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Sharpton: Donald Trump Is the White Don King
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In Salon, Al Sharpton offers an insightful depiction of Donald Trump:

“The best way I can describe Donald Trump to friends is to say if Don King had been born white he’d be Donald Trump. Both of them are great self-promoters and great at just continuing to talk even if you’re not talking back at them.”

“Don King had me fly with him and Trump to Atlantic [City] in Trump’s helicopter, and it was one of the most memorable things in my life to sit on that big, black Trump helicopter, both of them talking nonstop, not listening to each other. And I’m sitting there. It was probably the longest ride I ever was on. Both of them shut me up.”

 
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  1. Don King is a cool character . I always liked him . He is a convicted murderer , yet he got released and had a 2nd act . He made many millions swindling boxers who were young enough to be his sons and could easily kick his arse into the ground yet he always comes up out of the water dry as a bone .

    • Replies: @Granesperanzablanco
    @marwan

    I believe Don King killed two men. One he stomped to death

    Interesting stories about him and the Irish and Italian mob in Cleveland at that time. Lots of car bombs.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @marwan


    He is a convicted murderer
     
    To be fair, a judge reduced the conviction to non-negligent manslaughter, then he was pardoned.
    , @Tony
    @marwan

    Don King is a low life. I liked when the fictional Don King got knocked out in Rocky V.

  2. I dun said it first.

  3. Anti-PC Lib attracts connies.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Although I am very much a pottymouth and often have to censor my comments here so our delicate, whimsical flower of a host will allow my comments through, even I must say that our neckbearded atheist friend here cusses too much. Naughty words should be a spice not the main course.

  4. A great self-promoter and non-stop talker sounds like a perfect description of Obama.

    • Replies: @Granesperanzablanco
    @Anon

    Um no. Obama is closer to an aloof introvert

    Replies: @Anon

  5. Sharpton looks healthy in this picture. But today he looks like a famine victime. Did he contract acquired immunity dead-man-walking syndrome?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Worse. He went vegan.

  6. Pretty funny.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @ben tillman

    Yea..That's the best quote I've ever seen from Sharpton.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  7. Matt Taibbi got it right with comparing Trump to Ric Flair. Flair has class, cajones and bling.

    Don King is just a pimp for black boxers, whom he used and cast aside. He’s garbage and ruined boxing.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @rod1963

    I don't do this sort of thing much because I don't like pedantry, but I see the mistake often enough that I feel compelled to point out that a cajón is a drawer, and the word you want is cojones.

    Sorry for being a dick. As far as your actual comment goes, I agree with you on both counts.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  8. Trump will be the most authentically black president that we’ve ever had.

  9. “… It was probably the longest ride I ever was on. Both of them shut me up.”

    Another unexpected benefit–a guy who can get Al Sharpton to shut up!

    My man Trump is looking better and better each day.

  10. Don King is the black Donald Trump.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Hibernian

    Reminds me of when English footballer Rodney Marsh was asked if he was the white Pele, no he replied, he is the black Rodney Marsh.

    The thing with Trump is that the more you look into him the more impressed you get, my initial opinion has certainly radically changed. There is a lot of substance there.

  11. @ben tillman
    Pretty funny.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    Yea..That’s the best quote I’ve ever seen from Sharpton.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He's a witty man.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Harry Baldwin

  12. Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he’ll never be a member of the aptly-named “Bushwood” country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn’t want to be a member: he is just there because he’s considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Logical Meme

    Caddyshack is awash with ((hostility)) towards WASPS.

    Once you realize that it's a lot less funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Evocatus

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Logical Meme

    If you want to know what "Caddyshack" was really about, I suggest you look up some of Steve's old posts on Country Clubs. And Trump has more in common with Judge Smails than with the Dangerfield character.

    Especially has a lot of Trumps' platform seems to be "You'll get nothing, and you'll like it."

    Replies: @John Gruskos

    , @Truth
    @Logical Meme


    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.
     
    Uhh...No. Czervik was self-made, that was the point of the character.

    Trump inherited at least $150m from his daddy (some say $400m) and has FAR underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 40 years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Dave Pinsen, @The Millennial Falcon

    , @Big Bill
    @Logical Meme

    Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true.

    Donald is like a lot of obnoxious, pushy New Yorkers who Get Things Done. The bankers with anger management issues. The lawyers who got their law degrees from Fordham Law School and go home to Bensonhurst at night. The name partners at midtown law firms who get enraged and throw heavy glass ashtrays at their walnut-paneled office walls, scaring the crap out of their associates. Uber-alphas.

    As the man said, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere ... even the White House.

    Alternatively, you can elect a pussy, cringing, third year associate like Rubio because he cleans up good and the church ladies like his manners. Or a smooth, Velveeta, junior partner like Cruz, who will never make the Management Committee.

    Replies: @granesperanzablanco, @Buffalo Joe

    , @Threecranes
    @Logical Meme

    Undoubtedly, Caddyshack was a great movie with plenty of stars like Dangerfield, Chase and Murray who deserve abundant praise but, but, but nevertheless, no small amount of credit is due Ted Knight for playing the part so well of the stick-in-the-mud and allowing himself to suffer the degradation of being the goat--and not just allowing himself, but playing the role to the hilt--a role, without which, the movie would have had no foil and hence no plot. It is, and was, as Danindc says above, an anti-Gentile propaganda piece--troubling, upon reflection, but no less funny for that.

  13. @Polynikes
    @ben tillman

    Yea..That's the best quote I've ever seen from Sharpton.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He’s a witty man.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    "Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He’s a witty man."

    Jackson, I believe, has a conscience and some innate decency. He may not make use of it much, but I believe he has them. I haven't detected much in the way of such qualities in Sharpton.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Steve Sailer

    King of right-wing talk radio in NYC was the late Bob Grant. He regularly railed against Al Sharpton, but Sharpton appeared on his show a few times. Grant found him funny and charming, almost against his will.

  14. I think Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign is the white, late middle-aged version of Jesse Jackson’s 1988 campaign.( https://spottedtoad.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/2016-is-1988/ ) Of course, if he wins the nomination, the analogy is totally off; but even if he loses, I think he’ll influence the long-run development of the GOP, just as the Democratic Party has been ever-more tightly reconfigured into the image of Jackson’s ’88 “The Rainbow Coalition” campaign.

  15. 34 years ago I was driving a yellow cab in New York. One of my fellow cabbies had been a classmate of Trump’s at that military high school Trump attended. This guy went into the merchant marine after high school and spent a lot of time in Vietnam. He spoke fondly of Trump. Said Trump was an OK guy.

  16. If you see Sharpton today, he looks like a bobble head.

  17. @Logical Meme
    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into 'sophisticated' Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he'll never be a member of the aptly-named "Bushwood" country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn't want to be a member: he is just there because he's considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    Replies: @Danindc, @Mr. Anon, @Truth, @Big Bill, @Threecranes

    Caddyshack is awash with ((hostility)) towards WASPS.

    Once you realize that it’s a lot less funny.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Danindc

    Hostility is funny.

    Replies: @DCThrowback

    , @Evocatus
    @Danindc

    Caddyshack was written largely by Brian Doyle-Murray (brother to Bill Murray) and was largely based on his experiences as a caddy at a country club in the Chicago suburbs. The Danny Noonan character was a stand in for the Irish-Catholic Murray family (eight kids in the family, father worked in a lumberyard, etc) and the original script was intended to focus on the caddies. The Jews weren't the only ones with an antipathy towards the WASP aristocracy of yesteryear.

  18. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He's a witty man.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    “Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He’s a witty man.”

    Jackson, I believe, has a conscience and some innate decency. He may not make use of it much, but I believe he has them. I haven’t detected much in the way of such qualities in Sharpton.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    I agree. Jesse Jackson actually started off doing some good things (telling black kids to go to school, not use drugs, etc.), but got into the race business when he realized that's where the money was at. Sharpton started off as a street rabble rouser and, eventually, mellowed out when he realized he could cut lucrative deals with the NYC establishment.

    Jackson, by the way, was very charismatic as a young man. He's burnt out now, but he really was something at his peak.

    Replies: @donut

  19. “Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson.”

    Isn’t that called Damning with faint praise?

  20. @Logical Meme
    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into 'sophisticated' Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he'll never be a member of the aptly-named "Bushwood" country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn't want to be a member: he is just there because he's considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    Replies: @Danindc, @Mr. Anon, @Truth, @Big Bill, @Threecranes

    If you want to know what “Caddyshack” was really about, I suggest you look up some of Steve’s old posts on Country Clubs. And Trump has more in common with Judge Smails than with the Dangerfield character.

    Especially has a lot of Trumps’ platform seems to be “You’ll get nothing, and you’ll like it.”

    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    @Mr. Anon

    The Trump campaign is Caddy Shack and Back to School in reverse:

    Brash nouveau riche W.A.S.P. causes consternation amongst stuffy uptight Jews.

    Replies: @Truth, @Evocatus

  21. @Danindc
    @Logical Meme

    Caddyshack is awash with ((hostility)) towards WASPS.

    Once you realize that it's a lot less funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Evocatus

    Hostility is funny.

    • Agree: gruff
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    @Steve Sailer

    who/whom tho

  22. One difference: Don King killed a man.

    A financial planner I know, a former heavyweight contender turned boxing ref, used to remind me of that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    The guy Don King killed owed him money. $600! In 1966! He ripped King off. King was just enforcing a debt and did a little street justice. King beat him up a little too badly and the guy died from the beating. Think about it, Eric Garner was was asphyxiated after having his throat crushed because he sold one loosie. None of the cops was even charged.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @Buffalo Joe

    , @Tim
    @Dave Pinsen

    King, actually killed two men.

    But what I always like about King is he knew how to manipulate black men (I know, not that difficult, but still).

    For that short period of time that Hasim Rahman was Heavyweight Champion, some Jewish guy had put together this incredibly elaborate contact that would have paid Rahman off over $100 million. It was complicated, but brilliant.

    But before he could sign Rahman, Rahman took a meeting with Don King, and instead of an elaborate, mega-multi-million dollar contract, King just took a duffel bag and filled it with cash. He emptied out that duffel bag in front of Rahman and got the contract.

    that's what I'm talking about!!

  23. @Mr. Anon
    @Logical Meme

    If you want to know what "Caddyshack" was really about, I suggest you look up some of Steve's old posts on Country Clubs. And Trump has more in common with Judge Smails than with the Dangerfield character.

    Especially has a lot of Trumps' platform seems to be "You'll get nothing, and you'll like it."

    Replies: @John Gruskos

    The Trump campaign is Caddy Shack and Back to School in reverse:

    Brash nouveau riche W.A.S.P. causes consternation amongst stuffy uptight Jews.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @John Gruskos

    No, again, Oldveau riche.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Trump

    , @Evocatus
    @John Gruskos

    Would a half-German, half-Scottish Highlander be considered a WASP though? He has the "W" and the "P" down but he isn't really genetically Anglo-Saxon/English.

  24. I think Dangerfield’s “Back to School” demonstrates a heightened style of Trump with a more resonant fidelity than Caddyshack.

  25. @marwan
    Don King is a cool character . I always liked him . He is a convicted murderer , yet he got released and had a 2nd act . He made many millions swindling boxers who were young enough to be his sons and could easily kick his arse into the ground yet he always comes up out of the water dry as a bone .

    Replies: @Granesperanzablanco, @ScarletNumber, @Tony

    I believe Don King killed two men. One he stomped to death

    Interesting stories about him and the Irish and Italian mob in Cleveland at that time. Lots of car bombs.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    One difference: Don King killed a man.

    A financial planner I know, a former heavyweight contender turned boxing ref, used to remind me of that.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tim

    The guy Don King killed owed him money. $600! In 1966! He ripped King off. King was just enforcing a debt and did a little street justice. King beat him up a little too badly and the guy died from the beating. Think about it, Eric Garner was was asphyxiated after having his throat crushed because he sold one loosie. None of the cops was even charged.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Didn't Don King kill a second guy, but got off on self-defense or he had it coming or something?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Cops weren't charged because they hadn't done anything wrong.
    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous, I knew a lot of guys that were as we used to say..."connected." Only an assh*le beats someone to death over $600. Dead men don't repay debts. It's ok to kill someone who owes you money? Is that what you are saying? And Eric Garner did not have his "throat crushed", he died of a heart attack brought on by his struggle with the cops. Selling "loosies" was his street job.

  27. @Anon
    A great self-promoter and non-stop talker sounds like a perfect description of Obama.

    Replies: @Granesperanzablanco

    Um no. Obama is closer to an aloof introvert

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Granesperanzablanco

    Does Obama give a lot of speeches and constantly try to hog the public's attention? Yes. Does he give a lot of speeches in which he refers to himself? Yes. He's not a true introvert. He may be a bit more circumspect in private because you can't be completely self-obsessed without other people walking out on you in disgust after awhile. Being a successful manipulator requires that you pay just enough attention to other people to figure out how to pull their strings, and Obama is good at that. His main goal in every social interaction is I, Me and Myself. He's just more polite about it than the average black.

  28. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    The guy Don King killed owed him money. $600! In 1966! He ripped King off. King was just enforcing a debt and did a little street justice. King beat him up a little too badly and the guy died from the beating. Think about it, Eric Garner was was asphyxiated after having his throat crushed because he sold one loosie. None of the cops was even charged.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @Buffalo Joe

    Didn’t Don King kill a second guy, but got off on self-defense or he had it coming or something?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Steve Sailer

    Tyson claims he beat the hell out of Don King long after they parted ways. If so, I guess King chose not to press charges, probably because he couldn't risk cross examination.

  29. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He's a witty man.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    King of right-wing talk radio in NYC was the late Bob Grant. He regularly railed against Al Sharpton, but Sharpton appeared on his show a few times. Grant found him funny and charming, almost against his will.

  30. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Didn't Don King kill a second guy, but got off on self-defense or he had it coming or something?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Tyson claims he beat the hell out of Don King long after they parted ways. If so, I guess King chose not to press charges, probably because he couldn’t risk cross examination.

  31. @marwan
    Don King is a cool character . I always liked him . He is a convicted murderer , yet he got released and had a 2nd act . He made many millions swindling boxers who were young enough to be his sons and could easily kick his arse into the ground yet he always comes up out of the water dry as a bone .

    Replies: @Granesperanzablanco, @ScarletNumber, @Tony

    He is a convicted murderer

    To be fair, a judge reduced the conviction to non-negligent manslaughter, then he was pardoned.

  32. @Logical Meme
    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into 'sophisticated' Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he'll never be a member of the aptly-named "Bushwood" country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn't want to be a member: he is just there because he's considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    Replies: @Danindc, @Mr. Anon, @Truth, @Big Bill, @Threecranes

    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Uhh…No. Czervik was self-made, that was the point of the character.

    Trump inherited at least $150m from his daddy (some say $400m) and has FAR underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 40 years.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    As I noted in this letter, that "underperformed the S&P 500" meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    Replies: @Warner, @Truth, @Steve Sailer, @reiner Tor

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/703143106976227330

    Replies: @Truth

    , @The Millennial Falcon
    @Truth

    That's one of the interesting things about Trump - he had all the prerequisites to join the aristocracy, but he actually loves the nouveau riche aesthetic.

    I think he's got a lot in common with the Duck Dynasty guys.

  33. @John Gruskos
    @Mr. Anon

    The Trump campaign is Caddy Shack and Back to School in reverse:

    Brash nouveau riche W.A.S.P. causes consternation amongst stuffy uptight Jews.

    Replies: @Truth, @Evocatus

  34. Trump related – A very interesting Playboy interview from 25 years ago that adds a lot of context to what we see playing out with Trump today.

    • Replies: @SnakeEyes
    @TangoMan

    Fascinating interview. His views haven't changed much since 1990. He could hve given that interview yesterday (apart from some of the anachronistic details).

  35. @Truth
    @Logical Meme


    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.
     
    Uhh...No. Czervik was self-made, that was the point of the character.

    Trump inherited at least $150m from his daddy (some say $400m) and has FAR underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 40 years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Dave Pinsen, @The Millennial Falcon

    As I noted in this letter, that “underperformed the S&P 500” meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    • Replies: @Warner
    @Dave Pinsen

    Also, an investment in the stock market doesn't create a job or build a neighborhood. It's not just the $10B or whatever that Trump got for himself. It's the $100s of billions that have been brought into the economy as a whole with tens of thousands of jobs over 40 years. The vitality of New York he helped maintain as well as other resorts. I don't care for casinos but billions in entertainment were created there. An investment is just money in-money out. The fact that DT contributed in a big way to the economy is more meaningful than a tally of how much he brought in for himself.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's a pay service

    Replies: @res

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Dave Pinsen

    Trump has spent a lot of money over the years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @reiner Tor
    @Dave Pinsen

    Could you copy in your letter? I can't access it.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  36. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    As I noted in this letter, that "underperformed the S&P 500" meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    Replies: @Warner, @Truth, @Steve Sailer, @reiner Tor

    Also, an investment in the stock market doesn’t create a job or build a neighborhood. It’s not just the $10B or whatever that Trump got for himself. It’s the $100s of billions that have been brought into the economy as a whole with tens of thousands of jobs over 40 years. The vitality of New York he helped maintain as well as other resorts. I don’t care for casinos but billions in entertainment were created there. An investment is just money in-money out. The fact that DT contributed in a big way to the economy is more meaningful than a tally of how much he brought in for himself.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Warner

    Trump bet big on Manhattan real estate when the place seemed dead in the water in the late 1970s. I can recall visiting Trump Tower when it was new, maybe on my 1984 trip, and thinking that this reflects a confidence not really seen since 1929.

    George Steinbrenner was another guy who bet big on New York in the 1970s. Why would anybody want to buy the New York Yankees? Especially, why would anybody want to buy a huge stadium in the South Bronx?

  37. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    The guy Don King killed owed him money. $600! In 1966! He ripped King off. King was just enforcing a debt and did a little street justice. King beat him up a little too badly and the guy died from the beating. Think about it, Eric Garner was was asphyxiated after having his throat crushed because he sold one loosie. None of the cops was even charged.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @Buffalo Joe

    Cops weren’t charged because they hadn’t done anything wrong.
    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.
     
    I can just hear Gomer now: "Cardiac arr-e-est! Cardiac arr-e-est!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9efgLHgsBmM

    Replies: @NOTA

  38. @TangoMan
    Trump related - A very interesting Playboy interview from 25 years ago that adds a lot of context to what we see playing out with Trump today.

    Replies: @SnakeEyes

    Fascinating interview. His views haven’t changed much since 1990. He could hve given that interview yesterday (apart from some of the anachronistic details).

  39. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    As I noted in this letter, that "underperformed the S&P 500" meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    Replies: @Warner, @Truth, @Steve Sailer, @reiner Tor

    It’s a pay service

    • Replies: @res
    @Truth

    Search for "David Pinsen Trump is due credit on inheritance and policies" and open the resulting link in an incognito window. Accessing the FT site like this avoids the paywall.

    @Dave Pinsen, thanks for the info. Perhaps you could include the letter title when posting your FT links to make it easier for non-subscribers to find/access them.

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @Dave Pinsen

  40. @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    "Sharpton is funnier than Jesse Jackson. He’s a witty man."

    Jackson, I believe, has a conscience and some innate decency. He may not make use of it much, but I believe he has them. I haven't detected much in the way of such qualities in Sharpton.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    I agree. Jesse Jackson actually started off doing some good things (telling black kids to go to school, not use drugs, etc.), but got into the race business when he realized that’s where the money was at. Sharpton started off as a street rabble rouser and, eventually, mellowed out when he realized he could cut lucrative deals with the NYC establishment.

    Jackson, by the way, was very charismatic as a young man. He’s burnt out now, but he really was something at his peak.

    • Replies: @donut
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Jackson hosted SNL back when he was running in "88 and told a great joke about his troubles with the press .

  41. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    As I noted in this letter, that "underperformed the S&P 500" meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    Replies: @Warner, @Truth, @Steve Sailer, @reiner Tor

    Trump has spent a lot of money over the years.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    That's true too.

  42. @Warner
    @Dave Pinsen

    Also, an investment in the stock market doesn't create a job or build a neighborhood. It's not just the $10B or whatever that Trump got for himself. It's the $100s of billions that have been brought into the economy as a whole with tens of thousands of jobs over 40 years. The vitality of New York he helped maintain as well as other resorts. I don't care for casinos but billions in entertainment were created there. An investment is just money in-money out. The fact that DT contributed in a big way to the economy is more meaningful than a tally of how much he brought in for himself.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Trump bet big on Manhattan real estate when the place seemed dead in the water in the late 1970s. I can recall visiting Trump Tower when it was new, maybe on my 1984 trip, and thinking that this reflects a confidence not really seen since 1929.

    George Steinbrenner was another guy who bet big on New York in the 1970s. Why would anybody want to buy the New York Yankees? Especially, why would anybody want to buy a huge stadium in the South Bronx?

  43. King has killed a few people, I doubt Trump ever killed anyone.

  44. @Truth
    @Logical Meme


    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.
     
    Uhh...No. Czervik was self-made, that was the point of the character.

    Trump inherited at least $150m from his daddy (some say $400m) and has FAR underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 40 years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Dave Pinsen, @The Millennial Falcon

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    OK, we'll use your numbers.

    We used $40 million as the starting point for 1974. Honghui Chen, associate professor of finance at the University of Central Florida, told us the account would have grown to $3.94 billion by November 2015 if the money had followed the S&P 500 index and all dividends had been reinvested.

    http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/dec/09/occupy-democrats/occupy-democrats-say-simple-investment-trumps-fath/

    I have no particular dislike (or like) for Donald Trump, but he was the richest kid in school, and the greatest source of his wealth is his daddy's money and connections. He had the advantages he had, and I get this, but like Boy George, he was "born on 3rd base and thinks he hit a triple."

    In other words, if "The Donald" wants to tell us how to be rich, he is first going to have to tell us how to start all over and pick rich daddies.

    What Don King did starting from welfare as he did, was much more impressive, in terms of pure accomplishment.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Guy de Prince, @NOTA

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @Dave Pinsen

    Trump has spent a lot of money over the years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That’s true too.

  46. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/703143106976227330

    Replies: @Truth

    OK, we’ll use your numbers.

    We used $40 million as the starting point for 1974. Honghui Chen, associate professor of finance at the University of Central Florida, told us the account would have grown to $3.94 billion by November 2015 if the money had followed the S&P 500 index and all dividends had been reinvested.

    http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/dec/09/occupy-democrats/occupy-democrats-say-simple-investment-trumps-fath/

    I have no particular dislike (or like) for Donald Trump, but he was the richest kid in school, and the greatest source of his wealth is his daddy’s money and connections. He had the advantages he had, and I get this, but like Boy George, he was “born on 3rd base and thinks he hit a triple.”

    In other words, if “The Donald” wants to tell us how to be rich, he is first going to have to tell us how to start all over and pick rich daddies.

    What Don King did starting from welfare as he did, was much more impressive, in terms of pure accomplishment.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    Can Chen point to one billionaire who got that rich by putting a < $50 million inheritance in an index fund? Also, bear in mind Trump says he was only given a $1mm grub stake by his father. One would think enterprising reporters could determine what actually happened to Fred Trump Sr.'s estate, and who got what.

    As for having the right parents, read the Playboy interview someone linked to above. Trump goes more granular than that, saying successful temperament is genetic; that he has it, and that his late, alcoholic brother Fred didn't.

    What Donald Trump has accomplished is rare - even among his 5 siblings. Only one ended up a multi-billionaire, despite all 5 having a centi-millionaire father.

    Replies: @Truth, @TangoMan

    , @Guy de Prince
    @Truth

    That ignores taxes and living expenses. Index funds (which didn't even exist when he received his inheritance) get taxed not just on dividends but also long and short term capital gains when they reallocate resources to match the index.

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    , @NOTA
    @Truth

    Is there good data somewhere on what fraction of people who inherited a comparable amount to Trump did as well?

    Replies: @Truth

  47. @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    OK, we'll use your numbers.

    We used $40 million as the starting point for 1974. Honghui Chen, associate professor of finance at the University of Central Florida, told us the account would have grown to $3.94 billion by November 2015 if the money had followed the S&P 500 index and all dividends had been reinvested.

    http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/dec/09/occupy-democrats/occupy-democrats-say-simple-investment-trumps-fath/

    I have no particular dislike (or like) for Donald Trump, but he was the richest kid in school, and the greatest source of his wealth is his daddy's money and connections. He had the advantages he had, and I get this, but like Boy George, he was "born on 3rd base and thinks he hit a triple."

    In other words, if "The Donald" wants to tell us how to be rich, he is first going to have to tell us how to start all over and pick rich daddies.

    What Don King did starting from welfare as he did, was much more impressive, in terms of pure accomplishment.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Guy de Prince, @NOTA

    Can Chen point to one billionaire who got that rich by putting a < $50 million inheritance in an index fund? Also, bear in mind Trump says he was only given a $1mm grub stake by his father. One would think enterprising reporters could determine what actually happened to Fred Trump Sr.'s estate, and who got what.

    As for having the right parents, read the Playboy interview someone linked to above. Trump goes more granular than that, saying successful temperament is genetic; that he has it, and that his late, alcoholic brother Fred didn't.

    What Donald Trump has accomplished is rare – even among his 5 siblings. Only one ended up a multi-billionaire, despite all 5 having a centi-millionaire father.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    But Dave, I don't think you understand, The Donald has bequathed his "businessman genes" to a few people; all equally "self made."

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/donald-trump-jr-net-worth-salary-job-age-wife/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    And all with the politically correct, shall we say, "Talmudic" other half.

    Now Dave, I never once said, that Donald Trump does not have talent as a businessman. That would be a lie, and Lord knows, "not fucking up a good thing" is a talent that many lack, in and of it self.

    I also get that you, and many other "disenfranchised" white males feel that Donald Trump "will make this country great again(tm)" as he is AN ALPHA WHO HAS PULLED HIMSELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS! As opposed to our current "Communist in Chief" who has been GIVEN EVERYTHING HE HAS!

    (excuse me for a second...)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm81LSKJC2k

    (Ok, I'm back)

    But if there is one thing you really need to take out of the Trump "story", it is that, at the top of the income curve, a rising tide lifts all boats! He would have (arguably, in your opinion) made more money in the stock market than he did with "The Art of the Deal." In other words, You, Dave Pilsen, of Hackensack, NJ, are playing a fixed game, and you won't ever "win." Not without knowing who the opponents are.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @TangoMan
    @Dave Pinsen

    Trump's sister, the judge, should be a fantastic control. Most estates are divided equally among the siblings so this doesn't seem like an outlandish assumption to make. We can also look at the estate of Trump's brother. The sister was busy being a judge so she probably had someone managing her money. The brother died so someone is managing the estate he left to his own family. Are the two as wealthy as Donald?

  48. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    I agree. Jesse Jackson actually started off doing some good things (telling black kids to go to school, not use drugs, etc.), but got into the race business when he realized that's where the money was at. Sharpton started off as a street rabble rouser and, eventually, mellowed out when he realized he could cut lucrative deals with the NYC establishment.

    Jackson, by the way, was very charismatic as a young man. He's burnt out now, but he really was something at his peak.

    Replies: @donut

    Jackson hosted SNL back when he was running in “88 and told a great joke about his troubles with the press .

  49. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    Can Chen point to one billionaire who got that rich by putting a < $50 million inheritance in an index fund? Also, bear in mind Trump says he was only given a $1mm grub stake by his father. One would think enterprising reporters could determine what actually happened to Fred Trump Sr.'s estate, and who got what.

    As for having the right parents, read the Playboy interview someone linked to above. Trump goes more granular than that, saying successful temperament is genetic; that he has it, and that his late, alcoholic brother Fred didn't.

    What Donald Trump has accomplished is rare - even among his 5 siblings. Only one ended up a multi-billionaire, despite all 5 having a centi-millionaire father.

    Replies: @Truth, @TangoMan

    But Dave, I don’t think you understand, The Donald has bequathed his “businessman genes” to a few people; all equally “self made.”

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/donald-trump-jr-net-worth-salary-job-age-wife/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    And all with the politically correct, shall we say, “Talmudic” other half.

    Now Dave, I never once said, that Donald Trump does not have talent as a businessman. That would be a lie, and Lord knows, “not fucking up a good thing” is a talent that many lack, in and of it self.

    I also get that you, and many other “disenfranchised” white males feel that Donald Trump “will make this country great again(tm)” as he is AN ALPHA WHO HAS PULLED HIMSELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS! As opposed to our current “Communist in Chief” who has been GIVEN EVERYTHING HE HAS!

    (excuse me for a second…)

    (Ok, I’m back)

    But if there is one thing you really need to take out of the Trump “story”, it is that, at the top of the income curve, a rising tide lifts all boats! He would have (arguably, in your opinion) made more money in the stock market than he did with “The Art of the Deal.” In other words, You, Dave Pilsen, of Hackensack, NJ, are playing a fixed game, and you won’t ever “win.” Not without knowing who the opponents are.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    Truth,

    You really should read the interview with Trump. He said, in 1990, that the odds were stacked against his kids, as a lot of rich kids turn out poorly. He has lucked out that all of his adult kids turned out well. It's really remarkable.

    Now, I didn't click on the net worth links to his kids, but would it be safe to assume that none of them is 15x richer than Trump, as Trump is at least 15x richer than his father was?

    Another thing, going back to your previous comment: why would you (or Chen) start the hypothetical in 1974? Trump's father didn't pass away until 1999. Who inherits all of his father's money 25 years before his father dies?

    Replies: @Truth

  50. @Hibernian
    Don King is the black Donald Trump.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Reminds me of when English footballer Rodney Marsh was asked if he was the white Pele, no he replied, he is the black Rodney Marsh.

    The thing with Trump is that the more you look into him the more impressed you get, my initial opinion has certainly radically changed. There is a lot of substance there.

  51. @Logical Meme
    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into 'sophisticated' Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he'll never be a member of the aptly-named "Bushwood" country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn't want to be a member: he is just there because he's considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    Replies: @Danindc, @Mr. Anon, @Truth, @Big Bill, @Threecranes

    Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true.

    Donald is like a lot of obnoxious, pushy New Yorkers who Get Things Done. The bankers with anger management issues. The lawyers who got their law degrees from Fordham Law School and go home to Bensonhurst at night. The name partners at midtown law firms who get enraged and throw heavy glass ashtrays at their walnut-paneled office walls, scaring the crap out of their associates. Uber-alphas.

    As the man said, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere … even the White House.

    Alternatively, you can elect a pussy, cringing, third year associate like Rubio because he cleans up good and the church ladies like his manners. Or a smooth, Velveeta, junior partner like Cruz, who will never make the Management Committee.

    • Replies: @granesperanzablanco
    @Big Bill

    "Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true. "

    Sounds like you might be similar to a 3rd year associate pussy who couldn't make it there?

    Replies: @Tommy Hobbes

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Big Bill

    Big Bill, Love your metaphors.

  52. @Anon
    Anti-PC Lib attracts connies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFjndBbLDZc

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Although I am very much a pottymouth and often have to censor my comments here so our delicate, whimsical flower of a host will allow my comments through, even I must say that our neckbearded atheist friend here cusses too much. Naughty words should be a spice not the main course.

  53. Remember when the National Lampoon had a feature called “Don King’s Negro Corner?”

  54. @Logical Meme
    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into 'sophisticated' Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.

    Like Trump, Czervik is uber-wealthy, but is essentially excluded (or barely tolerated) by Judge Smails (Ted White), the latter representing the MSM/Dem/GOP Establishment Complex.

    Smails tells Czervik he'll never be a member of the aptly-named "Bushwood" country club, to which Czervik responds that he doesn't want to be a member: he is just there because he's considering buying Bushwood and turning it into condominiums.

    The archetype of this Dangerfield character had legs, as he revivified essentially the same character in Back To School (1986).

    Replies: @Danindc, @Mr. Anon, @Truth, @Big Bill, @Threecranes

    Undoubtedly, Caddyshack was a great movie with plenty of stars like Dangerfield, Chase and Murray who deserve abundant praise but, but, but nevertheless, no small amount of credit is due Ted Knight for playing the part so well of the stick-in-the-mud and allowing himself to suffer the degradation of being the goat–and not just allowing himself, but playing the role to the hilt–a role, without which, the movie would have had no foil and hence no plot. It is, and was, as Danindc says above, an anti-Gentile propaganda piece–troubling, upon reflection, but no less funny for that.

  55. @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    OK, we'll use your numbers.

    We used $40 million as the starting point for 1974. Honghui Chen, associate professor of finance at the University of Central Florida, told us the account would have grown to $3.94 billion by November 2015 if the money had followed the S&P 500 index and all dividends had been reinvested.

    http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/dec/09/occupy-democrats/occupy-democrats-say-simple-investment-trumps-fath/

    I have no particular dislike (or like) for Donald Trump, but he was the richest kid in school, and the greatest source of his wealth is his daddy's money and connections. He had the advantages he had, and I get this, but like Boy George, he was "born on 3rd base and thinks he hit a triple."

    In other words, if "The Donald" wants to tell us how to be rich, he is first going to have to tell us how to start all over and pick rich daddies.

    What Don King did starting from welfare as he did, was much more impressive, in terms of pure accomplishment.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Guy de Prince, @NOTA

    That ignores taxes and living expenses. Index funds (which didn’t even exist when he received his inheritance) get taxed not just on dividends but also long and short term capital gains when they reallocate resources to match the index.

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Guy de Prince

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    Disagree. Trump made his fortune through a series of projects, each of which had potential to collapse. Bloomberg and someone like Gates or Slim made their fortune by creating or exploiting what amounts to a natural monopoly - once you get such a project up and running it becomes a money machine largely immune from competition. Just think of all of the risk points in a building project, from land assembly through permitting through financing through building through leasing, such projects can go tits up anywhere along the line. Now repeat for hundreds of projects.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @Danindc

    Hostility is funny.

    Replies: @DCThrowback

    who/whom tho

  57. Also, an investment in the stock market doesn’t create a job or build a neighborhood.

    Yes it does.

    Hostility is funny.

    I agree, a reverse Caddyshack would be extremely funny. Odd how little attention is given to such potential cash cows.

  58. @rod1963
    Matt Taibbi got it right with comparing Trump to Ric Flair. Flair has class, cajones and bling.

    Don King is just a pimp for black boxers, whom he used and cast aside. He's garbage and ruined boxing.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    I don’t do this sort of thing much because I don’t like pedantry, but I see the mistake often enough that I feel compelled to point out that a cajón is a drawer, and the word you want is cojones.

    Sorry for being a dick. As far as your actual comment goes, I agree with you on both counts.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    slumber_j, Most dicks have cojones.

  59. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Cops weren't charged because they hadn't done anything wrong.
    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.

    I can just hear Gomer now: “Cardiac arr-e-est! Cardiac arr-e-est!

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Reg Cæsar

    Call me a bleeding heart liberal, but I think the cops should refrain from unnecessarily killing even fat asthmatic citizens.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  60. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    The guy Don King killed owed him money. $600! In 1966! He ripped King off. King was just enforcing a debt and did a little street justice. King beat him up a little too badly and the guy died from the beating. Think about it, Eric Garner was was asphyxiated after having his throat crushed because he sold one loosie. None of the cops was even charged.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @Buffalo Joe

    Anonymous, I knew a lot of guys that were as we used to say…”connected.” Only an assh*le beats someone to death over $600. Dead men don’t repay debts. It’s ok to kill someone who owes you money? Is that what you are saying? And Eric Garner did not have his “throat crushed”, he died of a heart attack brought on by his struggle with the cops. Selling “loosies” was his street job.

  61. @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's a pay service

    Replies: @res

    Search for “David Pinsen Trump is due credit on inheritance and policies” and open the resulting link in an incognito window. Accessing the FT site like this avoids the paywall.

    @Dave Pinsen, thanks for the info. Perhaps you could include the letter title when posting your FT links to make it easier for non-subscribers to find/access them.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @res

    Thanks.

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @res

    I can try that next time, but sometimes the titles are different online versus in print (it may have something to do with their different editions). In any case, I took a picture of the hard copy of the letter, tweeted it, and then pasted that tweet in comment #45 above.

    Replies: @res

  62. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Granesperanzablanco
    @Anon

    Um no. Obama is closer to an aloof introvert

    Replies: @Anon

    Does Obama give a lot of speeches and constantly try to hog the public’s attention? Yes. Does he give a lot of speeches in which he refers to himself? Yes. He’s not a true introvert. He may be a bit more circumspect in private because you can’t be completely self-obsessed without other people walking out on you in disgust after awhile. Being a successful manipulator requires that you pay just enough attention to other people to figure out how to pull their strings, and Obama is good at that. His main goal in every social interaction is I, Me and Myself. He’s just more polite about it than the average black.

  63. @Truth
    @Logical Meme


    Given how DT, a Queens guy, never quite fit into ‘sophisticated’ Manhattan circles, a better analogy might be DT as the loud, abrasive, un-PC, but very wealthy Al Czervik character from Caddyshack (1980), played by the immortal Rodney Dangerfield.
     
    Uhh...No. Czervik was self-made, that was the point of the character.

    Trump inherited at least $150m from his daddy (some say $400m) and has FAR underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 40 years.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Dave Pinsen, @The Millennial Falcon

    That’s one of the interesting things about Trump – he had all the prerequisites to join the aristocracy, but he actually loves the nouveau riche aesthetic.

    I think he’s got a lot in common with the Duck Dynasty guys.

  64. @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    OK, we'll use your numbers.

    We used $40 million as the starting point for 1974. Honghui Chen, associate professor of finance at the University of Central Florida, told us the account would have grown to $3.94 billion by November 2015 if the money had followed the S&P 500 index and all dividends had been reinvested.

    http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/dec/09/occupy-democrats/occupy-democrats-say-simple-investment-trumps-fath/

    I have no particular dislike (or like) for Donald Trump, but he was the richest kid in school, and the greatest source of his wealth is his daddy's money and connections. He had the advantages he had, and I get this, but like Boy George, he was "born on 3rd base and thinks he hit a triple."

    In other words, if "The Donald" wants to tell us how to be rich, he is first going to have to tell us how to start all over and pick rich daddies.

    What Don King did starting from welfare as he did, was much more impressive, in terms of pure accomplishment.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Guy de Prince, @NOTA

    Is there good data somewhere on what fraction of people who inherited a comparable amount to Trump did as well?

    • Replies: @Truth
    @NOTA

    The Whole Walton family.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  65. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    It should be a lesson to everyone: if you are morbidly obese slob with asthma and bad heart, resisting arrest may be harmful to your health.
     
    I can just hear Gomer now: "Cardiac arr-e-est! Cardiac arr-e-est!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9efgLHgsBmM

    Replies: @NOTA

    Call me a bleeding heart liberal, but I think the cops should refrain from unnecessarily killing even fat asthmatic citizens.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @NOTA

    Eric Garner was a career criminal. He resisted arrest. Should the cops have Tazed him? Shot him? Just how much force should they have used?

    Even cops get pissed off. I am surprised there are not more of these incidents considering the dirtball lowlifes most cops deal with every day.

  66. @NOTA
    @Reg Cæsar

    Call me a bleeding heart liberal, but I think the cops should refrain from unnecessarily killing even fat asthmatic citizens.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Eric Garner was a career criminal. He resisted arrest. Should the cops have Tazed him? Shot him? Just how much force should they have used?

    Even cops get pissed off. I am surprised there are not more of these incidents considering the dirtball lowlifes most cops deal with every day.

  67. @Dave Pinsen
    One difference: Don King killed a man.

    A financial planner I know, a former heavyweight contender turned boxing ref, used to remind me of that.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tim

    King, actually killed two men.

    But what I always like about King is he knew how to manipulate black men (I know, not that difficult, but still).

    For that short period of time that Hasim Rahman was Heavyweight Champion, some Jewish guy had put together this incredibly elaborate contact that would have paid Rahman off over $100 million. It was complicated, but brilliant.

    But before he could sign Rahman, Rahman took a meeting with Don King, and instead of an elaborate, mega-multi-million dollar contract, King just took a duffel bag and filled it with cash. He emptied out that duffel bag in front of Rahman and got the contract.

    that’s what I’m talking about!!

  68. @NOTA
    @Truth

    Is there good data somewhere on what fraction of people who inherited a comparable amount to Trump did as well?

    Replies: @Truth

    The Whole Walton family.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    When he died, Sam Walton was worth at least 100 times more than Fred Trump. High-end estimates of Fred Trump's net worth I've seen are $200 million. Walton was worth more than $20 billion.

    Replies: @Truth

  69. @Big Bill
    @Logical Meme

    Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true.

    Donald is like a lot of obnoxious, pushy New Yorkers who Get Things Done. The bankers with anger management issues. The lawyers who got their law degrees from Fordham Law School and go home to Bensonhurst at night. The name partners at midtown law firms who get enraged and throw heavy glass ashtrays at their walnut-paneled office walls, scaring the crap out of their associates. Uber-alphas.

    As the man said, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere ... even the White House.

    Alternatively, you can elect a pussy, cringing, third year associate like Rubio because he cleans up good and the church ladies like his manners. Or a smooth, Velveeta, junior partner like Cruz, who will never make the Management Committee.

    Replies: @granesperanzablanco, @Buffalo Joe

    “Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true. ”

    Sounds like you might be similar to a 3rd year associate pussy who couldn’t make it there?

    • Replies: @Tommy Hobbes
    @granesperanzablanco

    Harsh judgement. You shouldn't condemn anyone for leaving that crime filled hell hole.

  70. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    Can Chen point to one billionaire who got that rich by putting a < $50 million inheritance in an index fund? Also, bear in mind Trump says he was only given a $1mm grub stake by his father. One would think enterprising reporters could determine what actually happened to Fred Trump Sr.'s estate, and who got what.

    As for having the right parents, read the Playboy interview someone linked to above. Trump goes more granular than that, saying successful temperament is genetic; that he has it, and that his late, alcoholic brother Fred didn't.

    What Donald Trump has accomplished is rare - even among his 5 siblings. Only one ended up a multi-billionaire, despite all 5 having a centi-millionaire father.

    Replies: @Truth, @TangoMan

    Trump’s sister, the judge, should be a fantastic control. Most estates are divided equally among the siblings so this doesn’t seem like an outlandish assumption to make. We can also look at the estate of Trump’s brother. The sister was busy being a judge so she probably had someone managing her money. The brother died so someone is managing the estate he left to his own family. Are the two as wealthy as Donald?

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
  71. @Guy de Prince
    @Truth

    That ignores taxes and living expenses. Index funds (which didn't even exist when he received his inheritance) get taxed not just on dividends but also long and short term capital gains when they reallocate resources to match the index.

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    Replies: @TangoMan

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    Disagree. Trump made his fortune through a series of projects, each of which had potential to collapse. Bloomberg and someone like Gates or Slim made their fortune by creating or exploiting what amounts to a natural monopoly – once you get such a project up and running it becomes a money machine largely immune from competition. Just think of all of the risk points in a building project, from land assembly through permitting through financing through building through leasing, such projects can go tits up anywhere along the line. Now repeat for hundreds of projects.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    Actually the basis of Trump's, Gates's, and Bloomberg's wealth are similar. Bloomberg terminals and Windows are the virtual versions of the natural monopolistic power enjoyed by real estate in general and Manhattan real estate especially. Real estate value primarily derives from land value, not the building or whatever project located on the specific lot. That's why empty lots in Manhattan have such high value, and increase in value without any construction on it.

  72. @Big Bill
    @Logical Meme

    Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true.

    Donald is like a lot of obnoxious, pushy New Yorkers who Get Things Done. The bankers with anger management issues. The lawyers who got their law degrees from Fordham Law School and go home to Bensonhurst at night. The name partners at midtown law firms who get enraged and throw heavy glass ashtrays at their walnut-paneled office walls, scaring the crap out of their associates. Uber-alphas.

    As the man said, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere ... even the White House.

    Alternatively, you can elect a pussy, cringing, third year associate like Rubio because he cleans up good and the church ladies like his manners. Or a smooth, Velveeta, junior partner like Cruz, who will never make the Management Committee.

    Replies: @granesperanzablanco, @Buffalo Joe

    Big Bill, Love your metaphors.

  73. @John Gruskos
    @Mr. Anon

    The Trump campaign is Caddy Shack and Back to School in reverse:

    Brash nouveau riche W.A.S.P. causes consternation amongst stuffy uptight Jews.

    Replies: @Truth, @Evocatus

    Would a half-German, half-Scottish Highlander be considered a WASP though? He has the “W” and the “P” down but he isn’t really genetically Anglo-Saxon/English.

  74. @slumber_j
    @rod1963

    I don't do this sort of thing much because I don't like pedantry, but I see the mistake often enough that I feel compelled to point out that a cajón is a drawer, and the word you want is cojones.

    Sorry for being a dick. As far as your actual comment goes, I agree with you on both counts.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    slumber_j, Most dicks have cojones.

  75. @Danindc
    @Logical Meme

    Caddyshack is awash with ((hostility)) towards WASPS.

    Once you realize that it's a lot less funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Evocatus

    Caddyshack was written largely by Brian Doyle-Murray (brother to Bill Murray) and was largely based on his experiences as a caddy at a country club in the Chicago suburbs. The Danny Noonan character was a stand in for the Irish-Catholic Murray family (eight kids in the family, father worked in a lumberyard, etc) and the original script was intended to focus on the caddies. The Jews weren’t the only ones with an antipathy towards the WASP aristocracy of yesteryear.

  76. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    As I noted in this letter, that "underperformed the S&P 500" meme is spurious: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fcad5482-8706-11e5-9f8c-a8d619fa707c.html

    Replies: @Warner, @Truth, @Steve Sailer, @reiner Tor

    Could you copy in your letter? I can’t access it.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @reiner Tor

    See comment #45.

  77. @res
    @Truth

    Search for "David Pinsen Trump is due credit on inheritance and policies" and open the resulting link in an incognito window. Accessing the FT site like this avoids the paywall.

    @Dave Pinsen, thanks for the info. Perhaps you could include the letter title when posting your FT links to make it easier for non-subscribers to find/access them.

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @Dave Pinsen

    Thanks.

  78. You’re really incredible Steve.

    What does Trump have to do to get some good press from you? You spend 15 years writing about the disaster of illegal immigration from Mexico and then you turn your nose up at Trump because he as the stylistic equivalent of “pointy elbows”? Give me a break. You need to get over whatever it is about Trump that triggers you and embrace the greatest political gift you could possibly have hoped for.

    • Replies: @AnonAnon
    @Economic Sophisms

    I think Steve's problem is that he is not from the Northeast. Scott Adams explains it well in his blog:


    For starters, the visceral reaction that makes so many people dislike Trump has a lot to do with his New York style. I grew up in upstate New York and his style registers with me in a completely different way than it does with my California friends who can’t stand him. What I see is bluntness, honesty, some risk-taking, and a competitive nature. I don’t hate any of that. In fact, I kind of like it.

    I have blogged about making the transition from my New York personality to my California personality. New Yorkers tend to say whatever they think is true to whoever is standing nearby. Not much filter. Californians say what they think will make you feel good. The California way would feel like lying if it were not so well-meaning.

    I certainly understand that Trump comes off as arrogant, obnoxious, and lots of other bad stuff. But over time, and compared to the liars on stage with him, you might get hooked on hearing his honest opinions. That’s how the New York style works. At first you hate it because it seems so harsh. In time you start to appreciate the honesty. And when you realize the harshness is not a signal of real evil – just a style – you tend to get over it. He won’t win over all of his haters, but I predict that his New York style will grow on people more than you would expect. You could say his style is his biggest problem, but it might be self-solving with time and exposure. He is getting both.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dave Pinsen

  79. The Whole Walton family.

    So, like, .000001% then.

  80. The Jews weren’t the only ones with an antipathy towards the WASP aristocracy of yesteryear.

    Jews let lots of Irish into Hollywood. Can’t imagine why.

  81. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TangoMan
    @Guy de Prince

    His career is more impressive than Bush but way less impressive than someone like Bloomberg.

    Disagree. Trump made his fortune through a series of projects, each of which had potential to collapse. Bloomberg and someone like Gates or Slim made their fortune by creating or exploiting what amounts to a natural monopoly - once you get such a project up and running it becomes a money machine largely immune from competition. Just think of all of the risk points in a building project, from land assembly through permitting through financing through building through leasing, such projects can go tits up anywhere along the line. Now repeat for hundreds of projects.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Actually the basis of Trump’s, Gates’s, and Bloomberg’s wealth are similar. Bloomberg terminals and Windows are the virtual versions of the natural monopolistic power enjoyed by real estate in general and Manhattan real estate especially. Real estate value primarily derives from land value, not the building or whatever project located on the specific lot. That’s why empty lots in Manhattan have such high value, and increase in value without any construction on it.

  82. The irony is that, with the increasing black cultural influence in the US, Trump may pave the way for crude black megalomaniac politicians on the national stage.

  83. @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    But Dave, I don't think you understand, The Donald has bequathed his "businessman genes" to a few people; all equally "self made."

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/donald-trump-jr-net-worth-salary-job-age-wife/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/eric-trump-net-worth-salary-age-wife-height-job-foundation-wedding-married/

    And all with the politically correct, shall we say, "Talmudic" other half.

    Now Dave, I never once said, that Donald Trump does not have talent as a businessman. That would be a lie, and Lord knows, "not fucking up a good thing" is a talent that many lack, in and of it self.

    I also get that you, and many other "disenfranchised" white males feel that Donald Trump "will make this country great again(tm)" as he is AN ALPHA WHO HAS PULLED HIMSELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS! As opposed to our current "Communist in Chief" who has been GIVEN EVERYTHING HE HAS!

    (excuse me for a second...)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm81LSKJC2k

    (Ok, I'm back)

    But if there is one thing you really need to take out of the Trump "story", it is that, at the top of the income curve, a rising tide lifts all boats! He would have (arguably, in your opinion) made more money in the stock market than he did with "The Art of the Deal." In other words, You, Dave Pilsen, of Hackensack, NJ, are playing a fixed game, and you won't ever "win." Not without knowing who the opponents are.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Truth,

    You really should read the interview with Trump. He said, in 1990, that the odds were stacked against his kids, as a lot of rich kids turn out poorly. He has lucked out that all of his adult kids turned out well. It’s really remarkable.

    Now, I didn’t click on the net worth links to his kids, but would it be safe to assume that none of them is 15x richer than Trump, as Trump is at least 15x richer than his father was?

    Another thing, going back to your previous comment: why would you (or Chen) start the hypothetical in 1974? Trump’s father didn’t pass away until 1999. Who inherits all of his father’s money 25 years before his father dies?

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    Dave:

    You like "The Donald" and I get it, but you have to understand; the odds, in America are NEVER stacked against the rich, or their children; now understand before we go on; that does not mean that quite a few of them dont find a way to fuck it up. The odds are stacked against the kids of a semi-employed construction worker, or a kid who's father left, and mother works two low-paying jobs.

    "Now, I didn’t click on the net worth links to his kids, but would it be safe to assume that none of them is 15x richer than Trump, as Trump is at least 15x richer than his father was?"

    They are still in their early thirties, The Donald is close to 70.

  84. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Sharpton looks healthy in this picture. But today he looks like a famine victime. Did he contract acquired immunity dead-man-walking syndrome?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Worse. He went vegan.

  85. @res
    @Truth

    Search for "David Pinsen Trump is due credit on inheritance and policies" and open the resulting link in an incognito window. Accessing the FT site like this avoids the paywall.

    @Dave Pinsen, thanks for the info. Perhaps you could include the letter title when posting your FT links to make it easier for non-subscribers to find/access them.

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @Dave Pinsen

    I can try that next time, but sometimes the titles are different online versus in print (it may have something to do with their different editions). In any case, I took a picture of the hard copy of the letter, tweeted it, and then pasted that tweet in comment #45 above.

    • Replies: @res
    @Dave Pinsen

    Thanks for the reply (and your many interesting posts). I forgot to check carefully for your reply before I posted so I missed the picture (the picture does not show in the preview which was what I checked).

    Good point. There's a decent chance that the print title would be good enough for a Google search even if it is not an exact match. Another possibility would be giving the date.

  86. @Truth
    @NOTA

    The Whole Walton family.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    When he died, Sam Walton was worth at least 100 times more than Fred Trump. High-end estimates of Fred Trump’s net worth I’ve seen are $200 million. Walton was worth more than $20 billion.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen

    LOL, so they were so much more "disadvantaged" than The Donald.

  87. @reiner Tor
    @Dave Pinsen

    Could you copy in your letter? I can't access it.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    See comment #45.

  88. @marwan
    Don King is a cool character . I always liked him . He is a convicted murderer , yet he got released and had a 2nd act . He made many millions swindling boxers who were young enough to be his sons and could easily kick his arse into the ground yet he always comes up out of the water dry as a bone .

    Replies: @Granesperanzablanco, @ScarletNumber, @Tony

    Don King is a low life. I liked when the fictional Don King got knocked out in Rocky V.

  89. @Economic Sophisms
    You're really incredible Steve.

    What does Trump have to do to get some good press from you? You spend 15 years writing about the disaster of illegal immigration from Mexico and then you turn your nose up at Trump because he as the stylistic equivalent of "pointy elbows"? Give me a break. You need to get over whatever it is about Trump that triggers you and embrace the greatest political gift you could possibly have hoped for.

    Replies: @AnonAnon

    I think Steve’s problem is that he is not from the Northeast. Scott Adams explains it well in his blog:

    For starters, the visceral reaction that makes so many people dislike Trump has a lot to do with his New York style. I grew up in upstate New York and his style registers with me in a completely different way than it does with my California friends who can’t stand him. What I see is bluntness, honesty, some risk-taking, and a competitive nature. I don’t hate any of that. In fact, I kind of like it.

    I have blogged about making the transition from my New York personality to my California personality. New Yorkers tend to say whatever they think is true to whoever is standing nearby. Not much filter. Californians say what they think will make you feel good. The California way would feel like lying if it were not so well-meaning.

    I certainly understand that Trump comes off as arrogant, obnoxious, and lots of other bad stuff. But over time, and compared to the liars on stage with him, you might get hooked on hearing his honest opinions. That’s how the New York style works. At first you hate it because it seems so harsh. In time you start to appreciate the honesty. And when you realize the harshness is not a signal of real evil – just a style – you tend to get over it. He won’t win over all of his haters, but I predict that his New York style will grow on people more than you would expect. You could say his style is his biggest problem, but it might be self-solving with time and exposure. He is getting both.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AnonAnon

    Yes.

    I've compared it to George Steinbrenner's 1970s-1980s New York Yankees vs. the super-PR polished Los Angeles Dodgers of the same period.

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @AnonAnon

    See also Reihan Salam ( http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/02/i_can_t_hate_donald_trump_i_do_hate_the_republicans_who_ve_enabled_him.html )

    Excerpt:


    I can’t bring myself to hate Donald Trump. Part of this is a quirk of biography. Like a lot of native New Yorkers around my age, I find his outer-borough accent so comfortingly familiar that I can’t help but smile whenever I hear his voice, even when he’s saying something outrageously offensive. To a certain kind of smart, scrappy, lower-middle-class New York youth in the ’80s and ’90s, Trump was the living embodiment of gaudy success—a kind of mash-up of Santa Claus, Scrooge McDuck, and Vito Corleone. When I was a kid, it was not at all uncommon to hear friends and classmates declare that they wanted to be Donald Trump when they grew up. They didn’t want to be real estate developers or casino magnates. They literally wanted to be Trump, which seems doubly strange in hindsight, as so few of the kids I have in mind were white.

     

  90. @AnonAnon
    @Economic Sophisms

    I think Steve's problem is that he is not from the Northeast. Scott Adams explains it well in his blog:


    For starters, the visceral reaction that makes so many people dislike Trump has a lot to do with his New York style. I grew up in upstate New York and his style registers with me in a completely different way than it does with my California friends who can’t stand him. What I see is bluntness, honesty, some risk-taking, and a competitive nature. I don’t hate any of that. In fact, I kind of like it.

    I have blogged about making the transition from my New York personality to my California personality. New Yorkers tend to say whatever they think is true to whoever is standing nearby. Not much filter. Californians say what they think will make you feel good. The California way would feel like lying if it were not so well-meaning.

    I certainly understand that Trump comes off as arrogant, obnoxious, and lots of other bad stuff. But over time, and compared to the liars on stage with him, you might get hooked on hearing his honest opinions. That’s how the New York style works. At first you hate it because it seems so harsh. In time you start to appreciate the honesty. And when you realize the harshness is not a signal of real evil – just a style – you tend to get over it. He won’t win over all of his haters, but I predict that his New York style will grow on people more than you would expect. You could say his style is his biggest problem, but it might be self-solving with time and exposure. He is getting both.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dave Pinsen

    Yes.

    I’ve compared it to George Steinbrenner’s 1970s-1980s New York Yankees vs. the super-PR polished Los Angeles Dodgers of the same period.

  91. @AnonAnon
    @Economic Sophisms

    I think Steve's problem is that he is not from the Northeast. Scott Adams explains it well in his blog:


    For starters, the visceral reaction that makes so many people dislike Trump has a lot to do with his New York style. I grew up in upstate New York and his style registers with me in a completely different way than it does with my California friends who can’t stand him. What I see is bluntness, honesty, some risk-taking, and a competitive nature. I don’t hate any of that. In fact, I kind of like it.

    I have blogged about making the transition from my New York personality to my California personality. New Yorkers tend to say whatever they think is true to whoever is standing nearby. Not much filter. Californians say what they think will make you feel good. The California way would feel like lying if it were not so well-meaning.

    I certainly understand that Trump comes off as arrogant, obnoxious, and lots of other bad stuff. But over time, and compared to the liars on stage with him, you might get hooked on hearing his honest opinions. That’s how the New York style works. At first you hate it because it seems so harsh. In time you start to appreciate the honesty. And when you realize the harshness is not a signal of real evil – just a style – you tend to get over it. He won’t win over all of his haters, but I predict that his New York style will grow on people more than you would expect. You could say his style is his biggest problem, but it might be self-solving with time and exposure. He is getting both.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dave Pinsen

    See also Reihan Salam ( http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/02/i_can_t_hate_donald_trump_i_do_hate_the_republicans_who_ve_enabled_him.html )

    Excerpt:

    I can’t bring myself to hate Donald Trump. Part of this is a quirk of biography. Like a lot of native New Yorkers around my age, I find his outer-borough accent so comfortingly familiar that I can’t help but smile whenever I hear his voice, even when he’s saying something outrageously offensive. To a certain kind of smart, scrappy, lower-middle-class New York youth in the ’80s and ’90s, Trump was the living embodiment of gaudy success—a kind of mash-up of Santa Claus, Scrooge McDuck, and Vito Corleone. When I was a kid, it was not at all uncommon to hear friends and classmates declare that they wanted to be Donald Trump when they grew up. They didn’t want to be real estate developers or casino magnates. They literally wanted to be Trump, which seems doubly strange in hindsight, as so few of the kids I have in mind were white.

  92. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    Truth,

    You really should read the interview with Trump. He said, in 1990, that the odds were stacked against his kids, as a lot of rich kids turn out poorly. He has lucked out that all of his adult kids turned out well. It's really remarkable.

    Now, I didn't click on the net worth links to his kids, but would it be safe to assume that none of them is 15x richer than Trump, as Trump is at least 15x richer than his father was?

    Another thing, going back to your previous comment: why would you (or Chen) start the hypothetical in 1974? Trump's father didn't pass away until 1999. Who inherits all of his father's money 25 years before his father dies?

    Replies: @Truth

    Dave:

    You like “The Donald” and I get it, but you have to understand; the odds, in America are NEVER stacked against the rich, or their children; now understand before we go on; that does not mean that quite a few of them dont find a way to fuck it up. The odds are stacked against the kids of a semi-employed construction worker, or a kid who’s father left, and mother works two low-paying jobs.

    “Now, I didn’t click on the net worth links to his kids, but would it be safe to assume that none of them is 15x richer than Trump, as Trump is at least 15x richer than his father was?”

    They are still in their early thirties, The Donald is close to 70.

  93. @Dave Pinsen
    @Truth

    When he died, Sam Walton was worth at least 100 times more than Fred Trump. High-end estimates of Fred Trump's net worth I've seen are $200 million. Walton was worth more than $20 billion.

    Replies: @Truth

    LOL, so they were so much more “disadvantaged” than The Donald.

  94. “so few of the kids I have in mind were white.”

    Dems are going to be shocked at how much of the NAM vote Trump is going to attract. In the black/hispanic community, as in Muslim communities, the “strong horse” is most admired. Trump is simply THE man, el Jefe, the natural leader.

    Compared to some old white woman (woman!), who you gonna vote for? Landslide?

  95. Trump got something south of 100m inheritance and turned it into something north of a billion in assets. That’s not nothing. It’s not par, either. Lots of people who inherit wealth coast on it. Lots of people who earn millions squander it all; I hear something like 70% of NBA players are broke within 5 years of leaving the NBA. A fool and his money are soon parted.

    the odds, in America are NEVER stacked against the rich, or their children; now understand before we go on; that does not mean that quite a few of them dont find a way to fuck it up. The odds are stacked against the kids of a semi-employed construction worker, or a kid who’s father left, and mother works two low-paying jobs.

    The odds are stacked against former NBA stars.

    I think I’ve read that lottery winners have relatively poor outcomes, too.

  96. @Dave Pinsen
    @res

    I can try that next time, but sometimes the titles are different online versus in print (it may have something to do with their different editions). In any case, I took a picture of the hard copy of the letter, tweeted it, and then pasted that tweet in comment #45 above.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks for the reply (and your many interesting posts). I forgot to check carefully for your reply before I posted so I missed the picture (the picture does not show in the preview which was what I checked).

    Good point. There’s a decent chance that the print title would be good enough for a Google search even if it is not an exact match. Another possibility would be giving the date.

  97. @granesperanzablanco
    @Big Bill

    "Having lived in the Bronx and worked in Midtown for five years (before escaping) this rings very true. "

    Sounds like you might be similar to a 3rd year associate pussy who couldn't make it there?

    Replies: @Tommy Hobbes

    Harsh judgement. You shouldn’t condemn anyone for leaving that crime filled hell hole.

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