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Show Me the Professor and I'll Find You the Crime: the Joshua Katz Sequel
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From the New York Times news section today, what I reported yesterday:

University Must Reinstate Professor Who Tweeted About ‘Black Privilege’

An arbitrator found that the University of Central Florida failed to show “just cause” last year when it fired Charles Negy, a tenured professor whose comments generated outrage on campus.

By Michael Levenson
May 19, 2022

The University of Central Florida must reinstate a longtime tenured professor who was fired after comments he made on Twitter

In retweeting a link to my June 3, 2020 column on the Mostly Peaceful Protests “The Bonfire of the Insanities.”

were roundly condemned as racist following the murder of George Floyd, an arbitrator has ruled.

The arbitrator said that the university failed to show “just cause” in January 2021, when it terminated the professor, Charles Negy, the author of a book titled “White Shaming: Bullying Based on Prejudice, Virtue-Signaling, and Ignorance.”

Available for purchase in paperback for \$33.74.

The university indicated it would not challenge the ruling, which requires that Dr. Negy be reinstated with tenure, pay and benefits, and said it would work with him “on the details of his work assignment for the fall term.” …

Dr. Negy, an associate professor of psychology who taught at the university for 22 years and had tenure for 18 years before he was fired, said he expected to be back in the classroom in August.

“It was a fraudulent firing from the beginning,” Dr. Negy said in an interview. “Just because George Floyd died, which was a national tragedy, doesn’t mean the social mob gets to go around demanding people get fired just because they are offended by controversial comments.”

The university had said in June 2020 that it was investigating Dr. Negy’s comments on Twitter as well as accusations of bias and unfair treatment in his classroom. It announced the inquiry one day after he wrote, as demonstrators around the country were protesting Mr. Floyd’s murder, that he had a “sincere question.”

“If Afr. Americans as a group, had the same behavioral profile as Asian Americans (on average, performing the best academically, having the highest income, committing the lowest crime, etc.), would we still be proclaiming ‘systematic racism’ exists?” he wrote.

In another comment on Twitter, he wrote, “Black privilege is real: Besides affirm. action, special scholarships and other set asides, being shielded from legitimate criticism is a privilege. But as a group, they’re missing out on much needed feedback.”

The comments led to student protests, and the Student Senate called for his termination.

University leaders, including the president, Alexander N. Cartwright, said in a statement at the time that they were “disgusted by the racist posts,” and were gathering information about complaints of bias in Dr. Negy’s classes.

“If any student, current or former, believes they may have experienced abusive or discriminatory behavior by any faculty or staff member, we want to know about it,” they wrote.

As outrage spread, Dr. Negy said he deleted the tweets “in a panic,” which he now regrets, because he stands behind them “100 percent.”

In January 2021, the university fired Dr. Negy, although not for his comments on Twitter, which it said were protected by the First Amendment.

In a termination letter, which cited repeated violations of university policies and regulations, the university said Dr. Negy had created “a hostile learning environment” for his students “through discriminatory harassment.”

The letter said he had deterred students from filing complaints about his classroom conduct and had failed to report that a student had told him that she had been sexually assaulted by one of his teaching assistants in February 2014.

As long as you define “sexual assault” as hands-free flirting by a dorky undergrad.

… In the ruling on Monday, the arbitrator, Ben Falcigno, found that the university had failed to show “just cause” when it fired Dr. Negy because it had not given him a chance to change his conduct in the classroom or, alternatively, to show that he was incapable of changing his behavior.

Mr. Falcigno pointed out that Dr. Negy had received three awards for teaching productivity and excellence, and that his last five annual evaluations showed that he was “rated as overall outstanding.” He said the university had also given Dr. Negy a raise to persuade him not to leave.

“There is no evidence that U.C.F. gave him reason to believe he was anything but as highly esteemed as his evaluations and treatment, with no reason to perform differently,” Mr. Falcigno wrote, adding that management was now blaming him for “what it retroactively sees as serious misconduct.”

Alissa Carmi, a U.C.F. senior and former student of Dr. Negy’s, said on Thursday that she was devastated by the finding.

“As soon as I heard that this morning, I bawled my eyes out immediately,” she said.

Contra Richard Hanania, “Women’s Tears [don’t always] Win In the Marketplace of Ideas.”

Ms. Carmi said she and a roommate had spent months gathering testimonials from Dr. Negy’s current and former students who felt that they had been subjected to racism and other forms of discrimination in his classroom. …

“It sets a precedent that a professor can dictate religious beliefs, racism and all that just for a grade,” Ms. Carmi said.

Samantha Harris, one of Dr. Negy’s lawyers, called the arbitrator’s finding “a victory for the rule of law, and a reminder that due process matters.”

“The arbitrator’s decision is a powerful rebuke of the ‘show me the man, I’ll find you the crime’ treatment that frightens so many people into silence,” she said. “Cases like this have a tremendous chilling effect on free speech, as most people would rather remain silent than pay the price Dr. Negy has paid for speaking his mind.”

Dr. Negy said he recognized that he may not be warmly welcomed back to campus.

“It’s not fun walking on to campus knowing that your colleagues won’t speak to you, but I don’t give a damn about them,” he said. “I’m going to do what I’m going do.”

Also from the New York Times news section today:

After Campus Uproar, Princeton Proposes to Fire Tenured Professor

Joshua Katz says he was targeted because of his criticism of a campus protest group. A university report says the concerns are related to his inappropriate conduct with a female student.

Katz is a leading classicist, although he’s more of an Indo-Europeanist.

Here’s his article on whether “testimony” and “testicles” have the same root. Yeah, he sounds like a horndog, but a smart, funny, politically incorrect one.

I wonder if Joshua Katz is related to Jonathan Katz, a Washington U. of St. Louis physics professor whom the Woke are also always trying to get fired?

By Anemona Hartocollis
May 19, 2022

In July 2020, as social justice protests roiled the nation, Joshua Katz, a Princeton classics professor, wrote in a small influential journal that some faculty proposals to combat racism at Princeton would foment “civil war on campus,” and denounced a student group, the Black Justice League, as “a small local terrorist organization” because of its tactics in pushing for institutional changes.

The remarks in Quillette made him a lightning rod in the campus free speech debate, reviled by some who thought what he said was racist, and lionized by others who defended his right to say it.

The NYT won’t link to his essay in Quillette until much later in the article, but I do.

And they sent up a flare that led to scrutiny of other aspects of his life, including his conduct with female students.

Unlike the derisible six-degrees-of-separation charge against Negy that the arbitrator dismissed as having never been communicated to faculty, Katz really did sleep with an undergrad coed, but he was already punished for that several years ago. So the attempt to now fire Katz is obvious double jeopardy.

In the latest fallout from that debate, Princeton’s president has recommended dismissing Dr. Katz, according to a May 10 letter from the president to the chair of the trustees.

But the professor, who is tenured, is not facing dismissal for his speech.

Of course not. If he’d praised Black Lives Matter, all this double jeopardy would have come down upon him anyway.

Sure.

His job is at stake for what a university report says was his failure to be totally forthcoming about a sexual relationship with a student 15 years ago that he has already been punished for.

… Dr. Katz declined an interview. But his lawyer, Samantha Harris,

Where did we see that name before?

said she was expecting the trustees to fire him. “In our view, this is the culmination of the witch hunt that began days after Professor Katz published an article in Quillette that led people to call for his termination,” Ms. Harris said on Thursday.

Princeton’s faculty dean, Gene A. Jarrett, rejected that view. In a 10-page report, dated Nov. 30, 2021, the dean detailed reasons for dismissing Dr. Katz. Dr. Jarrett addressed what he said was Dr. Katz’s contention that there was a “direct line” from the Quillette article to being investigated for misconduct.

“I have considered Professor Katz’s claim and have determined that the current political climate of the university, whether perceived or real, is not germane to the case, nor does it play a role in my recommendation,” Dr. Jarrett wrote. That document became the basis for the president’s recommendation.

The case has deeply divided the campus. Many students were already furious about his Quillette article. And the potential firing has only fueled the controversy — with dividing lines between those who see it as thinly disguised retaliation for offensive speech, and those who believe that the furor over his remarks about race incidentally exposed additional troubling behavior.

Dr. Katz, 52, has also become a cause célèbre among a number of conservative columnists, some of whom say that his case represents a troubling escalation in the debate over free speech on campuses, in which expressing an unorthodox opinion is not a matter of protected speech but a stain on one’s character that justifies excavating past wrongs to expunge it. An article about Dr. Katz in The American Conservative last year was called “Persecution & Propaganda at Princeton.”

“Is this the world we want to live in, where you express an opinion that other people don’t like, and suddenly your personal life is turned inside out, looking for evidence to destroy you?” Ms. Harris, his lawyer, said.

… A university spokesman said at the time [of the Quillette article] that Princeton would be “looking into the matter,” but no investigation materialized. Dr. Katz celebrated in July 2020 with a Wall Street Journal opinion piece, “I Survived Cancellation at Princeton.”

But with attention focused on Dr. Katz, the student newspaper, The Daily Princetonian, began an investigation of sexual harassment accusations against him. It culminated in a lengthy report in February 2021 about his sexual relationship with the undergraduate.

Princeton already knew about her. The university had started an investigation after it learned of the relationship in late 2017, and Dr. Katz confessed to a consensual affair. He was quietly suspended without pay for a year.

So, double jeopardy.

Except, of course, when it comes to women’s complaints against non-woke professors, there is no limit short of the heat death of the universe.

 
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  1. • Replies: @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is literally the least scandalous thing associated with Hunter Biden.

  2. Pixo says:

    Katz is another impressive Germanic-Ashkenazi hybrid.

    I suspect Princeton’s woke affirmative action weirdos plan to fire him in part because he conducts the kind of humanities scholarship they are intellectually incapable of. His bio:

    “ I maintain a number of active research areas, including etymology and Indo-European historical/comparative phonology and morphology. In my more linguistic work I have proposed or refined sound rules in languages such as Hittite, Greek, Latin, and Tocharian; offered a series of novel explanations for the system of personal pronouns in Proto-Indo-European; and provided new perspectives on the history and prehistory of such words as eel, sphinx, testicle/testimony, and vespers. ”

    “ Most of my publications fall into eight interrelated categories, listed here roughly in the order in which I became engaged with them: (1) “hard-core” problems in Indo-European linguistics, especially of a phonological or morphological nature and often concerning the reconstruction of pronouns, particles, and other “little” words; (2) matters of “Wörter und Sachen,” especially animals and body parts; (3) evidence of linguistic and cultural contact; (4) linguistic perspectives on myth, ritual, law, and religion; (5) Archaic Greek poetry, especially Homer and Hesiod; (6) Classical Latin poetry, especially Vergil; (7) the history and practice of wordplay; and (8) the history of scholarship.”

    “ As for graduate seminars, I regularly offer instruction in such topics as Proto-Indo-European, Linear B and the Mycenaean world, Greek Dialects, the historical and comparative grammar of Latin, Vedic Sanskrit, and Old Irish.”

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Pixo


    Most of my publications fall into eight interrelated categories
     
    Yowza, he's been getting away with that all this time? Dude's research badly needs to be "decolonized."
  3. Selective prosecution is insidiously evil.

  4. I have come around to the Khmer Rouge’s standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Nodwink

    they should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    To dig potatoes with their eyeglasses!

    , @G. Poulin
    @Nodwink

    I wonder if they would recognize a raw potato if they saw one.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Nodwink

    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it. I cannot remember exactly how it all played out, but it was different in that the intellectuals were being harassed and uprooted because they had spoken or written things AGAINST the regime (Chairman Mao's, of course).

    Yet the university "intellectuals" of the left here are at the forefront of our Cultural Revolution, rather than the common people, who in China were told to quit school and pick up a little Red Book.

    We may have different variations, but make no mistake, iStevers, we are in the midst of our own Cultural Revolution. 2 years back, one could joke about it, but now? These things can spiral out of control in ways neither side expects. I defer to John Derbyshire, but was it the death of Mao only that put an end to the decade-long China Cult-Rev? We're going to have to end this one ourselves.

    Finally, to address the point made by Anon-#259 here: I see your point. We need to discuss solutions and plans. However, what Steve is doing with some of these ridiculous university stories is introducing us to the fact that we are involved in a Cultural Revolution. (Maybe he doesn't see it yet either ...)

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @San Fernando Curt
    @Nodwink

    Go full-Khmer and make these useless eaters the potatoes dug.

    , @Alden
    @Nodwink

    When I become Supreme All Powerful dictator of America I will do to the universities and media what Henry 8 did to catholic monasteries convents schools colleges and churches. Confiscate them and erase their ideology. But I would treat the personnel differently from how Henry treated the monks and nuns. He gave them pensions so they could live out their lives.

    I would do unto college employees and journalists what they deserve. Not wanting to attract the FBI and Homeland Security to this site I won’t write what they deserve.

  5. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/iamdanlevey/status/1527472425843163136

    Replies: @J.Ross

    This is literally the least scandalous thing associated with Hunter Biden.

    • Agree: Spect3r
  6. “As soon as I heard that this morning, I bawled my eyes out immediately,” she said.

    In the immortal words of black protestors, “F–k your white tears!” (Can I say that or is that BLM only?)

    “It sets a precedent that a professor can dictate religious beliefs, racism and all that just for a grade,” Ms. Carmi said.

    Oh yeah, that’s exactly the precedent it sets lol. How the hell do these people get into college in the first place? The demise of the western university system cannot come quickly enough for my liking.

  7. @Pixo
    Katz is another impressive Germanic-Ashkenazi hybrid.

    I suspect Princeton’s woke affirmative action weirdos plan to fire him in part because he conducts the kind of humanities scholarship they are intellectually incapable of. His bio:

    “ I maintain a number of active research areas, including etymology and Indo-European historical/comparative phonology and morphology. In my more linguistic work I have proposed or refined sound rules in languages such as Hittite, Greek, Latin, and Tocharian; offered a series of novel explanations for the system of personal pronouns in Proto-Indo-European; and provided new perspectives on the history and prehistory of such words as eel, sphinx, testicle/testimony, and vespers. ”



    “ Most of my publications fall into eight interrelated categories, listed here roughly in the order in which I became engaged with them: (1) “hard-core” problems in Indo-European linguistics, especially of a phonological or morphological nature and often concerning the reconstruction of pronouns, particles, and other “little” words; (2) matters of “Wörter und Sachen,” especially animals and body parts; (3) evidence of linguistic and cultural contact; (4) linguistic perspectives on myth, ritual, law, and religion; (5) Archaic Greek poetry, especially Homer and Hesiod; (6) Classical Latin poetry, especially Vergil; (7) the history and practice of wordplay; and (8) the history of scholarship.”

    “ As for graduate seminars, I regularly offer instruction in such topics as Proto-Indo-European, Linear B and the Mycenaean world, Greek Dialects, the historical and comparative grammar of Latin, Vedic Sanskrit, and Old Irish.”

    Replies: @silviosilver

    Most of my publications fall into eight interrelated categories

    Yowza, he’s been getting away with that all this time? Dude’s research badly needs to be “decolonized.”

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  8. OT Recipient of millions of dollars from China Joseph Biden has determined that it’s okay for China (the country that gave him millions of dollars) to buy the Russian oil that we were going to make unsellable in order to hurt Putin.
    Because, after all, like the man himself said, sanctions don’t stop invasions.
    https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/chinese-efforts-replenish-reserves-with-russian-oil-would-not-violate-us-2022-05-19/

  9. Anon[259] • Disclaimer says:

    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let’s get more Coeur D’Alene type articles por favor. And maybe leave out the stats everyone intuitively knows already so the articles are sharable. It’d be more effective marketing of your work than retweeting some dweeb professor. Glad he got his back pay tho lol.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Anon

    First they came for university professors. I did not speak out
    - because I was not a university professor.
    Then they came ....

    Replies: @Chief Seattle

    , @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Who cares? 98% of Americans have never been and will never visit Coeur d'Alene. I find the death of our university system to be much more interesting than a travel blog about some town in Idaho.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let’s get more Coeur D’Alene type articles por favor.
     
    Steve is Steve and will trot out what interests Steve.

    But Anon, you're wrong on this "petty uni drama". Hollyweird has been much more powerful in reaching the common man--and spreading lies to the world. But the rise-of-the-Jews through the universities, pushing--and successfully establishing--their minoritarian narrative of evil whitey oppressing poor virtuous minorities is hugely important. The difference in narrative and quality of thought between American universities in 1950 or even 1960 and now is night and day. And the feeding of toxic minoritarian b.s. into the brains of smart young Americans for a couple generations explains a good bit about why our elites are both so treasonous and disastrously incompetent today--a leading cause of American decline.

    These university battles are both demonstrative of our societal rot, and critical. We normies either win back room for argument, debate, sanity--and then win the debate because their lies are lies and our truths are truths. Or else we have to separate off a patch of sanity for ourselves. Our else America simply declines and dies.

    , @Daniel H
    @Anon

    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama

    “ As for graduate seminars, I regularly offer instruction in such topics as Proto-Indo-European, Linear B and the Mycenaean world, Greek Dialects, the historical and comparative grammar of Latin, Vedic Sanskrit, and Old Irish.”

    Many care about the fate of a man who devotes his time, intelligence and energy to the study (at the highest degree) of the aforementioned matter. If I could do it again, this is the type of stuff that I would devote my time to.

  10. @Nodwink
    I have come around to the Khmer Rouge's standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @G. Poulin, @Achmed E. Newman, @San Fernando Curt, @Alden

    they should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    To dig potatoes with their eyeglasses!

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  11. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:

    So, double jeopardy.

    Is “double jeopardy” even a thing?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anonymous

    It used to be in the Constitution, if that's what you mean by "thing". Since the [anti-]Civil Rights revolution, though, there is a workaround for putting whites or other political dissidents in double jeopardy with Federal [anti-]Civil Rights charges, which just happen to carry the same penalties as ordinary double jeopardy would.

    If you are asking if Princeton's (or any other institution of lower learning) academic discipline rules prohibit double jeopardy, I don't know, but these academic institutions like to flatter themselves that they are great polities with august laws, often semi-cribbed from US law, so ... maybe. Or maybe there is some Federal funding rule that requires it.

  12. Surely our ancestors could never have foreseen that the unsupervised mixing of charismatic and high-status men and nubile young women could result in fornication.

  13. Semi-OT

    Is there a source for recent statistics of suicides at colleges? Recent, as in since the lockdown mania started.

    I ask because I am hearing anecdotally about a startling number of college suicides in the last two years, but searching for actual statistics has not been fruitful. All the studies seem to be older (though showing some kind of suicide increase since my own college days), and the CDC doesn’t seem to have suicide stats more specific than “15-24 year olds” and nothing more recent than 2020 in any case.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Almost Missouri

    >nothing more recent 2020

    I think you have your answer. The government's national database on large fire events has similarly gone unupdated.
    ---------
    Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner, etc OST) is dead, and there's nothing about it at the Wall Street Journal, but it's unstickied at 4chan's /tv/ board?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @anonymous
    @Almost Missouri

    Three suicides at Princeton this year, two in the last week :(

  14. Here’s [Katz’s] article on whether “testimony” and “testicles” have the same root.

    It’s been known since forever: Testi-moany is how one reacts if struck in the nuts. The pain can drive the even the pious to be sack-religious, with much cursing and blasphemy.

  15. @Anonymous

    So, double jeopardy.
     
    Is “double jeopardy” even a thing?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    It used to be in the Constitution, if that’s what you mean by “thing”. Since the [anti-]Civil Rights revolution, though, there is a workaround for putting whites or other political dissidents in double jeopardy with Federal [anti-]Civil Rights charges, which just happen to carry the same penalties as ordinary double jeopardy would.

    If you are asking if Princeton’s (or any other institution of lower learning) academic discipline rules prohibit double jeopardy, I don’t know, but these academic institutions like to flatter themselves that they are great polities with august laws, often semi-cribbed from US law, so … maybe. Or maybe there is some Federal funding rule that requires it.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  16. @Anon
    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let's get more Coeur D'Alene type articles por favor. And maybe leave out the stats everyone intuitively knows already so the articles are sharable. It'd be more effective marketing of your work than retweeting some dweeb professor. Glad he got his back pay tho lol.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Daniel H

    First they came for university professors. I did not speak out
    – because I was not a university professor.
    Then they came ….

    • Agree: San Fernando Curt
    • Replies: @Chief Seattle
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I read this as "First they came for university professors. I did not speak out because I was a university professor."

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  17. @Almost Missouri
    Semi-OT

    Is there a source for recent statistics of suicides at colleges? Recent, as in since the lockdown mania started.

    I ask because I am hearing anecdotally about a startling number of college suicides in the last two years, but searching for actual statistics has not been fruitful. All the studies seem to be older (though showing some kind of suicide increase since my own college days), and the CDC doesn't seem to have suicide stats more specific than "15-24 year olds" and nothing more recent than 2020 in any case.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @anonymous

    >nothing more recent 2020

    I think you have your answer. The government’s national database on large fire events has similarly gone unupdated.
    ———
    Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner, etc OST) is dead, and there’s nothing about it at the Wall Street Journal, but it’s unstickied at 4chan’s /tv/ board?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @J.Ross

    "Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner, etc OST) is dead, and there’s nothing about it at the Wall Street Journal"

    The good news is that the Guardian has a big piece by a guy who only seems to know his Hollywood stuff, but the comments are great.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2022/may/19/vangelis-greek-composer-chariots-of-fire-blade-runner-dies

    I personally loved his stuff with Jon Anderson. The middle-class Greek boy and the Accrington milkman were a great combination.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21Qg2wYRmRc

  18. The curse of the US is that of a highly functioning multiracail society that keeps stats. Other functioning multiracial societies, or recently multiracial- France, UK, perhaps some mostly white Latin American countries… are not that functioning nor do they keep stats.

    Of course that blacks in Brazil or in France lag in all areas of academic achievement, just- everybody knows that and nobody cares. I am sure they got stats in Brazil or Colombia, but- they don’t care. They will not be explicit about it, but they all (including blacks) know that blacks don’t care for scholarly or academic careers. I suppose it’s the same with Indians in Bolivia and Paraguay. Or with smaller Siberian peoples in Russia.

    I don’t see much fuss about academic under-achievement of American Indians/Native Americans in the US. It’s always about blacks, because they’re more numerous than others, very present in popular culture & sports, aggressive as mobs, idolized in the post-civil rights discourse.

    It is impossible to say publicly that such a prominent segment of a society, whether because of biology or culture, is something eternally alien & destined to be always visibly inferior in all cognitive fields.

    If you threw out the window crime stats, do the same with edu stats.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  19. A lot of labor arbitrators are current/former college professors. Tough nut to crack for the university looking to fire a prof.

  20. @Nodwink
    I have come around to the Khmer Rouge's standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @G. Poulin, @Achmed E. Newman, @San Fernando Curt, @Alden

    I wonder if they would recognize a raw potato if they saw one.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @G. Poulin

    They can learn.

    https://st.depositphotos.com/1004099/2865/i/950/depositphotos_28652959-stock-photo-male-hand-holding-brown-leather.jpg

  21. Princeton President Eisgruber is an obsequious, insufferable coward. He has been on his knees since at least 2015.

    Very high likelihood that the woman speaking in this clip is an immigrant and not someone whose “ancestors” built Princeton.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @clifford brown

    Wouldn't matter if she were an immigrant.

    Princeton is located in Mercer County, NJ, which is in our own time an exurb of Philadelphia. It's campus was planted there in 1756. In 1910, blacks accounted for 3.2% of the population of New Jersey and 2.5% of the population of Pennsylvania. In our own time, blacks are about 45% less likely than others to be employed in construction and extraction occupations. In 1910, in re nominated skilled trades, blacks were between 40% and 95% less likely to be found; it's possible that they were a higher share of general labor in the building trades, but the census data on 'laborers' is not that granular.

    I tend to doubt there have been all that many blacks employed in the building of Princeton.

  22. “In another comment on Twitter, he wrote, “Black privilege is real: Besides affirm. action, special scholarships and other set asides, being shielded from legitimate criticism is a privilege. But as a group, they’re missing out on much needed feedback.”

    The comments led to student protests, and the Student Senate called for his termination.”

    I don’t think you can state something more true than his twitter comment.

  23. White Shaming by Negy is a great book. Thin and expensive, it is packed chock a block with rhetorical ammo. It should be required reading for all White college grads.

  24. • LOL: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @The Alarmist

    Both

  25. @Anon
    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let's get more Coeur D'Alene type articles por favor. And maybe leave out the stats everyone intuitively knows already so the articles are sharable. It'd be more effective marketing of your work than retweeting some dweeb professor. Glad he got his back pay tho lol.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Daniel H

    Who cares? 98% of Americans have never been and will never visit Coeur d’Alene. I find the death of our university system to be much more interesting than a travel blog about some town in Idaho.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AndrewR

    On the other hand, Coeur d’Alene is pretty interesting.

    It's almost as if different people have different opinions about what they are interested in. So I'm just going to write about whatever I'm interested in.

  26. @Nodwink
    I have come around to the Khmer Rouge's standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @G. Poulin, @Achmed E. Newman, @San Fernando Curt, @Alden

    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it. I cannot remember exactly how it all played out, but it was different in that the intellectuals were being harassed and uprooted because they had spoken or written things AGAINST the regime (Chairman Mao’s, of course).

    Yet the university “intellectuals” of the left here are at the forefront of our Cultural Revolution, rather than the common people, who in China were told to quit school and pick up a little Red Book.

    We may have different variations, but make no mistake, iStevers, we are in the midst of our own Cultural Revolution. 2 years back, one could joke about it, but now? These things can spiral out of control in ways neither side expects. I defer to John Derbyshire, but was it the death of Mao only that put an end to the decade-long China Cult-Rev? We’re going to have to end this one ourselves.

    Finally, to address the point made by Anon-#259 here: I see your point. We need to discuss solutions and plans. However, what Steve is doing with some of these ridiculous university stories is introducing us to the fact that we are involved in a Cultural Revolution. (Maybe he doesn’t see it yet either …)

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it.
     
    I see a lot of merit in sending the "intellectuals" inhabiting our universities now, to the pig farms. But not as workers.

    Replies: @Alden

  27. @The Alarmist
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/53/62/5b/53625b5c413d843cea06b77b6856461f.png

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Both

  28. @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Who cares? 98% of Americans have never been and will never visit Coeur d'Alene. I find the death of our university system to be much more interesting than a travel blog about some town in Idaho.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    On the other hand, Coeur d’Alene is pretty interesting.

    It’s almost as if different people have different opinions about what they are interested in. So I’m just going to write about whatever I’m interested in.

  29. Alissa Carmi, a U.C.F. senior and former student of Dr. Negy’s, said on Thursday that she was devastated by the finding.

    “As soon as I heard that this morning, I bawled my eyes out immediately,” she said.

    Ms. Carmi said she and a roommate had spent months gathering testimonials from Dr. Negy’s current and former students who felt that they had been subjected to racism and other forms of discrimination in his classroom. …

    “It sets a precedent that a professor can dictate religious beliefs, racism and all that just for a grade,” Ms. Carmi said.

    It is clear that a great many women–even if intelligent and interested–simply do not belong around anything resembling a university–with ideas and argument and reasoning and stuff.

    Maybe we could try having women’s “universities”, where women could study stuff that would be carefully catered to conform precisely to the authorized prevailing fashionable thoughts of the day. Different universities to accommodate the slightly varying conventional wisdoms of various regional and political establishments. Or perhaps at such “universities” the girl could answer a questionnaire and then get an appropriately tailored schedule of courses with professors and syllabi that would not upset her–sort of a bespoke curriculum.

    We did a–dangerous–experiment–upend the old wisdom and see what happens. The last couple decades have been given us an answer.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Until about 60 years ago America had hundreds of those colleges. They were called Women’s Colleges. All women students. And mostly women employees. Except for a few cooks and repair and maintenance men. Carefully selected to be middle aged bald and chubby.

    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment. It worked.

    Stupid witches the harassers tend to be black and Hispanic pervs not White college students.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @bomag

  30. Dean Gene A. Jarrett is a Negro with a specialty in Negroes:

    https://dof.princeton.edu/dean

  31. @Anon
    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let's get more Coeur D'Alene type articles por favor. And maybe leave out the stats everyone intuitively knows already so the articles are sharable. It'd be more effective marketing of your work than retweeting some dweeb professor. Glad he got his back pay tho lol.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Daniel H

    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let’s get more Coeur D’Alene type articles por favor.

    Steve is Steve and will trot out what interests Steve.

    But Anon, you’re wrong on this “petty uni drama”. Hollyweird has been much more powerful in reaching the common man–and spreading lies to the world. But the rise-of-the-Jews through the universities, pushing–and successfully establishing–their minoritarian narrative of evil whitey oppressing poor virtuous minorities is hugely important. The difference in narrative and quality of thought between American universities in 1950 or even 1960 and now is night and day. And the feeding of toxic minoritarian b.s. into the brains of smart young Americans for a couple generations explains a good bit about why our elites are both so treasonous and disastrously incompetent today–a leading cause of American decline.

    These university battles are both demonstrative of our societal rot, and critical. We normies either win back room for argument, debate, sanity–and then win the debate because their lies are lies and our truths are truths. Or else we have to separate off a patch of sanity for ourselves. Our else America simply declines and dies.

  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Nodwink

    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it. I cannot remember exactly how it all played out, but it was different in that the intellectuals were being harassed and uprooted because they had spoken or written things AGAINST the regime (Chairman Mao's, of course).

    Yet the university "intellectuals" of the left here are at the forefront of our Cultural Revolution, rather than the common people, who in China were told to quit school and pick up a little Red Book.

    We may have different variations, but make no mistake, iStevers, we are in the midst of our own Cultural Revolution. 2 years back, one could joke about it, but now? These things can spiral out of control in ways neither side expects. I defer to John Derbyshire, but was it the death of Mao only that put an end to the decade-long China Cult-Rev? We're going to have to end this one ourselves.

    Finally, to address the point made by Anon-#259 here: I see your point. We need to discuss solutions and plans. However, what Steve is doing with some of these ridiculous university stories is introducing us to the fact that we are involved in a Cultural Revolution. (Maybe he doesn't see it yet either ...)

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it.

    I see a lot of merit in sending the “intellectuals” inhabiting our universities now, to the pig farms. But not as workers.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Animals including humans make great pig feed.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  33. outrage on campus

    Campus Uproar

    Gamecock went to college when the campus was BORING.

    Indeed . . .

    The case has deeply divided the campus.

    Betcha nobody f*&^ing cares.

    Many students were already furious about his Quillette article.

    Lemme guess: 3 cared. None made it to ‘furious.’

  34. He wrote: I prefer … to prowl around … rather than pursue one single …

    Was he signalling?

  35. @G. Poulin
    @Nodwink

    I wonder if they would recognize a raw potato if they saw one.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    They can learn.

    • LOL: Adam Smith
  36. Katz also married an ex-student who is half his age.

    “that he had hindered that investigation by not being totally honest and forthcoming, according to the report.”

    That is always the complaint in a witchhunt, when they do not find anything substantive.

  37. @Nodwink
    I have come around to the Khmer Rouge's standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @G. Poulin, @Achmed E. Newman, @San Fernando Curt, @Alden

    Go full-Khmer and make these useless eaters the potatoes dug.

  38. Ms. Carmi said she and a roommate had spent months gathering testimonials from Dr. Negy’s current and former students who felt that they had been subjected to racism and other forms of discrimination in his classroom. …

    Ms. Carmi sad she and a roommate had spent months gathering testimonials from other students to whom Dr. Negy had awarded Cs, Ds, and Fs.

    FIFY

  39. @Nodwink
    I have come around to the Khmer Rouge's standpoint regarding intellectuals and middle-class urbanites. They should be marched at gunpoint out of New York and Los Angeles, and sent to Idaho to dig potatoes by hand.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @G. Poulin, @Achmed E. Newman, @San Fernando Curt, @Alden

    When I become Supreme All Powerful dictator of America I will do to the universities and media what Henry 8 did to catholic monasteries convents schools colleges and churches. Confiscate them and erase their ideology. But I would treat the personnel differently from how Henry treated the monks and nuns. He gave them pensions so they could live out their lives.

    I would do unto college employees and journalists what they deserve. Not wanting to attract the FBI and Homeland Security to this site I won’t write what they deserve.

  40. @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I read 10 books on the Chinese Cultural Revolution about that many years back, Nodwink. The sending of intellectuals to pig farms in Manchuria was part of it.
     
    I see a lot of merit in sending the "intellectuals" inhabiting our universities now, to the pig farms. But not as workers.

    Replies: @Alden

    Animals including humans make great pig feed.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Alden

    No, they don't. Pigs that eat off the land (roots, plants, etc) have much better tasting meat than pigs fed animal remains (like on game ranches.)

    I hunted boar enough to know the difference.

  41. @clifford brown
    Princeton President Eisgruber is an obsequious, insufferable coward. He has been on his knees since at least 2015.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIeR8EuqBfc

    Very high likelihood that the woman speaking in this clip is an immigrant and not someone whose "ancestors" built Princeton.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Wouldn’t matter if she were an immigrant.

    Princeton is located in Mercer County, NJ, which is in our own time an exurb of Philadelphia. It’s campus was planted there in 1756. In 1910, blacks accounted for 3.2% of the population of New Jersey and 2.5% of the population of Pennsylvania. In our own time, blacks are about 45% less likely than others to be employed in construction and extraction occupations. In 1910, in re nominated skilled trades, blacks were between 40% and 95% less likely to be found; it’s possible that they were a higher share of general labor in the building trades, but the census data on ‘laborers’ is not that granular.

    I tend to doubt there have been all that many blacks employed in the building of Princeton.

  42. @AnotherDad

    Alissa Carmi, a U.C.F. senior and former student of Dr. Negy’s, said on Thursday that she was devastated by the finding.

    “As soon as I heard that this morning, I bawled my eyes out immediately,” she said.

    Ms. Carmi said she and a roommate had spent months gathering testimonials from Dr. Negy’s current and former students who felt that they had been subjected to racism and other forms of discrimination in his classroom. …

    “It sets a precedent that a professor can dictate religious beliefs, racism and all that just for a grade,” Ms. Carmi said.
     
    It is clear that a great many women--even if intelligent and interested--simply do not belong around anything resembling a university--with ideas and argument and reasoning and stuff.

    Maybe we could try having women's "universities", where women could study stuff that would be carefully catered to conform precisely to the authorized prevailing fashionable thoughts of the day. Different universities to accommodate the slightly varying conventional wisdoms of various regional and political establishments. Or perhaps at such "universities" the girl could answer a questionnaire and then get an appropriately tailored schedule of courses with professors and syllabi that would not upset her--sort of a bespoke curriculum.





    We did a--dangerous--experiment--upend the old wisdom and see what happens. The last couple decades have been given us an answer.

    Replies: @Alden

    Until about 60 years ago America had hundreds of those colleges. They were called Women’s Colleges. All women students. And mostly women employees. Except for a few cooks and repair and maintenance men. Carefully selected to be middle aged bald and chubby.

    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment. It worked.

    Stupid witches the harassers tend to be black and Hispanic pervs not White college students.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alden

    This is a fantasy.

    Women's colleges went under because much of their raison d'etre disappeared after 1966 or thereabouts, as parents and young women stopped caring about purity. Where they remained viable, they succumbed to the chronic other-directedness of just about everyone involved in producing higher-education services. Then our odious appellate judiciary insisted arbitrarily in 1995 that public colleges had to be co-ed, and our politicians were unwilling to tell them to pound sand.

    However, a residue of women's colleges remained. What was thoroughly destroyed was the complex of men's colleges, of which just four remain in the United States (with a total enrollment of just north of 4,000). And that was the actual target of people like Karen deCrow.

    One problem the residue of women's colleges have: they're a magnet for lesbians.

    , @bomag
    @Alden


    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment.
     
    Not sure how much business this brought to the legal profession. Did give women, women we don't want in charge of anything, a club with which to beat males in the hierarchy.
  43. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Until about 60 years ago America had hundreds of those colleges. They were called Women’s Colleges. All women students. And mostly women employees. Except for a few cooks and repair and maintenance men. Carefully selected to be middle aged bald and chubby.

    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment. It worked.

    Stupid witches the harassers tend to be black and Hispanic pervs not White college students.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @bomag

    This is a fantasy.

    Women’s colleges went under because much of their raison d’etre disappeared after 1966 or thereabouts, as parents and young women stopped caring about purity. Where they remained viable, they succumbed to the chronic other-directedness of just about everyone involved in producing higher-education services. Then our odious appellate judiciary insisted arbitrarily in 1995 that public colleges had to be co-ed, and our politicians were unwilling to tell them to pound sand.

    However, a residue of women’s colleges remained. What was thoroughly destroyed was the complex of men’s colleges, of which just four remain in the United States (with a total enrollment of just north of 4,000). And that was the actual target of people like Karen deCrow.

    One problem the residue of women’s colleges have: they’re a magnet for lesbians.

  44. @J.Ross
    @Almost Missouri

    >nothing more recent 2020

    I think you have your answer. The government's national database on large fire events has similarly gone unupdated.
    ---------
    Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner, etc OST) is dead, and there's nothing about it at the Wall Street Journal, but it's unstickied at 4chan's /tv/ board?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner, etc OST) is dead, and there’s nothing about it at the Wall Street Journal”

    The good news is that the Guardian has a big piece by a guy who only seems to know his Hollywood stuff, but the comments are great.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2022/may/19/vangelis-greek-composer-chariots-of-fire-blade-runner-dies

    I personally loved his stuff with Jon Anderson. The middle-class Greek boy and the Accrington milkman were a great combination.

  45. @Anon
    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama. No one. I bet if you polled the students at this second tier school 98 out of a 100 would have no idea who this guy is or what the hell you are talking about. Let's get more Coeur D'Alene type articles por favor. And maybe leave out the stats everyone intuitively knows already so the articles are sharable. It'd be more effective marketing of your work than retweeting some dweeb professor. Glad he got his back pay tho lol.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Daniel H

    Feel like Steve is getting dragged into the weeds lately a bit. Look, no one cares about this petty uni drama

    “ As for graduate seminars, I regularly offer instruction in such topics as Proto-Indo-European, Linear B and the Mycenaean world, Greek Dialects, the historical and comparative grammar of Latin, Vedic Sanskrit, and Old Irish.”

    Many care about the fate of a man who devotes his time, intelligence and energy to the study (at the highest degree) of the aforementioned matter. If I could do it again, this is the type of stuff that I would devote my time to.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
  46. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Animals including humans make great pig feed.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    No, they don’t. Pigs that eat off the land (roots, plants, etc) have much better tasting meat than pigs fed animal remains (like on game ranches.)

    I hunted boar enough to know the difference.

  47. Steve,

    Samantha Harris was Samantha Kors, Alan Charles Kors’ daughter.

    He’s an old style liberal (U Penn professor) who teamed up with Harvey Silverglate to found FIRE, where Samantha used to work.

    Free speech runs in the family.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Quidite

    I listened to Alan Charles Kors' "Great Courses" series of lectures on Voltaire. Dr. Kors was the single most skilled Great Courses lecturer I've heard at the arcane art of delivering high brow lectures that were written and spoken in a way to be completely intelligible to a listener driving on the freeway.

    Replies: @New Dealer, @silviosilver

  48. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Anon

    First they came for university professors. I did not speak out
    - because I was not a university professor.
    Then they came ....

    Replies: @Chief Seattle

    I read this as “First they came for university professors. I did not speak out because I was a university professor.”

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Chief Seattle

    Chief.....I understand your pain. It must be utterly embarrassing for a warrior to see he's become some kind of New Age ecological icon.

  49. @Quidite
    Steve,

    Samantha Harris was Samantha Kors, Alan Charles Kors’ daughter.

    He’s an old style liberal (U Penn professor) who teamed up with Harvey Silverglate to found FIRE, where Samantha used to work.

    Free speech runs in the family.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I listened to Alan Charles Kors’ “Great Courses” series of lectures on Voltaire. Dr. Kors was the single most skilled Great Courses lecturer I’ve heard at the arcane art of delivering high brow lectures that were written and spoken in a way to be completely intelligible to a listener driving on the freeway.

    • Replies: @New Dealer
    @Steve Sailer

    Me too. Best Great Courses audio I've listened to.

    , @silviosilver
    @Steve Sailer

    Kors is indeed excellent. I've listened to his Intellectual History of the 17th and 18 centuries. But he's far from the only excellent lecturer The Teaching Company has employed. I've listened to plenty of courses (The Modern Scholar too) and there's only been a few that I thought were subpar, and that was mostly because the subject matter didn't really lend itself to listening while driving/walking.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @Quidite

    I listened to Alan Charles Kors' "Great Courses" series of lectures on Voltaire. Dr. Kors was the single most skilled Great Courses lecturer I've heard at the arcane art of delivering high brow lectures that were written and spoken in a way to be completely intelligible to a listener driving on the freeway.

    Replies: @New Dealer, @silviosilver

    Me too. Best Great Courses audio I’ve listened to.

  51. @Chief Seattle
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I read this as "First they came for university professors. I did not speak out because I was a university professor."

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Chief…..I understand your pain. It must be utterly embarrassing for a warrior to see he’s become some kind of New Age ecological icon.

  52. anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri
    Semi-OT

    Is there a source for recent statistics of suicides at colleges? Recent, as in since the lockdown mania started.

    I ask because I am hearing anecdotally about a startling number of college suicides in the last two years, but searching for actual statistics has not been fruitful. All the studies seem to be older (though showing some kind of suicide increase since my own college days), and the CDC doesn't seem to have suicide stats more specific than "15-24 year olds" and nothing more recent than 2020 in any case.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @anonymous

    Three suicides at Princeton this year, two in the last week 🙁

  53. Anonymous[915] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of cancelled professors, check our the railroading of David Sabatini by MIT. Spurned female faculty accused him of harassment when it was evident all along that the sex was consensual and it was primarily her who sought it. Bary Weiss has a write up about it on her Substack. It’s a fair portrayal of the situation.

  54. @Steve Sailer
    @Quidite

    I listened to Alan Charles Kors' "Great Courses" series of lectures on Voltaire. Dr. Kors was the single most skilled Great Courses lecturer I've heard at the arcane art of delivering high brow lectures that were written and spoken in a way to be completely intelligible to a listener driving on the freeway.

    Replies: @New Dealer, @silviosilver

    Kors is indeed excellent. I’ve listened to his Intellectual History of the 17th and 18 centuries. But he’s far from the only excellent lecturer The Teaching Company has employed. I’ve listened to plenty of courses (The Modern Scholar too) and there’s only been a few that I thought were subpar, and that was mostly because the subject matter didn’t really lend itself to listening while driving/walking.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @silviosilver

    It's a challenge to deliver a lecture on a highbrow topic in a manner such that listeners won't lose the thread while driving. The Great Courses people do a good job of picking out lecturers who can pull off that feat.

  55. @silviosilver
    @Steve Sailer

    Kors is indeed excellent. I've listened to his Intellectual History of the 17th and 18 centuries. But he's far from the only excellent lecturer The Teaching Company has employed. I've listened to plenty of courses (The Modern Scholar too) and there's only been a few that I thought were subpar, and that was mostly because the subject matter didn't really lend itself to listening while driving/walking.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    It’s a challenge to deliver a lecture on a highbrow topic in a manner such that listeners won’t lose the thread while driving. The Great Courses people do a good job of picking out lecturers who can pull off that feat.

  56. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Until about 60 years ago America had hundreds of those colleges. They were called Women’s Colleges. All women students. And mostly women employees. Except for a few cooks and repair and maintenance men. Carefully selected to be middle aged bald and chubby.

    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment. It worked.

    Stupid witches the harassers tend to be black and Hispanic pervs not White college students.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @bomag

    The feminazis wanted all colleges made coed so lawyers could sue the colleges for women students claiming sexual harassment.

    Not sure how much business this brought to the legal profession. Did give women, women we don’t want in charge of anything, a club with which to beat males in the hierarchy.

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