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From The Guardian:

‘I was a bad influence on the Beatles’: James Taylor on Lennon, love and recovery
Jenny Stevens
Mon 17 Feb 2020 01.00

… Born in Boston in 1948, Taylor was, according to his memoir, “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts”. His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests, and hauling her five kids to Martha’s Vineyard every summer to “restore our Yankee credentials”. Not long after moving the family to North Carolina, Taylor’s father was assigned to the navy. He spent two years on an expedition to the south pole, where he held the keys to the liquor cabinet of 100 men.

Dr. Taylor did a bang-up job of keeping the other 99 men from drinking too much:

He went to the bottom of the world and returned with a serious drinking problem. …

He [James Taylor not his dad] met Donald Trump once, “in an airport. I just thought of him as a frivolous, minor player. It drives me crazy how unworthy he is of our attention and how much of it he has.” He is rooting for the Democratic candidates Deval Patrick and Elizabeth Warren – both from Massachusetts, where he now lives. “But at this point, I’d be happy to see pretty much anyone in – the bar is so low. Because the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

After all, who is more Southern than Donald Trump?

 
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  1. I thought it was an excellent interview about addiction, which is hard to capture.

  2. • Replies: @Anonymous
    Why did you post this?
    , @68W58
    I’m about an hour from Hendersonville, it’s a nice place despite its proximity to Asheville. Last fall I worked for the Census, there was an immigrant from Colombia who was taking a class to be an enumerator from Hendersonville and someone asked her about the Hispanic community there. “When I came, 30 years ago it was only five percent,” she said, “but today, eighty percent!”

    Now, it isn’t even close to that, but she is probably right about the trend and she was completely confident about her incorrect assertion.
  3. South Pole’s pretty far.

    • Replies: @donut
    Argentina has a South Pole base . During the winter staffing is reduced a Dr. who had contracted to stay over changed his mind but they wouldn't relieve him for a few good reasons . He set the base on fire so that they would evacuate everybody . I once saw a video , couldn't find it on youtube, of a full on brawl at a South Korean station .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Antarctica

    I believe that the station leader is usually deputized as a US Marshall at each station .
  4. And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    Used to?
  5. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    And he married the octoroon-Jewess dumpster fire Carly Simon.

    (My father knew one of her sisters at one time, I’m just saying. Left to my own devices, if I’d had the chance, I’d probably have banged Carly, but I wouldn’t have married her. As Elia Kazan told frenemy Arthur Miller when Miller married MM largely for the express purpose of going over on Kazan, you don’t marry a girl like that!)

  6. … Born in Boston in 1948, Taylor was, according to his memoir, “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts”. His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests

    I’m pretty sure that the White Southern population was more Anglo and Protestant than the White population from Boston, which included lots of Catholics and Ellis Island ethnics.

    Here are some of the demographics on who pushed desegregation.

    https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/parshat-beshalach-the-green-book/

    The American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, and the Anti-Defamation League were central to the campaign against racial prejudice. Jews made substantial financial contributions to many civil rights organizations, including the NAACP, the Urban League, the Congress of Racial Equality, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. About 50 percent of the civil rights attorneys in the South during the 1960s were Jews, as were over 50 percent of the Whites who went to Mississippi in 1964 to challenge Jim Crow Laws.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Yeah, but she was Roundhead and they were Cavalier, or, in Carolina, even worse.
    , @Anonymous
    Taylor’s paternal line may have received its surname on Ellis Island.
  7. “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts”

    Yep, matches the Puritan profile.

    his mother … fought against the politics [of the South] … spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests

    Indeed.

    “It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland and his father’s parents immigrated from Germany around 1890.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland
     
    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing's worth of difference. They threw out most of the sacraments, including marriage, which they destroyed over time. Calvin reduced marriage to the level of "agriculture".

    Four walls and a sermon. That says it all.

    doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters
     
    If they're too dirty to sit in front of the counter, they're too dirty to work behind it, let alone in the kitchen. Mrs Taylor no doubt missed the strict hygiene laws of the Northeast. Dr Taylor no doubt had his hands full at the hospital treating food poisoning.
  8. @JohnnyWalker123

    … Born in Boston in 1948, Taylor was, according to his memoir, “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts”. His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests
     
    I'm pretty sure that the White Southern population was more Anglo and Protestant than the White population from Boston, which included lots of Catholics and Ellis Island ethnics.

    Here are some of the demographics on who pushed desegregation.

    https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/parshat-beshalach-the-green-book/

    The American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, and the Anti-Defamation League were central to the campaign against racial prejudice. Jews made substantial financial contributions to many civil rights organizations, including the NAACP, the Urban League, the Congress of Racial Equality, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. About 50 percent of the civil rights attorneys in the South during the 1960s were Jews, as were over 50 percent of the Whites who went to Mississippi in 1964 to challenge Jim Crow Laws.

     

    Yeah, but she was Roundhead and they were Cavalier, or, in Carolina, even worse.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    The northern colonists wanted to escape the aristocracy while the southern colonists wanted to be the aristocracy. There's a reason why the Carolinas and Georgia were named after kings and Maryland was named after the wife of a king.
  9. Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they’re not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.

    • Replies: @Michael Tomac
    I'll have to say, some of the nuttiest liberals I've met have been white liberals, especially the WASPs. A lot of other minority groups like Asians and Hispanics are liberal too, but its usually the white liberals that take that shit overboard and go full on woke.
    , @syonredux

    Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they’re not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.
     
    On the other hand, we could use a revival of Massachusetts WASP conservatism:


    https://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/stoddard-duotone.jpg


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothrop_Stoddard
  10. He is rooting for the Democratic candidates Deval Patrick and Elizabeth Warren – both from Massachusetts, where he now lives.

    Patrick thought it was no big deal when an FBI sniper blew off the head of Vicki Weaver while she was holding her infant daughter in her arms:
    https://www.fff.org/explore-freedom/article/ruby-ridge-still-matters/

    When he was a top official in the Justice Department in 1994, Patrick whitewashed FBI abuses at Ruby Ridge. A 542-page confidential Justice Department task force report recommended federal criminal charges against the FBI sniper who killed Vicki Weaver. Patrick overturned that recommendation because he insisted that “excessive force” had not been used. “One shot, one kill” was apparently irrelevant to his analysis. In an era where Americans are increasingly protesting law-enforcement abuses, Patrick’s ruling on Ruby Ridge may come back to haunt him.

  11. And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.

    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.

    Sick.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white
     
    And? Nobody hated them for that. White people made beds everywhere.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.

    Sick.
     
    Yowsa. Yeah that sounds really accurate.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammy_memorial

    the monument would have been located along Massachusetts Avenue
     
    By the tits of Tituba!

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fa/TitubaandtheChildren-Fredericks.jpg
    , @MEH 0910
    Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America:

    Massachusetts Rank Ways: A System of Truncated Orders

    ******
    The experience of social oppression in England caused the founders of Massachusetts to modify the ranking system in their society. After much discussion, they deliberately eliminated both the top and bottom strata of the East Anglian social order, and at the same time carefully preserved its middling distinctions.
     

    ******
    Even as the founders of Massachusetts sought to eliminate extremes of rank from their society, they were very far from being egalitarian. Most Massachusetts towns deliberately preserved inequalities of status and wealth within a narrow range. Practices varied in detail from one town to another. But most communities deliberately attempted to preserve the system of social ranks which had existed within the small villages of East Anglia. The King, peers, great gentry, landless laborers and wandering poor were all outsiders to those little communities. Most actual members belonged to three ranks—the lesser gentry, yeomanry and cottagers. These people lived, worked and worshipped together, in ways that were bound by ancient customs of stratification, which had existed from “tyme out of mind” in East Anglian communities.”

    ******
    In short, the ranking system of East Anglia was reproduced in Massachusetts with two decisive differences. First, the top and bottom strata were removed, and inequality persisted within a more narrow range. Second, the importance of material differences was qualified by age and moral standing, for which the Puritans entertained high respect.
     
  12. It’s as good an explanation as any why my WASP Puritan (Massachusetts Bay Colony–1635) ancestors moved west from New England–James Taylor’s mother sounds insufferable.

    And BTW, progressive politics are not exactly Puritan.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.

    Puritans were all about egalitarianism. They rebelled (to some extent, understandably) against hierarchy and aristocracy.

    In some ways, Cromwell’s New Model Army were proto-socialists.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?
    , @Thea
    The elements of feminism that don’t originate from Jews seem to flow mostly from New England’s upper class.
  13. James Taylor: Making American Standard

    Available February 28, 2020.

    It takes an extraordinary artist to re-imagine some of the most beloved songs of the 20th century and make them completely their own. Unlike most who have tackled similar material, American Standard’s beautifully simple, stripped-down arrangements are based on the 2-guitar collaboration of James Taylor and John Pizzarelli, rather than standard piano arrangements. James was determined to keep that sound at the center of the project, and the effect is mesmerizing.

    [MORE]

    American Standard was primarily recorded at James’s home studio, TheBarn in MA, with additional work done at United Recording and Capitol Studios in Los Angeles and Treasure Isle and Blackbird Studios in Nashville. An all-star array of Taylor’s musical comrades make significant contributions here including:
    – Steve Gadd, drums,
    – Luis Conte, percussion
    – Jimmy Johnson, bass
    – Viktor Krauss, upright bass
    – Larry Goldings, melodica/Hammond B3 Organ
    – Walt Fowler, trumpet/flugelhorn
    – Lou Marini, clarinet/sax
    – Stuart Duncan, violin
    – Jerry Douglas, dobro
    – Arnold McCuller, vocals
    – Kate Markowitz, vocals
    – Andrea Zonn, vocals
    – Dorian Holley, vocals
    – Caroline Taylor, vocals

    Track listing:
    1. My Blue Heaven (Walter Donaldson-George A. Whiting)
    2. Moon River (Henry Mancini-Johnny Mercer)
    3. Teach Me Tonight (Gene De Paul-Sammy Cahn)
    4. As Easy As Rolling Off A Log (M.K. Jerome-Jack Scholl)
    5. Almost Like Being In Love (Frederick Loewe-Alan Jay Lerner)
    6. Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ The Boat (Frank Loesser)
    7. The Nearness Of You (Hoagy Carmichael-Ned Washington)
    8. You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught (Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein II)
    9. God Bless The Child (Billie Holiday-Arthur Herzog Jr.)
    10. Pennies From Heaven (Arthur Johnston-Johnny Burke)
    11. My Heart Stood Still (Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart)
    12. Ol’ Man River (Jerome Kern-Oscar Hammerstein II)
    13. It’s Only A Paper Moon (Harold Arlen-Yip Hardburg-Billy Rose)
    14. The Surrey With The Fringe On Top (Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein II)

    Growing up in a musical family, James fell in love with the exquisite melodies, impeccable phrasing and concise storytelling of the early era songwriting masters absorbing the qualities that would become essential to his work in popular music a few years later. American Standard is a reminder of the things that make James Taylor so special, a supreme dedication to his craft and an abiding appreciation for the everlasting power of the American song.

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    Isn't "American Standard" the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
    Is Mr. Taylor trolling us?
  14. I liked him as “The driver” in Two Lane Blacktop circa 1971. Young, almost non-verbal, with a full head of hair, merely epitome of that era’s losers along with Dennis Wilson, Warren Oats and Lauri Bird (all rather dead by 1983). I’d give him oscar for something for that film.

  15. @G. Poulin
    And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.

    Used to?

  16. JT has been such a douche bag for so long that I will not even bother to comment on this post.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    At least he’s trying to be patriotic.
  17. I just thought of him as a frivolous, minor player. It drives me crazy how unworthy he is of our attention and how much of it he has.

    And this from a pop star. And don’t anybody pipe in that Taylor is a “serious” artist.

  18. @JohnnyWalker123

    … Born in Boston in 1948, Taylor was, according to his memoir, “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts”. His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests
     
    I'm pretty sure that the White Southern population was more Anglo and Protestant than the White population from Boston, which included lots of Catholics and Ellis Island ethnics.

    Here are some of the demographics on who pushed desegregation.

    https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/parshat-beshalach-the-green-book/

    The American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, and the Anti-Defamation League were central to the campaign against racial prejudice. Jews made substantial financial contributions to many civil rights organizations, including the NAACP, the Urban League, the Congress of Racial Equality, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. About 50 percent of the civil rights attorneys in the South during the 1960s were Jews, as were over 50 percent of the Whites who went to Mississippi in 1964 to challenge Jim Crow Laws.

     

    Taylor’s paternal line may have received its surname on Ellis Island.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Nope, they were Scottish and came long before the Ellis Island era. Not all liberal doctors are Jewish.

    Yankees were doing the whole liberal/Leftist professional thing long before the 1st Ashkenazi Jew graduated from med school. Jewish leftists copied their whole save the world shtick from WASPs - they looked up to them, they emulated them. Whites should be proud that they invented this but for some reason they are always trying to blame it on the Jews, even when the person in question is not remotely Jewish.
  19. @Bragadocious
    Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they're not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.

    I’ll have to say, some of the nuttiest liberals I’ve met have been white liberals, especially the WASPs. A lot of other minority groups like Asians and Hispanics are liberal too, but its usually the white liberals that take that shit overboard and go full on woke.

    • Agree: Thea
  20. @Desiderius
    https://youtu.be/Szx6JsgukS8

    South Pole’s pretty far.

    Argentina has a South Pole base . During the winter staffing is reduced a Dr. who had contracted to stay over changed his mind but they wouldn’t relieve him for a few good reasons . He set the base on fire so that they would evacuate everybody . I once saw a video , couldn’t find it on youtube, of a full on brawl at a South Korean station .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Antarctica

    I believe that the station leader is usually deputized as a US Marshall at each station .

    • Thanks: JMcG
    • Replies: @donut
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_stations_in_Antarctica
  21. @Bragadocious
    Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they're not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.

    Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they’re not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.

    On the other hand, we could use a revival of Massachusetts WASP conservatism:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothrop_Stoddard

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Wouldn't reading Derb get you the same effect?
  22. @Desiderius
    https://youtu.be/4z8lS--AyBU

    Why did you post this?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Why did you post this?
     
    For the same reason I'm gonna post one or two myself. It's a beautiful song. No matter how much of a lefty JT is (or turned out to be), I never read anything of it, don't plan on it, and will just enjoy his music. I really did think that JT was a Southern boy since forever, as I knew he'd spent time in Chapel Hill... damn shame about his Yankee Mom, though ...

    James Taylor spent a week or so at a funny farm outside of Boston, Mass due to depression one time. I'd driven by that place before and never knew about this. Of course I didn't pull in there, like this guy. This song and maybe Fire & Rain too were supposed to be about that experience.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wr_ZRLgduiU

    His take on southern California is excellent, with no offense to our host..."I need your Golden Gated cities like a hole in the head...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waOLnpuKUME

    This one's just the best:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpsOuzB3eAg

    OK, this is not a time for levity - do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly? A long distance dedication to commenter Rosie:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxENtNlOG4k
    , @Desiderius
    Because all y’all dipshits are getting worked up about JT’s mom not liking Carolina. Obv JT felt differently. Good song, beautiful place, shitty senators.

    If you had to live in Chapel Hill you wouldn’t like it either.

  23. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.
     
    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.


    Sick.

    https://www.shorpy.com/files/images/SHORPY-24343u.preview.jpg

    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white

    And? Nobody hated them for that. White people made beds everywhere.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.

    Sick.

    Yowsa. Yeah that sounds really accurate.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Yowsa. Yeah that sounds really accurate.
     
    Well, how would you interpret it?
  24. @Jim Don Bob
    JT has been such a douche bag for so long that I will not even bother to comment on this post.

    At least he’s trying to be patriotic.

  25. @RichardTaylor

    “brought up devoted to progressive politics, self-improvement and the arts"
     
    Yep, matches the Puritan profile.

    his mother ... fought against the politics [of the South] ... spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests
     
    Indeed.

    "It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    I believe Donald Trump's ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland and his father's parents immigrated from Germany around 1890.

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland

    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing’s worth of difference. They threw out most of the sacraments, including marriage, which they destroyed over time. Calvin reduced marriage to the level of “agriculture”.

    Four walls and a sermon. That says it all.

    doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters

    If they’re too dirty to sit in front of the counter, they’re too dirty to work behind it, let alone in the kitchen. Mrs Taylor no doubt missed the strict hygiene laws of the Northeast. Dr Taylor no doubt had his hands full at the hospital treating food poisoning.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    "On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground."

    E.A. Ross, 'The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People'
    , @RichardTaylor

    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing’s worth of difference.
     
    There are vast behavioral differences between Puritans and other groups of White people. As far as their religion, all Protestants may be crazy, but they're all crazy in their unique way.

    I do appreciate your realtime demonstration that hatred for Southern Whites drives the dark hearts of many. As we see, the old New England stock is dying out (or is already pretty much gone) because they placed their hatred for others (Whites) above whatever they were for.

    Hate defeats itself. Love wins!
    , @kihowi
    As one with an intimate knowledge of Calvinism and Calvinists, YES. They're high up in the running, if not actually at the top for "worst white people".
  26. @syonredux

    Massachusetts WASP liberals will be the death of us all. Fortunately, they’re not procreating much these days and seem to have hunkered down in just a few towns like Weston and Brookline. Their influence is waning, thank god.
     
    On the other hand, we could use a revival of Massachusetts WASP conservatism:


    https://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/stoddard-duotone.jpg


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothrop_Stoddard

    Wouldn’t reading Derb get you the same effect?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Wouldn’t reading Derb get you the same effect?
     
    No.
  27. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden”

    It’s got a lot going for it:

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    There is much to love about Massachusetts.
  28. @Redneck farmer
    Wouldn't reading Derb get you the same effect?

    Wouldn’t reading Derb get you the same effect?

    No.

  29. His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests, and hauling her five kids to Martha’s Vineyard every summer to “restore our Yankee credentials”.

    “It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.
     
    As much as I loathe New England, there is only one valid interpretation of the coming of the war:

    The slaveholders had, since the invention of the cotton gin, left behind the generally anti-slavery tendency of the founding generation in favor of economic profit.

    They did not believe their institutions could survive as long as the foundation of their institutions, slavery, was hemmed in by a burgeoning North that was abandoning the Democratic Party, traditionally the vehicle of the "slave power," in favor of a new Republican Party that proposed simply to restore the Northwest Ordinance and let slavery die peacefully.

    Meanwhile, a fringe abolitionist minority in the North gave moderate Southerners the impression that the Republican Party itself was more extreme than it really was.

    A determined, skilled, and highly motivated radical minority within the South was able to use fractious Democratic politics of 1860 to lead a secessionist uprising in the 7 states of the Deep South. Buchanan's handling of the situation was downright boot-licking; Lincoln's, though firmer, consisted solely of holding onto remaining federal property and delivering the mail. The "fire-eaters" then finagled a shooting incident at Fort Sumter, after which the United States government had to do something.

    Southern sympathizers can pretend otherwise, can pretend that they were forced into the fray, but Edmund Ruffin was gleeful to start the war.

    If Lincoln had not been assassinated, it has been said his main goal for the 2nd term was to find a way to remove blacks from America.

    Although most Confederate soldiers did not own slaves, over one half came from families that owned slaves. The average Union soldier was fighting for what he perceived as the white man's republic; the average Confederate soldier, though incredibly brave and in many ways noble, was fighting for a bad cause.

    I have ancestors on both sides, by the way. And I do prefer the company of rural Southerners to obnoxious and puffed-up New Englanders. But I'm glad my Union ancestors won.

    P.S. I have run out of comments for this hour. To the guy above, Wilkey, who praises the Southerners for supporting Lend-Lease: AMERICA FIRST! Lend-Lease was an unconstitutional disaster. Southerners should be ashamed that their politicians supported the war-monger Roosevelt.

    http://www.charleslindbergh.com/images2/Amfirst12pic.jpg

    , @dvorak

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.
     
    Moldbug:
    "[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc."
  30. @Anonymous

    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white
     
    And? Nobody hated them for that. White people made beds everywhere.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.

    Sick.
     
    Yowsa. Yeah that sounds really accurate.

    Yowsa. Yeah that sounds really accurate.

    Well, how would you interpret it?

  31. @syonredux

    She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden”
     
    It's got a lot going for it:


    https://s3.freefoto.com/images/1212/02/1212_02_56_web.jpg

    http://www.myinterestingfacts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Nathaniel-Hawthorne-Novelist.jpg

    https://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/images/henry-adams-3.png

    https://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/JohnWinthropColorPortrait.jpg


    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-63gobQp3QVE/UUMegNegh4I/AAAAAAAAE5g/0Chl7l7Wulw/s1600/Charles_Sanders_Peirce.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/46/49/58/464958e77b4c3fc8da4e0a614afa541a.jpg

    https://cdn.thecrazytourist.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Stockbridge-Massachusetts-1024x681.jpg

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/org/journal/images/sanders1000.jpg


    https://notesfromalargecontinent.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/paul-sagars-boston-pictures-017.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/40/80/37/4080375593d476549ad5dc0ee8533570--boston-attractions-anglican-church.jpg

    https://www.gpsmycity.com/img/gd/2424.jpg

    https://www.fodors.com/assets/destinations/1015153/the-mount-edith-wharton-home-lenox-berkshires-massachusetts_main.jpg


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/77/ba/ac/77baac623a0fd3293843d25564dae11b.jpg

    https://www.spaceanswers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Dr._Robert_H._Goddard_-_GPN-2002-0001311.jpg

    There is much to love about Massachusetts.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    "I am for all parts of the country: north, south, east, and west. All except God-damned New England!" - a farmer in Lancaster County, PA, 1860
    , @Hibernian
    Beautiful scenery; home of MIT and Peter Lynch. OTOH, home of the Kennedys and the Bulger Brothers, and adoptive home of Bill Weld, Deval Patrick, and Elizabeth Warren.
  32. @Reg Cæsar

    And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.
     
    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.


    Sick.

    https://www.shorpy.com/files/images/SHORPY-24343u.preview.jpg

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammy_memorial

    the monument would have been located along Massachusetts Avenue

    By the tits of Tituba!

  33. @Forbes
    It's as good an explanation as any why my WASP Puritan (Massachusetts Bay Colony--1635) ancestors moved west from New England--James Taylor's mother sounds insufferable.

    And BTW, progressive politics are not exactly Puritan.

    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.

    Puritans were all about egalitarianism. They rebelled (to some extent, understandably) against hierarchy and aristocracy.

    In some ways, Cromwell’s New Model Army were proto-socialists.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.
     
    Quakers are closer.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?
     
    Of course they would have been possible. Communism, as an ideal, has deep roots:

    Acts 2:42-47 King James Version

    42 And they continued stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.

    43 And fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.

    44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;

    45 And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need.


    46 And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart,

    47 Praising God, and having favour with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved.
  34. While James’ father was dean of the medical school at UNC from 1964-71, Stephen Colbert’s father was first vice president for academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina from 1969-74.

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.

    • Replies: @Tony
    Colbert is a real douche.
    , @Anonymous

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.
     
    His Buddy Holly cover, "Everyday," was a hit. Also, "Copperline" did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I'm not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you'd think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James' voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni's brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson's. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.
    , @The Wild Geese Howard

    He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour.
     
    Huey Lewis and Billy Ocean just dropped new albums.

    What year is it again?
  35. @MEH 0910
    James Taylor: Making American Standard
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctWs_usT-BM

    Available February 28, 2020.

    It takes an extraordinary artist to re-imagine some of the most beloved songs of the 20th century and make them completely their own. Unlike most who have tackled similar material, American Standard’s beautifully simple, stripped-down arrangements are based on the 2-guitar collaboration of James Taylor and John Pizzarelli, rather than standard piano arrangements. James was determined to keep that sound at the center of the project, and the effect is mesmerizing.
     

    American Standard was primarily recorded at James's home studio, TheBarn in MA, with additional work done at United Recording and Capitol Studios in Los Angeles and Treasure Isle and Blackbird Studios in Nashville. An all-star array of Taylor’s musical comrades make significant contributions here including:
    - Steve Gadd, drums,
    - Luis Conte, percussion
    - Jimmy Johnson, bass
    - Viktor Krauss, upright bass
    - Larry Goldings, melodica/Hammond B3 Organ
    - Walt Fowler, trumpet/flugelhorn
    - Lou Marini, clarinet/sax
    - Stuart Duncan, violin
    - Jerry Douglas, dobro
    - Arnold McCuller, vocals
    - Kate Markowitz, vocals
    - Andrea Zonn, vocals
    - Dorian Holley, vocals
    - Caroline Taylor, vocals

    Track listing:
    1. My Blue Heaven (Walter Donaldson-George A. Whiting)
    2. Moon River (Henry Mancini-Johnny Mercer)
    3. Teach Me Tonight (Gene De Paul-Sammy Cahn)
    4. As Easy As Rolling Off A Log (M.K. Jerome-Jack Scholl)
    5. Almost Like Being In Love (Frederick Loewe-Alan Jay Lerner)
    6. Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ The Boat (Frank Loesser)
    7. The Nearness Of You (Hoagy Carmichael-Ned Washington)
    8. You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught (Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein II)
    9. God Bless The Child (Billie Holiday-Arthur Herzog Jr.)
    10. Pennies From Heaven (Arthur Johnston-Johnny Burke)
    11. My Heart Stood Still (Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart)
    12. Ol’ Man River (Jerome Kern-Oscar Hammerstein II)
    13. It’s Only A Paper Moon (Harold Arlen-Yip Hardburg-Billy Rose)
    14. The Surrey With The Fringe On Top (Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein II)

    Growing up in a musical family, James fell in love with the exquisite melodies, impeccable phrasing and concise storytelling of the early era songwriting masters absorbing the qualities that would become essential to his work in popular music a few years later. American Standard is a reminder of the things that make James Taylor so special, a supreme dedication to his craft and an abiding appreciation for the everlasting power of the American song.
     

    Isn’t “American Standard” the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
    Is Mr. Taylor trolling us?

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Isn’t “American Standard” the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
     
    It is.

    Also it is the name that Fender used for a new line of its classic guitar and bass models, with various deprovements, in the 1980s onward. They used the "American Standard" model label in a text font very nearly identical to the one actually used on American Standard porcelain bathroom fixtures.
    , @MEH 0910
    Celebrating 140+ Years of Home Innovation | American Standard
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bh1fMLG5Ig
  36. @ScarletNumber
    While James' father was dean of the medical school at UNC from 1964-71, Stephen Colbert's father was first vice president for academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina from 1969-74.

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn't had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.

    Colbert is a real douche.

  37. @Reg Cæsar

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland
     
    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing's worth of difference. They threw out most of the sacraments, including marriage, which they destroyed over time. Calvin reduced marriage to the level of "agriculture".

    Four walls and a sermon. That says it all.

    doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters
     
    If they're too dirty to sit in front of the counter, they're too dirty to work behind it, let alone in the kitchen. Mrs Taylor no doubt missed the strict hygiene laws of the Northeast. Dr Taylor no doubt had his hands full at the hospital treating food poisoning.

    “On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground.”

    E.A. Ross, ‘The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People’

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Judah P Benjamin might take issue with that one.
    , @syonredux

    “On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground.”

    E.A. Ross, ‘The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People’
     
    Dunno. Anti-Jewish sentiment was lower in the South than in the North, which makes sense. The South (an agricultural region without much in the way of an entrepreneurial tradition) provided an open field for Jewish talents. The North, in contrast, was full of hard-driving , well-educated Yankees, who saw Jews as competitors.
  38. @Clifford Brown
    There is much to love about Massachusetts.

    “I am for all parts of the country: north, south, east, and west. All except God-damned New England!” – a farmer in Lancaster County, PA, 1860

  39. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests, and hauling her five kids to Martha’s Vineyard every summer to “restore our Yankee credentials”.

    Well obviously she wanted to expose her children to all sorts of diversity: diverse people who earned their millions in real estate, diverse people who earned their millions in manufacturing, diverse people who earned their millions in insurance, diverse people people who earned their millions in finance, and diverse people who inherited all their money. And those white Southerners who were worried about “black power” because they actually had to live with large numbers of them. Well fie on them.

  40. @Reg Cæsar

    And they wonder why Southerners used to hate Yankees with a white-hot passion.
     
    And vice versa. In Boston, white people served the sodas and made the beds. They may have been unlettered, but they were white.

    Back in the 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy asked Congress to deface the National Mall with a statue portraying a witch doctor about to eat a white child.


    Sick.

    https://www.shorpy.com/files/images/SHORPY-24343u.preview.jpg

    Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America:

    Massachusetts Rank Ways: A System of Truncated Orders

    ******
    The experience of social oppression in England caused the founders of Massachusetts to modify the ranking system in their society. After much discussion, they deliberately eliminated both the top and bottom strata of the East Anglian social order, and at the same time carefully preserved its middling distinctions.

    [MORE]

    ******
    Even as the founders of Massachusetts sought to eliminate extremes of rank from their society, they were very far from being egalitarian. Most Massachusetts towns deliberately preserved inequalities of status and wealth within a narrow range. Practices varied in detail from one town to another. But most communities deliberately attempted to preserve the system of social ranks which had existed within the small villages of East Anglia. The King, peers, great gentry, landless laborers and wandering poor were all outsiders to those little communities. Most actual members belonged to three ranks—the lesser gentry, yeomanry and cottagers. These people lived, worked and worshipped together, in ways that were bound by ancient customs of stratification, which had existed from “tyme out of mind” in East Anglian communities.”

    ******
    In short, the ranking system of East Anglia was reproduced in Massachusetts with two decisive differences. First, the top and bottom strata were removed, and inequality persisted within a more narrow range. Second, the importance of material differences was qualified by age and moral standing, for which the Puritans entertained high respect.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor

    ... the founders of Massachusetts ... deliberately eliminated both the top and bottom strata of the East Anglian social order, and at the same time carefully preserved its middling distinctions.
     
    That's fascinating. I wonder if that could account for both the best and worst traits we see in the old Puritans? Industrious, valuing education, prudent with money, etc. But the worst side of middle class preoccupations with obedience to social norms, moral zealousness, virtue signaling, etc.
  41. “It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    One day they’re bragging about how the North won the Civil War.

    The next day they’re complaining about the South’s influence on politics.

    You know, if they didn’t want the South to have so much influence on American politics maybe they should have just let the South go and saved 700,000 or so lives.

    And for the record, for all the complaints about Southern politics, the South was the only region of the country whose political leaders were (almost) 100% in support of the Lend-Lease Act. Much of the rest of the country actually favored sitting the war out while Hitler did whatever the hell he wanted.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    And for the record, for all the complaints about Southern politics, the South was the only region of the country whose political leaders were (almost) 100% in support of the Lend-Lease Act. Much of the rest of the country actually favored sitting the war out while Hitler did whatever the hell he wanted.
     
    In other words, much of the rest of the country was still familiar with Washington's Farewell Address.

    Particularly a certain Swedish family from Little Falls, Minnesota.

    https://statues.vanderkrogt.net/Foto/us/usmn31.jpg

    https://images.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2004/233/7124865_109315342441.jpg
  42. @Dr. X

    His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests, and hauling her five kids to Martha’s Vineyard every summer to “restore our Yankee credentials”.
     

    "It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.

    As much as I loathe New England, there is only one valid interpretation of the coming of the war:

    The slaveholders had, since the invention of the cotton gin, left behind the generally anti-slavery tendency of the founding generation in favor of economic profit.

    They did not believe their institutions could survive as long as the foundation of their institutions, slavery, was hemmed in by a burgeoning North that was abandoning the Democratic Party, traditionally the vehicle of the “slave power,” in favor of a new Republican Party that proposed simply to restore the Northwest Ordinance and let slavery die peacefully.

    Meanwhile, a fringe abolitionist minority in the North gave moderate Southerners the impression that the Republican Party itself was more extreme than it really was.

    A determined, skilled, and highly motivated radical minority within the South was able to use fractious Democratic politics of 1860 to lead a secessionist uprising in the 7 states of the Deep South. Buchanan’s handling of the situation was downright boot-licking; Lincoln’s, though firmer, consisted solely of holding onto remaining federal property and delivering the mail. The “fire-eaters” then finagled a shooting incident at Fort Sumter, after which the United States government had to do something.

    Southern sympathizers can pretend otherwise, can pretend that they were forced into the fray, but Edmund Ruffin was gleeful to start the war.

    If Lincoln had not been assassinated, it has been said his main goal for the 2nd term was to find a way to remove blacks from America.

    Although most Confederate soldiers did not own slaves, over one half came from families that owned slaves. The average Union soldier was fighting for what he perceived as the white man’s republic; the average Confederate soldier, though incredibly brave and in many ways noble, was fighting for a bad cause.

    I have ancestors on both sides, by the way. And I do prefer the company of rural Southerners to obnoxious and puffed-up New Englanders. But I’m glad my Union ancestors won.

    P.S. I have run out of comments for this hour. To the guy above, Wilkey, who praises the Southerners for supporting Lend-Lease: AMERICA FIRST! Lend-Lease was an unconstitutional disaster. Southerners should be ashamed that their politicians supported the war-monger Roosevelt.

    • Agree: JMcG
  43. [Taylor] is rooting for the Democratic candidates Deval Patrick and Elizabeth Warren – both from Massachusetts, where he now lives. “But at this point, I’d be happy to see pretty much anyone in – the bar is so low. Because the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    Just one more piece of evidence showing that the entertainment industry’s self-perceived intelligence and actual intelligence is more disparate than probably any other industry. Or maybe he’s just mad because nobody in the Trump administration has asked him to apologize in song to France or Canada or whoever.

    When the name James Taylor came up, I used to think of his hits of 50 years ago. Now I think of that embarrassingly retarded Two Lane Blacktop performance

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    The delusions of our betters is something to behold.
  44. Waspiest-WASP ever apparently means being able to drink/drug yourself stupid for years on end yet still manage to be successful at your job. Blacks and Hispanics must absolutely hate that sort of competence. WASPs even do addiction better than minorities do.

  45. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buck Ransom
    Isn't "American Standard" the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
    Is Mr. Taylor trolling us?

    Isn’t “American Standard” the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?

    It is.

    Also it is the name that Fender used for a new line of its classic guitar and bass models, with various deprovements, in the 1980s onward. They used the “American Standard” model label in a text font very nearly identical to the one actually used on American Standard porcelain bathroom fixtures.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    The plumbing fixture company was also an industrial pump company at least at one time.
    , @donvonburg
    The American Standard Series were actual improvements in most ways from the vintage-style models that Fender was building. They had a much better truss rod that adjusted from the neck and a much better stock trem system on the Strats, and the pickups didn't cause string warble and were quieter. They were good gigging guitars. They didn't buzz or hum and they stayed in tune.The urethane finishes really didn't degrade the sound but the cork sniffers thought they did. And also the fingerboard radius was flatter, making them much better for 90 percent of players now.


    Were they ideal? No. The hardware was low cost and they used free machining steel for the trem inertia block and sintered saddles, which did nothing for the sound, and they didn't have the compound radius fretboard which is the biggest improvement in guitars in decades. And to fight fret sprout they excessively rounded off the fingerboard edges, meaning the E strings can go a little over the side. They also never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity to fix unnecessary quirks. But these instruments basically are gigworthy and low trouble factor guitars.

    Clean stock ones are starting to rise in value, which indicates people now see this.
  46. @Dr. X

    His father, a doctor, moved the family to the south when he became the dean of the medical school of the University of North Carolina; his mother didn’t want to go, and fought against the politics she found there. She saw the north-eastern state of Massachusetts as a “lost Eden” and would spend her days doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters, on protests, and hauling her five kids to Martha’s Vineyard every summer to “restore our Yankee credentials”.
     

    "It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.

    Moldbug:
    “[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc.”

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    One man's superstition is another man's Faith.
    , @ben tillman

    Moldbug:
    “[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc.”
     
    Those things aren't "philosophical mysteries".
  47. @Anonymous
    Why did you post this?

    Why did you post this?

    For the same reason I’m gonna post one or two myself. It’s a beautiful song. No matter how much of a lefty JT is (or turned out to be), I never read anything of it, don’t plan on it, and will just enjoy his music. I really did think that JT was a Southern boy since forever, as I knew he’d spent time in Chapel Hill… damn shame about his Yankee Mom, though …

    James Taylor spent a week or so at a funny farm outside of Boston, Mass due to depression one time. I’d driven by that place before and never knew about this. Of course I didn’t pull in there, like this guy. This song and maybe Fire & Rain too were supposed to be about that experience.

    His take on southern California is excellent, with no offense to our host…“I need your Golden Gated cities like a hole in the head…

    This one’s just the best:

    OK, this is not a time for levity – do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly? A long distance dedication to commenter Rosie:

    • Replies: @anonymous

    OK, this is not a time for levity – do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly?
     
    You know damned well he's never gonna sing that one in concert. That's why I don't buy his current bullshit.

    Back in the eighties, through serendipity I met and interacted with him for a short time. He's a very bright guy, surprisingly quick-witted, and his humor is very very dark. The jokes he made were not for liberal ears. At all.

    His son Ben recounted one episode where James dropped by the house to visit him, post divorce, when Carly wasn't home. He said, "I'm hungry," and opened the fridge, pulled out a lot of food, dumped it on a plate, and started eating... Carly's food. Ben said, "Dad! That's really rude! You shouldn't just start eating mom's food!" James retorted, "Why not? I paid for it."

    Anyway, remember what a fellow said, if your station in life, or your paycheck, depends on having a certain point of view, that's the point of view you're gonna have. Ain't nobody gonna publicly logic you out of it.

    Bank accounts carry their own logic, particular to the account holder.

    This is "cancel culture," and Dad Loves His Work.

  48. @Anonymous
    Why did you post this?

    Because all y’all dipshits are getting worked up about JT’s mom not liking Carolina. Obv JT felt differently. Good song, beautiful place, shitty senators.

    If you had to live in Chapel Hill you wouldn’t like it either.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Shitty Senators? I sure hope you're not referring to Jesse Helms.

    I guess I'm a little behind the times, huh, but Chapel Hill was a nice place back during the time JT lived there.

  49. @Desiderius
    Because all y’all dipshits are getting worked up about JT’s mom not liking Carolina. Obv JT felt differently. Good song, beautiful place, shitty senators.

    If you had to live in Chapel Hill you wouldn’t like it either.

    Shitty Senators? I sure hope you’re not referring to Jesse Helms.

    I guess I’m a little behind the times, huh, but Chapel Hill was a nice place back during the time JT lived there.

    • Replies: @68W58
    Even so Helms himself said that we should put a fence around Chapel Hill and make it the state zoo.
    , @Desiderius
    Richard Burr.

    The research triangle long ago succumbed to Colbert disease, although Raleigh might be salvageable.

    , @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/RoscoeBDavis1/status/1229843058059071489?s=20
  50. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….So maybe the Confederacy did win….

    The US white majority will soon disappear forever
    By 2050, the US will be a ‘majority-minority’ country, with white non-Hispanics making up less than half of the total population.

    But the white share of the U.S. population has been dropping, from a little under 90% in 1950 to 60% in 2018. It will likely drop below 50% in another 25 years.

    White nationalists want America to be white again. But this will never happen. America is on its way to becoming predominantly nonwhite.

    https://www.chicagoreporter.com/the-us-white-majority-will-soon-disappear-forever/

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320

    White:291,300

    https://www.sciway.net/afam/slavery/population.html

    https://www.sciway.net/afam/slavery/population.html

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….
     
    Exactly right. There's a positive correlation between proximity to other races and race-realism.

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320
    White:291,300
     
    And South Carolina was the first to secede.
  51. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber
    While James' father was dean of the medical school at UNC from 1964-71, Stephen Colbert's father was first vice president for academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina from 1969-74.

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn't had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.

    His Buddy Holly cover, “Everyday,” was a hit. Also, “Copperline” did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I’m not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you’d think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James’ voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni’s brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson’s. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson's is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes. i had several relatives on my mother's side who by their mid-70 shook like paint shakers (from Parkinsons) and on my father's side not a one, though several lethal heart attacks and two separate cases of the same uncommon cancer.

    I never found her as sexually attractive as a lot of guys did and I never liked her politics. But what a voice! She was the number one female pop interpreter of other people's lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female"rock" singer. With Dolly ( a superb entertainer and very good songwriter but the least powerful singer of the three) and Emmylou (the flat out best female country singer of her era) she was the dominant singer in the "Trio" recordings and not half bad with the Nelson Riddle stuff.
    , @Anonymous
    Joni had polio and a brain aneurysm, drugs were not her primary problem. She was intelligent enough to figure out that her problem in playing guitar was her hands' limitations and she worked out a big series of open and modal tunings , and guitar players are still listening to those records and trying to figure out what she did.

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.
    , @ScarletNumber

    His Buddy Holly cover, “Everyday,” was a hit. Also, “Copperline” did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.
     
    Considering that James made his bones as a singer/songwriter, it is cheating to include a cover. In any event, it only reached 61 on the charts. Copperline didn't chart at all.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "James’ voice is finally giving out"

    I know there's autotune and all that, but he sounded pretty good in Dublin in summer 2018, far better than I expected he would.

    Mud Slide Slim still stands up pretty well today, where Tapestry doesn't sound anywhere near as good as it did in 1972.

    But I can never understand why anyone takes more notice of what an actor or musician thinks about politics than a plumber or taxi-driver's views. I can only assume that they're invested not just in the music, but in the presented persona of the performer.

    "Joni’s brain is mush"

    Dunno. Another person whose music I love, but abandoning your child is a terrible thing to do. I'm sure her daughter would prefer to have had a mother, rather than the world having Court And Spark.

  52. @Reg Cæsar

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland
     
    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing's worth of difference. They threw out most of the sacraments, including marriage, which they destroyed over time. Calvin reduced marriage to the level of "agriculture".

    Four walls and a sermon. That says it all.

    doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters
     
    If they're too dirty to sit in front of the counter, they're too dirty to work behind it, let alone in the kitchen. Mrs Taylor no doubt missed the strict hygiene laws of the Northeast. Dr Taylor no doubt had his hands full at the hospital treating food poisoning.

    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing’s worth of difference.

    There are vast behavioral differences between Puritans and other groups of White people. As far as their religion, all Protestants may be crazy, but they’re all crazy in their unique way.

    I do appreciate your realtime demonstration that hatred for Southern Whites drives the dark hearts of many. As we see, the old New England stock is dying out (or is already pretty much gone) because they placed their hatred for others (Whites) above whatever they were for.

    Hate defeats itself. Love wins!

  53. @Buck Ransom
    Isn't "American Standard" the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
    Is Mr. Taylor trolling us?

    Celebrating 140+ Years of Home Innovation | American Standard

  54. @ScarletNumber
    While James' father was dean of the medical school at UNC from 1964-71, Stephen Colbert's father was first vice president for academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina from 1969-74.

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn't had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.

    He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour.

    Huey Lewis and Billy Ocean just dropped new albums.

    What year is it again?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    #WTH are albums?

    - Millennials
  55. As we see, the old New England stock is dying out (or is already pretty much gone) because they placed their hatred for others (Whites) above whatever they were for.

    There are close to 4o million Mayflower descendants today. That hardly constitutes disappearance.

    As far as hatred for whites, they didn’t flood their own territories with primitive Africans who spit in their food for 400 years.

    Hate defeats itself. Love wins!

    That the Census, when it asked, showed that one in every seven or eight Negroes was a mulatto certainly testifies to that!

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor

    There are close to 4o million Mayflower descendants today. That hardly constitutes disappearance.
     
    Well, the numbers I see say 35 million worldwide, but in America, it's closer to 10 million. So, we're talking about a lot of people who have a few drops of Mayflower blood. Kind of like those blonde haired, blue eyed guys who claim to be Cherokee.

    As far as hatred for whites, they didn’t flood their own territories with primitive Africans who spit in their food for 400 years.
     
    Blacks seldom did that, don't get your history from Jesse Jackson. And as we've already established, New Englanders were bringing in a lot of the slaves.

    So why did New England peter out with so many priggish schoolmarms and other old maids? Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern. It's not a generative belief system. It dies out.
  56. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    "On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground."

    E.A. Ross, 'The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People'

    Judah P Benjamin might take issue with that one.

  57. @syonredux

    It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    ......Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)....So maybe the Confederacy did win....

    The US white majority will soon disappear forever
    By 2050, the US will be a 'majority-minority' country, with white non-Hispanics making up less than half of the total population.
     

    But the white share of the U.S. population has been dropping, from a little under 90% in 1950 to 60% in 2018. It will likely drop below 50% in another 25 years.
     

    White nationalists want America to be white again. But this will never happen. America is on its way to becoming predominantly nonwhite.
     
    https://www.chicagoreporter.com/the-us-white-majority-will-soon-disappear-forever/

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320

    White:291,300


    https://www.sciway.net/afam/slavery/population.html


    https://www.sciway.net/afam/slavery/population.html

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….

    Exactly right. There’s a positive correlation between proximity to other races and race-realism.

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320
    White:291,300

    And South Carolina was the first to secede.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….

    Exactly right. There’s a positive correlation between proximity to other races and race-realism.
     

    Except the South Carolina elite thought that they had the perfect society (White minority, Black majority)....

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320
    White:291,300

    And South Carolina was the first to secede.
     

    Yeah, they really thought that being outnumbered by Blacks was a great idea......Now, if they had had their heads screwed on straight,instead of seceding, they would have concentrated on convincing everyone in the South to ship their slaves back to Africa and set them free...
  58. @MEH 0910
    Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America:

    Massachusetts Rank Ways: A System of Truncated Orders

    ******
    The experience of social oppression in England caused the founders of Massachusetts to modify the ranking system in their society. After much discussion, they deliberately eliminated both the top and bottom strata of the East Anglian social order, and at the same time carefully preserved its middling distinctions.
     

    ******
    Even as the founders of Massachusetts sought to eliminate extremes of rank from their society, they were very far from being egalitarian. Most Massachusetts towns deliberately preserved inequalities of status and wealth within a narrow range. Practices varied in detail from one town to another. But most communities deliberately attempted to preserve the system of social ranks which had existed within the small villages of East Anglia. The King, peers, great gentry, landless laborers and wandering poor were all outsiders to those little communities. Most actual members belonged to three ranks—the lesser gentry, yeomanry and cottagers. These people lived, worked and worshipped together, in ways that were bound by ancient customs of stratification, which had existed from “tyme out of mind” in East Anglian communities.”

    ******
    In short, the ranking system of East Anglia was reproduced in Massachusetts with two decisive differences. First, the top and bottom strata were removed, and inequality persisted within a more narrow range. Second, the importance of material differences was qualified by age and moral standing, for which the Puritans entertained high respect.
     

    … the founders of Massachusetts … deliberately eliminated both the top and bottom strata of the East Anglian social order, and at the same time carefully preserved its middling distinctions.

    That’s fascinating. I wonder if that could account for both the best and worst traits we see in the old Puritans? Industrious, valuing education, prudent with money, etc. But the worst side of middle class preoccupations with obedience to social norms, moral zealousness, virtue signaling, etc.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  59. anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Why did you post this?
     
    For the same reason I'm gonna post one or two myself. It's a beautiful song. No matter how much of a lefty JT is (or turned out to be), I never read anything of it, don't plan on it, and will just enjoy his music. I really did think that JT was a Southern boy since forever, as I knew he'd spent time in Chapel Hill... damn shame about his Yankee Mom, though ...

    James Taylor spent a week or so at a funny farm outside of Boston, Mass due to depression one time. I'd driven by that place before and never knew about this. Of course I didn't pull in there, like this guy. This song and maybe Fire & Rain too were supposed to be about that experience.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wr_ZRLgduiU

    His take on southern California is excellent, with no offense to our host..."I need your Golden Gated cities like a hole in the head...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waOLnpuKUME

    This one's just the best:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpsOuzB3eAg

    OK, this is not a time for levity - do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly? A long distance dedication to commenter Rosie:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxENtNlOG4k

    OK, this is not a time for levity – do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly?

    You know damned well he’s never gonna sing that one in concert. That’s why I don’t buy his current bullshit.

    Back in the eighties, through serendipity I met and interacted with him for a short time. He’s a very bright guy, surprisingly quick-witted, and his humor is very very dark. The jokes he made were not for liberal ears. At all.

    His son Ben recounted one episode where James dropped by the house to visit him, post divorce, when Carly wasn’t home. He said, “I’m hungry,” and opened the fridge, pulled out a lot of food, dumped it on a plate, and started eating… Carly’s food. Ben said, “Dad! That’s really rude! You shouldn’t just start eating mom’s food!” James retorted, “Why not? I paid for it.”

    Anyway, remember what a fellow said, if your station in life, or your paycheck, depends on having a certain point of view, that’s the point of view you’re gonna have. Ain’t nobody gonna publicly logic you out of it.

    Bank accounts carry their own logic, particular to the account holder.

    This is “cancel culture,” and Dad Loves His Work.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you for that interesting reply, #329. I just wonder why a guy like that wouldn't have enough money/assets by now to not need to depend on said paycheck. Lots of people at his age figure they can finally say what they do want to say and not give a damn what others think. It's too bad JT doesn't (per your opinion that this talk is just BS).
  60. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.
     
    His Buddy Holly cover, "Everyday," was a hit. Also, "Copperline" did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I'm not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you'd think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James' voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni's brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson's. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.

    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson’s is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes. i had several relatives on my mother’s side who by their mid-70 shook like paint shakers (from Parkinsons) and on my father’s side not a one, though several lethal heart attacks and two separate cases of the same uncommon cancer.

    I never found her as sexually attractive as a lot of guys did and I never liked her politics. But what a voice! She was the number one female pop interpreter of other people’s lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female”rock” singer. With Dolly ( a superb entertainer and very good songwriter but the least powerful singer of the three) and Emmylou (the flat out best female country singer of her era) she was the dominant singer in the “Trio” recordings and not half bad with the Nelson Riddle stuff.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson’s is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes.
     
    Unless you do cocaine. Then your genes won’t help you much. Linda did cocaine.

    I think the boomer generation is ignorant about the long-term effects of cocaine because they don’t want to know. Cocaine causes brain damage if you snort it, like fire from an acetylene torch burns your fingers if you touch the flame.

    Again I say in the next 5 years, you’re going to see a lot if your favorite boomer music performers come apart at the seams. Because they have brain damage.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2001/11/could-cocaine-cause-parkinsons-disease
    , @ScarletNumber

    [Linda Ronstadt] was the number one female pop interpreter of other people’s lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female”rock” singer.
     
    It's amazing how many of her hits were covers. Even Different Drum, which she did with the Stone Poneys, was written by Michael Nesmith of The Monkees. He performed it once on the show, but only as a joke. Then he did this great live, acoustic version in 1992 in which he was classy enough to apologize to and thank Linda at the end.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDgF-A_kGVg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMkiZ9tO-Zs
  61. @donut
    Argentina has a South Pole base . During the winter staffing is reduced a Dr. who had contracted to stay over changed his mind but they wouldn't relieve him for a few good reasons . He set the base on fire so that they would evacuate everybody . I once saw a video , couldn't find it on youtube, of a full on brawl at a South Korean station .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Antarctica

    I believe that the station leader is usually deputized as a US Marshall at each station .
  62. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.
     
    His Buddy Holly cover, "Everyday," was a hit. Also, "Copperline" did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I'm not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you'd think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James' voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni's brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson's. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.

    Joni had polio and a brain aneurysm, drugs were not her primary problem. She was intelligent enough to figure out that her problem in playing guitar was her hands’ limitations and she worked out a big series of open and modal tunings , and guitar players are still listening to those records and trying to figure out what she did.

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.
     
    Michelle Phillips was a snorter and devoted acid head, and her brain is currently fried. If you have more brain matter to fry, the obvious signs take longer, but those ladies are harboring brain damage, and it will manifest. Count on it.
    , @donvonburg
    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she's had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.

    I can't for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I'd have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we're a depraved species at the end of the day.

    Stevie is also extremely short, 5' or 5'1", something like that.
  63. “Because the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    A lot of Northeastern liberals — not just New Englanders — are driven to a frothing rage by Trump not just because he contradicts their most cherished assumptions, but because he is — horrifyingly — a dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker. Though they’d love the recast him as “hick from the sticks,” this just isn’t going to play.

    On the topic of James Taylor, he was a talented song writer and musician in my youth. I know nothing about his music now. I appreciate his talents, but if there is any correlation between artistic talent and political insight, it is probably negative.

  64. @Reg Cæsar

    As we see, the old New England stock is dying out (or is already pretty much gone) because they placed their hatred for others (Whites) above whatever they were for.
     
    There are close to 4o million Mayflower descendants today. That hardly constitutes disappearance.

    As far as hatred for whites, they didn't flood their own territories with primitive Africans who spit in their food for 400 years.

    Hate defeats itself. Love wins!

     

    That the Census, when it asked, showed that one in every seven or eight Negroes was a mulatto certainly testifies to that!

    There are close to 4o million Mayflower descendants today. That hardly constitutes disappearance.

    Well, the numbers I see say 35 million worldwide, but in America, it’s closer to 10 million. So, we’re talking about a lot of people who have a few drops of Mayflower blood. Kind of like those blonde haired, blue eyed guys who claim to be Cherokee.

    As far as hatred for whites, they didn’t flood their own territories with primitive Africans who spit in their food for 400 years.

    Blacks seldom did that, don’t get your history from Jesse Jackson. And as we’ve already established, New Englanders were bringing in a lot of the slaves.

    So why did New England peter out with so many priggish schoolmarms and other old maids? Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern. It’s not a generative belief system. It dies out.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern.
     
    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine. Perhaps the other Taylor’s mom was just a bit hysterical—Steve characterizing her as a “WASPiest WASP ever” is surely a bit of bait that you bit.

    Anyway, forget James ‘Tanglewood Tote’ Taylor, here’s Yankee wailer Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV to rock all y’all:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFr7i550-s4
  65. @Reg Cæsar

    I believe Donald Trump’s ancestors were non-Puritan. His mother came from Scotland
     
    They were Calvinists. Not a farthing's worth of difference. They threw out most of the sacraments, including marriage, which they destroyed over time. Calvin reduced marriage to the level of "agriculture".

    Four walls and a sermon. That says it all.

    doing sit-ins at segregated lunch counters
     
    If they're too dirty to sit in front of the counter, they're too dirty to work behind it, let alone in the kitchen. Mrs Taylor no doubt missed the strict hygiene laws of the Northeast. Dr Taylor no doubt had his hands full at the hospital treating food poisoning.

    As one with an intimate knowledge of Calvinism and Calvinists, YES. They’re high up in the running, if not actually at the top for “worst white people”.

  66. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Joni had polio and a brain aneurysm, drugs were not her primary problem. She was intelligent enough to figure out that her problem in playing guitar was her hands' limitations and she worked out a big series of open and modal tunings , and guitar players are still listening to those records and trying to figure out what she did.

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.

    Michelle Phillips was a snorter and devoted acid head, and her brain is currently fried. If you have more brain matter to fry, the obvious signs take longer, but those ladies are harboring brain damage, and it will manifest. Count on it.

  67. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson's is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes. i had several relatives on my mother's side who by their mid-70 shook like paint shakers (from Parkinsons) and on my father's side not a one, though several lethal heart attacks and two separate cases of the same uncommon cancer.

    I never found her as sexually attractive as a lot of guys did and I never liked her politics. But what a voice! She was the number one female pop interpreter of other people's lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female"rock" singer. With Dolly ( a superb entertainer and very good songwriter but the least powerful singer of the three) and Emmylou (the flat out best female country singer of her era) she was the dominant singer in the "Trio" recordings and not half bad with the Nelson Riddle stuff.

    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson’s is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes.

    Unless you do cocaine. Then your genes won’t help you much. Linda did cocaine.

    I think the boomer generation is ignorant about the long-term effects of cocaine because they don’t want to know. Cocaine causes brain damage if you snort it, like fire from an acetylene torch burns your fingers if you touch the flame.

    Again I say in the next 5 years, you’re going to see a lot if your favorite boomer music performers come apart at the seams. Because they have brain damage.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2001/11/could-cocaine-cause-parkinsons-disease

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    One of the most beloved actors of his time famously suffers Parkinson's today, which may have something to do with what he did to be awake enough to star in one of the most beloved movies of all time at night while continuing to star in his TV series during the day.
    , @dr kill
    Ok, Boomer . Your reward for living a boring life is to be a 90 year old for 30 years. Enjoy!!
  68. @Anonymous
    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson's is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes. i had several relatives on my mother's side who by their mid-70 shook like paint shakers (from Parkinsons) and on my father's side not a one, though several lethal heart attacks and two separate cases of the same uncommon cancer.

    I never found her as sexually attractive as a lot of guys did and I never liked her politics. But what a voice! She was the number one female pop interpreter of other people's lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female"rock" singer. With Dolly ( a superb entertainer and very good songwriter but the least powerful singer of the three) and Emmylou (the flat out best female country singer of her era) she was the dominant singer in the "Trio" recordings and not half bad with the Nelson Riddle stuff.

    [Linda Ronstadt] was the number one female pop interpreter of other people’s lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female”rock” singer.

    It’s amazing how many of her hits were covers. Even Different Drum, which she did with the Stone Poneys, was written by Michael Nesmith of The Monkees. He performed it once on the show, but only as a joke. Then he did this great live, acoustic version in 1992 in which he was classy enough to apologize to and thank Linda at the end.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Since she was not at all a songwriter all her hits were, in modern parlance, covers. Whereas Parton has made a good chunk of her money and fame as a songwriter. Harris wrote a little but mostly is an interpreter of others’ songs, and a very good one at that. In fact her voice is so pure many country purists love her as a person (she was also hotter AF under her modest attire) but can only listen to her in limited doses.
  69. @The Wild Geese Howard

    He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour.
     
    Huey Lewis and Billy Ocean just dropped new albums.

    What year is it again?

    #WTH are albums?

    – Millennials

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    https://twitter.com/Goofyfan_Chuck/status/1229801130496057347

    What year did you say it was again?

    Where am I?
  70. @Anonymous

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.
     
    His Buddy Holly cover, "Everyday," was a hit. Also, "Copperline" did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I'm not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you'd think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James' voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni's brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson's. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.

    His Buddy Holly cover, “Everyday,” was a hit. Also, “Copperline” did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    Considering that James made his bones as a singer/songwriter, it is cheating to include a cover. In any event, it only reached 61 on the charts. Copperline didn’t chart at all.

  71. @Achmed E. Newman
    Shitty Senators? I sure hope you're not referring to Jesse Helms.

    I guess I'm a little behind the times, huh, but Chapel Hill was a nice place back during the time JT lived there.

    Even so Helms himself said that we should put a fence around Chapel Hill and make it the state zoo.

  72. @anonymous

    OK, this is not a time for levity – do you understand what happened to Machine Gun Kelly?
     
    You know damned well he's never gonna sing that one in concert. That's why I don't buy his current bullshit.

    Back in the eighties, through serendipity I met and interacted with him for a short time. He's a very bright guy, surprisingly quick-witted, and his humor is very very dark. The jokes he made were not for liberal ears. At all.

    His son Ben recounted one episode where James dropped by the house to visit him, post divorce, when Carly wasn't home. He said, "I'm hungry," and opened the fridge, pulled out a lot of food, dumped it on a plate, and started eating... Carly's food. Ben said, "Dad! That's really rude! You shouldn't just start eating mom's food!" James retorted, "Why not? I paid for it."

    Anyway, remember what a fellow said, if your station in life, or your paycheck, depends on having a certain point of view, that's the point of view you're gonna have. Ain't nobody gonna publicly logic you out of it.

    Bank accounts carry their own logic, particular to the account holder.

    This is "cancel culture," and Dad Loves His Work.

    Thank you for that interesting reply, #329. I just wonder why a guy like that wouldn’t have enough money/assets by now to not need to depend on said paycheck. Lots of people at his age figure they can finally say what they do want to say and not give a damn what others think. It’s too bad JT doesn’t (per your opinion that this talk is just BS).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Look at what happened to Howard Stern. A lot more than money at stake.
  73. @Desiderius
    https://youtu.be/4z8lS--AyBU

    I’m about an hour from Hendersonville, it’s a nice place despite its proximity to Asheville. Last fall I worked for the Census, there was an immigrant from Colombia who was taking a class to be an enumerator from Hendersonville and someone asked her about the Hispanic community there. “When I came, 30 years ago it was only five percent,” she said, “but today, eighty percent!”

    Now, it isn’t even close to that, but she is probably right about the trend and she was completely confident about her incorrect assertion.

  74. @Anonymous

    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson’s is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes.
     
    Unless you do cocaine. Then your genes won’t help you much. Linda did cocaine.

    I think the boomer generation is ignorant about the long-term effects of cocaine because they don’t want to know. Cocaine causes brain damage if you snort it, like fire from an acetylene torch burns your fingers if you touch the flame.

    Again I say in the next 5 years, you’re going to see a lot if your favorite boomer music performers come apart at the seams. Because they have brain damage.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2001/11/could-cocaine-cause-parkinsons-disease

    One of the most beloved actors of his time famously suffers Parkinson’s today, which may have something to do with what he did to be awake enough to star in one of the most beloved movies of all time at night while continuing to star in his TV series during the day.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Do you mean Michael J. Fox, Steve?
    , @MEH 0910
    NYT:

    Parkinson's 'Clusters' Getting a Closer Look
    By Mary Duenwald
    May 14, 2002

    Michael J. Fox's celebrity can do more than raise money for Parkinson's research. It may also help open an avenue of research that scientists have long wanted to explore.

    Mr. Fox, it turns out, was one of four people who worked on a production crew at a television studio in Vancouver, British Columbia, in the late 1970's and developed Parkinson's disease. Given that only 125 people worked on the crew in those years -- including actors, directors, writers, production people and technicians -- the number of cases seems extraordinary.

    It is possible that the cluster of cases arose purely from chance. But researchers are interested in studying them in hopes they will lead to clues to possible environmental factors or even viruses that may contribute to to the disease.
     

    Don S. Williams, who directed Mr. Fox in two Canadian situation comedies beginning when the actor was 16, and who also has Parkinson's, tried to get in touch with Mr. Fox soon after reading the news. ''But I couldn't get past his handlers,'' he said.

    Mr. Williams (also a cast member of ''The X Files'' for four years) learned of his illness nine years ago, when he was 55.

    Sally Gardner, whose Parkinson's was diagnosed when she was 38, in 1984, had been a script supervisor in the late 1970's, and had worked with Mr. Fox and Mr. Williams. The fourth member of the cluster, a cameraman who has kept his identity secret, was recently found by Jerry Thompson, writer and director of a Canadian television documentary about Mr. Fox and Parkinson's disease. The cameraman's diagnosis came at age 54.

    Thompson's documentary, ''The Parkinson's Enigma,'' which was broadcast last month, publicized the cluster's existence.

    Could something at the television studio have caused the disease in all four people? Dr. Calne, Dr. Langston and other experts believe it could have. Perhaps something they breathed or ate or drank -- a toxin, perhaps, or an infectious agent -- set the disease process in motion.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_and_Me#Parkinson's_disease
  75. @Steve Sailer
    One of the most beloved actors of his time famously suffers Parkinson's today, which may have something to do with what he did to be awake enough to star in one of the most beloved movies of all time at night while continuing to star in his TV series during the day.

    Do you mean Michael J. Fox, Steve?

  76. @Anonymous

    Anyway, he was also in Parade yesterday. He has a new album coming out on February 28, so he must be doing the press tour. Remember, he hasn’t had a hit song since Her Town Too in 1981.
     
    His Buddy Holly cover, "Everyday," was a hit. Also, "Copperline" did well. I think that was the last hit he actually wrote.

    I'm not a songwriter, but it seems like as much as he’s done, and because of his technical chops, you'd think figuring out the math of of hit song to produce at least one per record wouldn’t be so hard for him. But I guess it is.

    James' voice is finally giving out, so this may be his last album. I’ve come to notice that if you were a druggy in your younger years, it comes back to kick you hard in the ass by your late sixties. Seems like cocaine in particular does a number on the brain.

    Joni's brain is mush. Linda Ronstadt and Carly Simon have Parkinson's. All coke lovers back in the day. I think in the next five years, we’re gonna see most of the rest of the Laurel Canyon crew blow up.

    “James’ voice is finally giving out”

    I know there’s autotune and all that, but he sounded pretty good in Dublin in summer 2018, far better than I expected he would.

    Mud Slide Slim still stands up pretty well today, where Tapestry doesn’t sound anywhere near as good as it did in 1972.

    But I can never understand why anyone takes more notice of what an actor or musician thinks about politics than a plumber or taxi-driver’s views. I can only assume that they’re invested not just in the music, but in the presented persona of the performer.

    “Joni’s brain is mush”

    Dunno. Another person whose music I love, but abandoning your child is a terrible thing to do. I’m sure her daughter would prefer to have had a mother, rather than the world having Court And Spark.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Adoption is not a panacea but it works out well sometimes. Being the biological accident kid of a celebrity single mother almost never does.
  77. @Clifford Brown
    There is much to love about Massachusetts.

    Beautiful scenery; home of MIT and Peter Lynch. OTOH, home of the Kennedys and the Bulger Brothers, and adoptive home of Bill Weld, Deval Patrick, and Elizabeth Warren.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Good hockey
  78. @Anonymous

    Isn’t “American Standard” the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
     
    It is.

    Also it is the name that Fender used for a new line of its classic guitar and bass models, with various deprovements, in the 1980s onward. They used the "American Standard" model label in a text font very nearly identical to the one actually used on American Standard porcelain bathroom fixtures.

    The plumbing fixture company was also an industrial pump company at least at one time.

  79. @dvorak

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.
     
    Moldbug:
    "[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc."

    One man’s superstition is another man’s Faith.

  80. @Forbes
    It's as good an explanation as any why my WASP Puritan (Massachusetts Bay Colony--1635) ancestors moved west from New England--James Taylor's mother sounds insufferable.

    And BTW, progressive politics are not exactly Puritan.

    The elements of feminism that don’t originate from Jews seem to flow mostly from New England’s upper class.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Feminism is civilizational Alzheimer’s. Same shit happened to Rome and the Ming.
    , @Thirdeye
    Nineteenth Century feminism was driven by WASP businesswomen, especially in the west. They ran the service industries in frontier towns - boarding houses, laundry, bathhouses, brothels and such. As big players in small town economies they wanted recognition. The first state to grant women suffrage was Wyoming. It was also a Republican thing.
  81. @Achmed E. Newman
    Shitty Senators? I sure hope you're not referring to Jesse Helms.

    I guess I'm a little behind the times, huh, but Chapel Hill was a nice place back during the time JT lived there.

    Richard Burr.

    The research triangle long ago succumbed to Colbert disease, although Raleigh might be salvageable.

    • Replies: @captflee
    Tillis is damned near as bad as Burr.

    You are considerably more sanguine concerning the city of my birth than am I. My last positive thought concerning a good outcome was in the middle sixties; Carroll Jr. High classes were traipsed across the street to take in GWTW in 70mm glory at the Cardinal during one of its periodic re-releases, and I was there able to observe my schoolmates reacting to the film. Seeing the little yankee shits slump down into their seats as the rest of the audience roared its approval of Melanie's killing the Blue Uniformed Scum of the Earth(TM) bummer was a moment to treasure for a lifetime.
  82. Reality is for people who can’t handle drugs.

  83. @Anonymous

    Linda Ronstadt was never all that serious a druggie. I think Parkinson’s is twenty percent lifestyle and eighty percent genes.
     
    Unless you do cocaine. Then your genes won’t help you much. Linda did cocaine.

    I think the boomer generation is ignorant about the long-term effects of cocaine because they don’t want to know. Cocaine causes brain damage if you snort it, like fire from an acetylene torch burns your fingers if you touch the flame.

    Again I say in the next 5 years, you’re going to see a lot if your favorite boomer music performers come apart at the seams. Because they have brain damage.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2001/11/could-cocaine-cause-parkinsons-disease

    Ok, Boomer . Your reward for living a boring life is to be a 90 year old for 30 years. Enjoy!!

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    "Non-smokers also die, but smokers are dead longer!"
  84. @RichardTaylor

    There are close to 4o million Mayflower descendants today. That hardly constitutes disappearance.
     
    Well, the numbers I see say 35 million worldwide, but in America, it's closer to 10 million. So, we're talking about a lot of people who have a few drops of Mayflower blood. Kind of like those blonde haired, blue eyed guys who claim to be Cherokee.

    As far as hatred for whites, they didn’t flood their own territories with primitive Africans who spit in their food for 400 years.
     
    Blacks seldom did that, don't get your history from Jesse Jackson. And as we've already established, New Englanders were bringing in a lot of the slaves.

    So why did New England peter out with so many priggish schoolmarms and other old maids? Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern. It's not a generative belief system. It dies out.

    Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern.

    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine. Perhaps the other Taylor’s mom was just a bit hysterical—Steve characterizing her as a “WASPiest WASP ever” is surely a bit of bait that you bit.

    Anyway, forget James ‘Tanglewood Tote’ Taylor, here’s Yankee wailer Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV to rock all y’all:

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine
     
    That's probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The "ethnic" Whites don't feel that way about the South - the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger ... all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    , @Reg Cæsar

    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine.
     
    It reminds me of what one of Larry Auster's readers blurted out after reading a long back-and-forth on his site about some early 20th-century geopolitical dealings in Europe: "Why do Jews think everything is about them?" Yes, Jewish populations were involved in the mix, but would clearly have been one of the lower priorities for either side. But Jews didn't see it that way.

    It's not that Richard's stereotyping isn't true, it's just that those schoolmarms were very much in the minority. Just as the haughty, white-haired Batson D Belfry-type Southern senator is. (Yes, Belfry was based in part on Tip O'Neill, but O'Neill was a Celt who represented South Boston.) Belfry represented East Virginia in the US Senate.


    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aw0neSylwUM/VQ4gSw3ikeI/AAAAAAAAH8M/i4B-m3hrcH8/s1600/tmsho131008.gif

    A good analogy would be Southern queers, who inundated northern and eastern cities from the 1960s to the 1990s. They weren't treated well at home, so they left. But annoying as those guys were, we didn't tar the entire South with a pink brush. If you need examples, there are loads, from Tennessee Williams and Truman Capote to Rex Reed to Way Bandy and, Manhattan upbringing aside, son-of-the-South Anderson Cooper.

    We had a real winner in Minneapolis, a Texan named Tim Campbell who published free gay weeklies. The police used to tease him as "Timmy", and he'd throw a hissy fit in print. He's gone home now; things have gotten better for his type.

    James Taylor spent time in a mental institution as a youth. Makes me wonder if people named Taylor are more likely to be nuts.

    Taylor's brother is named Livingston-- a Celtic surname! A Scottish-Dutch patroon in New York. Madness!

  85. @Hibernian
    Beautiful scenery; home of MIT and Peter Lynch. OTOH, home of the Kennedys and the Bulger Brothers, and adoptive home of Bill Weld, Deval Patrick, and Elizabeth Warren.

    Good hockey

  86. I was reminded of this part of the Wikipedia entry for Endicott Peabody, the Governor of Massachusetts back in the early 1960s:

    On April 1, 1964, the governor’s 72-year-old mother, Mary Parkman Peabody, made headlines when she was arrested at the Ponce de Leon Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Florida, for attempting to be served in an integrated group at a racially segregated restaurant. The action made her a hero to the civil rights movement and brought civil rights efforts in St. Augustine, the nation’s oldest city, to national and international attention.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endicott_Peabody#Governorship

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    Old Mass. political joke:

    Q: How many towns in the Commonwealth are named for the Governor?

    A: Four. Endicott, Peabody, Marblehead, and Athol.

    A more recent one, completely off-topic:

    Q: What's Barney Frank's favorite sign in his district?

    A: Entering Dennis.
  87. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you for that interesting reply, #329. I just wonder why a guy like that wouldn't have enough money/assets by now to not need to depend on said paycheck. Lots of people at his age figure they can finally say what they do want to say and not give a damn what others think. It's too bad JT doesn't (per your opinion that this talk is just BS).

    Look at what happened to Howard Stern. A lot more than money at stake.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, but they can't take what you've got already... YET.
  88. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern.
     
    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine. Perhaps the other Taylor’s mom was just a bit hysterical—Steve characterizing her as a “WASPiest WASP ever” is surely a bit of bait that you bit.

    Anyway, forget James ‘Tanglewood Tote’ Taylor, here’s Yankee wailer Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV to rock all y’all:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFr7i550-s4

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The “ethnic” Whites don’t feel that way about the South – the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger … all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now.
     
    Yankee (i.e., old English) numbers may be proportionally diminished from days of yore, but they’re still going strong in plenty of towns.

    all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million)
     
    Yes, and both sides fought with impressive ferociousness. Fratricidal carnage is nothing to muse lightly upon, yet it also shouldn’t be lamented forever and ever. Surely much of defining contemporary white “Southern Pride” stems not from the Antebellum, but from inherited memory of the fierce fight waged during the war itself.

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/good-grief-more-straussianism/#comment-2141156 (#11)

    , @syonredux

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger … all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).
     
    Don't be a goon. Union troops did not go on a "rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans":

    Union Battle Deaths:110,000+

    Confederate Battle Deaths:94,000+

    Union Deaths Due to disease/accidents:230,000

    Confederate Deaths due to disease/accidents:164,000

    Union soldiers who died while in Confederate Prison camps:25,000–30,000

    Confederate soldiers who died in Union Prison camps: 26,000–31,000
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The “ethnic” Whites don’t feel that way about the South – the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.
     
    Oh, yeah? Plenty of Ellis Islanders feel themselves free of antebellum guilt and preach to no end about it. Those of old Yankee stock-- like my dad, and many of my fellow genealogists-- are much more reticent. We have the paperwork for our own ancestors' mini-plantations, in Rhode Island, on Cape Cod and Long Island, and New Jersey. Those rare flat, relatively warm places.

    Jews and Scandinavians are the worst, but Irish are not too far behind. (Chris Matthews!) Italians and Germans are more benign and Poles, well, they're irrelevant. They have their own Sanduskys to live down.

    For the record, I've never taken part in calumny toward the South, and have often defended your people from others' canards. But it works both ways, and I will stand up for my own people, too. Even if most of them were heretics.

    , @Foreign Expert
    Surprisingly there’s little consciousness of French Canadians in New England, besides Kerouac. I read somewhere they are the largest “ethnic” group. When I was growing up in Massachusetts the people across the street spoke French. When I worked in a factory during summers, several of the me spoke French and little English. No one talks about them.
  89. @Desiderius
    Look at what happened to Howard Stern. A lot more than money at stake.

    Yeah, but they can’t take what you’ve got already… YET.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    That’s my point. For someone like JT they take friends and family. Not all are called to be apostles.
  90. @Thea
    The elements of feminism that don’t originate from Jews seem to flow mostly from New England’s upper class.

    Feminism is civilizational Alzheimer’s. Same shit happened to Rome and the Ming.

  91. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, but they can't take what you've got already... YET.

    That’s my point. For someone like JT they take friends and family. Not all are called to be apostles.

  92. Anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    [Linda Ronstadt] was the number one female pop interpreter of other people’s lyrics of her time, and arguably the best female”rock” singer.
     
    It's amazing how many of her hits were covers. Even Different Drum, which she did with the Stone Poneys, was written by Michael Nesmith of The Monkees. He performed it once on the show, but only as a joke. Then he did this great live, acoustic version in 1992 in which he was classy enough to apologize to and thank Linda at the end.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDgF-A_kGVg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMkiZ9tO-Zs

    Since she was not at all a songwriter all her hits were, in modern parlance, covers. Whereas Parton has made a good chunk of her money and fame as a songwriter. Harris wrote a little but mostly is an interpreter of others’ songs, and a very good one at that. In fact her voice is so pure many country purists love her as a person (she was also hotter AF under her modest attire) but can only listen to her in limited doses.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Hiking in Topanga Canyon many years ago, I saw an unbelievably beautiful woman in her 50s. Yup, she was Emmy Lou Harris.
  93. @YetAnotherAnon
    "James’ voice is finally giving out"

    I know there's autotune and all that, but he sounded pretty good in Dublin in summer 2018, far better than I expected he would.

    Mud Slide Slim still stands up pretty well today, where Tapestry doesn't sound anywhere near as good as it did in 1972.

    But I can never understand why anyone takes more notice of what an actor or musician thinks about politics than a plumber or taxi-driver's views. I can only assume that they're invested not just in the music, but in the presented persona of the performer.

    "Joni’s brain is mush"

    Dunno. Another person whose music I love, but abandoning your child is a terrible thing to do. I'm sure her daughter would prefer to have had a mother, rather than the world having Court And Spark.

    Adoption is not a panacea but it works out well sometimes. Being the biological accident kid of a celebrity single mother almost never does.

  94. @dvorak

    Increasingly, I am recognizing that the Civil War was about one group of insufferable white prigs hating another group of whites, and Negroes just happened to be a convenient prop to morally justify killing their fellow whites.
     
    Moldbug:
    "[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc."

    Moldbug:
    “[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc.”

    Those things aren’t “philosophical mysteries”.

    • Replies: @dvorak

    Those things aren’t “philosophical mysteries”.
     
    Moldbug/Yarvin addresses your objection in the very next paragraph:

    "None of these concepts, as defined in orthodox Universalist doctrine, is even slightly coherent. All can absorb arbitrary mental energy without producing any rational thought. In this they are best compared to Plotinian, Talmudic, or Scholastic nonsense."
  95. @Anonymous
    Since she was not at all a songwriter all her hits were, in modern parlance, covers. Whereas Parton has made a good chunk of her money and fame as a songwriter. Harris wrote a little but mostly is an interpreter of others’ songs, and a very good one at that. In fact her voice is so pure many country purists love her as a person (she was also hotter AF under her modest attire) but can only listen to her in limited doses.

    Hiking in Topanga Canyon many years ago, I saw an unbelievably beautiful woman in her 50s. Yup, she was Emmy Lou Harris.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    You've told us this story before, Steve. And I saw Joni Mitchell naked walking on the rocks on the coast of California*. Face it, Steve, you're in LUV.

    .

    .

    .

    * ... inside the For the Roses album cover, here, SFW because it was taken from behind.

    This is the best song from that album:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YVroYzNz60

    She was still having a hard time with that fitting-the-lyrics-to-the-tune thing. Still, nice bod.
  96. He [James Taylor not his dad] met Donald Trump once, “in an airport. I just thought of him as a frivolous, minor player. It drives me crazy how unworthy he is of our attention and how much of it he has.”

    Donald Trump is the president of the United States of America, the richest, most powerful country in the world today, armed to the teeth, so I very much disagree with the idea he is unworthy of anyone’s attention. Mr. Taylor was already arguably wrong that Trump was just a minor player, and he seems to be doubling down in his error. Some people never learn.

    (…) the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”

    What appears to me is that, for some, Donald Trump getting to be president of the US has discredited the office, and has made them, in a way, lose hope. I have limited evidence regarding this and cannot positvely tie it to what has been called “Trump Derangement Syndrome”, but American suicide rates are increasing, particularly among middle-aged women, the birth rate keeps going down, and recent surveys suggest Americans are increasingly “unhappy”. Once hope is lost, my experience tells it’s not easily regained (like trust). So some rather “ungood” times might lie ahead.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/481783-record-high-90-percent-of-americans-satisfied-with
  97. @J1234

    [Taylor] is rooting for the Democratic candidates Deval Patrick and Elizabeth Warren – both from Massachusetts, where he now lives. “But at this point, I’d be happy to see pretty much anyone in – the bar is so low. Because the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    Just one more piece of evidence showing that the entertainment industry's self-perceived intelligence and actual intelligence is more disparate than probably any other industry. Or maybe he's just mad because nobody in the Trump administration has asked him to apologize in song to France or Canada or whoever.

    When the name James Taylor came up, I used to think of his hits of 50 years ago. Now I think of that embarrassingly retarded Two Lane Blacktop performance

    The delusions of our betters is something to behold.

  98. @dr kill
    Ok, Boomer . Your reward for living a boring life is to be a 90 year old for 30 years. Enjoy!!

    “Non-smokers also die, but smokers are dead longer!”

  99. @Anonymous
    Taylor’s paternal line may have received its surname on Ellis Island.

    Nope, they were Scottish and came long before the Ellis Island era. Not all liberal doctors are Jewish.

    Yankees were doing the whole liberal/Leftist professional thing long before the 1st Ashkenazi Jew graduated from med school. Jewish leftists copied their whole save the world shtick from WASPs – they looked up to them, they emulated them. Whites should be proud that they invented this but for some reason they are always trying to blame it on the Jews, even when the person in question is not remotely Jewish.

  100. @Anonymous

    Isn’t “American Standard” the name of a corporation that makes toilets and urinals?
     
    It is.

    Also it is the name that Fender used for a new line of its classic guitar and bass models, with various deprovements, in the 1980s onward. They used the "American Standard" model label in a text font very nearly identical to the one actually used on American Standard porcelain bathroom fixtures.

    The American Standard Series were actual improvements in most ways from the vintage-style models that Fender was building. They had a much better truss rod that adjusted from the neck and a much better stock trem system on the Strats, and the pickups didn’t cause string warble and were quieter. They were good gigging guitars. They didn’t buzz or hum and they stayed in tune.The urethane finishes really didn’t degrade the sound but the cork sniffers thought they did. And also the fingerboard radius was flatter, making them much better for 90 percent of players now.

    Were they ideal? No. The hardware was low cost and they used free machining steel for the trem inertia block and sintered saddles, which did nothing for the sound, and they didn’t have the compound radius fretboard which is the biggest improvement in guitars in decades. And to fight fret sprout they excessively rounded off the fingerboard edges, meaning the E strings can go a little over the side. They also never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity to fix unnecessary quirks. But these instruments basically are gigworthy and low trouble factor guitars.

    Clean stock ones are starting to rise in value, which indicates people now see this.

  101. @RichardTaylor

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine
     
    That's probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The "ethnic" Whites don't feel that way about the South - the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger ... all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now.

    Yankee (i.e., old English) numbers may be proportionally diminished from days of yore, but they’re still going strong in plenty of towns.

    all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million)

    Yes, and both sides fought with impressive ferociousness. Fratricidal carnage is nothing to muse lightly upon, yet it also shouldn’t be lamented forever and ever. Surely much of defining contemporary white “Southern Pride” stems not from the Antebellum, but from inherited memory of the fierce fight waged during the war itself.

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/good-grief-more-straussianism/#comment-2141156 (#11)

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Correction on last line: comment (#111)
    , @RichardTaylor
    Interesting comment. Yes, the dynamic of back and forth hostility was there. I would have recommended you just let us go!
    , @Anonymous

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:
     
    What happened to Svigor?
  102. @Anonymous
    Joni had polio and a brain aneurysm, drugs were not her primary problem. She was intelligent enough to figure out that her problem in playing guitar was her hands' limitations and she worked out a big series of open and modal tunings , and guitar players are still listening to those records and trying to figure out what she did.

    Stevie Nicks and Debbie Harry were both pretty serious coke snorters and both are sharp as tacks if you get to talk to them today.

    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she’s had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.

    I can’t for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I’d have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we’re a depraved species at the end of the day.

    Stevie is also extremely short, 5′ or 5’1″, something like that.

    • Replies: @anonymous

    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she’s had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.
     
    She probably has employee's who rescue her from having to show off her executive function, which can't be great. Also, the ability to control emotions take a hit. Her firing of Fleetwood Mac's songwriter seems to show a lack of both. Didn't seem smart, or rational. We'll see how she gets along in the next 5 years.

    I can’t for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I’d have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we’re a depraved species at the end of the day.
     
    There's a Gelson's at the foot of the Hollywood Hills that a lot of celebs frequent, and especially their ex-wives. A common occurrence for me is seeing an amazing looking woman from behind, and when I get around to her front side, it turns out to be a woman in her early sixties, with a lot of plastic surgery. I get tricked every time! I joke to friends that visiting Gelson's is like getting stuck in that shitty scene from "The Shining."

    https://youtu.be/E1NsA_FdbHg?t=130
  103. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now.
     
    Yankee (i.e., old English) numbers may be proportionally diminished from days of yore, but they’re still going strong in plenty of towns.

    all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million)
     
    Yes, and both sides fought with impressive ferociousness. Fratricidal carnage is nothing to muse lightly upon, yet it also shouldn’t be lamented forever and ever. Surely much of defining contemporary white “Southern Pride” stems not from the Antebellum, but from inherited memory of the fierce fight waged during the war itself.

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/good-grief-more-straussianism/#comment-2141156 (#11)

    Correction on last line: comment (#111)

  104. @Steve Sailer
    Hiking in Topanga Canyon many years ago, I saw an unbelievably beautiful woman in her 50s. Yup, she was Emmy Lou Harris.

    You’ve told us this story before, Steve. And I saw Joni Mitchell naked walking on the rocks on the coast of California*. Face it, Steve, you’re in LUV.

    .

    .

    .

    * … inside the For the Roses album cover, here, SFW because it was taken from behind.

    This is the best song from that album:

    She was still having a hard time with that fitting-the-lyrics-to-the-tune thing. Still, nice bod.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A great songwriter and musician, Joni is not a good looking woman. At all.

    Emmylou has a pretty face from the front and a good body, but in profile she has BJ Backjaw, which some excellent singers share. The opposite is Drop Front Jaw/Triangle Face. MM had that a little and exaggerated it by holding her jaw open with her lips closed. Julee Cruise is an extreme example. Both had breathy light voices.
  105. @S. Anonyia
    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.

    Puritans were all about egalitarianism. They rebelled (to some extent, understandably) against hierarchy and aristocracy.

    In some ways, Cromwell’s New Model Army were proto-socialists.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?

    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.

    Quakers are closer.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?

    Of course they would have been possible. Communism, as an ideal, has deep roots:

    Acts 2:42-47 King James Version

    42 And they continued stedfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.

    43 And fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.

    44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;

    45 And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need.

    46 And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart,

    47 Praising God, and having favour with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved.

    • Replies: @Hibernian

    44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;
     
    It's necessary to have the first part to a very high degree to make the second part work. 320 million people as a family seated around a table can be believed only by some 18 year olds; those who preach this as a cover story certainly don't believe it themselves.
  106. @Desiderius
    Richard Burr.

    The research triangle long ago succumbed to Colbert disease, although Raleigh might be salvageable.

    Tillis is damned near as bad as Burr.

    You are considerably more sanguine concerning the city of my birth than am I. My last positive thought concerning a good outcome was in the middle sixties; Carroll Jr. High classes were traipsed across the street to take in GWTW in 70mm glory at the Cardinal during one of its periodic re-releases, and I was there able to observe my schoolmates reacting to the film. Seeing the little yankee shits slump down into their seats as the rest of the audience roared its approval of Melanie’s killing the Blue Uniformed Scum of the Earth(TM) bummer was a moment to treasure for a lifetime.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Even if Raleigh wanted to put on airs Chapel Hill and Durham already took them all and then some. They've got to embrace their roots by default. Last time I was there to visit my aunt it was getting akmost DC-level sprawly so who knows.

    Your story brings to mind this, from a man who nearly redeems the place on his own:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10739.The_Moviegoer
  107. @Desiderius
    Yeah, but she was Roundhead and they were Cavalier, or, in Carolina, even worse.

    The northern colonists wanted to escape the aristocracy while the southern colonists wanted to be the aristocracy. There’s a reason why the Carolinas and Georgia were named after kings and Maryland was named after the wife of a king.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Uh, no. They both had a few who would be king by some other name and many who just wanted a chance. Cf. the Lord Protector of their previous republic.
  108. @Achmed E. Newman
    #WTH are albums?

    - Millennials

    What year did you say it was again?

    Where am I?

  109. @RichardTaylor

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine
     
    That's probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The "ethnic" Whites don't feel that way about the South - the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger ... all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger … all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    Don’t be a goon. Union troops did not go on a “rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans”:

    Union Battle Deaths:110,000+

    Confederate Battle Deaths:94,000+

    Union Deaths Due to disease/accidents:230,000

    Confederate Deaths due to disease/accidents:164,000

    Union soldiers who died while in Confederate Prison camps:25,000–30,000

    Confederate soldiers who died in Union Prison camps: 26,000–31,000

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    Good point, the war done to the Battle Hymn of the Republic probably killed closer to 700,000.

    Actually, I guess the original song was John Brown's Body. Soon, LOTS of bodies were a-moldering in the grave.
  110. anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @donvonburg
    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she's had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.

    I can't for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I'd have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we're a depraved species at the end of the day.

    Stevie is also extremely short, 5' or 5'1", something like that.

    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she’s had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.

    She probably has employee’s who rescue her from having to show off her executive function, which can’t be great. Also, the ability to control emotions take a hit. Her firing of Fleetwood Mac’s songwriter seems to show a lack of both. Didn’t seem smart, or rational. We’ll see how she gets along in the next 5 years.

    I can’t for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I’d have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we’re a depraved species at the end of the day.

    There’s a Gelson’s at the foot of the Hollywood Hills that a lot of celebs frequent, and especially their ex-wives. A common occurrence for me is seeing an amazing looking woman from behind, and when I get around to her front side, it turns out to be a woman in her early sixties, with a lot of plastic surgery. I get tricked every time! I joke to friends that visiting Gelson’s is like getting stuck in that shitty scene from “The Shining.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I love Lindsey Buckingham ( not THAT way!) but he did not want to tour and they wanted one last victory lap. The McVie’s are HOW old? So it had to be.

    It was the band’s call not just hers. I’m with them on this one.
  111. @RichardTaylor

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….
     
    Exactly right. There's a positive correlation between proximity to other races and race-realism.

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320
    White:291,300
     
    And South Carolina was the first to secede.

    ……Well, the racial composition of the USA is starting to resemble antebellum South Carolina (White minority, POC majority)….

    Exactly right. There’s a positive correlation between proximity to other races and race-realism.

    Except the South Carolina elite thought that they had the perfect society (White minority, Black majority)….

    South Carolina in 1860:

    Black:412,320
    White:291,300

    And South Carolina was the first to secede.

    Yeah, they really thought that being outnumbered by Blacks was a great idea……Now, if they had had their heads screwed on straight,instead of seceding, they would have concentrated on convincing everyone in the South to ship their slaves back to Africa and set them free…

  112. Never heard of James Taylor (and I’m almost 40 years old).

  113. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:

    He [James Taylor not his dad] met Donald Trump once, “in an airport. I just thought of him as a frivolous, minor player. It drives me crazy how unworthy he is of our attention and how much of it he has.”

    Trump might retort that the same could be said for a guy who was a straight-up junkie for 10 years, ran about with complete lowlifes, turned John Lennon on to heroin (want to know who helped break up the Beatles? Ask James Taylor. A heroin habit makes being in the Beatles a real pain in the ass), who essentially abandoned his kids, and has been heard to have physically beat the shit out of his wife, who was gracious enough to leave that out of her biography. Hi Carly!

    James Taylor was a great music performer, who really needs to shut up.
    Like a eunuch giving sex tips, one day, someone’s he knows is going to talk.

  114. He’s like the Garry Trudeau of pop music.

  115. @Achmed E. Newman
    Shitty Senators? I sure hope you're not referring to Jesse Helms.

    I guess I'm a little behind the times, huh, but Chapel Hill was a nice place back during the time JT lived there.

  116. @Thirdeye
    The northern colonists wanted to escape the aristocracy while the southern colonists wanted to be the aristocracy. There's a reason why the Carolinas and Georgia were named after kings and Maryland was named after the wife of a king.

    Uh, no. They both had a few who would be king by some other name and many who just wanted a chance. Cf. the Lord Protector of their previous republic.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    Royalty offended the sensibilities of the intentional communities that were the core of the New England colonies as well as Pennsylvania. The southern colonies were founded by people who obtained a Royal Charter and they were the colonies to get rich in.
  117. @Thea
    The elements of feminism that don’t originate from Jews seem to flow mostly from New England’s upper class.

    Nineteenth Century feminism was driven by WASP businesswomen, especially in the west. They ran the service industries in frontier towns – boarding houses, laundry, bathhouses, brothels and such. As big players in small town economies they wanted recognition. The first state to grant women suffrage was Wyoming. It was also a Republican thing.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Thea
    Interesting. So prohibition can’t be viewed as another inter feminism scuffle.


    I was thinking of Nathaniel Hawthorne and likeminded women.
  118. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Well, they based their identity on being anti-Southern.
     
    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine. Perhaps the other Taylor’s mom was just a bit hysterical—Steve characterizing her as a “WASPiest WASP ever” is surely a bit of bait that you bit.

    Anyway, forget James ‘Tanglewood Tote’ Taylor, here’s Yankee wailer Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV to rock all y’all:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFr7i550-s4

    Richard, I think you’re overly steamed about Yankees. Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine.

    It reminds me of what one of Larry Auster’s readers blurted out after reading a long back-and-forth on his site about some early 20th-century geopolitical dealings in Europe: “Why do Jews think everything is about them?” Yes, Jewish populations were involved in the mix, but would clearly have been one of the lower priorities for either side. But Jews didn’t see it that way.

    It’s not that Richard’s stereotyping isn’t true, it’s just that those schoolmarms were very much in the minority. Just as the haughty, white-haired Batson D Belfry-type Southern senator is. (Yes, Belfry was based in part on Tip O’Neill, but O’Neill was a Celt who represented South Boston.) Belfry represented East Virginia in the US Senate.


    A good analogy would be Southern queers, who inundated northern and eastern cities from the 1960s to the 1990s. They weren’t treated well at home, so they left. But annoying as those guys were, we didn’t tar the entire South with a pink brush. If you need examples, there are loads, from Tennessee Williams and Truman Capote to Rex Reed to Way Bandy and, Manhattan upbringing aside, son-of-the-South Anderson Cooper.

    We had a real winner in Minneapolis, a Texan named Tim Campbell who published free gay weeklies. The police used to tease him as “Timmy”, and he’d throw a hissy fit in print. He’s gone home now; things have gotten better for his type.

    James Taylor spent time in a mental institution as a youth. Makes me wonder if people named Taylor are more likely to be nuts.

    Taylor’s brother is named Livingston– a Celtic surname! A Scottish-Dutch patroon in New York. Madness!

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
  119. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    "On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground."

    E.A. Ross, 'The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People'

    “On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground.”

    E.A. Ross, ‘The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People’

    Dunno. Anti-Jewish sentiment was lower in the South than in the North, which makes sense. The South (an agricultural region without much in the way of an entrepreneurial tradition) provided an open field for Jewish talents. The North, in contrast, was full of hard-driving , well-educated Yankees, who saw Jews as competitors.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    The north tended to uphold traditions based on its foundation in religious communities and if you didn't conform you were out in the cold. Roger Williams founded the breakaway colony Rhode Island to uphold the principle of religious freedom that was lacking in Massachusetts. The first American synagogue was built in Rhode Island in 1639. The south started out more commercially than religiously minded.
  120. @Desiderius
    Uh, no. They both had a few who would be king by some other name and many who just wanted a chance. Cf. the Lord Protector of their previous republic.

    Royalty offended the sensibilities of the intentional communities that were the core of the New England colonies as well as Pennsylvania. The southern colonies were founded by people who obtained a Royal Charter and they were the colonies to get rich in.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    I hear the same was true of Napoleon and Lenin.

    C'mon man, what's the point of taking Calvinism seriously if you're going to be that naive about the fallenness of Man?
  121. @RichardTaylor

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine
     
    That's probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The "ethnic" Whites don't feel that way about the South - the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger ... all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    The “ethnic” Whites don’t feel that way about the South – the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Oh, yeah? Plenty of Ellis Islanders feel themselves free of antebellum guilt and preach to no end about it. Those of old Yankee stock– like my dad, and many of my fellow genealogists– are much more reticent. We have the paperwork for our own ancestors’ mini-plantations, in Rhode Island, on Cape Cod and Long Island, and New Jersey. Those rare flat, relatively warm places.

    Jews and Scandinavians are the worst, but Irish are not too far behind. (Chris Matthews!) Italians and Germans are more benign and Poles, well, they’re irrelevant. They have their own Sanduskys to live down.

    For the record, I’ve never taken part in calumny toward the South, and have often defended your people from others’ canards. But it works both ways, and I will stand up for my own people, too. Even if most of them were heretics.

  122. @syonredux

    “On the other hand the Yankees have for the Jews a cousinly feeling. Puritanism was a kind of Hebraism and throve most in the parts of England where, centuries before, the Jews had been thickest. With his rationalism, his shrewdness, his inquisitiveness and acquisitiveness, the Yankee can meet the Jew on his own ground.”

    E.A. Ross, ‘The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People’
     
    Dunno. Anti-Jewish sentiment was lower in the South than in the North, which makes sense. The South (an agricultural region without much in the way of an entrepreneurial tradition) provided an open field for Jewish talents. The North, in contrast, was full of hard-driving , well-educated Yankees, who saw Jews as competitors.

    The north tended to uphold traditions based on its foundation in religious communities and if you didn’t conform you were out in the cold. Roger Williams founded the breakaway colony Rhode Island to uphold the principle of religious freedom that was lacking in Massachusetts. The first American synagogue was built in Rhode Island in 1639. The south started out more commercially than religiously minded.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    The first American synagogue was built in Rhode Island in 1639.
     
    Dunno.....According to WIKIPEDIA, New York has the oldest (1654)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_oldest_synagogues_in_the_United_States
  123. Anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    You've told us this story before, Steve. And I saw Joni Mitchell naked walking on the rocks on the coast of California*. Face it, Steve, you're in LUV.

    .

    .

    .

    * ... inside the For the Roses album cover, here, SFW because it was taken from behind.

    This is the best song from that album:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YVroYzNz60

    She was still having a hard time with that fitting-the-lyrics-to-the-tune thing. Still, nice bod.

    A great songwriter and musician, Joni is not a good looking woman. At all.

    Emmylou has a pretty face from the front and a good body, but in profile she has BJ Backjaw, which some excellent singers share. The opposite is Drop Front Jaw/Triangle Face. MM had that a little and exaggerated it by holding her jaw open with her lips closed. Julee Cruise is an extreme example. Both had breathy light voices.

  124. @anonymous

    I have a customer who knows Stevie because his father knew her father at the company he managed, and he reports that she is quite intelligent and lucid but aside from being drug free has all her predilections as always. She apparently is not really into witchcraft but is quite content to let people think that (the image sells) and has no spiritual base of reference to speak of. As with a lot of women her age in her position and shape (she’s had a lot of work) she is quite the cougar as well.
     
    She probably has employee's who rescue her from having to show off her executive function, which can't be great. Also, the ability to control emotions take a hit. Her firing of Fleetwood Mac's songwriter seems to show a lack of both. Didn't seem smart, or rational. We'll see how she gets along in the next 5 years.

    I can’t for the life of me see that if I were in my twenties today I’d have any attraction to any woman her age-not even Christie Brinkley, who from a reasonable distance could pass for very much younger-but I guess some do. I suspect they are after the fame and to tell their drinking buddies, which is pretty sad, but we’re a depraved species at the end of the day.
     
    There's a Gelson's at the foot of the Hollywood Hills that a lot of celebs frequent, and especially their ex-wives. A common occurrence for me is seeing an amazing looking woman from behind, and when I get around to her front side, it turns out to be a woman in her early sixties, with a lot of plastic surgery. I get tricked every time! I joke to friends that visiting Gelson's is like getting stuck in that shitty scene from "The Shining."

    https://youtu.be/E1NsA_FdbHg?t=130

    I love Lindsey Buckingham ( not THAT way!) but he did not want to tour and they wanted one last victory lap. The McVie’s are HOW old? So it had to be.

    It was the band’s call not just hers. I’m with them on this one.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Lindsey is being replaced by two guitarists, Mike Campbell and Neil Finn.

    Campbell is not by himself a great fit but neither would any one else be-Buckingham is absolutely unique in technique and general outlook. He's a fingerpicker pretty exclusively and plays in a lot of different odd tunings.

    His songwriting is not the issue because this is a presumably final tour and they are just recapping existing songs The band did the best they could and in no way does this cue anyone to question anyone's judgment. Buckingham, incidentally, had a massive cardiac event and a chest crack open heart procedure and would have needed a couple of months to recover anyway, so it worked out.
  125. @Wilkey

    "It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    One day they're bragging about how the North won the Civil War.

    The next day they're complaining about the South's influence on politics.

    You know, if they didn't want the South to have so much influence on American politics maybe they should have just let the South go and saved 700,000 or so lives.

    And for the record, for all the complaints about Southern politics, the South was the only region of the country whose political leaders were (almost) 100% in support of the Lend-Lease Act. Much of the rest of the country actually favored sitting the war out while Hitler did whatever the hell he wanted.

    And for the record, for all the complaints about Southern politics, the South was the only region of the country whose political leaders were (almost) 100% in support of the Lend-Lease Act. Much of the rest of the country actually favored sitting the war out while Hitler did whatever the hell he wanted.

    In other words, much of the rest of the country was still familiar with Washington’s Farewell Address.

    Particularly a certain Swedish family from Little Falls, Minnesota.

  126. @Cagey Beast
    I was reminded of this part of the Wikipedia entry for Endicott Peabody, the Governor of Massachusetts back in the early 1960s:

    On April 1, 1964, the governor's 72-year-old mother, Mary Parkman Peabody, made headlines when she was arrested at the Ponce de Leon Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Florida, for attempting to be served in an integrated group at a racially segregated restaurant. The action made her a hero to the civil rights movement and brought civil rights efforts in St. Augustine, the nation's oldest city, to national and international attention.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endicott_Peabody#Governorship

    Old Mass. political joke:

    Q: How many towns in the Commonwealth are named for the Governor?

    A: Four. Endicott, Peabody, Marblehead, and Athol.

    A more recent one, completely off-topic:

    Q: What’s Barney Frank’s favorite sign in his district?

    A: Entering Dennis.

    • Thanks: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Entering Marion

    John Forster

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Lw8ADKeaOM

    Every year I drive out to Cape Cod for the last part of June
    Leave the city by 10, then you're there in the late afternoon
    On the way, there's a village called Marion that you pass through
    The first time I approached it,
    I'll always remember the sign that came into view

    It said: "Entering Marion"
    And I thought, "What a fun little sign!"
    But the feeling of entering Marion had a kick that was hard to define
    A rapturous rush, a physical flush, chills up and down the spine
    For the few minutes I was in Marion, all Massachusetts was mine
    Well, it got to be kind of an annual thing;
    The event that would start each vacation off with a bang!
    Then one year, who knows why, I decided to try a new route
    So I got out my map and I traced one I thought was a beaute
    After driving all morning I came to the top of a hill
    Where a sign stood before me that promised a new kind of thrill

    It said: "Entering Beverly"
    Which was lovely and not overbuilt
    And the pleasure of entering Beverly far outweighed any feelings of guilt
    I could say I'm contrite, but it wouldn't be right
    For the truth is that later that day, I found myself entering Sharon
    It was there, so was I, we enjoyed it; hey, what can I say?
    By the next year I'd try any route just for novelty's sake
    I was cursed with a thirst that no single township could slake
    Oh, at the wheel I looked calm, but inside I was running a mock
    When a sign in the road dead ahead sent me straight into shock

    "Entering Lawrence"
    My god; I was out of control!
    And I'd no sooner finished with Lawrence,
    Then boom; I was entering Lowel
    Then I backtracked and reentered Lawrence
    Then Quincy and Norton as well
    Around midnight I pulled into Ethel and flopped in a fleabag motel
    I slept fitfully in my clothing
    And awoke in a pool of sweat and self-loathing
    Lying there, feeling lower than carion,
    A name came clear as a clarion
    I jumped in my car, and before very far
    I was entering Marion
    How totally, wonderfully great!
    How grand to be entering Marion after tramping all over the state
    Every sleazebucket 'burb, every trist by the curb, Had really just helped me to find

    I'm happiest entering Marion
    I guess I'm the Marion kind
    Oh yes, I'm the Marion kind
    Source: Musixmatch
    Songwriters: Forster John
    Entering Marion lyrics © Limousine Music Co

     

  127. Because the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there.

    Well, except for the vile woman he defeated to get there.

  128. @syonredux

    Progressive politics are Puritan, if we are comparing modern politics to 17th century ideologies. Closer to Puritan than any other religion/cultural movement from the time.
     
    Quakers are closer.

    Would the French Revolution or communism have been possible without the example of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell?
     
    Of course they would have been possible. Communism, as an ideal, has deep roots:

    Acts 2:42-47 King James Version

    42 And they continued stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.

    43 And fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.

    44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;

    45 And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need.


    46 And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart,

    47 Praising God, and having favour with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved.

    44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;

    It’s necessary to have the first part to a very high degree to make the second part work. 320 million people as a family seated around a table can be believed only by some 18 year olds; those who preach this as a cover story certainly don’t believe it themselves.

  129. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    I love Lindsey Buckingham ( not THAT way!) but he did not want to tour and they wanted one last victory lap. The McVie’s are HOW old? So it had to be.

    It was the band’s call not just hers. I’m with them on this one.

    Lindsey is being replaced by two guitarists, Mike Campbell and Neil Finn.

    Campbell is not by himself a great fit but neither would any one else be-Buckingham is absolutely unique in technique and general outlook. He’s a fingerpicker pretty exclusively and plays in a lot of different odd tunings.

    His songwriting is not the issue because this is a presumably final tour and they are just recapping existing songs The band did the best they could and in no way does this cue anyone to question anyone’s judgment. Buckingham, incidentally, had a massive cardiac event and a chest crack open heart procedure and would have needed a couple of months to recover anyway, so it worked out.

  130. @Thirdeye
    Royalty offended the sensibilities of the intentional communities that were the core of the New England colonies as well as Pennsylvania. The southern colonies were founded by people who obtained a Royal Charter and they were the colonies to get rich in.

    I hear the same was true of Napoleon and Lenin.

    C’mon man, what’s the point of taking Calvinism seriously if you’re going to be that naive about the fallenness of Man?

  131. @adreadline

    He [James Taylor not his dad] met Donald Trump once, “in an airport. I just thought of him as a frivolous, minor player. It drives me crazy how unworthy he is of our attention and how much of it he has.”
     
    Donald Trump is the president of the United States of America, the richest, most powerful country in the world today, armed to the teeth, so I very much disagree with the idea he is unworthy of anyone's attention. Mr. Taylor was already arguably wrong that Trump was just a minor player, and he seems to be doubling down in his error. Some people never learn.

    (...) the very worst person possible that you could think to be heading the thing is there. It’s like the Confederacy has won the civil war.”
     
    What appears to me is that, for some, Donald Trump getting to be president of the US has discredited the office, and has made them, in a way, lose hope. I have limited evidence regarding this and cannot positvely tie it to what has been called "Trump Derangement Syndrome'', but American suicide rates are increasing, particularly among middle-aged women, the birth rate keeps going down, and recent surveys suggest Americans are increasingly "unhappy''. Once hope is lost, my experience tells it's not easily regained (like trust). So some rather "ungood'' times might lie ahead.
    • Replies: @adreadline

    https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/481783-record-high-90-percent-of-americans-satisfied-with
     
    Americans are getting more miserable, and there's data to prove it

    Depression Is on the Rise in the U.S., Especially Among Young Teens

    Could there have been a most recent reversal in a trend? Yes, of course. Then, we might expect to see birth rates increasing, or at least no longer falling (as they have been doing for several years now), and suicides to decrease, or at least stop rising, in the coming years (birth and suicide rates being more survey-proof). If that's the case, there has been a reversal. If that turns out not to be the case, then I have my doubts about the reality of that survey.

  132. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @slumber_j
    Old Mass. political joke:

    Q: How many towns in the Commonwealth are named for the Governor?

    A: Four. Endicott, Peabody, Marblehead, and Athol.

    A more recent one, completely off-topic:

    Q: What's Barney Frank's favorite sign in his district?

    A: Entering Dennis.

    Entering Marion

    John Forster

    Every year I drive out to Cape Cod for the last part of June
    Leave the city by 10, then you’re there in the late afternoon
    On the way, there’s a village called Marion that you pass through
    The first time I approached it,
    I’ll always remember the sign that came into view

    It said: “Entering Marion”
    And I thought, “What a fun little sign!”
    But the feeling of entering Marion had a kick that was hard to define
    A rapturous rush, a physical flush, chills up and down the spine
    For the few minutes I was in Marion, all Massachusetts was mine
    Well, it got to be kind of an annual thing;
    The event that would start each vacation off with a bang!
    Then one year, who knows why, I decided to try a new route
    So I got out my map and I traced one I thought was a beaute
    After driving all morning I came to the top of a hill
    Where a sign stood before me that promised a new kind of thrill

    It said: “Entering Beverly”
    Which was lovely and not overbuilt
    And the pleasure of entering Beverly far outweighed any feelings of guilt
    I could say I’m contrite, but it wouldn’t be right
    For the truth is that later that day, I found myself entering Sharon
    It was there, so was I, we enjoyed it; hey, what can I say?
    By the next year I’d try any route just for novelty’s sake
    I was cursed with a thirst that no single township could slake
    Oh, at the wheel I looked calm, but inside I was running a mock
    When a sign in the road dead ahead sent me straight into shock

    “Entering Lawrence”
    My god; I was out of control!
    And I’d no sooner finished with Lawrence,
    Then boom; I was entering Lowel
    Then I backtracked and reentered Lawrence
    Then Quincy and Norton as well
    Around midnight I pulled into Ethel and flopped in a fleabag motel
    I slept fitfully in my clothing
    And awoke in a pool of sweat and self-loathing
    Lying there, feeling lower than carion,
    A name came clear as a clarion
    I jumped in my car, and before very far
    I was entering Marion
    How totally, wonderfully great!
    How grand to be entering Marion after tramping all over the state
    Every sleazebucket ‘burb, every trist by the curb, Had really just helped me to find

    I’m happiest entering Marion
    I guess I’m the Marion kind
    Oh yes, I’m the Marion kind
    Source: Musixmatch
    Songwriters: Forster John
    Entering Marion lyrics © Limousine Music Co

  133. @captflee
    Tillis is damned near as bad as Burr.

    You are considerably more sanguine concerning the city of my birth than am I. My last positive thought concerning a good outcome was in the middle sixties; Carroll Jr. High classes were traipsed across the street to take in GWTW in 70mm glory at the Cardinal during one of its periodic re-releases, and I was there able to observe my schoolmates reacting to the film. Seeing the little yankee shits slump down into their seats as the rest of the audience roared its approval of Melanie's killing the Blue Uniformed Scum of the Earth(TM) bummer was a moment to treasure for a lifetime.

    Even if Raleigh wanted to put on airs Chapel Hill and Durham already took them all and then some. They’ve got to embrace their roots by default. Last time I was there to visit my aunt it was getting akmost DC-level sprawly so who knows.

    Your story brings to mind this, from a man who nearly redeems the place on his own:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10739.The_Moviegoer

    • Replies: @captflee
    From my years in the Big Sleazy I came to greatly appreciate Walker's work, but I must confess to being an even greater fan of his uncle's Lanterns on the Levee.
  134. @Thirdeye
    The north tended to uphold traditions based on its foundation in religious communities and if you didn't conform you were out in the cold. Roger Williams founded the breakaway colony Rhode Island to uphold the principle of religious freedom that was lacking in Massachusetts. The first American synagogue was built in Rhode Island in 1639. The south started out more commercially than religiously minded.

    The first American synagogue was built in Rhode Island in 1639.

    Dunno…..According to WIKIPEDIA, New York has the oldest (1654)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_oldest_synagogues_in_the_United_States

  135. @Desiderius
    Even if Raleigh wanted to put on airs Chapel Hill and Durham already took them all and then some. They've got to embrace their roots by default. Last time I was there to visit my aunt it was getting akmost DC-level sprawly so who knows.

    Your story brings to mind this, from a man who nearly redeems the place on his own:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10739.The_Moviegoer

    From my years in the Big Sleazy I came to greatly appreciate Walker’s work, but I must confess to being an even greater fan of his uncle’s Lanterns on the Levee.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Will Percy should be required reading for our entire Godforsaken ruling class. Would puncture their shallow prejudices and then some.
  136. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now.
     
    Yankee (i.e., old English) numbers may be proportionally diminished from days of yore, but they’re still going strong in plenty of towns.

    all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million)
     
    Yes, and both sides fought with impressive ferociousness. Fratricidal carnage is nothing to muse lightly upon, yet it also shouldn’t be lamented forever and ever. Surely much of defining contemporary white “Southern Pride” stems not from the Antebellum, but from inherited memory of the fierce fight waged during the war itself.

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/good-grief-more-straussianism/#comment-2141156 (#11)

    Interesting comment. Yes, the dynamic of back and forth hostility was there. I would have recommended you just let us go!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I would have recommended you just let us go!
     
    Wouldn’t dream of it.
  137. @syonredux

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger … all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).
     
    Don't be a goon. Union troops did not go on a "rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans":

    Union Battle Deaths:110,000+

    Confederate Battle Deaths:94,000+

    Union Deaths Due to disease/accidents:230,000

    Confederate Deaths due to disease/accidents:164,000

    Union soldiers who died while in Confederate Prison camps:25,000–30,000

    Confederate soldiers who died in Union Prison camps: 26,000–31,000

    Good point, the war done to the Battle Hymn of the Republic probably killed closer to 700,000.

    Actually, I guess the original song was John Brown’s Body. Soon, LOTS of bodies were a-moldering in the grave.

  138. @Desiderius
    https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/481783-record-high-90-percent-of-americans-satisfied-with

    https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/481783-record-high-90-percent-of-americans-satisfied-with

    Americans are getting more miserable, and there’s data to prove it

    Depression Is on the Rise in the U.S., Especially Among Young Teens

    Could there have been a most recent reversal in a trend? Yes, of course. Then, we might expect to see birth rates increasing, or at least no longer falling (as they have been doing for several years now), and suicides to decrease, or at least stop rising, in the coming years (birth and suicide rates being more survey-proof). If that’s the case, there has been a reversal. If that turns out not to be the case, then I have my doubts about the reality of that survey.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Birth rates sure increased circa late 2016 on my street. Whole lotta strollers going on.
  139. @RichardTaylor

    Truth is, New Englanders don’t think about the South much at all, and if they do, it’s not always with the antipathy you imagine
     
    That's probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now. The "ethnic" Whites don't feel that way about the South - the Irish, the Germans, the Polish, etc.

    Now back in the day, when their numbers were larger ... all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million).

    Surprisingly there’s little consciousness of French Canadians in New England, besides Kerouac. I read somewhere they are the largest “ethnic” group. When I was growing up in Massachusetts the people across the street spoke French. When I worked in a factory during summers, several of the me spoke French and little English. No one talks about them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    According to Gregory Clark, French Canadian-Americans are near the bottom of white American ethnic groups at becoming doctors and other symbols of achievement. There is nothing particularly wrong with them, as far as I know, they just don't have a lot of high achievers. So they don't get much attention.
    , @Anonymous
    There was a Democrat presidential candidate in the 1970s who got in trouble for insulting these people, but I no longer remember the details. I think he used an insulting name for them.
  140. @RichardTaylor
    Interesting comment. Yes, the dynamic of back and forth hostility was there. I would have recommended you just let us go!

    I would have recommended you just let us go!

    Wouldn’t dream of it.

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
  141. @Steve Sailer
    One of the most beloved actors of his time famously suffers Parkinson's today, which may have something to do with what he did to be awake enough to star in one of the most beloved movies of all time at night while continuing to star in his TV series during the day.

    NYT:

    Parkinson’s ‘Clusters’ Getting a Closer Look
    By Mary Duenwald
    May 14, 2002

    Michael J. Fox’s celebrity can do more than raise money for Parkinson’s research. It may also help open an avenue of research that scientists have long wanted to explore.

    Mr. Fox, it turns out, was one of four people who worked on a production crew at a television studio in Vancouver, British Columbia, in the late 1970’s and developed Parkinson’s disease. Given that only 125 people worked on the crew in those years — including actors, directors, writers, production people and technicians — the number of cases seems extraordinary.

    It is possible that the cluster of cases arose purely from chance. But researchers are interested in studying them in hopes they will lead to clues to possible environmental factors or even viruses that may contribute to to the disease.

    [MORE]

    Don S. Williams, who directed Mr. Fox in two Canadian situation comedies beginning when the actor was 16, and who also has Parkinson’s, tried to get in touch with Mr. Fox soon after reading the news. ”But I couldn’t get past his handlers,” he said.

    Mr. Williams (also a cast member of ”The X Files” for four years) learned of his illness nine years ago, when he was 55.

    Sally Gardner, whose Parkinson’s was diagnosed when she was 38, in 1984, had been a script supervisor in the late 1970’s, and had worked with Mr. Fox and Mr. Williams. The fourth member of the cluster, a cameraman who has kept his identity secret, was recently found by Jerry Thompson, writer and director of a Canadian television documentary about Mr. Fox and Parkinson’s disease. The cameraman’s diagnosis came at age 54.

    Thompson’s documentary, ”The Parkinson’s Enigma,” which was broadcast last month, publicized the cluster’s existence.

    Could something at the television studio have caused the disease in all four people? Dr. Calne, Dr. Langston and other experts believe it could have. Perhaps something they breathed or ate or drank — a toxin, perhaps, or an infectious agent — set the disease process in motion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_and_Me#Parkinson’s_disease

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Thompson’s documentary, ”The Parkinson’s Enigma,” which was broadcast last month, publicized the cluster’s existence.

    Could something at the television studio have caused the disease in all four people? Dr. Calne, Dr. Langston and other experts believe it could have. Perhaps something they breathed or ate or drank
     

    "Perhaps"??

    The fact is, brain damage proceeds with everyone by the age of 35. Slowly and surely, it’s a fact if life. Except for moderate exercise, inflammation accelerates the process. "Sharp as a tack" at 45 is not as "sharp as a tack" at 28.

    Cocaine, drinking, smoking, sugar consumption, empty carbs, and std's, enhances inflammation, and accelerates the aging process. Robin Williams engaged in all of this, and trashed his brain. His brain was his money-maker, and he shit on it every day. He asked for what he got. He thought he was special. Nature doesn’t care. Parkinson's, Lewy Body, Alzheimer’s, or the scores of other types of less celebrated dementia will win the day.

    If you think cognitive dissonance is inherent in one's political views, try asking some tubby middle-aged nerd how his health is faring. "Bernie is going to be our next president, and I’m still as sharp as a tack! Just like Stevie Nicks! The Betty White of Rock!"

    Conclusion: Play games with the devil, and you’re apt to get burned.

    And to the "okay, boomer" beta male couch-ridden twerps... enjoy your destiny:

    Sitting in your own stink in a state care facility, being cared for by a fat Phillippino woman who hates you, and you call "mammy."

  142. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That’s probably true about modern New Englanders, since the descendants of the old Puritan stock are a minority now.
     
    Yankee (i.e., old English) numbers may be proportionally diminished from days of yore, but they’re still going strong in plenty of towns.

    all I can say is some rather hostile fellows came down on a rampage that killed over 600,000 White Americans (at a time when the population was only around 30 million)
     
    Yes, and both sides fought with impressive ferociousness. Fratricidal carnage is nothing to muse lightly upon, yet it also shouldn’t be lamented forever and ever. Surely much of defining contemporary white “Southern Pride” stems not from the Antebellum, but from inherited memory of the fierce fight waged during the war itself.

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/good-grief-more-straussianism/#comment-2141156 (#11)

    I refer you to this comment of mine in a past argument between Syonredux and Svigor along similar North vs. South lines:

    What happened to Svigor?

  143. @Foreign Expert
    Surprisingly there’s little consciousness of French Canadians in New England, besides Kerouac. I read somewhere they are the largest “ethnic” group. When I was growing up in Massachusetts the people across the street spoke French. When I worked in a factory during summers, several of the me spoke French and little English. No one talks about them.

    According to Gregory Clark, French Canadian-Americans are near the bottom of white American ethnic groups at becoming doctors and other symbols of achievement. There is nothing particularly wrong with them, as far as I know, they just don’t have a lot of high achievers. So they don’t get much attention.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Many of the high achievers may have returned to Quebec and never come back. That's what I'd do.
  144. @captflee
    From my years in the Big Sleazy I came to greatly appreciate Walker's work, but I must confess to being an even greater fan of his uncle's Lanterns on the Levee.

    Will Percy should be required reading for our entire Godforsaken ruling class. Would puncture their shallow prejudices and then some.

  145. @adreadline

    https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/481783-record-high-90-percent-of-americans-satisfied-with
     
    Americans are getting more miserable, and there's data to prove it

    Depression Is on the Rise in the U.S., Especially Among Young Teens

    Could there have been a most recent reversal in a trend? Yes, of course. Then, we might expect to see birth rates increasing, or at least no longer falling (as they have been doing for several years now), and suicides to decrease, or at least stop rising, in the coming years (birth and suicide rates being more survey-proof). If that's the case, there has been a reversal. If that turns out not to be the case, then I have my doubts about the reality of that survey.

    Birth rates sure increased circa late 2016 on my street. Whole lotta strollers going on.

  146. @Steve Sailer
    According to Gregory Clark, French Canadian-Americans are near the bottom of white American ethnic groups at becoming doctors and other symbols of achievement. There is nothing particularly wrong with them, as far as I know, they just don't have a lot of high achievers. So they don't get much attention.

    Many of the high achievers may have returned to Quebec and never come back. That’s what I’d do.

  147. @Thirdeye
    Nineteenth Century feminism was driven by WASP businesswomen, especially in the west. They ran the service industries in frontier towns - boarding houses, laundry, bathhouses, brothels and such. As big players in small town economies they wanted recognition. The first state to grant women suffrage was Wyoming. It was also a Republican thing.

    Interesting. So prohibition can’t be viewed as another inter feminism scuffle.

    I was thinking of Nathaniel Hawthorne and likeminded women.

  148. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    NYT:

    Parkinson's 'Clusters' Getting a Closer Look
    By Mary Duenwald
    May 14, 2002

    Michael J. Fox's celebrity can do more than raise money for Parkinson's research. It may also help open an avenue of research that scientists have long wanted to explore.

    Mr. Fox, it turns out, was one of four people who worked on a production crew at a television studio in Vancouver, British Columbia, in the late 1970's and developed Parkinson's disease. Given that only 125 people worked on the crew in those years -- including actors, directors, writers, production people and technicians -- the number of cases seems extraordinary.

    It is possible that the cluster of cases arose purely from chance. But researchers are interested in studying them in hopes they will lead to clues to possible environmental factors or even viruses that may contribute to to the disease.
     

    Don S. Williams, who directed Mr. Fox in two Canadian situation comedies beginning when the actor was 16, and who also has Parkinson's, tried to get in touch with Mr. Fox soon after reading the news. ''But I couldn't get past his handlers,'' he said.

    Mr. Williams (also a cast member of ''The X Files'' for four years) learned of his illness nine years ago, when he was 55.

    Sally Gardner, whose Parkinson's was diagnosed when she was 38, in 1984, had been a script supervisor in the late 1970's, and had worked with Mr. Fox and Mr. Williams. The fourth member of the cluster, a cameraman who has kept his identity secret, was recently found by Jerry Thompson, writer and director of a Canadian television documentary about Mr. Fox and Parkinson's disease. The cameraman's diagnosis came at age 54.

    Thompson's documentary, ''The Parkinson's Enigma,'' which was broadcast last month, publicized the cluster's existence.

    Could something at the television studio have caused the disease in all four people? Dr. Calne, Dr. Langston and other experts believe it could have. Perhaps something they breathed or ate or drank -- a toxin, perhaps, or an infectious agent -- set the disease process in motion.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_and_Me#Parkinson's_disease

    Thompson’s documentary, ”The Parkinson’s Enigma,” which was broadcast last month, publicized the cluster’s existence.

    Could something at the television studio have caused the disease in all four people? Dr. Calne, Dr. Langston and other experts believe it could have. Perhaps something they breathed or ate or drank

    “Perhaps”??

    The fact is, brain damage proceeds with everyone by the age of 35. Slowly and surely, it’s a fact if life. Except for moderate exercise, inflammation accelerates the process. “Sharp as a tack” at 45 is not as “sharp as a tack” at 28.

    Cocaine, drinking, smoking, sugar consumption, empty carbs, and std’s, enhances inflammation, and accelerates the aging process. Robin Williams engaged in all of this, and trashed his brain. His brain was his money-maker, and he shit on it every day. He asked for what he got. He thought he was special. Nature doesn’t care. Parkinson’s, Lewy Body, Alzheimer’s, or the scores of other types of less celebrated dementia will win the day.

    If you think cognitive dissonance is inherent in one’s political views, try asking some tubby middle-aged nerd how his health is faring. “Bernie is going to be our next president, and I’m still as sharp as a tack! Just like Stevie Nicks! The Betty White of Rock!”

    Conclusion: Play games with the devil, and you’re apt to get burned.

    And to the “okay, boomer” beta male couch-ridden twerps… enjoy your destiny:

    Sitting in your own stink in a state care facility, being cared for by a fat Phillippino woman who hates you, and you call “mammy.”

  149. @Foreign Expert
    Surprisingly there’s little consciousness of French Canadians in New England, besides Kerouac. I read somewhere they are the largest “ethnic” group. When I was growing up in Massachusetts the people across the street spoke French. When I worked in a factory during summers, several of the me spoke French and little English. No one talks about them.

    There was a Democrat presidential candidate in the 1970s who got in trouble for insulting these people, but I no longer remember the details. I think he used an insulting name for them.

  150. @ben tillman

    Moldbug:
    “[Universalism is] a mystery cult because it displaces theistic traditions by replacing metaphysical superstitions with philosophical mysteries, such as humanity, progress, equality, democracy, justice, environment, community, peace, etc.”
     
    Those things aren't "philosophical mysteries".

    Those things aren’t “philosophical mysteries”.

    Moldbug/Yarvin addresses your objection in the very next paragraph:

    “None of these concepts, as defined in orthodox Universalist doctrine, is even slightly coherent. All can absorb arbitrary mental energy without producing any rational thought. In this they are best compared to Plotinian, Talmudic, or Scholastic nonsense.”

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