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Not confidence-inducing: AstraZeneca messed up its clinical trial of Oxford’s vaccine, giving the first few thousand volunteers only half of what they’d planned as the first dose. But that turned out 90% effective compared to only 62% effective for the planned two full doses.

From The Guardian:

Oxford Covid vaccine hit 90% success rate thanks to dosing error

Participants given first shot at half strength by mistake were found to be better protected

Jessica Murray and agency
Mon 23 Nov 2020 18.24

The Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine trials reached 90% efficacy by accident thanks to the “serendipity” of an error that led to some participants receiving half doses, it has emerged.

On Monday scientists revealed that the Oxford vaccine had an overall efficacy of 70%, but could be around 90% effective when administered as a half dose followed by a full dose a month later.

“The reason we had the half dose is serendipity,” said Mene Pangalos, executive vice-president of biopharmaceuticals research and development at AstraZeneca.

Yes, he is Dr. Pangalos.

When university researchers were distributing the vaccine at the end of April, around the start of Oxford and AstraZeneca’s partnership, they noticed expected side effects such as fatigue, headaches or arm aches were milder than expected.

“So we went back and checked … and we found out that they had underpredicted the dose of the vaccine by half,” said Pangalos.

Instead of restarting the trial, he said researchers decided to continue with the half dose and administer the full dose booster shot at the scheduled time.

About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later, with data showing 90% were protected. In the larger group, who were given two full doses also four weeks apart, efficacy was 62%.

It’s all for the best in this best of all possible worlds, reported Dr. Pangalos

Scientists said they still could not fully explain why the half dose gave better protection, but said it may be that it triggers the immune system differently.

How small was the sample size for this error that worked out well?

One issue was that due to the blinding process, they went quite a few months without knowing that their mistaken dosage was doing better in the trial. I presume they will now switch to this new pattern, but who knows how long that will take to get more results.

 
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  1. was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Tyrade

    Thanks.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Tyrade

    But we must cultivate our garden.....

    , @JimB
    @Tyrade


    was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?
     
    Funny thing about humor. If you examine it too closely it ceases to be funny. And if you pay real close attention, you will find misogyny, homophobia, transphobia and racism minutely diffused into every sentence you utter.
  2. I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    • Replies: @Fatmanscoop
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia
     
    No-one can say anything which goes against the agenda - no matter how representative of basic sanity the point in question may be - because it hints that you may be disloyal. Wrong-thinkers will be excommunicated.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    I don't disagree about lying, power-hungry head cases, but remember that the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @anon, @MBlanc46

    , @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    , @Dieter Kief
    @RichardTaylor

    no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come

    No lockdown in the German part of Switzerland until now. –

    Fewer people on a ventilator in the first eight months in this part of Switzerland than last year.

    No excess deaths at all from January through August.

    Schools open, businesses open. Museum and restaurants open throughout.

    A regional spotlight: No one in an intensive care bed at the end of October 2020 in the Kanton Appenzell Innnerrhoden, a total of three people in Appenzell Außerrhoden, nobody on a ventilator (I see parts of these two mountain-regions from Konstanz with my eyes).

    Oh – they use masks inside since ca. June, but not during classes, for example. Before, they held it might tbe safer not to wear masks. It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.

    So – no lockdown so far, and everything just fine. There was a second wave in October – but it is getting objectively better already. It might have caused some excess deaths.


    These here are doctors who are working evidence-based and show their clinical data, which I refer to above:

    https://www.initiative-qualitaetsmedizin.de/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @utu
    @RichardTaylor

    To unhinged paranoiacs everything seems "I’m pretty sure".

    , @Kratoklastes
    @RichardTaylor


    I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels.
     
    It's not at all clear why anybody would be in a position to keep thinking such a thing, unless they had suffered a head injury that reduced their cognition to levels usually associated with severe hookworm infestation.

    For a start it would mean that at some point you would have to start thinking such a thing, which would require preternatural levels of ignorance of observable reality.

    Intelligent, well-balanced people do not want to be bureaucrats, much less political officeholders. That ship sailed before Solon was born.

    Acton's (deliberate) misdirection was designed to mislead people to think that "power corrupts; absolute power, absolutely".

    The truth is quite different: political power attracts the already-corrupt.

    Always ask yourself: what is the worst type of person I can imagine, who would want that job. That person will be representative of the job in question, and all the 'intelligent, well-balanced people' will be elsewhere. Gresham's Law applies to talent (it applies to most things, in fact: one tiny piece of shit in a cake ruins the cake).

  3. Mistakes made and not detected for months in testing do not increase my confidence in vaccines. But let the guinea pigs line up!

    • Agree: Charon, Polynikes
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Diversity Heretic

    If the testers can't get the dose right and can't detect their error for months, how much confidence should anyone have in the results that they're reporting?

    Replies: @anon, @Hypnotoad666

    , @AnotherDad
    @Diversity Heretic

    My zeroth order guess is that the difference here is just noise. You can gin up some stuff, but naively there isn't much reason to suspect the lower dose up front would be better.

    I suspect some luck. A few more cases that should have, but randomly did not, develop on that side of the sample. A few more cases that did, but should not have, on the other. Vaccine 70-80%ish effective.

    But ... you never know.

  4. Maybe we’re going to find out someone transposed numbers?

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Redneck farmer

    Isn't anyone worried about the disparate impact? Won't someone please think of the disparate impact?

    , @fish
    @Redneck farmer

    So 09 or 9% effective?


    I like those odds!

    , @Known Fact
    @Redneck farmer

    ... Or misplaced one of those pesky decimal points

  5. @Tyrade
    was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @JimB

    Thanks.

  6. @Diversity Heretic
    Mistakes made and not detected for months in testing do not increase my confidence in vaccines. But let the guinea pigs line up!

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @AnotherDad

    If the testers can’t get the dose right and can’t detect their error for months, how much confidence should anyone have in the results that they’re reporting?

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @anon
    @Diversity Heretic

    yes there is no way the sponsor overlooked or mis-calculated a dosing error. That is a sure way to fail FDA approval. oh right we dont need that frivolity "now".

    Replies: @Sean

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Diversity Heretic


    About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later, with data showing 90% were protected. In the larger group, who were given two full doses also four weeks apart, efficacy was 62%.

     

    So cutting the dose in half decreases the rate of infection by 67%. That means a one-quarter dose would protected 96.7% of people. And no dose at all would therefore surely be 100% effective.

    I am pretty sure that's how science works.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

  7. Makes you wonder about the Excel formulae used (my guess) in the results analysis. Plenty of room for errors there, not just in the formulae, but in the way it handles the data.

    The early test-and-trace CV19 system in the UK was a bit of a shambles, partly because of the way data was passed into the system. No one seemed to be in charge of reconciling the record counts, indeed I’m not even sure if they appreciated the importance thereof. Excel data import and export is fraught with issues, mainly due to Excel trying to be clever (e.g. if it looks like a number, save it as a number, if it looks like a date, save it as a date).

    From Candide

    Pangloss was professor of metaphysico-theologico-cosmolo-nigology. He proved admirably that there is no effect without a cause, and that, in this best of all possible worlds, the Baron’s castle was the most magnificent of castles, and his lady the best of all possible Baronesses.

    “It is demonstrable,” said he, “that things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for all being created for an end, all is necessarily for the best end. Observe, that the nose has been formed to bear spectacles—thus we have spectacles. Legs are visibly designed for stockings—and we have stockings. Stones were made to be hewn, and to construct castles—therefore my lord has a magnificent castle; for the greatest baron in the province ought to be the best lodged. Pigs were made to be eaten—therefore we eat pork all the year round. Consequently they who assert that all is well have said a foolish thing, they should have said all is for the best.”

    Candide listened attentively and believed innocently; for he thought Miss Cunegonde extremely beautiful, though he never had the courage to tell her so. He concluded that after the happiness of being born of Baron of Thunder-ten-Tronckh, the second degree of happiness was to be Miss Cunegonde, the third that of seeing her every day, and the fourth that of hearing Master Pangloss, the greatest philosopher of the whole province, and consequently of the whole world.

    One day Cunegonde, while walking near the castle, in a little wood which they called a park, saw between the bushes, Dr. Pangloss giving a lesson in experimental natural philosophy to her mother’s chamber-maid, a little brown wench, very pretty and very docile. As Miss Cunegonde had a great disposition for the sciences, she breathlessly observed the repeated experiments of which she was a witness; she clearly perceived the force of the Doctor’s reasons, the effects, and the causes; she turned back greatly flurried, quite pensive, and filled with the desire to be learned; dreaming that she might well be a sufficient reason for young Candide, and he for her.

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Makes you wonder about the Excel formulae used (my guess) in the results analysis.
     
    Excel? Pretty sure they used 'Dominion' software.
  8. Maybe we disagree on the meaning of the word “serendipity “

    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.

    But then the corporation developing the vaccine gets paid regardless, can’t be sued for damages, and is agitating for forced vaccinations.

    Yea, serendipity.

    • Agree: donut, Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @Charon
    @theMann


    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.
     
    Well they didn't think anyone would be paying attention. Meanwhile you are a wordsmith who can't spell yeah?

    Replies: @theMann

    , @Alice
    @theMann

    For 5 years now, I have seen in the complete collapse of engineering and education. The people in positions of authority are now all AA or DIE hires. They know nothing, and they are so incompetent they cannot tell good work from bad, so they don't even keep around the competent as assistants to help them out.

    There is no reason to believe their numbers of efficacy in this trial, any more than you should believe they know what dosages they are given ina freaking clinical trial. it boggles the mind someone would have proof they can't run a trial snd then turn around and believe their results are valid. The Murray Gell -Mann amnesia effect in spades.

  9. @Diversity Heretic
    @Diversity Heretic

    If the testers can't get the dose right and can't detect their error for months, how much confidence should anyone have in the results that they're reporting?

    Replies: @anon, @Hypnotoad666

    yes there is no way the sponsor overlooked or mis-calculated a dosing error. That is a sure way to fail FDA approval. oh right we dont need that frivolity “now”.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @anon


    https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/the-drug-trial-bbc-examines-what-went-wrong-in-the-infamous-elephant-men-case_uk_

    More than 11 years ago, eight healthy young men took part in a clinical trial of an experimental leukaemia drug known as TGN1412. The drug, which manipulated the immune system, had been successfully tested on monkeys although never on humans. But what should have been a routine clinical trial at an independent clinic at north west London’s Northwick Park Hospital, soon spiralled into one of the most infamous medical emergencies in recent British history.


    It features candid personal testimony from doctors who struggled to bring the clinical catastrophe under control: “This was a mystery, we had no way of predicting how severe it was going to get. There was no rule book for how to deal with this.”Volunteer Rob Oldfield had signed up to the trial for a fee of £2,000, with no clue of the trauma that would follow.

    Ryan Wilson spent four months in hospital and had his toes and parts of his feet and fingers amputated after battling the symptoms of pneumonia, septicaemia and dry gangrene. In an interview with the Guardian in 2007, Wilson said he is still haunted by the words of his father, who told him the night before the trial: “Don’t do it. Your body is a temple.”

    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans. It is understood that some volunteers have received confidential compensation payments, but still suffer from weakened immune systems and other side effects, and will never know the true legacy of the drug which so nearly cost them their lives. Within an hour of receiving the drug, six of the volunteers had been rushed to intensive care where they were fighting for their lives. As a BBC Two drama documentary airing on Tuesday night recounts: “It was all manic, everything was happening all at once, they were vomiting, they were screaming in pain, people fainting.”

    This combination of symptoms known as a “cytokine storm” saw the men’s temperatures soar, their organs fail, and some of their bodies swell so severely that they became known in newspapers around the world as the ‘Elephant Men’.
     

    Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @YetAnotherAnon

  10. How small was the sample size for this error that worked out well?

    It says in the part you quoted above, Steve:

    About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    But how many cases were there?

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Anonymous

  11. This is bizarre on so many levels. I’m surprised they went public with this. It destroys confidence in AzztraZeneca and the vaccine.

    • Replies: @Old and Grumpy
    @AndrewR

    The Brits will get the jab no matter what. Wrong thinkers will be the only ones who question Astra Zenaca. In a way the will out themselves for easy detection. Kinda makes one wonder if the report went public for such a nefarious reason.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @AndrewR

    "I’m surprised they went public with this. It destroys confidence in AzztraZeneca and the vaccine."

    Why? Because people are rational? Because they are smart?

    If there is one thing we smart, rational people know for sure, it's that it doesn't matter what you "tell" the people; all they hear is "derp derp derp do this."

    Of course they went public with it. They are just trolling us now.

  12. @Some Guy

    How small was the sample size for this error that worked out well?
     
    It says in the part you quoted above, Steve:

    About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    But how many cases were there?

    • Replies: @Some Guy
    @Steve Sailer

    Cases of people who got Covid despite taking the vaccine? Wouldn't an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it? Or 300 people? I don't know.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @FPD72

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I estimate that 2 people in the half dose arm got covid, 30 in the full dose, and 99 in the placebo arm.

    The press release says that there were 23k people in the study, 12390 in Britain, 10300 in Brazil. And that 2741 got half dose, 8895 full dose, leaving 11054 in the placebo.
    Then
    99/11054=0.0090 in placebo
    30/8895=0.0034, 62% reduced
      2/2741 =0.0007 more than 90% reduced
    also, 32/11636=0.0028, about 70% reduced

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  13. @Tyrade
    was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @JimB

    But we must cultivate our garden…..

  14. One of the things I love about Sailer’s blog is how major milestones in societal collapse can be met with the equanimity of a dispassionate excursion into an autistic exegesis of the statistical proof of a vaccine that is quite clearly being foist upon the world to kill us all.

    • Thanks: The King is a Fink
    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    In the past people took this as a Friday night creature feature that could be forgotten in the morning like a now distant nightmare

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBUByVIYk_Q

  15. @Pat Hannagan
    One of the things I love about Sailer's blog is how major milestones in societal collapse can be met with the equanimity of a dispassionate excursion into an autistic exegesis of the statistical proof of a vaccine that is quite clearly being foist upon the world to kill us all.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhLd18Xg6x0

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    In the past people took this as a Friday night creature feature that could be forgotten in the morning like a now distant nightmare

  16. Trumps America

    Fortunately we have an incoming admistration that follows science and is kind

    I guarantee the virus will be controlled by mid 2021 at the latest

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Gee Vince gillroy

    Gee, that's quite a guarantee. It is now the end of November so mid 2021, as in June, is just seven months away. Controlled where? America or worldwide? The only thing I would guarantee is the state governments and mayors aren't giving up their control of our lives.

  17. @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    But how many cases were there?

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Anonymous

    Cases of people who got Covid despite taking the vaccine? Wouldn’t an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it? Or 300 people? I don’t know.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    A little over 100 people in the trial came down with Covid.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @MikeJa

    , @FPD72
    @Some Guy


    Wouldn’t an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it?
     
    An efficacy of 90% means that those who received the vaccine caught Covid-19 at 10% of the rate of the unvaccinated control group.

    Replies: @Sean

  18. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    No-one can say anything which goes against the agenda – no matter how representative of basic sanity the point in question may be – because it hints that you may be disloyal. Wrong-thinkers will be excommunicated.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Fatmanscoop

    Exactly. The madness is top-down and highly coordinated.

    https://www.rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk/blm-covid-impact/blacklivesmatter-racism-and-legacy/

  19. The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn’t work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don’t yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don’t expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called “third world” countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Jonathan Mason

    My understanding is that the flu vaccine not only makes it less likely to get sick from the flu, but also decreases the severity of the illness if you do fall ill.

    , @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    Americans in general are kind of fixated in the past and assume that America is the most advanced country. They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where people shit in the street and food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around and not in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    What they are not taking into account is that the world has not stood still - other countries have advanced while the US has gone sideways or even deteriorated. In 1950 80% of world automobile production was in the US. Currently it is 12%. If you stand on a subway platform in NY, some crazy homeless person might shove you onto the tracks, but this would never happen to you in Shanghai, not just because they keep the criminally insane locked up but because modern subway systems have platform doors that make this impossible. The NY subway will get platform doors in approximately never. We are like late Rome - we just don't have the resources or skills to implement large scale projects like that at a cost that we could afford. I don't know what it will take for Americans to change their mental image of themselves as #1.

    The first step in fixing any problem is acknowledging that you have a problem and Americans are in denial as to how far the US has fallen in the world and what a disorganized place we have become. Trump, in the end, did very little to fix this (maybe it was beyond the capability of anyone) and Biden will only make things worse. Part of the reason why Shanghai and Santo Domingo look a lot better than they used to (and the Bronx looks a lot worse) is because tons of US dollars have flowed into those places, either as a result of their exporting both people (who send remittances back home) and goods to the US. This has all been pretty much a one-way street.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Charon
    @Jonathan Mason


    I don’t expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.
     
    Most of our doses will be sent to Africa because racism, or dispensed to Africans in America because racism, and around 10% of those recipients will be organized and disciplined enough ever to return for their second dose.

    The uberclass in America will get special vaccines once it's clear which versions are safest.
    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Jonathan Mason


    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done?
     
    Maybe, but that's a counterfactual that can never be proven.

    Recall, though, one of my top 10 least favorite people on the planet, the "expert" Dr. Anthony Fauci pontificating that it was going to take 18 to 24 months instead of the 9 or so it has actually taken.

    So here's another counterfactual. Joe Biden was president, he genuflects to Fauci's worrywarting, and here we sit, another 12 months of lockdown catastrophe.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason


    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware ...
     
    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans' freedom again, as with the TSA, cause ... awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON'T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Jonathan Mason

  20. @Some Guy
    @Steve Sailer

    Cases of people who got Covid despite taking the vaccine? Wouldn't an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it? Or 300 people? I don't know.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @FPD72

    A little over 100 people in the trial came down with Covid.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Steve Sailer

    Had a chat with my prospective son-in-law tonight and though I'm impressed with his intelligence I was feeling rather flat in terms of future renegade acts.

    Still, I suppose that sort of attitude is to be commended.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpN6YBTazKk

    , @MikeJa
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/nov/23/astrazeneca-says-its-coronavirus-vaccine-has-70-per-cent-efficacy-covid-oxford-university


    The interim analysis is based on 131 infections among participants, half of whom received the vaccine while the rest, in a control group, were given an established meningitis shot.
     
    131 people infected. To get 90% effectiveness they should breakdown 119 control group and 12 of the vaccinated group. If it were only 70% effective you'd expect 36 vaccinated patients getting sick. Hmm 36 vs 12. Interesting, but if you can mess up the dosage I wouldn't be too sure you've properly randomized the participants.
  21. @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    A little over 100 people in the trial came down with Covid.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @MikeJa

    Had a chat with my prospective son-in-law tonight and though I’m impressed with his intelligence I was feeling rather flat in terms of future renegade acts.

    Still, I suppose that sort of attitude is to be commended.

  22. I wonder what happened to whoever screwed this up ? Do you fire them for error or promote them for developing a better dosage ?

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @AKAHorace

    It could have been someone like that negro slave in Caswell County, North Carolina who accidentally discovered flue cured tobacco for his master.

    https://ncccha.blogspot.com/2010/01/bright-leaf-tobacco-process.html

    , @Charon
    @AKAHorace

    Depends on their position in the "Progressive Stack"

  23. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    I don’t disagree about lying, power-hungry head cases, but remember that the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SFG


    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.
     
    Only small and midsize Deplorable businessmen.

    Bezos is loving this and laughing all the way to the bank.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anon

    , @anon
    @SFG

    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Businesses deemed to be critical are already open. Gasoline stations, convenience stores, big box stores such as WalMart / Target / Best Buy are all open. Cell phone stores are open. Fast food franchieses are open, just only for drive up. Etc.

    Plenty of businesses are open. Just not the small ones, the family owned ones.
    Probably a mere coincidence.

    , @MBlanc46
    @SFG

    And the Dems want Biden to look like the savior of the world. On JAN 20 the seas stop rising and covid slinks away, defeated.

  24. Steve, please let an experiment play out.

    How many of your readers recognise that a horrible experiment is being played out on them and how many reckon it’s all real and how many are like you?

    How many see themselves as dostoyevsky did and how many refused to concede?

    I am a sick man…. I am a spiteful man. I am an unattractive man. I believe my liver is diseased. However, I know nothing at all about my disease, and do not know for certain what ails me. I don’t consult a doctor for it, and never have, though I have a respect for medicine and doctors. Besides, I am extremely superstitious, sufficiently so to respect medicine, anyway (I am well-educated enough not to be superstitious, but I am superstitious). No, I refuse to consult a doctor from spite. That you probably will not understand. Well, I understand it, though. Of course, I can’t explain who it is precisely that I am mortifying in this case by my spite: I am perfectly well aware that I cannot “pay out” the doctors by not consulting them; I know better than anyone that by all this I am only injuring myself and no one else. But still, if I don’t consult a doctor it is from spite. My liver is bad, well–let it get worse!

    as in can your readers please start to explain themselves? getting pretty sick and tired of reading daily stormer.

  25. @Fatmanscoop
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia
     
    No-one can say anything which goes against the agenda - no matter how representative of basic sanity the point in question may be - because it hints that you may be disloyal. Wrong-thinkers will be excommunicated.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Exactly. The madness is top-down and highly coordinated.

    https://www.rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk/blm-covid-impact/blacklivesmatter-racism-and-legacy/

  26. I told you all this would happen…

  27. @Jonathan Mason
    The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn't work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don't yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don't expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called "third world" countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D, @Charon, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Achmed E. Newman

    My understanding is that the flu vaccine not only makes it less likely to get sick from the flu, but also decreases the severity of the illness if you do fall ill.

  28. @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    I don't disagree about lying, power-hungry head cases, but remember that the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @anon, @MBlanc46

    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Only small and midsize Deplorable businessmen.

    Bezos is loving this and laughing all the way to the bank.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans, BB753
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Gold box, this is the explanation, this is why our societal theme is now the Twilight Zone episode where no one dares upset the little boy with telekinesis: the same monopolists who already loved diversity nonsense and environment nonsense want our entire culture and goverbment to be nonsense. Maximum freedom of movememt for them.

    , @Anon
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Exactly. I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. Now I buy meds, lightbulbs, new-dangled mops, spare parts, school supplies and they come to me. Great reset, thankfully I’m spared the drones.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  29. Anon[161] • Disclaimer says:

    For a new vaccine dosing is obviously a guess. After approval it’s not unusual to test smaller doses, especially when looking for the Goldilocks dosage that works well enough at an inexpensive price for use in the Third World. Sometimes the dose is kept constant, but the number of shots is reduced. Japan stopped recommending two flu shots about five years ago even though two is somewhat more effective than one.

  30. After this entire hangin on to Trump batty boy behaviour subsides we need to have a reckoning O(bloody hell we’ve endured peak inflammatory hypersentisiteve syndrome from all and sundry pro-trump people)

    I fear Anglin must be on the verge of an aneurism just one lambasting of his irish brethren on behalf of his greatest love, the English, away

    Andrew, give it a rest, mate

  31. The 21st century is all about promising extraordinary things, and delivering crumbs.


  32. Russia says data on Sputnik Covid vaccine shows 95% efficacy

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/24/russia-says-data-on-sputnik-covid-vaccine-shows-95-efficacy

    • LOL: 415 reasons
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @PiltdownMan

    It wouldn't be the Guardian without a dig at Russia, Hungary and a couple of Soros quotes.

    The Guardian used to love love love the old Soviet Union.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Gott


    @ozymandias - if they used Dominion software they could have any result they want!

    , @415 reasons
    @PiltdownMan

    This is seriously one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. A ridiculous example of western arrogance. Especially after the fawning coverage the Oxford group received and the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press. A very good example we should all remember when the libs act like some media quote giving expert is the infallible voice of truth. Turns out those quote giving experts at Oxford got taken to the woodshed by their vodka swilling competitors working for Putin in basic vaccinology.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Steve Sailer
    @PiltdownMan

    Thanks.

  33. One possible explanation for the lower dose seeming to be paradoxically “more effective.:”

    It may be that is this trial (as was true int the Pfizer and Moderna trials) they did not test everyone in the trial for COVID as an endpoint.

    Rather, they only tested subjects who complained of “appropriate symptoms” for COVID. Then the COVID-positive endpoint for the vaccine group and the placebo group was determined from that small subset of total subject population. The actual difference in total COVID-positivity rates between the placebo and vaccine groups is unknown. Since many COVID-positives are not symptomatic, the majority of COVID-positives in both the vaccine and control groups may have gone undetected by the trial.

    Since subjects who got the lower vaccine dose may have had fewer symptoms to complain about (body aches, transient temperatures, etc.) it may be that fewer of them got tested, therefore fewer COVID-positives in that group = “more efficacy” in the low-dose group.

    This is just one example of the problems arising from testing vaccine efficacy for a virus that has such a high incidence of asymptomatic cases.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @PennTothal

    I understand that those vaccinated with the lower dose may have had few symptoms (and therefore less testing) than the placebo group but why would they have fewer symptoms than the full initial dose group?

    It is understood that in live cold virus based vaccines there is an issue that your immune system may kill the vaccine before it can deliver its payload if you already have immunity to it due to prior exposure (mRNA vaccines don't have this problem). Therefore, they have to use an adenovirus that is not already circulating in the wild, either a monkey virus or a human virus that has been modified to disguise itself. Even if the virus is novel, by the time you get the 2nd dose you might have an immune response to it. The Russian vaccine takes this into account by using different virus carriers in dose #1 and dose #2 but the Oxford Astra vaccine does not. A possible hypothesis is that by provoking a larger immune response in dose #1, dose #2 is make less effective.

    , @By-tor
    @PennTothal

    'Asymptomatic cases'? So say the inhumanes pushing the lockdowns, expensive and inaccurate PCR test kits and labeling hypertension, diabetes and cancer deaths as 'Covid-19' casualties. Known liars Fauci-Gates ( Schwab ) have been pushing this ruse since they gamed it at 'Event 201' in October 2019.

  34. @anon
    @Diversity Heretic

    yes there is no way the sponsor overlooked or mis-calculated a dosing error. That is a sure way to fail FDA approval. oh right we dont need that frivolity "now".

    Replies: @Sean

    https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/the-drug-trial-bbc-examines-what-went-wrong-in-the-infamous-elephant-men-case_uk_

    More than 11 years ago, eight healthy young men took part in a clinical trial of an experimental leukaemia drug known as TGN1412. The drug, which manipulated the immune system, had been successfully tested on monkeys although never on humans. But what should have been a routine clinical trial at an independent clinic at north west London’s Northwick Park Hospital, soon spiralled into one of the most infamous medical emergencies in recent British history.

    It features candid personal testimony from doctors who struggled to bring the clinical catastrophe under control: “This was a mystery, we had no way of predicting how severe it was going to get. There was no rule book for how to deal with this.”Volunteer Rob Oldfield had signed up to the trial for a fee of £2,000, with no clue of the trauma that would follow.

    Ryan Wilson spent four months in hospital and had his toes and parts of his feet and fingers amputated after battling the symptoms of pneumonia, septicaemia and dry gangrene. In an interview with the Guardian in 2007, Wilson said he is still haunted by the words of his father, who told him the night before the trial: “Don’t do it. Your body is a temple.”

    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans. It is understood that some volunteers have received confidential compensation payments, but still suffer from weakened immune systems and other side effects, and will never know the true legacy of the drug which so nearly cost them their lives. Within an hour of receiving the drug, six of the volunteers had been rushed to intensive care where they were fighting for their lives. As a BBC Two drama documentary airing on Tuesday night recounts: “It was all manic, everything was happening all at once, they were vomiting, they were screaming in pain, people fainting.”

    This combination of symptoms known as a “cytokine storm” saw the men’s temperatures soar, their organs fail, and some of their bodies swell so severely that they became known in newspapers around the world as the ‘Elephant Men’.

    Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer.

    • Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Sean


    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans.
     
    Jeez, what does this sentence mean? "Properly considered?"

    Who writes this crap?

    Tried to link to article and got a 404.

    All drug trials first require a non-clinical safety evaluation and then a Phase 1 dosing regimen in humans to figure out the proper level. Did they skip those steps?

    Journalism. They all should be tarred and feathered.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Sean

    "Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer."

    Parexel are an American company, started by a Swiss, who were running the trials on behalf of a German company.

    My layman's suggestion is that perhaps radical new products should first be tested on a single human, not six at a time.

    https://i.postimg.cc/d3bFvGnL/badantibodies.jpg

    Replies: @Sean

  35. @YetAnotherAnon
    Makes you wonder about the Excel formulae used (my guess) in the results analysis. Plenty of room for errors there, not just in the formulae, but in the way it handles the data.

    The early test-and-trace CV19 system in the UK was a bit of a shambles, partly because of the way data was passed into the system. No one seemed to be in charge of reconciling the record counts, indeed I'm not even sure if they appreciated the importance thereof. Excel data import and export is fraught with issues, mainly due to Excel trying to be clever (e.g. if it looks like a number, save it as a number, if it looks like a date, save it as a date).


    From Candide


    Pangloss was professor of metaphysico-theologico-cosmolo-nigology. He proved admirably that there is no effect without a cause, and that, in this best of all possible worlds, the Baron's castle was the most magnificent of castles, and his lady the best of all possible Baronesses.

    "It is demonstrable," said he, "that things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for all being created for an end, all is necessarily for the best end. Observe, that the nose has been formed to bear spectacles—thus we have spectacles. Legs are visibly designed for stockings—and we have stockings. Stones were made to be hewn, and to construct castles—therefore my lord has a magnificent castle; for the greatest baron in the province ought to be the best lodged. Pigs were made to be eaten—therefore we eat pork all the year round. Consequently they who assert that all is well have said a foolish thing, they should have said all is for the best."

    Candide listened attentively and believed innocently; for he thought Miss Cunegonde extremely beautiful, though he never had the courage to tell her so. He concluded that after the happiness of being born of Baron of Thunder-ten-Tronckh, the second degree of happiness was to be Miss Cunegonde, the third that of seeing her every day, and the fourth that of hearing Master Pangloss, the greatest philosopher of the whole province, and consequently of the whole world.

    One day Cunegonde, while walking near the castle, in a little wood which they called a park, saw between the bushes, Dr. Pangloss giving a lesson in experimental natural philosophy to her mother's chamber-maid, a little brown wench, very pretty and very docile. As Miss Cunegonde had a great disposition for the sciences, she breathlessly observed the repeated experiments of which she was a witness; she clearly perceived the force of the Doctor's reasons, the effects, and the causes; she turned back greatly flurried, quite pensive, and filled with the desire to be learned; dreaming that she might well be a sufficient reason for young Candide, and he for her.
     

    Replies: @Ozymandias

    Makes you wonder about the Excel formulae used (my guess) in the results analysis.

    Excel? Pretty sure they used ‘Dominion’ software.

  36. @Some Guy
    @Steve Sailer

    Cases of people who got Covid despite taking the vaccine? Wouldn't an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it? Or 300 people? I don't know.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @FPD72

    Wouldn’t an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it?

    An efficacy of 90% means that those who received the vaccine caught Covid-19 at 10% of the rate of the unvaccinated control group.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Thanks: Some Guy
    • Replies: @Sean
    @FPD72

    They have not done any trials on seropositive (already had it) or old people yet, and that a vaccine may be efficacious at stopping the inoculated person getting ill with Covid-19 does not necessarily mean they are not infected and shedding viral particles. The crucial questions are still to be answered, though it is looking good and there are so many being worked on the odds of success--in a combination of them perhaps--seem really quite high now.

    Replies: @FPD72

  37. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SFG


    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.
     
    Only small and midsize Deplorable businessmen.

    Bezos is loving this and laughing all the way to the bank.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anon

    Gold box, this is the explanation, this is why our societal theme is now the Twilight Zone episode where no one dares upset the little boy with telekinesis: the same monopolists who already loved diversity nonsense and environment nonsense want our entire culture and goverbment to be nonsense. Maximum freedom of movememt for them.

  38. @PiltdownMan



    Russia says data on Sputnik Covid vaccine shows 95% efficacy

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/24/russia-says-data-on-sputnik-covid-vaccine-shows-95-efficacy


     

    https://twitter.com/sputnikvaccine/status/1330869140358377472?s=20


     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @415 reasons, @Steve Sailer

    It wouldn’t be the Guardian without a dig at Russia, Hungary and a couple of Soros quotes.

    The Guardian used to love love love the old Soviet Union.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Gott

    @ozymandias – if they used Dominion software they could have any result they want!

  39. @AndrewR
    This is bizarre on so many levels. I'm surprised they went public with this. It destroys confidence in AzztraZeneca and the vaccine.

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy, @Peter D. Bredon

    The Brits will get the jab no matter what. Wrong thinkers will be the only ones who question Astra Zenaca. In a way the will out themselves for easy detection. Kinda makes one wonder if the report went public for such a nefarious reason.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Old and Grumpy

    "The Brits will get the jab no matter what."

    Reactions here seem split into "I can't wait!" and "After you, mate!".

    A fair few people are cautious about a jab that's so new. I wonder if countries (or airlines) will start to insist on the jab before you can fly/visit?

  40. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.

    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. Someday we will all be saying “Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren’t all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!” or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be “the science”.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • LOL: Dan Hayes, Liza
    • Replies: @utu
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. - For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don't launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWa6e3WhZ4

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    , @Liza
    @Mr. Anon

    Like socialism. If a little bit doesn't have the desired positive effect, why, you just add more. The promised result - Utopia - still isn't showing up? Don't worry - you'll be the lucky recipients of the full-bore, double-barreled, 4-star version right quick.

    As to corona prevention, they'll go much farther than chicken suits and daily soap water enemas, believe me. The Folks Who Run Things are fanatics.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mr. Anon

    I ran out of "responses", and I needed some sort of combination anyway. A negative response from utu tells me right away you've got a winner of a comment.

    Good one, Mr. Anon! This needs to be ctrl-c'd and ctrl-v'd elsewhere. I'm on it.

    , @J.Ross
    @Mr. Anon

    Hey. Hey. Hey. Gotta flatten the curve, these are the critical three weeks. All criticism should be saved until after the critical three weeks. If the next three weeks reveal themselves to be the critical three weeks too then that's just more curve to flatten.

    , @HA
    @Mr. Anon

    "Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again."

    That's your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don't save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays. Clearly, speed limits and drunk-driving restrictions should also be removed forthwith. And yes, Wuhan-flu is peaking again despite the many truthers who assured us it would up and disappear the moment that Biden was elected. Viruses seem to have little regard half-witted conspiracy theories, more's the pity.

    It's worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don't work. They've since done a U-turn.

    And we now have increasing evidence even in the US that masks, while no panacea (so that sending kids back to school, and congregating for the holidays will indeed cause a surge in the virus), do reduce both transmission, and severity of the disease.


    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state's population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn't require masks continued to see their cases increase.
     

    I added the bit in brackets to make it more relevant, but I think it nonetheless gets the point across.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Adam Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61Ui9Et3DDL._AC_UL1500_.jpg

    https://www.healthline.com/health/soap-suds-enema

    "Two weeks to flatten the curve!" turned into "We all must wear face diapers, everywhere, forever!"

  41. @FPD72
    @Some Guy


    Wouldn’t an efficacy of 90% imply that 10% still got it?
     
    An efficacy of 90% means that those who received the vaccine caught Covid-19 at 10% of the rate of the unvaccinated control group.

    Replies: @Sean

    They have not done any trials on seropositive (already had it) or old people yet, and that a vaccine may be efficacious at stopping the inoculated person getting ill with Covid-19 does not necessarily mean they are not infected and shedding viral particles. The crucial questions are still to be answered, though it is looking good and there are so many being worked on the odds of success–in a combination of them perhaps–seem really quite high now.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Sean

    If by “they” you mean all of the vaccine trials for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, my wife and I both participated in the Pfizer trial and we are 70 years old. By the reaction we had to the second injection we suspected we got the vaccine but we confirmed it at an independent lab three weeks later; we both tested positive for the antibodies.

    Replies: @Sean, @Sean

  42. Anon[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SFG


    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.
     
    Only small and midsize Deplorable businessmen.

    Bezos is loving this and laughing all the way to the bank.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anon

    Exactly. I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. Now I buy meds, lightbulbs, new-dangled mops, spare parts, school supplies and they come to me. Great reset, thankfully I’m spared the drones.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anon


    " I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. "
     
    You can almost always beat the Amazon price, Ebay and often the manufacturers website is cheaper. And you can often bypass Ebay too and go direct to the seller.

    Given that Amazon and Ebay always take their cut, it's always cheaper elsewhere if you look. I use Amazon as a "top price" marker.

    Example - a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.


    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.

    Replies: @clyde

  43. Has anyone yet seen a definition of “effective” or “efficacy”?

    Were the unvaccinated subjected to the same tests and same number of HCR cycles as the impaled?

    Says who?

    Were any non-criminal organizations involved in the procedures?

    Were any of the tests more reliable than the tests recently thrown out by Portuguese courts as having 97% error rates?

    Anybody spot the error in this piece?
    https://nypost.com/2020/07/31/seasonal-flu-reports-hit-record-lows-amid-global-social-distancing/

    Global social distancing rules targeting coronavirus have pushed influenza infection rates to a record low, early figures show, signaling that the measures are having an unprecedented impact on other communicable diseases.

    Bueller?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Bill Jones


    Were the unvaccinated subjected to the same tests and same number of HCR cycles as the impaled?
     
    Drug trials are conducted on a "double blind" basis - neither the trial participant nor his doctor knows whether he has gotten the real medication or the placebo. So those in the field would have no way of biasing the results in this way, which is why the trial is double blind to begin with.

    Your objection are all just a bunch of hand waving and stupid questions. It is possible to have serious objections to the drug trials but yours aren't.
    , @epebble
    @Bill Jones


    Global social distancing rules targeting coronavirus have pushed influenza infection rates to a record low, early figures show, signaling that the measures are having an unprecedented impact on other communicable diseases.
     
    I am guessing most infectious diseases will afflict fewer number of people in 2020 than previous years. It may even end up causing fewer overall deaths from infectious diseases (worldwide, from Tuberculosis, influenza, measles, etc.,) when looking back from a few years later. Imagine that: Covid-19 was really good in lowering the number of infectious disease fatalities in 2020.
  44. @Jonathan Mason
    The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn't work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don't yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don't expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called "third world" countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D, @Charon, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Achmed E. Newman

    Americans in general are kind of fixated in the past and assume that America is the most advanced country. They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where people shit in the street and food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around and not in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    What they are not taking into account is that the world has not stood still – other countries have advanced while the US has gone sideways or even deteriorated. In 1950 80% of world automobile production was in the US. Currently it is 12%. If you stand on a subway platform in NY, some crazy homeless person might shove you onto the tracks, but this would never happen to you in Shanghai, not just because they keep the criminally insane locked up but because modern subway systems have platform doors that make this impossible. The NY subway will get platform doors in approximately never. We are like late Rome – we just don’t have the resources or skills to implement large scale projects like that at a cost that we could afford. I don’t know what it will take for Americans to change their mental image of themselves as #1.

    The first step in fixing any problem is acknowledging that you have a problem and Americans are in denial as to how far the US has fallen in the world and what a disorganized place we have become. Trump, in the end, did very little to fix this (maybe it was beyond the capability of anyone) and Biden will only make things worse. Part of the reason why Shanghai and Santo Domingo look a lot better than they used to (and the Bronx looks a lot worse) is because tons of US dollars have flowed into those places, either as a result of their exporting both people (who send remittances back home) and goods to the US. This has all been pretty much a one-way street.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D

    " They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where... food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around "

    Isn't that the Wuhan Wet Market? Such things can coexist with high speed trains, nuclear missiles and jet fighters, just as imprisoning, parading and killing a small and inoffensive wild bird coexisted with dreadnoughts, the Maxim gun and the most extensive (and shortest lived) empire in world history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wren_Day

    On the same topic, "bush meat" from Africa is being sold in three different markets in the EU capital.

    "Import the Third World, become the Third World".

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2259906-the-meat-of-protected-african-animals-is-being-sold-in-belgium/

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D

    Good comment Jack.

    Couple thoughts:

    1) First a caveat. Most of the places i've been in the 3rd world (including the DR), most people are not getting their groceries


    in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.
     
    They get them--i get them--in much smaller, not particularly modern shops. And yeah, also often from farmers/vendors selling directly on the street.

    2) Minoritarianism is expensive!
    The US could lead the world with the productivity of it's white population carraying along a 10% black population. When i was a kid we were still--at the tail end--of building the world's greatest infrastructure. Obviously, "the world" was going to catch up--they need/want highways, bridges, tunnels, skyscrapers, aqueducts, airports too.

    But the other thing issue is once you bring in minoritarianism and the busybodying super-state is running around looking over everyone's shoulder and trying to remedy every "wrong" it is both super-expensive, sucking up and redirecting state resources from productive capital investments and also hampers productive activity--now like swimming in jello.


    The classic AnotherDadism that gets at this: "Diversity is the Health of the State"

    With the corollaries:
    -- "Diversity is the illness of the productive sector."
    -- "There's less money left over for the state to do it's normal/useful jobs."
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Yes, you are right, but to be fair, the majority of people here (Ecuador) do buy most of their food in traditional markets, for example, I have been in the fish market in the local town of La Libertad where there are 50 numbered booths where fishermen sell their fish, and the spacing between the booths is not even 2 meters. But at least they are wearing masks and using hand sanitizer.

    The difference here is that supermarkets are the more expensive option, regarded as a kind of convenience store where you have everything in one place in air-conditioned, electrically lit, serendipity, chilled, frozen, freshly-baked, or whatever, but you pay for the convenience of having orange juice ready squeezed and bottled for you, versus just buying the fruit in bulk in the market for perhaps a third of the price and extracting the juice yourself.

    This makes one realize how badly most Americans are ripped off by supermarkets, which are probably perceived as a cheaper and more convenient option than farmer's or fisherman's markets, which are not so cheap in the US.

    I think the majority of people here in Ecuador would feel rather sorry for Americans having little access to food purchases other than in supermarkets.

    On the other hand, Americans will laugh at the Ecuadorians' lack of business savvy. When I get a bottle of purified drinking water with my $2.50 lunch for 30 cents at a restaurant on a terrace overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the Ecuadorian restaurateurs do not seem to know that they should be charging $3.99 as customers should pay extra for the ocean view and breeze. (Ecuador is on the US dollar.)

    They clearly need business school missionaries to come down and show them the correct way to prosperity.

    So, it may come that in the fullness of time, the rest of the world will take its lesson from those brave Americans who have decided that the best way to defeat Covid-19 is to totally ignore all infection control precautions, and decide that is the way to go, but I would not count on it just yet.

    Incidentally, although some have said there that Covid-19 is simply a hoax invented to get rid of President Trump, a number of government leaders in the region have been reelected this year in spite of tourist economies being absolutely devastated by Covid-19 precautions and quarantines.

    For example, Holness in Jamaica was recently reelected with a massively increased majority, so it can be done, but if you are going to get enogh people to follow you, you need to get their trust and show leadership.

    Even sheep need other sheep with leadership qualities.

  45. @Redneck farmer
    Maybe we're going to find out someone transposed numbers?

    Replies: @Charon, @fish, @Known Fact

    Isn’t anyone worried about the disparate impact? Won’t someone please think of the disparate impact?

  46. @theMann
    Maybe we disagree on the meaning of the word “serendipity “

    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.

    But then the corporation developing the vaccine gets paid regardless, can’t be sued for damages, and is agitating for forced vaccinations.

    Yea, serendipity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Alice

    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.

    Well they didn’t think anyone would be paying attention. Meanwhile you are a wordsmith who can’t spell yeah?

    • Replies: @theMann
    @Charon

    Spell, yes. Type, not so much.

    Not to mention every word I type is governed by my two cats battling furiously for the coveted position of lying between the monitor and the keyboard.

  47. https://www.inquirer.com/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-vaccine-trust-latino-black-communities-20201124.html

    If you are black or hispanic and have worries about the vaccine, that’s a “trust gap”. But if you are white, you are an anti-vaxxer loon.

    • Thanks: BenKenobi
  48. @Jonathan Mason
    The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn't work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don't yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don't expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called "third world" countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D, @Charon, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Most of our doses will be sent to Africa because racism, or dispensed to Africans in America because racism, and around 10% of those recipients will be organized and disciplined enough ever to return for their second dose.

    The uberclass in America will get special vaccines once it’s clear which versions are safest.

  49. @PennTothal
    One possible explanation for the lower dose seeming to be paradoxically "more effective.:"

    It may be that is this trial (as was true int the Pfizer and Moderna trials) they did not test everyone in the trial for COVID as an endpoint.

    Rather, they only tested subjects who complained of "appropriate symptoms" for COVID. Then the COVID-positive endpoint for the vaccine group and the placebo group was determined from that small subset of total subject population. The actual difference in total COVID-positivity rates between the placebo and vaccine groups is unknown. Since many COVID-positives are not symptomatic, the majority of COVID-positives in both the vaccine and control groups may have gone undetected by the trial.

    Since subjects who got the lower vaccine dose may have had fewer symptoms to complain about (body aches, transient temperatures, etc.) it may be that fewer of them got tested, therefore fewer COVID-positives in that group = "more efficacy" in the low-dose group.

    This is just one example of the problems arising from testing vaccine efficacy for a virus that has such a high incidence of asymptomatic cases.

    Replies: @Jack D, @By-tor

    I understand that those vaccinated with the lower dose may have had few symptoms (and therefore less testing) than the placebo group but why would they have fewer symptoms than the full initial dose group?

    It is understood that in live cold virus based vaccines there is an issue that your immune system may kill the vaccine before it can deliver its payload if you already have immunity to it due to prior exposure (mRNA vaccines don’t have this problem). Therefore, they have to use an adenovirus that is not already circulating in the wild, either a monkey virus or a human virus that has been modified to disguise itself. Even if the virus is novel, by the time you get the 2nd dose you might have an immune response to it. The Russian vaccine takes this into account by using different virus carriers in dose #1 and dose #2 but the Oxford Astra vaccine does not. A possible hypothesis is that by provoking a larger immune response in dose #1, dose #2 is make less effective.

  50. @Redneck farmer
    Maybe we're going to find out someone transposed numbers?

    Replies: @Charon, @fish, @Known Fact

    So 09 or 9% effective?

    I like those odds!

  51. @Bill Jones
    Has anyone yet seen a definition of "effective" or "efficacy"?

    Were the unvaccinated subjected to the same tests and same number of HCR cycles as the impaled?

    Says who?

    Were any non-criminal organizations involved in the procedures?

    Were any of the tests more reliable than the tests recently thrown out by Portuguese courts as having 97% error rates?

    Anybody spot the error in this piece?
    https://nypost.com/2020/07/31/seasonal-flu-reports-hit-record-lows-amid-global-social-distancing/

    Global social distancing rules targeting coronavirus have pushed influenza infection rates to a record low, early figures show, signaling that the measures are having an unprecedented impact on other communicable diseases.

    Bueller?

    Replies: @Jack D, @epebble

    Were the unvaccinated subjected to the same tests and same number of HCR cycles as the impaled?

    Drug trials are conducted on a “double blind” basis – neither the trial participant nor his doctor knows whether he has gotten the real medication or the placebo. So those in the field would have no way of biasing the results in this way, which is why the trial is double blind to begin with.

    Your objection are all just a bunch of hand waving and stupid questions. It is possible to have serious objections to the drug trials but yours aren’t.

  52. @Tyrade
    was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @JimB

    was there a Dr Pangloss (sp?) in there?

    Funny thing about humor. If you examine it too closely it ceases to be funny. And if you pay real close attention, you will find misogyny, homophobia, transphobia and racism minutely diffused into every sentence you utter.

  53. @Sean
    @anon


    https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/the-drug-trial-bbc-examines-what-went-wrong-in-the-infamous-elephant-men-case_uk_

    More than 11 years ago, eight healthy young men took part in a clinical trial of an experimental leukaemia drug known as TGN1412. The drug, which manipulated the immune system, had been successfully tested on monkeys although never on humans. But what should have been a routine clinical trial at an independent clinic at north west London’s Northwick Park Hospital, soon spiralled into one of the most infamous medical emergencies in recent British history.


    It features candid personal testimony from doctors who struggled to bring the clinical catastrophe under control: “This was a mystery, we had no way of predicting how severe it was going to get. There was no rule book for how to deal with this.”Volunteer Rob Oldfield had signed up to the trial for a fee of £2,000, with no clue of the trauma that would follow.

    Ryan Wilson spent four months in hospital and had his toes and parts of his feet and fingers amputated after battling the symptoms of pneumonia, septicaemia and dry gangrene. In an interview with the Guardian in 2007, Wilson said he is still haunted by the words of his father, who told him the night before the trial: “Don’t do it. Your body is a temple.”

    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans. It is understood that some volunteers have received confidential compensation payments, but still suffer from weakened immune systems and other side effects, and will never know the true legacy of the drug which so nearly cost them their lives. Within an hour of receiving the drug, six of the volunteers had been rushed to intensive care where they were fighting for their lives. As a BBC Two drama documentary airing on Tuesday night recounts: “It was all manic, everything was happening all at once, they were vomiting, they were screaming in pain, people fainting.”

    This combination of symptoms known as a “cytokine storm” saw the men’s temperatures soar, their organs fail, and some of their bodies swell so severely that they became known in newspapers around the world as the ‘Elephant Men’.
     

    Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @YetAnotherAnon

    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans.

    Jeez, what does this sentence mean? “Properly considered?”

    Who writes this crap?

    Tried to link to article and got a 404.

    All drug trials first require a non-clinical safety evaluation and then a Phase 1 dosing regimen in humans to figure out the proper level. Did they skip those steps?

    Journalism. They all should be tarred and feathered.

  54. @Anon
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Exactly. I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. Now I buy meds, lightbulbs, new-dangled mops, spare parts, school supplies and they come to me. Great reset, thankfully I’m spared the drones.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    ” I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. “

    You can almost always beat the Amazon price, Ebay and often the manufacturers website is cheaper. And you can often bypass Ebay too and go direct to the seller.

    Given that Amazon and Ebay always take their cut, it’s always cheaper elsewhere if you look. I use Amazon as a “top price” marker.

    Example – a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.

    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @clyde
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Example – a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.
    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.
     
    Same here in the USA. Amazon is good for finding/approximating the item's price level. Then buy at ebay or the actual website. This is highly variable and best price can be found, might be found at any of the three once shipping is factored in.
    I shift in and out of Amazon Prime. I have some vitamins Zinc-Quercitin-D etc in my cart and will push the button on Black Friday.

    Bored semi-elderly white woken women are who is making Jeff Bezos more billions. They swipe right and buy their more useless more stuff, that if only it lead to salvation (after a while) or at least 72 hours worth of joy.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  55. @Jonathan Mason
    The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn't work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don't yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don't expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called "third world" countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D, @Charon, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Achmed E. Newman

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done?

    Maybe, but that’s a counterfactual that can never be proven.

    Recall, though, one of my top 10 least favorite people on the planet, the “expert” Dr. Anthony Fauci pontificating that it was going to take 18 to 24 months instead of the 9 or so it has actually taken.

    So here’s another counterfactual. Joe Biden was president, he genuflects to Fauci’s worrywarting, and here we sit, another 12 months of lockdown catastrophe.

  56. The kind of PR win you get from looking at the dose not as half-empty, but half-full

  57. 3000 isn’t really a large number in this case. If, as Sailer writes above, that it was 100 people in the entire trial who were clinically diagnosed with COVID-19, that number is divided between the placebo group, the full two-dose group, and the “half”-dosed group. The numbers would have, at a guess, divided respectively, 80-12-8

  58. From the article

    “The reason we had the half dose is serendipity,” said Mene Pangalos, executive vice-president of biopharmaceuticals research and development at AstraZeneca.

    When university researchers were distributing the vaccine at the end of April, around the start of Oxford and AstraZeneca’s partnership, they noticed expected side effects such as fatigue, headaches or arm aches were milder than expected.

    “So we went back and checked … and we found out that they had underpredicted the dose of the vaccine by half,” said Pangalos.

    What? “Underpredicted?” Is that even a word? Did this guy even use that word?

    And what, exactly, happened?

    Did AstraZeneca send full doses to the clinics and the clinic only administered half? If so, the clinicians need to be taken to the woodshed. The outfits that run these trials do this stuff all the time, so this would not only be an unusual error, but an egregious error, “serendipitous” or not.

    Or did AstraZeneca send half doses and labeled them as full? The EMA should fine them significant dollars if they made such a stupid unacceptable and silly mistake.

    Or was it something entirely different?

    In addition to being a Marxist rag, The Guardian is the poster child for shoddy journalism and stupid writing.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia


    Did AstraZeneca send full doses to the clinics
     
    Reread the text more closely, it matches what I've read elsewhere, Oxford, where the vaccine candidate was developed, made the screwup before AZ was fully on board.
  59. @Sean
    @anon


    https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/the-drug-trial-bbc-examines-what-went-wrong-in-the-infamous-elephant-men-case_uk_

    More than 11 years ago, eight healthy young men took part in a clinical trial of an experimental leukaemia drug known as TGN1412. The drug, which manipulated the immune system, had been successfully tested on monkeys although never on humans. But what should have been a routine clinical trial at an independent clinic at north west London’s Northwick Park Hospital, soon spiralled into one of the most infamous medical emergencies in recent British history.


    It features candid personal testimony from doctors who struggled to bring the clinical catastrophe under control: “This was a mystery, we had no way of predicting how severe it was going to get. There was no rule book for how to deal with this.”Volunteer Rob Oldfield had signed up to the trial for a fee of £2,000, with no clue of the trauma that would follow.

    Ryan Wilson spent four months in hospital and had his toes and parts of his feet and fingers amputated after battling the symptoms of pneumonia, septicaemia and dry gangrene. In an interview with the Guardian in 2007, Wilson said he is still haunted by the words of his father, who told him the night before the trial: “Don’t do it. Your body is a temple.”

    Parexel, the company that ran the clinic where the drug trial was carried out, was found to have not properly considered the safe dosage of the drug for humans. It is understood that some volunteers have received confidential compensation payments, but still suffer from weakened immune systems and other side effects, and will never know the true legacy of the drug which so nearly cost them their lives. Within an hour of receiving the drug, six of the volunteers had been rushed to intensive care where they were fighting for their lives. As a BBC Two drama documentary airing on Tuesday night recounts: “It was all manic, everything was happening all at once, they were vomiting, they were screaming in pain, people fainting.”

    This combination of symptoms known as a “cytokine storm” saw the men’s temperatures soar, their organs fail, and some of their bodies swell so severely that they became known in newspapers around the world as the ‘Elephant Men’.
     

    Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @YetAnotherAnon

    “Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer.”

    Parexel are an American company, started by a Swiss, who were running the trials on behalf of a German company.

    My layman’s suggestion is that perhaps radical new products should first be tested on a single human, not six at a time.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Christian Busch Retweeted
    Thiemo Fetzer
    @fetzert
    ·
    Nov 24
    Timely #ContactTracing does matter fighting #COVID19. In a new paper (Rightwards arrow https://bit.ly/394Ebuo) we study a bizarre #Excel error in England that caused 16k cases to NOT be contact traced. We econometrically can link this blunder to ~ 120k new cases & 1.5k deaths..
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  60. Anon[155] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Anyone think we’ve entered a new era of government? With Obama, the elites realized that what they wanted was a weak figurehead president so the elites could run wild controlling the government agencies to their own financial benefit with no oversight. The reason the elites liked–and backed–a dingleberry like Biden was because he was weak. They wanted a weak president who wouldn’t give them any oversight or trouble. They also want a compromised president because they can threaten him if he doesn’t obey. Biden is known to have taken Chinese bribes, and the elites love that. They can destroy him if he gets out of line.

    In a way, it’s like the transition the Japanese made from having an emperor who actually ran things to being a figurehead for government agencies that do what they want.

    We may be entering an era of a permanently weak president.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Anon

    OneFiveFive, the Japan of WWII was largely run by the military. The military was divide between army and navy and neither group cared for the other. According to Professor Saburo Ienaga, author of "The Pacific War, 1931-1945" " the Japanese Navy did not even inform the Army of the great losses suffered at Midway.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

    , @Keypusher
    @Anon

    Compared to Trump, Obama was about as powerful as Josef Stalin. The weakest president you will ever see is Trump.

    , @AndrewR
    @Anon

    You may know this, but it's worth nothing that the 天皇 (which is bizarrely translated into English as "emperor") was a figurehead for centuries until the Meiji restoration. The 80 years or so until they were conquered was very unusual for recent centuries.

  61. Anon[353] • Disclaimer says:

    Ars Technica on the half-dose mystery:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/11/astrazenecas-covid-19-vaccine-shows-success-heres-how-it-stacks-up-to-others/

    AstraZeneca’s better result with the regimen starting with a half dose has already led to head scratching among experts. [It may be BS for various reasons, but] if that finding does hold up, some experts have already begun speculating as to why.

    Several think it may be down to the adenovirus packaging. Though the vaccine is aimed at spurring immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein carried by the adenovirus, some immune responses will inevitably attack the adenovirus itself. If the two-dose regimen starts out high, it may tip the immunity scales toward a stronger anti-adenovirus response rather than an anti-spike response when the booster shot is delivered. This is speculative, though, and understanding what’s actually happening will require far more data.

    On a positive note, needing less vaccine in the first dose—if that really does end up being the case—means more people can be vaccinated with the same amount of vaccine manufacturing capacity.

    • Thanks: vhrm
  62. @AndrewR
    This is bizarre on so many levels. I'm surprised they went public with this. It destroys confidence in AzztraZeneca and the vaccine.

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy, @Peter D. Bredon

    “I’m surprised they went public with this. It destroys confidence in AzztraZeneca and the vaccine.”

    Why? Because people are rational? Because they are smart?

    If there is one thing we smart, rational people know for sure, it’s that it doesn’t matter what you “tell” the people; all they hear is “derp derp derp do this.”

    Of course they went public with it. They are just trolling us now.

  63. @Redneck farmer
    Maybe we're going to find out someone transposed numbers?

    Replies: @Charon, @fish, @Known Fact

    … Or misplaced one of those pesky decimal points

  64. @Sean
    @FPD72

    They have not done any trials on seropositive (already had it) or old people yet, and that a vaccine may be efficacious at stopping the inoculated person getting ill with Covid-19 does not necessarily mean they are not infected and shedding viral particles. The crucial questions are still to be answered, though it is looking good and there are so many being worked on the odds of success--in a combination of them perhaps--seem really quite high now.

    Replies: @FPD72

    If by “they” you mean all of the vaccine trials for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, my wife and I both participated in the Pfizer trial and we are 70 years old. By the reaction we had to the second injection we suspected we got the vaccine but we confirmed it at an independent lab three weeks later; we both tested positive for the antibodies.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @FPD72

    I'm betting you are untypically healthy seventy year olds and not overweight. Most people that age are already dealing with at least one chronic health condition.

    Replies: @FPD72

    , @Sean
    @FPD72

    The Oxford vaccine for COVID-19 was tested in Britain and Brazil. There has been no testing of it on anyone over 55 in Britain so no hospitalised or severe cases in anyone who received the Oxford vaccine is not terribly surprising.

    In Brazil it was 62 % effective. Scientists are aghast at the way the British and Brazilian testing (not the same placebo) has been combined for one 'split the different' figure.


    I expect the UK will use the Oxford one for window dressing, but huge orders for the Pfizer vaccine have already been placed by Britain

  65. @Bill Jones
    Has anyone yet seen a definition of "effective" or "efficacy"?

    Were the unvaccinated subjected to the same tests and same number of HCR cycles as the impaled?

    Says who?

    Were any non-criminal organizations involved in the procedures?

    Were any of the tests more reliable than the tests recently thrown out by Portuguese courts as having 97% error rates?

    Anybody spot the error in this piece?
    https://nypost.com/2020/07/31/seasonal-flu-reports-hit-record-lows-amid-global-social-distancing/

    Global social distancing rules targeting coronavirus have pushed influenza infection rates to a record low, early figures show, signaling that the measures are having an unprecedented impact on other communicable diseases.

    Bueller?

    Replies: @Jack D, @epebble

    Global social distancing rules targeting coronavirus have pushed influenza infection rates to a record low, early figures show, signaling that the measures are having an unprecedented impact on other communicable diseases.

    I am guessing most infectious diseases will afflict fewer number of people in 2020 than previous years. It may even end up causing fewer overall deaths from infectious diseases (worldwide, from Tuberculosis, influenza, measles, etc.,) when looking back from a few years later. Imagine that: Covid-19 was really good in lowering the number of infectious disease fatalities in 2020.

  66. Anon[353] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out because of chronic intense pain (and then she came down with adoption fever). She had a disease called endometriosis that is apparently real, but the issue of its associated pain is controversial. Doctors (more than a third of whom are female) often say the pain is in the woman’s head, while feminists say that the medical profession suffers from institutional patriarchical misogyny and wants women to suffer.

    Googling around on this I found a pre-internet dissertation from 1979 [sic], written by a woman, that weirdly seems to connect this psychogenic pain version of endometriosis with today’s rapid onset gender dysphoria. From the conclusion to the dissertation:

    Personality Correlates of Endometriosis
    Mary Lou Collins
    Western Michigan University
    https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3677&context=dissertations

    At the onset of menstrual life at about the age of 12 years, the endometriotic woman views herself negatively because she is female and wishes somehow she could change her sex. The duration of this unfavorable sexual identity persists into adulthood and mani­fests itself in painful sexual intercourse and continued menstrual difficulties such as dysmenorrhea and hypermenorrhea. She has feelings of being limited and pressed by social and vocational aspects of her life space, is over­ sensitive, and experiences pervasive and generalized resent­ment and hostility (MMPI Scale 6). She expresses this hostility in an indirect fashion towards men. For example, she may avoid sexual intercourse because of the pain associated with the act. Her complaints may also induce feelings of guilt in her mate following intercourse. Concurrent dysmenorrhea may also serve as an expression of aggressiveness against the male, as a method of self­ punishment, and as a manifestation of her rejection of the feminine role (Menninger, 1939).

    In fairness the dissertation ascribes other characteristics to the “endometriotic woman” that don’t seem to apply to ROGD. And I can see how feminists get pissed off, because this all reads like Freudian “hysteria.” But maybe there is a grain of truth in “hysteria.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon

    Do you know and interact with any women? Or are women extraterrestrial?

    Endometriosis makes getting pregnant difficult. Surgery fixes that. Menstrual pain varies with the condition, but can happen.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/endometriosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20354656

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out...
     
    https://christinthecity.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/thanks-be-to-god-web.jpg

    Boy, 5, Is Allegedly Beaten to Death by Mom's Boyfriend While She Was in Hospital Giving Birth

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon

    No human body--much less the human reproductive system--is perfect. There are always going to be failures. That said, endometriosis should be strongly selected against. (But then homosexuality should be even more strongly selected against, yet it exists.)

    One thing i'm pretty confident is involved:

    We are in a massive experiment of women delaying and reducing their fertility. Back in the day a typical peasant girl might not have enough fat to reach menarche until she was maybe 14, 15, 16 or more, and then would marry are start having children in her early twenties.

    Now with abundant calories a typical American girl has menarche at around 12--many earlier. But then--if college educated--probably does not have child for 15 to 20 or more years, and few have more than 2. We have tens of millions of young women, well--overly well!--fed, their bodies primed for child bearing who year, after year, after year have empty wombs.

    Any surprise that there are issues?

    ~~

    We--Western Civilization--are undergoing selection against the anti-natal types, which we really, really need to go faster.

    But the problem is these anti-natal types are voting and "refugees welcome!"ing in the destruction of the West before we can get rid of them.

  67. Dear Sir, kindly read up on Bradford Hill criteria for deciding if a study makes sense. If there is no dose – response effect, as in this example, where 2 doses are worse than 1.5, we are leaving the realms of biology and entering the realms of hormesis and mithridatism.

    OT, Mr. Sailer, please consider uploading the previous incarnations of your blog here. It’s so amusing to read about, say, Andrew Sullivan from the times where people actually cared about him.

  68. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    But how many cases were there?

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Anonymous

    I estimate that 2 people in the half dose arm got covid, 30 in the full dose, and 99 in the placebo arm.

    The press release says that there were 23k people in the study, 12390 in Britain, 10300 in Brazil. And that 2741 got half dose, 8895 full dose, leaving 11054 in the placebo.
    Then
    99/11054=0.0090 in placebo
    30/8895=0.0034, 62% reduced
      2/2741 =0.0007 more than 90% reduced
    also, 32/11636=0.0028, about 70% reduced

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Anonymous

    Yes, but were they all uniformly exposed to the virus?

  69. anon[121] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    I don't disagree about lying, power-hungry head cases, but remember that the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @anon, @MBlanc46

    the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Businesses deemed to be critical are already open. Gasoline stations, convenience stores, big box stores such as WalMart / Target / Best Buy are all open. Cell phone stores are open. Fast food franchieses are open, just only for drive up. Etc.

    Plenty of businesses are open. Just not the small ones, the family owned ones.
    Probably a mere coincidence.

  70. Drug trials are conducted on a “double blind” basis – neither the trial participant nor his doctor knows whether he has gotten the real medication or the placebo. So those in the field would have no way of biasing the results in this way, which is why the trial is double blind to begin with.

    Generic drivel demonstrates your total ignorance of what was actually done in this instance,

    Or any other.

  71. Meanwhile, important things, like complete Reality Disconnect.

    Dow Jones breaks 30,000 milestone for first time as stocks soar amid vaccine hopes and formal start of Biden transition

    and also

    Caitlin Johnstone: Right calls Biden a puppet of Xi as he packs his cabinet with China hawks

    – Biden’s expected Defense Secretary Michele Flournoy opined this past June that the US military needs a new arms race to obtain “the capability to credibly threaten to sink all of China’s military vessels, submarines, and merchant ships in the South China Sea within 72 hours.”

    – Biden’s choice for Secretary of State Tony Blinken plans on undermining Beijing’s Belt and Road Initiative, reportedly wants to “tame” and “try to coalesce skeptical international partners into a new competition with” China, and said that the Biden administration will “fully enforce” the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, “including sanctions on officials, financial institutions, companies and individuals.” Earlier this month The Economist reported that Republicans that are hawkish on China would be happy with a Secretary of State nomination for Blinken.

    – Biden’s choice for National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan was described by Forbes this past June as a “Peter Navarro-like China hawk” who believes that Beijing is “gearing up to contest America’s global leadership” and that those signs are “unmistakable, and they are ubiquitous.”

    A festering turkey doesn’t pick wars at its whim. This will end in amazing amounts of tears.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @El Dato


    This will end in amazing amounts of tears.
     
    Just call him Bawlin' Biden, the Crier in Chief:
    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    It's going to be a long four years.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  72. It’s all for the best in this best of all possible worlds, reported Dr. Pangalos

    One doesn’t come across a lot of Voltaire humor in the 21st century.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    Thanks.

  73. I must say that this blog has been excellent concerning information on vaccines & the pros and cons of research & outcomes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @northeast

    Thanks.

  74. “Oxford Covid vaccine hit 90% success rate thanks to dosing error

    Participants given first shot at half strength by mistake were found to be better protected”

    Why not keep halving doses and see if it still works. If you do that enough times you will have proven homeopathy works against covid.

    • Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    @George

    beat me to it

  75. the original vaccine developments 100 to 200 years ago had similar results.

    some guys thought maybe cleaning all the lab equipment to clean room levels of sterility would make the vaccines work better and eliminate any contamination, but they were surprised to find that vaccines worked WORSE the cleaner the lab equipment got.

    later on it was discovered that things had to be slightly ‘dirty’ to provoke the best immune system response from vaccines.

    over the years various things have been removed from vaccines, most recently all the thimerosal, which happened about 25 years ago? the idea was there couldn’t even be trace amounts of mercury. long term study of this issue finds that thimerosal probably was having no effect on kids.

    one of the current battlegrounds is aluminum molecules in vaccines, and whether they can get thru the blood brain barrier, and not be eliminated normally by the body.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @prime noticer

    The aluminum thing is dumb. Aluminum is like the 2nd most common element in the earth's crust (as an oxide and you can't reduce it by simple methods like iron so the metal was unknown until modern times) and is absorbed by plants and contained in fruits and veg. We also consume it in antacids and deodorants. Whatever tiny amount of alu. that is in vaccine is nothing compared to the amount of alu. that you already consume. Anti-vaxxers will never run out of objections - if you remove mercury then it's alu, if you remove the alu. then they will find something else to object to.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @prime noticer

  76. @AKAHorace
    I wonder what happened to whoever screwed this up ? Do you fire them for error or promote them for developing a better dosage ?

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Charon

    It could have been someone like that negro slave in Caswell County, North Carolina who accidentally discovered flue cured tobacco for his master.

    https://ncccha.blogspot.com/2010/01/bright-leaf-tobacco-process.html

  77. Yes, he is Dr. Pangalos.

  78. Dans ce meilleur des mondes possibles, tout est au mieux.
    (In this best of all possible worlds, everything is for the best.)
    — Pangloss

    Si c’est ici le meilleur des mondes possibles, que sont donc les autres?
    (If this is the best of all possible worlds, what are the others?)
    — Candide

    @iSteve, you should start feeling your inner-Candide with all this “good” news.

  79. @prime noticer
    the original vaccine developments 100 to 200 years ago had similar results.

    some guys thought maybe cleaning all the lab equipment to clean room levels of sterility would make the vaccines work better and eliminate any contamination, but they were surprised to find that vaccines worked WORSE the cleaner the lab equipment got.

    later on it was discovered that things had to be slightly 'dirty' to provoke the best immune system response from vaccines.

    over the years various things have been removed from vaccines, most recently all the thimerosal, which happened about 25 years ago? the idea was there couldn't even be trace amounts of mercury. long term study of this issue finds that thimerosal probably was having no effect on kids.

    one of the current battlegrounds is aluminum molecules in vaccines, and whether they can get thru the blood brain barrier, and not be eliminated normally by the body.

    Replies: @Jack D

    The aluminum thing is dumb. Aluminum is like the 2nd most common element in the earth’s crust (as an oxide and you can’t reduce it by simple methods like iron so the metal was unknown until modern times) and is absorbed by plants and contained in fruits and veg. We also consume it in antacids and deodorants. Whatever tiny amount of alu. that is in vaccine is nothing compared to the amount of alu. that you already consume. Anti-vaxxers will never run out of objections – if you remove mercury then it’s alu, if you remove the alu. then they will find something else to object to.

    • Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Jack D

    The anti-vaxxers subscribe to their own unique subset of magical thinking.

    Namely, injecting yourself with stuff other than your stuff is somehow "unnatural" and fraught with danger.

    Pennicilin is about as foreign a substance one can get, but a lot of people lived because they stuck that needle in. Meanwhile, the anti-vaxxers were asleep in the history classes that addressed smallpox and polio.

    The anti-vaxxers are a strange soup of political beliefs. You've got the corrupt low IQ Hollywooders like Jenny McCarthy, along with brain dead leftoids and ex Flower Children, and the more idiotically rightist and off the grid types. It's a bizarre amalgam.

    I recall reading a piece a while ago, when whooping cough cases were spiking among school children in places like Santa Monica and Malibu. Some public health expert was asked how you can track the families that likely did not have their kids vaccinated.

    Easy, he said. Just draw a 3 mile radius with a Whole Foods at the center, and you'll find plenty of families living within that circle who've opted their kids out. The interviewer was skeptical. The response from this guy?

    "I am not kidding."

    , @prime noticer
    @Jack D

    i'm aware of some of that. aluminum is like the number 4 most common thing in soil, and most living things evolved millions of years ago to deal with it biologically. humans collect it into the kidneys then urinate it out or something along those lines.

    i mention the super clean version of vaccines 100 years ago as being wrong, because it's the adjuvant, or the thing in vaccines that triggers the immune system, that seems to have to be there to make vaccines highly effective.

    the argument here is that aluminum molecules are used for the adjuvant in about half of current vaccines, and that instead of that aluminum all getting collected, some of it gets into the brain. possibly by the immune system picking it up and traveling with it across the blood brain barrier, where it interacts with neurons in a fashion similar to other metals.

    i'm only reporting things i've read. i'm agnostic on the process here. there is some real work from UCLA professors on autoimmune reactions involved here. but there's no great explanation about which immune system element, like phagocytes, would be carrying aluminum to the brain. or whether the 2 versions of aluminum used as adjuvents are even dangerous in this putative scenario.

  80. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I estimate that 2 people in the half dose arm got covid, 30 in the full dose, and 99 in the placebo arm.

    The press release says that there were 23k people in the study, 12390 in Britain, 10300 in Brazil. And that 2741 got half dose, 8895 full dose, leaving 11054 in the placebo.
    Then
    99/11054=0.0090 in placebo
    30/8895=0.0034, 62% reduced
      2/2741 =0.0007 more than 90% reduced
    also, 32/11636=0.0028, about 70% reduced

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Yes, but were they all uniformly exposed to the virus?

  81. @northeast
    I must say that this blog has been excellent concerning information on vaccines & the pros and cons of research & outcomes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  82. @Servant of Gla'aki

    It’s all for the best in this best of all possible worlds, reported Dr. Pangalos
     
    One doesn't come across a lot of Voltaire humor in the 21st century.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  83. Just letting off steam. My 103 year old mother was going to join us for Thanksgiving. We divided the family so Mom would be at my house and some family would be at my daughter’s house. Seven per household. Mom was excited because she would meet her newest eight month old great grand daughter. Today coumo the cocksucker announced that I would need to get Mom tested within 24 hours before she could return to her assisted living facility and then still go back into 14 day quarantine. She would need to be tested three times while in quarantine. Where would I get Mom tested on Thursday ? I hate that POS. Mom took it well…”Life isn’t always what you want it to be, Joey.” cuomo said he had to tell his kids they couldn’t be with grandma. I wish cuomo was with his father.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe

    103 is amazing man. You've got some longevity genes in your bloodline.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  84. @Jack D
    @prime noticer

    The aluminum thing is dumb. Aluminum is like the 2nd most common element in the earth's crust (as an oxide and you can't reduce it by simple methods like iron so the metal was unknown until modern times) and is absorbed by plants and contained in fruits and veg. We also consume it in antacids and deodorants. Whatever tiny amount of alu. that is in vaccine is nothing compared to the amount of alu. that you already consume. Anti-vaxxers will never run out of objections - if you remove mercury then it's alu, if you remove the alu. then they will find something else to object to.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @prime noticer

    The anti-vaxxers subscribe to their own unique subset of magical thinking.

    Namely, injecting yourself with stuff other than your stuff is somehow “unnatural” and fraught with danger.

    Pennicilin is about as foreign a substance one can get, but a lot of people lived because they stuck that needle in. Meanwhile, the anti-vaxxers were asleep in the history classes that addressed smallpox and polio.

    The anti-vaxxers are a strange soup of political beliefs. You’ve got the corrupt low IQ Hollywooders like Jenny McCarthy, along with brain dead leftoids and ex Flower Children, and the more idiotically rightist and off the grid types. It’s a bizarre amalgam.

    I recall reading a piece a while ago, when whooping cough cases were spiking among school children in places like Santa Monica and Malibu. Some public health expert was asked how you can track the families that likely did not have their kids vaccinated.

    Easy, he said. Just draw a 3 mile radius with a Whole Foods at the center, and you’ll find plenty of families living within that circle who’ve opted their kids out. The interviewer was skeptical. The response from this guy?

    “I am not kidding.”

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  85. @George
    "Oxford Covid vaccine hit 90% success rate thanks to dosing error

    Participants given first shot at half strength by mistake were found to be better protected"

    Why not keep halving doses and see if it still works. If you do that enough times you will have proven homeopathy works against covid.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    beat me to it

  86. @Jack D
    @prime noticer

    The aluminum thing is dumb. Aluminum is like the 2nd most common element in the earth's crust (as an oxide and you can't reduce it by simple methods like iron so the metal was unknown until modern times) and is absorbed by plants and contained in fruits and veg. We also consume it in antacids and deodorants. Whatever tiny amount of alu. that is in vaccine is nothing compared to the amount of alu. that you already consume. Anti-vaxxers will never run out of objections - if you remove mercury then it's alu, if you remove the alu. then they will find something else to object to.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @prime noticer

    i’m aware of some of that. aluminum is like the number 4 most common thing in soil, and most living things evolved millions of years ago to deal with it biologically. humans collect it into the kidneys then urinate it out or something along those lines.

    i mention the super clean version of vaccines 100 years ago as being wrong, because it’s the adjuvant, or the thing in vaccines that triggers the immune system, that seems to have to be there to make vaccines highly effective.

    the argument here is that aluminum molecules are used for the adjuvant in about half of current vaccines, and that instead of that aluminum all getting collected, some of it gets into the brain. possibly by the immune system picking it up and traveling with it across the blood brain barrier, where it interacts with neurons in a fashion similar to other metals.

    i’m only reporting things i’ve read. i’m agnostic on the process here. there is some real work from UCLA professors on autoimmune reactions involved here. but there’s no great explanation about which immune system element, like phagocytes, would be carrying aluminum to the brain. or whether the 2 versions of aluminum used as adjuvents are even dangerous in this putative scenario.

  87. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come

    No lockdown in the German part of Switzerland until now. –

    Fewer people on a ventilator in the first eight months in this part of Switzerland than last year.

    No excess deaths at all from January through August.

    Schools open, businesses open. Museum and restaurants open throughout.

    A regional spotlight: No one in an intensive care bed at the end of October 2020 in the Kanton Appenzell Innnerrhoden, a total of three people in Appenzell Außerrhoden, nobody on a ventilator (I see parts of these two mountain-regions from Konstanz with my eyes).

    Oh – they use masks inside since ca. June, but not during classes, for example. Before, they held it might tbe safer not to wear masks. It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.

    So – no lockdown so far, and everything just fine. There was a second wave in October – but it is getting objectively better already. It might have caused some excess deaths.

    These here are doctors who are working evidence-based and show their clinical data, which I refer to above:

    https://www.initiative-qualitaetsmedizin.de/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dieter Kief


    It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.
     
    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/123rhb1426-1556611867.jpg?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&resize=980:*
  88. @Buffalo Joe
    Just letting off steam. My 103 year old mother was going to join us for Thanksgiving. We divided the family so Mom would be at my house and some family would be at my daughter's house. Seven per household. Mom was excited because she would meet her newest eight month old great grand daughter. Today coumo the cocksucker announced that I would need to get Mom tested within 24 hours before she could return to her assisted living facility and then still go back into 14 day quarantine. She would need to be tested three times while in quarantine. Where would I get Mom tested on Thursday ? I hate that POS. Mom took it well..."Life isn't always what you want it to be, Joey." cuomo said he had to tell his kids they couldn't be with grandma. I wish cuomo was with his father.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    103 is amazing man. You’ve got some longevity genes in your bloodline.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, when I think that I will have to live another 29 years to reach 103 it become depressing. Mom says she is ready to go to the next level, tired of everyday life. Thank you. Stay safe.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @JohnnyWalker123

  89. @Dieter Kief
    @RichardTaylor

    no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come

    No lockdown in the German part of Switzerland until now. –

    Fewer people on a ventilator in the first eight months in this part of Switzerland than last year.

    No excess deaths at all from January through August.

    Schools open, businesses open. Museum and restaurants open throughout.

    A regional spotlight: No one in an intensive care bed at the end of October 2020 in the Kanton Appenzell Innnerrhoden, a total of three people in Appenzell Außerrhoden, nobody on a ventilator (I see parts of these two mountain-regions from Konstanz with my eyes).

    Oh – they use masks inside since ca. June, but not during classes, for example. Before, they held it might tbe safer not to wear masks. It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.

    So – no lockdown so far, and everything just fine. There was a second wave in October – but it is getting objectively better already. It might have caused some excess deaths.


    These here are doctors who are working evidence-based and show their clinical data, which I refer to above:

    https://www.initiative-qualitaetsmedizin.de/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/123rhb1426-1556611867.jpg?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&resize=980:*

  90. It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the wine-bottle is the Coat of Arms from Grischun / Bergün (so this is possibly likely the Rhätische Bahn) - but unfortunately in a - purified version -

    - here's the real stuff:


    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berg%C3%BCn/Bravuogn#/media/Datei:Berg%C3%BCn_Bravuogn_wappen.svg

    I must say - I'm astonished when I come to those villages (Bergün is a dream come true) and find these things on the walls of the village hall, on flags in parades, in museums etc. This is one kind/ one form of - a living - and proud - tradition. - (Tourists are kept a bit off of this trail though).

  91. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    Americans in general are kind of fixated in the past and assume that America is the most advanced country. They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where people shit in the street and food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around and not in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    What they are not taking into account is that the world has not stood still - other countries have advanced while the US has gone sideways or even deteriorated. In 1950 80% of world automobile production was in the US. Currently it is 12%. If you stand on a subway platform in NY, some crazy homeless person might shove you onto the tracks, but this would never happen to you in Shanghai, not just because they keep the criminally insane locked up but because modern subway systems have platform doors that make this impossible. The NY subway will get platform doors in approximately never. We are like late Rome - we just don't have the resources or skills to implement large scale projects like that at a cost that we could afford. I don't know what it will take for Americans to change their mental image of themselves as #1.

    The first step in fixing any problem is acknowledging that you have a problem and Americans are in denial as to how far the US has fallen in the world and what a disorganized place we have become. Trump, in the end, did very little to fix this (maybe it was beyond the capability of anyone) and Biden will only make things worse. Part of the reason why Shanghai and Santo Domingo look a lot better than they used to (and the Bronx looks a lot worse) is because tons of US dollars have flowed into those places, either as a result of their exporting both people (who send remittances back home) and goods to the US. This has all been pretty much a one-way street.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @Jonathan Mason

    ” They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where… food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around “

    Isn’t that the Wuhan Wet Market? Such things can coexist with high speed trains, nuclear missiles and jet fighters, just as imprisoning, parading and killing a small and inoffensive wild bird coexisted with dreadnoughts, the Maxim gun and the most extensive (and shortest lived) empire in world history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wren_Day

    On the same topic, “bush meat” from Africa is being sold in three different markets in the EU capital.

    “Import the Third World, become the Third World”.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2259906-the-meat-of-protected-african-animals-is-being-sold-in-belgium/

  92. @PiltdownMan



    Russia says data on Sputnik Covid vaccine shows 95% efficacy

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/24/russia-says-data-on-sputnik-covid-vaccine-shows-95-efficacy


     

    https://twitter.com/sputnikvaccine/status/1330869140358377472?s=20


     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @415 reasons, @Steve Sailer

    This is seriously one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. A ridiculous example of western arrogance. Especially after the fawning coverage the Oxford group received and the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press. A very good example we should all remember when the libs act like some media quote giving expert is the infallible voice of truth. Turns out those quote giving experts at Oxford got taken to the woodshed by their vodka swilling competitors working for Putin in basic vaccinology.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @415 reasons


    the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press
     
    Russia officially approved Sputnik V one month before they started their Phase 3 efficacy testing. Is that really so hard to understand, that they skipped the most important part of vaccine testing, where you test it on as many people as you can afford to to see if the inevitable risks are worth it???

    Because vaccines are given to healthy people, the risk/reward benefit calculation is much more weighted towards less risks compared to medicines you give to people who are already ill. And this in a context where we think so many make full recoveries from COVID-19 a lot will get it to if possible provide herd immunity for the vulnerable who also can't get immunized by a vaccine.

    So Sputnik V is currently a political stunt solid in theory, note the use of two different adenovirus vectors for dose 1 and 2 showing they're a step ahead of AZ/Oxford without any "accidents" to help them along, but "unproven by SCIENCE!!!," and I can't see anyone sane trusting Russia's Phase 3 trial results. We'll only know when it's tried out on large populations outside of the control of Russian censorship etc.

    Replies: @415 reasons

  93. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    To unhinged paranoiacs everything seems “I’m pretty sure”.

  94. @Reg Cæsar

    It turned out, that mask-wearing helped to secure the use of public transport especially, something very popular in Switzerland.
     
    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/123rhb1426-1556611867.jpg

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    On the wine-bottle is the Coat of Arms from Grischun / Bergün (so this is possibly likely the Rhätische Bahn) – but unfortunately in a – purified version –

    – here’s the real stuff:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berg%C3%BCn/Bravuogn#/media/Datei:Berg%C3%BCn_Bravuogn_wappen.svg

    I must say – I’m astonished when I come to those villages (Bergün is a dream come true) and find these things on the walls of the village hall, on flags in parades, in museums etc. This is one kind/ one form of – a living – and proud – tradition. – (Tourists are kept a bit off of this trail though).

  95. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. – For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    • Disagree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @utu


    For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.
     
    A completely unfalsifiable claim.

    Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.
     
    Or that it's already killed the most vulnerable.

    Anyway - I hope you look good in feathers. Oh, and bottoms up!
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @utu


    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.
     
    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

    I'm too tired to even paste in a Captain Picard facepalm meme. Reg?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mr. Anon
    @utu


    For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.
     
    The same old unfalsifiable nostrums.

    Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.
     
    Or that most of the most vulnerable people have already been afflicted.

    Well, for your sake, I hope you look good in feathers. Bottoms up!
    , @Adam Smith
    @utu


    For a very good reason. W/o face diapers , w/o antisocial distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.
     
    No. They wouldn't.

    https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

    The cases!, like so many other things these days, are blatantly fraudulent.

    http://philosophers-stone.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/The-scam-has-been-confirmed-Dsalud-November-2020.pdf

    Why you anti-facediapering libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.
     
    What a strange comment. The pro-panicers and pro-facediaperers are the ones "launching a cause". We libertarians are live and let live. Do what you want, just leave us alone. The authoritarians/totalitarians are the ones interfering in the lives of others. They're happy to force their insanity and edicts upon others, with violence if necessary. Libertarians are not dangerous and violent, unlike the dominant culture which has succumbed to mass hysteria.

    I will not play charades with you or otherwise go along with your insanity.

    Wear a face diaper or chicken suit if you wish, but please, just leave us libertarians alone.

    Replies: @utu

  96. ” They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where… food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around “

    Isn’t that the Wuhan Wet Market?

    Decades ago, a Chinese colleague shared his verdict on New York City’s Chinatown wet markets – he pronounced them dirty and malodorous. I assume he felt Chinese wet markets in his homeland were more sanitary. He also found NYC as a whole shockingly dilapidated, dirty and dangerous – not at all what he expected vis-a-vis the financial capital of the world. And this was a guy not given to sharing strong opinions about much of anything – his almost emotional outburst was more remarkable than the words he uttered. Something about NYC’s condition – even at the peak of its prosperity – touched a chord. It would be amusing to find out what he thinks about de Blasio’s NYC today.

    • Replies: @Keypusher
    @Johann Ricke

    I visited China a couple of decades ago and almost passed out from the stench at some markets. Your colleague was applying a different standard to the USA than he applied to his own country.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  97. @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    A little over 100 people in the trial came down with Covid.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @MikeJa

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/nov/23/astrazeneca-says-its-coronavirus-vaccine-has-70-per-cent-efficacy-covid-oxford-university

    The interim analysis is based on 131 infections among participants, half of whom received the vaccine while the rest, in a control group, were given an established meningitis shot.

    131 people infected. To get 90% effectiveness they should breakdown 119 control group and 12 of the vaccinated group. If it were only 70% effective you’d expect 36 vaccinated patients getting sick. Hmm 36 vs 12. Interesting, but if you can mess up the dosage I wouldn’t be too sure you’ve properly randomized the participants.

  98. @Charon
    @theMann


    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.
     
    Well they didn't think anyone would be paying attention. Meanwhile you are a wordsmith who can't spell yeah?

    Replies: @theMann

    Spell, yes. Type, not so much.

    Not to mention every word I type is governed by my two cats battling furiously for the coveted position of lying between the monitor and the keyboard.

  99. @Anon
    OT: Anyone think we've entered a new era of government? With Obama, the elites realized that what they wanted was a weak figurehead president so the elites could run wild controlling the government agencies to their own financial benefit with no oversight. The reason the elites liked--and backed--a dingleberry like Biden was because he was weak. They wanted a weak president who wouldn't give them any oversight or trouble. They also want a compromised president because they can threaten him if he doesn't obey. Biden is known to have taken Chinese bribes, and the elites love that. They can destroy him if he gets out of line.

    In a way, it's like the transition the Japanese made from having an emperor who actually ran things to being a figurehead for government agencies that do what they want.

    We may be entering an era of a permanently weak president.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Keypusher, @AndrewR

    OneFiveFive, the Japan of WWII was largely run by the military. The military was divide between army and navy and neither group cared for the other. According to Professor Saburo Ienaga, author of “The Pacific War, 1931-1945″ ” the Japanese Navy did not even inform the Army of the great losses suffered at Midway.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @Buffalo Joe

    Why did not Japanese coherence overcome such a petty inter service rally ?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  100. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe

    103 is amazing man. You've got some longevity genes in your bloodline.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Johnny, when I think that I will have to live another 29 years to reach 103 it become depressing. Mom says she is ready to go to the next level, tired of everyday life. Thank you. Stay safe.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Buffalo Joe

    I hope you're still commenting here in 2049.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe


    Thank you. Stay safe.
     
    Thanks. You as well.

    Check out this site. It's by a senior-citizen who's in amazing physical shape. The site contains a lot of practical advice on staying healthy as you age. There's advice on exercise, supplementation, diet, and various other topics.

    https://roguehealthandfitness.com/

    You can't control the fact that you're getting older, but getting older is a lot easier when you're in good health. If you're healthy, the next 29+ years will be a lot more fun.

    While I highly recommend reading through the site, here's a quick summary.

    -Lift weights 2x a week
    -Get as much sunshine as possible
    -Take supplements (Vitamin D, Vitamin K2, Omega 3 Fish Oil, Magnesium Citrate)
    -Eat non-processed foods (with a strong preference for meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese)
    -Do low-to-moderate carb
    -Limit sugar
    -Do intermittent fast (if you can)
    -Eat probiotic-rich foods (Kefir, Kimchi, Sauerkraut)
    -Eat berries
    -Drink black coffee
    -Eat dark chocolate
    -Take cold showers
    -Key to good health is controlling insulin and blood sugar/glucose
    -Consider metformin

    One very simple way to better health. Donate blood once every 2 months.

    We have an excess of iron storage in body, which tends to worsen with age. Excess iron correlates very strongly with lots of health problems (cancer, heart disease, blood pressure), as the iron literally rusts in your body and causes oxidative stress. By donating blood, you can lower your iron level significantly. There are actually lots of studies that show blood donation is associated with good health and long lifespan.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Buffalo Joe

  101. @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, when I think that I will have to live another 29 years to reach 103 it become depressing. Mom says she is ready to go to the next level, tired of everyday life. Thank you. Stay safe.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @JohnnyWalker123

    I hope you’re still commenting here in 2049.

  102. @Anon
    OT

    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out because of chronic intense pain (and then she came down with adoption fever). She had a disease called endometriosis that is apparently real, but the issue of its associated pain is controversial. Doctors (more than a third of whom are female) often say the pain is in the woman's head, while feminists say that the medical profession suffers from institutional patriarchical misogyny and wants women to suffer.

    Googling around on this I found a pre-internet dissertation from 1979 [sic], written by a woman, that weirdly seems to connect this psychogenic pain version of endometriosis with today's rapid onset gender dysphoria. From the conclusion to the dissertation:

    Personality Correlates of Endometriosis
    Mary Lou Collins
    Western Michigan University
    https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3677&context=dissertations


    At the onset of menstrual life at about the age of 12 years, the endometriotic woman views herself negatively because she is female and wishes somehow she could change her sex. The duration of this unfavorable sexual identity persists into adulthood and mani­fests itself in painful sexual intercourse and continued menstrual difficulties such as dysmenorrhea and hypermenorrhea. She has feelings of being limited and pressed by social and vocational aspects of her life space, is over­ sensitive, and experiences pervasive and generalized resent­ment and hostility (MMPI Scale 6). She expresses this hostility in an indirect fashion towards men. For example, she may avoid sexual intercourse because of the pain associated with the act. Her complaints may also induce feelings of guilt in her mate following intercourse. Concurrent dysmenorrhea may also serve as an expression of aggressiveness against the male, as a method of self­ punishment, and as a manifestation of her rejection of the feminine role (Menninger, 1939).
     
    In fairness the dissertation ascribes other characteristics to the "endometriotic woman" that don't seem to apply to ROGD. And I can see how feminists get pissed off, because this all reads like Freudian "hysteria." But maybe there is a grain of truth in "hysteria."

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

    Do you know and interact with any women? Or are women extraterrestrial?

    Endometriosis makes getting pregnant difficult. Surgery fixes that. Menstrual pain varies with the condition, but can happen.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/endometriosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20354656

  103. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    From the article


    “The reason we had the half dose is serendipity,” said Mene Pangalos, executive vice-president of biopharmaceuticals research and development at AstraZeneca.

    When university researchers were distributing the vaccine at the end of April, around the start of Oxford and AstraZeneca’s partnership, they noticed expected side effects such as fatigue, headaches or arm aches were milder than expected.

    “So we went back and checked … and we found out that they had underpredicted the dose of the vaccine by half,” said Pangalos.
     
    What? "Underpredicted?" Is that even a word? Did this guy even use that word?

    And what, exactly, happened?

    Did AstraZeneca send full doses to the clinics and the clinic only administered half? If so, the clinicians need to be taken to the woodshed. The outfits that run these trials do this stuff all the time, so this would not only be an unusual error, but an egregious error, "serendipitous" or not.

    Or did AstraZeneca send half doses and labeled them as full? The EMA should fine them significant dollars if they made such a stupid unacceptable and silly mistake.

    Or was it something entirely different?

    In addition to being a Marxist rag, The Guardian is the poster child for shoddy journalism and stupid writing.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Did AstraZeneca send full doses to the clinics

    Reread the text more closely, it matches what I’ve read elsewhere, Oxford, where the vaccine candidate was developed, made the screwup before AZ was fully on board.

  104. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anon


    " I’ve learned to buy many things at Amazon that before would have meant running errands and perhaps spending on extra items at the store. "
     
    You can almost always beat the Amazon price, Ebay and often the manufacturers website is cheaper. And you can often bypass Ebay too and go direct to the seller.

    Given that Amazon and Ebay always take their cut, it's always cheaper elsewhere if you look. I use Amazon as a "top price" marker.

    Example - a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.


    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.

    Replies: @clyde

    Example – a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.
    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.

    Same here in the USA. Amazon is good for finding/approximating the item’s price level. Then buy at ebay or the actual website. This is highly variable and best price can be found, might be found at any of the three once shipping is factored in.
    I shift in and out of Amazon Prime. I have some vitamins Zinc-Quercitin-D etc in my cart and will push the button on Black Friday.

    Bored semi-elderly white woken women are who is making Jeff Bezos more billions. They swipe right and buy their more useless more stuff, that if only it lead to salvation (after a while) or at least 72 hours worth of joy.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @clyde

    Used to know a guy who supplemented his income on eBay. Said Christmas was a great time, drunk people sat at home with nowt better to do than spend cash online.

  105. @El Dato
    Meanwhile, important things, like complete Reality Disconnect.

    Dow Jones breaks 30,000 milestone for first time as stocks soar amid vaccine hopes and formal start of Biden transition

    and also

    Caitlin Johnstone: Right calls Biden a puppet of Xi as he packs his cabinet with China hawks

    - Biden's expected Defense Secretary Michele Flournoy opined this past June that the US military needs a new arms race to obtain "the capability to credibly threaten to sink all of China's military vessels, submarines, and merchant ships in the South China Sea within 72 hours."

    - Biden's choice for Secretary of State Tony Blinken plans on undermining Beijing's Belt and Road Initiative, reportedly wants to "tame" and "try to coalesce skeptical international partners into a new competition with" China, and said that the Biden administration will "fully enforce" the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, "including sanctions on officials, financial institutions, companies and individuals." Earlier this month The Economist reported that Republicans that are hawkish on China would be happy with a Secretary of State nomination for Blinken.

    - Biden's choice for National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan was described by Forbes this past June as a "Peter Navarro-like China hawk" who believes that Beijing is “gearing up to contest America’s global leadership” and that those signs are “unmistakable, and they are ubiquitous.”

     

    https://twitter.com/SenTomCotton/status/1330993653276405767

    A festering turkey doesn't pick wars at its whim. This will end in amazing amounts of tears.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    This will end in amazing amounts of tears.

    Just call him Bawlin’ Biden, the Crier in Chief:

    It’s going to be a long four years.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Stan Adams

    Stan, a long four years but how many with biden as POTUS?

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  106. Gophers-Badgers game called off after positive COVID-19 tests

    Nearing end of 1st Quarter, nearly 40% of St. Paul Public High School Students have failing grades

    In reading, the United States ranks 15th among the 31 participating countries, 45 percent of a standard deviation behind Finland, the world leader. One might attribute this to the fact that English is a difficult language to learn-except that the United States was the lowest scoring of all the English-speaking countries. Canada, New Zealand, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Ireland all ranked higher. So did Korea, Japan, Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Norway, and France. The results in math and science were equally dismal.

    Still another international comparison, this provided by the International Adult Literacy Survey, provides a different way of assessing the quality of education in the United States. It was administered during the mid-1990s to a cross-section of 16- to 65-year-olds in 14 European and North American countries.

    The United States ranked 12th on the test, trailing Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, and Germany by significant margins. The news gets even worse: the United States appears to be living on its past. The literacy skills of Americans aged 56 to 65 ranked them second in the world. These highfliers had attended school in the 1950s, at a time when SAT scores reached heights to which they have never since returned-and Europeans were still trying to put together an education system that could serve more than an elite cadre.

    Americans who went to school during the 1960s ranked a respectable 3rd; those schooled in the 1970s ranked 5th. But 16- to 25-year-olds, adults who were wandering America’s school hallways during the 1980s and 1990s, ranked 14th. In short, the literacy survey records a simple, steady progression downward. Apologists will find excuses for these outcomes, of course. The downward U. S. trajectory is due more to gains elsewhere than to slippage within the United States, some will say, as if this were satisfying. Others may say that U.S. scores are pulled down by its immigrants and ethnic diversity…, overlooking the fact that other countries have immigrants too. [!]

    https://www.educationnext.org/tickettonowhere/

    • Replies: @Alice
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, we are living on the past. Minnesota in particular is preparing for a future where the citizenry won't be attending universities and isn't even capable of being a low-skill menial work force. But all states are in that shape; not all admit it.

    But no one in education will admit why we have fallen so far: not the least of which is the teachers who were that highly literate are all gone. Teachers can't teach what they don't know, so they can't educate even the ones whose genes and upbringing could make them numerate and literate any longer.

    this is not simply the decline in the last 50 years. Go back and read the California 6th grade reader Jerry Pournelle put on kindle, from the 1900s. Heck, read the Federalist papers, written for the farmers of the day.

    Ultimately, only the Hajnal line immigrants to the US believed in educating the most promising, apprenticing the most talented, hiring the most innovative. All others hire their family, their tribe, their clan, and they all torpedo the good work of the Other to make themselves not look so bad. By the 50s, Buckley showed in GAMAY that we had stopped professing these traits as American Exceptionalism. They already had ceded all ground to immigrationists, identity politicians, and above all, ignorant teachers. There is no one left to uphold standards of the modern enlightenment.

  107. @415 reasons
    @PiltdownMan

    This is seriously one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. A ridiculous example of western arrogance. Especially after the fawning coverage the Oxford group received and the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press. A very good example we should all remember when the libs act like some media quote giving expert is the infallible voice of truth. Turns out those quote giving experts at Oxford got taken to the woodshed by their vodka swilling competitors working for Putin in basic vaccinology.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press

    Russia officially approved Sputnik V one month before they started their Phase 3 efficacy testing. Is that really so hard to understand, that they skipped the most important part of vaccine testing, where you test it on as many people as you can afford to to see if the inevitable risks are worth it???

    Because vaccines are given to healthy people, the risk/reward benefit calculation is much more weighted towards less risks compared to medicines you give to people who are already ill. And this in a context where we think so many make full recoveries from COVID-19 a lot will get it to if possible provide herd immunity for the vulnerable who also can’t get immunized by a vaccine.

    So Sputnik V is currently a political stunt solid in theory, note the use of two different adenovirus vectors for dose 1 and 2 showing they’re a step ahead of AZ/Oxford without any “accidents” to help them along, but “unproven by SCIENCE!!!,” and I can’t see anyone sane trusting Russia’s Phase 3 trial results. We’ll only know when it’s tried out on large populations outside of the control of Russian censorship etc.

    • Replies: @415 reasons
    @That Would Be Telling

    My point is not that the Russian vaccine effort was obviously successful at the time they approved it—clearly the Russian approval was akin to a phase III trial and did not have the same evidentiary bar as FDA approval. But, the Russian vaccine designers made a decision based on this foreseeable outcome to use two different vectors for their prime/boost. The mopes at Oxford/AZ chose not to. There are logistical and other considerations that would lead you to use a single vector, but it turns out those should have been outweighed by considerations of efficacy. That oversight is definitely arrogant! The head of the academic group, Sarah Gilbert, is quoted in the Guardian article, and she still didn’t catch on to the fact that by far the most likely explanation is that they had generated too many anti-vector antibodies for the boost to work. Go back and read her quotes in many hagiographic articles about their vaccine over the spring and summer. These people screwed the pooch! And it seems like their bacon was only saved by a separate logistical mistake they made where they literally administered a mischaracterized drug product to thousands of human volunteers!

    Here is one such example but there are many https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.independent.co.uk/news/health/coronavirus-vaccine-oxford-latest-results-covid-19-sarah-gilbert-interview-trial-a9695161.html%3Famp

    Replies: @Jack D

  108. @That Would Be Telling
    @415 reasons


    the extremely skeptical, adversarial the early approval of the Russian vaccine received in our press
     
    Russia officially approved Sputnik V one month before they started their Phase 3 efficacy testing. Is that really so hard to understand, that they skipped the most important part of vaccine testing, where you test it on as many people as you can afford to to see if the inevitable risks are worth it???

    Because vaccines are given to healthy people, the risk/reward benefit calculation is much more weighted towards less risks compared to medicines you give to people who are already ill. And this in a context where we think so many make full recoveries from COVID-19 a lot will get it to if possible provide herd immunity for the vulnerable who also can't get immunized by a vaccine.

    So Sputnik V is currently a political stunt solid in theory, note the use of two different adenovirus vectors for dose 1 and 2 showing they're a step ahead of AZ/Oxford without any "accidents" to help them along, but "unproven by SCIENCE!!!," and I can't see anyone sane trusting Russia's Phase 3 trial results. We'll only know when it's tried out on large populations outside of the control of Russian censorship etc.

    Replies: @415 reasons

    My point is not that the Russian vaccine effort was obviously successful at the time they approved it—clearly the Russian approval was akin to a phase III trial and did not have the same evidentiary bar as FDA approval. But, the Russian vaccine designers made a decision based on this foreseeable outcome to use two different vectors for their prime/boost. The mopes at Oxford/AZ chose not to. There are logistical and other considerations that would lead you to use a single vector, but it turns out those should have been outweighed by considerations of efficacy. That oversight is definitely arrogant! The head of the academic group, Sarah Gilbert, is quoted in the Guardian article, and she still didn’t catch on to the fact that by far the most likely explanation is that they had generated too many anti-vector antibodies for the boost to work. Go back and read her quotes in many hagiographic articles about their vaccine over the spring and summer. These people screwed the pooch! And it seems like their bacon was only saved by a separate logistical mistake they made where they literally administered a mischaracterized drug product to thousands of human volunteers!

    Here is one such example but there are many https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.independent.co.uk/news/health/coronavirus-vaccine-oxford-latest-results-covid-19-sarah-gilbert-interview-trial-a9695161.html%3Famp

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @415 reasons

    We now have, thanks to AA, an extraordinarily stupid leadership class even in the "hard" sciences. This is not even my field and I was able to figure out that the paradoxical results for the 1/2 dose vaccine were probably due to the fact that it created fewer antibodies to the vaccine vector by the time you got your booster. And the Rooshians (who have been in the vaccine game since the time of Sabin if not sooner - the first big usage of the Sabin vaccine was in the USSR) were smart enough to use two different adenoviruses to avoid this problem altogether.

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert (and she's not even a late transitioning trannie).

    "


    There are some scientists who will happily work more or less on their own on one subject for a very long time… That's not the way I like to work. I like to try to take into account ideas from lots of different areas," [Sarah Gilbert] told BBC Radio 4's The Life Scientific, earlier this year. "I did consider leaving science at that point and doing something different."
     
    A 'spergy guy who over focuses on one little thing is EXACTLY what you need to do modern science. You need a guy who eats, sleeps and drinks vaccines, who is obsessed with vaccines, who thinks like a virus, who has no other life. He is the kind of guy who is not going to make such an obvious error. Sarah Gilbert is probably good at managing the people in her lab, in writing perfect grant applications, etc. She is good at all of the FORMS of science and at getting promoted over some spergy guy who isn't the least bit interested in or good at all that social crap.

    I just finished watching The Queen's Gambit. It was great eye candy ( Anya Taylor-Joy is very easy on the eyes and the costumes and sets were great) but there were plot holes big enough to drive a truck through. Her character had it ALL in a way that no real life chess master does - interest in fashion as well as chess, everyone who saw her fell in love with her - men, women, dogs, etc. Real life modern chess masters tend to be 'spergy and 'spergs are overwhelmingly men and not usually easy to like. Spergs also tend to be indifferent to their appearance (unless their obsession is around their appearance in which case they don't care about anything BUT their appearance). There is a reason why Beth Harmon is a fictional character and Wakanda is a fictional place and they have no real life counterparts. Watching the show you WANT there to be a real life Beth Harmon but sadly there isn't, nor is Sarah Gilbert a real life Salk. But our leadership keeps confusing fantasy with reality. The fantasy is so much more fun.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Jonathan Mason

  109. @Diversity Heretic
    @Diversity Heretic

    If the testers can't get the dose right and can't detect their error for months, how much confidence should anyone have in the results that they're reporting?

    Replies: @anon, @Hypnotoad666

    About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later, with data showing 90% were protected. In the larger group, who were given two full doses also four weeks apart, efficacy was 62%.

    So cutting the dose in half decreases the rate of infection by 67%. That means a one-quarter dose would protected 96.7% of people. And no dose at all would therefore surely be 100% effective.

    I am pretty sure that’s how science works.

    • LOL: AnotherDad, Charon
    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Hypnotoad666

    "I am pretty sure that’s how science works. "

    They broke science for the Manmade Global Warming/Climate Change project.

    As long as there is a consensus that the vaccine is working, then the vaccine is working.

    As long as there is a consensus that the election was fair, then ...

  110. @PennTothal
    One possible explanation for the lower dose seeming to be paradoxically "more effective.:"

    It may be that is this trial (as was true int the Pfizer and Moderna trials) they did not test everyone in the trial for COVID as an endpoint.

    Rather, they only tested subjects who complained of "appropriate symptoms" for COVID. Then the COVID-positive endpoint for the vaccine group and the placebo group was determined from that small subset of total subject population. The actual difference in total COVID-positivity rates between the placebo and vaccine groups is unknown. Since many COVID-positives are not symptomatic, the majority of COVID-positives in both the vaccine and control groups may have gone undetected by the trial.

    Since subjects who got the lower vaccine dose may have had fewer symptoms to complain about (body aches, transient temperatures, etc.) it may be that fewer of them got tested, therefore fewer COVID-positives in that group = "more efficacy" in the low-dose group.

    This is just one example of the problems arising from testing vaccine efficacy for a virus that has such a high incidence of asymptomatic cases.

    Replies: @Jack D, @By-tor

    ‘Asymptomatic cases’? So say the inhumanes pushing the lockdowns, expensive and inaccurate PCR test kits and labeling hypertension, diabetes and cancer deaths as ‘Covid-19’ casualties. Known liars Fauci-Gates ( Schwab ) have been pushing this ruse since they gamed it at ‘Event 201’ in October 2019.

  111. How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @SaneClownPosse


    How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.
     
    PCR is fit for purpose if someone has COVID-19 symptoms and you want higher confidence they've actually got COVID-19. Which would be its role in scoring cases in these Phase 3 trials.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.
     
    "cocktail jab?" What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    , @Jack D
    @SaneClownPosse


    How do they know the vaccine is effective?
     
    They give half the people in the trial a placebo and half the real vaccine and then they wait to see who gets sick with Covid. 9x as many people got sick in placebo arm.

    Even if the PCR tests were unreliable (they aren't) then since they gave everyone the same tests (even their care doctors didn't know who got the real vaccine) you would expect the errors to be randomly distributed. But 90-95% of the positives were in the placebo group. This is far, far beyond any level that could be attributed to chance.

    Next question.

    Yes the real reason for the jab is so that Google and Apple can keep track of you at all times. Using their phones they can only track you 95% of the time.
  112. @Hypnotoad666
    @Diversity Heretic


    About 3,000 people were given the half dose and then a full dose four weeks later, with data showing 90% were protected. In the larger group, who were given two full doses also four weeks apart, efficacy was 62%.

     

    So cutting the dose in half decreases the rate of infection by 67%. That means a one-quarter dose would protected 96.7% of people. And no dose at all would therefore surely be 100% effective.

    I am pretty sure that's how science works.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    “I am pretty sure that’s how science works. ”

    They broke science for the Manmade Global Warming/Climate Change project.

    As long as there is a consensus that the vaccine is working, then the vaccine is working.

    As long as there is a consensus that the election was fair, then …

  113. @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, when I think that I will have to live another 29 years to reach 103 it become depressing. Mom says she is ready to go to the next level, tired of everyday life. Thank you. Stay safe.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @JohnnyWalker123

    Thank you. Stay safe.

    Thanks. You as well.

    Check out this site. It’s by a senior-citizen who’s in amazing physical shape. The site contains a lot of practical advice on staying healthy as you age. There’s advice on exercise, supplementation, diet, and various other topics.

    https://roguehealthandfitness.com/

    You can’t control the fact that you’re getting older, but getting older is a lot easier when you’re in good health. If you’re healthy, the next 29+ years will be a lot more fun.

    While I highly recommend reading through the site, here’s a quick summary.

    -Lift weights 2x a week
    -Get as much sunshine as possible
    -Take supplements (Vitamin D, Vitamin K2, Omega 3 Fish Oil, Magnesium Citrate)
    -Eat non-processed foods (with a strong preference for meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese)
    -Do low-to-moderate carb
    -Limit sugar
    -Do intermittent fast (if you can)
    -Eat probiotic-rich foods (Kefir, Kimchi, Sauerkraut)
    -Eat berries
    -Drink black coffee
    -Eat dark chocolate
    -Take cold showers
    -Key to good health is controlling insulin and blood sugar/glucose
    -Consider metformin

    One very simple way to better health. Donate blood once every 2 months.

    We have an excess of iron storage in body, which tends to worsen with age. Excess iron correlates very strongly with lots of health problems (cancer, heart disease, blood pressure), as the iron literally rusts in your body and causes oxidative stress. By donating blood, you can lower your iron level significantly. There are actually lots of studies that show blood donation is associated with good health and long lifespan.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I agree with the black coffee and dark chocolate. But your list omits two shots of Jack Daniels, which is good for what ails you.

    Also, in all seriousness, I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with "heat shock proteins" or something. But even if the health benefits weren't there, it's a pretty relaxing thing to do. (Especially, if combined with the two shots of JD.).

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, thank you for the list. I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years. Wish I had never smoked but kicked that habit over 30 years ago. Have one Manhattan a day and lift light weights at home. Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul. Caffine and I don't get along and although I love the taste, I skip fried foods. Stay safe my friend.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  114. @Buffalo Joe
    @Anon

    OneFiveFive, the Japan of WWII was largely run by the military. The military was divide between army and navy and neither group cared for the other. According to Professor Saburo Ienaga, author of "The Pacific War, 1931-1945" " the Japanese Navy did not even inform the Army of the great losses suffered at Midway.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

    Why did not Japanese coherence overcome such a petty inter service rally ?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Houston 1992


    Why did not Japanese coherence overcome such a petty inter service rally ?
     

    Japan and the Koreas are the most homogenous. Racial politics can be complicated and nasty in these countries, where nationalism and ethnicity have at times gone hand-in-hand, from Hirohito's Japan to Kim Il Sung's North Korea. The lack of diversity perhaps informs these politics, although it's tough to say which caused which.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/16/a-revealing-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-ethnically-diverse-countries/


     

    Handy Guide to Finnish Political Parties

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Finnish_parliamentary_election%2C_2015_results_by_constituency.png/220px-Finnish_parliamentary_election%2C_2015_results_by_constituency.png

    https://www.riskandforecast.com/useruploads/images/2010/pc_flash_report_101122_municipal_elections_chart1.png

    https://www.communicationmatters.at/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Ergebnisse_EU-Wahl_2019_Rand.001-1024x768.png

    List of political parties in the Faroe Islands


    https://alchetron.com/cdn/list-of-political-parties-in-the-faroe-islands-360ab9f5-94ba-4684-bad3-f6309c11d7d-resize-750.jpg


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Icelandic_general_election_2017_-_Results_by_Constituency.svg/400px-Icelandic_general_election_2017_-_Results_by_Constituency.svg.png


    https://i.redd.it/b81d67z2t5l01.png

  115. Steve, I’ve been analyzing your recent posts, and the most popular ones, judging by number of comments, involve recaps of popular television series and fast food reviews. Maybe you should concentrate on this kind of content (the occasional golf post is fine).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The number of comments is correlated with how long until the next post. I could recap a popular television series about fast food and get only 50 comments if I posted 6 more times later that day.

    Replies: @Alice, @Achmed E. Newman

  116. @Anon
    Steve, I've been analyzing your recent posts, and the most popular ones, judging by number of comments, involve recaps of popular television series and fast food reviews. Maybe you should concentrate on this kind of content (the occasional golf post is fine).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The number of comments is correlated with how long until the next post. I could recap a popular television series about fast food and get only 50 comments if I posted 6 more times later that day.

    • Replies: @Alice
    @Steve Sailer

    and much to our chagrin, sometimes you do!

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Right. I've seen it where you are working your ass off on a Takimag column, and there has been no new post for 12 freaking hours. 12 hours, Steve! Your commenters are going off the wall off topic on the last one, and you'll get 250 comments under a post about golf course architecture as practiced by a Hollywood actor that your sister-in-law went to high school with.

    In the meantime, I'll tell you what, I'm that || close to clicking on a Godfree Roberts column and chiming in about the 5 year plan of 1958. No, that'd be .. just ... sick ...

  117. @SFG
    @RichardTaylor

    I don't disagree about lying, power-hungry head cases, but remember that the businessmen want things to open up so people will spend money again.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @anon, @MBlanc46

    And the Dems want Biden to look like the savior of the world. On JAN 20 the seas stop rising and covid slinks away, defeated.

  118. At half a dose you can now double the profit.

    With enough toxic sludge left over to give those poor Africans a shot at getting the juice.

    Hopefully Billy “The Vaccine and Depopulation Expert” Gates won’t water the stuff down all in the hopes of making a few extra shekles before the full soft kill is put into effect.

    Of course, you’ll need to get a booster shot year round, let’s say every three months just to be sure.

    So, roll up your sleeve and drop your drawers cause your about to feel a little pinch not only in your arm but Uranus.

  119. @Anon
    OT

    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out because of chronic intense pain (and then she came down with adoption fever). She had a disease called endometriosis that is apparently real, but the issue of its associated pain is controversial. Doctors (more than a third of whom are female) often say the pain is in the woman's head, while feminists say that the medical profession suffers from institutional patriarchical misogyny and wants women to suffer.

    Googling around on this I found a pre-internet dissertation from 1979 [sic], written by a woman, that weirdly seems to connect this psychogenic pain version of endometriosis with today's rapid onset gender dysphoria. From the conclusion to the dissertation:

    Personality Correlates of Endometriosis
    Mary Lou Collins
    Western Michigan University
    https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3677&context=dissertations


    At the onset of menstrual life at about the age of 12 years, the endometriotic woman views herself negatively because she is female and wishes somehow she could change her sex. The duration of this unfavorable sexual identity persists into adulthood and mani­fests itself in painful sexual intercourse and continued menstrual difficulties such as dysmenorrhea and hypermenorrhea. She has feelings of being limited and pressed by social and vocational aspects of her life space, is over­ sensitive, and experiences pervasive and generalized resent­ment and hostility (MMPI Scale 6). She expresses this hostility in an indirect fashion towards men. For example, she may avoid sexual intercourse because of the pain associated with the act. Her complaints may also induce feelings of guilt in her mate following intercourse. Concurrent dysmenorrhea may also serve as an expression of aggressiveness against the male, as a method of self­ punishment, and as a manifestation of her rejection of the feminine role (Menninger, 1939).
     
    In fairness the dissertation ascribes other characteristics to the "endometriotic woman" that don't seem to apply to ROGD. And I can see how feminists get pissed off, because this all reads like Freudian "hysteria." But maybe there is a grain of truth in "hysteria."

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out…

    Boy, 5, Is Allegedly Beaten to Death by Mom’s Boyfriend While She Was in Hospital Giving Birth

  120. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    Americans in general are kind of fixated in the past and assume that America is the most advanced country. They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where people shit in the street and food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around and not in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    What they are not taking into account is that the world has not stood still - other countries have advanced while the US has gone sideways or even deteriorated. In 1950 80% of world automobile production was in the US. Currently it is 12%. If you stand on a subway platform in NY, some crazy homeless person might shove you onto the tracks, but this would never happen to you in Shanghai, not just because they keep the criminally insane locked up but because modern subway systems have platform doors that make this impossible. The NY subway will get platform doors in approximately never. We are like late Rome - we just don't have the resources or skills to implement large scale projects like that at a cost that we could afford. I don't know what it will take for Americans to change their mental image of themselves as #1.

    The first step in fixing any problem is acknowledging that you have a problem and Americans are in denial as to how far the US has fallen in the world and what a disorganized place we have become. Trump, in the end, did very little to fix this (maybe it was beyond the capability of anyone) and Biden will only make things worse. Part of the reason why Shanghai and Santo Domingo look a lot better than they used to (and the Bronx looks a lot worse) is because tons of US dollars have flowed into those places, either as a result of their exporting both people (who send remittances back home) and goods to the US. This has all been pretty much a one-way street.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @Jonathan Mason

    Good comment Jack.

    Couple thoughts:

    1) First a caveat. Most of the places i’ve been in the 3rd world (including the DR), most people are not getting their groceries

    in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    They get them–i get them–in much smaller, not particularly modern shops. And yeah, also often from farmers/vendors selling directly on the street.

    2) Minoritarianism is expensive!
    The US could lead the world with the productivity of it’s white population carraying along a 10% black population. When i was a kid we were still–at the tail end–of building the world’s greatest infrastructure. Obviously, “the world” was going to catch up–they need/want highways, bridges, tunnels, skyscrapers, aqueducts, airports too.

    But the other thing issue is once you bring in minoritarianism and the busybodying super-state is running around looking over everyone’s shoulder and trying to remedy every “wrong” it is both super-expensive, sucking up and redirecting state resources from productive capital investments and also hampers productive activity–now like swimming in jello.

    The classic AnotherDadism that gets at this: “Diversity is the Health of the State”

    With the corollaries:
    — “Diversity is the illness of the productive sector.”
    — “There’s less money left over for the state to do it’s normal/useful jobs.”

  121. @utu
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. - For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don't launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWa6e3WhZ4

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.

    A completely unfalsifiable claim.

    Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Or that it’s already killed the most vulnerable.

    Anyway – I hope you look good in feathers. Oh, and bottoms up!

  122. @theMann
    Maybe we disagree on the meaning of the word “serendipity “

    But the revelation that a vaccine company can’t run a trial competently is not something I would refer to as serendipity, more like ominous.

    But then the corporation developing the vaccine gets paid regardless, can’t be sued for damages, and is agitating for forced vaccinations.

    Yea, serendipity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Alice

    For 5 years now, I have seen in the complete collapse of engineering and education. The people in positions of authority are now all AA or DIE hires. They know nothing, and they are so incompetent they cannot tell good work from bad, so they don’t even keep around the competent as assistants to help them out.

    There is no reason to believe their numbers of efficacy in this trial, any more than you should believe they know what dosages they are given ina freaking clinical trial. it boggles the mind someone would have proof they can’t run a trial snd then turn around and believe their results are valid. The Murray Gell -Mann amnesia effect in spades.

  123. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The number of comments is correlated with how long until the next post. I could recap a popular television series about fast food and get only 50 comments if I posted 6 more times later that day.

    Replies: @Alice, @Achmed E. Newman

    and much to our chagrin, sometimes you do!

  124. anon[107] • Disclaimer says:

    Completely and totally OT, but I felt the need to sperg out for a moment.

    So the new Secretary of State says that his step-dad escaped from a death march, and was rescued by Sgt. Bill Ellington, who served in the 761st Tank Battalion, nicknamed The Black Panthers.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8983451/Biden-pick-Tony-Blinken-recounts-stepfathers-extraordinary-story-surviving-Holocaust.html

    Now, if you read that article, you’ll find a link to another article that says that the camp his step-dad escaped from was Dachau.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/immigration/393630-whats-happened-at-our-border-is-not-what-america-should-be

    So the question is, were any of the prisoners who evacuated Dachau actually rescued by the Black Panthers?

    The only reference I can find by searching for “Black Panthers Dachau” is the semi-famous film Liberators, which was made in 1992, as an attempt to bridge relations between blacks and Jews during a time when there were tensions between them in New York City. That’s the movie where Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel claimed that a huge, muscular black man came into Buchenwald and began cursing, and his curses turned into holy words, and the emaciated prisoners tried lifting him up on their shoulders, but were too weak to do it.

    This was all fake, of course, and when the movie came out, actual soldiers proved that the Black Panthers had nothing to do with the liberation of Buchenwald, and the filmmakers basically withdrew it.

    But what about Dachau? Supposedly, the Black Panthers were about seventy miles away from Dachau when it was liberated, but then, the death march was about seventy miles long. So, just from that, it is theoretically possible that this kid just happened to run into a tank driven by a black guy.

    On the other hand, since we live in a world where every black achievement gets trumpeted to the heavens, I feel like I would have been able to find some other source for that if it had actually happened. Because another possibility is that he either saw or was involved in the making of Liberators, and just made that story up.

    There’s this article, in the LA Times:

    https://www.latimes.com/opinion/la-xpm-2012-feb-01-la-oe-perlman-dachau-20120201-story.html

    It mentions that a woman in Australia heard from her father that he had been rescued from Dachau by a black man in a tank. But guess what? Samuel Pisar went to school in Melbourne and lived there for at least a few years. So it seems entirely possible that it’s his daughter. How many Dachau escapees that were rescued by black men in tanks can possibly have moved to Australia?

    And he’s told the story before.

    https://www.thecrimson.com/article/1982/11/29/the-long-road-pin-1979-samuel/

    Now, that’s an article that’s from 1982, which would pre-date Liberators. So maybe it’s legit.

    In that version of the story, incidentally, he said “Hail Roosevelt!”, not “God bless America”, for what it’s worth.

    That article also mentions how, one day in Auschwitz, they were calling out the names of people to be gassed, and they called his name, so thinking quickly, he picked up a rag and a bucket and then started wiping down the floor, and then the Germans told him to leave, and then I guess they forgot all about how they were going to gas him, and he went back to his bunk, and they never remembered to gas him later. You know how those concentration camp guards are.

    So I would argue that Samuel Pisar is not always 100% accurate in his memories of the war years.

    But does anyone here actually know where the 761st Tank Battalion actually was on the day of the death march? Is this goofball story even theoretically possible? It doesn’t sound like it would be, and Pisar seems fairly “creative” with his memories, but as I said, he’s been telling it for a while now.

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @utu
    @anon

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/ceremony-marks-20-years-since-oscar-nominated-sham/
    The film tendentiously claimed that African-American GIs from the 761st Tank and 183rd Combat Engineers battalions liberated Buchenwald (21,000 prisoners) and Dachau (32,000), two of the largest concentration camps freed by the US Army.

    Leon Bass, one of the stars of “Liberators,” was first misrepresented as a Buchenwald liberator in 1981, at an International Liberators Conference hosted by the US Holocaust Memorial Council at the State Department in Washington.

    Bass’s great heroism had in fact consisted of a visit to Buchenwald on April 17, 1945, six days after the camp’s liberation, during which another 183rd soldier, William Scott III, took a few photographs.

    But a Feb. 8, 1993, article in the New Republic, “The Exaggerators,” written by Jeffrey Goldberg, delivered a devastating blow to the film. While the opening scene shows two veterans of the 761st Tank Battalion “returning” to Buchenwald with survivor Benjamin Bender, one of the GIs, E.G. McConnell, confessed to Goldberg that his first trip to the camp was in 1991, courtesy of WNET. Goldberg also reported that McConnell’s admission was “supported by a host of veterans of the 761st,” the battalion featured in “Liberators.”

    Six months later, the New York Times published an article about a just-released independent report by WNET conceding that African-American GIs played no role in the liberation of either Buchenwald or Dachau. In contrast to the Motion Picture Academy, PBS’s flagship station instituted a “new policy of requiring producers [of documentaries] to demonstrate proof of their claims before financing is provided.”

    Replies: @anon

  125. @Reg Cæsar
    Gophers-Badgers game called off after positive COVID-19 tests


    Nearing end of 1st Quarter, nearly 40% of St. Paul Public High School Students have failing grades

    In reading, the United States ranks 15th among the 31 participating countries, 45 percent of a standard deviation behind Finland, the world leader. One might attribute this to the fact that English is a difficult language to learn-except that the United States was the lowest scoring of all the English-speaking countries. Canada, New Zealand, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Ireland all ranked higher. So did Korea, Japan, Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Norway, and France. The results in math and science were equally dismal.

    Still another international comparison, this provided by the International Adult Literacy Survey, provides a different way of assessing the quality of education in the United States. It was administered during the mid-1990s to a cross-section of 16- to 65-year-olds in 14 European and North American countries.

    The United States ranked 12th on the test, trailing Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, and Germany by significant margins. The news gets even worse: the United States appears to be living on its past. The literacy skills of Americans aged 56 to 65 ranked them second in the world. These highfliers had attended school in the 1950s, at a time when SAT scores reached heights to which they have never since returned-and Europeans were still trying to put together an education system that could serve more than an elite cadre.

    Americans who went to school during the 1960s ranked a respectable 3rd; those schooled in the 1970s ranked 5th. But 16- to 25-year-olds, adults who were wandering America’s school hallways during the 1980s and 1990s, ranked 14th. In short, the literacy survey records a simple, steady progression downward. Apologists will find excuses for these outcomes, of course. The downward U. S. trajectory is due more to gains elsewhere than to slippage within the United States, some will say, as if this were satisfying. Others may say that U.S. scores are pulled down by its immigrants and ethnic diversity..., overlooking the fact that other countries have immigrants too. [!]


    https://www.educationnext.org/tickettonowhere/
     

    Replies: @Alice

    Yes, we are living on the past. Minnesota in particular is preparing for a future where the citizenry won’t be attending universities and isn’t even capable of being a low-skill menial work force. But all states are in that shape; not all admit it.

    But no one in education will admit why we have fallen so far: not the least of which is the teachers who were that highly literate are all gone. Teachers can’t teach what they don’t know, so they can’t educate even the ones whose genes and upbringing could make them numerate and literate any longer.

    this is not simply the decline in the last 50 years. Go back and read the California 6th grade reader Jerry Pournelle put on kindle, from the 1900s. Heck, read the Federalist papers, written for the farmers of the day.

    Ultimately, only the Hajnal line immigrants to the US believed in educating the most promising, apprenticing the most talented, hiring the most innovative. All others hire their family, their tribe, their clan, and they all torpedo the good work of the Other to make themselves not look so bad. By the 50s, Buckley showed in GAMAY that we had stopped professing these traits as American Exceptionalism. They already had ceded all ground to immigrationists, identity politicians, and above all, ignorant teachers. There is no one left to uphold standards of the modern enlightenment.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  126. @Houston 1992
    @Buffalo Joe

    Why did not Japanese coherence overcome such a petty inter service rally ?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Why did not Japanese coherence overcome such a petty inter service rally ?

    Japan and the Koreas are the most homogenous. Racial politics can be complicated and nasty in these countries, where nationalism and ethnicity have at times gone hand-in-hand, from Hirohito’s Japan to Kim Il Sung’s North Korea. The lack of diversity perhaps informs these politics, although it’s tough to say which caused which.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/16/a-revealing-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-ethnically-diverse-countries/

    Handy Guide to Finnish Political Parties

    List of political parties in the Faroe Islands


  127. I’m starting to get the distinct impression my betters don’t know what the fuck they’re doing.

  128. OT: Today’s news for everyone who didn’t bother to vote for Trump, thought he was abrasive, didn’t like his tweets:

    President-elect Biden:
    “Some of it’s going to depend on the kind of cooperation I can or cannot get from the United States Congress. But I am going, I made a commitment, in the first 100 days, I will send an immigration bill to the United States Senate with a pathway to citizenship for over 11 million undocumented people in America.”

    Lots of Republican senators are interested in making a deal, it turns out. They want to make up for being in the same party with the Bad Orange Man.

  129. @Anon
    OT

    I was reading this crazy piece by Lena Dunham at Harpers about how she had her entire reproductive apparatus cut out because of chronic intense pain (and then she came down with adoption fever). She had a disease called endometriosis that is apparently real, but the issue of its associated pain is controversial. Doctors (more than a third of whom are female) often say the pain is in the woman's head, while feminists say that the medical profession suffers from institutional patriarchical misogyny and wants women to suffer.

    Googling around on this I found a pre-internet dissertation from 1979 [sic], written by a woman, that weirdly seems to connect this psychogenic pain version of endometriosis with today's rapid onset gender dysphoria. From the conclusion to the dissertation:

    Personality Correlates of Endometriosis
    Mary Lou Collins
    Western Michigan University
    https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3677&context=dissertations


    At the onset of menstrual life at about the age of 12 years, the endometriotic woman views herself negatively because she is female and wishes somehow she could change her sex. The duration of this unfavorable sexual identity persists into adulthood and mani­fests itself in painful sexual intercourse and continued menstrual difficulties such as dysmenorrhea and hypermenorrhea. She has feelings of being limited and pressed by social and vocational aspects of her life space, is over­ sensitive, and experiences pervasive and generalized resent­ment and hostility (MMPI Scale 6). She expresses this hostility in an indirect fashion towards men. For example, she may avoid sexual intercourse because of the pain associated with the act. Her complaints may also induce feelings of guilt in her mate following intercourse. Concurrent dysmenorrhea may also serve as an expression of aggressiveness against the male, as a method of self­ punishment, and as a manifestation of her rejection of the feminine role (Menninger, 1939).
     
    In fairness the dissertation ascribes other characteristics to the "endometriotic woman" that don't seem to apply to ROGD. And I can see how feminists get pissed off, because this all reads like Freudian "hysteria." But maybe there is a grain of truth in "hysteria."

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

    No human body–much less the human reproductive system–is perfect. There are always going to be failures. That said, endometriosis should be strongly selected against. (But then homosexuality should be even more strongly selected against, yet it exists.)

    One thing i’m pretty confident is involved:

    We are in a massive experiment of women delaying and reducing their fertility. Back in the day a typical peasant girl might not have enough fat to reach menarche until she was maybe 14, 15, 16 or more, and then would marry are start having children in her early twenties.

    Now with abundant calories a typical American girl has menarche at around 12–many earlier. But then–if college educated–probably does not have child for 15 to 20 or more years, and few have more than 2. We have tens of millions of young women, well–overly well!–fed, their bodies primed for child bearing who year, after year, after year have empty wombs.

    Any surprise that there are issues?

    ~~

    We–Western Civilization–are undergoing selection against the anti-natal types, which we really, really need to go faster.

    But the problem is these anti-natal types are voting and “refugees welcome!”ing in the destruction of the West before we can get rid of them.

  130. 90% success is phenomenal! 🎉🎄🎉

    And then you remember that anyone with an immune system under 50 years of age enjoys 99.98% success versus the coronasniffles.

    Hoax.

  131. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe


    Thank you. Stay safe.
     
    Thanks. You as well.

    Check out this site. It's by a senior-citizen who's in amazing physical shape. The site contains a lot of practical advice on staying healthy as you age. There's advice on exercise, supplementation, diet, and various other topics.

    https://roguehealthandfitness.com/

    You can't control the fact that you're getting older, but getting older is a lot easier when you're in good health. If you're healthy, the next 29+ years will be a lot more fun.

    While I highly recommend reading through the site, here's a quick summary.

    -Lift weights 2x a week
    -Get as much sunshine as possible
    -Take supplements (Vitamin D, Vitamin K2, Omega 3 Fish Oil, Magnesium Citrate)
    -Eat non-processed foods (with a strong preference for meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese)
    -Do low-to-moderate carb
    -Limit sugar
    -Do intermittent fast (if you can)
    -Eat probiotic-rich foods (Kefir, Kimchi, Sauerkraut)
    -Eat berries
    -Drink black coffee
    -Eat dark chocolate
    -Take cold showers
    -Key to good health is controlling insulin and blood sugar/glucose
    -Consider metformin

    One very simple way to better health. Donate blood once every 2 months.

    We have an excess of iron storage in body, which tends to worsen with age. Excess iron correlates very strongly with lots of health problems (cancer, heart disease, blood pressure), as the iron literally rusts in your body and causes oxidative stress. By donating blood, you can lower your iron level significantly. There are actually lots of studies that show blood donation is associated with good health and long lifespan.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Buffalo Joe

    I agree with the black coffee and dark chocolate. But your list omits two shots of Jack Daniels, which is good for what ails you.

    Also, in all seriousness, I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with “heat shock proteins” or something. But even if the health benefits weren’t there, it’s a pretty relaxing thing to do. (Especially, if combined with the two shots of JD.).

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Hypnotoad666


    I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with “heat shock proteins” or something. But even if the health benefits weren’t there, it’s a pretty relaxing thing to do.
     
    Absolutely. Heat exposure produces a hormetic reaction, which results in the body strengthening itself. Cold showers, exercise, blood donation, cocoa, and black coffee all produce hormetic responses too.

    Check this out.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150223122602.htm

    A sauna may do more than just make you sweat. A new study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

     

    Saunas cost about $4,000-$6,000 and take a lot of size. You could go to a sauna at a fitness club (like LA Fitness), but that's not always convenient.

    "High" cocoa consumption is associated with a 47% reduction in the mortality rate.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/409867

    Results: One third of the men did not use cocoa at baseline. The median cocoa intake among users was 2.11 g/d. After adjustment, the mean systolic blood pressure in the highest tertile of cocoa intake was 3.7 mm Hg lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −7.1 to −0.3 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) and the mean diastolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower (95% CI, −4.0 to −0.2 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) compared with the lowest tertile. During follow-up, 314 men died, 152 of cardiovascular diseases. Compared with the lowest tertile of cocoa intake, the adjusted relative risk for men in the highest tertile was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.32-0.78; P = .004 for trend) for cardiovascular mortality and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.39-0.72; P < .001) for all-cause mortality.

     

    "High" was only 4.18 grams/day.

    So if you eat one "small" chocolate bar per week (which is typically about 40-50 grams in weight) and make sure it's 70% cocoa, you'll cut your risk of death in half. Which is remarkable.

    Eat a small dark chocolate bar once per week and expect to live many more years. Pretty cool.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  132. @Anon
    OT: Anyone think we've entered a new era of government? With Obama, the elites realized that what they wanted was a weak figurehead president so the elites could run wild controlling the government agencies to their own financial benefit with no oversight. The reason the elites liked--and backed--a dingleberry like Biden was because he was weak. They wanted a weak president who wouldn't give them any oversight or trouble. They also want a compromised president because they can threaten him if he doesn't obey. Biden is known to have taken Chinese bribes, and the elites love that. They can destroy him if he gets out of line.

    In a way, it's like the transition the Japanese made from having an emperor who actually ran things to being a figurehead for government agencies that do what they want.

    We may be entering an era of a permanently weak president.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Keypusher, @AndrewR

    Compared to Trump, Obama was about as powerful as Josef Stalin. The weakest president you will ever see is Trump.

  133. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    Like socialism. If a little bit doesn’t have the desired positive effect, why, you just add more. The promised result – Utopia – still isn’t showing up? Don’t worry – you’ll be the lucky recipients of the full-bore, double-barreled, 4-star version right quick.

    As to corona prevention, they’ll go much farther than chicken suits and daily soap water enemas, believe me. The Folks Who Run Things are fanatics.

  134. @Hypnotoad666
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I agree with the black coffee and dark chocolate. But your list omits two shots of Jack Daniels, which is good for what ails you.

    Also, in all seriousness, I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with "heat shock proteins" or something. But even if the health benefits weren't there, it's a pretty relaxing thing to do. (Especially, if combined with the two shots of JD.).

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with “heat shock proteins” or something. But even if the health benefits weren’t there, it’s a pretty relaxing thing to do.

    Absolutely. Heat exposure produces a hormetic reaction, which results in the body strengthening itself. Cold showers, exercise, blood donation, cocoa, and black coffee all produce hormetic responses too.

    Check this out.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150223122602.htm

    A sauna may do more than just make you sweat. A new study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

    Saunas cost about $4,000-$6,000 and take a lot of size. You could go to a sauna at a fitness club (like LA Fitness), but that’s not always convenient.

    “High” cocoa consumption is associated with a 47% reduction in the mortality rate.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/409867

    Results: One third of the men did not use cocoa at baseline. The median cocoa intake among users was 2.11 g/d. After adjustment, the mean systolic blood pressure in the highest tertile of cocoa intake was 3.7 mm Hg lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −7.1 to −0.3 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) and the mean diastolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower (95% CI, −4.0 to −0.2 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) compared with the lowest tertile. During follow-up, 314 men died, 152 of cardiovascular diseases. Compared with the lowest tertile of cocoa intake, the adjusted relative risk for men in the highest tertile was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.32-0.78; P = .004 for trend) for cardiovascular mortality and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.39-0.72; P < .001) for all-cause mortality.

    “High” was only 4.18 grams/day.

    So if you eat one “small” chocolate bar per week (which is typically about 40-50 grams in weight) and make sure it’s 70% cocoa, you’ll cut your risk of death in half. Which is remarkable.

    Eat a small dark chocolate bar once per week and expect to live many more years. Pretty cool.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    For over ten years, I have eaten a 90% chocolate bar at least a few times a week. My clownish father has always referred to them as "candy bars." Needless to say, he's not one to take dietary advice from.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  135. @SaneClownPosse
    How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Jack D

    How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.

    PCR is fit for purpose if someone has COVID-19 symptoms and you want higher confidence they’ve actually got COVID-19. Which would be its role in scoring cases in these Phase 3 trials.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.

    “cocktail jab?” What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @That Would Be Telling


    “cocktail jab?” What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?
     
    All jabs involve a cocktail of adjuvants, preservatives, cell cultures and other ingredients.

    Does the new jab contain WI38, MRC 5, HEK 293, MF59, aluminum, thimerosal, formaldehyde, lecithin, gelatin, peanut protein or polysorbate 80? Does it contain neomycin, streptomycin, polymyxin b, gentamicin or kanamycin? For example, the shingles vaccine, like several vaccines, should not be given to people with a history of adverse reaction to neomycin or to people who've had a severe case of the chicken pox.

    It's important to read the inserts because some vaccines are not safe for everyone.
    Vaccines are not one size fits all.

    https://www.health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Package-inserts

    Replies: @Jack D, @Keypusher

  136. @Old and Grumpy
    @AndrewR

    The Brits will get the jab no matter what. Wrong thinkers will be the only ones who question Astra Zenaca. In a way the will out themselves for easy detection. Kinda makes one wonder if the report went public for such a nefarious reason.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “The Brits will get the jab no matter what.”

    Reactions here seem split into “I can’t wait!” and “After you, mate!”.

    A fair few people are cautious about a jab that’s so new. I wonder if countries (or airlines) will start to insist on the jab before you can fly/visit?

  137. @clyde
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Example – a decent quality jumpstarter (battery pack) for my cars in case someone drains the battery. £107 delivered on Amazon. £89 with free postage on Ebay. £83 including postage from the manufacturer.
    I only use Amazon if I want something next day.
     
    Same here in the USA. Amazon is good for finding/approximating the item's price level. Then buy at ebay or the actual website. This is highly variable and best price can be found, might be found at any of the three once shipping is factored in.
    I shift in and out of Amazon Prime. I have some vitamins Zinc-Quercitin-D etc in my cart and will push the button on Black Friday.

    Bored semi-elderly white woken women are who is making Jeff Bezos more billions. They swipe right and buy their more useless more stuff, that if only it lead to salvation (after a while) or at least 72 hours worth of joy.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Used to know a guy who supplemented his income on eBay. Said Christmas was a great time, drunk people sat at home with nowt better to do than spend cash online.

  138. @AKAHorace
    I wonder what happened to whoever screwed this up ? Do you fire them for error or promote them for developing a better dosage ?

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Charon

    Depends on their position in the “Progressive Stack”

  139. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    I ran out of “responses”, and I needed some sort of combination anyway. A negative response from utu tells me right away you’ve got a winner of a comment.

    Good one, Mr. Anon! This needs to be ctrl-c’d and ctrl-v’d elsewhere. I’m on it.

  140. @Jonathan Mason
    The average flu vaccine is about 70% effective, but while this may not sound very good at the individual level (please can I have a refund, it didn't work for me and I nearly died after paying good money for the vaccine), this is actually quite effective in achieving enough herd immunity to keep the R number within acceptable limits.

    The AstraZenca vaccine, at about $8 for a double dose is by far the most cost effective compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. We don't yet know the prices for the Russian and Chinese vaccines, though the Russians have said Sputnik V will probably be available at cost.

    I don't expect Americans to be lining up for the Russian vaccine, but clearly if it is sold on a large scale to various nations, this will free up more vaccine doses of Western vaccines for Americans to receive quick jabs.

    Trump is claiming kudos for handing out vast amounts of money to drug companies to develop vaccines, and for cutting red tape to speed up approval, but is this not what any head of state would have done? Was there any serious consideration of not doing so, in spite of the fact that such an action speaks more of socialism than a belief in the curative values of the free market?

    It seems like the kind of thing that Putin would have done. Oh, wait a minute, he did, so maybe he was taking a lead from Trump after a private conversation on the red phone.

    Or was there opposition to Operation Warp Speed within the Trump administration on grounds of ideology?

    Incidentally, I am currently in Ecuador, and have been for a few weeks. Here the social distancing is very well thought out and consistent. For example, buses, which are the main form of public transportation have the maximum number of passengers written on the outside of the bus, and elderly persons like myself are always seated at the front of the bus to reduce exposure to air breathed by other persons to the minimum.

    Masks are worn everywhere, even by joggers, though I did see a woman in the supermarket last week with her mask below her nose.

    On entering a supermarket, you have your temperature taken on the arm, and are given a squirt of hand sanitizer. Your shopping cart handle is then personally sanitized and dried for you.

    At check out, shoppers wait two meters apart, and are directed by staff as to which cashier line to join.

    When I was in the Dominican Republic a couple of months ago, the supermarkets all had tripod mounted cameras that looked similar to cell phones, which framed your face and took your temperature. You then got the hand sanitizer treatment.

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware of infection control measures, but you would think that if people in so-called "third world" countries were trying so hard to contain the disease, then Americans could do equally well.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D, @Charon, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Achmed E. Newman

    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware …

    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans’ freedom again, as with the TSA, cause … awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON’T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans’ freedom again, as with the TSA, cause … awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON’T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?
     
    He could do worse, Ecuador has a better climate and more pleasant Spanish accent than South Florida. A lot of Americans are choosing to retire there.

    There are a lot of Americans who comment here who cannot take the most measured, polite suggestions that something is being done better in another country without telling people to "Go live there if you like it so much". This is not a good attitude for the US. The Chinese were the same way in until the late 19th century, automatically assuming their own superiority and that they had nothing to learn from foreigners. They paid a lot for this attitude.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I am very seriously considering it. I would imagine that at a time like this a very large number of Americans, particularly those who are retired, or those who can do their work online, would want to relocate somewhere else where the quality of life is better than in the US.

    And surely if you find that the racial problem that is the heritage of the civil war is still very serious problem in the US, would it not be a good idea to move somewhere else in the Americas where that issue does not exist to any relevant extent?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  141. @utu
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. - For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don't launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWa6e3WhZ4

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.

    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

    I’m too tired to even paste in a Captain Picard facepalm meme. Reg?

    • Agree: Liza, Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman



    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.

     

    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

     

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c3/00/4a/c3004a77b71df34be927c033ffa9c5d8.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  142. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    Hey. Hey. Hey. Gotta flatten the curve, these are the critical three weeks. All criticism should be saved until after the critical three weeks. If the next three weeks reveal themselves to be the critical three weeks too then that’s just more curve to flatten.

  143. @utu
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. - For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don't launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWa6e3WhZ4

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.

    The same old unfalsifiable nostrums.

    Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Or that most of the most vulnerable people have already been afflicted.

    Well, for your sake, I hope you look good in feathers. Bottoms up!

  144. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The number of comments is correlated with how long until the next post. I could recap a popular television series about fast food and get only 50 comments if I posted 6 more times later that day.

    Replies: @Alice, @Achmed E. Newman

    Right. I’ve seen it where you are working your ass off on a Takimag column, and there has been no new post for 12 freaking hours. 12 hours, Steve! Your commenters are going off the wall off topic on the last one, and you’ll get 250 comments under a post about golf course architecture as practiced by a Hollywood actor that your sister-in-law went to high school with.

    In the meantime, I’ll tell you what, I’m that || close to clicking on a Godfree Roberts column and chiming in about the 5 year plan of 1958. No, that’d be .. just … sick …

    • LOL: Gordo
  145. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Hypnotoad666


    I would add that a ton of recent science says that doing hot saunas has some awesome health benefits, almost akin to doing a heavy aerobic workout. It has to do with “heat shock proteins” or something. But even if the health benefits weren’t there, it’s a pretty relaxing thing to do.
     
    Absolutely. Heat exposure produces a hormetic reaction, which results in the body strengthening itself. Cold showers, exercise, blood donation, cocoa, and black coffee all produce hormetic responses too.

    Check this out.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150223122602.htm

    A sauna may do more than just make you sweat. A new study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

     

    Saunas cost about $4,000-$6,000 and take a lot of size. You could go to a sauna at a fitness club (like LA Fitness), but that's not always convenient.

    "High" cocoa consumption is associated with a 47% reduction in the mortality rate.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/409867

    Results: One third of the men did not use cocoa at baseline. The median cocoa intake among users was 2.11 g/d. After adjustment, the mean systolic blood pressure in the highest tertile of cocoa intake was 3.7 mm Hg lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −7.1 to −0.3 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) and the mean diastolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower (95% CI, −4.0 to −0.2 mm Hg; P = .03 for trend) compared with the lowest tertile. During follow-up, 314 men died, 152 of cardiovascular diseases. Compared with the lowest tertile of cocoa intake, the adjusted relative risk for men in the highest tertile was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.32-0.78; P = .004 for trend) for cardiovascular mortality and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.39-0.72; P < .001) for all-cause mortality.

     

    "High" was only 4.18 grams/day.

    So if you eat one "small" chocolate bar per week (which is typically about 40-50 grams in weight) and make sure it's 70% cocoa, you'll cut your risk of death in half. Which is remarkable.

    Eat a small dark chocolate bar once per week and expect to live many more years. Pretty cool.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    For over ten years, I have eaten a 90% chocolate bar at least a few times a week. My clownish father has always referred to them as “candy bars.” Needless to say, he’s not one to take dietary advice from.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @AndrewR

    That's an excellent habit.

    Interestingly, you might benefit from a lower cocoa percentage.

    When cocoa has an extremely high cocoa percentage, it's often "Dutched" (treated with alkaline) to reduce the bittnerness. Unfortunately, this has the effect of removing some of the polyphenols, which diminishes the health benefits. So if you go with a slightly lower percentage, you might be able to find something that's not "Dutched." Though to really know whether your chocolate has undergone this process, you often have to call up the manufacturer.

    Which brand do you eat? Lindt? Ghirardelli?

    Replies: @AndrewR

  146. @Anon
    OT: Anyone think we've entered a new era of government? With Obama, the elites realized that what they wanted was a weak figurehead president so the elites could run wild controlling the government agencies to their own financial benefit with no oversight. The reason the elites liked--and backed--a dingleberry like Biden was because he was weak. They wanted a weak president who wouldn't give them any oversight or trouble. They also want a compromised president because they can threaten him if he doesn't obey. Biden is known to have taken Chinese bribes, and the elites love that. They can destroy him if he gets out of line.

    In a way, it's like the transition the Japanese made from having an emperor who actually ran things to being a figurehead for government agencies that do what they want.

    We may be entering an era of a permanently weak president.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Keypusher, @AndrewR

    You may know this, but it’s worth nothing that the 天皇 (which is bizarrely translated into English as “emperor”) was a figurehead for centuries until the Meiji restoration. The 80 years or so until they were conquered was very unusual for recent centuries.

  147. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason


    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware ...
     
    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans' freedom again, as with the TSA, cause ... awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON'T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Jonathan Mason

    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans’ freedom again, as with the TSA, cause … awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON’T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?

    He could do worse, Ecuador has a better climate and more pleasant Spanish accent than South Florida. A lot of Americans are choosing to retire there.

    There are a lot of Americans who comment here who cannot take the most measured, polite suggestions that something is being done better in another country without telling people to “Go live there if you like it so much”. This is not a good attitude for the US. The Chinese were the same way in until the late 19th century, automatically assuming their own superiority and that they had nothing to learn from foreigners. They paid a lot for this attitude.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace

    No, you get me wrong, Horace.

    a) I agree with a lot of what Jack D. had to say, though not with his root causes of America's current "Can't do" mentality. It has a lot more to do with regulations and taxes (something Trump DID try to do something about) than the half-assed Socialists here want to admit. Secondly, a root cause is that American industry and DIYers have to deal with Cheap China-made Crap.

    b) You may not have followed the comments as much as me, which is totally understandable, Horace. Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-World. (I didn't know it was Ecuador till now, but whatever ...) The thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist, but he does not live in S. Florida. If he were there, I wouldn't give a dang about him screwing up that shithole that we didn't even want to stop for gas at on the way to the Florida Keys.

    No, Mr. Mason lives in the only Southern part left of the State, as I already wrote. That would be the section roughly north of the I-4 to the coast up to the Georgia border, but not counting the panhandle, so through Tallahassee to the west and back down toward the north end of Tampa Bay. He told us he lives in Jax or thereabouts. They don't need another damn Socialist telling them how to run their business. Mr. Mason is highly anti-gun too - in Jacksonville, Florida no less!

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace

    Yeah, I do see where I confused things: I meant Southern Florida culturally, not geographically. Sorry.

  148. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    Americans in general are kind of fixated in the past and assume that America is the most advanced country. They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where people shit in the street and food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around and not in modern supermarkets with more advanced technology than your local (bankrupt) A&P.

    What they are not taking into account is that the world has not stood still - other countries have advanced while the US has gone sideways or even deteriorated. In 1950 80% of world automobile production was in the US. Currently it is 12%. If you stand on a subway platform in NY, some crazy homeless person might shove you onto the tracks, but this would never happen to you in Shanghai, not just because they keep the criminally insane locked up but because modern subway systems have platform doors that make this impossible. The NY subway will get platform doors in approximately never. We are like late Rome - we just don't have the resources or skills to implement large scale projects like that at a cost that we could afford. I don't know what it will take for Americans to change their mental image of themselves as #1.

    The first step in fixing any problem is acknowledging that you have a problem and Americans are in denial as to how far the US has fallen in the world and what a disorganized place we have become. Trump, in the end, did very little to fix this (maybe it was beyond the capability of anyone) and Biden will only make things worse. Part of the reason why Shanghai and Santo Domingo look a lot better than they used to (and the Bronx looks a lot worse) is because tons of US dollars have flowed into those places, either as a result of their exporting both people (who send remittances back home) and goods to the US. This has all been pretty much a one-way street.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @AnotherDad, @Jonathan Mason

    Yes, you are right, but to be fair, the majority of people here (Ecuador) do buy most of their food in traditional markets, for example, I have been in the fish market in the local town of La Libertad where there are 50 numbered booths where fishermen sell their fish, and the spacing between the booths is not even 2 meters. But at least they are wearing masks and using hand sanitizer.

    The difference here is that supermarkets are the more expensive option, regarded as a kind of convenience store where you have everything in one place in air-conditioned, electrically lit, serendipity, chilled, frozen, freshly-baked, or whatever, but you pay for the convenience of having orange juice ready squeezed and bottled for you, versus just buying the fruit in bulk in the market for perhaps a third of the price and extracting the juice yourself.

    This makes one realize how badly most Americans are ripped off by supermarkets, which are probably perceived as a cheaper and more convenient option than farmer’s or fisherman’s markets, which are not so cheap in the US.

    I think the majority of people here in Ecuador would feel rather sorry for Americans having little access to food purchases other than in supermarkets.

    On the other hand, Americans will laugh at the Ecuadorians’ lack of business savvy. When I get a bottle of purified drinking water with my $2.50 lunch for 30 cents at a restaurant on a terrace overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the Ecuadorian restaurateurs do not seem to know that they should be charging $3.99 as customers should pay extra for the ocean view and breeze. (Ecuador is on the US dollar.)

    They clearly need business school missionaries to come down and show them the correct way to prosperity.

    So, it may come that in the fullness of time, the rest of the world will take its lesson from those brave Americans who have decided that the best way to defeat Covid-19 is to totally ignore all infection control precautions, and decide that is the way to go, but I would not count on it just yet.

    Incidentally, although some have said there that Covid-19 is simply a hoax invented to get rid of President Trump, a number of government leaders in the region have been reelected this year in spite of tourist economies being absolutely devastated by Covid-19 precautions and quarantines.

    For example, Holness in Jamaica was recently reelected with a massively increased majority, so it can be done, but if you are going to get enogh people to follow you, you need to get their trust and show leadership.

    Even sheep need other sheep with leadership qualities.

  149. @utu
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course we will also be told “Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren’t mask-mandates”. - For a very good reason. W/o masks , w/o social distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher. Furthermore there is a possibility that masks reduce the severity of the diseases by lowering the viral dose. This might be a part of the multivariate equation explaining why the IFR in the second wave is lower than in the first.

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don't launch the cause against wearing underwear. After all underwear is very restrictive particularly to your manhood?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWa6e3WhZ4

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    For a very good reason. W/o face diapers , w/o antisocial distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.

    No. They wouldn’t.

    https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

    The cases!, like so many other things these days, are blatantly fraudulent.

    http://philosophers-stone.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/The-scam-has-been-confirmed-Dsalud-November-2020.pdf

    Why you anti-facediapering libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.

    What a strange comment. The pro-panicers and pro-facediaperers are the ones “launching a cause”. We libertarians are live and let live. Do what you want, just leave us alone. The authoritarians/totalitarians are the ones interfering in the lives of others. They’re happy to force their insanity and edicts upon others, with violence if necessary. Libertarians are not dangerous and violent, unlike the dominant culture which has succumbed to mass hysteria.

    I will not play charades with you or otherwise go along with your insanity.

    Wear a face diaper or chicken suit if you wish, but please, just leave us libertarians alone.

    • Replies: @utu
    @Adam Smith

    "...leave us libertarians alone..." - After you retreat to a separate isolated from the rest of society area where your recalcitrant antisocial behaviors won't pose a threat to the reset of us. A GULAG for libertarians somewhere in Alaska.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  150. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    “Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again.”

    That’s your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don’t save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays. Clearly, speed limits and drunk-driving restrictions should also be removed forthwith. And yes, Wuhan-flu is peaking again despite the many truthers who assured us it would up and disappear the moment that Biden was elected. Viruses seem to have little regard half-witted conspiracy theories, more’s the pity.

    It’s worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don’t work. They’ve since done a U-turn.

    And we now have increasing evidence even in the US that masks, while no panacea (so that sending kids back to school, and congregating for the holidays will indeed cause a surge in the virus), do reduce both transmission, and severity of the disease.

    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state’s population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn’t require masks continued to see their cases increase.

    I added the bit in brackets to make it more relevant, but I think it nonetheless gets the point across.

    • Thanks: utu
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @HA


    That’s your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don’t save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays.
     
    That's a specious comparison. What underlying causative effect is going up to explain the increasing infection rate? Winter? If that's the case, then we'd probably be better off dosing with Vitamin D3. Ever heard Lord Fauci even mention D3? I haven't? There have been local peaks in COVID around the country ever since last Spring, even after mask mandates went into effect. Look at the time history of infections in California - you can't even tell from the graph when the mask mandate went into effect. Some effect.

    It’s worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don’t work. They’ve since done a U-turn.
     
    It's worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won't protect you.

    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state’s population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn’t require masks continued to see their cases increase.
     
    Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It's bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago.

    https://sentinelksmo.org/more-deception-kdhe-hid-data-to-justify-mask-mandate/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @HA

  151. @SaneClownPosse
    How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Jack D

    How do they know the vaccine is effective?

    They give half the people in the trial a placebo and half the real vaccine and then they wait to see who gets sick with Covid. 9x as many people got sick in placebo arm.

    Even if the PCR tests were unreliable (they aren’t) then since they gave everyone the same tests (even their care doctors didn’t know who got the real vaccine) you would expect the errors to be randomly distributed. But 90-95% of the positives were in the placebo group. This is far, far beyond any level that could be attributed to chance.

    Next question.

    Yes the real reason for the jab is so that Google and Apple can keep track of you at all times. Using their phones they can only track you 95% of the time.

  152. @Diversity Heretic
    Mistakes made and not detected for months in testing do not increase my confidence in vaccines. But let the guinea pigs line up!

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @AnotherDad

    My zeroth order guess is that the difference here is just noise. You can gin up some stuff, but naively there isn’t much reason to suspect the lower dose up front would be better.

    I suspect some luck. A few more cases that should have, but randomly did not, develop on that side of the sample. A few more cases that did, but should not have, on the other. Vaccine 70-80%ish effective.

    But … you never know.

  153. @Stan Adams
    @El Dato


    This will end in amazing amounts of tears.
     
    Just call him Bawlin' Biden, the Crier in Chief:
    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/11/20/14/35913026-8970247-image-m-4_1605882769599.jpg

    It's going to be a long four years.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Stan, a long four years but how many with biden as POTUS?

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Buffalo Joe

    Biden will be PINO from Day 1. Like RBG, he'll be kept "alive" until they've exhausted every ounce of plausible deniability.

    Through a judicious combination of Audio-Animatronics (the Bidenbot) and CGI, they'll be able to keep the charade going for quite a while. At least a year, maybe two.

    I have not discounted the possibility that Biden is already clinically brain-dead. (His neurons are dropping like flies.)

    Indeed, I am not prepared to assert categorically that I, personally, am still alive. After this election, I have a nagging suspicion that I've already died and gone to Hell.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  154. @Gee Vince gillroy
    Trumps America

    Fortunately we have an incoming admistration that follows science and is kind

    I guarantee the virus will be controlled by mid 2021 at the latest

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Gee, that’s quite a guarantee. It is now the end of November so mid 2021, as in June, is just seven months away. Controlled where? America or worldwide? The only thing I would guarantee is the state governments and mayors aren’t giving up their control of our lives.

  155. @Mr. Anon
    @RichardTaylor


    I’m pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it’ll be lockdowns for years to come.
     
    Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again. Of course we will also be told "Well, imagine how bad it would be if there weren't mask-mandates". Someday we will all be saying "Well, imagine how bad the pandemic would be if we weren't all wearing chicken-suits and getting daily soap-water enemas!" or whatever our public-health wardens next deem to be "the science".

    Replies: @utu, @Liza, @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross, @HA, @Adam Smith

    https://www.healthline.com/health/soap-suds-enema

    “Two weeks to flatten the curve!” turned into “We all must wear face diapers, everywhere, forever!”

  156. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe


    Thank you. Stay safe.
     
    Thanks. You as well.

    Check out this site. It's by a senior-citizen who's in amazing physical shape. The site contains a lot of practical advice on staying healthy as you age. There's advice on exercise, supplementation, diet, and various other topics.

    https://roguehealthandfitness.com/

    You can't control the fact that you're getting older, but getting older is a lot easier when you're in good health. If you're healthy, the next 29+ years will be a lot more fun.

    While I highly recommend reading through the site, here's a quick summary.

    -Lift weights 2x a week
    -Get as much sunshine as possible
    -Take supplements (Vitamin D, Vitamin K2, Omega 3 Fish Oil, Magnesium Citrate)
    -Eat non-processed foods (with a strong preference for meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese)
    -Do low-to-moderate carb
    -Limit sugar
    -Do intermittent fast (if you can)
    -Eat probiotic-rich foods (Kefir, Kimchi, Sauerkraut)
    -Eat berries
    -Drink black coffee
    -Eat dark chocolate
    -Take cold showers
    -Key to good health is controlling insulin and blood sugar/glucose
    -Consider metformin

    One very simple way to better health. Donate blood once every 2 months.

    We have an excess of iron storage in body, which tends to worsen with age. Excess iron correlates very strongly with lots of health problems (cancer, heart disease, blood pressure), as the iron literally rusts in your body and causes oxidative stress. By donating blood, you can lower your iron level significantly. There are actually lots of studies that show blood donation is associated with good health and long lifespan.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Buffalo Joe

    Johnny, thank you for the list. I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years. Wish I had never smoked but kicked that habit over 30 years ago. Have one Manhattan a day and lift light weights at home. Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul. Caffine and I don’t get along and although I love the taste, I skip fried foods. Stay safe my friend.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe


    I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years.
     
    You're ahead of the curve. I hadn't even heard of fasting (for health benefits) until maybe 5 years ago.

    Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul.
     
    Interestingly, long-distance cardio isn't healthy, contrary to what the mainstream authorities have told us. So you're better off skipping it.

    If you need help with the knees, take Fish Oil, Turmeric, and Glucosamine. The first two supplements will lower inflammation and pain, while the Glucosamine is good at repairing cartilage. Taking collagen can be helpful to your knees as well, and will even make you look younger.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  157. @That Would Be Telling
    @SaneClownPosse


    How do they know the vaccine is effective? Using the not fit for purpose PCR?

    I think that they need a reliable diagnostic tool before they start jabbing people.
     
    PCR is fit for purpose if someone has COVID-19 symptoms and you want higher confidence they've actually got COVID-19. Which would be its role in scoring cases in these Phase 3 trials.

    But maybe COVID-19 is not the reason for the cocktail jab.
     
    "cocktail jab?" What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    “cocktail jab?” What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?

    All jabs involve a cocktail of adjuvants, preservatives, cell cultures and other ingredients.

    Does the new jab contain WI38, MRC 5, HEK 293, MF59, aluminum, thimerosal, formaldehyde, lecithin, gelatin, peanut protein or polysorbate 80? Does it contain neomycin, streptomycin, polymyxin b, gentamicin or kanamycin? For example, the shingles vaccine, like several vaccines, should not be given to people with a history of adverse reaction to neomycin or to people who’ve had a severe case of the chicken pox.

    It’s important to read the inserts because some vaccines are not safe for everyone.
    Vaccines are not one size fits all.

    https://www.health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Package-inserts

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Adam Smith

    Absolutely, but maybe 1% of the people who refuse to be vaccinated are actually allergic or sensitive to some vaccine component. Maybe a vaccine is a "cocktail" but the whole shot is only a few cc's so you are talking about minute quantities of preservatives. Some of the ingredients you list would also be found in, for example, any loaf of bread that you buy in the supermarket, in much larger quantities because they need to preserve a 1 or 2 lb. loaf of bread on the shelf and not just a tiny ampule of vaccine under refrigeration.

    Replies: @Liza, @Adam Smith

    , @Keypusher
    @Adam Smith

    I had a severe case of chicken pox. No issues with shingles vaccine.

  158. @Achmed E. Newman
    @utu


    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.
     
    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

    I'm too tired to even paste in a Captain Picard facepalm meme. Reg?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.

    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Not the Capt. Picard facepalm, but even more apropos, Reg. Thanks.

  159. @Adam Smith
    @utu


    For a very good reason. W/o face diapers , w/o antisocial distancing infections prevalence and deaths cases would be much higher.
     
    No. They wouldn't.

    https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

    The cases!, like so many other things these days, are blatantly fraudulent.

    http://philosophers-stone.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/The-scam-has-been-confirmed-Dsalud-November-2020.pdf

    Why you anti-facediapering libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.
     
    What a strange comment. The pro-panicers and pro-facediaperers are the ones "launching a cause". We libertarians are live and let live. Do what you want, just leave us alone. The authoritarians/totalitarians are the ones interfering in the lives of others. They're happy to force their insanity and edicts upon others, with violence if necessary. Libertarians are not dangerous and violent, unlike the dominant culture which has succumbed to mass hysteria.

    I will not play charades with you or otherwise go along with your insanity.

    Wear a face diaper or chicken suit if you wish, but please, just leave us libertarians alone.

    Replies: @utu

    “…leave us libertarians alone…” – After you retreat to a separate isolated from the rest of society area where your recalcitrant antisocial behaviors won’t pose a threat to the reset of us. A GULAG for libertarians somewhere in Alaska.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @utu

    There's another one of your strange comments.

    A GULAG for libertarians? And anyone else you disagree with?

    Totalitarianism and authoritarianism are antisocial.

    Authoritarian followers are the most dangerous people on earth.

    Replies: @utu

  160. @Buffalo Joe
    @Stan Adams

    Stan, a long four years but how many with biden as POTUS?

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Biden will be PINO from Day 1. Like RBG, he’ll be kept “alive” until they’ve exhausted every ounce of plausible deniability.

    Through a judicious combination of Audio-Animatronics (the Bidenbot) and CGI, they’ll be able to keep the charade going for quite a while. At least a year, maybe two.

    I have not discounted the possibility that Biden is already clinically brain-dead. (His neurons are dropping like flies.)

    Indeed, I am not prepared to assert categorically that I, personally, am still alive. After this election, I have a nagging suspicion that I’ve already died and gone to Hell.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Stan Adams

    Stan, I need an Agree Button with a LOL chaser. Good post.

  161. @utu
    @Adam Smith

    "...leave us libertarians alone..." - After you retreat to a separate isolated from the rest of society area where your recalcitrant antisocial behaviors won't pose a threat to the reset of us. A GULAG for libertarians somewhere in Alaska.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    There’s another one of your strange comments.

    A GULAG for libertarians? And anyone else you disagree with?

    Totalitarianism and authoritarianism are antisocial.

    Authoritarian followers are the most dangerous people on earth.

    • Replies: @utu
    @Adam Smith

    "dangerous people on earth." - Only dangerous to recalcitrant libertarians who are not fit to live in a society.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  162. @anon
    Completely and totally OT, but I felt the need to sperg out for a moment.

    So the new Secretary of State says that his step-dad escaped from a death march, and was rescued by Sgt. Bill Ellington, who served in the 761st Tank Battalion, nicknamed The Black Panthers.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8983451/Biden-pick-Tony-Blinken-recounts-stepfathers-extraordinary-story-surviving-Holocaust.html

    Now, if you read that article, you'll find a link to another article that says that the camp his step-dad escaped from was Dachau.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/immigration/393630-whats-happened-at-our-border-is-not-what-america-should-be

    So the question is, were any of the prisoners who evacuated Dachau actually rescued by the Black Panthers?

    The only reference I can find by searching for "Black Panthers Dachau" is the semi-famous film Liberators, which was made in 1992, as an attempt to bridge relations between blacks and Jews during a time when there were tensions between them in New York City. That's the movie where Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel claimed that a huge, muscular black man came into Buchenwald and began cursing, and his curses turned into holy words, and the emaciated prisoners tried lifting him up on their shoulders, but were too weak to do it.

    This was all fake, of course, and when the movie came out, actual soldiers proved that the Black Panthers had nothing to do with the liberation of Buchenwald, and the filmmakers basically withdrew it.

    But what about Dachau? Supposedly, the Black Panthers were about seventy miles away from Dachau when it was liberated, but then, the death march was about seventy miles long. So, just from that, it is theoretically possible that this kid just happened to run into a tank driven by a black guy.

    On the other hand, since we live in a world where every black achievement gets trumpeted to the heavens, I feel like I would have been able to find some other source for that if it had actually happened. Because another possibility is that he either saw or was involved in the making of Liberators, and just made that story up.

    There's this article, in the LA Times:

    https://www.latimes.com/opinion/la-xpm-2012-feb-01-la-oe-perlman-dachau-20120201-story.html

    It mentions that a woman in Australia heard from her father that he had been rescued from Dachau by a black man in a tank. But guess what? Samuel Pisar went to school in Melbourne and lived there for at least a few years. So it seems entirely possible that it's his daughter. How many Dachau escapees that were rescued by black men in tanks can possibly have moved to Australia?

    And he's told the story before.

    https://www.thecrimson.com/article/1982/11/29/the-long-road-pin-1979-samuel/

    Now, that's an article that's from 1982, which would pre-date Liberators. So maybe it's legit.

    In that version of the story, incidentally, he said "Hail Roosevelt!", not "God bless America", for what it's worth.

    That article also mentions how, one day in Auschwitz, they were calling out the names of people to be gassed, and they called his name, so thinking quickly, he picked up a rag and a bucket and then started wiping down the floor, and then the Germans told him to leave, and then I guess they forgot all about how they were going to gas him, and he went back to his bunk, and they never remembered to gas him later. You know how those concentration camp guards are.

    So I would argue that Samuel Pisar is not always 100% accurate in his memories of the war years.

    But does anyone here actually know where the 761st Tank Battalion actually was on the day of the death march? Is this goofball story even theoretically possible? It doesn't sound like it would be, and Pisar seems fairly "creative" with his memories, but as I said, he's been telling it for a while now.

    Replies: @utu

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/ceremony-marks-20-years-since-oscar-nominated-sham/
    The film tendentiously claimed that African-American GIs from the 761st Tank and 183rd Combat Engineers battalions liberated Buchenwald (21,000 prisoners) and Dachau (32,000), two of the largest concentration camps freed by the US Army.

    Leon Bass, one of the stars of “Liberators,” was first misrepresented as a Buchenwald liberator in 1981, at an International Liberators Conference hosted by the US Holocaust Memorial Council at the State Department in Washington.

    Bass’s great heroism had in fact consisted of a visit to Buchenwald on April 17, 1945, six days after the camp’s liberation, during which another 183rd soldier, William Scott III, took a few photographs.

    But a Feb. 8, 1993, article in the New Republic, “The Exaggerators,” written by Jeffrey Goldberg, delivered a devastating blow to the film. While the opening scene shows two veterans of the 761st Tank Battalion “returning” to Buchenwald with survivor Benjamin Bender, one of the GIs, E.G. McConnell, confessed to Goldberg that his first trip to the camp was in 1991, courtesy of WNET. Goldberg also reported that McConnell’s admission was “supported by a host of veterans of the 761st,” the battalion featured in “Liberators.”

    Six months later, the New York Times published an article about a just-released independent report by WNET conceding that African-American GIs played no role in the liberation of either Buchenwald or Dachau. In contrast to the Motion Picture Academy, PBS’s flagship station instituted a “new policy of requiring producers [of documentaries] to demonstrate proof of their claims before financing is provided.”

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @anon
    @utu

    Right. Liberarors was a fraud, and kind of a hilarious one. But he was telling this story before Liberators even came out.

    The issue is, Pisar's specific claim isn't that the Black Panthers liberated Dachau. He says that he had escaped from Dachau when he was away from the camp, and being marched back. And then, he hid in a barn for an unspecified amount of time, and then heard a tank and went towards it, and it was a Black Panther.

    So the problem with debunking this story is, we don't know exactly where the barn was, and we don't know how long he was hiding. He seems to say that it was weeks. So he could have been hanging out there even after the camp was liberated, and just not known it.

    So it's possible (unlikely, but possible) that he was hanging out until sometime in late April or even May, and just ran into a Black Panther tank on its way to somewhere else.

    I don't really know how you would go about disproving that, without knowing where exactly they were for all that time. They were in the general vicinity of Dachau at the time of the liberation (meaning, within about seventy miles), but I don't know where they went after that, and if they ever went closer to Munich.

    So I don't know. It's a goofy story, and this guy seems prone to stretching the truth. But I feel like it is technically possible, with the limited information we have.

    But I still kind of doubt it.

  163. @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    For over ten years, I have eaten a 90% chocolate bar at least a few times a week. My clownish father has always referred to them as "candy bars." Needless to say, he's not one to take dietary advice from.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s an excellent habit.

    Interestingly, you might benefit from a lower cocoa percentage.

    When cocoa has an extremely high cocoa percentage, it’s often “Dutched” (treated with alkaline) to reduce the bittnerness. Unfortunately, this has the effect of removing some of the polyphenols, which diminishes the health benefits. So if you go with a slightly lower percentage, you might be able to find something that’s not “Dutched.” Though to really know whether your chocolate has undergone this process, you often have to call up the manufacturer.

    Which brand do you eat? Lindt? Ghirardelli?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A lot of Lindt. Also a lot of the endangered species brand. I assume you know what I speak of? I'm not sure they want their brand name to be public. Every flavor and strength has its own animal. The strongest is a black panther

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  164. @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, thank you for the list. I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years. Wish I had never smoked but kicked that habit over 30 years ago. Have one Manhattan a day and lift light weights at home. Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul. Caffine and I don't get along and although I love the taste, I skip fried foods. Stay safe my friend.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years.

    You’re ahead of the curve. I hadn’t even heard of fasting (for health benefits) until maybe 5 years ago.

    Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul.

    Interestingly, long-distance cardio isn’t healthy, contrary to what the mainstream authorities have told us. So you’re better off skipping it.

    If you need help with the knees, take Fish Oil, Turmeric, and Glucosamine. The first two supplements will lower inflammation and pain, while the Glucosamine is good at repairing cartilage. Taking collagen can be helpful to your knees as well, and will even make you look younger.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, thank you for all the advice and it's free too. Or is there a co-pay? Again thank you.

  165. @PiltdownMan



    Russia says data on Sputnik Covid vaccine shows 95% efficacy

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/24/russia-says-data-on-sputnik-covid-vaccine-shows-95-efficacy


     

    https://twitter.com/sputnikvaccine/status/1330869140358377472?s=20


     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @415 reasons, @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  166. @Adam Smith
    @That Would Be Telling


    “cocktail jab?” What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?
     
    All jabs involve a cocktail of adjuvants, preservatives, cell cultures and other ingredients.

    Does the new jab contain WI38, MRC 5, HEK 293, MF59, aluminum, thimerosal, formaldehyde, lecithin, gelatin, peanut protein or polysorbate 80? Does it contain neomycin, streptomycin, polymyxin b, gentamicin or kanamycin? For example, the shingles vaccine, like several vaccines, should not be given to people with a history of adverse reaction to neomycin or to people who've had a severe case of the chicken pox.

    It's important to read the inserts because some vaccines are not safe for everyone.
    Vaccines are not one size fits all.

    https://www.health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Package-inserts

    Replies: @Jack D, @Keypusher

    Absolutely, but maybe 1% of the people who refuse to be vaccinated are actually allergic or sensitive to some vaccine component. Maybe a vaccine is a “cocktail” but the whole shot is only a few cc’s so you are talking about minute quantities of preservatives. Some of the ingredients you list would also be found in, for example, any loaf of bread that you buy in the supermarket, in much larger quantities because they need to preserve a 1 or 2 lb. loaf of bread on the shelf and not just a tiny ampule of vaccine under refrigeration.

    • Replies: @Liza
    @Jack D

    There is a great difference in effect between the miniscule qty of unhealthy substances found in "any loaf of bread" and injecting any amount whatsoever into a baby's blood.

    , @Adam Smith
    @Jack D

    I agree with what you're saying.
    Many store bought foods are poisonous and lack any nutritional value.

    I'm one of those crazy people who always reads the labels. I have for years. I don't buy food with preservatives (other than salt) or food color (my dad worked in a chemical plant that made food color so I know how toxic those dyes are) or anything highly processed. I stay clear of anything gmo or artificial. I don't buy pre-made packaged food. I don't buy store bought bread because bread should not have duck feathers in it. I bake bread from organic non-gmo grains. I do buy fresh fruit and vegetables when I can find them clean enough. I buy non-gmo pasta and crackers. I buy organic non-gmo vegetables in cans or frozen. I do buy some meat at the store but I'm very careful about the quality, no hormones, no antibiotics, etc. There's an organic farm not too far from where I live. They have some really nice beef. I buy heart there for $3.25 a lb. Their ribeye is a little pricey, but worth it. I have a huge organic heirloom garden because I cannot buy many of the things I like to eat at the store because store bought produce has too many pesticides and it lacks the flavor and nutrition of freshly grown produce.

    I gave up eating at restaurants years ago because of the low quality ingredients. (I'm a pretty good cook, I worked as a grill cook for years.) I can make it better at home, with higher quality ingredients for less cash and still buy some wine or beer (which are the dirtiest "foods" I consume) to go with it. My wife is one of the greatest chefs on earth and I've learned alot about cooking from her. She spoils me with great food all the time. It's not that we wouldn't like to go to a restaurant once in a while, but we were always so disappointed in the food when we did, so we gave up.

    I hope you have a nice evening and a nice Thanksgiving Mr. D.

  167. @JohnnyWalker123
    @AndrewR

    That's an excellent habit.

    Interestingly, you might benefit from a lower cocoa percentage.

    When cocoa has an extremely high cocoa percentage, it's often "Dutched" (treated with alkaline) to reduce the bittnerness. Unfortunately, this has the effect of removing some of the polyphenols, which diminishes the health benefits. So if you go with a slightly lower percentage, you might be able to find something that's not "Dutched." Though to really know whether your chocolate has undergone this process, you often have to call up the manufacturer.

    Which brand do you eat? Lindt? Ghirardelli?

    Replies: @AndrewR

    A lot of Lindt. Also a lot of the endangered species brand. I assume you know what I speak of? I’m not sure they want their brand name to be public. Every flavor and strength has its own animal. The strongest is a black panther

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @AndrewR


    Also a lot of the endangered species brand.

     

    Yeah. I've had that. It's hard to get in contact with them, for some reason. They didn't respond to my inquiries.

    Lindt
     
    Here's the message that I received from Lindt.

    Thank you for reaching out about our 70% EXCELLENCE Bars and the use of alkali, also known as Dutch Processing, in some of our products. Though most of our products do not contain cocoa processed with alkali, the high cocoa 78%, 90%, 95%, 99% and 100% Excellence Bars do use this method. This special cocoa powder simply helps to mellow the bitterness normally associated with high cocoa content chocolate, while providing a balanced, flavorful experience. Therefore, the 70% EXCELLENCE bar does NOT use alkali.
     
    To conclude, anything 70% (and below) is not Dutched/Alkalized. If you go above to 78% and higher, then there is Dutching/Alkalizing.

    The Dutching/Alkalizing process does not necessarily ruin the benefits of the cocoa, but there's a significant reduction in polyphenols. Since the higher cocoa percentages don't taste any better (worse actually), there's no reason to eat very high cocoa chocolates. You can eat 70% cocoa Lindt and get more benefits than the higher percentage bars. The 70% will be easier to eat due to its greater sweetness.

    You can read further here.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28272800/

    Total polyphenol content was 1.8 times lower in alkalized cocoa samples than in natural ones. Epicatechin/catechin ratio was changed due to the process of alkalization in favor of catechin (2.21 in natural and 1.45 in alkalized cocoa powders). Combined results of 3 antioxidative tests (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS) were used for calculation of RACI (Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index) and GAS (Global Antioxidant Score) values that were consistently higher in natural than in alkalized cocoa extracts. Obtained results have shown significant correlations between these values and phenolic content (0.929 ≤ r ≤ 0.957, P < 0.01).
     
    For people who are not super fond of dark chocolate, 70% cocoa Lindt is a good choice. I find it's not too bitter.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  168. @Adam Smith
    @utu

    There's another one of your strange comments.

    A GULAG for libertarians? And anyone else you disagree with?

    Totalitarianism and authoritarianism are antisocial.

    Authoritarian followers are the most dangerous people on earth.

    Replies: @utu

    “dangerous people on earth.” – Only dangerous to recalcitrant libertarians who are not fit to live in a society.

    • Agree: Yevardian
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @utu

    Libertarians? It isn't necessarily libertarian to not want this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XyhhASaTms

    If you lot want to self-commit yourself to some kind gulag, be our guests.

  169. @Jack D
    @Adam Smith

    Absolutely, but maybe 1% of the people who refuse to be vaccinated are actually allergic or sensitive to some vaccine component. Maybe a vaccine is a "cocktail" but the whole shot is only a few cc's so you are talking about minute quantities of preservatives. Some of the ingredients you list would also be found in, for example, any loaf of bread that you buy in the supermarket, in much larger quantities because they need to preserve a 1 or 2 lb. loaf of bread on the shelf and not just a tiny ampule of vaccine under refrigeration.

    Replies: @Liza, @Adam Smith

    There is a great difference in effect between the miniscule qty of unhealthy substances found in “any loaf of bread” and injecting any amount whatsoever into a baby’s blood.

  170. anon[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @utu
    @anon

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/ceremony-marks-20-years-since-oscar-nominated-sham/
    The film tendentiously claimed that African-American GIs from the 761st Tank and 183rd Combat Engineers battalions liberated Buchenwald (21,000 prisoners) and Dachau (32,000), two of the largest concentration camps freed by the US Army.

    Leon Bass, one of the stars of “Liberators,” was first misrepresented as a Buchenwald liberator in 1981, at an International Liberators Conference hosted by the US Holocaust Memorial Council at the State Department in Washington.

    Bass’s great heroism had in fact consisted of a visit to Buchenwald on April 17, 1945, six days after the camp’s liberation, during which another 183rd soldier, William Scott III, took a few photographs.

    But a Feb. 8, 1993, article in the New Republic, “The Exaggerators,” written by Jeffrey Goldberg, delivered a devastating blow to the film. While the opening scene shows two veterans of the 761st Tank Battalion “returning” to Buchenwald with survivor Benjamin Bender, one of the GIs, E.G. McConnell, confessed to Goldberg that his first trip to the camp was in 1991, courtesy of WNET. Goldberg also reported that McConnell’s admission was “supported by a host of veterans of the 761st,” the battalion featured in “Liberators.”

    Six months later, the New York Times published an article about a just-released independent report by WNET conceding that African-American GIs played no role in the liberation of either Buchenwald or Dachau. In contrast to the Motion Picture Academy, PBS’s flagship station instituted a “new policy of requiring producers [of documentaries] to demonstrate proof of their claims before financing is provided.”

    Replies: @anon

    Right. Liberarors was a fraud, and kind of a hilarious one. But he was telling this story before Liberators even came out.

    The issue is, Pisar’s specific claim isn’t that the Black Panthers liberated Dachau. He says that he had escaped from Dachau when he was away from the camp, and being marched back. And then, he hid in a barn for an unspecified amount of time, and then heard a tank and went towards it, and it was a Black Panther.

    So the problem with debunking this story is, we don’t know exactly where the barn was, and we don’t know how long he was hiding. He seems to say that it was weeks. So he could have been hanging out there even after the camp was liberated, and just not known it.

    So it’s possible (unlikely, but possible) that he was hanging out until sometime in late April or even May, and just ran into a Black Panther tank on its way to somewhere else.

    I don’t really know how you would go about disproving that, without knowing where exactly they were for all that time. They were in the general vicinity of Dachau at the time of the liberation (meaning, within about seventy miles), but I don’t know where they went after that, and if they ever went closer to Munich.

    So I don’t know. It’s a goofy story, and this guy seems prone to stretching the truth. But I feel like it is technically possible, with the limited information we have.

    But I still kind of doubt it.

  171. @415 reasons
    @That Would Be Telling

    My point is not that the Russian vaccine effort was obviously successful at the time they approved it—clearly the Russian approval was akin to a phase III trial and did not have the same evidentiary bar as FDA approval. But, the Russian vaccine designers made a decision based on this foreseeable outcome to use two different vectors for their prime/boost. The mopes at Oxford/AZ chose not to. There are logistical and other considerations that would lead you to use a single vector, but it turns out those should have been outweighed by considerations of efficacy. That oversight is definitely arrogant! The head of the academic group, Sarah Gilbert, is quoted in the Guardian article, and she still didn’t catch on to the fact that by far the most likely explanation is that they had generated too many anti-vector antibodies for the boost to work. Go back and read her quotes in many hagiographic articles about their vaccine over the spring and summer. These people screwed the pooch! And it seems like their bacon was only saved by a separate logistical mistake they made where they literally administered a mischaracterized drug product to thousands of human volunteers!

    Here is one such example but there are many https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.independent.co.uk/news/health/coronavirus-vaccine-oxford-latest-results-covid-19-sarah-gilbert-interview-trial-a9695161.html%3Famp

    Replies: @Jack D

    We now have, thanks to AA, an extraordinarily stupid leadership class even in the “hard” sciences. This is not even my field and I was able to figure out that the paradoxical results for the 1/2 dose vaccine were probably due to the fact that it created fewer antibodies to the vaccine vector by the time you got your booster. And the Rooshians (who have been in the vaccine game since the time of Sabin if not sooner – the first big usage of the Sabin vaccine was in the USSR) were smart enough to use two different adenoviruses to avoid this problem altogether.

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert (and she’s not even a late transitioning trannie).

    There are some scientists who will happily work more or less on their own on one subject for a very long time… That’s not the way I like to work. I like to try to take into account ideas from lots of different areas,” [Sarah Gilbert] told BBC Radio 4’s The Life Scientific, earlier this year. “I did consider leaving science at that point and doing something different.”

    A ‘spergy guy who over focuses on one little thing is EXACTLY what you need to do modern science. You need a guy who eats, sleeps and drinks vaccines, who is obsessed with vaccines, who thinks like a virus, who has no other life. He is the kind of guy who is not going to make such an obvious error. Sarah Gilbert is probably good at managing the people in her lab, in writing perfect grant applications, etc. She is good at all of the FORMS of science and at getting promoted over some spergy guy who isn’t the least bit interested in or good at all that social crap.

    I just finished watching The Queen’s Gambit. It was great eye candy ( Anya Taylor-Joy is very easy on the eyes and the costumes and sets were great) but there were plot holes big enough to drive a truck through. Her character had it ALL in a way that no real life chess master does – interest in fashion as well as chess, everyone who saw her fell in love with her – men, women, dogs, etc. Real life modern chess masters tend to be ‘spergy and ‘spergs are overwhelmingly men and not usually easy to like. Spergs also tend to be indifferent to their appearance (unless their obsession is around their appearance in which case they don’t care about anything BUT their appearance). There is a reason why Beth Harmon is a fictional character and Wakanda is a fictional place and they have no real life counterparts. Watching the show you WANT there to be a real life Beth Harmon but sadly there isn’t, nor is Sarah Gilbert a real life Salk. But our leadership keeps confusing fantasy with reality. The fantasy is so much more fun.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jack D


    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert
     
    Why hate to say it? There's a lot of underperforming women in biology (OK, not your field, but it was going to be mine before external factors ended my college career). And a further clue is that the official team is half women, "Prof. Sarah Gilbert, Prof. Andrew Pollard, Prof. Teresa Lambe, Dr Sandy Douglas, Prof. Catherine Green and Prof. Adrian Hill," I checked and Professors Teresa and Catherine are indeed women (and biological women based on quick glances at photos of them). The only reason anyone sane would take this vaccine is that after this unforgivable even if serendipitous accident AZ joined the project, and is possibly giving it the degree of professionalism it needs.

    Truly unforgivable, no one noted for example that only half the vaccine they'd produced has been used up in those first injections (or maybe the excess was thrown away?? But that's also not good), there's a number of ways this could have come to their attention other than noting a cohort with a different side effect profile and then digging out why.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D


    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert
     
    Is she Jewish, then?

    She seems to have a pretty sound resume as a scientist, played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine, and is the mother of triplets, so like Margaret Thatcher who had twins, she seems to have been extremely reproductively efficient.

    Probably only had sex once in her life and produced three children.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  172. @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A lot of Lindt. Also a lot of the endangered species brand. I assume you know what I speak of? I'm not sure they want their brand name to be public. Every flavor and strength has its own animal. The strongest is a black panther

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Also a lot of the endangered species brand.

    Yeah. I’ve had that. It’s hard to get in contact with them, for some reason. They didn’t respond to my inquiries.

    Lindt

    Here’s the message that I received from Lindt.

    Thank you for reaching out about our 70% EXCELLENCE Bars and the use of alkali, also known as Dutch Processing, in some of our products. Though most of our products do not contain cocoa processed with alkali, the high cocoa 78%, 90%, 95%, 99% and 100% Excellence Bars do use this method. This special cocoa powder simply helps to mellow the bitterness normally associated with high cocoa content chocolate, while providing a balanced, flavorful experience. Therefore, the 70% EXCELLENCE bar does NOT use alkali.

    To conclude, anything 70% (and below) is not Dutched/Alkalized. If you go above to 78% and higher, then there is Dutching/Alkalizing.

    The Dutching/Alkalizing process does not necessarily ruin the benefits of the cocoa, but there’s a significant reduction in polyphenols. Since the higher cocoa percentages don’t taste any better (worse actually), there’s no reason to eat very high cocoa chocolates. You can eat 70% cocoa Lindt and get more benefits than the higher percentage bars. The 70% will be easier to eat due to its greater sweetness.

    You can read further here.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28272800/

    Total polyphenol content was 1.8 times lower in alkalized cocoa samples than in natural ones. Epicatechin/catechin ratio was changed due to the process of alkalization in favor of catechin (2.21 in natural and 1.45 in alkalized cocoa powders). Combined results of 3 antioxidative tests (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS) were used for calculation of RACI (Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index) and GAS (Global Antioxidant Score) values that were consistently higher in natural than in alkalized cocoa extracts. Obtained results have shown significant correlations between these values and phenolic content (0.929 ≤ r ≤ 0.957, P < 0.01).

    For people who are not super fond of dark chocolate, 70% cocoa Lindt is a good choice. I find it’s not too bitter.

    • Thanks: Liza
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oh my. That's a lot to take in. I like the 90% because there's less sugar. But I'll try the 70%

  173. @Jack D
    @Adam Smith

    Absolutely, but maybe 1% of the people who refuse to be vaccinated are actually allergic or sensitive to some vaccine component. Maybe a vaccine is a "cocktail" but the whole shot is only a few cc's so you are talking about minute quantities of preservatives. Some of the ingredients you list would also be found in, for example, any loaf of bread that you buy in the supermarket, in much larger quantities because they need to preserve a 1 or 2 lb. loaf of bread on the shelf and not just a tiny ampule of vaccine under refrigeration.

    Replies: @Liza, @Adam Smith

    I agree with what you’re saying.
    Many store bought foods are poisonous and lack any nutritional value.

    I’m one of those crazy people who always reads the labels. I have for years. I don’t buy food with preservatives (other than salt) or food color (my dad worked in a chemical plant that made food color so I know how toxic those dyes are) or anything highly processed. I stay clear of anything gmo or artificial. I don’t buy pre-made packaged food. I don’t buy store bought bread because bread should not have duck feathers in it. I bake bread from organic non-gmo grains. I do buy fresh fruit and vegetables when I can find them clean enough. I buy non-gmo pasta and crackers. I buy organic non-gmo vegetables in cans or frozen. I do buy some meat at the store but I’m very careful about the quality, no hormones, no antibiotics, etc. There’s an organic farm not too far from where I live. They have some really nice beef. I buy heart there for $3.25 a lb. Their ribeye is a little pricey, but worth it. I have a huge organic heirloom garden because I cannot buy many of the things I like to eat at the store because store bought produce has too many pesticides and it lacks the flavor and nutrition of freshly grown produce.

    I gave up eating at restaurants years ago because of the low quality ingredients. (I’m a pretty good cook, I worked as a grill cook for years.) I can make it better at home, with higher quality ingredients for less cash and still buy some wine or beer (which are the dirtiest “foods” I consume) to go with it. My wife is one of the greatest chefs on earth and I’ve learned alot about cooking from her. She spoils me with great food all the time. It’s not that we wouldn’t like to go to a restaurant once in a while, but we were always so disappointed in the food when we did, so we gave up.

    I hope you have a nice evening and a nice Thanksgiving Mr. D.

  174. @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans’ freedom again, as with the TSA, cause … awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON’T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?
     
    He could do worse, Ecuador has a better climate and more pleasant Spanish accent than South Florida. A lot of Americans are choosing to retire there.

    There are a lot of Americans who comment here who cannot take the most measured, polite suggestions that something is being done better in another country without telling people to "Go live there if you like it so much". This is not a good attitude for the US. The Chinese were the same way in until the late 19th century, automatically assuming their own superiority and that they had nothing to learn from foreigners. They paid a lot for this attitude.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    No, you get me wrong, Horace.

    a) I agree with a lot of what Jack D. had to say, though not with his root causes of America’s current “Can’t do” mentality. It has a lot more to do with regulations and taxes (something Trump DID try to do something about) than the half-assed Socialists here want to admit. Secondly, a root cause is that American industry and DIYers have to deal with Cheap China-made Crap.

    b) You may not have followed the comments as much as me, which is totally understandable, Horace. Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-World. (I didn’t know it was Ecuador till now, but whatever …) The thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist, but he does not live in S. Florida. If he were there, I wouldn’t give a dang about him screwing up that shithole that we didn’t even want to stop for gas at on the way to the Florida Keys.

    No, Mr. Mason lives in the only Southern part left of the State, as I already wrote. That would be the section roughly north of the I-4 to the coast up to the Georgia border, but not counting the panhandle, so through Tallahassee to the west and back down toward the north end of Tampa Bay. He told us he lives in Jax or thereabouts. They don’t need another damn Socialist telling them how to run their business. Mr. Mason is highly anti-gun too – in Jacksonville, Florida no less!

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-WorldThe thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist...
     
    Very amusing, Achmed!

    I am an American citizen and have been such for more than 30 years. I would describe myself more as somewhat conservative, than hard-core Socialist, but then you probably think that Josef 'Man of Steel' Biden is a communist.

    I would prefer a more socialized system of financing health care in the United States, that is true, but no more so than in another nonsocialist countries, practically all of which, in the developed world, have a universal system of financing health care, though even Britain, with its National Health Service which is free at point of care, has something like 10% of the population having voluntary private insurance programs.

    I have no interest in taking away everyone's guns, but I do think that there should be some regulation of firearms to keep them out of the hands of criminals and crazies. Probably everyone who has a gun for private purposes ought to have to carry an insurance policy.

    Other than that, I am moderately conservative on most issues. I am happy for children to have religious education in schools and think that they ought to be educated about the stories in the Bible, which are part of the western tradition. I am pretty agnostic on abortion, but on the whole, I would prefer people not to have them.

    I would like to see the quality of life in the US much less in thrall to the major corporations that govern every aspect of life in the US, and even pay off state and national legislatures to enact laws in their favor that make it difficult for individuals to compete on a level playing field even in businesses as basic as providing fast food or sandwiches.

    I would have thought that you yourself would want to consider leaving the US to find a better quality of life elsewhere.

    After all, the problem of integrating the population left over after slavery has never really been completely cracked in the US, and large tracts of the country are now occupied by immigrants who you believe do not share American values.

    America is now expecting to spend the next four years with the communist Biden in the White House, and if he croaks, Harris, the prostitute could be president until 2028 and will probably legalize prostitution and make it mandatory for all girls..

    Surely, if ever there was a time to get out of the US and take your family, this was it. You could probably cash out and buy a nice home in South America, and your children would hardly even see a black person or even know what rap music is.

    Like many people in South America, you would be able to build a wall around your home compound, and fortify it with metal gates, iron grills, barbed wire on top of the walls, and of course gun turrets from which to repel invaders.

    Life would be much cheaper, you would eat better and have better health, and would probably have a lot less stress in your life. Probably even have a mistress or two to relax with.

    Don't you owe it to your children to move out of the US before Harris turns it into a facsimile of North Korea? That would be foresight and rugged individualism. They would love you for it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

  175. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman



    Why you anti-masking libertarians don’t launch the cause against wearing underwear.

     

    Because nobody is forcing us to wear underwear.

     

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c3/00/4a/c3004a77b71df34be927c033ffa9c5d8.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Not the Capt. Picard facepalm, but even more apropos, Reg. Thanks.

  176. @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans’ freedom again, as with the TSA, cause … awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON’T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?
     
    He could do worse, Ecuador has a better climate and more pleasant Spanish accent than South Florida. A lot of Americans are choosing to retire there.

    There are a lot of Americans who comment here who cannot take the most measured, polite suggestions that something is being done better in another country without telling people to "Go live there if you like it so much". This is not a good attitude for the US. The Chinese were the same way in until the late 19th century, automatically assuming their own superiority and that they had nothing to learn from foreigners. They paid a lot for this attitude.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, I do see where I confused things: I meant Southern Florida culturally, not geographically. Sorry.

  177. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason


    Maybe it is all Covid-19 theater, just like the TSA at airports, but at least it makes people more aware ...
     
    Right, got it. So we take away a big part of Americans' freedom again, as with the TSA, cause ... awareness. You have to go back not come back, Jonathan. Really, if Ecuador really has its act together, why DON'T you and your adopted family stay there and not grace the last Southern part of Florida left with your Socialist presence?

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Jonathan Mason

    I am very seriously considering it. I would imagine that at a time like this a very large number of Americans, particularly those who are retired, or those who can do their work online, would want to relocate somewhere else where the quality of life is better than in the US.

    And surely if you find that the racial problem that is the heritage of the civil war is still very serious problem in the US, would it not be a good idea to move somewhere else in the Americas where that issue does not exist to any relevant extent?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    PS: You can't get away from the racial problem. It used to be move to Boise, Idaho or Maine or somewhere. Now, if there aren't already lots of blacks there for the (AA) jobs and welfare benefits, then the nice Lutheran ladies import some Africans.

    BTW, it's not a legacy from the Civil War. Do you not even understand recent history? This is a legacy from 100 years later, the Civil Rites era.


    Ooops, I see just now you wrote somewhere in the Americas with that "s". Yeah, well, I hope you do get down to Ecuador to stay. If it works out for you and your family, I'd be glad to hear that.

  178. @Stan Adams
    @Buffalo Joe

    Biden will be PINO from Day 1. Like RBG, he'll be kept "alive" until they've exhausted every ounce of plausible deniability.

    Through a judicious combination of Audio-Animatronics (the Bidenbot) and CGI, they'll be able to keep the charade going for quite a while. At least a year, maybe two.

    I have not discounted the possibility that Biden is already clinically brain-dead. (His neurons are dropping like flies.)

    Indeed, I am not prepared to assert categorically that I, personally, am still alive. After this election, I have a nagging suspicion that I've already died and gone to Hell.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Stan, I need an Agree Button with a LOL chaser. Good post.

  179. @Johann Ricke


    ” They assume that 3rd world countries are all hellholes where… food is sold by peasants squatting on the ground beside crates of live chickens while flies swarm around “
     
    Isn’t that the Wuhan Wet Market?
     
    Decades ago, a Chinese colleague shared his verdict on New York City's Chinatown wet markets - he pronounced them dirty and malodorous. I assume he felt Chinese wet markets in his homeland were more sanitary. He also found NYC as a whole shockingly dilapidated, dirty and dangerous - not at all what he expected vis-a-vis the financial capital of the world. And this was a guy not given to sharing strong opinions about much of anything - his almost emotional outburst was more remarkable than the words he uttered. Something about NYC's condition - even at the peak of its prosperity - touched a chord. It would be amusing to find out what he thinks about de Blasio's NYC today.

    Replies: @Keypusher

    I visited China a couple of decades ago and almost passed out from the stench at some markets. Your colleague was applying a different standard to the USA than he applied to his own country.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Keypusher


    I visited China a couple of decades ago and almost passed out from the stench at some markets. Your colleague was applying a different standard to the USA than he applied to his own country.
     
    China's a big place. The guy was from Beijing. I'm gonna guess it was one gigantic Chinatown, with hundreds of wet markets. Perhaps he was from an upscale area, and *his* wet market was a cut above.
  180. @Adam Smith
    @That Would Be Telling


    “cocktail jab?” What in the blazes is that supposed to mean or be?
     
    All jabs involve a cocktail of adjuvants, preservatives, cell cultures and other ingredients.

    Does the new jab contain WI38, MRC 5, HEK 293, MF59, aluminum, thimerosal, formaldehyde, lecithin, gelatin, peanut protein or polysorbate 80? Does it contain neomycin, streptomycin, polymyxin b, gentamicin or kanamycin? For example, the shingles vaccine, like several vaccines, should not be given to people with a history of adverse reaction to neomycin or to people who've had a severe case of the chicken pox.

    It's important to read the inserts because some vaccines are not safe for everyone.
    Vaccines are not one size fits all.

    https://www.health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Package-inserts

    Replies: @Jack D, @Keypusher

    I had a severe case of chicken pox. No issues with shingles vaccine.

  181. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Buffalo Joe


    I fast one day a week and have for nearly 35 years.
     
    You're ahead of the curve. I hadn't even heard of fasting (for health benefits) until maybe 5 years ago.

    Used to walk 3 miles a day but my knees now need and overhaul.
     
    Interestingly, long-distance cardio isn't healthy, contrary to what the mainstream authorities have told us. So you're better off skipping it.

    If you need help with the knees, take Fish Oil, Turmeric, and Glucosamine. The first two supplements will lower inflammation and pain, while the Glucosamine is good at repairing cartilage. Taking collagen can be helpful to your knees as well, and will even make you look younger.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Johnny, thank you for all the advice and it’s free too. Or is there a co-pay? Again thank you.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  182. @Jack D
    @415 reasons

    We now have, thanks to AA, an extraordinarily stupid leadership class even in the "hard" sciences. This is not even my field and I was able to figure out that the paradoxical results for the 1/2 dose vaccine were probably due to the fact that it created fewer antibodies to the vaccine vector by the time you got your booster. And the Rooshians (who have been in the vaccine game since the time of Sabin if not sooner - the first big usage of the Sabin vaccine was in the USSR) were smart enough to use two different adenoviruses to avoid this problem altogether.

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert (and she's not even a late transitioning trannie).

    "


    There are some scientists who will happily work more or less on their own on one subject for a very long time… That's not the way I like to work. I like to try to take into account ideas from lots of different areas," [Sarah Gilbert] told BBC Radio 4's The Life Scientific, earlier this year. "I did consider leaving science at that point and doing something different."
     
    A 'spergy guy who over focuses on one little thing is EXACTLY what you need to do modern science. You need a guy who eats, sleeps and drinks vaccines, who is obsessed with vaccines, who thinks like a virus, who has no other life. He is the kind of guy who is not going to make such an obvious error. Sarah Gilbert is probably good at managing the people in her lab, in writing perfect grant applications, etc. She is good at all of the FORMS of science and at getting promoted over some spergy guy who isn't the least bit interested in or good at all that social crap.

    I just finished watching The Queen's Gambit. It was great eye candy ( Anya Taylor-Joy is very easy on the eyes and the costumes and sets were great) but there were plot holes big enough to drive a truck through. Her character had it ALL in a way that no real life chess master does - interest in fashion as well as chess, everyone who saw her fell in love with her - men, women, dogs, etc. Real life modern chess masters tend to be 'spergy and 'spergs are overwhelmingly men and not usually easy to like. Spergs also tend to be indifferent to their appearance (unless their obsession is around their appearance in which case they don't care about anything BUT their appearance). There is a reason why Beth Harmon is a fictional character and Wakanda is a fictional place and they have no real life counterparts. Watching the show you WANT there to be a real life Beth Harmon but sadly there isn't, nor is Sarah Gilbert a real life Salk. But our leadership keeps confusing fantasy with reality. The fantasy is so much more fun.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Jonathan Mason

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert

    Why hate to say it? There’s a lot of underperforming women in biology (OK, not your field, but it was going to be mine before external factors ended my college career). And a further clue is that the official team is half women, “Prof. Sarah Gilbert, Prof. Andrew Pollard, Prof. Teresa Lambe, Dr Sandy Douglas, Prof. Catherine Green and Prof. Adrian Hill,” I checked and Professors Teresa and Catherine are indeed women (and biological women based on quick glances at photos of them). The only reason anyone sane would take this vaccine is that after this unforgivable even if serendipitous accident AZ joined the project, and is possibly giving it the degree of professionalism it needs.

    Truly unforgivable, no one noted for example that only half the vaccine they’d produced has been used up in those first injections (or maybe the excess was thrown away?? But that’s also not good), there’s a number of ways this could have come to their attention other than noting a cohort with a different side effect profile and then digging out why.

  183. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace

    No, you get me wrong, Horace.

    a) I agree with a lot of what Jack D. had to say, though not with his root causes of America's current "Can't do" mentality. It has a lot more to do with regulations and taxes (something Trump DID try to do something about) than the half-assed Socialists here want to admit. Secondly, a root cause is that American industry and DIYers have to deal with Cheap China-made Crap.

    b) You may not have followed the comments as much as me, which is totally understandable, Horace. Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-World. (I didn't know it was Ecuador till now, but whatever ...) The thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist, but he does not live in S. Florida. If he were there, I wouldn't give a dang about him screwing up that shithole that we didn't even want to stop for gas at on the way to the Florida Keys.

    No, Mr. Mason lives in the only Southern part left of the State, as I already wrote. That would be the section roughly north of the I-4 to the coast up to the Georgia border, but not counting the panhandle, so through Tallahassee to the west and back down toward the north end of Tampa Bay. He told us he lives in Jax or thereabouts. They don't need another damn Socialist telling them how to run their business. Mr. Mason is highly anti-gun too - in Jacksonville, Florida no less!

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-WorldThe thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist…

    Very amusing, Achmed!

    I am an American citizen and have been such for more than 30 years. I would describe myself more as somewhat conservative, than hard-core Socialist, but then you probably think that Josef ‘Man of Steel’ Biden is a communist.

    I would prefer a more socialized system of financing health care in the United States, that is true, but no more so than in another nonsocialist countries, practically all of which, in the developed world, have a universal system of financing health care, though even Britain, with its National Health Service which is free at point of care, has something like 10% of the population having voluntary private insurance programs.

    I have no interest in taking away everyone’s guns, but I do think that there should be some regulation of firearms to keep them out of the hands of criminals and crazies. Probably everyone who has a gun for private purposes ought to have to carry an insurance policy.

    Other than that, I am moderately conservative on most issues. I am happy for children to have religious education in schools and think that they ought to be educated about the stories in the Bible, which are part of the western tradition. I am pretty agnostic on abortion, but on the whole, I would prefer people not to have them.

    I would like to see the quality of life in the US much less in thrall to the major corporations that govern every aspect of life in the US, and even pay off state and national legislatures to enact laws in their favor that make it difficult for individuals to compete on a level playing field even in businesses as basic as providing fast food or sandwiches.

    I would have thought that you yourself would want to consider leaving the US to find a better quality of life elsewhere.

    After all, the problem of integrating the population left over after slavery has never really been completely cracked in the US, and large tracts of the country are now occupied by immigrants who you believe do not share American values.

    America is now expecting to spend the next four years with the communist Biden in the White House, and if he croaks, Harris, the prostitute could be president until 2028 and will probably legalize prostitution and make it mandatory for all girls..

    Surely, if ever there was a time to get out of the US and take your family, this was it. You could probably cash out and buy a nice home in South America, and your children would hardly even see a black person or even know what rap music is.

    Like many people in South America, you would be able to build a wall around your home compound, and fortify it with metal gates, iron grills, barbed wire on top of the walls, and of course gun turrets from which to repel invaders.

    Life would be much cheaper, you would eat better and have better health, and would probably have a lot less stress in your life. Probably even have a mistress or two to relax with.

    Don’t you owe it to your children to move out of the US before Harris turns it into a facsimile of North Korea? That would be foresight and rugged individualism. They would love you for it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    My comment wasn't made to be amusing, but just an explanation to AKAHorace and others. Please note that I wasn't trying to dox you in any way, Jonathan. All I wrote was what you've told us before.

    You didn't correct anything, as there was nothing to correct. You are an immigrant, and I never said you were a recent one. The fact that you have been here 30 years and have not learned a damn American value yet makes it even worse. I recall you used to live in the US Northeast or something and are reasonably recent to Jacksonville or wherever nearby place.

    I see you have tried to make a comment to turn my knowledge of your political angle (and the reason even Western Euro immigration is usually a bad deal for us*) into some sort of farce. Your stance on "oh, just some common-sense regulation on guns" and your wish for government-run health care are no different from that of Nancy Pelosi. Hell, you've got your wish already, Jonathan. All you have to do is click your heels three times and say "there's no place like home, there's no place like home" - get back to England. They have to let you in, and you could easily get immigration visas for you family. They invite foreigners in with even more relish than our American elites do.

    Did you not tell us you voted for the Hildabeast and Obama before that? Face it, you are a Socialist. In your personal life you may be socially conservative, but why'd you have to bring another foreign Socialist vote and mindset to the one still Southern/Conservative part of Florida? Didn't you fit in better up north? Oh, I see, cheaper property and a better quality of life, and you can tall those rednecks "you're a bunch of rubes. This is how you do it. More taxes. More regulations."

    I'll answer in a separate comment the rest of your comment about my situation.


    .

    * I make exceptions for John Derbyshire, Peter Brimelow, and a few Dutch and French guys I know who actually paid attention and learned something during their time here.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Rugged individualism, my ass! There's no frontier left, Mr. Mason. There's no country with much freedom left at all. If that wasn't the case, I'd/We'd have been gone LONG AGO. I knew things were going monotonically in the wrong direction back in 1995.

    It's not just about making a nice place just for me and my family. There is a future after that. You sound very much like Supply and Demand who told me right here that he's got a deal set up for his family in China with all his guanxi and all, never mind the place going to Orwellian hell. He's all set up, yeah (we may not hear at all from him after a few years - not my problem).

    I've thought about Uruguay for various reasons. They have serious gun control though, which means the insurance policy that we will have to use here won't be available if things go bad there. (I know you are big on insurance and all. Is that the insurance policy you mean with the guns?)

    Heh heh, yeah you make fun of what people don't like about the (not-a-done-deal-either) coming of the Harris administration. How long have you been reading Steve Sailer, as long as me? Yet, you haven't picked up a thing, hardly. Besides that a Trump win would be virtually poking people like you in the eye, I see it as a way to just gain a little more time before the SHTF here.

    I go back and forth on just getting out, Jonathan, which I will lay out better in a Peak Stupidity post to be called "Should I Stay or Should I Go Now". I think that this country is still worth defending, for the land and for the remaining dozens of millions of still patriotic Americans. The problem is that we are not organized, and they've made it hard to get organized. All we need is a portion of the country to be left alone in. People like you don't want that. (I mean, the people of Jacksonville didn't exactly invite you down there, did they?)

    Then again, I see the mass of face-diaper-wearing parents at the elementary school and wonder why I should give a damn about these stupid cucks.

    That's my dilemma. Thanks for asking. I gotta go one way or the other before the SHTF.

  184. @Jack D
    @415 reasons

    We now have, thanks to AA, an extraordinarily stupid leadership class even in the "hard" sciences. This is not even my field and I was able to figure out that the paradoxical results for the 1/2 dose vaccine were probably due to the fact that it created fewer antibodies to the vaccine vector by the time you got your booster. And the Rooshians (who have been in the vaccine game since the time of Sabin if not sooner - the first big usage of the Sabin vaccine was in the USSR) were smart enough to use two different adenoviruses to avoid this problem altogether.

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert (and she's not even a late transitioning trannie).

    "


    There are some scientists who will happily work more or less on their own on one subject for a very long time… That's not the way I like to work. I like to try to take into account ideas from lots of different areas," [Sarah Gilbert] told BBC Radio 4's The Life Scientific, earlier this year. "I did consider leaving science at that point and doing something different."
     
    A 'spergy guy who over focuses on one little thing is EXACTLY what you need to do modern science. You need a guy who eats, sleeps and drinks vaccines, who is obsessed with vaccines, who thinks like a virus, who has no other life. He is the kind of guy who is not going to make such an obvious error. Sarah Gilbert is probably good at managing the people in her lab, in writing perfect grant applications, etc. She is good at all of the FORMS of science and at getting promoted over some spergy guy who isn't the least bit interested in or good at all that social crap.

    I just finished watching The Queen's Gambit. It was great eye candy ( Anya Taylor-Joy is very easy on the eyes and the costumes and sets were great) but there were plot holes big enough to drive a truck through. Her character had it ALL in a way that no real life chess master does - interest in fashion as well as chess, everyone who saw her fell in love with her - men, women, dogs, etc. Real life modern chess masters tend to be 'spergy and 'spergs are overwhelmingly men and not usually easy to like. Spergs also tend to be indifferent to their appearance (unless their obsession is around their appearance in which case they don't care about anything BUT their appearance). There is a reason why Beth Harmon is a fictional character and Wakanda is a fictional place and they have no real life counterparts. Watching the show you WANT there to be a real life Beth Harmon but sadly there isn't, nor is Sarah Gilbert a real life Salk. But our leadership keeps confusing fantasy with reality. The fantasy is so much more fun.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Jonathan Mason

    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert

    Is she Jewish, then?

    She seems to have a pretty sound resume as a scientist, played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine, and is the mother of triplets, so like Margaret Thatcher who had twins, she seems to have been extremely reproductively efficient.

    Probably only had sex once in her life and produced three children.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine
     
    The clinical trials of which started in 2008 per Wikipedia. 12 years are enough to know it didn't work, the advanced state of the art is currently just better ways to make the same sort of isolated protein vaccine that traditionally is brewed in the membranes of chicken eggs.

    In your previous comment, you claim not to be a hard-core socialist, but want to restrict "private gun ownership," that by itself a telling phrase, to those who can afford an insurance policy of a type that doesn't exist, and would be curious indeed. What would it insure against?

    For gun accidents, the fatal ones have dramatically dropped since 1980 from 800 to 500 annually while the population has increased by ~50% and the guns it owns by roughly 2.5 times (with the nationwide sweep of shall issue concealed carry, now 42 states and ~72% of the population they're a lot more useful ... and now the latter percentage is going up as people escape from Blue hellholes like NYC). Or is this a precrime thing, you want insurance companies to price policies based on their guessing who's going to commit crimes with them? Would suck to be black in such a scheme. Plus who do the policies pay out to? Just what specific problems are you trying to solve with this policy?

    No, you just don't want people to "privately" own guns, and there's no more reliable touchstone than that.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  185. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D


    I hate to say this but I think a big clue to the less than spectacular results of the Oxford vaccine may be related to the fact that the head of the project is named Sarah Gilbert
     
    Is she Jewish, then?

    She seems to have a pretty sound resume as a scientist, played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine, and is the mother of triplets, so like Margaret Thatcher who had twins, she seems to have been extremely reproductively efficient.

    Probably only had sex once in her life and produced three children.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine

    The clinical trials of which started in 2008 per Wikipedia. 12 years are enough to know it didn’t work, the advanced state of the art is currently just better ways to make the same sort of isolated protein vaccine that traditionally is brewed in the membranes of chicken eggs.

    In your previous comment, you claim not to be a hard-core socialist, but want to restrict “private gun ownership,” that by itself a telling phrase, to those who can afford an insurance policy of a type that doesn’t exist, and would be curious indeed. What would it insure against?

    For gun accidents, the fatal ones have dramatically dropped since 1980 from 800 to 500 annually while the population has increased by ~50% and the guns it owns by roughly 2.5 times (with the nationwide sweep of shall issue concealed carry, now 42 states and ~72% of the population they’re a lot more useful … and now the latter percentage is going up as people escape from Blue hellholes like NYC). Or is this a precrime thing, you want insurance companies to price policies based on their guessing who’s going to commit crimes with them? Would suck to be black in such a scheme. Plus who do the policies pay out to? Just what specific problems are you trying to solve with this policy?

    No, you just don’t want people to “privately” own guns, and there’s no more reliable touchstone than that.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @That Would Be Telling

    Doesn't automobile insurance pay for medical treatment for injured third parties?

  186. @FPD72
    @Sean

    If by “they” you mean all of the vaccine trials for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, my wife and I both participated in the Pfizer trial and we are 70 years old. By the reaction we had to the second injection we suspected we got the vaccine but we confirmed it at an independent lab three weeks later; we both tested positive for the antibodies.

    Replies: @Sean, @Sean

    I’m betting you are untypically healthy seventy year olds and not overweight. Most people that age are already dealing with at least one chronic health condition.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Sean

    Overweight but not obese. BMI around 27. We try to walk a couple of miles a day. I play golf weekly with my sons, mow the yard with a push mower, etc. We quit the gym in March so I haven’t been doing resistance training since then. I need to get back to that. I got some resistance bands but haven’t been motivated; I guess I have the Covid ennui.

    Replies: @Sean

  187. @HA
    @Mr. Anon

    "Most western countries, and many states in the U.S. have mask mandates and have had them for months now. And yet the virus, we are told, is peaking again."

    That's your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don't save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays. Clearly, speed limits and drunk-driving restrictions should also be removed forthwith. And yes, Wuhan-flu is peaking again despite the many truthers who assured us it would up and disappear the moment that Biden was elected. Viruses seem to have little regard half-witted conspiracy theories, more's the pity.

    It's worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don't work. They've since done a U-turn.

    And we now have increasing evidence even in the US that masks, while no panacea (so that sending kids back to school, and congregating for the holidays will indeed cause a surge in the virus), do reduce both transmission, and severity of the disease.


    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state's population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn't require masks continued to see their cases increase.
     

    I added the bit in brackets to make it more relevant, but I think it nonetheless gets the point across.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    That’s your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don’t save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays.

    That’s a specious comparison. What underlying causative effect is going up to explain the increasing infection rate? Winter? If that’s the case, then we’d probably be better off dosing with Vitamin D3. Ever heard Lord Fauci even mention D3? I haven’t? There have been local peaks in COVID around the country ever since last Spring, even after mask mandates went into effect. Look at the time history of infections in California – you can’t even tell from the graph when the mask mandate went into effect. Some effect.

    It’s worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don’t work. They’ve since done a U-turn.

    It’s worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won’t protect you.

    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state’s population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn’t require masks continued to see their cases increase.

    Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It’s bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago.

    https://sentinelksmo.org/more-deception-kdhe-hid-data-to-justify-mask-mandate/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Anon


    It’s worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won’t protect you.

     

    https://www.worldlifestyle.com/content/111266/eb2888bbd42031047918593713e4d927.jpg
    , @HA
    @Mr. Anon

    "Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It’s bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago."

    Proof? What, some blogger who doesn't know there's a log of a week or more between a change in social distancing or mask-wearing and a change in infections? Yeah, if that's your proof, you needn't have bothered.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  188. @utu
    @Adam Smith

    "dangerous people on earth." - Only dangerous to recalcitrant libertarians who are not fit to live in a society.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Libertarians? It isn’t necessarily libertarian to not want this:

    If you lot want to self-commit yourself to some kind gulag, be our guests.

  189. @JohnnyWalker123
    @AndrewR


    Also a lot of the endangered species brand.

     

    Yeah. I've had that. It's hard to get in contact with them, for some reason. They didn't respond to my inquiries.

    Lindt
     
    Here's the message that I received from Lindt.

    Thank you for reaching out about our 70% EXCELLENCE Bars and the use of alkali, also known as Dutch Processing, in some of our products. Though most of our products do not contain cocoa processed with alkali, the high cocoa 78%, 90%, 95%, 99% and 100% Excellence Bars do use this method. This special cocoa powder simply helps to mellow the bitterness normally associated with high cocoa content chocolate, while providing a balanced, flavorful experience. Therefore, the 70% EXCELLENCE bar does NOT use alkali.
     
    To conclude, anything 70% (and below) is not Dutched/Alkalized. If you go above to 78% and higher, then there is Dutching/Alkalizing.

    The Dutching/Alkalizing process does not necessarily ruin the benefits of the cocoa, but there's a significant reduction in polyphenols. Since the higher cocoa percentages don't taste any better (worse actually), there's no reason to eat very high cocoa chocolates. You can eat 70% cocoa Lindt and get more benefits than the higher percentage bars. The 70% will be easier to eat due to its greater sweetness.

    You can read further here.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28272800/

    Total polyphenol content was 1.8 times lower in alkalized cocoa samples than in natural ones. Epicatechin/catechin ratio was changed due to the process of alkalization in favor of catechin (2.21 in natural and 1.45 in alkalized cocoa powders). Combined results of 3 antioxidative tests (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS) were used for calculation of RACI (Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index) and GAS (Global Antioxidant Score) values that were consistently higher in natural than in alkalized cocoa extracts. Obtained results have shown significant correlations between these values and phenolic content (0.929 ≤ r ≤ 0.957, P < 0.01).
     
    For people who are not super fond of dark chocolate, 70% cocoa Lindt is a good choice. I find it's not too bitter.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Oh my. That’s a lot to take in. I like the 90% because there’s less sugar. But I’ll try the 70%

  190. @Sean
    @FPD72

    I'm betting you are untypically healthy seventy year olds and not overweight. Most people that age are already dealing with at least one chronic health condition.

    Replies: @FPD72

    Overweight but not obese. BMI around 27. We try to walk a couple of miles a day. I play golf weekly with my sons, mow the yard with a push mower, etc. We quit the gym in March so I haven’t been doing resistance training since then. I need to get back to that. I got some resistance bands but haven’t been motivated; I guess I have the Covid ennui.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @FPD72


    EVEN if restricted to populations as Keys intended, BMI is not as simple as it seems. The highest life expectancy in 2 million Norwegians was found in the “over-weight” part of the population, that is, those with BMI 26-28. The “ideally slim,” with BMI 18-20 had lower life expectancy than the “obese” with BMI 34-36, while being “under-weight” (BMI<18.5) was associated with more excess death than BMI 30-35.

    When explaining this to students, I used to speculate that the reason could be that heavier weight might stand a person in better stead in the face of surgery or serious illness later in life, never dreaming that this is exactly what would happen to me. Radical cancer surgery reduced my weight by 25%, my BMI from an “obese” 30 to a “normal” 22, and took 6 inches off my waist. Had I started with an ideal BMI, I would have ended up dangerously underweight.
     

    At a BMI of 27, you are right on the money. Hypertension is overtreated in America, certainly by comparison with Germany, where if you are feeling under the weather doktors will prescribe medicine to raise your blood pressure
  191. @Keypusher
    @Johann Ricke

    I visited China a couple of decades ago and almost passed out from the stench at some markets. Your colleague was applying a different standard to the USA than he applied to his own country.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    I visited China a couple of decades ago and almost passed out from the stench at some markets. Your colleague was applying a different standard to the USA than he applied to his own country.

    China’s a big place. The guy was from Beijing. I’m gonna guess it was one gigantic Chinatown, with hundreds of wet markets. Perhaps he was from an upscale area, and *his* wet market was a cut above.

  192. @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    played a part in the development of the universal flu vaccine
     
    The clinical trials of which started in 2008 per Wikipedia. 12 years are enough to know it didn't work, the advanced state of the art is currently just better ways to make the same sort of isolated protein vaccine that traditionally is brewed in the membranes of chicken eggs.

    In your previous comment, you claim not to be a hard-core socialist, but want to restrict "private gun ownership," that by itself a telling phrase, to those who can afford an insurance policy of a type that doesn't exist, and would be curious indeed. What would it insure against?

    For gun accidents, the fatal ones have dramatically dropped since 1980 from 800 to 500 annually while the population has increased by ~50% and the guns it owns by roughly 2.5 times (with the nationwide sweep of shall issue concealed carry, now 42 states and ~72% of the population they're a lot more useful ... and now the latter percentage is going up as people escape from Blue hellholes like NYC). Or is this a precrime thing, you want insurance companies to price policies based on their guessing who's going to commit crimes with them? Would suck to be black in such a scheme. Plus who do the policies pay out to? Just what specific problems are you trying to solve with this policy?

    No, you just don't want people to "privately" own guns, and there's no more reliable touchstone than that.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Doesn’t automobile insurance pay for medical treatment for injured third parties?

  193. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Sean

    "Something tells me the British pharmaceutical industry is not going to hold onto its world class status much longer."

    Parexel are an American company, started by a Swiss, who were running the trials on behalf of a German company.

    My layman's suggestion is that perhaps radical new products should first be tested on a single human, not six at a time.

    https://i.postimg.cc/d3bFvGnL/badantibodies.jpg

    Replies: @Sean

    Christian Busch Retweeted
    Thiemo Fetzer
    @fetzert
    ·
    Nov 24
    Timely #ContactTracing does matter fighting #COVID19. In a new paper (Rightwards arrow https://bit.ly/394Ebuo) we study a bizarre #Excel error in England that caused 16k cases to NOT be contact traced. We econometrically can link this blunder to ~ 120k new cases & 1.5k deaths..

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Sean

    That cock up came almost certainly because Serco used some consultants two years out of uni, without reasonable Excel data experience and without realising they needed a data audit trail. When you're pinging data between one system and another, especially if Excel is involved at any stage (because there are 50 ways to corrupt/lose data), you need control counts which reconcile.

    If when the data was generated in (say) format A, someone produced a small bit of code to read the records, count them and add a count in a header or trailer record, all this could have been avoided. Even better if it adds a field to say where the data's come from.

    At each stage of the "data transformation" (standard buzzword) the program checks the counts are kosher, and when they're all put into a big system (usually in a database by this time) the counts should all reconcile, plus if you do have any data issues you can see the source, thanks to the "source" field you added early on.

    (I do this sort of thing for a living)

  194. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-WorldThe thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist...
     
    Very amusing, Achmed!

    I am an American citizen and have been such for more than 30 years. I would describe myself more as somewhat conservative, than hard-core Socialist, but then you probably think that Josef 'Man of Steel' Biden is a communist.

    I would prefer a more socialized system of financing health care in the United States, that is true, but no more so than in another nonsocialist countries, practically all of which, in the developed world, have a universal system of financing health care, though even Britain, with its National Health Service which is free at point of care, has something like 10% of the population having voluntary private insurance programs.

    I have no interest in taking away everyone's guns, but I do think that there should be some regulation of firearms to keep them out of the hands of criminals and crazies. Probably everyone who has a gun for private purposes ought to have to carry an insurance policy.

    Other than that, I am moderately conservative on most issues. I am happy for children to have religious education in schools and think that they ought to be educated about the stories in the Bible, which are part of the western tradition. I am pretty agnostic on abortion, but on the whole, I would prefer people not to have them.

    I would like to see the quality of life in the US much less in thrall to the major corporations that govern every aspect of life in the US, and even pay off state and national legislatures to enact laws in their favor that make it difficult for individuals to compete on a level playing field even in businesses as basic as providing fast food or sandwiches.

    I would have thought that you yourself would want to consider leaving the US to find a better quality of life elsewhere.

    After all, the problem of integrating the population left over after slavery has never really been completely cracked in the US, and large tracts of the country are now occupied by immigrants who you believe do not share American values.

    America is now expecting to spend the next four years with the communist Biden in the White House, and if he croaks, Harris, the prostitute could be president until 2028 and will probably legalize prostitution and make it mandatory for all girls..

    Surely, if ever there was a time to get out of the US and take your family, this was it. You could probably cash out and buy a nice home in South America, and your children would hardly even see a black person or even know what rap music is.

    Like many people in South America, you would be able to build a wall around your home compound, and fortify it with metal gates, iron grills, barbed wire on top of the walls, and of course gun turrets from which to repel invaders.

    Life would be much cheaper, you would eat better and have better health, and would probably have a lot less stress in your life. Probably even have a mistress or two to relax with.

    Don't you owe it to your children to move out of the US before Harris turns it into a facsimile of North Korea? That would be foresight and rugged individualism. They would love you for it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    My comment wasn’t made to be amusing, but just an explanation to AKAHorace and others. Please note that I wasn’t trying to dox you in any way, Jonathan. All I wrote was what you’ve told us before.

    You didn’t correct anything, as there was nothing to correct. You are an immigrant, and I never said you were a recent one. The fact that you have been here 30 years and have not learned a damn American value yet makes it even worse. I recall you used to live in the US Northeast or something and are reasonably recent to Jacksonville or wherever nearby place.

    I see you have tried to make a comment to turn my knowledge of your political angle (and the reason even Western Euro immigration is usually a bad deal for us*) into some sort of farce. Your stance on “oh, just some common-sense regulation on guns” and your wish for government-run health care are no different from that of Nancy Pelosi. Hell, you’ve got your wish already, Jonathan. All you have to do is click your heels three times and say “there’s no place like home, there’s no place like home” – get back to England. They have to let you in, and you could easily get immigration visas for you family. They invite foreigners in with even more relish than our American elites do.

    Did you not tell us you voted for the Hildabeast and Obama before that? Face it, you are a Socialist. In your personal life you may be socially conservative, but why’d you have to bring another foreign Socialist vote and mindset to the one still Southern/Conservative part of Florida? Didn’t you fit in better up north? Oh, I see, cheaper property and a better quality of life, and you can tall those rednecks “you’re a bunch of rubes. This is how you do it. More taxes. More regulations.”

    I’ll answer in a separate comment the rest of your comment about my situation.

    .

    * I make exceptions for John Derbyshire, Peter Brimelow, and a few Dutch and French guys I know who actually paid attention and learned something during their time here.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No I voted for Obama against Hildabeast and I voted for Trump against Hildabeast. Anyone but Hillary!

    This time around I had to hold my nose and vote for Biden, even though I think he's a completely despicable person, simply because Trump has shown himself to be unfit for office and actually incapable of being the leader of the free world.

    Biden is also a scumbag, but when you have to choose between a scumbag and a sleaze bag, what can you do? My expectation is that Harris will take over as the regent on approximately January 21st, and that she will surprise people by growing in the job, which I don't see any of the other principals doing.

    I thought Harris was a poor choice for vice president, but she is starting to grow on me and seems to have a sense of humor, which will be invaluable in dealing with Congress.

    She is also a pleasing blend of ethnicities and will probably do much better on the international diplomatic front than either Biden or Trump.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  195. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Mr. Mason here is a British immigrant with his step family from the maybe-not-so-3rd-WorldThe thing is, he is a hard-core Socialist...
     
    Very amusing, Achmed!

    I am an American citizen and have been such for more than 30 years. I would describe myself more as somewhat conservative, than hard-core Socialist, but then you probably think that Josef 'Man of Steel' Biden is a communist.

    I would prefer a more socialized system of financing health care in the United States, that is true, but no more so than in another nonsocialist countries, practically all of which, in the developed world, have a universal system of financing health care, though even Britain, with its National Health Service which is free at point of care, has something like 10% of the population having voluntary private insurance programs.

    I have no interest in taking away everyone's guns, but I do think that there should be some regulation of firearms to keep them out of the hands of criminals and crazies. Probably everyone who has a gun for private purposes ought to have to carry an insurance policy.

    Other than that, I am moderately conservative on most issues. I am happy for children to have religious education in schools and think that they ought to be educated about the stories in the Bible, which are part of the western tradition. I am pretty agnostic on abortion, but on the whole, I would prefer people not to have them.

    I would like to see the quality of life in the US much less in thrall to the major corporations that govern every aspect of life in the US, and even pay off state and national legislatures to enact laws in their favor that make it difficult for individuals to compete on a level playing field even in businesses as basic as providing fast food or sandwiches.

    I would have thought that you yourself would want to consider leaving the US to find a better quality of life elsewhere.

    After all, the problem of integrating the population left over after slavery has never really been completely cracked in the US, and large tracts of the country are now occupied by immigrants who you believe do not share American values.

    America is now expecting to spend the next four years with the communist Biden in the White House, and if he croaks, Harris, the prostitute could be president until 2028 and will probably legalize prostitution and make it mandatory for all girls..

    Surely, if ever there was a time to get out of the US and take your family, this was it. You could probably cash out and buy a nice home in South America, and your children would hardly even see a black person or even know what rap music is.

    Like many people in South America, you would be able to build a wall around your home compound, and fortify it with metal gates, iron grills, barbed wire on top of the walls, and of course gun turrets from which to repel invaders.

    Life would be much cheaper, you would eat better and have better health, and would probably have a lot less stress in your life. Probably even have a mistress or two to relax with.

    Don't you owe it to your children to move out of the US before Harris turns it into a facsimile of North Korea? That would be foresight and rugged individualism. They would love you for it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    Rugged individualism, my ass! There’s no frontier left, Mr. Mason. There’s no country with much freedom left at all. If that wasn’t the case, I’d/We’d have been gone LONG AGO. I knew things were going monotonically in the wrong direction back in 1995.

    It’s not just about making a nice place just for me and my family. There is a future after that. You sound very much like Supply and Demand who told me right here that he’s got a deal set up for his family in China with all his guanxi and all, never mind the place going to Orwellian hell. He’s all set up, yeah (we may not hear at all from him after a few years – not my problem).

    I’ve thought about Uruguay for various reasons. They have serious gun control though, which means the insurance policy that we will have to use here won’t be available if things go bad there. (I know you are big on insurance and all. Is that the insurance policy you mean with the guns?)

    Heh heh, yeah you make fun of what people don’t like about the (not-a-done-deal-either) coming of the Harris administration. How long have you been reading Steve Sailer, as long as me? Yet, you haven’t picked up a thing, hardly. Besides that a Trump win would be virtually poking people like you in the eye, I see it as a way to just gain a little more time before the SHTF here.

    I go back and forth on just getting out, Jonathan, which I will lay out better in a Peak Stupidity post to be called “Should I Stay or Should I Go Now”. I think that this country is still worth defending, for the land and for the remaining dozens of millions of still patriotic Americans. The problem is that we are not organized, and they’ve made it hard to get organized. All we need is a portion of the country to be left alone in. People like you don’t want that. (I mean, the people of Jacksonville didn’t exactly invite you down there, did they?)

    Then again, I see the mass of face-diaper-wearing parents at the elementary school and wonder why I should give a damn about these stupid cucks.

    That’s my dilemma. Thanks for asking. I gotta go one way or the other before the SHTF.

  196. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I am very seriously considering it. I would imagine that at a time like this a very large number of Americans, particularly those who are retired, or those who can do their work online, would want to relocate somewhere else where the quality of life is better than in the US.

    And surely if you find that the racial problem that is the heritage of the civil war is still very serious problem in the US, would it not be a good idea to move somewhere else in the Americas where that issue does not exist to any relevant extent?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    PS: You can’t get away from the racial problem. It used to be move to Boise, Idaho or Maine or somewhere. Now, if there aren’t already lots of blacks there for the (AA) jobs and welfare benefits, then the nice Lutheran ladies import some Africans.

    BTW, it’s not a legacy from the Civil War. Do you not even understand recent history? This is a legacy from 100 years later, the Civil Rites era.

    Ooops, I see just now you wrote somewhere in the Americas with that “s”. Yeah, well, I hope you do get down to Ecuador to stay. If it works out for you and your family, I’d be glad to hear that.

  197. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    My comment wasn't made to be amusing, but just an explanation to AKAHorace and others. Please note that I wasn't trying to dox you in any way, Jonathan. All I wrote was what you've told us before.

    You didn't correct anything, as there was nothing to correct. You are an immigrant, and I never said you were a recent one. The fact that you have been here 30 years and have not learned a damn American value yet makes it even worse. I recall you used to live in the US Northeast or something and are reasonably recent to Jacksonville or wherever nearby place.

    I see you have tried to make a comment to turn my knowledge of your political angle (and the reason even Western Euro immigration is usually a bad deal for us*) into some sort of farce. Your stance on "oh, just some common-sense regulation on guns" and your wish for government-run health care are no different from that of Nancy Pelosi. Hell, you've got your wish already, Jonathan. All you have to do is click your heels three times and say "there's no place like home, there's no place like home" - get back to England. They have to let you in, and you could easily get immigration visas for you family. They invite foreigners in with even more relish than our American elites do.

    Did you not tell us you voted for the Hildabeast and Obama before that? Face it, you are a Socialist. In your personal life you may be socially conservative, but why'd you have to bring another foreign Socialist vote and mindset to the one still Southern/Conservative part of Florida? Didn't you fit in better up north? Oh, I see, cheaper property and a better quality of life, and you can tall those rednecks "you're a bunch of rubes. This is how you do it. More taxes. More regulations."

    I'll answer in a separate comment the rest of your comment about my situation.


    .

    * I make exceptions for John Derbyshire, Peter Brimelow, and a few Dutch and French guys I know who actually paid attention and learned something during their time here.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    No I voted for Obama against Hildabeast and I voted for Trump against Hildabeast. Anyone but Hillary!

    This time around I had to hold my nose and vote for Biden, even though I think he’s a completely despicable person, simply because Trump has shown himself to be unfit for office and actually incapable of being the leader of the free world.

    Biden is also a scumbag, but when you have to choose between a scumbag and a sleaze bag, what can you do? My expectation is that Harris will take over as the regent on approximately January 21st, and that she will surprise people by growing in the job, which I don’t see any of the other principals doing.

    I thought Harris was a poor choice for vice president, but she is starting to grow on me and seems to have a sense of humor, which will be invaluable in dealing with Congress.

    She is also a pleasing blend of ethnicities and will probably do much better on the international diplomatic front than either Biden or Trump.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    ...incapable of being the leader of the free world.

     

    https://image.slidesharecdn.com/quotesfromonbecomingaleader-151031113227-lva1-app6892/95/20-remarkable-quotes-from-on-becoming-a-leader-19-638.jpg?cb=1446291234


    https://cdn-0.scatteredquotes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Leadership-Quotes-3-600x600.jpg


    https://myquestdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/steve-sack-minneapolis-star-tribune.jpg?w=900&h=650


    She is also a pleasing [!} blend of ethnicities and will probably do much better on the international diplomatic front than either Biden or Trump.
     
    https://fertiltude.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/diplomacy.jpg?w=584
  198. @Mr. Anon
    @HA


    That’s your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don’t save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays.
     
    That's a specious comparison. What underlying causative effect is going up to explain the increasing infection rate? Winter? If that's the case, then we'd probably be better off dosing with Vitamin D3. Ever heard Lord Fauci even mention D3? I haven't? There have been local peaks in COVID around the country ever since last Spring, even after mask mandates went into effect. Look at the time history of infections in California - you can't even tell from the graph when the mask mandate went into effect. Some effect.

    It’s worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don’t work. They’ve since done a U-turn.
     
    It's worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won't protect you.

    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state’s population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn’t require masks continued to see their cases increase.
     
    Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It's bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago.

    https://sentinelksmo.org/more-deception-kdhe-hid-data-to-justify-mask-mandate/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @HA

    It’s worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won’t protect you.

  199. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No I voted for Obama against Hildabeast and I voted for Trump against Hildabeast. Anyone but Hillary!

    This time around I had to hold my nose and vote for Biden, even though I think he's a completely despicable person, simply because Trump has shown himself to be unfit for office and actually incapable of being the leader of the free world.

    Biden is also a scumbag, but when you have to choose between a scumbag and a sleaze bag, what can you do? My expectation is that Harris will take over as the regent on approximately January 21st, and that she will surprise people by growing in the job, which I don't see any of the other principals doing.

    I thought Harris was a poor choice for vice president, but she is starting to grow on me and seems to have a sense of humor, which will be invaluable in dealing with Congress.

    She is also a pleasing blend of ethnicities and will probably do much better on the international diplomatic front than either Biden or Trump.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …incapable of being the leader of the free world.



    She is also a pleasing [!} blend of ethnicities and will probably do much better on the international diplomatic front than either Biden or Trump.

  200. @Sean
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Christian Busch Retweeted
    Thiemo Fetzer
    @fetzert
    ·
    Nov 24
    Timely #ContactTracing does matter fighting #COVID19. In a new paper (Rightwards arrow https://bit.ly/394Ebuo) we study a bizarre #Excel error in England that caused 16k cases to NOT be contact traced. We econometrically can link this blunder to ~ 120k new cases & 1.5k deaths..
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    That cock up came almost certainly because Serco used some consultants two years out of uni, without reasonable Excel data experience and without realising they needed a data audit trail. When you’re pinging data between one system and another, especially if Excel is involved at any stage (because there are 50 ways to corrupt/lose data), you need control counts which reconcile.

    If when the data was generated in (say) format A, someone produced a small bit of code to read the records, count them and add a count in a header or trailer record, all this could have been avoided. Even better if it adds a field to say where the data’s come from.

    At each stage of the “data transformation” (standard buzzword) the program checks the counts are kosher, and when they’re all put into a big system (usually in a database by this time) the counts should all reconcile, plus if you do have any data issues you can see the source, thanks to the “source” field you added early on.

    (I do this sort of thing for a living)

  201. @RichardTaylor
    I'm pretty sure, no matter how it turns out, it'll be lockdowns for years to come.

    We now have lying, power-hungry head cases driving our elites. I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels. But apparently they have the manhood of a church mouse. They just give in to the New Intelligentsia

    Replies: @Fatmanscoop, @SFG, @Mr. Anon, @Dieter Kief, @utu, @Kratoklastes

    I kept thinking there must be lots of intelligent well-balanced people who keep things running at top levels.

    It’s not at all clear why anybody would be in a position to keep thinking such a thing, unless they had suffered a head injury that reduced their cognition to levels usually associated with severe hookworm infestation.

    For a start it would mean that at some point you would have to start thinking such a thing, which would require preternatural levels of ignorance of observable reality.

    Intelligent, well-balanced people do not want to be bureaucrats, much less political officeholders. That ship sailed before Solon was born.

    Acton’s (deliberate) misdirection was designed to mislead people to think that “power corrupts; absolute power, absolutely“.

    The truth is quite different: political power attracts the already-corrupt.

    Always ask yourself: what is the worst type of person I can imagine, who would want that job. That person will be representative of the job in question, and all the ‘intelligent, well-balanced people’ will be elsewhere. Gresham’s Law applies to talent (it applies to most things, in fact: one tiny piece of shit in a cake ruins the cake).

  202. @FPD72
    @Sean

    Overweight but not obese. BMI around 27. We try to walk a couple of miles a day. I play golf weekly with my sons, mow the yard with a push mower, etc. We quit the gym in March so I haven’t been doing resistance training since then. I need to get back to that. I got some resistance bands but haven’t been motivated; I guess I have the Covid ennui.

    Replies: @Sean

    EVEN if restricted to populations as Keys intended, BMI is not as simple as it seems. The highest life expectancy in 2 million Norwegians was found in the “over-weight” part of the population, that is, those with BMI 26-28. The “ideally slim,” with BMI 18-20 had lower life expectancy than the “obese” with BMI 34-36, while being “under-weight” (BMI<18.5) was associated with more excess death than BMI 30-35.

    When explaining this to students, I used to speculate that the reason could be that heavier weight might stand a person in better stead in the face of surgery or serious illness later in life, never dreaming that this is exactly what would happen to me. Radical cancer surgery reduced my weight by 25%, my BMI from an “obese” 30 to a “normal” 22, and took 6 inches off my waist. Had I started with an ideal BMI, I would have ended up dangerously underweight.

    At a BMI of 27, you are right on the money. Hypertension is overtreated in America, certainly by comparison with Germany, where if you are feeling under the weather doktors will prescribe medicine to raise your blood pressure

  203. @FPD72
    @Sean

    If by “they” you mean all of the vaccine trials for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, my wife and I both participated in the Pfizer trial and we are 70 years old. By the reaction we had to the second injection we suspected we got the vaccine but we confirmed it at an independent lab three weeks later; we both tested positive for the antibodies.

    Replies: @Sean, @Sean

    The Oxford vaccine for COVID-19 was tested in Britain and Brazil. There has been no testing of it on anyone over 55 in Britain so no hospitalised or severe cases in anyone who received the Oxford vaccine is not terribly surprising.

    In Brazil it was 62 % effective. Scientists are aghast at the way the British and Brazilian testing (not the same placebo) has been combined for one ‘split the different’ figure.

    I expect the UK will use the Oxford one for window dressing, but huge orders for the Pfizer vaccine have already been placed by Britain

  204. @Mr. Anon
    @HA


    That’s your logic? I guess by that measure, seat belts don’t save lives if car accidents still go up during holidays.
     
    That's a specious comparison. What underlying causative effect is going up to explain the increasing infection rate? Winter? If that's the case, then we'd probably be better off dosing with Vitamin D3. Ever heard Lord Fauci even mention D3? I haven't? There have been local peaks in COVID around the country ever since last Spring, even after mask mandates went into effect. Look at the time history of infections in California - you can't even tell from the graph when the mask mandate went into effect. Some effect.

    It’s worth noting that Dutch health experts were similarly using every pathetically lame excuse they could think of to try and convince themselves that masks don’t work. They’ve since done a U-turn.
     
    It's worth noting that Danish health experts have recently concluded that masks won't protect you.

    The Kansas mask requirement went into effect on July 3, when coronavirus cases were rising across the state. But 81 counties opted out of the mandate, as permitted by state law. The other 24 counties — which account for the majority of the state’s population — chose to require that masks be worn in public places.

    The CDC and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment analyzed trends in county-level cases before the mandate went into effect and two months afterward. Though rates were considerably higher in the 24 counties that required masks, [providing incontrovertible evidence to a bunch of self-congratulating morons at iSteve that masks are worthless] over the two-month study period they brought the growth of cases under control and even reduced them. The counties that didn’t require masks continued to see their cases increase.
     
    Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It's bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago.

    https://sentinelksmo.org/more-deception-kdhe-hid-data-to-justify-mask-mandate/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @HA

    “Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It’s bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago.”

    Proof? What, some blogger who doesn’t know there’s a log of a week or more between a change in social distancing or mask-wearing and a change in infections? Yeah, if that’s your proof, you needn’t have bothered.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @HA

    Your lies are old, but you tell 'em good. The Kansas state government deliberately misrepresent the graphs of case numbers to make it look like masks had an effect.

    They didn't.

    You'd better get back in your sterile bubble before you catch the gripe, COVID-hysteric.

  205. @HA
    @Mr. Anon

    "Still pimping the Kansas miracle? It’s bulls**t, and was proved to be some time ago."

    Proof? What, some blogger who doesn't know there's a log of a week or more between a change in social distancing or mask-wearing and a change in infections? Yeah, if that's your proof, you needn't have bothered.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Your lies are old, but you tell ’em good. The Kansas state government deliberately misrepresent the graphs of case numbers to make it look like masks had an effect.

    They didn’t.

    You’d better get back in your sterile bubble before you catch the gripe, COVID-hysteric.

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