The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Second Hour of My Podcast with Charles Murray
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Here’s the second and final hour of the Power Line podcast hosted by Steven Hayward featuring Charles Murray and myself.

 
Hide 31 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Just listened to the first hour.

    Lots of good stuff, but, much as I respect Charles Murray…he just can’t wait to distance himself from anybody from Fishtown.

    More Glenn Youngkin, less Trumpism, is what America needs?

    Sigh.

  2. Hey iSteve, how will the first Black female supreme court justice vote on affirmative action?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @George

    The same as Breyer. Replacing Breyer isn't going to change anything, at least in the short run. Maybe someday the fact that Breyer's replacement is going to be somewhat more leftist than Breyer (especially on racial stuff) will have an impact at the margin, but under the current composition of the court it's not likely to change many actual outcomes.

    , @indocon
    @George

    Ideally she should recuse because she directly benefitted from it, LOL.

  3. OT: The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I’m following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd’s death as a concentration camp.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Hibernian


    The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I’m following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd’s death as a concentration camp.
     
    Does that make Derek Chauvin Amon Goeth?

    Geez. Everything in this country is some iteration of the chattel slavery of blacks or the Holocaust of the Jews. At least the black slavery did happen here. Why is the Holocaust morality-play a recurring theme here? (Not that it's surprising given what's sitting at the center of our nation's capital.)

    Don't answer. That was a rhetorical question.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @nebulafox
    @Hibernian

    One white, one black, one Hmong.

    The American Nazi Party or the KKK must have developed a DEI department to manage their moles across society. Be Afraid.

  4. I know it’s late in the day but you should probably do more of this, Steve.

    Advice isn’t universal but I find people I liked reading in the 2000s, I tend to like to hear them BS on podcasts, if they do that, now.

    But I only liked to read 5-10 people in the 2000s, so at the same time “duh–podcast” isn’t as “duh” as it may seem. May have in fact been bad advice for the 99.999999999% of humans I did not enjoy reading in the 2000s.

  5. @Hibernian
    OT: The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I'm following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd's death as a concentration camp.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @nebulafox

    The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I’m following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd’s death as a concentration camp.

    Does that make Derek Chauvin Amon Goeth?

    Geez. Everything in this country is some iteration of the chattel slavery of blacks or the Holocaust of the Jews. At least the black slavery did happen here. Why is the Holocaust morality-play a recurring theme here? (Not that it’s surprising given what’s sitting at the center of our nation’s capital.)

    Don’t answer. That was a rhetorical question.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    Western Europe, too. I think the UN passed a resolution a while back, but nobody outside there and the US pays attention.

    Now, I'd personally think that faceless bureaucrats, the media, and multinational finance corporations passive-aggressively emphasizing victimhood as aspiration and using it to push policies like open borders and blood guilt is, like, a dumb idea if the goal is rebutting everything the Nazis ever claimed about Jews. But as we all know, such a notion is racist. And being a racist is the worst possible thing you can be. Worse than being a child molester or a serial killer. Certainly enough that it invalidates common sense.

    FWIW, it speaks volumes that the one nation in which a "Holocaust Memorial Day" would be valid, Israel, does not put on a gauzy parade of internationalist platitudes and simpering. They instead commemorate the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, where people are celebrated for *refusing* to be victims. I suspect that's partially because they actually give a damn about their co-nationals there, whatever the government's faults.

    (As for the rest of the world, I've said it before: foreign governments playing The Game for their own interests, however annoying or damaging that can be, is simply not as disgusting or controllable as what Americans are doing to their co-nationals. Still, from my understanding, the Israeli choice to do that in 1951 was deliberate, and generally smacks of authenticity and not primarily trying to make this about subordinating others, unlike these people. And I find it offensive to the dead, really, to make the story of genocide, any genocide, into an internationalist thing.

    Whereas when did the US start doing this? 1990s? 2000s?)

  6. Second half was more interesting. Charles’ take on under-qualified black professionals was a good start. Just imagine IQ testing the faculties of all the black studies departments!

    You should this podcast every six months!

  7. In the spot where they speak of the new fascination with Emmett Till, they fail to mention the Israel lobby. One can’t really get a grasp on all of the fascination with a time when “white privilege” was a meaningful notion, without looking more closely at “where does political power lie today?” The main distinguishing thing about Trump was that he took the stance of “I’m just going to say right up front that my loyalty is to Israel, and now I hope I can avoid having to say anything bad about white chumps.” The brazen way that he was open about this really stung in some quarters. Without appreciating that, one can’t make sense of the current obsession with Emmett Till.

  8. I listened to the first part and after it the realization sunk in: This conversation, so calm, logical and humane, is virtually a thought crime today. Steve Sailer and Charles Murray are, each in his own way, something close to pariahs. This tells me into what a deep hole we’ve sunk.

    • Agree: ginger bread man
    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Tono Bungay

    The conversation is perfectly reasonable to a large fraction of Americans, just not to most of the people in media and academia. Creating more ways for this kind of discussion to happen and be easily accessed is one way of doing an end run around this narrow-minded clique.

  9. This would potentially be an interesting conversation in a world where everyone wasn’t walking on eggshells, but this was…well, boring.

    >lots of incompetent blacks
    >nonwhites are going to get upset about this any time now (says increasingly nervous man for the 500th time)
    >the host (or maybe it was Murray?) even started to reference the idea that blacks themselves are victims of this, providing an anecdote to that effect.
    >the host then laments not having more time to talk about the mismatch hypothesis

    For a bunch that likes to fashion themselves as edgy and speaking the unspeakable truths, they seemed awfully content to avoid the following: the biggest victims of equalitarianism are White people. Not blacks. Not Asians. We are becoming hated minorities in our own countries. I don’t even know what to say to the idea that Shaniqua having imposter syndrome is more important.

    It really seemed like Steve was holding back here out of respect for Murray agreeing to speak with him. If that isn’t the case and he really doesn’t take issue with the absurdity of basically everything coming out of his mouth, then I am extremely disappointed. I couldn’t help but cringe every time Murray incredulously wondered why people couldn’t just be individualists in spite of race differences.

    It’s been a long time since I read Steve Sailer’s explanation of ‘citizenism’, so perhaps I am completely off-base. But I recall it being based on the acceptance of the current demographic situation and trying to make the best of it — not necessarily pathologizing past restrictive immigration policies or the existence of nation states/nationalism in other contexts. I suspect that Murray, in contrast, would have to take the position that restricting Asians and prioritizing immigrants from western Europe was ”’racist”’, because of not judging them as individuals. Similarly, Murray would have to express horror that Europeans in Europe don’t want to be replaced even with high-skilled immigrants.

  10. The elites have gone off the rails, middle America in the heartlands is fed up by the irreal woke crap the elites are force-feeding them constantly; the white middle class is in defense mode (!) – at home, so to speak.

    Hm.

    And what would Sarah Palin say about this analysis of the three men in one boat above – or Steve Bannon? Steven Pinker?

  11. Agree with those saying the second half is better, perhaps now that Murray has let his hair down a little.

    But waitaminute! What did Murray say at 21:30?

    Google has discovered the first aptitude test that will not “get them into trouble with the Feds”!

    Is this the long-sought Holy Grail: an aptitude test with no disparate impact?

    Or is it just that it is so rarified that no blacks attempt it anyway, so there is no one disparately to impact against?

    Or is it somehow disguised so that it is not an evil bad test of IQ, but a nice good test of Googliness?

    Anyone know what he is talking about?

    • Replies: @danand
    @Almost Missouri

    "What did Murray say at 21:30?"

    Almost Missouri, Murray's Google comments caught my attention also. It's well known around here that Google hires, barring an applicant bringing in "special knowledge", based on intellect. Much more so than other Silicon Valley companies.

    The interview process really puts a prospect through the ringer, lasting days to weeks. Typically, off the bat, they send you home with a complex process homework assignment. They review your solution(s), and then proceed to interrogate, ensuring the work yours.

    Make it past that, questions similar to what one would find in a typical intellect evaluation are presented, usually verbally initially, then written. Make it over those hurtles, finally the more typical "can we work with/do we like you/are you suited to the work" part of the interview starts.

    The rewards can be, or at least were when the stock was on a moonshot, well worth trouble. Just this last Tuesday an acquaintance, who's worked for Google a couple years short a decade, informed me it was moving day into his Los Altos home. Said he wanted to be a little closer to the office, in the event he could not continue working remotely. Sold most of his Google equity the make the $6M purchase. The yearly property tax assessment alone would do me in.

    In any event, seems to be a typical Googlite pattern. Work there a few years, then move out of the million dollar slums over to Lake Wobegon (Los Atos, Palo Alto), where all the children are above average, the homeless few(er), and the local grocery stores exclusively Whole Foods.

    As an aside, my wife interviewed with Google several years back, ended round 2. If not an "exceptional", one way to get a foot wedged thru Googles door is internship. One of my wife's report's husband (recently graduated from Brown) just got hired full time, ~150K base +~50K in Restricted Stock Units, for an entry position. Don't see them moving over to Lake Wobegon anytime soon.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @NOTA
    @Almost Missouri

    If I can have a bunch of very smart people sit in a room with you and feed you hard logic/math/programming problems, I can effectively filter on IQ without formally giving anyone an IQ test. (Though Google could surely make a good case for using IQ tests in hiring, given the nature of the work they do.)

  12. Steve I’m listening to this now, early in you and Charles are interested in schools moving away from standardized testing. I am too.

    But, don’t worry. The SATs are old technology, scheduled for culling by modern Big Data AI any day now.

    All these kids using google classroom are having every imaginable metric tracked throughout their schooling. Google classroom data scientists know who the smart kids are. They just need to package it into a product to sell.

    The implications are scary.

  13. @Twinkie
    @Hibernian


    The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I’m following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd’s death as a concentration camp.
     
    Does that make Derek Chauvin Amon Goeth?

    Geez. Everything in this country is some iteration of the chattel slavery of blacks or the Holocaust of the Jews. At least the black slavery did happen here. Why is the Holocaust morality-play a recurring theme here? (Not that it's surprising given what's sitting at the center of our nation's capital.)

    Don't answer. That was a rhetorical question.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Western Europe, too. I think the UN passed a resolution a while back, but nobody outside there and the US pays attention.

    Now, I’d personally think that faceless bureaucrats, the media, and multinational finance corporations passive-aggressively emphasizing victimhood as aspiration and using it to push policies like open borders and blood guilt is, like, a dumb idea if the goal is rebutting everything the Nazis ever claimed about Jews. But as we all know, such a notion is racist. And being a racist is the worst possible thing you can be. Worse than being a child molester or a serial killer. Certainly enough that it invalidates common sense.

    FWIW, it speaks volumes that the one nation in which a “Holocaust Memorial Day” would be valid, Israel, does not put on a gauzy parade of internationalist platitudes and simpering. They instead commemorate the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, where people are celebrated for *refusing* to be victims. I suspect that’s partially because they actually give a damn about their co-nationals there, whatever the government’s faults.

    (As for the rest of the world, I’ve said it before: foreign governments playing The Game for their own interests, however annoying or damaging that can be, is simply not as disgusting or controllable as what Americans are doing to their co-nationals. Still, from my understanding, the Israeli choice to do that in 1951 was deliberate, and generally smacks of authenticity and not primarily trying to make this about subordinating others, unlike these people. And I find it offensive to the dead, really, to make the story of genocide, any genocide, into an internationalist thing.

    Whereas when did the US start doing this? 1990s? 2000s?)

    • Thanks: Cato
  14. @Hibernian
    OT: The Lane/Kueng/Thao trial in Minny St. Paul, which I'm following a little, seems to be based on a theory that Thao, if not all three, is/are like concentration camp security guards with the scene of George Floyd's death as a concentration camp.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @nebulafox

    One white, one black, one Hmong.

    The American Nazi Party or the KKK must have developed a DEI department to manage their moles across society. Be Afraid.

  15. @George
    Hey iSteve, how will the first Black female supreme court justice vote on affirmative action?

    Replies: @Jack D, @indocon

    The same as Breyer. Replacing Breyer isn’t going to change anything, at least in the short run. Maybe someday the fact that Breyer’s replacement is going to be somewhat more leftist than Breyer (especially on racial stuff) will have an impact at the margin, but under the current composition of the court it’s not likely to change many actual outcomes.

  16. did you talk about how charles would’ve perished in aktion t4?

    i think he was at harvard the same time my dad was.

    sad.

  17. You need to ask Murray why his prediction that white working class public schools would become dangerous zoos like black public schools are didn’t happen at all.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @ATBOTL

    Was that in " The Bell Curve " ? or one of his solo works? I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing in TBC but I don't remember anything about schools.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  18. @ATBOTL
    You need to ask Murray why his prediction that white working class public schools would become dangerous zoos like black public schools are didn't happen at all.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    Was that in ” The Bell Curve ” ? or one of his solo works? I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing in TBC but I don’t remember anything about schools.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Unladen Swallow


    I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing
     
    If he wrote that while living in Boston, then it's not a prediction so much as a description. Boston is the only place I've ever seen with significant numbers of whites in public housing though. I think they're mostly Irish-descended.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

  19. @Almost Missouri
    Agree with those saying the second half is better, perhaps now that Murray has let his hair down a little.

    But waitaminute! What did Murray say at 21:30?

    Google has discovered the first aptitude test that will not "get them into trouble with the Feds"!

    Is this the long-sought Holy Grail: an aptitude test with no disparate impact?

    Or is it just that it is so rarified that no blacks attempt it anyway, so there is no one disparately to impact against?

    Or is it somehow disguised so that it is not an evil bad test of IQ, but a nice good test of Googliness?

    Anyone know what he is talking about?

    Replies: @danand, @NOTA

    “What did Murray say at 21:30?”

    Almost Missouri, Murray’s Google comments caught my attention also. It’s well known around here that Google hires, barring an applicant bringing in “special knowledge”, based on intellect. Much more so than other Silicon Valley companies.

    The interview process really puts a prospect through the ringer, lasting days to weeks. Typically, off the bat, they send you home with a complex process homework assignment. They review your solution(s), and then proceed to interrogate, ensuring the work yours.

    Make it past that, questions similar to what one would find in a typical intellect evaluation are presented, usually verbally initially, then written. Make it over those hurtles, finally the more typical “can we work with/do we like you/are you suited to the work” part of the interview starts.

    The rewards can be, or at least were when the stock was on a moonshot, well worth trouble. Just this last Tuesday an acquaintance, who’s worked for Google a couple years short a decade, informed me it was moving day into his Los Altos home. Said he wanted to be a little closer to the office, in the event he could not continue working remotely. Sold most of his Google equity the make the \$6M purchase. The yearly property tax assessment alone would do me in.

    In any event, seems to be a typical Googlite pattern. Work there a few years, then move out of the million dollar slums over to Lake Wobegon (Los Atos, Palo Alto), where all the children are above average, the homeless few(er), and the local grocery stores exclusively Whole Foods.

    As an aside, my wife interviewed with Google several years back, ended round 2. If not an “exceptional”, one way to get a foot wedged thru Googles door is internship. One of my wife’s report’s husband (recently graduated from Brown) just got hired full time, ~150K base +~50K in Restricted Stock Units, for an entry position. Don’t see them moving over to Lake Wobegon anytime soon.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @danand

    Okay, but are 14% of the people people getting through these interviews black? If not, how does Google explain that to the Feds and other DIE sniffers?

    Maybe an unspoken advantage of operating in the otherwise insane jurisdiction of San Francisco is that it sets the black bogie at only 5% instead of 14%? Of course probably 98% of Google employees come from outside of SF, but maybe the Feds don't care so long as the paperwork gets filled out right. There's a fun business case that Harvard Business School won't be teaching any time soon: how much is it worth to operate in a jurisdiction with fewer than average blacks? For each percentage point of a lowered black bogie, how much more profit/free cash flow/ability to put up with government insanity do you get?

    Still, there must other jurisdictions that offer low blacks without all of SF's downsides. Or maybe Google likes the downsides?

    Finally, it is ironic that after one of the most rigorous admission processes on earth, Google ends up with a shockingly high fraction of demented wokels, as seen in the James Damore lawsuit spending endless hours posting political manifestoes, discussing the proper way of announcing one’s polygamy, lecturing on life as a “dragonkin plural being”, etc. Are those really the crème de la crème of employment candidates?

    Anyway, thanks for your insights on the Google ecosystem.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

  20. @Unladen Swallow
    @ATBOTL

    Was that in " The Bell Curve " ? or one of his solo works? I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing in TBC but I don't remember anything about schools.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing

    If he wrote that while living in Boston, then it’s not a prediction so much as a description. Boston is the only place I’ve ever seen with significant numbers of whites in public housing though. I think they’re mostly Irish-descended.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Almost Missouri

    I believe it was in reference to the increasing illegitimacy rates among poor whites if memory serves ( As a sort of if this goes on extrapolation ) Although maybe Murray was basing it on living in Boston while attending both Harvard and MIT and imagining it would spread nationwide.

  21. @danand
    @Almost Missouri

    "What did Murray say at 21:30?"

    Almost Missouri, Murray's Google comments caught my attention also. It's well known around here that Google hires, barring an applicant bringing in "special knowledge", based on intellect. Much more so than other Silicon Valley companies.

    The interview process really puts a prospect through the ringer, lasting days to weeks. Typically, off the bat, they send you home with a complex process homework assignment. They review your solution(s), and then proceed to interrogate, ensuring the work yours.

    Make it past that, questions similar to what one would find in a typical intellect evaluation are presented, usually verbally initially, then written. Make it over those hurtles, finally the more typical "can we work with/do we like you/are you suited to the work" part of the interview starts.

    The rewards can be, or at least were when the stock was on a moonshot, well worth trouble. Just this last Tuesday an acquaintance, who's worked for Google a couple years short a decade, informed me it was moving day into his Los Altos home. Said he wanted to be a little closer to the office, in the event he could not continue working remotely. Sold most of his Google equity the make the $6M purchase. The yearly property tax assessment alone would do me in.

    In any event, seems to be a typical Googlite pattern. Work there a few years, then move out of the million dollar slums over to Lake Wobegon (Los Atos, Palo Alto), where all the children are above average, the homeless few(er), and the local grocery stores exclusively Whole Foods.

    As an aside, my wife interviewed with Google several years back, ended round 2. If not an "exceptional", one way to get a foot wedged thru Googles door is internship. One of my wife's report's husband (recently graduated from Brown) just got hired full time, ~150K base +~50K in Restricted Stock Units, for an entry position. Don't see them moving over to Lake Wobegon anytime soon.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Okay, but are 14% of the people people getting through these interviews black? If not, how does Google explain that to the Feds and other DIE sniffers?

    Maybe an unspoken advantage of operating in the otherwise insane jurisdiction of San Francisco is that it sets the black bogie at only 5% instead of 14%? Of course probably 98% of Google employees come from outside of SF, but maybe the Feds don’t care so long as the paperwork gets filled out right. There’s a fun business case that Harvard Business School won’t be teaching any time soon: how much is it worth to operate in a jurisdiction with fewer than average blacks? For each percentage point of a lowered black bogie, how much more profit/free cash flow/ability to put up with government insanity do you get?

    Still, there must other jurisdictions that offer low blacks without all of SF’s downsides. Or maybe Google likes the downsides?

    Finally, it is ironic that after one of the most rigorous admission processes on earth, Google ends up with a shockingly high fraction of demented wokels, as seen in the James Damore lawsuit spending endless hours posting political manifestoes, discussing the proper way of announcing one’s polygamy, lecturing on life as a “dragonkin plural being”, etc. Are those really the crème de la crème of employment candidates?

    Anyway, thanks for your insights on the Google ecosystem.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Almost Missouri

    I don't know if the rigorous hiring process Google uses for programmers applies to the non-technical people it hires, although I don't know for sure. I know in the 1990's the same thing was said of Microsoft, that they had very difficult hiring tests, but the impression I got was that that was for the technical people only. I know Damore was hired by Google as a programmer, but then got bumped up to management.

    Steve posted about a disgruntled former black lady HR employee of Google, who was tasked with finding black CS graduates from historically black universities and sharing her bosses assessments that there weren't any. She was of course shocked that they would say so because obviously they were smart by her standards and of course she thought that proved Google was racist.

  22. @Almost Missouri
    @Unladen Swallow


    I vaguely recall him writing about poor whites living mostly/entirely in public housing
     
    If he wrote that while living in Boston, then it's not a prediction so much as a description. Boston is the only place I've ever seen with significant numbers of whites in public housing though. I think they're mostly Irish-descended.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    I believe it was in reference to the increasing illegitimacy rates among poor whites if memory serves ( As a sort of if this goes on extrapolation ) Although maybe Murray was basing it on living in Boston while attending both Harvard and MIT and imagining it would spread nationwide.

  23. @Almost Missouri
    @danand

    Okay, but are 14% of the people people getting through these interviews black? If not, how does Google explain that to the Feds and other DIE sniffers?

    Maybe an unspoken advantage of operating in the otherwise insane jurisdiction of San Francisco is that it sets the black bogie at only 5% instead of 14%? Of course probably 98% of Google employees come from outside of SF, but maybe the Feds don't care so long as the paperwork gets filled out right. There's a fun business case that Harvard Business School won't be teaching any time soon: how much is it worth to operate in a jurisdiction with fewer than average blacks? For each percentage point of a lowered black bogie, how much more profit/free cash flow/ability to put up with government insanity do you get?

    Still, there must other jurisdictions that offer low blacks without all of SF's downsides. Or maybe Google likes the downsides?

    Finally, it is ironic that after one of the most rigorous admission processes on earth, Google ends up with a shockingly high fraction of demented wokels, as seen in the James Damore lawsuit spending endless hours posting political manifestoes, discussing the proper way of announcing one’s polygamy, lecturing on life as a “dragonkin plural being”, etc. Are those really the crème de la crème of employment candidates?

    Anyway, thanks for your insights on the Google ecosystem.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    I don’t know if the rigorous hiring process Google uses for programmers applies to the non-technical people it hires, although I don’t know for sure. I know in the 1990’s the same thing was said of Microsoft, that they had very difficult hiring tests, but the impression I got was that that was for the technical people only. I know Damore was hired by Google as a programmer, but then got bumped up to management.

    Steve posted about a disgruntled former black lady HR employee of Google, who was tasked with finding black CS graduates from historically black universities and sharing her bosses assessments that there weren’t any. She was of course shocked that they would say so because obviously they were smart by her standards and of course she thought that proved Google was racist.

  24. @George
    Hey iSteve, how will the first Black female supreme court justice vote on affirmative action?

    Replies: @Jack D, @indocon

    Ideally she should recuse because she directly benefitted from it, LOL.

  25. In part 2, Murray states (at the 30 minute mark): “It is not very often that you can point to a single policy and say, this is the culprit. I will argue that you look at aggressive affirmative action, and this is the culprit.” A very thoughtful observation.

    Also important is Hayward’s “rant” (as he calls it) about the degradation of the original affirmative action policies into a McCarthyite, Maoist confessional racket.

    Another highlight is Sailer’s remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Peter Johnson


    Another highlight is Sailer’s remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.
     
    What is the mechanism by which that would increase social divisiveness?

    Replies: @Peter Johnson, @NOTA

  26. @Peter Johnson
    In part 2, Murray states (at the 30 minute mark): "It is not very often that you can point to a single policy and say, this is the culprit. I will argue that you look at aggressive affirmative action, and this is the culprit." A very thoughtful observation.

    Also important is Hayward's "rant" (as he calls it) about the degradation of the original affirmative action policies into a McCarthyite, Maoist confessional racket.

    Another highlight is Sailer's remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.

    Replies: @Anon

    Another highlight is Sailer’s remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.

    What is the mechanism by which that would increase social divisiveness?

    • Replies: @Peter Johnson
    @Anon

    The word "diversity" is an antonym of "unity" and focussing on diversity generates hostility toward social unity. Society is united or it is divided; the diversity theme encourages society toward division not union.

    , @NOTA
    @Anon

    It is hard to unite very different groups into a single coalition. Underclass blacks, middle-class blacks, Salvadorans hanging drywall in DC, educated gay couples raising dogs in their expensive city condo, blue-collar lesbian couples with a kid and six cats--the only way to press that group into a coalition that will stick together is to unite them against a common enemy, which turns out to be whites, or white men, or rural whites, or some such group. Otherwise, the gay male couple is mainly concerned with their 401Ks and the underclass blacks are mostly about keeping the public assistance coming and the Salvadorans mainly just want to keep la migra away, and besides that, the Salvadorans and blacks mostly find the gay and lesbian couples immoral and kinda creepy, and don't much like one another either. And as Tom Leher points out, everybody hates the Jews. Without heaping hatred and anger on their common enemy, the coalition would fly apart in a week.

  27. @Anon
    @Peter Johnson


    Another highlight is Sailer’s remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.
     
    What is the mechanism by which that would increase social divisiveness?

    Replies: @Peter Johnson, @NOTA

    The word “diversity” is an antonym of “unity” and focussing on diversity generates hostility toward social unity. Society is united or it is divided; the diversity theme encourages society toward division not union.

  28. @Tono Bungay
    I listened to the first part and after it the realization sunk in: This conversation, so calm, logical and humane, is virtually a thought crime today. Steve Sailer and Charles Murray are, each in his own way, something close to pariahs. This tells me into what a deep hole we've sunk.

    Replies: @NOTA

    The conversation is perfectly reasonable to a large fraction of Americans, just not to most of the people in media and academia. Creating more ways for this kind of discussion to happen and be easily accessed is one way of doing an end run around this narrow-minded clique.

  29. @Almost Missouri
    Agree with those saying the second half is better, perhaps now that Murray has let his hair down a little.

    But waitaminute! What did Murray say at 21:30?

    Google has discovered the first aptitude test that will not "get them into trouble with the Feds"!

    Is this the long-sought Holy Grail: an aptitude test with no disparate impact?

    Or is it just that it is so rarified that no blacks attempt it anyway, so there is no one disparately to impact against?

    Or is it somehow disguised so that it is not an evil bad test of IQ, but a nice good test of Googliness?

    Anyone know what he is talking about?

    Replies: @danand, @NOTA

    If I can have a bunch of very smart people sit in a room with you and feed you hard logic/math/programming problems, I can effectively filter on IQ without formally giving anyone an IQ test. (Though Google could surely make a good case for using IQ tests in hiring, given the nature of the work they do.)

  30. @Anon
    @Peter Johnson


    Another highlight is Sailer’s remarks on the Democratic Party using diversity as their main campaign theme, and how this innevitably increases social divisiveness.
     
    What is the mechanism by which that would increase social divisiveness?

    Replies: @Peter Johnson, @NOTA

    It is hard to unite very different groups into a single coalition. Underclass blacks, middle-class blacks, Salvadorans hanging drywall in DC, educated gay couples raising dogs in their expensive city condo, blue-collar lesbian couples with a kid and six cats–the only way to press that group into a coalition that will stick together is to unite them against a common enemy, which turns out to be whites, or white men, or rural whites, or some such group. Otherwise, the gay male couple is mainly concerned with their 401Ks and the underclass blacks are mostly about keeping the public assistance coming and the Salvadorans mainly just want to keep la migra away, and besides that, the Salvadorans and blacks mostly find the gay and lesbian couples immoral and kinda creepy, and don’t much like one another either. And as Tom Leher points out, everybody hates the Jews. Without heaping hatred and anger on their common enemy, the coalition would fly apart in a week.

    • Agree: Peter Johnson
  31. As this video below shows, the damage is done. Harvard students are not so bright:

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Talk TV sensationalists and axe-grinding ideologues have fallen for a myth of immigrant lawlessness.
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
Becker update V1.3.2