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Seattle Times: "Is Math Racist?"
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From the Seattle Times news section:

Is math racist? New course outlines prompt conversations about identity, race in Seattle classrooms

Oct. 8, 2019 at 5:00 am

By Elise Takahama
Seattle Times staff reporter

Education Lab is a Seattle Times project that spotlights promising approaches to persistent challenges in public education. It is produced in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network and is funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Amazon and City University of Seattle. Learn more about Ed Lab.

Is Seattle really teaching that “math is racist”? Why did parents start to see ideas for math lessons that go far beyond numbers and into questions of identity?

These and other questions erupted on Twitter last week, shortly after Seattle Public Schools released a draft of new learning objectives that integrate ethnic studies into math, and after conservative news outlets began berating the district.

Seattle schools are in the process of developing ethnic-studies frameworks for different subjects, including social studies and art.

… But while some school districts are only building stand-alone ethnic-studies classes, Seattle is also rethinking existing courses to be taught through an anti-racist lens. …

In math, lessons are more theoretical. Seattle’s recently released proposal includes questions like, “Where does Power and Oppression show up in our math experiences?” and “How is math manipulated to allow inequality and oppression to persist?”

Several online critics voiced their disapproval last week, insisting that Seattle schools were trying to politicize a subject that often serves as a universal language with clear, objective answers.

It’s not the first time the project has been attacked. Some detractors, Au said, don’t understand what ethnic studies is.

“We do talk about institutionalized racism and the histories and trajectories of racism in the country, but that doesn’t mean white kids need to be demonized in that process,” he said.

Actually, that’s the way it usually works out.

Tracy Castro-Gill, the SPS ethnic-studies program manager, added that these themes are rooted in research that suggests there are immense academic and social benefits to learning ethnic studies.

Which is why ethnic studies majors are in so much more demand in the marketplace than math majors.

… “There are studies that talk about specifically black and brown students not being seen as scientists or mathematicians … It affects their efficacy, their ability to engage in that kind of learning,” she said. “That’s why identity is so core to math and science.”

It’s not that the formulas and equations taught in current math classes are racist, Castro-Gill said — it’s about how they’re used in daily life.

“Nowhere in this document says that math is inherently racist,” she said. “It’s how math is used as a tool for oppression.”

One example teachers might mention in an ethnic studies math class, she said, is how black voters in the South were given literacy and numeracy tests before they could cast their ballot. Another might be a lesson on ratios that discusses gaps in incarceration rates and how the weight of a type of drug determines the length of a sentence.

“The numbers are objective,” she said, “but how we use it is not objective.”

Classes might also talk about how different cultures have practiced math, such as how Aztecs used a base-20 number system, as opposed to the base-10 system Americans use.

Schools have been doing this for about 45+ years.

It’s an idea that started gaining traction in Seattle’s school district in 2016.

“Increasingly, our demographics are [majority] students of color … And the data are telling us that we’re not serving them and we’re not meeting their needs,” Castro-Gill said.

Last year, 72.9% of Seattle students of color graduated on time, compared with 87.9% of white students, according to annual statistics from the state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Students of color, particularly Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, black/African American and American Indian/Alaskan Native students, also performed significantly worse in math and English than their white peers.

As usual, it’s The Gap.

 
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  1. Kronos says:

    I always wished they’d provide a logic section and historical overview of mathematics. I would’ve enjoyed John Derb’s book as a kid.

    *Ian Stewart’s stuff is great too.

  2. Given that ‘critical race theory’ holds that logic itself is racist, it should surprise no one that math is close behind. Besides, POCs are notoriously poor at math hence it could only be racism at work.

    For extra fun, try searching the phrase “LOGIC ITSELF IS RACIST” on Google vs your search engine of choice. Which reminds me: we need a better search engine.

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
    , @Realist
    , @Logan
  3. Ibound1 says:

    It’s when they say that gravity and microbiology are racist that you should worry. Bridges have a nasty way of falling down if not built correctly and an infections have a nasty way of killing you, when no antibiotics are around.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Kronos
  4. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Humans having two hands with five digits each, AFAIK base ten has been the normal system of numbers for most every civilization up until digital computers made binary, octal and hexadecimal (it should have been “sexadecimal” but IBM had a problem with sex) somewhat popular industrially.

    Maybe we should ask a numerologist if other number systems are also in use in that field. Fortunately, I know one;

    I am a skilled Practioner [sic] of Tarot and Numerology. An activist, artist and anarchist journalist; the author of several zines and a book due for publication in January 2020.

    I have trained at the College of Psychic Studies in Numerology, Tarot and Spiritual Grounding and now offer Numerology readings over Skype and telephone.

    I would love to help if you have any questions, and can negotiate rates according to income.

    For Bookings and Enquiries please contact

    https://www.nataliehynde.com/about

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Lurker
  5. syonredux says:

    Students of color, particularly Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, black/African American and American Indian/Alaskan Native students, also performed significantly worse in math and English than their white peers.

    I guess that East Asians just don’t count as POC……

    • Replies: @rexl
    , @Candide III
  6. … developing ethnic-studies frameworks …

    See, this is why we really can’t have Departments of Education at universities. They’ve just got to keep these people busy, so they don’t know for sure that their whole required degrees are SCAMS. If you’re going to have 10’s of thousands of future elementary school teachers writing theses every year, you’d damn well come up with some topics.

    That’s where this stuff comes from. I have a Peak Stupidity post forming in my head as I type about some BS on a paper my elementary school student brought home. It said “using prior knowledge (schema) to make connections and inferences when I am reading” For crying out loud, if the kid is smart he can just up and read, and understand what he’s reading. If he ain’t, he sure as hell will not understand what a “schema” is! I sure don’t. There’s another sheet that I wanted to give as the 2nd example, but it’s deep within my paper-trash fire-starting pile.

    So, I don’t know if this Elise Takahama really believes any of her own crap, but, dammit, if you’re gonna have a whole “Education Lab”, you’ve got to come up with some new shit now and then. Taxpayers are gonna get wise, otherwise.

  7. @Anonymous

    The Babylonians liked numbers involving 12 rather than 10.

  8. BTW, what were the Aztecs planning on doing, when teaching the young ones arithmetic, after they invented shoes? Or, were they never gonna wear shoes? I guess they never counted (pun intended) on Cortez’s and Pizzaro’s arrivals, and the subsequent civilization, including small retail establishments, with their signs warning “No shirt, no shoes, no service!”

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  9. If there is any more proof needed that things have been reduced to absurdity, this is it!

    And yes, it is The Gap. That is all this is about. Every effort to subvert our reasoning is about The Gap.

    This story has been kicking around all day, and my wife, a mathematician, just sees it as another stupid thing, like another mass shooting. So common now that she and I just are too jaded, or stunned perhaps, to even bother talking much about it. Really, what is there to say?

    Why expend any more breath arguing against this shit?

    Math certainly can be manipulated to oppress, as in taking purely mathematical gaps and calling them disparate impact. That’s not actually a manipulation of the math, just a stupid interpretation of results.

    Some schools have been injecting non-math into classrooms for a while. The best example is forcing math teachers to include writing exercises, to the point that the good math teachers are having their students do more writing and, ahem, logical thinking, than the crappy English teachers have the students do in English class.

    Oue district added a “language specialist” to go around and teach Spanish words in all the different classes, including math. Their property owners are paying for this.

    The insanity is endless. Infinite! That’s math I guess.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @anon
    , @Aardvark
  10. @Steve Sailer

    What other appendages were they using to make this easy to teach? I could see base 11 or 21, but …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  11. Dan Hayes says:

    Brought to one and all by the usual suspects: “the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Amazon….”.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Thomas
  12. @Ibound1

    No, it is now, when they say mathematics is racist. You know math is the foundation of most of the other things you are worried about. They have already infected many sciences. The decay has now gotten down to the root. The only cure is extraction.

    BTW: If math is racist, then racism is true!

    • Agree: Ibound1
  13. Altai says:

    Is math racist? New course outlines prompt conversations about identity, race in Seattle classrooms

    Oct. 8, 2019 at 5:00 am

    By Elise Takahama

    That byline tho. Seriously, did Elise think math was racist against her Japanese-American self?

  14. It not racist to suggest that not teaching subjects that might help students of assorted races to become doctors, dentists, architects, etc. is a good idea, because most of them are too thick to understand it, because exactly the same applies to white school children.

    However, it is very stupid, because to have a functioning democracy, we need citizens who can handle their own money, pay their bills, and perform some measurements during the course of their work, for example measuring doses of medications, or giving change to customers.

  15. Yes, Math is Racist.

    Everything becomes clear when you remember two rules:
    Rule 1: Anything in which NAMs have suboptimal outcomes = Racist
    Rule 2: Anything in which NAMs have superior outcomes = Diverse

  16. It’s at times like this that I force myself to remember that “laughter is the best medicine.”

  17. @Achmed E. Newman

    One theory was that there was an ancient math genius before the beginning of history who had 12 fingers.

    But 12 is a pretty convenient number for a lot of purposes.

    Maybe the scribes took pride in not counting on their fingers?

  18. @Buzz Mohawk

    Heck, the old way was to wring your hands at the fact that despite all of our efforts, minorities still did worse at math and science (etc) than white kids. Therefore we had to work even harder at helping those minorites do better.

    But that didn’t work. So the solution now is to destroy math and science (etc) because their continued existence forms a standing rebuke to the notion that minorities are as good or better than white kids at the various things they’re not as good at. Yes, that’s what I meant to say.

    By a similar token, do we have to get rid of sports which blacks are good at, and various forms of popular music where they dominate? Probably should get rid of violin playing (and math) because Asians. And various other stereotypes. Or does this only work one way?

    Probably. Because blacks are really good at crime, which would mean we’d have to abolish crime.

  19. But of course this BS is not originating with bl*cks or any other POC.

    It is people backed by the same ruling class faction who infiltrated, subverted, and destroyed teaching the humanities. Now they are going for math, hard sciences, and engineering. Also the same people pushing transgenderism etc.

    But it’s not really a “conspiracy” because they think they are doing good. Right?

  20. If mathematics is racist, then the truth is racist, logic is racist…

    Does it not follow then that racist conclusions and results can be true and correct? Objectively?

    Yes.

    So, according to The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, et al. and the Education Lab, racism can be a true and correct solution to a problem. We should thank them.

    (Better logicians can chime in and clean this up if they want to.)

    • Replies: @Semperluctor
  21. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    “There are studies that talk about specifically black and brown students not being seen as scientists or mathematicians … It affects their efficacy, their ability to engage in that kind of learning,” she said. “That’s why identity is so core to math and science.”

    If only there were ever Hollywood portrayals of smart black and brown people. What if, for example, the computer engineer genius from Terminator 2 were black? Granted, America was pretty racist 28 years ago when that movie came out, so it’s unlikely, but still…

  22. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    12 is the smoothest possible number of cylinders for a four cycle internal combustion engine to have, offering perfect double balance, and no “rocking couple” if the cylinder bores are aligned perpendicular to the crankshaft centerline (which requires fork-and-blade or male/female connecting rods). The Packard V12 auto engine which inspired Ferrari had offset bores for plain conrods, but the Packard 4M 2500 , the V-1710 Allison, the V-1650 Packard which was a copy of the RR Merlin, and the DB 601 all had fork and blade rods.

    But as a numbering system it would only make sense if humans had six digits on each hand.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    , @bomag
  23. @Steve Sailer

    You have the 12 constellations on the ecliptic, now that I think about it a bit. However, did it really have to be broken up into 12 though? It’s not like there are really Lions, Twins and Fish up there.

    Since I’m on this, the best book you could get for a budding astronomer, of say 10-13 years old, is a book by the same guy who wrote the Curious George books, one H.A. Rey. He draws the lines between stars in a MUCH BETTER fashion than the ancients, resulting in the constellations making sense. I found it, more easily than I thought I would, here on amazon.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  24. Multicultural math predates the Civil War.

    From Professor/General Hill’s text, interesting problems on New England trades and cultural practices:

    A Yankee mixes a certain number of wooden nutmegs, which cost him 1/4 cent apiece, with a quantity of real nutmegs, worth 4 cents apiece, and sells the whole assortment for $44; and gains $3.75 by the fraud. How many wooden nutmegs were there? 33

    In the year 1692, the people of Massachusetts executed, imprisoned, or privately persecuted 469 persons, of both sexes, and all ages, for alleged crime of witchcraft. Of these, twice as many were privately persecuted as were imprisoned, and 7 17/19 times as many more were imprisoned than were executed. Required the number of sufferers of each kind? 34

    In the year 1637, all the Pequod Indians that survived the slaughter on the Mystic River were either banished from Connecticut, or sold into slavery. The square root of twice the number of survivors is equal to 1/10 that number. What was the number? 35

  25. @Steve Sailer

    Perhaps based on their measurement of daylight per day, or their division of months in a year?

    Also, 3 is a very important numbers to many numerologists across cultures. Perhaps 6 and 12 are used because they are merely multiples of that number 3.

  26. For all this talk about math being scary to minorities or some kind of roadblock to success… I used to look over my past students’ standardized test results, and it was typical for ALL kids to do better in the math/science portions than in reading/English. This gap was pretty small for black kids but whites and Hispanics do significantly better in math than verbal.

    There is no real math crisis in America. But there is a burgeoning literacy crisis. Listen to people talk in old movies, or even 80s/90s movies, vs. today’s. It’s not just that people don’t read for fun, they also can’t comprehend practical instructions/memos, and dialogue in media and real life is dumbed down.

    • Replies: @IFHJ
    , @silviosilver
  27. So for the past 30 -50 years when statistics have supported race realism, and the SJWs refused to countenance it, the snide response from us was, “Heh. I guess numbers are racist.”

    Now the SJWs have taken that as true.

  28. “Is Math Racist?”

    Almost any sentence with numbers and the word “despite” is racist.

  29. @Achmed E. Newman

    Twelve hours of daylight, twelve to a dozen, twelve has deep roots probably going way back in the Fertile Crescent.

    • Replies: @black sea
  30. @R.G. Camara

    10: 1, 2, 5, 10
    12: 1, 3, 4, 6, 12

    More ways to arrange factors of 12 than of 10.

  31. Andy says:

    Ironically, when Ms. Castro parrots about “power and oppression” to denounce “white privilege”, she is parroting, whether she realize it or not (she might have learned the lingo second hand) Michel Foucault, the most eurocentric of philosophers, always eager to universalize from the experience of France

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  32. istevefan says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Or just do a Google search for American scientists, inventors, etc.

  33. @Achmed E. Newman

    BTW, what were the Aztecs planning on doing, when teaching the young ones arithmetic, after they invented shoes?

    Sacrificing them to the local rain gods, duh.

  34. IFHJ says:

    Here in the libtard run wild PNW, they are making elementary school math so wordy it might as well be English. My son who is really advanced in math absolutely hated math in elementary school because of all the writing he had to do in math. Elementary school teachers are people who failed Algebra I in HS. Most of them can barely do two digit subtraction, never mind multiplication, esp. the ones who teach k-2nd.

    The IB program in our high schools are notorious for the amount of writing in even calculus. Kids actually have to write a paper on logarithm! Liberals are people who can’t do math, so they’re trying to turn math into English, and English into grievance studies with all the stupid, dark, depressing books they make our kids read starting from 5th grade! And then they wonder why our kids are depressed and suicidal.

    Liberal nutjobs have gone off the deep end on education, and they’re dragging our kids over the cliff with them. All protests from parents are ignored. Our education “experts” know best.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Joe, Averaged
  35. IFHJ says:
    @S. Anonyia

    There is no real math crisis in America.

    I would not say that. Americans are increasingly math stupid. Take away the calculator and 95% of Americans – of all races, probably can’t calculate a 15% tip. If Americans weren’t so bad at math, we wouldn’t keep having these financial crisis with subprime loan fiasco, student loan bubble etc. Most Americans can’t calculate a simple interest rate, never mind compounding interest. That’s why so many have ridiculous credit card debt.

    Parents would die of embarrassment if they have to say “my kid can’t read”, but they have no problem saying “my kid can’t do math”. Some even say it with pride, esp. parents of girls, like that means their kids are not nerds but are popular or something.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  36. Another might be a lesson on ratios that discusses gaps in incarceration rates and how the weight of a type of drug determines the length of a sentence.

    Honestly this sounds way more grossly stereotype-y than the stuff they’re complaining about, like they’re admitting this is the kind of life they’re training the NAM students for. “Remember kids, under an ounce, out you’ll bounce!”

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  37. istevefan says:

    OT – We once discussed using Amazon Smile instead of Amazon to make small donations on each of your purchases to a charity like Numbers USA. Here are the latest stats for NumbersUSA and Amazon Smile.

    NumbersUSA Education & Research Foundation, recently received a quarterly donation of $336.13 thanks to customers shopping at smile.amazon.com.

    To date, AmazonSmile has donated a total of:

    $4,436.76 to NumbersUSA Education & Research Foundation
    $144,958,582.84 to all charities

    That’s not much. If anyone here uses Amazon to shop, consider logging into Amazon Smile and choosing NumbersUSA as your charity of choice. Amazon will donate a small amount of your purchase to them. You will have to go to Amazon Smile and search for NumbersUSA. Once you select them, they will automatically get a donation from each of your purchases so long as you checkout on Amazon Smile. If you check out on regular Amazon, no donation is made.

    For those unfamiliar with NumbersUSA, they are an immigration restriction advocacy group that lobbies congress. They were very useful during the amnesty pushes in 2006 and 2007. They have some good informative videos that present the immigration restrictionist point of view in a manner normies can accept.

    Here is their famous Gumball video.

  38. @Mr McKenna

    Bro, do you even DuckDuckGo?

  39. Dr. X says:

    Is math racist? OF COURSE it is — EVERYTHING created by the bourgeois white man is “racist.”

    Time to acknowledge that the communist revolution is over, and WE LOST. All of the contemporary leftist insantity is simply the Bolshevism of the black, the brown, the female, and the queer against the white-man-as-bourgeois-kulak.

    There’s only two options, folks — accept your servitude or start a counterrevolution.

  40. @Andy

    Right. Foucault’s motto could have been: if this topic doesn’t have anything to do with King Louis XIV, I’m not interested.

    • Agree: Andy
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  41. @Steve Sailer

    In his Synergetics, Buckminster Fuller attempts a new geometry. He makes a big deal out of “the closest packing of spheres,” and notes that the first layer is 12 around the single, core sphere. Thus:

    From this, he connects the centers and draws what he calls the “vector equillibrium,” which you can see above. He calls this nature’s coordinate system.

    The point here is that the first layer is 12, and there are twelve vertices of the structure.

    The minimum possible system in space is the tetrahedron, or 4 packed spheres.

    There are probably several ways in which the number 12 got into math, and BTW, the number 60 follows from that and is also prominent in numerical history, including 60 degree angles in an equilateral triangle and the 360 all the way around a circle.

    BTW: After reading the Seattle Times article, it seems pretty clear that nobody is calling math by itself racist. They are just injecting all the usual gobbledygook about how it is used and how to make stupid kids feel better about themselves in relation to the subject. So please forget my attempt to make a logical trick out of it.

  42. Math is so racist.

    Think of all the poor people of color, especially from the rural villages of third-world agrarian societies, who don’t stand a chance in the world of math.

    • Replies: @adreadline
    , @Kronos
  43. Joseph A. says:
    @Steve Sailer

    In 8th grade, we learnt that the Babylonians had a base 60 system, and that was my first exposure to thinking of grouping numbers differently. Pretty awesome. 60 has a lot going for it — factors: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, 60. Less fractions. Imagine the times tables those little scholars in training had to deal with!

    • Replies: @Steve2
  44. @Mr McKenna

    We would have to abolish everything. That seems to be the goal of the evil that has taken hold of our world.

    There is the old saying about Communism, that it makes everyone equally poor — except for the top party members.

    You just made me think again of “Harrison Bergeron,” a story by Kurt Vonnegut. It takes place in the year 2081, when everyone is finally made equal via handicapping. There is a Handicapping Bureau or Handicapper General, as I recall.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  45. @Steve Sailer

    Smart… 12 is a highly composite number (meaning it has more factors than any smaller natural number), which is a genuinely useful mathematical property. The organically developed imperial system is also full of more useful numbers like these…

    Sophisticated European central administrators who count on their fingers and measure their room temperatures relative to the behavior of dihydrogen monoxide at sea level… obviously prefer the superior metric system though.

  46. @Steve Sailer

    Because they (and you) used (can use) a compass to bisect a circle into 3 equal arcs. Then you use a straight edge to bisect one of them and spin your compass again to make 6. Do it twice more and you get 12 equal divisions of a circle. Hey! that’s the same number of lunar cycles in a solar year! Do it a couple more times and you have 24, why we have 24 hours in the day.

    Here’s where it gets interesting. If you draw circles through the intersections of the 12 circles you have drawn, they fall on the sin of 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45, 60 etc. In other words, the 6 circles through the intersections are latitudes, forming a true three dimensional view of e.g. our Earth from the North Star. The compass rose is basically a realistic view of a sphere. It’s not distorted as in a projection.

    Why this should be the case is beyond my analytical mathematic abilities.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @ThreeCranes
  47. Among the many irritating things about this article is the suggestion that people dislike this nonsense because they think it will vilify white people. No, we don’t like it because it is not math and it is phony pedagogy.

    By the way, how does a professor from UW-Bothell (basically a community college) get to determine what the math curriculum is for elementary schools, and lecture us on how we are bad if we don’t like ethnic studies?

  48. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    Its not that long ago that base 12 still had some influence in Britain.

    12 = dozen. The basic unit of egg sales is still 6 in a box i.e. half a dozen.

    12 X 12 = 1 gross. I can still dimly recall things being sold in a gross.

    Going further back; 12 pennies in a shilling.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @bomag
  49. @IFHJ

    Yeah, people are getting worse at simple mental math. But when provided with calculators and formulas there is generally a no real issue when they are tested. Perhaps practical mental math is a different skill than “school-math,” too- for instance, I’m really quick at figuring in my head, but my husband who has a STEM career struggles without paper or some other reference point. Maybe this means I shouldn’t have been so lazy and should have applied myself more when choosing a major- or perhaps it means it works a different part of the brain? Mental math seems like it’s more about memory and situational awareness than problem solving.

    And trust me, LOTS of kids cannot read in any practical sense. I’d guess about 1/4 of public school students over 13, more in the under 13 set. It’s that bad…. which is why I left education. Some parents won’t admit when their kid can’t read. Sometimes the parents can’t read themselves. Most often they just don’t pay enough attention to their kids to realize there is a problem.

    • Replies: @Jack Henson
  50. newrouter says:

    This what happens when you depend on a EDU degree to teach anything.

  51. Kronos says:
    @Ibound1

    Well you remember that “diversity” bridge collapse almost two years ago right?

    Once I heard that a newly constructed bridge collapsed and was connected to a university, my priori senses started to tingle.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  52. So, if I’m getting this right, Asians are oppressed people of color but not when it comes to this math stuff.

  53. rexl says:
    @syonredux

    Basically, what else is there other than math and English?

    • Replies: @Realist
  54. @Kronos

    My impression is that bridge collapse wasn’t all that much due to diversity and just to shoddy and/or corrupt Miami building practices that Dave Barry has written about.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @AnonAnon
  55. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Soviet (and Russian) aviation still uses the 32 point compass system, speed in km/hr, and altitude in meters, whereas the rest of the world uses 360 degrees of compass heading, altitude in feet, and speed and distances in nautical miles and nautical miles per hour (knots).

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  56. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    The out-of-wedlock birthdate is the gap that should be addressed. Until this gap closes, it’s difficult to see how any kind of equality will be achieved between blacks and other races in educational achievement, crime rates, etc.

    Out-of-wedlock births:

    Blacks – 69%
    Hispanic – 52%
    Whites – 28%
    Asian – 12%

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf (p. 25)

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  57. @PiltdownMan

    Ramanujan’s family was poor, but from what I know he was a Brahmin. He was not, say, an untouchable Dalit or even a lowly Shudra laborer, so one could still say (using that strange ”logic”) that math is indeed racist — just adapted to the particularities of Indian/Hindu society. Brahmin privilege.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  58. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    And 20 shillings in a pound.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    , @nokangaroos
  59. Kronos says:
    @PiltdownMan

    I felt bad for the Ramanujan, I read the book and its pretty good. Just goes to show vegans in Europe are not long for this world. Especially during WW1 food rationing.

    G.D. Hardy always came off as an asshole. Not just in this book but others (even his own.) his “A Mathematician’s Apology” showed how to be a thug in the math department.

  60. Thomas says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Seattle proper is increasingly becoming an ant farm run by wealthy liberals who live on the other side of Lake Washington to conduct social experiments like this and in other areas (see also homelessness and crime). They (and their kids) are insulated from the consequences and they get to assuage any guilt they might feel about living where they do (Sammamish just became the highest median income city in the country) by funding the various poverty pimp outfits that run city government. Bellevue is like an Asian version of Beverly Hills right now. Other than tourists who don’t know any better, nobody goes to downtown Seattle anymore unless they have to.

    I almost feel like they’re keeping Seattle a shithole to discourage all the tech wage slaves there from breeding. (Expedia just moved their headquarters from the Eastside to Interbay. I know people at Expedia who are not happy.)

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  61. @Dave Pinsen

    Barney the black guy was the ridiculously handy electronics genius on the old Mission Impossible series. Greg Morris at least did pull off this farfetched role pretty convincingly, though it’s odd that no evil Balkan dictator ever wondered, “What the hell is a black person doing in our Democratic People’s Republic?”

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    , @Brutusale
    , @RAZ
  62. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @IFHJ

    … they’re trying to turn … English into grievance studies with all the stupid, dark, depressing books they make our kids read starting from 5th grade! And then they wonder why our kids are depressed and suicidal.

    Yes! They make kids read horrible, depressing books. It’s unnecessary!

  63. Steve2 says:
    @Joseph A.

    Please note Babylonian loan repayments based on 60 months. See M. Hudson for details.

    Money math.

  64. @Steve Sailer

    Smart smart people dream up new systems which may or may not work well. Smart people adopt the systems that work and build on them to create potent structure. Other people occasionally adopt the ideas and the structure of the smart people to build families, civilizations, etc.

  65. @Dave Pinsen

    If only there were ever Hollywood portrayals of smart black and brown people. What if, for example, the computer engineer genius from Terminator 2 were black? Granted, America was pretty racist 28 years ago when that movie came out, so it’s unlikely, but still…

    I hired a skinny black kid with glasses for a non-technical role at my company, and he instantly became the go-to tech-question guy for a generation of imbecilic employees raised by Hollywood to believe that all black kids in glasses are computer geniuses.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  66. Speaking of high grade mathematics, it looks like Terrance Howard of Empire has been initiated into a neoplatonic gnostic mystery school. He’s droppin’ knowledge on the red carpet.

    I share his general skepticism of gravity.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  67. @Buzz Mohawk

    No. This is incorrect, & can be shown by set theory.
    In brief, maths, truth, and logic are not axiomatically (in your example) part of the same set.
    They may be part of different sets.

    The statement ‘If M then R’ does necessarily result in
    ‘Therefore T then R’

    In short “If M then R /then T then R” is not a priori true.

    If M then R may be true, while T then R is false.

    “If M then T” as an axiom would allow the truth of the statement “If M then R, then T then R”.

    Thus, your final conclusion can be correct if either if these axioms is posited:
    “If M then T” or “ If M then L”.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  68. Anon[244] • Disclaimer says:

    China, Russia, India, Iran, Korea, Japan and other rising economic powers and not slowing their kids up with such tripe as this.

    Scott Ritter has an article at Amconmag right now describing how genuinely impressive China’s new weapons are. The gap is closing all right.

  69. @Anonymous

    Once we close that gap, parity is achieved. Unless it’s more result than cause.

  70. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    These claims that math, or physics, or engineering, is racist never get down to specifics. (It the same as the way that how slavery continues to affect 21st century blacks is rarely spelled out, and anyone who tries is quickly shut up: “Uh, stress hormones, uh, intergenerationally transferred by epigenetics, yeah, that’s it.”)

    When forced to give examples, or to generate actual curricula, it ends up being:

    1. History of math, with “non-whites” having invented early math. This is interesting to everybody as long as the wokeness is kept at a low simmer. Trolly kids can liven things up by asking how they know the race of ancient mathematicians; whether North Africans and Egyptians were really black, and so on.

    2. Hidden figures type examples. “Yeah, there was Einstein, but there was this black chick who plugged numbers into a formula.”

    3. Social justice lectures unrelated to math.

    4. Silly rewriting of algebra problems to make “characters” black or Hispanic or otherwise make the surrounding story “ethnic.” This has the effect of adding more red herring content to the problems, making them harder, and increasing the interracial gap in scores.

    5. Stories of how the use of “math” (usually simple counting or numeracy) has resulting in genocides or oppression. “By counting the number of natives and taking that many bullets they were able to massacre the entire tribe.” A variation of this is used in woke engineering: Skip the dam seepage analysis chapter so that there will be class time to discuss evicted Indian tribes in the inundation area.

    6. Pointing out that STEM professors and Nobelists are massively skewed to white males and some Asians. The intention is to shock the students with evidence of bigotry; the actual result is to discourage students of color because “yeah, it figures, we already knew we are dumb in math.”

  71. In 1966 I got pulled out of a working class elementary school and was placed in an all day gifted and talented program beginning my 4th grade. Everyone had an IQ of 120 or better. We used the School Mathematics Study Group books that were developed in response to Sputnik around 1958. Thank you God for putting me in this program. Math has been very good to me over the years.

    The program was ended in 1970 because it wasn’t diverse enough.

  72. Bill P says:

    This a make-work program for Seattle democrats with ethnic studies degrees. Get ’em union jobs working for Seattle Public Schools. They’re even stacking them in Seattle City Light, which is why the rates are going up for utilities. In order to keep the revenue flowing, Seattle just banned gas lines in all newly constructed houses and slapped a new tax on heating oil so that nobody can circumvent the higher electricity fees. Of course, global warming is the excuse for this blatant ripoff.

    The city has truly gone over the edge. Last year was the best time to sell and get out. It’s still overpriced, but that won’t last forever, so if you still live there get out while you can. As soon as you leave the metro area life gets much better.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  73. anon[269] • Disclaimer says:

    Classes might also talk about how different cultures have practiced math, such as how Aztecs used a base-20 number system, as opposed to the base-10 system Americans use.

    The base-20 number system worked very effectively for Aztec culture. It took an Aztec priest 20 minutes to sacrifice and carve a victim for the dinner table. Will this be part of the new diversity curriculum?

  74. @WowJustWow

    If D’arvon flees the drive-by shooting in Hoodville at 1 AM, heading east in a carjacked SUV at 85 miles per hour …

  75. anon[592] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve
    As usual, it’s The Gap.

    Buzz Mohawk
    The insanity is endless. Infinite!

    Reading this article, a lot like previous articles, only with different city name and different people, may seem like this…

    [MORE]

    …but really? It’s this.

  76. anon[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My son attends Seattle Public Schools and will graduate next year. His non-science courses from middle school onward have been a total waste of time. They do not teach anything. They just preach against racism.
    I encourage him to get what he can out of the science courses, as those are still the least corrupted classes in the schools. I have given up any hope that he will ever get a real education in literature, history, or politics, unless he reads on his own. The universities have also stopped teaching these subjects. Take a walk through the student bookstore at the University of Washington and look at the books. Shockingly few works of great literature are on the shelves.
    I got a good education in a public school in a small town in the midwest. I got an even better education at a liberal arts college that taught critical thinking. Those days are over.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @silviosilver
  77. @IFHJ

    Richard Mitchell “The graves of academe”

  78. AnonAnon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Your impression is wrong – it was shitty engineering design, as many had suspected: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article212571434.html

    “The unconventional placement of diagonal supports in an uneven zig-zag pattern along the bridge produced a complex structural web with a glaring weakness at a key connection point, apparently overlooked by designers at FIGG Bridge Group, say three independent structural engineers who reviewed nearly 2,000 pages of calculations for the bridge at the Miami Herald’s request….”

    “The engineers believe FIGG significantly misjudged what would happen when a large amount of structural stress was placed on a single diagonal strut — a concrete brace that helped support the bridge — at the north end of the 174-foot span. That resulted in an undernourished strut and anchor that could not adequately bear the weight of the bridge and the substantial forces placed on them when the span was lifted into place over two support piers, the outside experts said. That joint is precisely where the bridge appears to have failed — and where potentially worrisome cracks began to appear even before the bridge was installed over the eight-lane road on March 10.

    As a consequence of the apparent design error, the diagonal support at the span’s north end was so overloaded that additional stress put on it by construction crews tightening internal support rods on March 15 likely caused it to separate from the walkway deck, instantly sending the entire 950-ton span crashing to the roadway in a chain reaction of structural failure, the engineers said. The accident killed one construction worker and five people sitting in cars at a stoplight below, including an FIU student, 18-year-old Alexa Duran.”

    • Replies: @Charon
  79. @Clifford Brown

    The funny thing is, when I saw Howard interviewed by one of Ted Koppell’s Nightline replacements, Martin Bashir, in 2006 (I checked the date), Bashir claimed Howard was a chemical engineer. That man on the red carpet is no chemical engineer.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  80. What happens if…when the white students get better marks in ethnic studies than the ethnics?

    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @bruce county
  81. @Steve Sailer

    Especially since you left out 2 as a factor of 12.

    Anyway, you can count to 12 on one hand using your thumb counting the bones of the other 4 fingers.

  82. Last year, 72.9% of Seattle students of color graduated on time…

    And 27.1% graduated doing time.

    Tracy Castro-Gill, the SPS ethnic-studies program manager

    Tracy Castro-Gill = Cloaca tryst girl.

    Don’t ethnic studies (of a sort) tell us that men of color are into that sort of thing?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  83. @Nicholas Stix

    I didn’t realize Terrence Howard was the black kid from Mr. Holland’s Opus.

    As it stands he is a Pratt dropout but continues to claim he is a chemical engineer.

    • Replies: @Charon
  84. @Steve Sailer

    10: 1, 2, 5, 10
    12: 1, 3, 4, 6, 12

    More ways to arrange factors of 12 than of 10.

    Tell that to the metric snobs…

    There is a way to count duodecimally, with one hand no less. Instead of using whole fingers, use the three sections of the four fingers, with the thumb as a counter.

    Both hands gives you four-and-twenty. Or more.


  85. Alfa158 says:
    @Known Fact

    The most memorable moment in that old series was the time they had Barney infiltrate a facility behind the Iron Curtain by dressing up as an East German border guard. I thought it was cute the way none of the characters gave him a second look.

    • Replies: @Charon
    , @Known Fact
  86. @Steve Sailer

    Also, it’s easy to group objects by threes or fours; you can immediately tell how many you’ve got. Threes and fours add up conveniently to 12s. By the time you’ve got five of something in hand, you’ve maybe got to hesitate and count.

    Dividing into halves and then quarters is also very natural; again, you’re ending up with fours. It’s hard to divide something into five equal parts.

    In other words, using 12s/dozens makes a lot of intuitive sense.

  87. @Dave Pinsen

    Seymour Cray-Cray?*

    Sub-Saharan migration to Sweden produced one of the greatest human scientists of the 23rd century, Dr. Richard Daystrom.

    In 2243, at the age of twenty-four, Daystrom became known as a “boy wonder” after he made the duotronic breakthrough, which won him the Nobel and Zee-Magnees Prizes. However, because of galaxy-wide systemic racism he was under-appreciated by his peers and successors, and resented them for developing improvements based on his work, while he was, in essence, left behind.

    In response, he devoted his full vigor to the development of the multitronic computer system to create a successful artificial intelligence. This culminated in the M-5, a computer system sophisticated enough to smoothly control a starship by itself, possibly precluding the need for organic crews. The M-5 at first performed well, successfully destroying a White Supremacist frieghter, the Woden. Unfortunately during subsequent war games, the supercomputer attacked Federation vessels using full-strength weapons, resulting in heavy loss of life.

    During a subsequent Board of Inquiry Dr. Daystrom explained that M-5 had not committed a Hate Crime, but had instead, due to white racism, “understandably gone cray-cray.”

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seymour_Cray
    https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Richard_Daystrom
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ultimate_Computer

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  88. @Anonymous

    Here’s an example of the kind of arithmetic schoolchildren in middle grades in Britain were expected to be able to do, before decimalisation of their currency in 1971.

    1. A gentleman left his eldest daughter £1500 more than the youngest, and her fortune was 11 thousand pounds, 11 hundred pounds and £11; what is the eldest sister’s fortune and how much did the father leave them in total?

    2. A man lent his friend at different times these several sums: £63, £25.15s, £32.7s, £15.14s.10d, and four score and nineteen pounds, half a guinea, and a shilling. How much did he lend in all?

    https://nrich.maths.org/5892

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
  89. Charon says:
    @Alfa158

    Well, the commies were notoriously non-racist. In theory anyway, which is mainly where they operated.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  90. J.Ross says:

    “We do talk about institutionalized racism and the histories and trajectories of racism in the country, but that doesn’t mean white kids need to be demonized in that process,” he said.

    Actually, that’s the way it usually works out.

    In Good as Gold, Joseph Heller has an archetyical DC swamp creature blow through a paragraph of no-time brazen self-contradictions, as a representation of the style of the place. In his NPR interview, Russia nothingburger witness Christopher Wylie starts out mentioning regulation of social media, but goes on to truebelieve the idea that disagreeing with the government is not possible for a rational person, and that wrongthink is self-proving Russian Russianism by Russians, concluding in logic (but not in superficial word choice) that Facebook ought to be handed far more power.

  91. @syonredux

    Asians aren’t POC – they are “white-adjacent”.

  92. Kronos says:
    @adreadline

    That Hindu goddess showed him math proofs on a holy scroll in his dreams. I’d consider that divine plagiarism. No divine entity showed me the answers of a calculus exam in my dreams, not one!

    I remember the goddess from “The Man who Knew Infinity” book. Also, Indian mother-in-laws can be quite cruel to a young wife.

  93. Kronos says:
    @Charon

    Not quite…

    In the book “Wild Swans” the last daughter’s 1960s High School class were taught to be careful around foreign black sailers. That they were cognitively at the level of children and easily “excited.”

    Also, Communists (especially in Asia) played the anti-colonial/Nationalist card very well. That included clans and such.

  94. Alright, it is easy to laugh at all those all-too-visible idiocies. But, it would be more productive to publicly denounce all moronic qualifications (unjust, oppression, power, inequality,..) in all studies: do lions “oppress” gazelles (or spiders- flies) because they attack & eat them; is there something “unequal” in the fact that there are much more rats than tigers (thus, rats being not adequately represented in movies); is photon, because it is massless, unjustly positioned in physics, in regard to electrons or mu mesons (there are incredibly more photons, but, counting the number of appearances of the noun “photon” in MSM, one should be aware of rampant electron-supremacy) ; is there a sort of sexploitation in writing rational numbers because numerator is above denominator, thus implying a sort of sexploitative missionary position in quotients; since there are no gay black characters in canonical British, Russian, French, German…. novels, should not these work be dumped from curriculum; is not algebraic topology an example of white supremacy, since “al” in algebra clearly stands for albinos (read – whites) & “top” from topology, combined with “al”, means “whites on top”, therefore white supremacy; affine geometry- where, evidently, “af” comes from Africa, is a form of cultural appropriation because white people stole affine geometry from Africans & did not mention explicitly it was African in origin…..

    Actually, this all is not as absurd as it may sound. You can construct anything about everything if you focus your “(white) male gaze”.

  95. @Steve Sailer

    The Aliens who gave us civilization had 12 fingers. DUUUUUUHH!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lurker
  96. britinara says:

    ” What is the answer to an argument turning on the belief that two and two make four?’
    ‘The answer is, “You say that because you are a mathematician.”’
    (“Pilgrim’s Regress”, C.S. Lewis)

    • LOL: Hibernian
  97. @Anonymous

    More exactly, a shilling is a number (30) of silver pennies, 240 to the pound.
    That certain inbred islanders cannot tell a shilling from a dozen is not our fault 😛

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  98. They don’t think 2+2=5, but it do.

  99. Realist says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Any study, subject or pursuit that requires intellectual prowess is racist.

  100. Realist says:
    @rexl

    Basically, what else is there other than math and English?

    STEM.

  101. Realist says:
    @anon

    I got a good education in a public school in a small town in the midwest. I got an even better education at a liberal arts college that taught critical thinking. Those days are over.

    Yes, sad but true.

  102. Lin says:

    Math is not just racist, it’s also sexist and gender biased.
    OK, we’ve base 10 number system because we have 10 fingers or the Aztecs used a base-20 number system because they also count the toes.
    Human males could have base 21 number system if they also count their penises while women and transgenders could only have base 10 or base 20 number systems(not to mention the situation embedding their fingers inside their body cavities)
    …………
    Algebra is also Islamic because ‘al gebra’ is Arabic.
    Those who love ‘greek style’ should love Euclid’s ‘Elements’.

  103. It probably won’t be long before the Great Intersectionality Cultural Revolution calls glasses and an absence of “peasant hands” racist too.

    As O’Brien from 1984 would say, “…and if a Person of Color says there are not four but five, how many fingers are there?”

  104. Pericles says:

    “Where does Power and Oppression show up in our math experiences?” and “How is math manipulated to allow inequality and oppression to persist?”

    Inequalities do occasionally appear, though we shall at first prefer to study equality, in the form of the equation. For diversity, it is then time to study multiple simultaneous equations, or systems of equations. Such systems are of course of great interest to us in the name of social justice.

    Oppression will be studied by considering the formulae that (significantly!) are written as, for example, ‘W over B’. It must be noted that B can never be zero! This will be discussed in some detail.

    Finally, Power will appear in solving what is known as differential equations. C exp(t) turns out to describe the solution. Hence, this is a primal example of people power.

  105. @Steve Sailer

    But 12 is a pretty convenient number for a lot of purposes.

    There are 12 lunations in a year. Jesus had 12 disciples. A jury has 12 members. There are 12 days of Christmas. Twelfth Night is a play by Shakespeare. There are 12 hours in half a day. There are 12 inches in a foot. In the old British currency, there were 12 pence to a shilling.

    There are 12 eggs in a dozen. No one sells ten eggs. That would be gross.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  106. Brutusale says:
    @Anonymous

    male/female connecting rods

    The Department of Diversity, Gender Division, would like to have a word with you about this usage, bigot!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  107. Brutusale says:
    @Known Fact

    I think this was the first of the media’s black technical experts.

    https://hh.fandom.com/wiki/Sergeant_James_Kinchloe

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  108. @Jonathan Mason

    There are 12 eggs in a dozen. No one sells ten eggs. That would be gross.

    Lol!

    When I lived out in Asia, I got used to eggs being sold ten to a carton.

    https://www.chewsegg.com/product.html

  109. @Mr McKenna

    By a similar token, do we have to get rid of sports which blacks are good at, and various forms of popular music where they dominate?

    We cannot get rid of jazz. Or dance.

  110. @Dave Pinsen

    The docu-drama Chernobyl, which was otherwise pretty good, inserted a fictional female nuclear physicist into the storyline.

  111. bomag says:
    @Lurker

    Last I checked, there is a active group in Britain advocating for base 12.

    Base 12 has the inherent advantage of more divisors vs. the nearby numbers.

  112. Mr. Anon says:

    Seattle Times: “Is Math Racist?”

    Inherently so. What with all those “greater than”, “less than”, and “not equal” symbols.

  113. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    It’s been suggested we count using the three bones on our four fingers.

  114. RAZ says:
    @Known Fact

    Remember wondering about that. But that was back in the day when it was seen as progress not to notice a person’s color. Now it is seen as progress to obsess about it. Bill Maher recently speaking about that.

    • Replies: @anon
  115. @ThreeCranes

    should be “they fall on the cosines of 15 degrees….”, not sins.

  116. @Alfa158

    That’s right — although he usually was strolling past the oblivious pasty-white fascists in coveralls that said Fon Kompani or Ministriy Elektrikal

  117. @reactionry

    And clearly driven mad by Star Fleet racism, actor William Marshall went from playing Dr. Daystrom to his signature film moment as Blacula

  118. @R.G. Camara

    The number three doesn’t get the respect it deserves, in my opinion.
    https://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Diaries/2016-10.html#mathcorner

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  119. @nokangaroos

    There are a number of ways of dividing and summing up the world. One type, which seems to have been favored by people in times of yore, began with a lump of something and divided it up. So, thickness of sheet metal is measured by how many to a previously agreed upon lump, which is why (counterintuitively to the modern mind) twelve gauge thickness is heavier than 16 gauge. Same with wire.

    Nails on the other hand, are measured by how heavy they are using a standard little bit of something, a coin. A ten penny nail is heavier and longer than an eight penny nail, 3″ vs. 2.5″.

    These old systems of measuring tended to fractionalized everything. One cup, a half, quarter etc. of a volume or length.

    Today we tend to stack one previously agreed upon small unit on top of the other, like bricks. We start by defining one unit, the meter, and then add them up. We agree to do all this in base ten.

    Zeno covered all this in his paradoxes. He showed that no matter what sort of conceptual approach we use to break down the world, our system cannot arrive at the Totality of the world as we experience it.

    In one paradox he divides space up by halves ad infinitum and can’t reach his destination (the process of dividing by halves was called The Dialectic by the Greeks. Linnaeus used it in his system of classifying plants and animals.). In another he finds himself trying to add up the infinity of infinitesimally small points between a gap, which is a critique of atomism.

    Zeno’s paradoxes are critiques of Ways of Thinking or Apprehending the World. They are not meant to be mere statements about the physical constitution of the world. 99.999999999999….percent of readers fail to grasp this point. Or maybe it’s that only half of half of half of half of half of half of half and so on….actually do grasp his point.

    In Linnaeus’ system, one reaches the point where the object under consideration can bear no further division. It is unique. We stand before an intellectual abyss. The gap is undefinable, ineffable.

    We cannot apprehend the uniqueness of things through cogitation because thinking proceeds by comparisons and division. To come to grips with the uniqueness of things we need to take a hit of acid or eat some psilocybin, both of which turn the comparing part of our brains off. But then we can’t speak about it. We can only experience it in silent communion.

  120. Charon says:
    @AnonAnon

    And the point of the story (not the MSM version of course) is that one of the lead engineers won an award for being a pioneering woman in the field for this very “achievement”.

    Once it collapsed the MSM agreed that it was all male engineers after all.

    • Replies: @res
  121. @PiltdownMan

    Even when the lessons are done, the worst is yet to happen, in the shape
    of an appalling sum. This is invented for me, and delivered to me orally
    by Mr. Murdstone, and begins, ‘If I go into a cheesemonger’s shop, and
    buy five thousand double-Gloucester cheeses at fourpence-halfpenny each,
    present payment’–at which I see Miss Murdstone secretly overjoyed.
    I pore over these cheeses without any result or enlightenment until
    dinner-time, when, having made a Mulatto of myself by getting the dirt
    of the slate into the pores of my skin, I have a slice of bread to help
    me out with the cheeses, and am considered in disgrace for the rest of
    the evening. [David Copperfield]

  122. Charon says:
    @ScarletNumber

    You see, the fact that he once contemplated becoming an engineer is good enough cause to call himself an engineer for the rest of his life.

    It’s a black thing, you wouldn’t understand.

    Also: check your privilege.

  123. @Brutusale

    Good catch. I had a friend whose sitcom idea was to move Hogan’s Heroes to an 1850s plantation, with the wacky slaves always outsmarting the pompous colonel and his doltish overseers. So you’d certainly have one of the slaves be a science genius, inventing anachronistic steampunk gizmos to help baffle whitey.

  124. @Bill P

    What did my Econ 101 instructor say; ‘The greatest enemy of business isn’t Communists, it’s competition.’

    Seattle knows this to be true and has acted accordingly.

  125. @S. Anonyia

    Gotta find the chart but something like only 48% of America is literate at a 10th grade plus level.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  126. black sea says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Twelve months of the year, twelve zodiac signs, twelve disciples, twelve angry men . . .

  127. @S. Anonyia

    Listen to people talk in old movies, or even 80s/90s movies, vs. today’s.

    I recently watched a late 70s documentary about gangs in the Bronx on youtube. Many of the comments remarked on how well spoken gang members were back then. There was nothing like the almost incomprehensible ebonics babble I hear on more recent videos of ghetto grade blacks.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  128. @anon

    My son attends Seattle Public Schools and will graduate next year. His non-science courses from middle school onward have been a total waste of time. They do not teach anything. They just preach against racism.

    What’s your son’s opinion on it all? Is he “woke” or does he see through the BS?

    • Replies: @anon
  129. res says:
    @Kronos

    It’s interesting that there is a base 10 system embedded inside those 59 symbols. A bit like how French spoken numbers are an odd mix of base 10 and base 20: https://blogs.transparent.com/french/french-numbers-1-100/

    P.S. Worth noting the lack of a zero in the Babylonian number system: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/roots-of-unity/ancient-babylonian-number-system-had-no-zero/

    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
  130. @Henry's Cat

    Jesus…. don’t even go there.

  131. @John Derbyshire

    In Christianity it does Mr. Derbyshire.

    Put that in your pipe and smoke it (really).

    And what is your opinion of duodecimalism, as argued for by, say, A. C. Aitken?

  132. @res

    As an exercise for the reader, sum up the first hundred whole numbers: 1+2+3+… 100.
    A bright young lad named F. Gauss had the answer in two seconds.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  133. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @RAZ

    Bill Maher recently speaking about that.

    I thought he was dead. Maybe he just looks it?

  134. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer

    That actually is a prevalent theory in certain quarters.

  135. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Brutusale

    Tell them to talk to Harley Davidson.

  136. res says:
    @Charon

    Well, clearly that is true. She was responsible for the innovative design while the male engineers failed at the boring triviality of making it work.

    Or something like that.

    But seriously, does anyone know of a good account of what happened (e.g. who exactly designed it and what was said about that before the collapse) with the FIU bridge? Because I went looking and most of what I found reeks of lying and spinning.
    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/was-all-female-responsible-bridge-collapse/
    http://sandrarose.com/2018/03/leonor-flores-wants-know-didnt-build-miami-bridge-get/

  137. Mike1 says:

    If you read the actual course outline they are explicit that there is “no right answer”. The article picks out less insane examples.

  138. Another might be a lesson on ratios

    Like this one 13/52?

  139. Logan says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Math is also well-known to be sexist.

    Since males out-perform females.

  140. Aardvark says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Simple math seemed the most straightforward to me, I mean what is to argue about 2 + 2 = 4?

    But the jackassery has crept in from the gone bananas crowd.

    One example was a female professor who claimed math was racist because of the Greek words used for various symbols like pi and delta could not be understood by PoC, as if the day I came out of the womb I intuitively understood Greek? This just made excuses for not having to learn. Did she seriously think that if 3.141592654… had been called Mokele-mbembe it would be easier for PoC to learn about the function of this number?

    The other one is this idea that if a student said 3 x 4 = 11 and could explain how they got the answer, they would mark it as correct. Now, this is oppressive because you are arming an idiot to go out in the world and prove forthrightly they are completely useless.

    “I take 2 of the fours and add them together to get 8 and then in order to practice diversity and inclusion I take the 3 and add that to the 8 to get 11”.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  141. @Ancient Briton

    0+100=100
    1+99=100
    2+98=100
    3+97=100

    So (101 *100)/2 = 5050

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  142. Fox says:

    There is only one solution: “Simplified Math”. The whole field is now rife with so-called “logic”, a neurotic obsession with “accuracy”, an obsessive emphasis on “formulating the problem” and an obsessive need to know the “solutions” mostly old white men have provided, and that over centuries, thus cementing a predominance of white-racist concepts in numerical analysis, algebra, calculus, a mode of analysis that always leads through its solutions back into the system, thus acting like a prison without exit.
    Simplified math, on the other hand, would provide freedom from racist precepts, it would allow liberal expression of feelings, validate them and steer the world away from the so-called “bottom line”. We would probably already have reached the stars had not rigid, classicist, anti-liberal, racist, elitist rules in “mathematics” prevented true progress.

    Jesting aside, we are on a steep decline into an unplumbed abyss. Before we reach the edge of the deep, let’s hope that something forces good sense and people of intelligence back onto the helm.

  143. @silviosilver

    Very close. Doing it your way would leave 50 by itself. It is:

    1 + 100 = 101
    2 + 99 = 101

    49 + 52 = 101
    50 + 51 = 101

    101 * 50 = 5050

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  144. @Aardvark

    My 7th grade math teacher marked me wrong when I defined π as the ratio between the circumference and diameter of the same circle. She said I was wrong because the word she was looking for was quotient.

    It was her first year out college and back then elementary school teachers could teach academics up through 8th grade.

    She ended up getting fired after 3 years.

  145. I just realized that liberalism is highly related to narcissism, in that every problem is something “I” have caused. The Gap is not because of innate differences in intelligence, but it must be because “I” the white person am not teaching good enough. Just as “global warming” is not natural, but something “I” the white person created.

  146. Lurker says:
    @Jack Henson

    And I think we can guess what kind of images would generally be used too illustrate a story like that.

    In fact no guessing required:

    https://www.creditdonkey.com/illiteracy-in-america.html

    https://medium.com/@OneYoungWorld_/32-million-american-adults-cant-read-why-literacy-is-the-key-to-growth-818996739523

    (pic won’t load but it’s in link)

    https://www.wyliecomm.com/2019/03/us-literacy-rate

    Of course those are actually pictures of white people reading but the real message is clear – illiteracy is conflated with whiteness.

    The Agenda™!

    • Replies: @Lurker
  147. Lurker says:
    @Daniel Williams

    Was that part of a fiendish 4d chess strategy? Watch who goes to him for tech advice more than once and then fire them?

  148. anon[274] • Disclaimer says:
    @silviosilver

    He and his friends are sick of the race sermons. They all like Trump.

  149. Lurker says:
    @silviosilver

    I happened to see this video (time stamped) recently, about a 1960 mid-air collision over New York. I was struck by how articulate the fire commissioner came over. Just how grown up. No “you knows”, umming and erring, no slang, no jargon. And he didn’t start off with “So”.

    Inspires instant confidence.

    (The reporter seems intelligent as well but he only gets a few words)

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  150. Lurker says:
    @Lurker

    *TO illustrate

    The irony!

    And curse the 5 minute edit window.

  151. @Mewhoo whatso

    I just realized that liberalism is highly related to narcissism, in that every problem is something “I” have caused. The Gap is not because of innate differences in intelligence, but it must be because “I” the white person am not teaching good enough. Just as “global warming” is not natural, but something “I” the white person created.

    Exactly. Now take the next step: if I’m big and powerful enough to be responsible for causing such catastrophes, then who is big and powerful enough to ‘fix’ them?

  152. @ScarletNumber

    Very close. Doing it your way would leave 50 by itself.

    How so?

    101*100 = 10,100

    10,100/2 = 5050

    • Replies: @res
  153. @Lurker

    I know what you mean. The thought first occurred to me that people were more articulate (to say nothing of their being better dressed) a couple of generations ago when I watched a bunch of old newsreel-type vids on youtube. Many of the expressions the narrators used had fallen out of fashion, but it seemed to me that they hadn’t been replaced by anything superior – quite the contrary. The wages of egalitarianism, I guess.

  154. res says:
    @silviosilver

    Luck. Your original comment:

    0+100=100
    1+99=100
    2+98=100
    3+97=100

    So (101 *100)/2 = 5050

    Extending that out the last equation would be
    50 + 50 = 100
    which was what ScarletNumber meant by “Doing it your way would leave 50 by itself.”

    But since (50 + 50) / 2 = 50 it gives the same answer.

    That’s why it is more correct to match
    1 + 100 = 101

    50 + 51 = 101

    • Agree: silviosilver
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