suck my nuts.

    Assistant: And Bernie Sanders is unhappy with—

    Zuck: Did Trump call back? I like that Trump. He never nags me like a shithead from Brooklyn. I told him he could keep my sister as a sex slave forever if I could have Ivanka for one weekend.

    Assistant: Also President Xi needs a callback …he sounded a little panicky.

    Zuck: What a fucking weirdo. I don’t have time for his shit. Listen, try Ivanka again at the private number and if Kushner answers tell him he can lick my hairy nuts.

    • LOL: SFG, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anonymous

    I like, but you missed an opportunity to make jokes about his taste for..ah...Chinese.

  64. @Mr. Blank
    I’m sure that maximizing profits has never crossed Mr. Soros’ mind.

    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory. It really does seem like something will eventually have to give.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Desiderius

    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory.

    Agree. Except I don’t know how Soros counts as one of “our” elites. I realize he somehow bought a piece of paper saying he’s legally an American citizen. But the idea that he is a patriotic American, or has the best interests of America in mind, is laughable.

    Indeed, Soros himself would probably admit he sees himself as a “citizen of the world” and is merely “American” as a flag of convenience (presumably for tax and campaign finance law reasons).

    Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Hypnotoad666

    What does America have to do with anything?

    They're our elites because they're who rules over us, none more than the terrible Eye of Soros. Maybe soon we can force them into a Magna Carta, but we haven't yet.

    For an alternative, new Moldbug:

    https://americanmind.org/essays/rip-globalism-dead-of-coronavirus/

    , @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery."

    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  65. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius, @SunBakedSuburb

    Eaten alive by anomie.

  66. @Hypnotoad666
    @Mr. Blank


    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory.
     
    Agree. Except I don't know how Soros counts as one of "our" elites. I realize he somehow bought a piece of paper saying he's legally an American citizen. But the idea that he is a patriotic American, or has the best interests of America in mind, is laughable.

    Indeed, Soros himself would probably admit he sees himself as a "citizen of the world" and is merely "American" as a flag of convenience (presumably for tax and campaign finance law reasons).

    Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Corvinus

    What does America have to do with anything?

    They’re our elites because they’re who rules over us, none more than the terrible Eye of Soros. Maybe soon we can force them into a Magna Carta, but we haven’t yet.

    For an alternative, new Moldbug:

    https://americanmind.org/essays/rip-globalism-dead-of-coronavirus/

  67. @Mr. Blank
    I’m sure that maximizing profits has never crossed Mr. Soros’ mind.

    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory. It really does seem like something will eventually have to give.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Desiderius

    Soros hasn’t been able to afford self-awareness since he was fifteen. Minds come up with workarounds, often with sociopathic results.

  68. @Anonymous
    Zuckerberg has a documented Octavian/Augustus obsession. His honeymoon photos were all posed in front of the statues in Italia. The emperor was not exactly antifa material. Not exactly on the same page as Karl Marx. Not a Bernie Bro. Wake up people.

    Hilarious that this guy Zuck is not recognized as a crypto right winger. I guess his various gestures toward the rabid dogs of woke are enough to give him cover. Seems obvious he's just cynically making politicsl payoffs to powerful ruling class cartels. Meanwhile he remains Octavian at heart.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Anonymous

    I remember prior to the 2016 election cycle the Wikipedia entry on Zuckerberg sorta implied he might have been something of a crypto-rightist or conservative guy. Their sources were all fully SJW types, so I didn’t know how much weight to give them, these people tend to think anyone not 100 percent with them is the enemy. However if Zuckerberg does really rely on Thiel for advice and counsel, maybe he really is.

    • Replies: @IHTG
    @Unladen Swallow

    It's just good old-fashioned Silicon Valley techbro libertarianism.

    Replies: @Lot

  69. @PhysicistDave
    @Desiderius

    Which reminds me of the great lines by the Bard:


    This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
    This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
    This other Eden, demi-paradise,
    This fortress built by Nature for her self
    Against infection and the hand of war,
    This happy breed of men, this little world,
    This precious stone set in a silver sea
    Which serves it in the office of a wall
    Or as a moat defensive to a house,
    Against the envy of less happier lands,
    This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England
     
    It is a day to celebrate. For better or for worse, I shall always be an American. But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.

    Perhaps there always will be an England.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.

    My favorite quote about England comes from Santayana:

    “Instinctively the Englishman is no missionary, no conqueror. He prefers the country to the town, and home to foreign parts. He is rather glad and relieved if only natives will remain natives and strangers strangers, and at a comfortable distance from himself. Yet outwardly he is most hospitable and accepts almost anybody for the time being; he travels and conquers without a settled design, because he has the instinct of exploration. His adventures are all external; they change him so little that he is not afraid of them. He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the deliriums of mankind. Never since the heroic days of Greece has the world had such a sweet, just, boyish master. It will be a black day for the human race when scientific blackguards, conspirators, churls, and fanatics manage to supplant him.”

    • Thanks: Thea
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Pincher Martin

    That's quoted in Peter Hitchens' (the good one) book "The Abolition Of Britain".

    Worth a read if you want a neat portrait of the UKs decline, it's a cultural history of Britain between the funerals of Winston Churchill and Princess Diana.

    https://archive.org/stream/the-abolition-of-britain-peter-hitchens/the-abolition-of-britain-peter-hitchens_djvu.txt

    This bit is prescient though not in the way he expected:


    Britain is, or soon will be, somewhere else - George Orwell's Airstrip One, or a series of regions in the European Federal State - Channelside, perhaps, as Kent and Sussex are merged with Pas-de-Calais, and a series of other unrecognizable and meaningless regions. For Britain, as she has been all these centuries, is far too big and powerful to be swallowed whole into the bland blend of the new multicultural Euroland
     
    .

    There's a critical review by John Tyndall of the National Front, who's another guy who can say "I told you so".

    http://www.spearhead.co.uk/0002-jt2.html

    , @Desiderius
    @Pincher Martin

    Master Gamgee couldn't have put it better himself.

    And this for all the Thatcher haters:

    https://youtu.be/Tetk_ayO1x4

    No anti-bullying program in that grocer's daughter's upbringing!

    Utterly unflapped.

  70. @JohnnyWalker123
    I just saw a very disturbing article on the Coronavirus that was posted on Zero Hedge.

    Zero Hedge just had their Twitter account suspended. Supposedly, the suspension was due to posting that article, but I can't confirm whether that's accurate.

    https://twitter.com/DavidBCollum/status/1223406112763977728

    Here are some of the relevant portions of Zero Hedge's article on the Coronavirus.

    Over the past few days, the mainstream press has vigorously pushed back against a theory about the origins of the coronavirus that has now infected as many as 70,000+ people in Wuhan alone (depending on whom you believe). The theory is that China obtained the coronavirus via a Canadian research program, and started molding it into a bioweapon at the Institute of Virology in Wuhan. Politifact pointed the finger at Zero Hedge, in particular, though the story was widely shared across independent-leaning media.

    The theory is that the virus, which was developed by infectious disease experts to function as a bio-weapon, originated in the Wuhan-based lab of Dr. Peng Zhou, China's preeminent researcher of bat immune systems, specifically in how their immune systems adapt to the presence of viruses like coronavirus and other destructive viruses. Somehow, the virus escaped from the lab, and the Hunan fish market where the virus supposedly originated is merely a ruse.

    Now, a respected epidemiologist who recently caught flack for claiming in a twitter threat that the virus appeared to be much more contagious than initially believed is pointing out irregularities in the virus's genome that suggests it might have been genetically engineered for the purposes of a weapon, and not just any weapon but the deadliest one of all.

    In "Uncanny similarity of unique inserts in the 2019-nCoV spike protein to HIV-1 gp120 and Gag", Indian researchers are baffled by segments of the virus's RNA that have no relation to other coronaviruses like SARS, and instead appear to be closer to HIV. The virus even responds to treatment by HIV medications.
     

    Why do the authors think the virus may be man-made? Because when looking at the above insertions which are not present in any of the closest coronavirus families, "it is quite unlikely for a virus to have acquired such unique insertions naturally in a short duration of time." Instead, they can be found in cell identification and membrane binding proteins located in the HIV genome.

     


    But the 'smoking gun' in this case are pieces of the virus's genetic code that Indian researchers, led by Prashant Pradhan at the Indian Institute of Technology, found may have been 'embedded' from HIV, which belongs to an entirely different family of viruses.

     

    I have no particular expertise in genetics or biology, so I can't make a judgement. If you click on this link, you can read more.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/coronavirus-contains-hiv-insertions-stoking-fears-over-artificially-created-bioweapon

    One aspect of this that I don't understand is why, if the virus is not that serious, China seems to have taken such draconian measures to suppress this virus. Do they know something that we don't? Why else would they mass quarantine people?

    https://twitter.com/business/status/1221355951359516673

    https://twitter.com/BraveTheWorld/status/1223347380029968384

    https://twitter.com/DrEricDing/status/1223305946723704832

    Is there someone here with a scientific/genetic background who can offer an opinion on this?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Lot, @eah

    Twitter account of ZH (@zerohedge), a website with a lot of traffic and some influence, is now suspended, reportedly due to tweeting about/a link to this coronavirus/bioweapon story (?).

    Trump is no doubt monitoring the situation.

    • Replies: @eah
    @eah

    https://twitter.com/broderick/status/1223393472041881600

    Replies: @Desiderius

  71. Facebook might be a goood site for cheap political campaigns, or even Russian budget election interference (LOL) but it’s far from a safe haven for free speech. Just try to get a non-pc comment published and you’ll find yourself in Facebook jail/purgatory for a week or a month.
    Strangely Facebook also adheres to a strict no-nipples code but they’re fine with vile musical videos portraying sexual and moral depravity.
    Make no mistake, Zuckerberg doesn’t believe in free speech and remains a true-blood liberal. Perhaps 30 years down the road, if his business model doesn’t crash, he’ll transition to evil liberal wannabe overlord like Bezos or even to Satan’s right-hand man, like Soros.
    For now, he’s just doing business and intelligence work, spying on everybody and selling information to the highest bidder.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @BB753

    He wants to make money. Soros and the Dems want to keep him from doing that. Perhaps he's betting on Trump winning given the Dem field is either senile, gay (and thus unelectable despite people being PC), or super-lefty.

    There are a few bits that suggest he may lean right (Facebook was scrubbing anti-white comments until the media complained, the ancient Roman thing is reminiscent of the old bow-tie NR types, he's friends with Thiel), but I'm sure he'll go with whoever lets him make more money. That's how you get to be a multibillionaire (as well as hard work, luck, connections, luck, having a new product, luck, monetizing something previously unmonetizable, and luck).

    Replies: @BB753

    , @Lagertha
    @BB753

    sheeshh y'all are so annoying and denying of stuff youu said in the past- whatever.

    Replies: @BB753, @Lagertha

  72. Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    OK, if you say so.

    OT

    link/tweet

    The Alt-Right Literally Only Wants One Thing And It’s Fucking Disgusting

    At the link (to a tweet) there’s a video of Bill Maher talking about his “idyllic” childhood growing up in 1960s New Jersey, when there was no racial tension/issues because there was only one race — “not that there’s anything wrong but there was something wrong with that”

  73. @Anonymous
    @ben tillman


    But Manson was a guitarist.
     
    Albeit not a very good one.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    Manson did have a song recorded by The Beach Boys.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Paleo Liberal

    " Manson did have a song recorded by The Beach Boys." and Guns n Roses

  74. BAP calls Zuckerberg “Zuckerface”, which is perfect.

  75. @Coemgen
    Wow, textbook sociopathy. Zuckerberg has something that Soros wants: Facebook. Soros tries to rationalize why Zuckerberg deserves to lose Facebook. What will Soros not do to to wrest it from Zuckerberg? More importantly, where is Bill Gates on this issue? Bill and Mark appear to be sympatico: both nebbish Harvard drop-outs who went on to control powerful business empires. Bill and Mark together may be able to withstand Soros. Btw, Zuckerberg's wife had better not let Soros see her in a miniskirt. All sociopaths know that a woman in a miniskirt is looking for action ...

    Replies: @bomag

    Zuckerberg has something that Soros wants: Facebook

    Yes; he wants the influence he thinks Facebook has, so he can plunge the knife even deeper into the body politic in service to his hatred of the good.

  76. @Unladen Swallow
    @Anonymous

    I remember prior to the 2016 election cycle the Wikipedia entry on Zuckerberg sorta implied he might have been something of a crypto-rightist or conservative guy. Their sources were all fully SJW types, so I didn't know how much weight to give them, these people tend to think anyone not 100 percent with them is the enemy. However if Zuckerberg does really rely on Thiel for advice and counsel, maybe he really is.

    Replies: @IHTG

    It’s just good old-fashioned Silicon Valley techbro libertarianism.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @IHTG

    I’d guess Zuck is about halfway between Thiel tech-libertarianism and Obama corporate center-leftism.

    His seeming lack of interest in politics other than having a nice supply of Indian coding coolies, something Thiel and Obama agree on, is possibly because he feels like the system is dysfunctional but otherwise adequately responsive to his views and agenda.

  77. @International Jew
    @Desiderius

    In the last thirty seconds, that blonde chairlady gives us a glimpse of the highhandedness Farage was talking about.

    At the very end, she's starting to chastise him for using the word "hate". I would have liked to see where she took that.

    Great showmanship anyway. Reminds me of Delta House walking out on Dean Wormer.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @eugyppius

    At the very end, she’s starting to chastise him for using the word “hate”. I would have liked to see where she took that.

    She took it basically nowhere. A hasty transcript:

    The word hate was used in the last contribution. And I really think, given what we listened to prior to this, that we should not hate anyone, or any nation, or any people.

    Source:

    I don’t know what the parliament had heard “prior to this”, but Farage said his constituents hated the EU (the institution), not Europe (the nations, the people).

  78. “Mr. Soros is a philanthropist”

    They misspelled misanthrope.

    I knew soon as they stopped crying over ’16 my enemies would start punishing social media for allowing it to happen. The Zuck is an easy target because his reputation is pre-tarnished. But why are we leaving Twitter and Google out of this conspiracy?

    Twitter especially. That’s where Trump Game is strongest.

  79. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.
     
    And this one, the California voter-- now resident in Idaho, Montana, Arizona, Texas, Alaska...

    https://www.artsheaven.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/edvard-munch-the-scream-1-510x625.jpg


    But you can't beat Chicago for unofficial portraits:


    https://artontrial.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/picture2.gif

    https://cdn.trendhunterstatic.com/phpthumbnails/26/26503/26503_1_600.jpeg

    Replies: @animalogic

    I find the portrait of the rifle very unconvincing. Though the live moose & the dead bear are nice touches.

  80. Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    He likes to serve Man.

    • LOL: ben tillman
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Alvaro Beauchamp

    "To Serve Man" is a cookbook!

    Don't get on that ship!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk01eeKMD_I

  81. Suprising Mr. Soros didn’t accuse Zuckerberg of converting to Christianity.

  82. The last sentence from the Soros quote seems to imply that it’s time to go full dekulakization on “Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg”, and to transform Facebook into a people’s kolhoz “in one way or another”.

    Ah, those wacky philanthropists.

  83. @eah
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Twitter account of ZH (@zerohedge), a website with a lot of traffic and some influence, is now suspended, reportedly due to tweeting about/a link to this coronavirus/bioweapon story (?).

    Trump is no doubt monitoring the situation.

    Replies: @eah

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @eah

    Jeez, ZH, smoove move there, ex lax. What were they thinking?

    Of a piece with their investing advice.

    Replies: @eah

  84. @ben tillman

    By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.
     
    LOL.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @athEIst

    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @athEIst

    He’s a cross between John Dillinger and Eric Garland.

    , @kaganovitch
    @athEIst

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    No, he was a currency swindler. His son does the currency swindling now. It's like Bernie Madoff used to be a hedge fund swindler. Now he's a auto accessories manufacturer.

  85. @Anonymous
    Obviously, some conspiracy theories have to be true, while others must be false.

    The real motivations of human beings are often odd and opaque, whether they are homeless bums on the street or kingmakers like George Soros. If there ever were a final call up yonder where everyone's every deed were revealed, and what they were thinking at the time they did it, the real answers would be at turns unbelievable and all too mundane.

    The two errors with conspiracy theory are either to believe conspiracies are imaginary and don't exist, or, that everything is a result of a carefully thought out conspiracy by often evil but usually rational actors. There is a lot of sheer randomness in the world, and a lot of obvious deals and design solutions never happen because of some petty grievance or obscure goal by some apparently insignificant player who turn out to wield immense power through any of several means.

    One reason the United States did so well during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was that the previous grievances of white people in Europe often got trampled under the capitalist and unregulated marketplace. If Frenchmen would not build a widget the best way because the inventor was a German, in America the German would be successful and hire everyone else and they would build it his way or be unemployed. The Chevrolet brothers wound up working as hourly employees at the company named after them. (And with very limited exceptions, white people are history's actors.) The French were good engineers, almost as good as and occasionally better than the Germans, but being insufferable their best engineering went nowhere outside of France. The Velosolex motorized bicycle, the Stylophot pocket camera, and of course the hydraulic suspension of the Citroen car, none very popular outside France. The British tried their own idea at hydraulic suspensions but it was even less reliable than the French, despite being simpler. The French never built much electronics worth a damn, whereas the German Telefunken, Neumann, Rohde & Schwarz stuff was at least technically good if way overpriced. In America, you had a winner-take-all mess but at least the winner had to be somewhat good.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack D

    “the French never built much electronics worth a damn”

    French cars are great to drive, if only they’d get the Japanese to do the electrics. Our last French car had a 100% electronic screen dashboard. Driving through a city one day the whole thing goes blank – no speedo, no fuel gauge, can’t tell if indicators are on. Only our own satnav, with its builtin speedo, saved us.

    Pity – great car in every other way, doors and floor full of useful compartments, huge low boot for the dog, very comfy seats, 50 mpg (Brit gallon). We replaced the dashboard, but when the (electric) power steering started cutting out intermittently (great fun on a roundabout, wife really appreciated it) we gave it up as a bad job.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily. Name a famous French sports car off the top of your head. (No Googling). They have great suspensions and seats, very comfortable ride but no power. Not a lot of opportunities to go really fast on French country roads or Paris streets. Even today, the biggest engine available in Renault's top of the line Talisman sedan is a 2L (Nissan) engine making 145 hp, which is the type of engine that would go in a small compact in America or Germany, not as the top option in your flagship sedan.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

  86. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    Nigel Farage reminded us that what his parents had been told about the European Common Market 50 years ago (when they approved of it), and what it grew to become (European Union) is very telling.

    Farage warned us about the siren song of the global elite today:

    They will promise one, limited, thing (with economic benefits, doncha know!) and deliver something else (an undemocratic oligarchy, complete with its own military and laws that are irrevocable and eternal.)

    Screw the global elite, the “internationalists” in every country. They hate us.

    Soros is one of them – I hope his helicopter crashes and burns soon.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Paul Jolliffe


    Nigel Farage reminded us that what his parents had been told about the European Common Market 50 years ago (when they approved of it), and what it grew to become (European Union) is very telling.
     
    Exact same bait and switch with Civil Rights with CRT as the shiv. See Caldwell’s postmortem. I remember discovering it in a friendly argument with the General Counsel of HfHI in 1996. Never been so furious. Not with her, she’d never known anything different, but with the bastards who carried it out.
  87. @Anonymous
    Zuckerberg has a documented Octavian/Augustus obsession. His honeymoon photos were all posed in front of the statues in Italia. The emperor was not exactly antifa material. Not exactly on the same page as Karl Marx. Not a Bernie Bro. Wake up people.

    Hilarious that this guy Zuck is not recognized as a crypto right winger. I guess his various gestures toward the rabid dogs of woke are enough to give him cover. Seems obvious he's just cynically making politicsl payoffs to powerful ruling class cartels. Meanwhile he remains Octavian at heart.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Anonymous

    What about his sister Donna?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    What about his sister Donna?

    Daddy issues plus sibling rivalry, perhaps.

  88. @Pincher Martin
    @PhysicistDave


    But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.
     
    My favorite quote about England comes from Santayana:

    “Instinctively the Englishman is no missionary, no conqueror. He prefers the country to the town, and home to foreign parts. He is rather glad and relieved if only natives will remain natives and strangers strangers, and at a comfortable distance from himself. Yet outwardly he is most hospitable and accepts almost anybody for the time being; he travels and conquers without a settled design, because he has the instinct of exploration. His adventures are all external; they change him so little that he is not afraid of them. He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the deliriums of mankind. Never since the heroic days of Greece has the world had such a sweet, just, boyish master. It will be a black day for the human race when scientific blackguards, conspirators, churls, and fanatics manage to supplant him.”
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Desiderius

    That’s quoted in Peter Hitchens’ (the good one) book “The Abolition Of Britain”.

    Worth a read if you want a neat portrait of the UKs decline, it’s a cultural history of Britain between the funerals of Winston Churchill and Princess Diana.

    https://archive.org/stream/the-abolition-of-britain-peter-hitchens/the-abolition-of-britain-peter-hitchens_djvu.txt

    This bit is prescient though not in the way he expected:

    Britain is, or soon will be, somewhere else – George Orwell’s Airstrip One, or a series of regions in the European Federal State – Channelside, perhaps, as Kent and Sussex are merged with Pas-de-Calais, and a series of other unrecognizable and meaningless regions. For Britain, as she has been all these centuries, is far too big and powerful to be swallowed whole into the bland blend of the new multicultural Euroland

    .

    There’s a critical review by John Tyndall of the National Front, who’s another guy who can say “I told you so”.

    http://www.spearhead.co.uk/0002-jt2.html

  89. @Thea
    OT but Africans have Neanderthal DNA as well.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/01/africans-carry-surprising-amount-neanderthal-dna

    Replies: @iffen, @Anon, @BB753

    CWT, wobble, wobble.

  90. @Paleo Liberal
    @Anonymous

    Manson did have a song recorded by The Beach Boys.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    ” Manson did have a song recorded by The Beach Boys.” and Guns n Roses

  91. @Colin Wright
    About the only thing that's true here is that Facebook is too big -- and therefore has too much power. It doesn't really matter what it's intentions or motives are; it's just too damned big.

    It's the same principle as with the nineteenth century railroads, or Standard Oil. Past a certain point, sheer size simply confers too much power on an organism.

    Replies: @anonymous

    This country should have a national legislature that could enact antitrust laws, to be enforced in a judicial forum by actions brought by lawyers in an executive branch.

    Wishful thinking …

  92. 3691206

    When people accidentally triple-post the same comment, why do you approve them? Is it automated? And if it’s automated, why wouldn’t duplicates be automatically removed?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @onetwothree

    I assume you are talking to Steve and not me. But I'll answer your question to the best of my ability.

    None of my posts actually posted in real time. This confused me, and I assumed I needed to repost the same comment.

    I also couldn't edit the comment, which I usually do with the five-minute grace period allowed after making a post. So I did make some minor revisions in each of the three versions that eventually made it through. The three posts were not identical. Perhaps that is why - to answer your question - each of them posted.

  93. @Anonymous
    Assistant: It's your sister again. She needs more money for----

    Zuck: Holy shit. I already told you to kill her. I'm serious. Just fucking do it.

    Assistant: Also Sen Schumer called about the white suprem---

    Zuck: Fuck that guy. So annoying. That's a pushy fucking Jew right there. Tell him to suck my nuts.

    Assistant: And Bernie Sanders is unhappy with---

    Zuck: Did Trump call back? I like that Trump. He never nags me like a shithead from Brooklyn. I told him he could keep my sister as a sex slave forever if I could have Ivanka for one weekend.

    Assistant: Also President Xi needs a callback ...he sounded a little panicky.

    Zuck: What a fucking weirdo. I don't have time for his shit. Listen, try Ivanka again at the private number and if Kushner answers tell him he can lick my hairy nuts.

    Replies: @SFG

    I like, but you missed an opportunity to make jokes about his taste for..ah…Chinese.

  94. By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    A philanthropist!

    By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a professional gambler and a misanthrope.

    There. Fixed it.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @James N. Kennett

    Didn't Soros some time in the past spend a bunch of his own money to set up new universities in Eastern European countries after the Iron Curtain came down? I would guess that he had a lot of say as regards the ideological orientation of those universities - I would guess further that they were "progressive" i.e. anti-nationalist, and one-worldish but I'm just guessing. Those expenditures seem to be to fall into the category of philanthropy, i.e. spending your own money not on yourself but on other things.

    These days, Soros seem to be spending money to promote one-worldism, unfettered immigration, which seem philanthropic according to the meaning of the word, however uncongenial such initiatives seem to me and others in comments here.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  95. If anyone should know a thing or two about conspiracies to bring about evil ends, it would be George Soros.

  96. @BB753
    Facebook might be a goood site for cheap political campaigns, or even Russian budget election interference (LOL) but it's far from a safe haven for free speech. Just try to get a non-pc comment published and you'll find yourself in Facebook jail/purgatory for a week or a month.
    Strangely Facebook also adheres to a strict no-nipples code but they're fine with vile musical videos portraying sexual and moral depravity.
    Make no mistake, Zuckerberg doesn't believe in free speech and remains a true-blood liberal. Perhaps 30 years down the road, if his business model doesn't crash, he'll transition to evil liberal wannabe overlord like Bezos or even to Satan's right-hand man, like Soros.
    For now, he's just doing business and intelligence work, spying on everybody and selling information to the highest bidder.

    Replies: @SFG, @Lagertha

    He wants to make money. Soros and the Dems want to keep him from doing that. Perhaps he’s betting on Trump winning given the Dem field is either senile, gay (and thus unelectable despite people being PC), or super-lefty.

    There are a few bits that suggest he may lean right (Facebook was scrubbing anti-white comments until the media complained, the ancient Roman thing is reminiscent of the old bow-tie NR types, he’s friends with Thiel), but I’m sure he’ll go with whoever lets him make more money. That’s how you get to be a multibillionaire (as well as hard work, luck, connections, luck, having a new product, luck, monetizing something previously unmonetizable, and luck).

    • Replies: @BB753
    @SFG

    Since the MSM is 100 % liberal and scared of losing their monopoly on news and commentary, thus losing control of the narrative, Dems will be cracking down harder on alternative media such as Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, etc. Because Dems know that social media and alternative news outlets are where elections will be won or lost from now on, as Trump proved in 2016. The establishment will make sure no other maverick candidate slips through the cracks of the system and wins. Youtube and Twitter do self-regulate and try to crush dissent online with a measure of success, Facebook much less, maybe because it's a nearly impossible task, given the sheer volume of information it holds.
    But to say that Facebook proves to be conservative-friendly is a stretch. As to Zuckerberg, I doubt he has strong convictions, probably a classical liberal, but liberal still.

  97. @Lot
    @International Jew

    Nope, read up more if you want, it isn’t a big secret.

    Trump’s Facebook strategy in 2016 was brilliant.

    The “employee embed” is pretty normal for tech companies to their customers who spend tens of millions of dollars per year or more.

    It’s basically in-person full-time VIP tech support.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    It’s basically in-person full-time VIP tech support.

    Right. If you are a big IBM or Oracle customer, you have one of their guys at your place.

  98. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    I am pretty sure Mr. Farage cuold be elected President. If only he had been born in Kenya.

    • LOL: black sea
  99. “For example, in the New York Times opinion section, George Soros presents his personal conspiracy theory: the Mark Zuckerberg-Donald Trump Conspiracy…”

    Except you didn’t NOTICE one important thing, Mr. Sailer. Trump has Jewish advisors. Zuckerberg is Jewish. Do they not enjoy conspiring? Do they not relish serving one master? Do they not love riling up us gentiles?

    I’m really surprised this pattern is lost on you. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Corvinus

    Technically it's a Jew-on-Jew conspiracy theory.

    I think the taboo on anything that makes Jews look bad (Israel influencing America, Epstein in league with intelligence, media collusion to make conservative whites look bad) in the MSM leads actual antisemites to come up with bizarre conspiracy theories (sex dungeon under pizza parlor, etc.)

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Corvinus

    "Tsk, tsk, tsk."

    You are spoof-proof. You satirize yourself. Kudos.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  100. @Hypnotoad666
    @Mr. Blank


    We have one of the most out-of-touch, lacking-in-self-awareness group of elites in modern memory.
     
    Agree. Except I don't know how Soros counts as one of "our" elites. I realize he somehow bought a piece of paper saying he's legally an American citizen. But the idea that he is a patriotic American, or has the best interests of America in mind, is laughable.

    Indeed, Soros himself would probably admit he sees himself as a "citizen of the world" and is merely "American" as a flag of convenience (presumably for tax and campaign finance law reasons).

    Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Corvinus

    “Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery.”

    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.
     
    You can touch and feel a building. It's a little harder to do that with a currency collapse. A Trump is much more comprehensible to the common man than is a Soros. Whose name derives from a fake language.

    In which you would be Korvo.

    In Volapük, Krov.

    In Toki Pona, Waso Pimeja Jaki kepeken uta suli.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  101. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Dr. Eric posted a debunking of the HIV article.

    Nobody is saying this isn’t a big issue. WHO, Scott Gottlieb, etc all saying this a major disaster and the Chinese are badly underreporting.

    Best case is SARS x 10 in human impact, x 50-100 in economic impact.

    Worst case I think that’s reasonably possible: 50 million infected worldwide, ~1.5 million deaths (mostly people over 70 with other medical issues), wave of loan defaults and bankruptcies and supply chain disruptions in China cause something on the scale of the ‘08 recession worldwide.

    We’ll see on Sunday night USA time what the actual mainland chinese do when their stock markets reopen. The futures are guessing about -5%, which qualifies on its own as a crash. But if the people on the ground feel the situation is better or worse than outsiders, that will be a “democratic” tell. USA is down 3%, but that’s against a background of Apple and Amazon and others reporting very strong Q4 2019 numbers.

    Replies: @Anon

    So many loyal subjects of the globalist empire had such high hopes for the 2019-nCoV.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/wuhan-coronavirus-unnecessary-panic-experts-say-2020-1

    The Wuhan coronavirus seems to have a low fatality rate, and most patients make full recoveries. Experts reveal why it’s causing panic anyway.

    So far, the virus does not seem to be as deadly as SARS, which killed 774 people from 2002 to 2003. SARS had a mortality rate of 9.6%, whereas about 2% of people infected with the new coronavirus have died. But the number of people infected after one month has already surpassed the SARS outbreak’s eight-month total.

    Many patients with coronavirus have already made full recoveries. According to Chinese officials, most of those who’ve died were elderly or had other ailments that compromised their immune systems…

    Past outbreaks of Ebola, however, had much higher death rates than SARS and the new coronavirus: 25 to 90%. Worldwide, Ebola has killed more than 33,000 people since 1976.

    The hysteria and panic was cultivated by Deep State. The bio-weapon in Frederick, MD? China and the Chinese (in China and elsewhere) have gotten a glimpse of how future covert warfare will conducted against them and their country.

  102. @SFG
    @BB753

    He wants to make money. Soros and the Dems want to keep him from doing that. Perhaps he's betting on Trump winning given the Dem field is either senile, gay (and thus unelectable despite people being PC), or super-lefty.

    There are a few bits that suggest he may lean right (Facebook was scrubbing anti-white comments until the media complained, the ancient Roman thing is reminiscent of the old bow-tie NR types, he's friends with Thiel), but I'm sure he'll go with whoever lets him make more money. That's how you get to be a multibillionaire (as well as hard work, luck, connections, luck, having a new product, luck, monetizing something previously unmonetizable, and luck).

    Replies: @BB753

    Since the MSM is 100 % liberal and scared of losing their monopoly on news and commentary, thus losing control of the narrative, Dems will be cracking down harder on alternative media such as Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, etc. Because Dems know that social media and alternative news outlets are where elections will be won or lost from now on, as Trump proved in 2016. The establishment will make sure no other maverick candidate slips through the cracks of the system and wins. Youtube and Twitter do self-regulate and try to crush dissent online with a measure of success, Facebook much less, maybe because it’s a nearly impossible task, given the sheer volume of information it holds.
    But to say that Facebook proves to be conservative-friendly is a stretch. As to Zuckerberg, I doubt he has strong convictions, probably a classical liberal, but liberal still.

  103. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.

    You didn’t finish the quote. Here’s the rest of it:

    “I, George Soros, should be in charge of Facebook. The only media that should be allowed to exist are media that explicitly favor Left wing causes that I support. Any medium that either intentionally or in practical effect results in support for non-Left wing causes should be destroyed or turned over to me. ”

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  104. @Pincher Martin
    @PhysicistDave


    But, a few years ago we visited Britain, and, in my heart, I know that were I not an American, I would be an Englishman.
     
    My favorite quote about England comes from Santayana:

    “Instinctively the Englishman is no missionary, no conqueror. He prefers the country to the town, and home to foreign parts. He is rather glad and relieved if only natives will remain natives and strangers strangers, and at a comfortable distance from himself. Yet outwardly he is most hospitable and accepts almost anybody for the time being; he travels and conquers without a settled design, because he has the instinct of exploration. His adventures are all external; they change him so little that he is not afraid of them. He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the deliriums of mankind. Never since the heroic days of Greece has the world had such a sweet, just, boyish master. It will be a black day for the human race when scientific blackguards, conspirators, churls, and fanatics manage to supplant him.”
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Desiderius

    Master Gamgee couldn’t have put it better himself.

    And this for all the Thatcher haters:

    No anti-bullying program in that grocer’s daughter’s upbringing!

    Utterly unflapped.

  105. I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories,

    Because most of them are bereft of inductive reasoning and impervious to contrary empirical data and to the absence of empirical data. See just about every bit of conspiracy literature on the Kennedy Assassination ever produced.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    But not all.

    Which is a leak in our game explicitly exploited by our adversaies with increasingly brazen frequency. It is urgently in need of repair. Ideally by fastidious men like yourself.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Art Deco

    I often say that the worst thing about almost all conspiracy theories is conspiracy theorists.

    , @NOTA
    @Art Deco

    Conspiracies happen, and are worth noting. But the conspiracy theory mode of thinking (where you construct an evidence-proof shell around your theory) is broken and you should avoid it.

    The MSM confuses the two, because they're mostly not very bright and their audience is mostly pretty dumb.

  106. @Art Deco
    I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories,

    Because most of them are bereft of inductive reasoning and impervious to contrary empirical data and to the absence of empirical data. See just about every bit of conspiracy literature on the Kennedy Assassination ever produced.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pincher Martin, @NOTA

    But not all.

    Which is a leak in our game explicitly exploited by our adversaies with increasingly brazen frequency. It is urgently in need of repair. Ideally by fastidious men like yourself.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    @Desiderius

    What bit of conspiracy theory do you find persuasive?

    Replies: @Desiderius

  107. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anonymous

    "the French never built much electronics worth a damn"

    French cars are great to drive, if only they'd get the Japanese to do the electrics. Our last French car had a 100% electronic screen dashboard. Driving through a city one day the whole thing goes blank - no speedo, no fuel gauge, can't tell if indicators are on. Only our own satnav, with its builtin speedo, saved us.

    Pity - great car in every other way, doors and floor full of useful compartments, huge low boot for the dog, very comfy seats, 50 mpg (Brit gallon). We replaced the dashboard, but when the (electric) power steering started cutting out intermittently (great fun on a roundabout, wife really appreciated it) we gave it up as a bad job.

    Replies: @Jack D

    For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily. Name a famous French sports car off the top of your head. (No Googling). They have great suspensions and seats, very comfortable ride but no power. Not a lot of opportunities to go really fast on French country roads or Paris streets. Even today, the biggest engine available in Renault’s top of the line Talisman sedan is a 2L (Nissan) engine making 145 hp, which is the type of engine that would go in a small compact in America or Germany, not as the top option in your flagship sedan.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D

    "For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black."

    English motorcyclists used to call Joe Lucas, whose company made most of the electrical stuff on UK cars, "The Prince Of Darkness".

    But I've not had as much trouble with UK cars as with French ones, electric-wise. Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Jack D


    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily.

     

    They've been working on the horsepower:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peugeot_308#GTI_by_Peugeot_Sport

    270hp in a 2900 lb vehicle will give you pretty good pickup.

    I spent a few years rolling around North Africa in the prior generation 308. Nice ride and handling, was not under-powered. I forget exactly which engine was in that car.
    , @captflee
    @Jack D

    Alpine Renault A110 (old or new). I rather prefer the circa 1972 model, though I suppose that's not really a true sports car, what with having roll-up windows...

    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.

    As our Saint himself was wont to say,

    "Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere."
    "Simplicate, then add lightness."

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  108. @Corvinus
    "For example, in the New York Times opinion section, George Soros presents his personal conspiracy theory: the Mark Zuckerberg-Donald Trump Conspiracy..."

    Except you didn't NOTICE one important thing, Mr. Sailer. Trump has Jewish advisors. Zuckerberg is Jewish. Do they not enjoy conspiring? Do they not relish serving one master? Do they not love riling up us gentiles?

    I'm really surprised this pattern is lost on you. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

    Replies: @SFG, @SunBakedSuburb

    Technically it’s a Jew-on-Jew conspiracy theory.

    I think the taboo on anything that makes Jews look bad (Israel influencing America, Epstein in league with intelligence, media collusion to make conservative whites look bad) in the MSM leads actual antisemites to come up with bizarre conspiracy theories (sex dungeon under pizza parlor, etc.)

  109. @Anonymous
    Obviously, some conspiracy theories have to be true, while others must be false.

    The real motivations of human beings are often odd and opaque, whether they are homeless bums on the street or kingmakers like George Soros. If there ever were a final call up yonder where everyone's every deed were revealed, and what they were thinking at the time they did it, the real answers would be at turns unbelievable and all too mundane.

    The two errors with conspiracy theory are either to believe conspiracies are imaginary and don't exist, or, that everything is a result of a carefully thought out conspiracy by often evil but usually rational actors. There is a lot of sheer randomness in the world, and a lot of obvious deals and design solutions never happen because of some petty grievance or obscure goal by some apparently insignificant player who turn out to wield immense power through any of several means.

    One reason the United States did so well during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was that the previous grievances of white people in Europe often got trampled under the capitalist and unregulated marketplace. If Frenchmen would not build a widget the best way because the inventor was a German, in America the German would be successful and hire everyone else and they would build it his way or be unemployed. The Chevrolet brothers wound up working as hourly employees at the company named after them. (And with very limited exceptions, white people are history's actors.) The French were good engineers, almost as good as and occasionally better than the Germans, but being insufferable their best engineering went nowhere outside of France. The Velosolex motorized bicycle, the Stylophot pocket camera, and of course the hydraulic suspension of the Citroen car, none very popular outside France. The British tried their own idea at hydraulic suspensions but it was even less reliable than the French, despite being simpler. The French never built much electronics worth a damn, whereas the German Telefunken, Neumann, Rohde & Schwarz stuff was at least technically good if way overpriced. In America, you had a winner-take-all mess but at least the winner had to be somewhat good.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack D

    The French domestic market was big enough that they never much cared about exports or about what furreners thought about their products.

    Post WWII W. Germany was poor at first – too poor for the Germans to buy their own stuff. After the war, BMW make Isetta microcars under license for their domestic market because Germans couldn’t afford real cars anymore (and because their main factory got left behind in E. Germany). The manufacturers had to export if they wanted to sell and they had to listen to what their foreign distributors told them.

    The French attitude was always, “my way or the highway”. If we brilliant French engineers decide to put the shifter on the dashboard and replace the brake pedal with a little button, we know what we are doing and if you American idiots don’t like it, tant pis. We are not changing anyzing for you. Our main French customers love it just the way it is and we are not changing it in order to sell 200 cars in America. If we decide to use 25mm handlebar stems on our bikes when everyone else in the world uses 1 inch, that’s our decision. Every bicycle shop IN FRANCE has 25mm parts so we don’t care what you use in your lousy country with terrible cheese.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @Jack D

    ‘The French attitude was always, “my way or the highway”.’

    And yet the entire nation rolled over and said nothing as they are getting demographically replaced.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Jay Leno might take issue.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kzW_ERSgFRY


    My first car was a Renault wagon with FWD and R&P steering. She was perfect for tooling around curvy upstate New York, but her assets were wasted in Michigan and Ohio. Handling, not speed. I got spare parts in Canada.

    A nearby mechanic has a 1950s Simca Aronde wasting away on his lot. I should ask what's wrong with it, and what he wants for it. If nothing else, I could paint it bleu-blanc-rouge and employ it as yard art.

    http://www.eurooldtimers.com/temp/stroj_big_tmb_32242.jpg


    A Tatra done up in the Slovak flag would be even better.


    https://assets.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/08/HMN0918-CIP-01.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J1234, @Jack D

  110. Soros’ eyes, with their underlid scrota
    Match the dashboard of someone’s Toyota
    In traffic destroyed,
    With airbags deployed.
    “Not so baggy my eyes are!” says Yoda.

  111. @Art Deco
    I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories,

    Because most of them are bereft of inductive reasoning and impervious to contrary empirical data and to the absence of empirical data. See just about every bit of conspiracy literature on the Kennedy Assassination ever produced.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pincher Martin, @NOTA

    I often say that the worst thing about almost all conspiracy theories is conspiracy theorists.

  112. @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily. Name a famous French sports car off the top of your head. (No Googling). They have great suspensions and seats, very comfortable ride but no power. Not a lot of opportunities to go really fast on French country roads or Paris streets. Even today, the biggest engine available in Renault's top of the line Talisman sedan is a 2L (Nissan) engine making 145 hp, which is the type of engine that would go in a small compact in America or Germany, not as the top option in your flagship sedan.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    “For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.”

    English motorcyclists used to call Joe Lucas, whose company made most of the electrical stuff on UK cars, “The Prince Of Darkness”.

    But I’ve not had as much trouble with UK cars as with French ones, electric-wise. Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.
     
    A lot of this is due to how rigorous the auto industry has gotten about testing everything that goes into their vehicles.

    They started down this path by adapting some of the relevant US military and aerospace environmental test standards.

    As time has passed, some of the SAE enviro test standards have become so rigorous that they have supplanted prior versions of the US military test standards.
    , @captflee
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Electrical issues with older Brit cars? Unpossible!

    To restore proper operation, may I suggest the Lucas Wiring Harness Replacement Smoke Kit (P/N 530433). Once you get the smoke back into the wires, Bob's your uncle!

  113. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I talked to Jerry Brown for five minutes once and that official portrait of him catches the unnerving real Jerry.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius, @SunBakedSuburb

    Especially the eyes.

  114. I thought Zuck was part of the machine collective. He’s going to usher in the techno-Roman empire.

  115. @Anon
    Mr Trump,

    That was "Soros",

    not "Soleimani".


    Please try again and get it right this time.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    Bond villain Soros flies around the world in a private jet that would be easy to track and target. Whoops! A sidewinder gets loose due to systems error. Western political elites mourn the loss of their puppeteer.

  116. @Corvinus
    "For example, in the New York Times opinion section, George Soros presents his personal conspiracy theory: the Mark Zuckerberg-Donald Trump Conspiracy..."

    Except you didn't NOTICE one important thing, Mr. Sailer. Trump has Jewish advisors. Zuckerberg is Jewish. Do they not enjoy conspiring? Do they not relish serving one master? Do they not love riling up us gentiles?

    I'm really surprised this pattern is lost on you. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

    Replies: @SFG, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Tsk, tsk, tsk.”

    You are spoof-proof. You satirize yourself. Kudos.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @SunBakedSuburb


    Kudos
     
    Kudos spelled backwards is "so Duk". As in Tiny.
  117. @JimDandy
    Yeah, yeah, but have you seen THIS?

    Witness Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Has No Balls and Appears to Have Vagina
    https://www.complex.com/life/2020/01/harvey-weinstein-accuser-claims-he-has-no-testicles

    Replies: @Rob

    “Witness Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Has No Balls and Appears to Have Vagina”

    The summary of her testimony in that article made it seem so undamning that, we’re i prone to conspiracy theories, and if Weinstein actually had any history of conspiracy, I would say that she was paid to give poor testimony to impugn the others’ by association. Bonus points for Weinstein if the defense offers a picture of his genitals into evidence. Double bonus points if that picture leaks and the internet determines it has been altered in any way.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Rob

    Similar thoughts ran through my head.

  118. @J.Ross
    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) ...
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women's fashions.
    But yeah Trump's getting acquitted and we're seeing meltdowns and fingerpointing. Apparently Kamala Harris started spontaneously laughing at a press conference like a crazy person. Cenk Uyghur proposed simply introducing a new set of phony caseless impeachment articles in the House. They don't seem to have a Plan H.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ben tillman, @Ganderson, @Morton's toes

    Ed Gein reference- don’t see many of those! Well played!

  119. @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily. Name a famous French sports car off the top of your head. (No Googling). They have great suspensions and seats, very comfortable ride but no power. Not a lot of opportunities to go really fast on French country roads or Paris streets. Even today, the biggest engine available in Renault's top of the line Talisman sedan is a 2L (Nissan) engine making 145 hp, which is the type of engine that would go in a small compact in America or Germany, not as the top option in your flagship sedan.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily.

    They’ve been working on the horsepower:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peugeot_308#GTI_by_Peugeot_Sport

    270hp in a 2900 lb vehicle will give you pretty good pickup.

    I spent a few years rolling around North Africa in the prior generation 308. Nice ride and handling, was not under-powered. I forget exactly which engine was in that car.

  120. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D

    "For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black."

    English motorcyclists used to call Joe Lucas, whose company made most of the electrical stuff on UK cars, "The Prince Of Darkness".

    But I've not had as much trouble with UK cars as with French ones, electric-wise. Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.

    A lot of this is due to how rigorous the auto industry has gotten about testing everything that goes into their vehicles.

    They started down this path by adapting some of the relevant US military and aerospace environmental test standards.

    As time has passed, some of the SAE enviro test standards have become so rigorous that they have supplanted prior versions of the US military test standards.

  121. Kabuki theater, that’s what it always is when a Jew accuses another Jew of anything. There’s no sincerity underneath. Fuckerberg will sooner conspire with Trump then Bernie Sanders would.

  122. @IHTG
    @Unladen Swallow

    It's just good old-fashioned Silicon Valley techbro libertarianism.

    Replies: @Lot

    I’d guess Zuck is about halfway between Thiel tech-libertarianism and Obama corporate center-leftism.

    His seeming lack of interest in politics other than having a nice supply of Indian coding coolies, something Thiel and Obama agree on, is possibly because he feels like the system is dysfunctional but otherwise adequately responsive to his views and agenda.

  123. If only this silly fantasy were true.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  124. @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Why any American would think he speaks for them is a mystery."

    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.

    You can touch and feel a building. It’s a little harder to do that with a currency collapse. A Trump is much more comprehensible to the common man than is a Soros. Whose name derives from a fake language.

    In which you would be Korvo.

    In Volapük, Krov.

    In Toki Pona, Waso Pimeja Jaki kepeken uta suli.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    Trusmp has little if any connection to the common man. He is a billionaire socialite who marketed himself as a politician to squarely benefit himself. He is an elitist. You’re not even being honest here.

    Though Trump does make it comprehensible that he is above the law. The common man would be put the pokey of they did anything remotely like Trump.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  125. @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    But not all.

    Which is a leak in our game explicitly exploited by our adversaies with increasingly brazen frequency. It is urgently in need of repair. Ideally by fastidious men like yourself.

    Replies: @PV van der Byl

    What bit of conspiracy theory do you find persuasive?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @PV van der Byl

    The one the IG already found evidence for and Durham is investigating. CIA has explicitly been using the term “conspiracy theory” to dodge accountability for decades.

  126. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The French domestic market was big enough that they never much cared about exports or about what furreners thought about their products.

    Post WWII W. Germany was poor at first - too poor for the Germans to buy their own stuff. After the war, BMW make Isetta microcars under license for their domestic market because Germans couldn't afford real cars anymore (and because their main factory got left behind in E. Germany). The manufacturers had to export if they wanted to sell and they had to listen to what their foreign distributors told them.

    The French attitude was always, "my way or the highway". If we brilliant French engineers decide to put the shifter on the dashboard and replace the brake pedal with a little button, we know what we are doing and if you American idiots don't like it, tant pis. We are not changing anyzing for you. Our main French customers love it just the way it is and we are not changing it in order to sell 200 cars in America. If we decide to use 25mm handlebar stems on our bikes when everyone else in the world uses 1 inch, that's our decision. Every bicycle shop IN FRANCE has 25mm parts so we don't care what you use in your lousy country with terrible cheese.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Reg Cæsar

    ‘The French attitude was always, “my way or the highway”.’

    And yet the entire nation rolled over and said nothing as they are getting demographically replaced.

  127. 3691206

    @Steve – if you personally curate the comments, why do you always let the double (and here triple) posts through?

  128. I am shocked that Soros has not been sued by now by someone who lost a family member due to some illegal alien he helped import. A billion dollars a life sounds reasonable. Not a lawyer but it would seem he and the rest of the wetback NGOs should be liable for the damage that results from their advocacy. This is especially true if it could be proven negligent due to enabling a criminal to come here.

    I would also love to know what Trump has been up to, if anything, about using our intelligence to infiltrate these networks. Now that would be a good use of the FBI-CIA, not helping failed mercenaries relocate in suburbia.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Prof. Woland

    It’s not our intelligence yet. Against Soleimani sure, but not the Eye of Soros. One hopes Johnwise Durhamgee nears Mt. Doom. Time runs short.

  129. @Thea
    OT but Africans have Neanderthal DNA as well.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/01/africans-carry-surprising-amount-neanderthal-dna

    Replies: @iffen, @Anon, @BB753

    Yeah, but they got via back-migration from Europeans into Africa over 20K years. In other words, while Europeans gradually weeded down their percentage of DNA from Neanderthals, Africans kept it.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anon


    Yeah, but they got via back-migration from Europeans into Africa over 20K years. In other words, while Europeans gradually weeded down their percentage of DNA from Neanderthals, Africans kept it.
     
    Yes, those are some very "other" words that mean nothing like what was said in the first place.
  130. @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Trump, as an elitist, falls under this category.
     
    You can touch and feel a building. It's a little harder to do that with a currency collapse. A Trump is much more comprehensible to the common man than is a Soros. Whose name derives from a fake language.

    In which you would be Korvo.

    In Volapük, Krov.

    In Toki Pona, Waso Pimeja Jaki kepeken uta suli.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Trusmp has little if any connection to the common man. He is a billionaire socialite who marketed himself as a politician to squarely benefit himself. He is an elitist. You’re not even being honest here.

    Though Trump does make it comprehensible that he is above the law. The common man would be put the pokey of they did anything remotely like Trump.

    • Troll: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Corvinus


    You’re not even being honest here.
     
    Liar, liar, pants on fire!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    Replies: @Desiderius

  131. https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/01/no_author/the-fbi-has-been-lying-about-seth-rich-185/

    Craig Murray on the FBI proven to have been lying about murdered Clinton staffer and probable Wikileaks leaker Seth Rich. I don’t know what’s going to happen but a lot is coming out now which was feared to never emerge. Hopefully this impeachment nonsense has scared Trump into actual seriousness about dealing with his subordinates: between it and the serial failures of the deep state, the neutrals of the bureaucracy must be coming around to apolitical professionalism if not support of their president.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @J.Ross

    The responsibility for patrolling the District of Columbia lies with the DC police, not the FBI. Have the DC Police been lying as well?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Desiderius

  132. @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    Trusmp has little if any connection to the common man. He is a billionaire socialite who marketed himself as a politician to squarely benefit himself. He is an elitist. You’re not even being honest here.

    Though Trump does make it comprehensible that he is above the law. The common man would be put the pokey of they did anything remotely like Trump.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    You’re not even being honest here.

    Liar, liar, pants on fire!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Hibernian

    Good sign to see him losing his cool.

  133. @PV van der Byl
    @Desiderius

    What bit of conspiracy theory do you find persuasive?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    The one the IG already found evidence for and Durham is investigating. CIA has explicitly been using the term “conspiracy theory” to dodge accountability for decades.

  134. @Prof. Woland
    I am shocked that Soros has not been sued by now by someone who lost a family member due to some illegal alien he helped import. A billion dollars a life sounds reasonable. Not a lawyer but it would seem he and the rest of the wetback NGOs should be liable for the damage that results from their advocacy. This is especially true if it could be proven negligent due to enabling a criminal to come here.

    I would also love to know what Trump has been up to, if anything, about using our intelligence to infiltrate these networks. Now that would be a good use of the FBI-CIA, not helping failed mercenaries relocate in suburbia.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    It’s not our intelligence yet. Against Soleimani sure, but not the Eye of Soros. One hopes Johnwise Durhamgee nears Mt. Doom. Time runs short.

  135. @Hibernian
    @Corvinus


    You’re not even being honest here.
     
    Liar, liar, pants on fire!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    Nah nuh nah nuh na na!

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Good sign to see him losing his cool.

  136. @Thea
    OT but Africans have Neanderthal DNA as well.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/01/africans-carry-surprising-amount-neanderthal-dna

    Replies: @iffen, @Anon, @BB753

    They say they sampled five African populations but not which ones.

  137. @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black.

    The traditional problem with French cars is that they are underengined because historically they taxed horsepower heavily. Name a famous French sports car off the top of your head. (No Googling). They have great suspensions and seats, very comfortable ride but no power. Not a lot of opportunities to go really fast on French country roads or Paris streets. Even today, the biggest engine available in Renault's top of the line Talisman sedan is a 2L (Nissan) engine making 145 hp, which is the type of engine that would go in a small compact in America or Germany, not as the top option in your flagship sedan.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    Alpine Renault A110 (old or new). I rather prefer the circa 1972 model, though I suppose that’s not really a true sports car, what with having roll-up windows…

    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.

    As our Saint himself was wont to say,

    “Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere.”
    “Simplicate, then add lightness.”

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @captflee


    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.
     
    Not necessarily.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/07/review-2009-dodge-challenger-rt-track-pack-%e2%80%9cclassic%e2%80%9d/

    The Internet’s conventional wisdom: the little Mazda would handily hold off the fat, slouchy Dodge. In the real world, I murdered the Miata. I blasted by the Elan-like roadster every time in the straight between [Summit Point] Turns Three and Four, before trail-braking and grinding the sidewalls all the way down the entrance to Four.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

  138. If Mr. Soros is a philanthropist, I’m the starting quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Dan Smith

    "Dan Smith. BYU."

    Ha ha!

  139. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D

    "For an Englishman to complain about French auto electrics is the pot calling the kettle black."

    English motorcyclists used to call Joe Lucas, whose company made most of the electrical stuff on UK cars, "The Prince Of Darkness".

    But I've not had as much trouble with UK cars as with French ones, electric-wise. Or US cars come to that. Japanese-made cars are impressively reliable, though.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @captflee

    Electrical issues with older Brit cars? Unpossible!

    To restore proper operation, may I suggest the Lucas Wiring Harness Replacement Smoke Kit (P/N 530433). Once you get the smoke back into the wires, Bob’s your uncle!

  140. @Alvaro Beauchamp
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.

    He likes to serve Man.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    “To Serve Man” is a cookbook!

    Don’t get on that ship!

  141. @J.Ross
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/01/no_author/the-fbi-has-been-lying-about-seth-rich-185/

    Craig Murray on the FBI proven to have been lying about murdered Clinton staffer and probable Wikileaks leaker Seth Rich. I don't know what's going to happen but a lot is coming out now which was feared to never emerge. Hopefully this impeachment nonsense has scared Trump into actual seriousness about dealing with his subordinates: between it and the serial failures of the deep state, the neutrals of the bureaucracy must be coming around to apolitical professionalism if not support of their president.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The responsibility for patrolling the District of Columbia lies with the DC police, not the FBI. Have the DC Police been lying as well?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Art Deco

    Whose responsibility is it to discuss Seth Rich and then say under oath that they did not discuss Seth Rich?
    Would that be the same DC Police who flat out said that they would not investigate James Alefantis?
    But your question is wierd anyway. The FBI is not suspected of having investigated Seth Rich ("I squashed this one with [pleasure?].") and I'm not really sure what the DC Police are supposed to have done.
    >there's a dead body
    >whoever made it dead isn't here any more
    >let's collect evidence, see that the body is taken to the morgue, and then eat pastries
    That's pretty much what they're supposed to do, at that point they will have earned the pastries.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    There are anomalies in the investigation, or lack thereof, as well as the hospital records. I don’t expect there to be enough in the public domain to say much more than that, but I also wouldn’t be surprised we’re there more to the story.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  142. @athEIst
    @ben tillman

    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @kaganovitch

    He’s a cross between John Dillinger and Eric Garland.

  143. @Art Deco
    @J.Ross

    The responsibility for patrolling the District of Columbia lies with the DC police, not the FBI. Have the DC Police been lying as well?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Desiderius

    Whose responsibility is it to discuss Seth Rich and then say under oath that they did not discuss Seth Rich?
    Would that be the same DC Police who flat out said that they would not investigate James Alefantis?
    But your question is wierd anyway. The FBI is not suspected of having investigated Seth Rich (“I squashed this one with [pleasure?].”) and I’m not really sure what the DC Police are supposed to have done.
    >there’s a dead body
    >whoever made it dead isn’t here any more
    >let’s collect evidence, see that the body is taken to the morgue, and then eat pastries
    That’s pretty much what they’re supposed to do, at that point they will have earned the pastries.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @J.Ross

    When you're ready to say something coherent, get back to me.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  144. @captflee
    @Jack D

    Alpine Renault A110 (old or new). I rather prefer the circa 1972 model, though I suppose that's not really a true sports car, what with having roll-up windows...

    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.

    As our Saint himself was wont to say,

    "Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere."
    "Simplicate, then add lightness."

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.

    Not necessarily.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/07/review-2009-dodge-challenger-rt-track-pack-%e2%80%9cclassic%e2%80%9d/

    The Internet’s conventional wisdom: the little Mazda would handily hold off the fat, slouchy Dodge. In the real world, I murdered the Miata. I blasted by the Elan-like roadster every time in the straight between [Summit Point] Turns Three and Four, before trail-braking and grinding the sidewalls all the way down the entrance to Four.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Then there's the McLaren F1, the weight of a Miata and 650 horsepower out of a V12 and six gears.

    That was nearly thirty years ago. It would probably be possible to mass produce a car that had 90 or 95 percent of the F1's performance, though the wisdom of selling such a potentially destructive device to consumers retail might be questionable.

    , @captflee
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Lightness is a relative thing, I suppose. A Miata is easily double the weight of a FF car. Lop a thousand pounds off the Mazda and I suspect the results will be just a bit different.

    In the earlier days of F1 motor racing Enzo Ferrari typified the horsepower dominant school of thought, as opposed to Colin Chapman's lower weight theory (taking into consideration that there are always limitations on just how much one can do and still stay within the confines of the technical regulations). During the years 1958-94, when both teams were active, Team Lotus took home 7 Constructor's Championships,and Scuderia Ferrari won 8, so there would seem to be merit in both schools of thought, though I suspect that Lotus spent considerably less doing so.

    Having both oodles of power and relative lightness, such as the Porsche 917-30 Can Am car back in '73 (basically 1 hp/lb. in qualifying setup), would seem the very height of felicity. 0 to 100 to 0 mph in less than seven seconds.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  145. @Paul Jolliffe
    @Desiderius

    Nigel Farage reminded us that what his parents had been told about the European Common Market 50 years ago (when they approved of it), and what it grew to become (European Union) is very telling.

    Farage warned us about the siren song of the global elite today:

    They will promise one, limited, thing (with economic benefits, doncha know!) and deliver something else (an undemocratic oligarchy, complete with its own military and laws that are irrevocable and eternal.)

    Screw the global elite, the "internationalists" in every country. They hate us.

    Soros is one of them - I hope his helicopter crashes and burns soon.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Nigel Farage reminded us that what his parents had been told about the European Common Market 50 years ago (when they approved of it), and what it grew to become (European Union) is very telling.

    Exact same bait and switch with Civil Rights with CRT as the shiv. See Caldwell’s postmortem. I remember discovering it in a friendly argument with the General Counsel of HfHI in 1996. Never been so furious. Not with her, she’d never known anything different, but with the bastards who carried it out.

  146. @Art Deco
    @J.Ross

    The responsibility for patrolling the District of Columbia lies with the DC police, not the FBI. Have the DC Police been lying as well?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Desiderius

    There are anomalies in the investigation, or lack thereof, as well as the hospital records. I don’t expect there to be enough in the public domain to say much more than that, but I also wouldn’t be surprised we’re there more to the story.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Desiderius

    I agree with you it is an odd case, but that's because of the circumstances, not anything law enforcement have said.

    No one has presented any evidence that Rich was mixed up in organized crime, the drug trade, espionage, political terrorism, smuggling, general tax evasion, money laundering, or trading in child pornography. Those are the usual hooks for federal involvement. The FBI isn't ordinarily a consultant in investigating common crimes; they have a forensics laboratory, but I think most of the time it does odd work outside the skill set of state police laboratories (though I suppose maybe it's the default for DC as there is no state lab there).

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Desiderius

  147. @onetwothree
    When people accidentally triple-post the same comment, why do you approve them? Is it automated? And if it's automated, why wouldn't duplicates be automatically removed?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I assume you are talking to Steve and not me. But I’ll answer your question to the best of my ability.

    None of my posts actually posted in real time. This confused me, and I assumed I needed to repost the same comment.

    I also couldn’t edit the comment, which I usually do with the five-minute grace period allowed after making a post. So I did make some minor revisions in each of the three versions that eventually made it through. The three posts were not identical. Perhaps that is why – to answer your question – each of them posted.

  148. ………, we do know what Mr. Trump said about the meeting: Mr. Zuckerberg “told me that I’m No. 1 in the world in Facebook.” …

    Well that settles it. He certainly wouldn’t exagerate about a thing like that. The humble, ever self-effacing Mr. Trump is seldom known to toot his own horn.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  149. This is just cover for Zuckerberg to go all out favoring the Dem candidate when the time comes, and dole out the hit jobs on Trump, so he could claim he wasn’t colluding with Trump.

  150. @Lot
    @Harry Baldwin

    How dare you!

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D41XX_oXkAI_F0a.jpg

    Replies: @black sea, @kaganovitch

    Giddyap

  151. @eah
    @eah

    https://twitter.com/broderick/status/1223393472041881600

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Jeez, ZH, smoove move there, ex lax. What were they thinking?

    Of a piece with their investing advice.

    • Replies: @eah
    @Desiderius

    You should instead question Broderick's role in getting ZH suspended, i.e. whether he was directly involved, indeed whether that was the/an aim of his "journalism" -- while I have mixed feelings about ZH, describing it as "Pro-Trump" is absurd, and shows Broderick himself has an agenda: don't take my word for it, review his "work" at BuzzFeed, as well as his Twitter timeline.

    Oh and BTW, was the Chinese scientist involved in altering ("weaponizing") this coronavirus? -- is Broderick interested in the answer to that question, i.e. whether it's true or not? -- is BuzzFeed? -- many people are rightly interested in this rather important question, and many more should be.

    https://twitter.com/broderick/status/682623594497703936

    Replies: @Desiderius

  152. @athEIst
    @ben tillman

    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @kaganovitch

    And here I thought he was a currency swindler.

    No, he was a currency swindler. His son does the currency swindling now. It’s like Bernie Madoff used to be a hedge fund swindler. Now he’s a auto accessories manufacturer.

  153. @J.Ross
    Mr Soros is a philanthropist

    How to satirize this (without the really obvious ones, you know, the architecture enthusiast or the seminary student) ...
    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
    Mr Gein enjoys the feel of women's fashions.
    But yeah Trump's getting acquitted and we're seeing meltdowns and fingerpointing. Apparently Kamala Harris started spontaneously laughing at a press conference like a crazy person. Cenk Uyghur proposed simply introducing a new set of phony caseless impeachment articles in the House. They don't seem to have a Plan H.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ben tillman, @Ganderson, @Morton's toes

    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.

    If you read Nikolas Schreck’s biography, Manson did have decent chops as a musician although his guitar playing was not up to the Wrecking Crew level.

    If you read Alston Chase’s biography, Kazcynski’s PhD thesis at U. Wisconsin was applauded as the latest greatest thing by Mathematicians across the world. He didn’t get that tenure track slot at UC with his networking and interviewing skills.

    So you are kind of mixing apples and oranges a little.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Morton's toes

    Ted Kazcynski went to the U of Michigan, not the U of Wisconsin. He resurrected his career there, he had struggled at Harvard to some extent, he thought Michigan was pretty easy by comparison.

    , @Morton's toes
    @Morton's toes

    Yes I meant UM not UW I always get those two mixed up.

  154. @Anon
    @Thea

    Yeah, but they got via back-migration from Europeans into Africa over 20K years. In other words, while Europeans gradually weeded down their percentage of DNA from Neanderthals, Africans kept it.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Yeah, but they got via back-migration from Europeans into Africa over 20K years. In other words, while Europeans gradually weeded down their percentage of DNA from Neanderthals, Africans kept it.

    Yes, those are some very “other” words that mean nothing like what was said in the first place.

  155. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard
    @captflee


    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.
     
    Not necessarily.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/07/review-2009-dodge-challenger-rt-track-pack-%e2%80%9cclassic%e2%80%9d/

    The Internet’s conventional wisdom: the little Mazda would handily hold off the fat, slouchy Dodge. In the real world, I murdered the Miata. I blasted by the Elan-like roadster every time in the straight between [Summit Point] Turns Three and Four, before trail-braking and grinding the sidewalls all the way down the entrance to Four.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

    Then there’s the McLaren F1, the weight of a Miata and 650 horsepower out of a V12 and six gears.

    That was nearly thirty years ago. It would probably be possible to mass produce a car that had 90 or 95 percent of the F1’s performance, though the wisdom of selling such a potentially destructive device to consumers retail might be questionable.

  156. @Ron Mexico
    @Pincher Martin

    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Tex

    Soros can’t handle the Millennials and Gen Z. No money (his dirty money) will buy them off because these young adults still know Right from Wrong. Killing them off, may be a problem, hhahhahaaaa. Why can’t this awful person die already? My mother and MIL and countless people in their 90’s-100’s (still alive group) are such better, loving of humanity-people.

  157. @Achmed E. Newman
    While having grown older, Mr. Soros has not grown up. It's not that he believes in any conspiracies. It's just that, like a 14 year-old schoolgirl, Mr. Soros is jealous that President Trump is # on Facebook.

    He's been seen crying in back of his Gulfstream due to his having only 0.001% of the number of Facebook Friends that Mr. Trump has. Listen, George, you make more friends promising to build walls on the southern border and ending US military aggression around the world than you do by ruining country's economies with currency trading and inciting left-wing riots. It's a damn shame his Mama never told him that.

    Replies: @Anon, @Lagertha

    Sorros is apoplectic. Trump knows the jig is up. https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/iceninekills/thejigisup.html

  158. @Pincher Martin
    I think it's silly to think Zuckerberg wanted anything to do with Trump in 2016. Zuckerberg might've belatedly realized that his company's interests currently line up with Trump voters, but I bet he's neither comfortable with that alignment nor is he seeking to exploit it in a strategic way. He's just rolling with it until something better comes along and I bet he's praying for that "something better" to come along sooner rather than later.

    Is an alignment of interests really a conspiracy?

    As for Soros what are we supposed to make of this accusation?

    I repeat and reaffirm my accusation against Facebook under the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.
     
    Yes, we clearly need to remove corporate leadership at our public companies when they seek to maximize profits instead of follow Soros' political philosophy.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Lagertha

    duh. 2% of humans are psychopaths. I have tangled with 3, and ‘they’ intruded in my life for some stages of my young adult life. I won’t write movies about it because I educated myself about sociopaths, in the 80’s – at least, they never hurt my pets or friends…killed random people connected to me.

    https://www.learning-mind.com/hare-psychopathology-checklist/

  159. This only has 110 views but it seems kinna relevant.

    You – literally – saw it here first!

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @moshe

    Zuckerberg is religious now?

    Replies: @nebulafox

  160. @BB753
    Facebook might be a goood site for cheap political campaigns, or even Russian budget election interference (LOL) but it's far from a safe haven for free speech. Just try to get a non-pc comment published and you'll find yourself in Facebook jail/purgatory for a week or a month.
    Strangely Facebook also adheres to a strict no-nipples code but they're fine with vile musical videos portraying sexual and moral depravity.
    Make no mistake, Zuckerberg doesn't believe in free speech and remains a true-blood liberal. Perhaps 30 years down the road, if his business model doesn't crash, he'll transition to evil liberal wannabe overlord like Bezos or even to Satan's right-hand man, like Soros.
    For now, he's just doing business and intelligence work, spying on everybody and selling information to the highest bidder.

    Replies: @SFG, @Lagertha

    sheeshh y’all are so annoying and denying of stuff youu said in the past- whatever.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
    @Lagertha

    Lagertha, oh brave shield-maiden, wouldst thou care to explain?

    , @Lagertha
    @Lagertha

    hahhahahaa - too late. I am like a firefly...

  161. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    I love Brexit!.

  162. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @captflee


    Being an apostle of Saint Colin of Hethel, I hold that in most respects weight is more important than power. An old school 1600cc/115HP Formula Ford car will run away from just about any supercar on a road course, despite having a fifth to a tenth of the horsepower.
     
    Not necessarily.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/07/review-2009-dodge-challenger-rt-track-pack-%e2%80%9cclassic%e2%80%9d/

    The Internet’s conventional wisdom: the little Mazda would handily hold off the fat, slouchy Dodge. In the real world, I murdered the Miata. I blasted by the Elan-like roadster every time in the straight between [Summit Point] Turns Three and Four, before trail-braking and grinding the sidewalls all the way down the entrance to Four.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

    Lightness is a relative thing, I suppose. A Miata is easily double the weight of a FF car. Lop a thousand pounds off the Mazda and I suspect the results will be just a bit different.

    In the earlier days of F1 motor racing Enzo Ferrari typified the horsepower dominant school of thought, as opposed to Colin Chapman’s lower weight theory (taking into consideration that there are always limitations on just how much one can do and still stay within the confines of the technical regulations). During the years 1958-94, when both teams were active, Team Lotus took home 7 Constructor’s Championships,and Scuderia Ferrari won 8, so there would seem to be merit in both schools of thought, though I suspect that Lotus spent considerably less doing so.

    Having both oodles of power and relative lightness, such as the Porsche 917-30 Can Am car back in ’73 (basically 1 hp/lb. in qualifying setup), would seem the very height of felicity. 0 to 100 to 0 mph in less than seven seconds.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @captflee

    Ferrari's engines in Colin Chapman's chassis would have been unbeatable, but that wasn't the done thing.

    My favorite Lotus is of course the 56/56B, with P&W PT-6 power and four wheel drive, had they got it sorted and had the sanctioning bodies not turned a gimlet eye towards turbines (they weren't as much antiturbine as anti-aeroderivative-turbine, they sort of rightly figured that it would turn into a junk formula with the use of unairworthy runout surplus engines, which indeed Granatelli's engine stocks actually were: a purpose built automotive racing turbine would been been fine as it would have supported an infrastructure like Cosworth or Meyer-Drake!).

  163. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    What about his sister Donna?

    Replies: @anon

    What about his sister Donna?

    Daddy issues plus sibling rivalry, perhaps.

  164. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The French domestic market was big enough that they never much cared about exports or about what furreners thought about their products.

    Post WWII W. Germany was poor at first - too poor for the Germans to buy their own stuff. After the war, BMW make Isetta microcars under license for their domestic market because Germans couldn't afford real cars anymore (and because their main factory got left behind in E. Germany). The manufacturers had to export if they wanted to sell and they had to listen to what their foreign distributors told them.

    The French attitude was always, "my way or the highway". If we brilliant French engineers decide to put the shifter on the dashboard and replace the brake pedal with a little button, we know what we are doing and if you American idiots don't like it, tant pis. We are not changing anyzing for you. Our main French customers love it just the way it is and we are not changing it in order to sell 200 cars in America. If we decide to use 25mm handlebar stems on our bikes when everyone else in the world uses 1 inch, that's our decision. Every bicycle shop IN FRANCE has 25mm parts so we don't care what you use in your lousy country with terrible cheese.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Reg Cæsar

    Jay Leno might take issue.

    My first car was a Renault wagon with FWD and R&P steering. She was perfect for tooling around curvy upstate New York, but her assets were wasted in Michigan and Ohio. Handling, not speed. I got spare parts in Canada.

    A nearby mechanic has a 1950s Simca Aronde wasting away on his lot. I should ask what’s wrong with it, and what he wants for it. If nothing else, I could paint it bleu-blanc-rouge and employ it as yard art.

    A Tatra done up in the Slovak flag would be even better.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Many old Simcas had a French made copy of the Ford V-8/60 engine and died an early death because midget racers bought them for the engine blocks. Parts support was terrible for any part that didn't fit some other car. Chrysler dealers sold them, but intensely disliked them and did not provide good service for them. They were actually not a terrible car. Most French cars other than Renaults had good workmanship and engineering: Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.

    Peugeots were and remain popular in Africa and parts of South America where older models are still built. The 504 was actually a pretty good car, except for the terrible parts availability and service. Melroe Bobcat skid steer loaders used Peugeot diesel engines so you could at least get some engine parts through construction equipment dealers. Otherwise, you had best know someone who could correspond in French with a dealer in France or Quebec who would ship parts. There were a few who would but you had to communicate in French. The Peugeot had some unusual features such as the rear end which used a bronze worm and wheel gear and took a specific Esso vegetable based lubricant.
    But when reasonably maintained it would go a long time , usually until it badly rusted. The diesel engine had value for core because again, they were used in Bobcats.

    Citroens were the objects of cult veneration in the US. A larger than average number of these people were gay males. They were, all joking aside, especially attracted to the SM. I'd say a third of the US Citroen car club were likely gay. Rolls Royce also used the Citroen hydraulic system in their seventies models, but they made a mess of it since they also retained their transmission driven servo power braking and the standard power steering so you had three hydraulic systems in one car, all using different and incompatible hydraulic fluids. They were an absolute nightmare to work on by 70s standards but seem almost normal now.

    My inside experience, or at least knowledge of it was from someone who was an engineer for a lawn equipment manufacturer which had decided that the Citroen 2CV horizontal twin would be excellent for their new tractor, which filled a niche between a Sears, Roebuck garden tractor (or their superior version of same, built around the core of their two wheel pull-tractor and Onan or Kohler flathead small engines) and a Ford N size small farm tractor. (In other words, a Farmall Cub-not a Cub Cadet, but the four cylinder Cub. IH quit making them, but there was a demand.) And indeed it was excellent. It was a compact air cooled engine, ran smooth, well made, had much better sfc than a flathead Kohler or Onan.

    So they approached Citroen to buy the engine. Citroen for whatever reason had no intention of actually selling them engines, but instead of saying no, jacked them around, with excuses that at first seemed to make sense but became increasingly suspicious. They went to France and bought a couple of engines for production prototypes as rebuilt service units from local dealers, and made no attempt to hide who they were. Citroen got wind of it and the dealers were notified that under no circumstances were they to sell anything to these people and if they did they would be punished. After managing to really back the Citroen people into a corner, they finally told them they were not going to sell them anything, did not want to deal with them, and had no intention of doing so from the start. And were not sorry in the least for having wasted their time. They wound up using a small Continental cast iron flathead four that was heavy and not that reliable and cost too much.

    The Citroen hydraulic integrated braking, steering and suspension hydraulics were actually very good. If you kept the fluid fresh and clean (particularly important in the early vegetable fluid based cars) it was long lasting and trouble free. After about ten or fifteen years, if you kept the car that long, you changed out everything in one fell swoop, which was expensive, but were good for another decade or two. Problems included the fact that Citroen ignored each and every convention in hydraulic engineering practice that they could, the filter was not very good, there was no fitting for a hydraulic mule for test, and that the rear brakes on the D tended to rust out because they never got hot: the front brakes supplied all the braking as well as all the traction. A few owners actually just plugged the lines or pinched them off and took the pads out, but you couldn't do that in a state with vehicle inspections.

    The four cylinder D engine was reliable but very heavy and underpowered. In the UK there were tuners who poked and stroked it and fitted SU or Weber carbs but none of that stuff made it here. VDO also made a fine gauge panel for the dash that gave you a Ferrari-like panel with all the proper VDO gauges, again, those never made it over here. An engine swap was complicated by the wrong way rotation of the engine, because the flywheel end was mounted forward, and they wanted the engine to be able to crank in the normal direction-with the hand crank furnished with each car! You could build a reverse rotation Chevy II four, but it was just as heavy and no one ever did it. Today you could use a Honda engine, since many of them are reverse rotation.

    The SM had a Maserati built 90 degree DOHC V6 that was a masterpiece on paper and an abortion in actual service. It was very compact, and had a tendency to self destruct, and of course there were no spare engines-you junked the car or spent a fortune having an aluminum welder who usually welded Top Fuel Hemi and Indy DFX Cosworth parts patch it up. No other engine fit very well-the Mazda rotary would have fit but there was no way to make one run the other way. Some thought was given to turning it around the other way but it would have taken custom front and rear housings and an eccentric shaft, I think Racing Beat quoted a quarter million up front to get it done. If there were a lot more SMs in the US it would have made sense, but by then the French had started buying the survivors back. Most which weren't scrapped are now back in Europe. (And then there was the one Burt Reynolds drove off the dock in The Longest Yard.)

    The Citroen was not the only car with hydraulic active suspension. Rolls Royce used Citroen parts but as a supplementary system-the Rolls weighed three times what a Citroen did. Mercedes built one of their high end sedans with hydraulic spheres on the rear -was this a 6.3 or 6.9 V8 version of the 450SEL? I don't remember. And the Brits had the BMC Hydralastic/ Hydragas system, best remembered in the US from the "MG Liquid Suspension Special" Indy car of the early 60s. The British system was simpler but not as reliable, because the unions had become pirahnalike at that point in British manufacturing. It went into smaller cars, and saloons rather than sports cars, few of which were sold here and fewer still which survived. I think there are only two places in the US that still have the special mule/fixture (more of an embalming machine than a hydraulic mule) needed to pressurize the system. I was told both had to build a motor/generator to supply 50 hertz power to run them. But the Cit system was the best.

    Why didn't others just copy the Citroen system? "Not Invented Here", I guess. There were patents, but they ran out in the seventies. Various American and other cars used air bag suspensions, but they are shitty in comparison to the Citroen air/oil system. Steezers use hydraulics in their lowriders, but it's 90 IQ engineering-a series stack of car batteries overdriving a surplus aircraft electric hydraulic pump (or a reverse engineered copy of same) driving ag equipment hydraulic rams. The 1-800-HOTROD set uses air aftermarket systems that also have all the faults of the OEM systems, but they don't care.

    Replies: @J1234, @Jack D

    , @J1234
    @Reg Cæsar

    Cool pics. Thanks.

    There's a '59 Renault Dauphine on eBay right now for about $6700. It looks pretty solid and apparently runs good. I have no idea if that's a good price, but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    The DS was an amazing car in many respects but the engine wasn't one of them. The French system of taxing vehicles according to "tax horsepower" (actually the formula was more related to displacement) basically destroyed their luxury car industry by making it cost prohibitive to register a car with a decent sized engine. And before the era of fuel injection and turbocharging, the only way you could make decent power was thru displacement so French cars had neither.

    The original plan was to use an air cooled boxer six derived from the 2 cylinder engine of the 2CV ("Deux Chevaux") but they ran out of money so they used a 4 cylinder of ancient design. This started out at 60 hp but over the years they managed to get it up to a still not very impressive 140 hp by the very end (although in a 2,800 lb. curb weight car made possible by a total lack of crash safety this was not bad ).

    As Anonymous mentions, for the successor SM model they used Maserati engines which had more performance but were a reliability nightmare.

  165. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Corvinus

    "Tsk, tsk, tsk."

    You are spoof-proof. You satirize yourself. Kudos.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Kudos

    Kudos spelled backwards is “so Duk”. As in Tiny.

  166. @Morton's toes
    @J.Ross


    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
     
    If you read Nikolas Schreck's biography, Manson did have decent chops as a musician although his guitar playing was not up to the Wrecking Crew level.

    If you read Alston Chase's biography, Kazcynski's PhD thesis at U. Wisconsin was applauded as the latest greatest thing by Mathematicians across the world. He didn't get that tenure track slot at UC with his networking and interviewing skills.

    So you are kind of mixing apples and oranges a little.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Morton's toes

    Ted Kazcynski went to the U of Michigan, not the U of Wisconsin. He resurrected his career there, he had struggled at Harvard to some extent, he thought Michigan was pretty easy by comparison.

  167. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Jay Leno might take issue.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kzW_ERSgFRY


    My first car was a Renault wagon with FWD and R&P steering. She was perfect for tooling around curvy upstate New York, but her assets were wasted in Michigan and Ohio. Handling, not speed. I got spare parts in Canada.

    A nearby mechanic has a 1950s Simca Aronde wasting away on his lot. I should ask what's wrong with it, and what he wants for it. If nothing else, I could paint it bleu-blanc-rouge and employ it as yard art.

    http://www.eurooldtimers.com/temp/stroj_big_tmb_32242.jpg


    A Tatra done up in the Slovak flag would be even better.


    https://assets.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/08/HMN0918-CIP-01.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J1234, @Jack D

    Many old Simcas had a French made copy of the Ford V-8/60 engine and died an early death because midget racers bought them for the engine blocks. Parts support was terrible for any part that didn’t fit some other car. Chrysler dealers sold them, but intensely disliked them and did not provide good service for them. They were actually not a terrible car. Most French cars other than Renaults had good workmanship and engineering: Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.

    Peugeots were and remain popular in Africa and parts of South America where older models are still built. The 504 was actually a pretty good car, except for the terrible parts availability and service. Melroe Bobcat skid steer loaders used Peugeot diesel engines so you could at least get some engine parts through construction equipment dealers. Otherwise, you had best know someone who could correspond in French with a dealer in France or Quebec who would ship parts. There were a few who would but you had to communicate in French. The Peugeot had some unusual features such as the rear end which used a bronze worm and wheel gear and took a specific Esso vegetable based lubricant.
    But when reasonably maintained it would go a long time , usually until it badly rusted. The diesel engine had value for core because again, they were used in Bobcats.

    Citroens were the objects of cult veneration in the US. A larger than average number of these people were gay males. They were, all joking aside, especially attracted to the SM. I’d say a third of the US Citroen car club were likely gay. Rolls Royce also used the Citroen hydraulic system in their seventies models, but they made a mess of it since they also retained their transmission driven servo power braking and the standard power steering so you had three hydraulic systems in one car, all using different and incompatible hydraulic fluids. They were an absolute nightmare to work on by 70s standards but seem almost normal now.

    My inside experience, or at least knowledge of it was from someone who was an engineer for a lawn equipment manufacturer which had decided that the Citroen 2CV horizontal twin would be excellent for their new tractor, which filled a niche between a Sears, Roebuck garden tractor (or their superior version of same, built around the core of their two wheel pull-tractor and Onan or Kohler flathead small engines) and a Ford N size small farm tractor. (In other words, a Farmall Cub-not a Cub Cadet, but the four cylinder Cub. IH quit making them, but there was a demand.) And indeed it was excellent. It was a compact air cooled engine, ran smooth, well made, had much better sfc than a flathead Kohler or Onan.

    So they approached Citroen to buy the engine. Citroen for whatever reason had no intention of actually selling them engines, but instead of saying no, jacked them around, with excuses that at first seemed to make sense but became increasingly suspicious. They went to France and bought a couple of engines for production prototypes as rebuilt service units from local dealers, and made no attempt to hide who they were. Citroen got wind of it and the dealers were notified that under no circumstances were they to sell anything to these people and if they did they would be punished. After managing to really back the Citroen people into a corner, they finally told them they were not going to sell them anything, did not want to deal with them, and had no intention of doing so from the start. And were not sorry in the least for having wasted their time. They wound up using a small Continental cast iron flathead four that was heavy and not that reliable and cost too much.

    The Citroen hydraulic integrated braking, steering and suspension hydraulics were actually very good. If you kept the fluid fresh and clean (particularly important in the early vegetable fluid based cars) it was long lasting and trouble free. After about ten or fifteen years, if you kept the car that long, you changed out everything in one fell swoop, which was expensive, but were good for another decade or two. Problems included the fact that Citroen ignored each and every convention in hydraulic engineering practice that they could, the filter was not very good, there was no fitting for a hydraulic mule for test, and that the rear brakes on the D tended to rust out because they never got hot: the front brakes supplied all the braking as well as all the traction. A few owners actually just plugged the lines or pinched them off and took the pads out, but you couldn’t do that in a state with vehicle inspections.

    The four cylinder D engine was reliable but very heavy and underpowered. In the UK there were tuners who poked and stroked it and fitted SU or Weber carbs but none of that stuff made it here. VDO also made a fine gauge panel for the dash that gave you a Ferrari-like panel with all the proper VDO gauges, again, those never made it over here. An engine swap was complicated by the wrong way rotation of the engine, because the flywheel end was mounted forward, and they wanted the engine to be able to crank in the normal direction-with the hand crank furnished with each car! You could build a reverse rotation Chevy II four, but it was just as heavy and no one ever did it. Today you could use a Honda engine, since many of them are reverse rotation.

    The SM had a Maserati built 90 degree DOHC V6 that was a masterpiece on paper and an abortion in actual service. It was very compact, and had a tendency to self destruct, and of course there were no spare engines-you junked the car or spent a fortune having an aluminum welder who usually welded Top Fuel Hemi and Indy DFX Cosworth parts patch it up. No other engine fit very well-the Mazda rotary would have fit but there was no way to make one run the other way. Some thought was given to turning it around the other way but it would have taken custom front and rear housings and an eccentric shaft, I think Racing Beat quoted a quarter million up front to get it done. If there were a lot more SMs in the US it would have made sense, but by then the French had started buying the survivors back. Most which weren’t scrapped are now back in Europe. (And then there was the one Burt Reynolds drove off the dock in The Longest Yard.)

    The Citroen was not the only car with hydraulic active suspension. Rolls Royce used Citroen parts but as a supplementary system-the Rolls weighed three times what a Citroen did. Mercedes built one of their high end sedans with hydraulic spheres on the rear -was this a 6.3 or 6.9 V8 version of the 450SEL? I don’t remember. And the Brits had the BMC Hydralastic/ Hydragas system, best remembered in the US from the “MG Liquid Suspension Special” Indy car of the early 60s. The British system was simpler but not as reliable, because the unions had become pirahnalike at that point in British manufacturing. It went into smaller cars, and saloons rather than sports cars, few of which were sold here and fewer still which survived. I think there are only two places in the US that still have the special mule/fixture (more of an embalming machine than a hydraulic mule) needed to pressurize the system. I was told both had to build a motor/generator to supply 50 hertz power to run them. But the Cit system was the best.

    Why didn’t others just copy the Citroen system? “Not Invented Here”, I guess. There were patents, but they ran out in the seventies. Various American and other cars used air bag suspensions, but they are shitty in comparison to the Citroen air/oil system. Steezers use hydraulics in their lowriders, but it’s 90 IQ engineering-a series stack of car batteries overdriving a surplus aircraft electric hydraulic pump (or a reverse engineered copy of same) driving ag equipment hydraulic rams. The 1-800-HOTROD set uses air aftermarket systems that also have all the faults of the OEM systems, but they don’t care.

    • Replies: @J1234
    @Anonymous

    Very informative post. Thanks for the education. I don't know as much as I should about European cars.


    Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.
     
    My wife and I were in Europe about twenty years ago and met a young French couple at an automobile museum. The young man was excited to tell us about the 2CV he was restoring, and showed us pictures. I mentioned the Renault company in passing, but he just shook his head in disgust...in true French fashion.

    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn't handle the car's size and speed.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Your Citroen engine story is very characteristic of dealing with the French. The Russians are similar in this regard. Often they have very good products (although perhaps not as good as they think - as far as they are concerned they are perfection and they are certainly not interested in hearing your ideas on how they could better because they are geniuses and you are an idiot who understands nothing). They seem to regard customers as inconveniences and they do their best to get you to go away. Should you succeed in buying one, then you should certainly not expect them to communicate with you in a barbaric foreign language nor to receive any spare parts.

    This lead to a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy - export sales to America were not profitable so we should not invest any time or effort into making them. They were not profitable because they were not selling enough volume and they were not selling enough volume because you could only buy one if you showed the greatest determination in getting past the obstacles.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  168. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @captflee
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Lightness is a relative thing, I suppose. A Miata is easily double the weight of a FF car. Lop a thousand pounds off the Mazda and I suspect the results will be just a bit different.

    In the earlier days of F1 motor racing Enzo Ferrari typified the horsepower dominant school of thought, as opposed to Colin Chapman's lower weight theory (taking into consideration that there are always limitations on just how much one can do and still stay within the confines of the technical regulations). During the years 1958-94, when both teams were active, Team Lotus took home 7 Constructor's Championships,and Scuderia Ferrari won 8, so there would seem to be merit in both schools of thought, though I suspect that Lotus spent considerably less doing so.

    Having both oodles of power and relative lightness, such as the Porsche 917-30 Can Am car back in '73 (basically 1 hp/lb. in qualifying setup), would seem the very height of felicity. 0 to 100 to 0 mph in less than seven seconds.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Ferrari’s engines in Colin Chapman’s chassis would have been unbeatable, but that wasn’t the done thing.

    My favorite Lotus is of course the 56/56B, with P&W PT-6 power and four wheel drive, had they got it sorted and had the sanctioning bodies not turned a gimlet eye towards turbines (they weren’t as much antiturbine as anti-aeroderivative-turbine, they sort of rightly figured that it would turn into a junk formula with the use of unairworthy runout surplus engines, which indeed Granatelli’s engine stocks actually were: a purpose built automotive racing turbine would been been fine as it would have supported an infrastructure like Cosworth or Meyer-Drake!).

  169. @moshe
    This only has 110 views but it seems kinna relevant.

    https://youtu.be/d4JUbvzM3sQ

    You - literally - saw it here first!

    Replies: @Coemgen

    Zuckerberg is religious now?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Coemgen

    The moment that Zuckerberg switched his religious identification on Facebook from "Atheist" to "Jewish" was the moment I knew he had higher political ambitions.

  170. @Desiderius
    @eah

    Jeez, ZH, smoove move there, ex lax. What were they thinking?

    Of a piece with their investing advice.

    Replies: @eah

    You should instead question Broderick’s role in getting ZH suspended, i.e. whether he was directly involved, indeed whether that was the/an aim of his “journalism” — while I have mixed feelings about ZH, describing it as “Pro-Trump” is absurd, and shows Broderick himself has an agenda: don’t take my word for it, review his “work” at BuzzFeed, as well as his Twitter timeline.

    Oh and BTW, was the Chinese scientist involved in altering (“weaponizing”) this coronavirus? — is Broderick interested in the answer to that question, i.e. whether it’s true or not? — is BuzzFeed? — many people are rightly interested in this rather important question, and many more should be.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @eah

    Buzzfeed is trash and always has been. They should have all been gone long ago if Jack wants to play censor.

    ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist. That has nothing to do with BF. It was just stupid.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  171. @J.Ross
    @Art Deco

    Whose responsibility is it to discuss Seth Rich and then say under oath that they did not discuss Seth Rich?
    Would that be the same DC Police who flat out said that they would not investigate James Alefantis?
    But your question is wierd anyway. The FBI is not suspected of having investigated Seth Rich ("I squashed this one with [pleasure?].") and I'm not really sure what the DC Police are supposed to have done.
    >there's a dead body
    >whoever made it dead isn't here any more
    >let's collect evidence, see that the body is taken to the morgue, and then eat pastries
    That's pretty much what they're supposed to do, at that point they will have earned the pastries.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    When you’re ready to say something coherent, get back to me.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Art Deco

    Okay boomer, don't let the Russian hackers gulag you next time you walk near your bed.

  172. @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    There are anomalies in the investigation, or lack thereof, as well as the hospital records. I don’t expect there to be enough in the public domain to say much more than that, but I also wouldn’t be surprised we’re there more to the story.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I agree with you it is an odd case, but that’s because of the circumstances, not anything law enforcement have said.

    No one has presented any evidence that Rich was mixed up in organized crime, the drug trade, espionage, political terrorism, smuggling, general tax evasion, money laundering, or trading in child pornography. Those are the usual hooks for federal involvement. The FBI isn’t ordinarily a consultant in investigating common crimes; they have a forensics laboratory, but I think most of the time it does odd work outside the skill set of state police laboratories (though I suppose maybe it’s the default for DC as there is no state lab there).

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Art Deco

    Here's how Seymour Hersh explained the FBI's involvement:


    When you have a death like that DC cops, if you’re dead, you don’t just generally go yep I know (unintelligible) you have to get in to the kids apartment and see what you can find. If he’s dead you don’t need a warrant but most cops get a warrant because they don’t know if they’ve guys has, has a, a roommate. You need a warrant. So they get a warrant. I’m just telling you, there is such a thing.

    They go in the house and they can’t do much with this computer. It’s (unintelligible) the cops don’t know much about it. So the DC cops they have a cyber unit in DC and they’re more sophisticated.

    They come and look at it. The idea is maybe he’s a series of exchanges with somebody who says I’m going to kill you motherfucker over a girl or… and they can’t get in. The cyber guys do a little better but they can’t make sense of it so they call the, they call the FBI cyber unit, the DC unit.

    The Washington field office is a hot shit unit. The guy running the Washington field office he’s like, he’s like, you know, he’s like a three star at an army base he’s already looking for four, you know what I mean? He’s gonna go in a top job. There’s a cyber unit there that’s excellent, given.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Desiderius
    @Art Deco


    not anything law enforcement have said
     
    Of course. The odd thing is what they haven't.

    The dog that didn't bark.

  173. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

    “Could you please remove your flags!,” commands the EU thug with an EU flag painted permanently on the wall behind her, as she cuts off an EU rep making a damn farewell speech.

    It’s ironic that a continent with so much to thank Britain for hates Britain so very much. It’s like the college kid who hates his parents while demanding his tuition money for the semester. And the EU is putting Britain to the rack on behalf of its ever faithful friend, Germany. The next time Britain has to save Europe from Germany it should insist on holding onto a little territory as a thank you. I would suggest some wine country in France, some ski slopes in Austria, and maybe a few hundred miles of coastline on the Mediterranean. Of course the next time Germany marches on the rest of Europe it will have to do so with a Muslim Wehrmacht, as none of the white people in Germany (or the rest of Europe) are bothering to have children.

    I was relieved that Farrage distinguished his contempt for the undemocratic EU from his love for the actual people of Europe, and that he reminded everyone of the way in which the EU deliberately undermines democratic representation by forcing countries to vote again when they vote the “wrong way,” or simply ignores the vote completely. He might also have reminded everyone that Cameron went to the EU and asked it to make reforms to its practices *before* the UK held the Brexit referendum, and the EU flatly refused.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Wilkey

    Well, keeping in mind the humorous connotations in this setting, "Hun" was a reference to Soros' Hungarian (which itself has been something of a misnomer for a mere thousand years) ancestry and ambitions. He's as much our Scourge of God as Attila was Rome's. And of course the EU these days is little more than an undead HRE slavering for the next million brains to devour.

    The Krauts do have a legit beef with the Brits though for sticking their nose in the European Civil War after keeping it out of ours, much to the surprise and chagrin of the Confederacy which had counted on securing their support much as their forefathers had done with the French. Palmerston was in fact game but I forget why it didn't happen. Of course it did on the continent much to the chagrin of all involved and many not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

  174. @Dan Smith
    If Mr. Soros is a philanthropist, I’m the starting quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    “Dan Smith. BYU.”

    Ha ha!

  175. @Morton's toes
    @J.Ross


    Mr Manson is a guitarist.
    Mr Kaczynski is a math whiz.
     
    If you read Nikolas Schreck's biography, Manson did have decent chops as a musician although his guitar playing was not up to the Wrecking Crew level.

    If you read Alston Chase's biography, Kazcynski's PhD thesis at U. Wisconsin was applauded as the latest greatest thing by Mathematicians across the world. He didn't get that tenure track slot at UC with his networking and interviewing skills.

    So you are kind of mixing apples and oranges a little.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Morton's toes

    Yes I meant UM not UW I always get those two mixed up.

  176. @Art Deco
    @Desiderius

    I agree with you it is an odd case, but that's because of the circumstances, not anything law enforcement have said.

    No one has presented any evidence that Rich was mixed up in organized crime, the drug trade, espionage, political terrorism, smuggling, general tax evasion, money laundering, or trading in child pornography. Those are the usual hooks for federal involvement. The FBI isn't ordinarily a consultant in investigating common crimes; they have a forensics laboratory, but I think most of the time it does odd work outside the skill set of state police laboratories (though I suppose maybe it's the default for DC as there is no state lab there).

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Desiderius

    Here’s how Seymour Hersh explained the FBI’s involvement:

    When you have a death like that DC cops, if you’re dead, you don’t just generally go yep I know (unintelligible) you have to get in to the kids apartment and see what you can find. If he’s dead you don’t need a warrant but most cops get a warrant because they don’t know if they’ve guys has, has a, a roommate. You need a warrant. So they get a warrant. I’m just telling you, there is such a thing.

    They go in the house and they can’t do much with this computer. It’s (unintelligible) the cops don’t know much about it. So the DC cops they have a cyber unit in DC and they’re more sophisticated.

    They come and look at it. The idea is maybe he’s a series of exchanges with somebody who says I’m going to kill you motherfucker over a girl or… and they can’t get in. The cyber guys do a little better but they can’t make sense of it so they call the, they call the FBI cyber unit, the DC unit.

    The Washington field office is a hot shit unit. The guy running the Washington field office he’s like, he’s like, you know, he’s like a three star at an army base he’s already looking for four, you know what I mean? He’s gonna go in a top job. There’s a cyber unit there that’s excellent, given.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    Hersh did some good work regarding Vietnam early in his career but lately he seems to have gone off the deep end. Nevertheless, he denies that he has any information from the FBI linking Rich to Wikileaks.

    Honestly, there are 350,000 black people who live in Washington, DC and their presence is a sufficient explanation for Rich's murder - you really don't need to go looking for more complex conspiracies. Nothing good ever happens when you are out on the street at 4AM as Rich was.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

  177. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Jay Leno might take issue.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kzW_ERSgFRY


    My first car was a Renault wagon with FWD and R&P steering. She was perfect for tooling around curvy upstate New York, but her assets were wasted in Michigan and Ohio. Handling, not speed. I got spare parts in Canada.

    A nearby mechanic has a 1950s Simca Aronde wasting away on his lot. I should ask what's wrong with it, and what he wants for it. If nothing else, I could paint it bleu-blanc-rouge and employ it as yard art.

    http://www.eurooldtimers.com/temp/stroj_big_tmb_32242.jpg


    A Tatra done up in the Slovak flag would be even better.


    https://assets.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/08/HMN0918-CIP-01.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J1234, @Jack D

    Cool pics. Thanks.

    There’s a ’59 Renault Dauphine on eBay right now for about $6700. It looks pretty solid and apparently runs good. I have no idea if that’s a good price, but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @J1234


    but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.
     
    There's a reason for that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  178. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Many old Simcas had a French made copy of the Ford V-8/60 engine and died an early death because midget racers bought them for the engine blocks. Parts support was terrible for any part that didn't fit some other car. Chrysler dealers sold them, but intensely disliked them and did not provide good service for them. They were actually not a terrible car. Most French cars other than Renaults had good workmanship and engineering: Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.

    Peugeots were and remain popular in Africa and parts of South America where older models are still built. The 504 was actually a pretty good car, except for the terrible parts availability and service. Melroe Bobcat skid steer loaders used Peugeot diesel engines so you could at least get some engine parts through construction equipment dealers. Otherwise, you had best know someone who could correspond in French with a dealer in France or Quebec who would ship parts. There were a few who would but you had to communicate in French. The Peugeot had some unusual features such as the rear end which used a bronze worm and wheel gear and took a specific Esso vegetable based lubricant.
    But when reasonably maintained it would go a long time , usually until it badly rusted. The diesel engine had value for core because again, they were used in Bobcats.

    Citroens were the objects of cult veneration in the US. A larger than average number of these people were gay males. They were, all joking aside, especially attracted to the SM. I'd say a third of the US Citroen car club were likely gay. Rolls Royce also used the Citroen hydraulic system in their seventies models, but they made a mess of it since they also retained their transmission driven servo power braking and the standard power steering so you had three hydraulic systems in one car, all using different and incompatible hydraulic fluids. They were an absolute nightmare to work on by 70s standards but seem almost normal now.

    My inside experience, or at least knowledge of it was from someone who was an engineer for a lawn equipment manufacturer which had decided that the Citroen 2CV horizontal twin would be excellent for their new tractor, which filled a niche between a Sears, Roebuck garden tractor (or their superior version of same, built around the core of their two wheel pull-tractor and Onan or Kohler flathead small engines) and a Ford N size small farm tractor. (In other words, a Farmall Cub-not a Cub Cadet, but the four cylinder Cub. IH quit making them, but there was a demand.) And indeed it was excellent. It was a compact air cooled engine, ran smooth, well made, had much better sfc than a flathead Kohler or Onan.

    So they approached Citroen to buy the engine. Citroen for whatever reason had no intention of actually selling them engines, but instead of saying no, jacked them around, with excuses that at first seemed to make sense but became increasingly suspicious. They went to France and bought a couple of engines for production prototypes as rebuilt service units from local dealers, and made no attempt to hide who they were. Citroen got wind of it and the dealers were notified that under no circumstances were they to sell anything to these people and if they did they would be punished. After managing to really back the Citroen people into a corner, they finally told them they were not going to sell them anything, did not want to deal with them, and had no intention of doing so from the start. And were not sorry in the least for having wasted their time. They wound up using a small Continental cast iron flathead four that was heavy and not that reliable and cost too much.

    The Citroen hydraulic integrated braking, steering and suspension hydraulics were actually very good. If you kept the fluid fresh and clean (particularly important in the early vegetable fluid based cars) it was long lasting and trouble free. After about ten or fifteen years, if you kept the car that long, you changed out everything in one fell swoop, which was expensive, but were good for another decade or two. Problems included the fact that Citroen ignored each and every convention in hydraulic engineering practice that they could, the filter was not very good, there was no fitting for a hydraulic mule for test, and that the rear brakes on the D tended to rust out because they never got hot: the front brakes supplied all the braking as well as all the traction. A few owners actually just plugged the lines or pinched them off and took the pads out, but you couldn't do that in a state with vehicle inspections.

    The four cylinder D engine was reliable but very heavy and underpowered. In the UK there were tuners who poked and stroked it and fitted SU or Weber carbs but none of that stuff made it here. VDO also made a fine gauge panel for the dash that gave you a Ferrari-like panel with all the proper VDO gauges, again, those never made it over here. An engine swap was complicated by the wrong way rotation of the engine, because the flywheel end was mounted forward, and they wanted the engine to be able to crank in the normal direction-with the hand crank furnished with each car! You could build a reverse rotation Chevy II four, but it was just as heavy and no one ever did it. Today you could use a Honda engine, since many of them are reverse rotation.

    The SM had a Maserati built 90 degree DOHC V6 that was a masterpiece on paper and an abortion in actual service. It was very compact, and had a tendency to self destruct, and of course there were no spare engines-you junked the car or spent a fortune having an aluminum welder who usually welded Top Fuel Hemi and Indy DFX Cosworth parts patch it up. No other engine fit very well-the Mazda rotary would have fit but there was no way to make one run the other way. Some thought was given to turning it around the other way but it would have taken custom front and rear housings and an eccentric shaft, I think Racing Beat quoted a quarter million up front to get it done. If there were a lot more SMs in the US it would have made sense, but by then the French had started buying the survivors back. Most which weren't scrapped are now back in Europe. (And then there was the one Burt Reynolds drove off the dock in The Longest Yard.)

    The Citroen was not the only car with hydraulic active suspension. Rolls Royce used Citroen parts but as a supplementary system-the Rolls weighed three times what a Citroen did. Mercedes built one of their high end sedans with hydraulic spheres on the rear -was this a 6.3 or 6.9 V8 version of the 450SEL? I don't remember. And the Brits had the BMC Hydralastic/ Hydragas system, best remembered in the US from the "MG Liquid Suspension Special" Indy car of the early 60s. The British system was simpler but not as reliable, because the unions had become pirahnalike at that point in British manufacturing. It went into smaller cars, and saloons rather than sports cars, few of which were sold here and fewer still which survived. I think there are only two places in the US that still have the special mule/fixture (more of an embalming machine than a hydraulic mule) needed to pressurize the system. I was told both had to build a motor/generator to supply 50 hertz power to run them. But the Cit system was the best.

    Why didn't others just copy the Citroen system? "Not Invented Here", I guess. There were patents, but they ran out in the seventies. Various American and other cars used air bag suspensions, but they are shitty in comparison to the Citroen air/oil system. Steezers use hydraulics in their lowriders, but it's 90 IQ engineering-a series stack of car batteries overdriving a surplus aircraft electric hydraulic pump (or a reverse engineered copy of same) driving ag equipment hydraulic rams. The 1-800-HOTROD set uses air aftermarket systems that also have all the faults of the OEM systems, but they don't care.

    Replies: @J1234, @Jack D

    Very informative post. Thanks for the education. I don’t know as much as I should about European cars.

    Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.

    My wife and I were in Europe about twenty years ago and met a young French couple at an automobile museum. The young man was excited to tell us about the 2CV he was restoring, and showed us pictures. I mentioned the Renault company in passing, but he just shook his head in disgust…in true French fashion.

    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn’t handle the car’s size and speed.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @J1234


    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn’t handle the car’s size and speed.
     
    That's true of most large cars of the era, but they are upgradeable today, and have been for decades.

    The really desirable 2CV variant is the one with two complete engines and transaxles, one in front and one in back. But they are all basically a great toy for tooling around in in a small town, but a deathtrap on the turnpike, particularly in Kansas with its intermittent gusting crosswinds.

    I think Billy Joel had a wreck in one a while ago in the Hamptons, or maybe the Jersey Shore, somewhere upscale out east.

    With the 25 year rule it is easy to bring them in the US now, but if you live in Hitlerfornia you want one titled as pre-67 but with the latest mechanicals backfitted. There are importers that do this. All the SMs have went back to France and we get a (relative) lot of 2CVs and the occasional D series or a CX.

    Replies: @captflee

    , @captflee
    @J1234

    Greg Gutfeld of "The Five" owned, perhaps still owns a Facel Vega.

    I've always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a "resto-mod" version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine. At 400BHP, oodles of torque, and 3700 lbs, performance is brisk. For the bespoke automotive equivalent of a Savile Row suit, the price is not terrible. Alas, LHD versions are rare, although piloting a RHD car in a LHD area certainly introduces a piquancy to one's travels, possibly even precluding use of the holy sail fawn.

    Replies: @J1234, @Anonymous

  179. @Art Deco
    @Desiderius

    I agree with you it is an odd case, but that's because of the circumstances, not anything law enforcement have said.

    No one has presented any evidence that Rich was mixed up in organized crime, the drug trade, espionage, political terrorism, smuggling, general tax evasion, money laundering, or trading in child pornography. Those are the usual hooks for federal involvement. The FBI isn't ordinarily a consultant in investigating common crimes; they have a forensics laboratory, but I think most of the time it does odd work outside the skill set of state police laboratories (though I suppose maybe it's the default for DC as there is no state lab there).

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Desiderius

    not anything law enforcement have said

    Of course. The odd thing is what they haven’t.

    The dog that didn’t bark.

  180. @Wilkey
    @Desiderius

    “Could you please remove your flags!,” commands the EU thug with an EU flag painted permanently on the wall behind her, as she cuts off an EU rep making a damn farewell speech.

    It’s ironic that a continent with so much to thank Britain for hates Britain so very much. It’s like the college kid who hates his parents while demanding his tuition money for the semester. And the EU is putting Britain to the rack on behalf of its ever faithful friend, Germany. The next time Britain has to save Europe from Germany it should insist on holding onto a little territory as a thank you. I would suggest some wine country in France, some ski slopes in Austria, and maybe a few hundred miles of coastline on the Mediterranean. Of course the next time Germany marches on the rest of Europe it will have to do so with a Muslim Wehrmacht, as none of the white people in Germany (or the rest of Europe) are bothering to have children.

    I was relieved that Farrage distinguished his contempt for the undemocratic EU from his love for the actual people of Europe, and that he reminded everyone of the way in which the EU deliberately undermines democratic representation by forcing countries to vote again when they vote the “wrong way,” or simply ignores the vote completely. He might also have reminded everyone that Cameron went to the EU and asked it to make reforms to its practices *before* the UK held the Brexit referendum, and the EU flatly refused.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Well, keeping in mind the humorous connotations in this setting, “Hun” was a reference to Soros’ Hungarian (which itself has been something of a misnomer for a mere thousand years) ancestry and ambitions. He’s as much our Scourge of God as Attila was Rome’s. And of course the EU these days is little more than an undead HRE slavering for the next million brains to devour.

    The Krauts do have a legit beef with the Brits though for sticking their nose in the European Civil War after keeping it out of ours, much to the surprise and chagrin of the Confederacy which had counted on securing their support much as their forefathers had done with the French. Palmerston was in fact game but I forget why it didn’t happen. Of course it did on the continent much to the chagrin of all involved and many not.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Desiderius

    One reason was another civil war raging elsewhere: the Taiping Rebellion. The British were moving toward supporting the Qing dynasty, and the pro-Qing forces in the Foreign Office couldn't legally justify that while simultaneously supporting the Confederates. Had the British ended up supporting the Taipings instead, it might have been a different story, given the strength of pro-Confederate sentiment in the British aristocracy in the early years of the Civil War. It would have been an extremely risky gambit to intervene, but elites have done stupider things, and the Royal Navy would have been a game-changer.

    The two single biggest markets in the world for the British Empire at the time were the USA and China. You could imagine how it scared the crap out of the Brits to have the cotton producing parts of the US secede at the same time that the Taipings already controlled the rich parts of China that produced all the tea and silk. There were real worries about an economic collapse around 1861-2 if one of the civil wars didn't end ASAP. Fortunately for London, both would.

    , @Anonymous
    @Desiderius

    There is no such thing as 'Europe'. There are 50 countries that all hate each other.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  181. @Rob
    @JimDandy

    “Witness Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Has No Balls and Appears to Have Vagina”

    The summary of her testimony in that article made it seem so undamning that, we’re i prone to conspiracy theories, and if Weinstein actually had any history of conspiracy, I would say that she was paid to give poor testimony to impugn the others’ by association. Bonus points for Weinstein if the defense offers a picture of his genitals into evidence. Double bonus points if that picture leaks and the internet determines it has been altered in any way.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Similar thoughts ran through my head.

  182. @J1234
    @Reg Cæsar

    Cool pics. Thanks.

    There's a '59 Renault Dauphine on eBay right now for about $6700. It looks pretty solid and apparently runs good. I have no idea if that's a good price, but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.

    Replies: @Jack D

    but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.

    There’s a reason for that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D



    but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.
     
    There’s a reason for that.
     
    I almost bought a '68 Dauphine in the mid-'70s right after passing driver's ed, for $250. But the father of the guy selling it called to advise him, "Don't sell it to anyone you know." Quite the vote of confidence.

    By coincidence, my first car turned out to be another Renault, a 12 wagon, six years later. These were the firm's trough years in the US market, before the LeCar; the vehicles were made in Canada, but not here.
  183. @James N. Kennett

    By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a philanthropist.
     
    A philanthropist!

    By George Soros
    Mr. Soros is a professional gambler and a misanthrope.
     
    There. Fixed it.

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    Didn’t Soros some time in the past spend a bunch of his own money to set up new universities in Eastern European countries after the Iron Curtain came down? I would guess that he had a lot of say as regards the ideological orientation of those universities – I would guess further that they were “progressive” i.e. anti-nationalist, and one-worldish but I’m just guessing. Those expenditures seem to be to fall into the category of philanthropy, i.e. spending your own money not on yourself but on other things.

    These days, Soros seem to be spending money to promote one-worldism, unfettered immigration, which seem philanthropic according to the meaning of the word, however uncongenial such initiatives seem to me and others in comments here.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anonymouse


    Those expenditures seem to be to fall into the category of philanthropy, i.e. spending your own money not on yourself but on other things.
     
    That's not what philanthropy is. Philanthropy involves promoting the welfare of the human race. Starting left-wing universities does just the opposite.
  184. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Jay Leno might take issue.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kzW_ERSgFRY


    My first car was a Renault wagon with FWD and R&P steering. She was perfect for tooling around curvy upstate New York, but her assets were wasted in Michigan and Ohio. Handling, not speed. I got spare parts in Canada.

    A nearby mechanic has a 1950s Simca Aronde wasting away on his lot. I should ask what's wrong with it, and what he wants for it. If nothing else, I could paint it bleu-blanc-rouge and employ it as yard art.

    http://www.eurooldtimers.com/temp/stroj_big_tmb_32242.jpg


    A Tatra done up in the Slovak flag would be even better.


    https://assets.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/08/HMN0918-CIP-01.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @J1234, @Jack D

    The DS was an amazing car in many respects but the engine wasn’t one of them. The French system of taxing vehicles according to “tax horsepower” (actually the formula was more related to displacement) basically destroyed their luxury car industry by making it cost prohibitive to register a car with a decent sized engine. And before the era of fuel injection and turbocharging, the only way you could make decent power was thru displacement so French cars had neither.

    The original plan was to use an air cooled boxer six derived from the 2 cylinder engine of the 2CV (“Deux Chevaux”) but they ran out of money so they used a 4 cylinder of ancient design. This started out at 60 hp but over the years they managed to get it up to a still not very impressive 140 hp by the very end (although in a 2,800 lb. curb weight car made possible by a total lack of crash safety this was not bad ).

    As Anonymous mentions, for the successor SM model they used Maserati engines which had more performance but were a reliability nightmare.

  185. @eah
    @Desiderius

    You should instead question Broderick's role in getting ZH suspended, i.e. whether he was directly involved, indeed whether that was the/an aim of his "journalism" -- while I have mixed feelings about ZH, describing it as "Pro-Trump" is absurd, and shows Broderick himself has an agenda: don't take my word for it, review his "work" at BuzzFeed, as well as his Twitter timeline.

    Oh and BTW, was the Chinese scientist involved in altering ("weaponizing") this coronavirus? -- is Broderick interested in the answer to that question, i.e. whether it's true or not? -- is BuzzFeed? -- many people are rightly interested in this rather important question, and many more should be.

    https://twitter.com/broderick/status/682623594497703936

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Buzzfeed is trash and always has been. They should have all been gone long ago if Jack wants to play censor.

    ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist. That has nothing to do with BF. It was just stupid.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Desiderius


    ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist. That has nothing to do with BF. It was just stupid.
     
    Agreed.
  186. the big shots — e.g., Trump, Hillary, Bezos, etc etc — all seem to believe in conspiracy theories about other big shots. For example, in the New York Times opinion section, George Soros presents his personal conspiracy theory: the Mark Zuckerberg-Donald Trump Conspiracy

    The real question is:

    Is Soros promoting a so-called “anti-semitic canard” by claiming that jewish oligarchs like Zuckerberg are secretly manipulating the results of “democratic” elections, using goy politicians as a public face for what is really jewish power?

    Or is Zuckerberg being “anti-semitic,” toward Gyorgy Schwartz by rejecting his claim? Maybe Zuck is even a “self-hating jew?”

    Enquiring minds want to know.

    On a more serious note, while it is likely that “big shots” (not unrealistically) fear coalitions of other “big shots” getting together to outmaneuver them in jockeying for power and shekels, it’s probably premature to assume that, simply because Schwartz said something, he must therefore believe it. It’s more likely that the objective truth of his claim is irrelevant to him — that he simply finds it useful in a more instrumental sense.

    He’s probably trying to:

    1. Shore up the crumbling remnants of the once-popular — and now long-debunked — “Russia conspiracy theory” explanation of Hillary’s loss

    2. Promote the popular semitic trope that Trump, despite being the clear the choice of the American people, is somehow an “illegitimate” president… because he wasn’t backed by the “right” plutocrats.

    3. Point out to Zuckerberg that Facebook’s editorial policy is not yet anti-White “enough,” and that even more draconian levels of censorship are necessary to ensure that Faceberg promotes the “correct” narrative. When Zuck responds by cracking down even further on political dissidents, this action can then be portrayed as a response to “grass roots” pressure to eliminate so-called “hate speech”.

    It’s probably just a coincidence that Elizabeth Warren recently made a similar demand for laws criminalizing o̶p̶p̶o̶s̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶v̶i̶e̶w̶s̶ “disinformation”

  187. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Many old Simcas had a French made copy of the Ford V-8/60 engine and died an early death because midget racers bought them for the engine blocks. Parts support was terrible for any part that didn't fit some other car. Chrysler dealers sold them, but intensely disliked them and did not provide good service for them. They were actually not a terrible car. Most French cars other than Renaults had good workmanship and engineering: Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.

    Peugeots were and remain popular in Africa and parts of South America where older models are still built. The 504 was actually a pretty good car, except for the terrible parts availability and service. Melroe Bobcat skid steer loaders used Peugeot diesel engines so you could at least get some engine parts through construction equipment dealers. Otherwise, you had best know someone who could correspond in French with a dealer in France or Quebec who would ship parts. There were a few who would but you had to communicate in French. The Peugeot had some unusual features such as the rear end which used a bronze worm and wheel gear and took a specific Esso vegetable based lubricant.
    But when reasonably maintained it would go a long time , usually until it badly rusted. The diesel engine had value for core because again, they were used in Bobcats.

    Citroens were the objects of cult veneration in the US. A larger than average number of these people were gay males. They were, all joking aside, especially attracted to the SM. I'd say a third of the US Citroen car club were likely gay. Rolls Royce also used the Citroen hydraulic system in their seventies models, but they made a mess of it since they also retained their transmission driven servo power braking and the standard power steering so you had three hydraulic systems in one car, all using different and incompatible hydraulic fluids. They were an absolute nightmare to work on by 70s standards but seem almost normal now.

    My inside experience, or at least knowledge of it was from someone who was an engineer for a lawn equipment manufacturer which had decided that the Citroen 2CV horizontal twin would be excellent for their new tractor, which filled a niche between a Sears, Roebuck garden tractor (or their superior version of same, built around the core of their two wheel pull-tractor and Onan or Kohler flathead small engines) and a Ford N size small farm tractor. (In other words, a Farmall Cub-not a Cub Cadet, but the four cylinder Cub. IH quit making them, but there was a demand.) And indeed it was excellent. It was a compact air cooled engine, ran smooth, well made, had much better sfc than a flathead Kohler or Onan.

    So they approached Citroen to buy the engine. Citroen for whatever reason had no intention of actually selling them engines, but instead of saying no, jacked them around, with excuses that at first seemed to make sense but became increasingly suspicious. They went to France and bought a couple of engines for production prototypes as rebuilt service units from local dealers, and made no attempt to hide who they were. Citroen got wind of it and the dealers were notified that under no circumstances were they to sell anything to these people and if they did they would be punished. After managing to really back the Citroen people into a corner, they finally told them they were not going to sell them anything, did not want to deal with them, and had no intention of doing so from the start. And were not sorry in the least for having wasted their time. They wound up using a small Continental cast iron flathead four that was heavy and not that reliable and cost too much.

    The Citroen hydraulic integrated braking, steering and suspension hydraulics were actually very good. If you kept the fluid fresh and clean (particularly important in the early vegetable fluid based cars) it was long lasting and trouble free. After about ten or fifteen years, if you kept the car that long, you changed out everything in one fell swoop, which was expensive, but were good for another decade or two. Problems included the fact that Citroen ignored each and every convention in hydraulic engineering practice that they could, the filter was not very good, there was no fitting for a hydraulic mule for test, and that the rear brakes on the D tended to rust out because they never got hot: the front brakes supplied all the braking as well as all the traction. A few owners actually just plugged the lines or pinched them off and took the pads out, but you couldn't do that in a state with vehicle inspections.

    The four cylinder D engine was reliable but very heavy and underpowered. In the UK there were tuners who poked and stroked it and fitted SU or Weber carbs but none of that stuff made it here. VDO also made a fine gauge panel for the dash that gave you a Ferrari-like panel with all the proper VDO gauges, again, those never made it over here. An engine swap was complicated by the wrong way rotation of the engine, because the flywheel end was mounted forward, and they wanted the engine to be able to crank in the normal direction-with the hand crank furnished with each car! You could build a reverse rotation Chevy II four, but it was just as heavy and no one ever did it. Today you could use a Honda engine, since many of them are reverse rotation.

    The SM had a Maserati built 90 degree DOHC V6 that was a masterpiece on paper and an abortion in actual service. It was very compact, and had a tendency to self destruct, and of course there were no spare engines-you junked the car or spent a fortune having an aluminum welder who usually welded Top Fuel Hemi and Indy DFX Cosworth parts patch it up. No other engine fit very well-the Mazda rotary would have fit but there was no way to make one run the other way. Some thought was given to turning it around the other way but it would have taken custom front and rear housings and an eccentric shaft, I think Racing Beat quoted a quarter million up front to get it done. If there were a lot more SMs in the US it would have made sense, but by then the French had started buying the survivors back. Most which weren't scrapped are now back in Europe. (And then there was the one Burt Reynolds drove off the dock in The Longest Yard.)

    The Citroen was not the only car with hydraulic active suspension. Rolls Royce used Citroen parts but as a supplementary system-the Rolls weighed three times what a Citroen did. Mercedes built one of their high end sedans with hydraulic spheres on the rear -was this a 6.3 or 6.9 V8 version of the 450SEL? I don't remember. And the Brits had the BMC Hydralastic/ Hydragas system, best remembered in the US from the "MG Liquid Suspension Special" Indy car of the early 60s. The British system was simpler but not as reliable, because the unions had become pirahnalike at that point in British manufacturing. It went into smaller cars, and saloons rather than sports cars, few of which were sold here and fewer still which survived. I think there are only two places in the US that still have the special mule/fixture (more of an embalming machine than a hydraulic mule) needed to pressurize the system. I was told both had to build a motor/generator to supply 50 hertz power to run them. But the Cit system was the best.

    Why didn't others just copy the Citroen system? "Not Invented Here", I guess. There were patents, but they ran out in the seventies. Various American and other cars used air bag suspensions, but they are shitty in comparison to the Citroen air/oil system. Steezers use hydraulics in their lowriders, but it's 90 IQ engineering-a series stack of car batteries overdriving a surplus aircraft electric hydraulic pump (or a reverse engineered copy of same) driving ag equipment hydraulic rams. The 1-800-HOTROD set uses air aftermarket systems that also have all the faults of the OEM systems, but they don't care.

    Replies: @J1234, @Jack D

    Your Citroen engine story is very characteristic of dealing with the French. The Russians are similar in this regard. Often they have very good products (although perhaps not as good as they think – as far as they are concerned they are perfection and they are certainly not interested in hearing your ideas on how they could better because they are geniuses and you are an idiot who understands nothing). They seem to regard customers as inconveniences and they do their best to get you to go away. Should you succeed in buying one, then you should certainly not expect them to communicate with you in a barbaric foreign language nor to receive any spare parts.

    This lead to a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy – export sales to America were not profitable so we should not invest any time or effort into making them. They were not profitable because they were not selling enough volume and they were not selling enough volume because you could only buy one if you showed the greatest determination in getting past the obstacles.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Indeed, if they had paid attention to the Germans and how they did business they would have made a lot of money. At the end of the day they are not that interestd in money, as long as they are making "enough".

    That said Citroens were assembled in the UK at Slough and they were rather more successful in the British market.

    Both the French and the Russians would do well to forget about exporting cars and concentrate on much more profitable light aircraft, at which both are pretty decent at designing. We now have a couple of the radial engine Yak trainers here in our area and the owners love them, but they are certificated Experimental/Airshow or R&D and so can't be used for their real purpose, which is flight instruction. They're fuel sluts but will burn car gas (in fact they prefer it) and if landed gear up you jack it up, drop the gear, replace the birch propeller blades and are good to go again. You can't shock cool the engine because there are Venetian blinds around the cowling. They are docile enough to be a good instrument platform and yet fully aerobatic. If the Russians got them type certificated and set up distribution properly they could sell ten thousand of them in the US over a ten year period. FBOs could make money with thee things.

  188. ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist.

    Yeah, that was kind of a dumb move. It’s one thing to claim that Bill Gates planned the whole thing with his “Event 201” scenario:

    Johns Hopkins had to publicly disavow, claiming that the virus in their model was a totally different coronavirus, and that neither Bill Gates, Johns Hopkins, or The World Economic Forum has any plans to to kill 65 million people with a bioengineered coronavirus in the near future.

    1. That was actually pretty funny

    2. Bill Gates is fair game for that kind of stuff.

    And general speculation about a possible synthetic origin of the virus are reasonable — if less entertaining than the Bill Gates theory.

    But “We know it’s a Chinese bioweapon, and this guy did it!”

    – Post name and contact info of some Chinese virologist.

    The false certainty, plus putting it all on some Chinese scientist who’s not a public figure, plus doxxing him… plus the guy’s in Wuhan, so if by some chance their theory should turn out to be wrong, he’s already got enough to deal with.

    Pretty bad optics. On the other hand, this:

    That has nothing to do with BF.

    is incorrect, as least in terms of how ZH got shoahed from Twitter. The Buzzfeed narrative enforcer made the complaint that got ZH banned — it’s remarkable how much time and effort so-called “journalists” put into suppressing other sources of information.

    Also, those claims were all in an article on ZeroHedge’s website, not a tweet.
    Major social media platforms are clearly going by your overall “social credit score,” rather than your behavior on the platform itself, in determining who qualifies to be heard in the “modern public square.” Sounds like the Chinese scientist may have grounds for a libel suit, but the Twitter ban is just the usual enforcement of Twitter’s editorial position.

    And of course, anti-White accounts like Christian Michael Exoo [aka “AntiFashGordon”] are allowed to engage in doxxing. libel, and inciting violence full time on Twitter, with zero repercussions. But that’s just the usual double standard.

  189. @Art Deco
    @J.Ross

    When you're ready to say something coherent, get back to me.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Okay boomer, don’t let the Russian hackers gulag you next time you walk near your bed.

  190. @Desiderius
    @Wilkey

    Well, keeping in mind the humorous connotations in this setting, "Hun" was a reference to Soros' Hungarian (which itself has been something of a misnomer for a mere thousand years) ancestry and ambitions. He's as much our Scourge of God as Attila was Rome's. And of course the EU these days is little more than an undead HRE slavering for the next million brains to devour.

    The Krauts do have a legit beef with the Brits though for sticking their nose in the European Civil War after keeping it out of ours, much to the surprise and chagrin of the Confederacy which had counted on securing their support much as their forefathers had done with the French. Palmerston was in fact game but I forget why it didn't happen. Of course it did on the continent much to the chagrin of all involved and many not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

    One reason was another civil war raging elsewhere: the Taiping Rebellion. The British were moving toward supporting the Qing dynasty, and the pro-Qing forces in the Foreign Office couldn’t legally justify that while simultaneously supporting the Confederates. Had the British ended up supporting the Taipings instead, it might have been a different story, given the strength of pro-Confederate sentiment in the British aristocracy in the early years of the Civil War. It would have been an extremely risky gambit to intervene, but elites have done stupider things, and the Royal Navy would have been a game-changer.

    The two single biggest markets in the world for the British Empire at the time were the USA and China. You could imagine how it scared the crap out of the Brits to have the cotton producing parts of the US secede at the same time that the Taipings already controlled the rich parts of China that produced all the tea and silk. There were real worries about an economic collapse around 1861-2 if one of the civil wars didn’t end ASAP. Fortunately for London, both would.

  191. @Coemgen
    @moshe

    Zuckerberg is religious now?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    The moment that Zuckerberg switched his religious identification on Facebook from “Atheist” to “Jewish” was the moment I knew he had higher political ambitions.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  192. @ben tillman
    @Art Deco

    Here's how Seymour Hersh explained the FBI's involvement:


    When you have a death like that DC cops, if you’re dead, you don’t just generally go yep I know (unintelligible) you have to get in to the kids apartment and see what you can find. If he’s dead you don’t need a warrant but most cops get a warrant because they don’t know if they’ve guys has, has a, a roommate. You need a warrant. So they get a warrant. I’m just telling you, there is such a thing.

    They go in the house and they can’t do much with this computer. It’s (unintelligible) the cops don’t know much about it. So the DC cops they have a cyber unit in DC and they’re more sophisticated.

    They come and look at it. The idea is maybe he’s a series of exchanges with somebody who says I’m going to kill you motherfucker over a girl or… and they can’t get in. The cyber guys do a little better but they can’t make sense of it so they call the, they call the FBI cyber unit, the DC unit.

    The Washington field office is a hot shit unit. The guy running the Washington field office he’s like, he’s like, you know, he’s like a three star at an army base he’s already looking for four, you know what I mean? He’s gonna go in a top job. There’s a cyber unit there that’s excellent, given.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    Hersh did some good work regarding Vietnam early in his career but lately he seems to have gone off the deep end. Nevertheless, he denies that he has any information from the FBI linking Rich to Wikileaks.

    Honestly, there are 350,000 black people who live in Washington, DC and their presence is a sufficient explanation for Rich’s murder – you really don’t need to go looking for more complex conspiracies. Nothing good ever happens when you are out on the street at 4AM as Rich was.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Jack D

    Wasn't Seth Rich shot in the back while on a residential neighborhood's sidewalk? That is, he wasn't in some dark alley or empty lot far from the watchful eye of the many DC police/security forces.
    Doesn't DC have echolocation/triangulation to instantly identify the location of gunfire?
    Weren't the DC police at the scene within a minute or so after the gunshot?
    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody's spycam?
    Wasn't there no evidence of robbery?
    Didn't Julian Assange offer a reward for information regarding Seth Rich's murder together with a strong implication that the DNC emails were leaked to Wikileaks by Seth Rich?
    Wasn't there a slew of coincidences that occurred around the same time (late Spring/early Summer 2016) that were only one or two degrees of separation from the DNC? (taking into account the DNC helped finance the Steele Dossier)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    4AM is getting into the time of morning when the blacks are all sleeping it off, they tend to start getting too drunk or high around 3, and the hood gets quiet from sometime after 3 am until noon or so when the early birds start getting up.

    I knew a guy that had a very profitable Section 8 appliance repair contract. he rolled into the hood at 5 am and was out, no matter what happened, at 11:30 or so. Said he rarely saw anyone besides passed out bums. Did it twenty years, made a couple of million, bought tax free municipal bonds and assumed "the position of fuck you", as in the famous John Goodman clip.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdfeXqHFmPI

  193. @Jack D
    @J1234


    but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.
     
    There's a reason for that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    but I almost never see Dauphines in good working order nowadays.

    There’s a reason for that.

    I almost bought a ’68 Dauphine in the mid-’70s right after passing driver’s ed, for $250. But the father of the guy selling it called to advise him, “Don’t sell it to anyone you know.” Quite the vote of confidence.

    By coincidence, my first car turned out to be another Renault, a 12 wagon, six years later. These were the firm’s trough years in the US market, before the LeCar; the vehicles were made in Canada, but not here.

  194. @Desiderius
    He's not the only one.

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1222562936771809280?s=20

    Suck it, Soros, you Nazi bugger! We'll never kneel before the Hun!

    Replies: @Lot, @International Jew, @PhysicistDave, @Paul Jolliffe, @Semi-Hemi, @Lagertha, @Wilkey, @Desiderius

  195. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @J1234
    @Anonymous

    Very informative post. Thanks for the education. I don't know as much as I should about European cars.


    Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.
     
    My wife and I were in Europe about twenty years ago and met a young French couple at an automobile museum. The young man was excited to tell us about the 2CV he was restoring, and showed us pictures. I mentioned the Renault company in passing, but he just shook his head in disgust...in true French fashion.

    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn't handle the car's size and speed.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn’t handle the car’s size and speed.

    That’s true of most large cars of the era, but they are upgradeable today, and have been for decades.

    The really desirable 2CV variant is the one with two complete engines and transaxles, one in front and one in back. But they are all basically a great toy for tooling around in in a small town, but a deathtrap on the turnpike, particularly in Kansas with its intermittent gusting crosswinds.

    I think Billy Joel had a wreck in one a while ago in the Hamptons, or maybe the Jersey Shore, somewhere upscale out east.

    With the 25 year rule it is easy to bring them in the US now, but if you live in Hitlerfornia you want one titled as pre-67 but with the latest mechanicals backfitted. There are importers that do this. All the SMs have went back to France and we get a (relative) lot of 2CVs and the occasional D series or a CX.

    • Replies: @captflee
    @Anonymous

    Pushing fifty years ago, R & T or maybe C and D had as something of a divider betwixt magazine proper and classifieds, a humorous photo. The only one I can recall is a 2CV tricked out in full Le Mans trim; fender flares, wide tires, air dams and wings, the whole ball of wax. It was hilarious.

  196. @Lagertha
    @BB753

    sheeshh y'all are so annoying and denying of stuff youu said in the past- whatever.

    Replies: @BB753, @Lagertha

    Lagertha, oh brave shield-maiden, wouldst thou care to explain?

  197. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    Hersh did some good work regarding Vietnam early in his career but lately he seems to have gone off the deep end. Nevertheless, he denies that he has any information from the FBI linking Rich to Wikileaks.

    Honestly, there are 350,000 black people who live in Washington, DC and their presence is a sufficient explanation for Rich's murder - you really don't need to go looking for more complex conspiracies. Nothing good ever happens when you are out on the street at 4AM as Rich was.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

    Wasn’t Seth Rich shot in the back while on a residential neighborhood’s sidewalk? That is, he wasn’t in some dark alley or empty lot far from the watchful eye of the many DC police/security forces.
    Doesn’t DC have echolocation/triangulation to instantly identify the location of gunfire?
    Weren’t the DC police at the scene within a minute or so after the gunshot?
    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody’s spycam?
    Wasn’t there no evidence of robbery?
    Didn’t Julian Assange offer a reward for information regarding Seth Rich’s murder together with a strong implication that the DNC emails were leaked to Wikileaks by Seth Rich?
    Wasn’t there a slew of coincidences that occurred around the same time (late Spring/early Summer 2016) that were only one or two degrees of separation from the DNC? (taking into account the DNC helped finance the Steele Dossier)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Coemgen

    Seth Rich was talking to his girlfriend at the time on the phone -- they were having a long discussion over whether one of them should take a job out of town. Presumably she heard what happened.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Coemgen

    Seth Rich was talking to his girlfriend at the time on the phone -- they were having a long discussion over whether one of them should take a job out of town. Presumably she heard what happened.

    , @Jack D
    @Coemgen


    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody’s spycam?
     
    Apparently there was some fuzzy security camera footage of two men running away. I assume that they fit the description "black youths" which narrows it down to maybe 30,000 people in DC.

    Was Tessa Majors also a Wikileaks source?

    Replies: @Coemgen

  198. @Coemgen
    @Jack D

    Wasn't Seth Rich shot in the back while on a residential neighborhood's sidewalk? That is, he wasn't in some dark alley or empty lot far from the watchful eye of the many DC police/security forces.
    Doesn't DC have echolocation/triangulation to instantly identify the location of gunfire?
    Weren't the DC police at the scene within a minute or so after the gunshot?
    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody's spycam?
    Wasn't there no evidence of robbery?
    Didn't Julian Assange offer a reward for information regarding Seth Rich's murder together with a strong implication that the DNC emails were leaked to Wikileaks by Seth Rich?
    Wasn't there a slew of coincidences that occurred around the same time (late Spring/early Summer 2016) that were only one or two degrees of separation from the DNC? (taking into account the DNC helped finance the Steele Dossier)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    Seth Rich was talking to his girlfriend at the time on the phone — they were having a long discussion over whether one of them should take a job out of town. Presumably she heard what happened.

    • Thanks: Coemgen
  199. @Coemgen
    @Jack D

    Wasn't Seth Rich shot in the back while on a residential neighborhood's sidewalk? That is, he wasn't in some dark alley or empty lot far from the watchful eye of the many DC police/security forces.
    Doesn't DC have echolocation/triangulation to instantly identify the location of gunfire?
    Weren't the DC police at the scene within a minute or so after the gunshot?
    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody's spycam?
    Wasn't there no evidence of robbery?
    Didn't Julian Assange offer a reward for information regarding Seth Rich's murder together with a strong implication that the DNC emails were leaked to Wikileaks by Seth Rich?
    Wasn't there a slew of coincidences that occurred around the same time (late Spring/early Summer 2016) that were only one or two degrees of separation from the DNC? (taking into account the DNC helped finance the Steele Dossier)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    Seth Rich was talking to his girlfriend at the time on the phone — they were having a long discussion over whether one of them should take a job out of town. Presumably she heard what happened.

  200. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Your Citroen engine story is very characteristic of dealing with the French. The Russians are similar in this regard. Often they have very good products (although perhaps not as good as they think - as far as they are concerned they are perfection and they are certainly not interested in hearing your ideas on how they could better because they are geniuses and you are an idiot who understands nothing). They seem to regard customers as inconveniences and they do their best to get you to go away. Should you succeed in buying one, then you should certainly not expect them to communicate with you in a barbaric foreign language nor to receive any spare parts.

    This lead to a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy - export sales to America were not profitable so we should not invest any time or effort into making them. They were not profitable because they were not selling enough volume and they were not selling enough volume because you could only buy one if you showed the greatest determination in getting past the obstacles.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Indeed, if they had paid attention to the Germans and how they did business they would have made a lot of money. At the end of the day they are not that interestd in money, as long as they are making “enough”.

    That said Citroens were assembled in the UK at Slough and they were rather more successful in the British market.

    Both the French and the Russians would do well to forget about exporting cars and concentrate on much more profitable light aircraft, at which both are pretty decent at designing. We now have a couple of the radial engine Yak trainers here in our area and the owners love them, but they are certificated Experimental/Airshow or R&D and so can’t be used for their real purpose, which is flight instruction. They’re fuel sluts but will burn car gas (in fact they prefer it) and if landed gear up you jack it up, drop the gear, replace the birch propeller blades and are good to go again. You can’t shock cool the engine because there are Venetian blinds around the cowling. They are docile enough to be a good instrument platform and yet fully aerobatic. If the Russians got them type certificated and set up distribution properly they could sell ten thousand of them in the US over a ten year period. FBOs could make money with thee things.

  201. @Coemgen
    @Jack D

    Wasn't Seth Rich shot in the back while on a residential neighborhood's sidewalk? That is, he wasn't in some dark alley or empty lot far from the watchful eye of the many DC police/security forces.
    Doesn't DC have echolocation/triangulation to instantly identify the location of gunfire?
    Weren't the DC police at the scene within a minute or so after the gunshot?
    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody's spycam?
    Wasn't there no evidence of robbery?
    Didn't Julian Assange offer a reward for information regarding Seth Rich's murder together with a strong implication that the DNC emails were leaked to Wikileaks by Seth Rich?
    Wasn't there a slew of coincidences that occurred around the same time (late Spring/early Summer 2016) that were only one or two degrees of separation from the DNC? (taking into account the DNC helped finance the Steele Dossier)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody’s spycam?

    Apparently there was some fuzzy security camera footage of two men running away. I assume that they fit the description “black youths” which narrows it down to maybe 30,000 people in DC.

    Was Tessa Majors also a Wikileaks source?

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Jack D


    Was Tessa Majors also a Wikileaks source?
     
    Has anyone from Wikileaks offered a reward for information regarding her murder?

    Aside, Julian Assange has been in the news of late: https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/julian-assange-extradition-case-drawn-months-68480528
  202. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    Hersh did some good work regarding Vietnam early in his career but lately he seems to have gone off the deep end. Nevertheless, he denies that he has any information from the FBI linking Rich to Wikileaks.

    Honestly, there are 350,000 black people who live in Washington, DC and their presence is a sufficient explanation for Rich's murder - you really don't need to go looking for more complex conspiracies. Nothing good ever happens when you are out on the street at 4AM as Rich was.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

    4AM is getting into the time of morning when the blacks are all sleeping it off, they tend to start getting too drunk or high around 3, and the hood gets quiet from sometime after 3 am until noon or so when the early birds start getting up.

    I knew a guy that had a very profitable Section 8 appliance repair contract. he rolled into the hood at 5 am and was out, no matter what happened, at 11:30 or so. Said he rarely saw anyone besides passed out bums. Did it twenty years, made a couple of million, bought tax free municipal bonds and assumed “the position of fuck you”, as in the famous John Goodman clip.

  203. @Desiderius
    @eah

    Buzzfeed is trash and always has been. They should have all been gone long ago if Jack wants to play censor.

    ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist. That has nothing to do with BF. It was just stupid.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    ZH doxxed and incited violence (in this context) against the scientist. That has nothing to do with BF. It was just stupid.

    Agreed.

  204. @Buzz Mohawk
    Mr. Soros's argument reads like a good comment on UR and nothing more. This means both that the comments here can be very good, and that Soros is no giant.

    He, a man as ugly as his own soul, is happy only when his own machinations work. Power for me and not for thee.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @NOTA

    Elites often turn out not to be so impressive when you see their thinking or logic on some day-to-day issue. Though what Soros writes for public consumption probably tells us little about what he actually believes–he’s telling us what he wants *us* to believe. Or what he wants Zuckerberg to have to react to by being marginally more hostile to Trump.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  205. @Art Deco
    I’m fascinated by how us nobodies are constantly told to never ever believe in conspiracy theories,

    Because most of them are bereft of inductive reasoning and impervious to contrary empirical data and to the absence of empirical data. See just about every bit of conspiracy literature on the Kennedy Assassination ever produced.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Pincher Martin, @NOTA

    Conspiracies happen, and are worth noting. But the conspiracy theory mode of thinking (where you construct an evidence-proof shell around your theory) is broken and you should avoid it.

    The MSM confuses the two, because they’re mostly not very bright and their audience is mostly pretty dumb.

  206. @Anonymouse
    @James N. Kennett

    Didn't Soros some time in the past spend a bunch of his own money to set up new universities in Eastern European countries after the Iron Curtain came down? I would guess that he had a lot of say as regards the ideological orientation of those universities - I would guess further that they were "progressive" i.e. anti-nationalist, and one-worldish but I'm just guessing. Those expenditures seem to be to fall into the category of philanthropy, i.e. spending your own money not on yourself but on other things.

    These days, Soros seem to be spending money to promote one-worldism, unfettered immigration, which seem philanthropic according to the meaning of the word, however uncongenial such initiatives seem to me and others in comments here.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Those expenditures seem to be to fall into the category of philanthropy, i.e. spending your own money not on yourself but on other things.

    That’s not what philanthropy is. Philanthropy involves promoting the welfare of the human race. Starting left-wing universities does just the opposite.

  207. I repeat and reaffirm my accusation against Facebook under the leadership of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg. They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences. One way or another, they should not be left in control of Facebook.

    Yeah, that’s awful! Like as if some money trader crashed the economy of a Southeast Asian country throwing millions into poverty and chaos just so he could add to his already enormous fortune.

  208. @Jack D
    @Coemgen


    How did a unsophisticated perp get away so quickly without, at least, being caught on somebody’s spycam?
     
    Apparently there was some fuzzy security camera footage of two men running away. I assume that they fit the description "black youths" which narrows it down to maybe 30,000 people in DC.

    Was Tessa Majors also a Wikileaks source?

    Replies: @Coemgen

    Was Tessa Majors also a Wikileaks source?

    Has anyone from Wikileaks offered a reward for information regarding her murder?

    Aside, Julian Assange has been in the news of late: https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/julian-assange-extradition-case-drawn-months-68480528

  209. @International Jew
    Trump's an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook "embed" a team inside his 2016 campaign.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Lot, @Tex

    Trump’s an even bigger idiot than I thought, if he let Facebook “embed” a team inside his 2016 campaign.

    If only Trump hadn’t been such an idiot he might have won the 2016 election.

  210. @Ron Mexico
    @Pincher Martin

    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Tex

    Which state did Soros represent at the signing of the US Constitution? GFY George.

    None, but he looks like he was old enough to read the Federalist Papers as they came off the presses.

  211. Trump understood the impact of Facebook/Social media and took Facebook up on its offer to help, and Hildebeast was too stupid or overconfident to do the same. That’s not a conspiracy – that’s a strategy.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @c matt


    Trump understood the impact of Facebook/Social media and took Facebook up on its offer to help, and Hildebeast was too stupid or overconfident to do the same. That’s not a conspiracy – that’s a strategy.
     
    Hillary had Facebook employees working for her campaign:
    Clinton Has a Team of Silicon Valley Stars. Trump Has Twitter

    Most of Hillary's quantifiable problems in the 2016 election originated with the Benghazi 9/11 and her calling half of Trump supporters "irredeemables" who belong in a basket of "deplorables." She had tons of cash and tech support for her campaign but a sow's ear is still a sow's ear.

  212. @rational actor
    Since so many people are eager to have a 'national conversation' about some trivial topic or other, allow me to propose a subject of inquiry. Let's have a national conversation about ultra-wealthy people using foundations and fake-charity NGOs to buy political influence and do end-runs around democratic process. While we're here, let's make it a long, detailed conversation that really gets into ramifications of what such people seek to achieve and why. Maybe George can participate, since he's so worried about authoritarianism.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Let’s have a national conversation about ultra-wealthy people using foundations and fake-charity NGOs to buy political influence and do end-runs around democratic process.

    Major conservative groups revealed to be “selling out” to big money liberal groups.

    [Tucker] Carlson revealed that Google (which also owns YouTube) – the ultra-Left corporation which regularly censors, expels, and de-platforms conservatives – has been generously funding nearly two dozen right-wing groups.

    The list includes such conservative stalwarts as The American Conservative Union (which runs CPAC), The Federalist Society, The National Review Institute (publisher of National Review), American Enterprise Institute, and Heritage Action (part of the Heritage Foundation). The list is from Google’s voluntary disclosures of groups it says received “substantial” funding from it. (The actual amounts were not listed.)

    On several occasions in recent years other pro-family groups around the country have disparaged MassResistance for our aggressive approach and bold truth-telling. When I’ve talked to them about it, several of them have actually admitted that we were doing the right thing. So why don’t they do it, too, I would ask? Mainly because their big donors wouldn’t let them, they admitted.

  213. @J1234
    @Anonymous

    Very informative post. Thanks for the education. I don't know as much as I should about European cars.


    Renaults tended to be crappy because they were government owned and most French buyers preferred a Citroen or Peugeot.
     
    My wife and I were in Europe about twenty years ago and met a young French couple at an automobile museum. The young man was excited to tell us about the 2CV he was restoring, and showed us pictures. I mentioned the Renault company in passing, but he just shook his head in disgust...in true French fashion.

    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn't handle the car's size and speed.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @captflee

    Greg Gutfeld of “The Five” owned, perhaps still owns a Facel Vega.

    I’ve always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a “resto-mod” version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine. At 400BHP, oodles of torque, and 3700 lbs, performance is brisk. For the bespoke automotive equivalent of a Savile Row suit, the price is not terrible. Alas, LHD versions are rare, although piloting a RHD car in a LHD area certainly introduces a piquancy to one’s travels, possibly even precluding use of the holy sail fawn.

    • Replies: @J1234
    @captflee


    I’ve always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a “resto-mod” version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine.
     
    Wow, I'm learning more about these cool European cars. Thanks for the education. First, I had no idea Bristol was still in business. Secondly, when I think of British cars with big Chrysler v-8's, I think of the Jensen Interceptor. I wasn't aware that Bristol did that, too. I think more Americans are familiar with the Jensen, as more than a few were imported into the US.

    Replies: @captflee

    , @Anonymous
    @captflee

    Bristols were made by a division of the Bristol aeroplane works and used a copy of the prewar BMW inline six which they also sold to AC for their AC Ace sports car.Bristol then decided to quit making their own engine and use a blueprinted Chrysler V8 instead, so the AC company had a problem of not being able to buy engines. This created an opportunity for Carroll Shelby that the AC Ace would be even better with an American V8. So he went to GM, which turned him down, as they figured the car would be competition for the Corvette. So he went to Ford and the Cobra was born.

    Bristols were not officially exported to the US after 1967 because of US emission and safety laws: for such a low volume product certification costs would have been prohibitive, or so they figured. But they were beautifully built, and very expensive to restore as well. Because they used a US Chrysler engine, upgrading them to modern electronic engine management and a later transmission would be easy.

    They were priced in the Rolls Royce, Aston Martin range, but because they no longer used their own engine they were considered less than as prestigious.

    Oddly enough, Facel Vega went from using US power to building their own engine, which turned out to be very unreliable and that was what put them out of business.

    There were numerous British, French, and other European cars that combined Euro coachwork with US power. For that matter, the Rolls Royce pushrod V8-which was made for Bentleys up until pretty recently-is in reality heavily derived from Oldsmobile's V8 and several things interchange either directly or with a little machine work.

    Replies: @anon

  214. @Desiderius
    @Wilkey

    Well, keeping in mind the humorous connotations in this setting, "Hun" was a reference to Soros' Hungarian (which itself has been something of a misnomer for a mere thousand years) ancestry and ambitions. He's as much our Scourge of God as Attila was Rome's. And of course the EU these days is little more than an undead HRE slavering for the next million brains to devour.

    The Krauts do have a legit beef with the Brits though for sticking their nose in the European Civil War after keeping it out of ours, much to the surprise and chagrin of the Confederacy which had counted on securing their support much as their forefathers had done with the French. Palmerston was in fact game but I forget why it didn't happen. Of course it did on the continent much to the chagrin of all involved and many not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

    There is no such thing as ‘Europe’. There are 50 countries that all hate each other.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anonymous

    And the Brits foolishly sacrificed the flower of her manhood to keep it that way.

    Kitchener thought he'd be fighting the Sudanese or some shit.

  215. @Anonymous
    @J1234


    My favorite French car was actually the old Facel Vega, late fifties early sixties. Had the big American engine, and was fast and beautiful, but I heard from a French guy online that some of his countrymen had antipathy towards the make and model; a famous French author died in one in a crash. Apparently the brakes couldn’t handle the car’s size and speed.
     
    That's true of most large cars of the era, but they are upgradeable today, and have been for decades.

    The really desirable 2CV variant is the one with two complete engines and transaxles, one in front and one in back. But they are all basically a great toy for tooling around in in a small town, but a deathtrap on the turnpike, particularly in Kansas with its intermittent gusting crosswinds.

    I think Billy Joel had a wreck in one a while ago in the Hamptons, or maybe the Jersey Shore, somewhere upscale out east.

    With the 25 year rule it is easy to bring them in the US now, but if you live in Hitlerfornia you want one titled as pre-67 but with the latest mechanicals backfitted. There are importers that do this. All the SMs have went back to France and we get a (relative) lot of 2CVs and the occasional D series or a CX.

    Replies: @captflee

    Pushing fifty years ago, R & T or maybe C and D had as something of a divider betwixt magazine proper and classifieds, a humorous photo. The only one I can recall is a 2CV tricked out in full Le Mans trim; fender flares, wide tires, air dams and wings, the whole ball of wax. It was hilarious.

  216. @captflee
    @J1234

    Greg Gutfeld of "The Five" owned, perhaps still owns a Facel Vega.

    I've always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a "resto-mod" version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine. At 400BHP, oodles of torque, and 3700 lbs, performance is brisk. For the bespoke automotive equivalent of a Savile Row suit, the price is not terrible. Alas, LHD versions are rare, although piloting a RHD car in a LHD area certainly introduces a piquancy to one's travels, possibly even precluding use of the holy sail fawn.

    Replies: @J1234, @Anonymous

    I’ve always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a “resto-mod” version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine.

    Wow, I’m learning more about these cool European cars. Thanks for the education. First, I had no idea Bristol was still in business. Secondly, when I think of British cars with big Chrysler v-8’s, I think of the Jensen Interceptor. I wasn’t aware that Bristol did that, too. I think more Americans are familiar with the Jensen, as more than a few were imported into the US.

    • Replies: @captflee
    @J1234

    Think nothing of it! Yes, the Interceptor was and is a very desirable automobile. And Bristol is still kicking, though I gather their continued existence is not a given.

    I was fortunate enough to grow up in an area with plenty of interesting cars around, so fairly early in the game learned about Facels, Bristols, Jensens, AC/Shelby Cobras, Sunbeam Tigers, Isos whether Grifo or Rivolta, De Tomasos, Bizzarinis, etc. That and the inordinate amount of time spent at VIR, Road Atlanta, Lime Rock, Mid-Ohio, Laguna Seca, and so forth.

    Bristol are presently using BMW V-8 power in their current model, the Bullet, as did Morgan for some time in the final version of the Plus 8, after using the Rover 3.5 liter alloy V-8 (itself a variant of the 215 cid aluminum Buick V-8) , but back in the late 50s/ early 60s when looking for an engine with lots of grunt at a reasonable cost I suppose there was little choice but to go American. Glad to hear that no old grudges are apparently being held, as Bristol were awarded (at a friendly price, one can speculate) rights to build various BMW models and engines as reparations for WW2, so...

    Speaking of Moggies, the Plus 6, their top model these days, sports an inline BMW six, albeit mated solely to a dual clutch 8 speed automatic (the sacrilege! What's next - windows in the doors?). Though, at 335BHP/2350 lbs I might be able to get over that, should they start exporting to the US and I win the lottery. If not I'm thinking a Plus 8 Plus (Corvette LS power).

  217. @c matt
    Trump understood the impact of Facebook/Social media and took Facebook up on its offer to help, and Hildebeast was too stupid or overconfident to do the same. That's not a conspiracy - that's a strategy.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    Trump understood the impact of Facebook/Social media and took Facebook up on its offer to help, and Hildebeast was too stupid or overconfident to do the same. That’s not a conspiracy – that’s a strategy.

    Hillary had Facebook employees working for her campaign:
    Clinton Has a Team of Silicon Valley Stars. Trump Has Twitter

    Most of Hillary’s quantifiable problems in the 2016 election originated with the Benghazi 9/11 and her calling half of Trump supporters “irredeemables” who belong in a basket of “deplorables.” She had tons of cash and tech support for her campaign but a sow’s ear is still a sow’s ear.

  218. @J1234
    @captflee


    I’ve always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a “resto-mod” version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine.
     
    Wow, I'm learning more about these cool European cars. Thanks for the education. First, I had no idea Bristol was still in business. Secondly, when I think of British cars with big Chrysler v-8's, I think of the Jensen Interceptor. I wasn't aware that Bristol did that, too. I think more Americans are familiar with the Jensen, as more than a few were imported into the US.

    Replies: @captflee

    Think nothing of it! Yes, the Interceptor was and is a very desirable automobile. And Bristol is still kicking, though I gather their continued existence is not a given.

    I was fortunate enough to grow up in an area with plenty of interesting cars around, so fairly early in the game learned about Facels, Bristols, Jensens, AC/Shelby Cobras, Sunbeam Tigers, Isos whether Grifo or Rivolta, De Tomasos, Bizzarinis, etc. That and the inordinate amount of time spent at VIR, Road Atlanta, Lime Rock, Mid-Ohio, Laguna Seca, and so forth.

    Bristol are presently using BMW V-8 power in their current model, the Bullet, as did Morgan for some time in the final version of the Plus 8, after using the Rover 3.5 liter alloy V-8 (itself a variant of the 215 cid aluminum Buick V-8) , but back in the late 50s/ early 60s when looking for an engine with lots of grunt at a reasonable cost I suppose there was little choice but to go American. Glad to hear that no old grudges are apparently being held, as Bristol were awarded (at a friendly price, one can speculate) rights to build various BMW models and engines as reparations for WW2, so…

    Speaking of Moggies, the Plus 6, their top model these days, sports an inline BMW six, albeit mated solely to a dual clutch 8 speed automatic (the sacrilege! What’s next – windows in the doors?). Though, at 335BHP/2350 lbs I might be able to get over that, should they start exporting to the US and I win the lottery. If not I’m thinking a Plus 8 Plus (Corvette LS power).

  219. @Anonymous
    @Desiderius

    There is no such thing as 'Europe'. There are 50 countries that all hate each other.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    And the Brits foolishly sacrificed the flower of her manhood to keep it that way.

    Kitchener thought he’d be fighting the Sudanese or some shit.

  220. @Anon
    It's not Zuckerberg that's "conspiring" with Trump, but rather Peter Thiel. Thiel is a board member of Facebook, one of its earliest investors, and a close advisor to Zuckerberg.

    Thiel is a Trump supporter and was instrumental in convincing Zuckerberg not to change its policy regarding targeted ads recently:

    https://newrepublic.com/article/156055/facebook-right-wing-company-part-one-million

    On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thiel, a longtime Facebook board member, has become Zuckerberg’s consigliere. With the company’s leadership under fire for its refusal to vet the veracity of political advertisements or limit advertisers’ ability to target ads—in contrast to Google and Twitter, which have taken steps to crack down on misleading content—Thiel has encouraged the embattled Facebook CEO “not to bow to public pressure.” The Journal noted that Thiel was “extending his influence while the company’s board and senior ranks are in flux.”
     
    Soros knows this. He's going after Zuck as an indirect means to go after Thiel.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Forbes

    On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thiel, a longtime Facebook board member, has become Zuckerberg’s consigliere.

    Do the WSJ’s editorial standards and style guide allow for calling someone a “consigliere”? Seems unlikely.

    I think it can be said The New Republic is peddling fake news.

    What Thiel is suggesting, if TNR is to be believed, is that FB should not engage in censorship. Seems prudent, and certainly consistent with Theil’s libertarian leanings.

  221. @Lagertha
    @BB753

    sheeshh y'all are so annoying and denying of stuff youu said in the past- whatever.

    Replies: @BB753, @Lagertha

    hahhahahaa – too late. I am like a firefly…

  222. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @captflee
    @J1234

    Greg Gutfeld of "The Five" owned, perhaps still owns a Facel Vega.

    I've always been partial to the Bristol 411, its Brit analog. The company still offers a "resto-mod" version, the Series 6, with modernized suspension, brakes, and engine. At 400BHP, oodles of torque, and 3700 lbs, performance is brisk. For the bespoke automotive equivalent of a Savile Row suit, the price is not terrible. Alas, LHD versions are rare, although piloting a RHD car in a LHD area certainly introduces a piquancy to one's travels, possibly even precluding use of the holy sail fawn.

    Replies: @J1234, @Anonymous

    Bristols were made by a division of the Bristol aeroplane works and used a copy of the prewar BMW inline six which they also sold to AC for their AC Ace sports car.Bristol then decided to quit making their own engine and use a blueprinted Chrysler V8 instead, so the AC company had a problem of not being able to buy engines. This created an opportunity for Carroll Shelby that the AC Ace would be even better with an American V8. So he went to GM, which turned him down, as they figured the car would be competition for the Corvette. So he went to Ford and the Cobra was born.

    Bristols were not officially exported to the US after 1967 because of US emission and safety laws: for such a low volume product certification costs would have been prohibitive, or so they figured. But they were beautifully built, and very expensive to restore as well. Because they used a US Chrysler engine, upgrading them to modern electronic engine management and a later transmission would be easy.

    They were priced in the Rolls Royce, Aston Martin range, but because they no longer used their own engine they were considered less than as prestigious.

    Oddly enough, Facel Vega went from using US power to building their own engine, which turned out to be very unreliable and that was what put them out of business.

    There were numerous British, French, and other European cars that combined Euro coachwork with US power. For that matter, the Rolls Royce pushrod V8-which was made for Bentleys up until pretty recently-is in reality heavily derived from Oldsmobile’s V8 and several things interchange either directly or with a little machine work.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    Bristols were made by a division of the Bristol aeroplane works...

    ...They were priced in the Rolls Royce, Aston Martin range,


    On behalf of the late Benny Hill, I must enquire regarding the price of a pair of Bristols.

  223. @Anonymous
    @captflee

    Bristols were made by a division of the Bristol aeroplane works and used a copy of the prewar BMW inline six which they also sold to AC for their AC Ace sports car.Bristol then decided to quit making their own engine and use a blueprinted Chrysler V8 instead, so the AC company had a problem of not being able to buy engines. This created an opportunity for Carroll Shelby that the AC Ace would be even better with an American V8. So he went to GM, which turned him down, as they figured the car would be competition for the Corvette. So he went to Ford and the Cobra was born.

    Bristols were not officially exported to the US after 1967 because of US emission and safety laws: for such a low volume product certification costs would have been prohibitive, or so they figured. But they were beautifully built, and very expensive to restore as well. Because they used a US Chrysler engine, upgrading them to modern electronic engine management and a later transmission would be easy.

    They were priced in the Rolls Royce, Aston Martin range, but because they no longer used their own engine they were considered less than as prestigious.

    Oddly enough, Facel Vega went from using US power to building their own engine, which turned out to be very unreliable and that was what put them out of business.

    There were numerous British, French, and other European cars that combined Euro coachwork with US power. For that matter, the Rolls Royce pushrod V8-which was made for Bentleys up until pretty recently-is in reality heavily derived from Oldsmobile's V8 and several things interchange either directly or with a little machine work.

    Replies: @anon

    Bristols were made by a division of the Bristol aeroplane works…

    …They were priced in the Rolls Royce, Aston Martin range,

    On behalf of the late Benny Hill, I must enquire regarding the price of a pair of Bristols.

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