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Scientific Study of Police Shootings Is Retracted Because ... Why?
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From Retraction Watch:

Authors of study on race and police killings ask for its retraction, citing “continued misuse” in the media

The authors of a controversial paper on race and police shootings say they are retracting the article, which became a flashpoint in the debate over killings by police, and now amid protests following the murder of George Floyd.

The 2019 article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), titled “Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings,” found “no evidence of anti-Black or anti-Hispanic disparities across shootings, and White officers are not more likely to shoot minority civilians than non-White officers.” It has been cited 14 times, according to Clarivate Analytics’ Web of Science, earning it a “hot paper” designation.

Joseph Cesario, a researcher at Michigan State University, told Retraction Watch that he and David Johnson, of the University of Maryland, College Park and a co-author, have submitted a request for retraction to PNAS. In the request, they write:

We were careless when describing the inferences that could be made from our data. This led to the misuse of our article to support the position that the probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans (MacDonald, 2019). To be clear, our work does not speak to this issue and should not be used to support such statements. We accordingly issued a correction to rectify this statement (Johnson & Cesario, 2020).

Although our data and statistical approach were valid to estimate the question we actually tested (the race of civilians fatally shot by police), given continued misuse of the article (e.g., MacDonald, 2020) we felt the right decision was to retract the article rather than publish further corrections. We take full responsibility for not being careful enough with the inferences made in our original article, as this directly led to the misunderstanding of our research.

By the way, the name is “Mac Donald” with a space in the middle.

… At the time, Jonathan Mummulo and Dean Knox, both of Princeton, called the correction an “opaque half-measure.” Today, Mummolo and Knox told Retraction Watch:

We appreciate the authors’ willingness to take this action. We hope readers and policymakers will now cease relying on this paper when considering the critical issue of racial bias in policing.

Is Mummulo an African like his name makes him sound?

Or is it just some rare Italian surname?

Dr. Mummulo should retract his name and take full responsibility for not being careful enough with the inferences as this directly led to the misunderstanding of his name.

 
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  1. “We’ll be good! Honest we will! Pls no punish! Pls..”

    • Thanks: Father Coughlin
    • Replies: @HammerJack
  2. To the memory hole!

    • Agree: Father Coughlin
  3. Well, they did capitalize “Black”, so there’s that.

    OTOH, they also capitalized “White”, which shows that this was part of the oppressive White Supremacy that we were all forced to live through back during the bloody tyranny of 2018.

    Maybe they can reissue their study with “white” uncapitalized.

    • Replies: @Russ
  4. JackOH says:

    If memory’s okay, American physicists were asked to voluntarily refrain from publishing after September 1939 to not inadvertently aid a German atomic weapon project. Take a hit for the team to serve a greater good, I suppose. (If I recall correctly, German physicists deduced that a publishing embargo did exist based on the absence of papers expected to confirm breakthrough phenomena.)

    So whose team are Cesario and company taking a hit for here? I’m sensitive to career-preservation issues, but is that all there is here? Whew!

    Maybe now’s the time for a talented novelist to write 1984 and After, the sequel to Orwell.

  5. Altai says:

    Is Mummulo an African like his name makes him sound?

    Or is it just some rare Italian surname?

    Dr. Mummulo should retract his name and take full responsibility for not being careful enough with the inferences as this directly led to the misunderstanding of his name.

    Many such cases. If you assume from her picture and her having a name spelled the same as a German one that she’s white, you’re a racist!

  6. Is there a race difference in the shooters (cops) when whites killed are compared to blacks killed.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  7. tyrone says:

    Hey scientist out there .science is now a political tool to screw whitey ,get with the program or you will be rubbing shoulders with the “elite” in some social services waiting room……..I tell you because I care.

    • Agree: bomag, a guy named me
  8. @James Speaks

    I found evidence in the cited article follow up that when black officer percentage increases, black officers are more likely to kill black suspects. Still no data on whether overall police killings increase when percentage of black officers increases.

  9. Franz says:

    Finally, a consistent anti-White pattern exists when benchmarking on weapons violation data.

    Tell it, brother. But anyone attending a rural gun show from the mid-90s on didn’t need a report for that.

    And if any of the Black Dude Army doing their anabasis* in Georgia has an illegal firearm, any bets there won’t be a peep from the Feds?

    * Apologies to Xenophon.

    • Replies: @dr kill
  10. So what other social science findings have been memory holed? What never even makes it to publication? What questions can’t even be asked because wrongthinkers have been removed or prevented from entering the field?

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @midtown
    , @Cido
  11. Dr. X says:

    Although our data and statistical approach were valid to estimate the question we actually tested (the race of civilians fatally shot by police), given continued misuse of the article (e.g., MacDonald, 2020) we felt the right decision was to retract the article

    America has become the Soviet Union, kids.

  12. Bitfu says:

    Apologies if you already covered Stephen Hsu and his forced resignation. His Thought Crime was this statement on Cesario’s study:

    “Cesario’s work…is essential to understanding deadly force and how to improve policing,”

    https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2020/06/resignation.html

  13. Did you see this one? More scientists request self-retraction over cancelation jitters, this time relating to research into crime and religiosity connection and national IQ:

    https://www.unz.com/jthompson/forbidden-fruit-2/

  14. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Just noticed how similar the words punish and publish are. Back in the old days, in academe, it was “publish or perish.” Now it’s “publish and be punished” or perhaps “publish and perish.”

  15. BB753 says:

    Well, MacDonald is the correct spelling.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macdonald

    And indeed, “Mummolo” is Italian.

    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Roderick Spode
    , @slumber_j
  16. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:

    Is Mummulo an African like his name makes him sound?

    Or is it just some rare Italian surname?

    Someone with a similar surname, Mike Mamula, former NFL DE/LB, is Serbian-American. The name sounds sounds Samoan but it appears (weirdly) that it’s Serb:

    https://www.names.org/n/mamula/about#associations

    Mamula played at BC and had one of the highest Wonderlic scores among NFL recruits ever and had one of the best combines. But his pro career was less than stellar.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  17. George says:

    “the probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans (MacDonald, 2019). ”

    A Heather is a white woman that weaponizes her privilege by mouthing off with the use of statistics. No apology needed as it won’t be accepted. See also, Hyptia of Alexandria, a proto-white woman who mouthed off using math in Africa no less. For historical context: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypatia#Death. What did she think would happen?

    In the future all Heathers should publish their screeds with a person of color to correct them for white privilege.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    , @RonaldB
  18. A) as usual, if the facts do not fit the narrative, then the #RacistFacts have to be withdrawn. #RacistFacts are racist, #FactsAreRacist.
    It is not permissible to stir up prejudices against “minorities”. This is the singular topic of Sincerity.Net.

    B) It is a career killing mistake that the study was ever published.

    C)@SteveSailer, this paper deserves a detailed analysis. It seems to show that Whites have a 2 to 5 times bigger chance of being shot, in comparison to their crime frequency and frequency of police encounters.
    That would totally disprove the entire Black Lives Matter movement. Rather it would require a White Lives Matter movement regarding systemic police racism towards whites.

    • Replies: @midtown
  19. Steve Hsu and Corey Washington talked to Cesario here:

    https://manifoldlearning.com/episode-011-transcript/

    Cesario describes the study looking at “do officers have one trigger finger for whites and one trigger finger for blacks?” He explains the study and how it is superior to stupid things like implicit bias. One thing he mentions that I did not know is that about 85% of police shootings occur in situations where someone called 911 or the police otherwise became aware of a crime in progress, instead of discretionary situations. Presumably, traffic stops are discretionary.

    Cesario did not have a problem with people like Mac Donald citing his work before:

    Corey: Have you been threatened since this paper came out, Joe?

    Joe: [laughs] The response has been really unusual, in the sense that the work itself has been picked up by a lot of what you might say are more conservative, politically conservative corridors and commentators and so on, and so there the response…

    Steve: Is that because only they can understand the math, or is it because… [Joe laughs] is it because the other side understands the math but they don’t want to talk about what you want to talk about?

    Joe: The latter I think, I assume it’s the latter. So you know, a lot of those responses have actually been very positive toward the work and people have shared it and liked it quite a lot, so…

    Steve: What about in a departmental colloquium?

    Joe: Well, our department is maybe somewhat unique in being a relatively objective group of individuals who have found the data to be convincing and have thought it to be very interesting — which isn’t to say that they haven’t asked hard questions about the data, but just that they’ve accepted the conclusions based on what the data are. That’s not going to be true for all corridors certainly, but…

    Steve: So at least in your experience, science works here in the academy.

    This is part of what brought down Hsu at MSU, where Cesario works. They have since learned that science does not work.

    • Thanks: MEH 0910, Unladen Swallow
  20. @BB753

    MacDonald is a correct spelling, but not the one Heather Mac Donald uses.

    • Replies: @BB753
  21. Rob McX says:
    @Dr. X

    Lysenko would thrive in today’s America.

  22. Is there evidence of a Black–White disparity in death by police gunfire in the United States?

    misuse of our article to support the position that the probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans… Although our data and statistical approach were valid to estimate the question we actually tested (the race of civilians fatally shot by police)

    Huh? One of our statistics boffins want to explain this one to me? It can’t possibly be as simple as the authors declaring that their study didn’t actually state what it explicitly stated… can it?

    This is one of those situations that appears to be so idiotic that I am driven to wonder if I am in fact the idiot, as it seems more likely that I would be missing some important context than that a gaggle of scientists would just barefacedly lie about their findings.

    • Agree: I Have Scinde
  23. JMR says:

    Galileo now recants without pressure from the Church.

    • Disagree: ic1000
  24. Stogumber says:

    Karl Popper argued that theories exist as part of a world 3, different not only from physical events but also from psychical events. That is, inferences exist as objective relations, they can be “discovered” or secretized, but they don’t cease to exist. Insofar, all these “retractions” are rather pointless.

  25. @JackOH

    Anthony Burgess was very talented. He wrote 1985.

    • Thanks: JackOH
    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    , @Harry Baldwin
  26. Redman says:

    I’m totally confused. What was the putative “misuse” of the data the authors mention? Is there a clearer explanation given of how MacDonald was misusing their paper?

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  27. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Accent on the word “was.” One of the characters in 1985 was a girl so stupid, she appeared retarded, but wasn’t. I thought that was an exaggeration. Was I ever wrong.

    ****

    I’m waiting for a post about the National Guard deployment to Atlanta. Seems that deserves a post of its own.

  28. slumber_j says:
    @BB753

    See, to me “Mummolo” sounds to me like Calabrian slang for a black person: something you’d read in a Carabinieri transcript from wiretapping the ‘Ndrangheta. Phonetically related to “mamaluke.”

    • Replies: @BB753
  29. This is a religious cult of anti-Whitism. Religions are pretty immune to facts and logic. Facts that contradict the Holy Word get ignored. That’s why crime stats don’t work.

    The anti-White zealots can only be defeated by undercutting their social legitimacy. So many pro-Whites are like Nixon, forever trying to impress the Ivy League with stats and debate. It’s a loser’s game. Instead, go Reagan, call them out for being anti-White cultists who are evil. Tucker is edging toward this.

    • Replies: @Thea
    , @Forbes
  30. @George

    Troll or sarc? Troof or restorative justice?

  31. B36 says:

    By the way, four years ago today 5 police officers were massacred in Dallas during a “peaceful” protest against police shootings. Pretty much forgotten.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_shooting_of_Dallas_police_officers

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @David In TN
  32. @B36

    When I first heard of it, the first words that leapt into my head were, “So, Donald Trump is going to be President.”

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Wilkey
  33. @Dr. X

    During the early Obama years, I had a Jewish dentist from the Soviet Union the same age as me. We had a very friendly relationship, and I used to rib him, “So you fled communism, to come here to … communism!”

    • Agree: Hibernian, David In TN
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  34. @Nicholas Stix

    Then there’s the Soviet joke, ‘We have freedom of speech in USSR, but you are not allowed to lie.’

    • LOL: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Duke84
    , @Forbes
  35. ic1000 says:
    @JMR

    > Galileo now recants without pressure from the Church.

    Oh, the Cathedral is exerting plenty of pressure on MSU professor Cesario and his coauthors. The TwitterMob defenstration of MSU VP of Research Steve Hsu was triggered by Hsu permitting Cesario to publish in his area of expertise. Pour encourager les autres doesn’t get much plainer than that.

  36. Art Deco says:

    A great many people in academe are, due to character defects, unfit for the privileges they hold. Likely most of them.

    • Agree: Abe
  37. cam says:

    The people on Slate Star Codex were the main supporters of Stephen Hsu when the multicult mob came after him. Stephen Hsu got canceled on June 19. Coincidentally Slate Star Codex self cancelled on June 22.

    A paper about the fact that there is no racial bias in police shootings has had many negative repercussions for a lot of people.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  38. midtown says:
    @Castlereagh

    Anything having to do with negative effects of homosexuality.

  39. midtown says:
    @SINCERITY.net

    Steve has mentioned that many whites commit suicide-by-cop, thus skewing up the number.

  40. Thea says:
    @RichardTaylor

    This is the heart of the matter. No amount of truth or logic will prevail.

    A dogmatic religion with no concept of repentance and forgiveness. It resembles an even harsher form of Islam. Something you said 10 years ago and now disagree with can be your downfall.

    • Replies: @Goddard
  41. Was it actually retracted?

  42. MEH 0910 says:
    @cam

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  43. It’s evident that Mac Donald is un-cancelable, or rather that she comes pre-canceled, so the only point of attack in order to excise this intolerable thorn in the narrative was to target the paper’s original authors. I just wish we could have seen the hostage video filming the penning of their retraction. I suppose we’ll never see the evidence of the pressure campaign mounted against them and the institutions at which they work.

    That said, if the concern is Black Lives Mattering in interactions with police, shouldn’t the reaction to data showing that blacks aren’t killed disproportionately by police be “Gee, that’s great! I feel way better! No need to riot now.?”

    And since we’ve been forced to talk about the left’s demands for massive shifts in public policy such as abolishing police which will likely have massive negative effects (including, i.e., fewer Black Lives Mattering overall with an subsequent increase in violent crime), isn’t the burden on those making these demands to show some data to support the proposition that police kill blacks for no good reason more frequently than they do everyone else? Are we just supposed to make policy on the basis of a few viral videos and the deep emotional feelings of our most superstitious sub-population?

    • Replies: @International Jew
  44. @Roderick Spode

    They are alleging that people are citing the article to argue that the probability of being shot does not differ by race. What the article actually says is that while black people have a higher probability of being shot relative to their percentage of the population, they have an equal or lower probability relative to their involvement in violent crimes, which is higher than white people’s involvement in violent crimes.

    Of course, I would dispute their statement that many people are citing it that way. Most people that I’ve seen are citing it not to argue that the probabilities of being shot by police for black and white people are equal, but rather to argue that measuring the risk of being shot relative to violent crime is more sensible than relative to the raw percentage of the population.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Reg Cæsar
  45. guest007 says:

    Once again, progressives show that no matter how much they say that they care about facts, they do not care about facts.

    Of course, if conservatives had one articulate leader who hand the skills to deal with facts, then that conservative leader could be on the way to replacing Trumpist. Yet, the Republican Party and conservatives in general do not have a single politician or leader that seems comfortable using facts and academic studies in discussions.

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @Muggles
  46. Ragno says:

    The moment Heather MacDonald became a heroine to normal people everywhere for making obviously-correct inferences from the data, instead of grabbing a lit torch and joining the mob like all the other Approved Intellectuals, her goose was earmarked for the cauldron.

    Remember when even social scientists were weedy types more prone to record the data than to immediately ‘interpret’ it? Your nickname must be ‘Boomer’ in that case, because that was a looong time ago. Not that you should believe Science is whatever corporate patrons wish it to be; no, not at all! It’s just that Science now isn’t whatever interrupts the flow of checks from deep-pocketed benefactors.

    And here you thought corruption in higher education was restricted to football teams and scholarships for celebrity children! Just be thankful you won’t be around a century from now, when the retraction for the bigoted inference “2 + 2 = 4”, written more-or-less legibly in crayon on a brown paper bag, graduates from the antechamber of Opaque Half-Measures to the Hall of Settled Science.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  47. The Retraction Watch guys were right the first time, the “correction” is “opaque” because the numbers speak for themselves. No “inference” is required.

    It’s like saying: “2 + 2 = 4, but we hereby officially disavow any inference that 4 – 2 = 2.”

    Idiots.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  48. ic1000 says:

    This is an important post. It’s like a forensic accountant’s explanation of how the Mob took over a profitable business and looted it. Normal people can see with their own eyes how it gets done.

    If they want to.

    Cathedral censorship works by controlling the top-line summary. The underlying information doesn’t have to be erased. Following Retraction Watch‘s lead (direct link), news and opinion organs will now open any mention of the Johnson, Tress, Burkel, Taylor, and Cesario PNAS paper (correct link) as “discredited” or “withdrawn.”

    1% of readers (0.1% of viewers) have the curiosity and persistence to find the source material and analyze it. That means that 99% (99.9%) take the Establishment account at face value. Plenty good enough.

    Below the fold, I reproduce the PNAS abstract, highlighting two sentences that directly undermine Black Lives Matter ‘s racist police and structural racism narratives.

    Even if entirely correct, the attack of Jonathan Mummulo and Dean Knox on the Cesario PNAS paper doesn’t invalidate it. The two Princeton scholars concede that Cesario and coauthors may discuss “whether a person fatally shot was more likely to be Black (or Hispanic) than White.” But Cesario et al. must be forbidden from inferring that there is no “evidence of anti-Black or anti-Hispanic disparity” in fatal police shootings of civilians, because Cesario et al. lack access to data that would let them calculate non-fatal police encounters by the race of civilians.

    No proxy for the missing denominator is permitted, except Black/Hispanic percentage of the population.

    Striking malfeasance on the parts of Mummulo, Knox, Retraction Watch, and the PNAS editors.

    [MORE]

    The Abstract of “Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings,” by David J. Johnson, Trevor Tress, Nicole Burkel, Carley Taylor, and Joseph Cesario. PNAS August 6, 2019, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1903856116

    Despite extensive attention to racial disparities in police shootings, two problems have hindered progress on this issue. First, databases of fatal officer-involved shootings (FOIS) lack details about officers, making it difficult to test whether racial disparities vary by officer characteristics. Second, there are conflicting views on which benchmark should be used to determine racial disparities when the outcome is the rate at which members from racial groups are fatally shot. We address these issues by creating a database of FOIS that includes detailed officer information. We test racial disparities using an approach that sidesteps the benchmark debate by directly predicting the race of civilians fatally shot rather than comparing the rate at which racial groups are shot to some benchmark. We report three main findings: 1) As the proportion of Black or Hispanic officers in a FOIS increases, a person shot is more likely to be Black or Hispanic than White, a disparity explained by county demographics; 2) race-specific county-level violent crime strongly predicts the race of the civilian shot; and 3) although we find no overall evidence of anti-Black or anti-Hispanic disparities in fatal shootings, when focusing on different subtypes of shootings (e.g., unarmed shootings or “suicide by cop”), data are too uncertain to draw firm conclusions. We highlight the need to enforce federal policies that record both officer and civilian information in FOIS.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  49. Ragno says:
    @wren

    Surely by now the really big brains at WSJ must realize that, by hiding their reporting behind an impenetrable paywall, they’re practically guaranteeing no one will see it.

    Or worse (according to them, naturally) – the vast majority of readers will have to make do with playing ‘telephone’ and relying upon second and third-hand recountings of that reporting. But that way, they’ll be able to blame the audience for being crucially uniformed – increasingly a position that patrons and large advertisers find useful if not pleasing.

    • Replies: @Ragno
  50. Jack D says:
    @wren

    I am amazed that the article expressly used the word “denounced”: “The Graduate Employees Union denounced Mr. Hsu.” {Isn’t that Dr. Hsu or did the revoke his diploma?}.

    I searched the internet and I was able to find a photo of Dr. Hsu being denounced for his improper way of thought:

    At least I think that’s him. One thing that you can tell from the photo is that denouncing people is good fun. Denunciation really puts a smile on your face (if you are the denouncer). Some things never change. What is best in life? To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women. It’s a real adrenaline high.

    To be clear, Dr. Hsu lost his position as VP of research but he retains his tenured faculty position so it’s not totally grim. He doesn’t have to go work on a pig farm cleaning out the barns. Yet.

  51. Alfa158 says:
    @Redman

    I thought the misuse was clearly spelled out:
    1. The paper presents evidence that White people indulging in criminal behavior are far more likely to be shot by police than are Black people indulging in the same criminal behavior.
    2. The misuse is that some White people who do not hate themselves for being White, are quoting the article as evidence that White people indulging in criminal behavior are far more likely to be shot by police than are Black people indulging in the same criminal behavior.
    3. In other words the misuse is that people are using the article to tell the truth.
    4. Telling the truth cannot be allowed.

    What’s weird to me is that researchers keep publishing information that they know Big Brother is going to destroy them for, go ahead and publish it anyway, then are shocked when they get hammered by the thought police. I would have thought these guys would have completed their study, saw they arrived at an inconvenient truth then quietly deepsixed it and pretended it never happened. Instead they publish it anyway and immediately have to frantically bury it to save themselves. Is there some sort of clause where you have to publish the results of your work or else you have to return grant money you received?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  52. Jack D says:
    @Alfa158

    I think that they naively undertook this research in a previous era, back when scientific research in America was immune from politics and you could still wear blackface on Halloween. Things have changed and they are desperately trying to cut the pages out of the encyclopedia. We are in Year Zero of the George Floyd Era. It’s time to adopt a new calendar. It’s no longer 2020, it’s 0 ADGF (the year of our Lord George Floyd).

    • Agree: Forbes
  53. ic1000 says:

    In the OP, Steve quoted the Struggle Session confession of hapless lower-tier university academics Cesario and Johnson, conceding the field to HPY Ivy League heavyweights Jonathan Mummulo and Dean Knox:

    We were careless when describing the inferences that could be made from our data. This led to the misuse of our article to support the position that the probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans (MacDonald, 2019). To be clear, our work does not speak to this issue and should not be used to support such statements. We accordingly issued a correction to rectify this statement (Johnson & Cesario, 2020).

    I was going to quote from Heather Mac Donald’s referenced City Journal account of the September 2019 session of the House Judiciary Committee where she testified about race, crime, and deaths in police custody.

    Instead, I’ll just repeat Steve’s link. The entire essay is worth reading; Mac Donald is one of the shrinking number of public intellectuals who are worthy of the title. False Testimony. Sworn statements at a recent congressional hearing on policing veered sharply from the truth: here are the facts.

  54. Jack D says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    O’Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb hidden and the four fingers extended.

    ‘How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?’

    ‘Four.’

    ‘And if the party says that it is not four but five — then how many?’

    ‘Four.’

    The word ended in a gasp of pain. The needle of the dial had shot up to fifty-five. The sweat had sprung out all over Winston’s body. The air tore into his lungs and issued again in deep groans which even by clenching his teeth he could not stop. O’Brien watched him, the four fingers still extended. He drew back the lever. This time the pain was only slightly eased.

    ‘How many fingers, Winston?’

    ‘Four.’

    The needle went up to sixty.

    ‘How many fingers, Winston?’

    ‘Four! Four! What else can I say? Four!’

    The needle must have risen again, but he did not look at it. The heavy, stern face and the four fingers filled his vision. The fingers stood up before his eyes like pillars, enormous, blurry, and seeming to vibrate, but unmistakably four.

    ‘How many fingers, Winston?’

    ‘Four! Stop it, stop it! How can you go on? Four! Four!’

    ‘How many fingers, Winston?’

    ‘Five! Five! Five!’

    ‘No, Winston, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there are four. How many fingers, please?’

    ‘Four! five! Four! Anything you like. Only stop it, stop the pain!’

    George Orwell, 1984

    • Replies: @Clyde
  55. @Roderick Spode

    I found myself scratching my head too, so I went and checked out the author’s website. To be fair, all the data and the test script (written in the language R) are freely available.

    Quoting from the paper’s results:

    1) all fatal shootings

    In sum, in nearly every case, Whites were either more likely
    to be fatally shot by police or police showed no significant disparity in either direction. Although Blacks have greater odds of
    being fatally shot given population proportions, Whites overall
    were more likely to be fatally shot given each group’s involvement in those situations where the police may be more likely to
    use deadly force.

    2) shootings of unarmed citizens with no citizen aggression

    Overall, the data provide little evidence of systematic antiBlack disparity in officers’ decisions to shoot unarmed,
    nonaggressing citizens. Officers either showed no meaningful
    disparity in either direction or, if anything, an overall pattern
    of anti-White disparity.

    3) shootings of unarmed citizens reaching for or holding an object

    Consistent with the analyses presented above, and as
    shown in Figure 3, none of the benchmarks on crime rates
    revealed consistent anti-Black disparity in being fatally shot
    while reaching for/holding a harmless object.

    misuse of our article to support the position that the probability of being shot by police *did not differ* between Black and White Americans.

    Note the term ‘misuse’. Not ‘misunderstood’, not ‘misconstrued’, not ‘misinterpreted’.
    The authors may be technically correct in stating that paper has been misused, since by my reading the paper provides a greater amount of evidence to show that the probability of being shot by police is *higher* for White Americans and thus the probabilities *do differ*.

    Ultimately, their retraction amounts to weasel words. It’s a shame they don’t have the spine to stand by their results, but then again probably not many people would, considering the current climate.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
  56. NIBRS homicide reports

    NIBRS homicide arrests

    NIBRS violent crime reports

    NIBRS violent crime arrests

    NIBRS incident reports

    Hmmm, you don’t say…

  57. @Jack D

    That is a great photo. The Asian student struggle sessions at Michigan State are going to be a doozie this fall.

  58. Doc Bob says:

    I am confused. It seems like there are two papers being conflated here.

    You link to a paper in Social Psychological and Personality Science. The quoted text later on refers to a paper being retracted from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  59. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    The authors better hurry up and ask for a retraction of their previous study,

    Cesario, J., Johnson, D. J., & Terrill, W. (2019). Is There Evidence of Racial Disparity in Police Use of Deadly Force? Analyses of Officer-Involved Fatal Shootings in 2015–2016. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 10(5), 586–595.

    Plus, they capitalize both White and Black! And we know it’s a dog whistle for White Power.

  60. Mr. Anon says:

    Although our data and statistical approach were valid to estimate the question we actually tested (the race of civilians fatally shot by police), given continued misuse of the article (e.g., MacDonald, 2020) we felt the right decision was to retract the article rather than publish further corrections.

    How did Mac Donald misuse it? By citing it? People should continue to cite this article by it’s name, and by the name of the authors. Here, let me repeat those names, in case you didn’t get them:

    Joseph Cesario, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

    David J. Johnson, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

    William Terrill, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

  61. Ragno says:
    @Ragno

    Huzzah! The pay wall is down! Score one for Objective Truth.

  62. @Doc Bob

    Thanks. I’ve got something confused but I’m too confused to figure out which paper is being retracted.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  63. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Gyrocopter

    What the article actually says is that while black people have a higher probability of being shot relative to their percentage of the population, they have an equal or lower probability relative to their involvement in violent crimes, which is higher than white people’s involvement in violent crimes.

    Can you not come up with a way to state this more clearly, less confusingly?

  64. nier says:

    Heather MacDonald should write a new article and cite all their previous published papers.

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
  65. Duke84 says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    We have freedom of speech in America but on certain topics you’re not allowed to tell the truth.

  66. KenH says:

    So two academics publish a paper that debunks, with hard data, the claims by BLM and the radical left regarding police shootings but since too many people noticed and are citing the work it’s being “misused”. This is like the Soviet Union where everything must parrot the party line and anyone who deviates faces denunciation and punishment.

    • Agree: res
  67. ic1000 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    > which paper is being retracted

    Cesario and Johnson are asking the Editors of the prestigous peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) to retract this paper:

    “Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings,” by David J. Johnson, Trevor Tress, Nicole Burkel, Carley Taylor, and Joseph Cesario. PNAS, August 6, 2019. Link.

    That built on earlier work, originally linked in the body of the main post. Being published in a lower-impact journal, that article hasn’t attracted the Eye Of Sauron HYP Progressives.

    Yet.

  68. @nier

    If the paper’s been retracted, does this mean that any other researcher (hello Heather!) could effectively re-issue the same paper, citing the same evidence, drawing the same conclusions and have it published in the same journal? Isn’t science, even social science. supposed to be all about reproducibility?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  69. The Left mocks Christians who ignore those aspects of science that conflict with their religious beliefs, at the same time that the Left actively quashes science that conflicts with its political beliefs and assails the scientists who revealed it.

    And by the way, the science that many Christians reject is the theory of evolution and global warming, the evidence for both of which is less indisputable than the evidence of racial differences. The Left is more dogmatic and intolerant about its political beliefs than Christians are about their religious beliefs.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  70. If this doesnt tell you that living in the West is currently unlivable, I dont know what will. You’re literally better off in Korea and never seeing another white person again in your life. At least you won’t be in Clown World. (BTW, the Clown World meme now gets you banned from Twitter).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lurker
    , @MBlanc46
  71. Russ says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Well, they did capitalize “Black”, so there’s that.

    OTOH, they also capitalized “White”, which shows that this was part of the oppressive White Supremacy that we were all forced to live through back during the bloody tyranny of 2018.

    Maybe they can reissue their study with “white” uncapitalized.

    I read a bonginoreport.com-linked article this morning in the Military Times which made a big show of the Black-white construct. And people wonder why Trump won’t activate the military to sit on the urban unrest.

  72. @ic1000

    It’s worth keeping an eye on that first paper. If it’s not also retracted, the authors will have to explain why it’s substantively different to the PNAS one.

    On the question of academic ethics, what’s meant to happen when another author has cited – especially approvingly – a now retracted paper in their own work?

  73. znon says:

    I think it would bring all the races together in a spirit of reconciliation to have everyone agree to be shot by the police at the same rate. Perhaps the mixed race people of BLM could request to be shot twice as much?

    • LOL: black sea
  74. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Are we just supposed to make policy on the basis of a few viral videos and the deep emotional feelings of our most superstitious sub-population?

    Sigh, yes.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @bruce county
    , @Abe
  75. @International Jew

    This isn’t about policy it’s extortion. It’s blackmail. It’s domestic terrorism.
    There is never enough we can do to please these infantile primitives.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
  76. @Anonymous

    With no actual games being played, perhaps every player in various sports can take a fresh Wunderlic and we can bet the over/unders. Is there a Wunderlic for racehorses? The results might shame some human ballplayers

  77. BB753 says:
    @Roderick Spode

    “MacDonald is a correct spelling, but not the one Heather Mac Donald uses.”

    Fine but why?

  78. I found it amusing there even is such a thing as Retraction Watch — are there now that many shoddy scientific screw-ups? Do they have a witty brite n’ brief section labeled Nevermind, for especially clueless research faux pas?

    And now their business is doubly booming due to papers that are too accurate, something like the makers of Viagra stumbling onto its highly profitable off-label use.

  79. Saul says:

    “Multiverse analyses showed…”

    Citation: Rick and Morty, et. al.

    Hahaha. I think he meant “multivariable”.

  80. Voltarde says:
    @Jack D

    In the mid-1990s I was working at the NIH. During Women’s History Month the entrance to our institute contained a large poster listing Woke Women Worthies of the World. Prominent on the list was “Madame Jiang Qing” who was described as a “Chinese Revolutionary Heroine”. During her trial after the fall of the Gang of Four (four in Chinese numerology is taboo, as it is associated with death), JQ’s famous quote was “I was Mao’s dog! Whoever Mao said bite, I bit!”. In the mid-1990s, and given the role that upper-echelon CPC “guanxi” back in China play in obtaining permission to study abroad, some of the visiting scholars from China at the NIH probably had relatives who were among JQ’s many victims during the Cultural Revolution (*). For these scientists from China to see “Mao’s dog”–someone who may have ordered the torture and murder of their parents–celebrated by the U.S. Government must have been a profoundly bitter experience.

    (*) During the CR, a common form of physical humiliation required of those being denounced was known as “doing the airplane”, i.e., having one’s arms pulled and hyper-extended behind one’s back, typically while being forced to stand on a chair. I guess the current parallel is “doing a forced landing”, i.e., being forced to “take a knee” and gaze worshipfully upward towards redemption.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Jack D
  81. @Steve Sailer

    Then there is the one written about right here in an article published yesterday on UR: Forbidden Fruit, by James Thompson.

    Am I missing something, or is this indeed another example of what is happening?

  82. I thought “Mummulo” was a parade in Philadelphia.

    Oh, wait… that’s “Mumia”.

  83. @Gyrocopter

    Shouldn’t that be Gyropter?

    Gyro- and helico- mean close to the same thing in Greek, while pter is “wing”. As in pterodactyl (“wing finger”) and pteranodon (toothless wing thing).

    “Copter” isn’t a root in any language.

    https://oldmachinepress.com/2012/09/06/papin-rouilly-gyroptere-gyropter/

    • Replies: @anon
  84. Polynikes says:
    @James Braxton

    Cormac McCarthy. But he’s getting up there and doesn’t really do current times political satire or commentary.

    • Agree: Thea
  85. bomag says:
    @guest007

    Yet, the Republican Party and conservatives in general do not have a single politician or leader that seems comfortable using facts and academic studies in discussions.

    A reflection that the nastiness of politics favors the Left over the Right.

    The first such politicians that come to mind are Pat Buchanan; Ted Cruz; Michael Bloomberg; Chris Christie. All torpedoed for various reasons.

    • Replies: @guest007
  86. Abe says:
    @International Jew

    W

    Are we just supposed to make policy on the basis of a few viral videos and the deep emotional feelings of our most superstitious sub-population?

    Sigh, yes.

    I watched FIELD OF DREAMS on Fathers’ Day with my son. Perfect choice which I deserve credit for since I had never seem more than a few minutes of it till that point (one of those classic movies one simply never gets to until way late despite having seen 100o’s of other flicks). Anyway, not the light supernatural sports movie I’d casually assumed it to be, but a real Boomer sensitive male weepy, therefore making it I guess the most Boom-y of Boomer flicks.

    And yet- there is a whole subplot of Kevin Costner’s wife fighting the school board to un-ban the novels of James Earl Jones’s famous 60’s novelist/counterculture guru. Free speech, 1st Amendment, U-S-A! And then we watch MATINEE this weekend, and there is also a nod to free speech as some of the towns citizens try to ban John Goodman’s “sicko” matinee monster movie (sure the “concerned citizens” in question are sharps in Goodman’s employ trying to gin up free publicity, but the civics point is still made).

    And there are probably dozens of other films from this time I can’t even remember now which, despite being about something else entirely, bother to make the detour to teach us about free speech fundamentals.

    Now Fragileisha dominates the newsroom, though, bossing around whatever relic weepy white male editors or new chiefs are still around. Personally I would be OK banning TV new entirely, and letting public debate be set SOLELY based on the printed word to avoid such visually-triggered freak-outs as the whole Covid Floyd fiasco has proven.

  87. BB753 says:
    @slumber_j

    Funnily, “mummulum” means “mummy” in Latin!
    Theres a famous Aenius Mummulus, a Gallo-Roman patrician general who fought for the Frankish kings in the 6th century, though it’s probably derived from a Germanic Langobardic name, because there’s a similar Frankish name and the root “mum- ” is rare or non-existant in early medieval Latin or romance (other than “mummare”, to mime). (mummulum as in “mummy” being a loan word from Egyptian).

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mummolus

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/42998885?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  88. RonaldB says:
    @George

    A better formulation would be “the conditional probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans, given the crime associated with the police contact.”

  89. @JMR

    You must be the hundredth “dissident” to mention that stupid r/atheism tier false history that “academics” (the dishonest type that this very article is about) use to slander the Church.

    If you want to be a real warrior for “truth” and “reality” maybe start by not credulously buying such pure bunk and looking up what actually happened. I.e. Galileo getting his friend the Pope to let him publish a book about the state of the debate, subsequently lying about the state of the debate in the book and instead peddling his own discredited heliocentric theory (discredited both by the more advanced Copernican Heliocentric and Brahe’s Geocentric models), and on top of that implicitly calling the Pope an idiot (putting his questions in the mouth of ‘Simplicio’, the simpleton). The fact is that the Church was the patron of Copernicus, Brahe, AND Galileo himself, not the suppressor of science modern anti-Christs have so easily convinced you it was.

    • Replies: @HA
  90. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  91. guest007 says:
    @bomag

    Pat Buchanan is not good at this and walks into figurative punches on TV. Ted Cruz is one of the most unlikable politicians in Americans and is why he barely beat Beto O’Rourke. Chris Christie has never seem a fact/data based person to me or at least did not feel comfortable talking about it.

    LIke I wrote, the Republicans have no one to take on fact-based arguments.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  92. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Excellent point! Yes, if one has access to the same data, formally it would be perfectly fine to just reproduce the results. One can even enhance it by including a new/larger dataset. One can even cite the memory-holed paper so as to acknowledge previous research.

  93. @B36

    “Pretty much forgotten.”

    Which is the general idea.

  94. @ic1000

    Even if entirely correct, the attack of Jonathan Mummulo and Dean Knox on the Cesario PNAS paper doesn’t invalidate it. The two Princeton scholars concede that Cesario and coauthors may discuss “whether a person fatally shot was more likely to be Black (or Hispanic) than White.” But Cesario et al. must be forbidden from inferring that there is no “evidence of anti-Black or anti-Hispanic disparity” in fatal police shootings of civilians, because Cesario et al. lack access to data that would let them calculate non-fatal police encounters by the race of civilians.

    No proxy for the missing denominator is permitted, except Black/Hispanic percentage of the population.

    Striking malfeasance on the parts of Mummulo, Knox, Retraction Watch, and the PNAS editors.

    ic1000–just wanted to say that your lead paragraph there really nails the nature of the “critique”.

    I’ve thought about this issue myself–i’d bet Steve and a lot of the commenters here have as well. Basically there is no rock solid way to prove that white cops aren’t biased in shootings–either relative to black cops or in general–because we don’t have rock solid objective data categorizing all “the situations” cops encounter. I.e. the Knox/Mummulo “critique” is mathematically correct. We simply have no (useable, quantifiable) data on all the interactions at all much less by suspect and officer race.

    But you nonetheless get a really good hint on bias by looking at two comparisons:
    — Do black officers in a jurisdiction shoot people or blacks less? No they don’t. Black officers seem somewhat more “trigger happy”.
    — Are blacks shot/killed more than there involvement in serious violent crime and/or the sorts of situations that are going to generate a guns-drawn-must-arrest-your-ass police response. No they are not. In fact, blacks are percentage wise “underkilled” relative to their participation in violent crime.

    Mummulo and Knox, of course, know all this. Their critique isn’t “hey you guys did not norm against the database of police encounters”; without being explicit it basically says “you don’t have the denominator (probablity of encounter type X) data … because it doesn’t exist.” Mummulo and Knox just don’t want Cesario–anyone–using the reasonable proxy data to draw the true–but non-narrative compliant–conclusions that no particular bias exists.

    Mummulo and Knox are simply doing minoritarian policing. In service of the minoritarian big lie of oppressive evil white gentiles … all in service of the elite, anti-republican project of denying white gentiles the right to live in their nations, according to their norms and values and under their own control.

    • Agree: ic1000
  95. rimfire says:

    Funny thing at Breitbart today. I made a comment on an artical about a shooting in NY. I wrote negros being negros. They would not allow this. I changed to blacks being blacks.They excepted that. I then wrote You can not use the word negro on this website. They would not print that. I then wrote May I use caucasian They deleted all of the comments

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
  96. @Harry Baldwin

    Their political beliefs are religious beliefs.

    • Agree: Unladen Swallow
  97. @Jack D

    “I am amazed the article expressly used the word ‘denounced’.”

    Sure it did. They approve of the word in that context.

  98. Jack D says:
    @Voltarde

    Our institutions (academia and government in particular) have been suffering from Communist penetration since at least the time of the Russian Revolution if not longer.

    I really thought that Marxism was dead after the fall of the Soviet Union but apparently it is even harder to wipe out than Covid. BLM itself has Marxist roots which they have take some pains to hide because they know that most Americans will not buy into an openly Marxist organization.

  99. @JackOH

    1984 and After?

    The only “after” is the boot in the face forever.

    Whose?

    Ours.

    • Replies: @JackOH
  100. rimfire says:

    By the way when did negro become a word you must no say?

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @Hibernian
  101. @Altai

    Not only German but fascist German: Jörg Haider.

    How can she live with herself?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  102. @Altai

    Being called white is the greatest insult a BIPOC can receive

    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
  103. Scientific Study of Police Shootings Is Retracted Because … Why?

    Because it accelerates the inevitable narrative collapse.

  104. @James Braxton

    Stanislaw Lem, Walker Percy or Max Frisch might have had a worthwhile take. And I’d trust Graham Greene with any assignment. Among the living? Let me think…

  105. @Old Palo Altan

    Not only German but fascist German: Jörg Haider.w

    Well, Jörg was actually Austrian, but, FWIW, both his parents were early members of the DNSAP. Der Apfel fällt nicht weit vom Stamm ?

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  106. Interview of Stephen Hsu about this at his blog here:

    Preposterously Flimsy” — podcast interview on Twitter Mob and MSU Moral Panic

    https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2020/07/preposterously-flimsy-podcast-interview.html

    • Replies: @Clyde
    , @Curtis Dunkel
  107. BenKenobi says:
    @bruce county

    There is never enough we can do to please thee infantile primitives.

    This doesn’t really come from them. They are, to borrow a phrase, merely “a convenient peg on which to hang a powerful weapon.”

    This is a Color Revolution in America, and it’s coming from the top.

  108. Stephen Hsu interview with Cesario here:

    Re-Post: Joe Cesario on Police Decision Making and Racial Bias in Deadly Force Decisions (Manifold Episode #11)

    https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2020/06/re-post-joe-cesario-on-police-decision.html

  109. Clyde says:
    @Jack D

    George Orwell predicted this! 70 years ago. Age 46 of tuberculosis. Years ago I read his “Down and Out in Paris”.

  110. @rimfire

    I’m old enough to recall when “negro” was considered dignified and respectful.

    BTW this “don’t quote my research” theme is reminding me of rock “stars” who don’t want conservative candidates to use their one hit song

  111. JimB says:

    You can’t retract valid research in refereed publications. It has become a part of the web of knowledge. Others have cited it. The authors are free to publish research invalidating their original position, of course.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  112. Clyde says:
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Stephen Hsu has tenure, so the mob will have a hard time (impossible?) removing him from his professorship.

  113. Cido says:
    @Castlereagh

    I think that fields like social sciences and antropology, have serious problems because it doesn’t attract people with a more objective scientific minds. These places are for “cool” people, not people that want the truth.

  114. Kronos says:
    @wren

    Well sh$t, they came for my other favorite Steve.

  115. Heaven knows what research data is out there that we’ll never see- the “Bowling Alone’ author held back his stuff on multiculti for years because it was all negative..

    It will be interesting to see the Wikipedia/MSM reference to Mac Donald now “the racist bigot Mac Donald cited bogus, discredited research in her writings..blah blah racist, blah blah BLM”

    • Agree: Gordo
  116. Hibernian says:
    @Ragno

    Remember when even social scientists were weedy types more prone to record the data than to immediately ‘interpret’ it? Your nickname must be ‘Boomer’ in that case, because that was a looong time ago.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boomer_Esiason

    Boomer is a young Boomer, born in 1961. I can’t stand him because he is a blatant Packer hater.

  117. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Father Coughlin

    (BTW, the Clown World meme now gets you banned from Twitter).

    Where is it stated that is the case?

  118. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimB

    You can’t retract valid research in refereed publications.

    Citation needed.

    • Replies: @JimB
  119. @James Braxton

    Jay McInnerny, T. C. Boyle, Jonathan Franzen, Matthieu Carrère, Martin Suter, Martin Amis, Jonathan Littell, William Vollmann – – – – Andrzej Stasiuk, Viktor Pelewin, Viktor Jerofejew, Gerd Hentschel, Peter Handke, Hans Magnus Enzensberger (documentarist/essayist, literary diagnostic), Eckhard Henscheid, Michel Houellebecq, Felix Huby, Ulrich Ritzel…

    • Replies: @James Braxton
  120. Anonymous[112] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s been said arts/culture/entertainment ran out of ideas and just rehash the old with ‘more advanced technology’ or concoct a kind of amnesiac formula with no sense of past or present.

    This BLM and Antifa nuttery follows the same trajectory. BLM has no new ideas. It’s just an accelerated re-enactment of black politics of the 60s. The difference is the Civil Rights Movement began with genuine hope & idealism and then fell apart with rising radicalism and urban riots.
    In contrast, BLM is goes from hope to disaster at the drop of a hat(or gangsta pants). It’s like Insta-Civil-Rights-Movement Re-enactment. ‘Justice for blacks’ and then, right away, “bang bang, gonna kill you ni**a!!”

    We can understand why Civil Rights Movement had such widespread support in the 60s. It sounded sensible. Also, US had some brakes against its excesses as the segregationist South had still had cultural capital. Also, 80% of Americans were against race-mixing. And even Liberal Democrat parents of boomers would today be considered culturally conservative. Also, colleges back then were maybe 2/3 liberal and 1/3 conservative(and the college liberals were more for freedom of speech). Silent Majority was a real thing.

    But BLM is so obviously stupid and based on lies, why does it have such traction? Recently, it was mainly because it became a weapon against Trump. In the final yrs of Obama administration, the Democratic Party intended to use BLM to generate black votes against GOP, but it backfired. As Obama was president and Hillary seemed to have victory sealed, many Democrat whites didn’t get too excited. But with Trump in office, they are virtue-signaling with BLM. These are such human lice. So cynical yet pretending to care.

    But another reason for the nuttery is today’s so-called ‘conservative’ is far more ‘left’ than liberals in the 60s. They are totally for race-mixing, cucking to blacks, globo-homo, sucking up to Jewish Power, and etc. It even got to the point of police captains kneeling for black thugs.
    And just about anyone who got a college degree came under PC indoctrination. And anyone watching TV got hooked to the Magic Negro, and anyone listening to music sees rappers as kings.

    Anyway, even as technology progresses, there are no new ideas in arts, culture, or society. So, white idiots larp as ‘communists’, and BLM morons think it’s the time to MARCH once again.
    Actually, there can be new ideas in society and culture… like the truth… such as blacks kill blacks and should try to stop. But truth isn’t as fun as the narrative.

  121. @rimfire

    Well, pretty much all media outlets are controlled by (((them))), even the ones that claim to be conservative.

  122. @Pop Warner

    Well, not if these people are not crazy!

  123. Lurker says:
    @Father Coughlin

    You’re literally better off in Korea and never seeing another white person again in your life.

    TPTB find your terms acceptable.

  124. @wren

    And let’s not forget Roland G. Fryer, Jr., the “rising-star” black economist who did a 2016 study on police shootings that concluded, inter alia: “On the most extreme use of force – officer involved shootings –we find no racial differences in either the raw data or when contextual factors are taken into account.”
    https://www.nber.org/papers/w22399.pdf

    But then, in a totally coincidental and unrelated development:

    In May 2018, The Harvard Crimson reported that Fryer was the subject of at least two Title IX complaints for sexual harassment.[19] Based on finding that Fryer “engaged in “unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature” against at least five employees over the course of a decade”,[19] Harvard barred him from his research lab, the Education Innovation Laboratory (EdLabs) in March 2018.[19] Harvard suspended Fryer in 2019 for two years without pay in March 2019.[20] EdLabs was permanently closed by Harvard in September 2019 as a further sanction against Fryer.[21] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roland_G._Fryer_Jr.#Academic_career

    As I recall, Steve covered the story and the “harassment” was telling a couple off-color jokes in the presence of some overly-prissy white women. Of course, if a “rising black star” can get cancelled for straying off the Narrative plantation, what message does that send to white researchers?

  125. Muggles says:
    @guest007

    >>Once again, progressives show that no matter how much they say that they care about facts, they do not care about facts.<<

    Where do you get the idea that progressives "say that they care about facts?" Progressive rhetoric rarely if ever bothers to cite anything factual, unless it is some recent occurrence which they work hard to weaponize into inflammatory acts and violence.

    They cite selective bits of history or events or even (usually) biased studies ginned out by biased think tank "researchers" on the payroll. Often the "facts" used are transparent hoaxes.

    Now they aren't the only ones to do this. But "progressivism" as the term is (mis) used nowadays is all about emotion, not facts. Feelings (theirs, not yours) rather than data or objective historical analysis.

    No one (other than some remote family) really cares about George Floyd. Why would they? Other than his cronies, running buddies and friends, he was just a name. No hero, just a pathetic loser/victim. Were this not filmed for later use, he would have been just another sad statistic.

    Communists (and other authoritarians) like to use martyrs they manufacture to gin up hate and war fever. Their goals are to push feelings and actions, not thought and reflection. Strangely enough the constant TV riot porn gins up the same response when old statues are torn down, regular people are menaced by mask wearing thugs and streets are blocked, cars burned, etc.

    The only emotional manipulation from the Right/conservative side is done either unintentionally by the CNN/NYT axis of evil showing these things, or on Fox News where commentators actually object to this happening. Then they wail that the Country is Disintegrating Before Your Eyes!

    So the Progressive/Soros Comrades want to heat up their ignorant Twitter mobs but as an unintended consequence, really have fired up the anti Biden GOP. A commentator here on Unz (elsewhere) posted a comment suggesting that the MSM plays all this up to "help elect Trump" to which I posted an LOL. Maybe I am wrong about that. That seems to be the actual effect.

    So either they don't know about "blowback" or there is something going on I don't understand.

  126. anon[286] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Shouldn’t that be Gyropter?

    No.

    Is it Gyrocopter?

  127. Funnily enough the BBC did a ‘fact check’ on Police deaths in custody drawn from UK data that produces similar results:
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52890363

    Blacks are 3% of the population and 8% of deaths in Police custody – whites 86%/85% respectively; asian, 8% pop but only 3% of deaths, (remember ‘asian’ mostly means indians/pakistanis in the UK).

    However, when it’s looked at as a percentage of those arrested, blacks represent 9% of arrests and 8% of deaths, while whites make 79% of arrests and 85% of deaths, making whites 25% more likely to die ‘per arrest’ than blacks.
    (this is my 3rd time trying to post this, I think the other attempts got eaten by the system; if not please delete the repeat posts!)

  128. @Clyde

    Stephen Hsu has tenure, so the mob will have a hard time (impossible?) removing him from his professorship.

    IDK, see my comment (#124), re Harvard giving the boot to Roland G. Fryer, who was tenured.

  129. HA says:
    @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    “peddling his own discredited heliocentric theory (discredited both by the more advanced Copernican Heliocentric and Brahe’s Geocentric models)”

    You make a good point, though it’s worth noting that both Tycho Brahe (who died in 1601) and Copernicus (whose groundbreaking book was published just before his death in 1543) published long before the Galileo trial, the final verdict of which was issued in 1633.

    It is true that any initial objections to Galileo’s writings dissipated after Jesuits built their own telescopes and verified some of his findings (e.g. moons of Jupiter), but then the whole thing exploded again for the reasons you mentioned.

    A good debunking of the standard narrative (at this point, we might as well call that the Monty Python version) is given by Tim O’Neill:

    https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-most-misunderstood-historical-event

    For more on the same topic, see:

    https://strangenotions.com/gods-philosophers/

  130. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  131. Muggles says:

    Here’s a new thought:

    Isn’t the inevitable (probably unspoken publicly) outcome of all of the BLM police hysteria going to be the replacement of all non black police officers in black neighborhoods?

    If you are a police chief, isn’t having a nearly all black police force in black areas the “solution” to all of the BLM fuss? Then all of the blacks in ‘hood resisting arrest, acting crazy, shoplifting, etc will not be shot or killed by white cops. Or Asian, Hispanic, etc.

    Now the BLM crowd might still protest some videoed and seeming unjustified shootings. But the racial edge is then gone. It just becomes a generic anti cop thing. Black on black killings are verboten topics in the MSM.

    If you know anything about black Africa (mostly run by quasi or outright dictators) you know that black police are capable in black run countries of being far more ruthless than you normally see here.

    Of course the black police will eventually object to being segregated into the dangerous high crime areas. But it will be hard to make that (perhaps) true compliant and be supported by the Comrades in City Hall. If white cops are so racist, why would the Comrades deliberately subject blacks to that?

  132. slumber_j says:
    @BB753

    “mummare”, to mime

    From which I’d guess we get “mummer” and “to keep mum.” I don’t have a good dictionary where I am though. Anyway, thanks!

    • Thanks: BB753, Kyle
  133. scientific study . . .

    Police officers shoot more whites than blacks — given that there are more whites than blacks by a magnitude of at 3x that makes sense. Now for the hard part . . . why do they shoot whites and blacks . . .

    ohhh, I know, we’ll ask the officers whether or not skin color mattered — objective and scientific.

    Laughing and good grief . . . that’s pulling a rabbit from a nonexistent hat.

    • Replies: @anon
  134. Abe says:
    @MEH 0910

    Steve needs to write a spec screenplay PRONTO (the rest of us can crowdsource script doctoring duties to punch up the jokes, tighten the pacing, etc.):

    A scheming, venal, stale pale male academic is about to have his career ruined when some BIPOC Fragileisha reportette threatens to expose his doctoral thesis, ironically the only truthful thing he’s ever written in an over decade-long career of churning out the sort of politically correct pablum guaranteed to snag book contracts and TV show appearances. Our venal antihero does everything he can think of to get the reportette to can her story, but he fails and his career is ruined. Except- when we wakes up the next day it is still yesterday, so he can try and save his career all over again. Yet after attempting 100’s of different tacks (from threats, to bribery, to ritually humiliating himself) and having all of them fail, he finally stops giving a [email protected] and devotes the whole day to simply telling the truth. Amazingly this not only saves his career, but the next morning he does not wake up to find it is still yesterday and- not only that- he discovers the reportette has fallen hard for him, asking him in a breathy whisper to touch her hair as the credits roll. I call this crowd-pleasing concoction- CANCEL HOG DAY.

    • Thanks: AnotherDad
  135. JackOH says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    OPA, thanks, and ditto for your comments here that offer good, different perspectives.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  136. Goddard says:
    @Thea

    Show a fighting spirit, and laugh at them whenever possible. Never back down. Play to win.

    • Thanks: Thea
  137. Neoconned says:
    @JackOH

    I love how its possible to “misuse” data….

  138. Wilkey says:
    @Steve Sailer

    We should compare coverage of the 4th anniversary of Dallas today to coverage of the 65th anniversary of Emmett Till coming up on August 28. Both had political ramifications. Just in the current context it’s hard to argue that Dallas should be getting lots of coverage today as it inarguably helped to elect Donald Trump.

  139. Wilkey says:

    Authors of study on race and police killings ask for its retraction, citing “continued misuse” in the media.

    And yet it moves.

  140. @wren

    Steve Hsu is a good guy and good scientist.

    Hsu is great, not just good. The Manifold podcast with his friend and colleague, Corey Washington, is a must listen.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  141. @Jack D

    To be clear, Dr. Hsu lost his position as VP of research but he retains his tenured faculty position so it’s not totally grim. He doesn’t have to go work on a pig farm cleaning out the barns. Yet.

    Jeez, that’s a shallow take, Jack.

    • Replies: @wren
    , @Jack D
  142. @Wilkey

    We should compare coverage of the 4th anniversary of Dallas today to coverage of the 65th anniversary of Emmett Till coming up on August 28. Both had political ramifications. Just in the current context it’s hard to argue that Dallas should be getting lots of coverage today as it inarguably helped to elect Donald Trump.

    Where’s Trump?

    If Trump wants to win again, he better start acting like it:

    — “We remember the BLM murder of five Dallas police officers …”

    — “Democrat riots” and “Democrat/BLM riots” (And don’t be shy about naming the names of BLM money men who are … shocking! … Democratic party money men).

    — “The most fundamental requirement of civilization and of our freedom and prosperity, is the rule of law.”

    — “Democrats’ anti-American war on free speech”.

    — “We will pursue a balance of trade with the rest of the world, and repatriate our industry, so we can produce what we consume and have jobs for all Americans.”

    — “I am stopping all immigration into the United States. As we recover from the destruction from the Xi virus–and some irresponsible closure policies–we need every last job for Americans thrown out of work, and for our young Americans graduating from High School and College. It’s the responsibility of American business to offer their jobs to Americans.”

    • Replies: @Wilkey
  143. MEH 0910 says:

    JayMan Retweeted:

  144. If Trump wants to win again, he better start acting like it:

    I think all Trump needs to do is let the pandemic take its toll on food supplies and coupled with persons of privileged color demanding reparations and other gibs … four more years.

  145. wren says:
    @Kibernetika

    Not shallow. Our maoist institutions are proudly headed in exactly that direction.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_Revolution

  146. @Calvin Hobbes

    Hsu also said he voted for Obama (2x) therefore he should be okay; unlike others who didn’t vote for Obama.

  147. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kibernetika

    Hsu is great, not just good. The Manifold podcast with his friend and colleague, Corey Washington, is a must listen.

    What is great about him?

  148. J.Ross says:
    @Clyde

    He has been removed from an office he held which distributed research money, but (so far) retains his professorship, which ought to be a watermark of safety as it’s in physics.

  149. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  150. Pedro Albizu Campos was the would-be Puerto Rican strongman whose followers nearly assassinated Harry Truman in 1950.

    –iStweet

    Two little terrorists go after one big one. Yawn. The real loser is the American people. We’re still stuck with Borinquen.

    Puerto Ricans attitudes display unbelievable cognitive dissonance.

    –Phillipus Arabus, in reply to above

    Or major-league cynicism.

  151. Neighbor gal was just over–she’d borrowed our van to pick up a mattress for her son to take back to college next month. Good chat. She’s a Christian and a conservative (and had reached out to black friends for advice.) I have a hard time believing it’s just right wing loons like me that are “done”. Nor even just a slice of Christian conservatives like her.

    I think a lot of “nice white people” out there are building a serious case of “Negro fatigue”. Most white people are just–deep down–not desirous of being pickled in blackety, black, black, black 24x7x365. It’s just thoroughly … uninteresting, and in fact, pathetic.

    The plain truth of it is Western Civilization–i.e. the accomplishments of white people–so totally tower over everything that blacks have ever down it’s just a joke. Pick any year of the last 500 years and white people did more interesting stuff than sub-Saharan blacks have done … in their entire existence. If this was a prize fight a referee would have stopped it before Homer. Heck it would have been stopped by Stonehenge.

    Our elites think making white people wallow in all this tedious, contentless whining from history’s laggard mediocrities who have been dragged to a high level of prosperity in the West through the efforts of white people … in a winner?

    • Agree: Wilkey
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Wilkey
    , @Pericles
  152. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @MEH 0910
  153. @ic1000

    It’s actually crazy that the editors would go along with this retraction. A retraction implies that either a serious impropriety has occurred or that a major methodological mistake has been made and that, either way, a major failure of peer review has taken place. Even accepting their rationale at face value, an incautious discussion of a result that is otherwise sound as a matter of data generation and analysis does not rise to the level of being worthy of retraction. But of course the whole world has gone crazy so it’s not *surprising* the editors would play ball with this sordid little scheme.

  154. Jack D says:
    @Kibernetika

    Are you not entertained? This whole shitshow is very grim. History (written, perhaps in Mandarin) will record it as the Great American Purge of 2020. So whatever moments of levity we can snatch from them will help us to keep our sanity until such time (if ever) as America regains its senses. One can only hope that Hsu’s rehabilitation will not be posthumous as it was for so many of Stalin’s victims.

  155. @Wilkey

    For the enemies of America, the real tragedy of the murdered Dallas police officers was the damage it did to BLM.

  156. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Maybe, maybe, this could work if blacks did not overplay their hand, but you just know that they are going to (have already) overplay their hand. We didn’t even have to wait for “defund the police” before the shooting broke out between the blacks, reminding us all why we have police (ESPECIALLY in black communities) in the first place. Give blacks freedom to air their thoughts and whaddaya know, their thoughts are that the Jews are plotting world domination (I realize that many here will agree but most Americans d0n’t). BLM mania is self limiting (among whites) because it doesn’t take long for white people to realize that these are not the folks you want driving the bus that you and your children are stuck riding on.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anonymous
  157. Wilkey says:
    @AnotherDad

    Where’s Trump? If Trump wants to win again, he better start acting like it: “We remember the BLM murder of five Dallas police officers …”

    I’ve said this here a few times before and I’ll say it again: Trump won in large part because the black vote didn’t turn out in 2016. There is, at least anecdotally, evidence to suggest that lots of blacks are actually quite fond of him. So a big part of his re-election strategy is based on not antagonizing black voters. And a big part of the Democrats strategy is trying to antagonize them to believe that Trump is persecuting them. That’s why they nationalize the “police brutality” issue despite the fact the George Floyd was killed in a hard left Democrat city that also has a black police chief (whose name, race and picture magically never get mentioned in news stories), and was killed by a multiracial group of cops.

    View it all from that perspective and you’ll understand why Trump probably hasn’t mentioned it. He would be a sucker to do so.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  158. Wilkey says:
    @AnotherDad

    Our elites think making white people wallow in all this tedious, contentless whining from history’s laggard mediocrities who have been dragged to a high level of prosperity in the West through the efforts of white people … in a winner?

    They keep telling us that “blacks built America.” But America without blacks would look something like Canada, Australia or New Zealand. Hardly bad places, those.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  159. @Jack D

    Maybe, maybe, this could work if blacks did not overplay their hand, but you just know that they are going to (have already) overplay their hand.

    According to blaggot Don Lemon, this black man overplayed his hand. He sounded too sane, and had to be put in his place:

    CNN anchor Don Lemon cooly lectures Terry Crews over his controversial Black Lives Matter comments

    This woman of color gets the same treatment for her sane views:

    Republican congressional candidate bragged about pulling daughter out of university for ‘brainwashing’ after she supported equal marriage

    “Orange County Republican” is Pink.co.uk’s version of “Florida Man”. As long as you’re here, why not count the racial stereotypes in their Virtual March banner?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  160. J.Ross says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lemon really is repugnant to listen to here, but the most striking thing is that the “controversial” idea he is mocking as disrespectfully as possible is the old negro folktale that people should be judged, not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. That’s the thing that’s so terribly stupid. In explaining to the great Mr Crews just how dumb he is, Snippetty Lemon invokes Martin Luther King, while trashing his ideas. Colbert the model.

  161. J.Ross says:
    @Wilkey

    If Canada was a lunar colony with regular flights to Mars.

  162. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  163. Anonymous[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Speaking of driving the bus, a local incident of a black high school athlete sexually assaulting a white student athlete and the entire school admin covering it up due to the races involved:

    https://qctimes.com/news/local/bettendorf-school-district-staff-sued-over-assault-on-high-school-bus/article_0787d00c-8df8-5373-8e02-0f1b79b7c9f6.amp.html

    • Replies: @ic1000
  164. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    From the Wikipedia description:

    In the hypothetical 1985 envisioned in the book, the trade unions have become so powerful that they exert full control over society; unions exist for every imaginable occupation. Unions start strikes with little reason and a strike by one union usually turns into a general strike.

    Another major theme of the novella is the rise of Islam as a major cultural and political force in Britain, due to large-scale immigration from the Middle East; London abounds with mosques and rich Arabs. Arab property ownership plays a major role in the story’s economic backdrop.

    The protagonist is a school teacher, and somewhat of a proponent of Classicism. He is struggling within an education system which puts more stock in more directly practical approaches to study.

    Okay, he got one out of three.

  165. MBlanc46 says:
    @Father Coughlin

    And this is just the beginning.

  166. have there been studies re:women police officers shooting suspects ? e.g. propensity of white female officers shooting unarmed black males,armed white females, inquiring minds want to know !

  167. @Clyde

    Tenure is just a social construct. It is far from impossible that a university under woke pressure might conjure up a ‘reason’ for firing a thoughtcriminal, tenure notwithstanding.

    I wish Hsu all the best, but these days the increasing acceptance of the woke axiom that speech = violence means it’s getting easier and easier for nervous university administrators to accuse free thinkers of doing ‘harm’ to students or colleagues, at which point tenure isn’t much protection anymore.

  168. duncsbaby says:
    @Wilkey

    George Floyd wasn’t killed by any cop at all. He died because of a drug overdose. He died while in police custody. He probably wouldn’t have ingested fatal amounts of fentanyl if he wasn’t being arrested, but that’s hardly the fault of the cops.

  169. MEH 0910 says:

    David Cole piece in Taki’s Magazine:

    Steve Sailer Retweeted:

  170. black sea says:
    @Clyde

    The Chinese have a wonderful, though chilling, expression, “. . . made to wear the tight shoe.”

    Tenure or no tenure, there are all sorts of ways to make someone wear the tight shoe, in the hope that it will eventually become uncomfortable enough to drive them out.

  171. Pericles says:
    @AnotherDad

    Neighbor gal was just over–she’d borrowed our van to pick up a mattress for her son to take back to college next month.

    The problem, of course, is sending the kids to the madrassa to be radicalized and paying well for the pleasure. Much of BLM is fat white college kids, as we can see from the videos.

    It’s not real fatigue until parents stop paying the universities to screw their children up and the alumni stop donating to the University Black Lives football/backyball team.

  172. @The Alarmist

    Ah, but no Germanophile as committed as myself ever uses “German” to mean just one country, least of all the Allied-imposed limbless trunk of 1945. What we mean is Deutschtum, although even here the more hardline of us would insist upon the addition of the northern reaches of both France and what is now called Italy:

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  173. Franz says:
    @dr kill

    Y’all may find this interesting. No confirmation anywhere I could find.

    Thanks. I have no way of knowing.

    A UK site dropped link in an article and it don’t seem like acting:

    On the other hand an awful lot of strange things happening this year. Anything’s possible.

  174. Franz says:
    @dr kill

    Several at this site too:

    http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/?p=209908

    Seems an odd prank. Pretty poor attempt at a spoof, seems to me.

  175. @MEH 0910

    Someone should remind Andrew “Winston” Sullivan that if the party says it supports free speech, it does.

  176. @Old Palo Altan

    My German-speaking friends and colleagues now call it the DACH.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  177. Gordo says:

    OT here some goodthinkers against cancel culture:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8500911/JK-Rowling-joins-150-authors-academics-calling-end-cancel-culture.html

    I’m still waiting for them to support anyone not on their own approved list, e.g. Anglin.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  178. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    Yes, it’s increasingly clear that BlackLivesMatter, Antifa and related Lib Leftist movements have become fundamentalist religious cults. Reason, and presenting the true facts of racially charged hate crime hoaxes, the truth does not have much/any effect when dealing with totalitarian religious cults, Mao Cultural Revolution fanatics, suicide bomber mass murderers. These types can only be defeated or contained by force and by other religious, political mass movements like Nationalism. Nationalism doesn’t have to be German National Socialism of the 1920s, 30s – things like Kemal Ataturk’s Turkish nationalism, Secular Kemalism did/does a good job of containing both radical Islam, backward Islam and the various Marxist, Communist, cult marxist cults afflicting the West for the entire 20th Century and now.

  179. guest007 says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    Ann Coulter’s on air personalty is meant to help her develop a brand and is not meant to convince anyone who is not already a true believer.

    However, Ann Coulter’s discussion of how badly most conservative candidates and politicians prepare themselves for dealing with the media should be forced viewing for anyone on the right who is pursuing office.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  180. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Gordo

    This “open letter” supporting in theory the rights of British and Americans to speak honestly about crime and politics without being fired, beaten or killed, it comes off to me like similar Liberals in the UK and USA coming out in theory to oppose The Iranian Ayatollah Khomeni’s Fatwa death command on Indian British author S. Rushdie for writing a book of fiction that said some negative things about the daughters of the Prophet Muhammed.

    In later years the bulk of rich and influential Lib Leftist artists, actors, directors like Doonsbury’s Garry Trudeau and Hollywood Idiot Michael Moore did not denounce the Islamic extremist terrorist that slaughter French Cartoonists Charlie Hebdo. Garry Trudeau said that would be “punching down” against Algerian Arab Muslims who can only be seen as victims in the White Racist French society. Garry Trudeau also fell hook, line and sinker for the University of Virginia White Fraternity rape hoax and when it was exposed as a complete hoax, Garry said “It didn’t matter’ because supposedly the University of Virginia at Charlottesville was a a place of institutional racism and sexism.

    Garry Trudeau pretty much lost his sense of humor when Ronald Reagan swept to a 49 state landslide victory – which Garry perceived as being the same as Hitler being elected.

  181. ic1000 says:
    @Anonymous

    Reply to Anonymous[218]’s comment on a school-bus assault case, two threads up.

  182. anon[124] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910

    Dr. Pinker:

    The intelligent old idealists might win this round, but the young, dumb, and filled-with-hate have time and numbers on their side.

    — Steve Sailer (@Steve_Sailer) July 7, 2020

    Isn’t Pinker an optimist who spent years telling us it would all work out fine as long as we kept doing more of what we had been doing — progressive liberalism? How’s that working out? What books will be burned next, which academics canceled, which life ruined for making the wrong hand gesture?

  183. Forbes says:
    @RichardTaylor

    Feelings matter, facts don’t…
    Everything before yesterday is wrong.

  184. Forbes says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The Reagan era anecdote was a conversation in Moscow between a local and a visiting American,

    American: In America, we have free speech–we can even criticize our president.
    Russian: In Soviet Union, we have free speech–we too can criticize your president.

  185. @JackOH

    Thank you.

    My perspectives may not always be good, but they are usually different and I expect will get more so as the world becomes a Dead Sea of witless conformity.

  186. @The Alarmist

    But is that not a term with a primarily economic meaning?

    Still, DACH-tum works rather well.

    • Replies: @GoRedWings!
  187. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

  188. JimB says:
    @Anonymous

    Private communication.

  189. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  190. @Dieter Kief

    I guess I should have added “who is up to the task.”

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  191. @guest007

    Ann Coulter has dealt with a great deal of factual material over the years in her columns and books.

    • Replies: @guest007
  192. The Wall Street Journal
    Opinion Commentary

    I Cited Their Study, So They Disavowed It

    Note that the following subtitle (“If scientists retract…”) seems a tad naïve but that’s because the subtitle was written by an editor, not the essay’s author. My guess it was intended to soften the message lest anyone imagine that day is already here. Links in original.

    [MORE]

    I Cited Their Study, So They Disavowed It
    If scientists retract research that challenges reigning orthodoxies, politics will drive scholarship.
    By Heather Mac Donald
    July 8, 2020 7:17 pm ET

    The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is a peer-reviewed journal that claims to publish “only the highest quality scientific research.” Now, the authors of a 2019 PNAS article are disowning their research simply because I cited it.

    Psychologists Joseph Cesario of Michigan State and David Johnson of the University of Maryland analyzed 917 fatal police shootings of civilians from 2015 to test whether the race of the officer or the civilian predicted fatal police shootings. Neither did. Once “race specific rates of violent crime” are taken into account, the authors found, there are no disparities among those fatally shot by the police. These findings accord with decades of research showing that civilian behavior is the greatest influence on police behavior.

    In September 2019, I cited the article’s finding in congressional testimony. I also referred to it in a City Journal article, in which I noted that two Princeton political scientists, Dean Knox and Jonathan Mummolo, had challenged the study design. Messrs. Cesario and Johnson stood by their findings. Even under the study design proposed by Messrs. Knox and Mummolo, they wrote, there is again “no significant evidence of anti-black disparity in the likelihood of being fatally shot by the police.”

    My June 3 Journal op-ed quoted the PNAS article’s conclusion verbatim. It set off a firestorm at Michigan State. The university’s Graduate Employees Union pressured the MSU press office to apologize for the “harm it caused” by mentioning my article in a newsletter. The union targeted physicist Steve Hsu, who had approved funding for Mr. Cesario’s research. MSU sacked Mr. Hsu from his administrative position. PNAS editorialized that Messrs. Cesario and Johnson had “poorly framed” their article—the one that got through the journal’s three levels of editorial and peer review.

    Mr. Cesario told this page that Mr. Hsu’s dismissal could narrow the “kinds of topics people can talk about, or what kinds of conclusions people can come to.” Now he and Mr. Johnson have themselves jeopardized the possibility of politically neutral scholarship. On Monday they retracted their paper. They say they stand behind its conclusion and statistical approach but complain about its “misuse,” specifically mentioning my op-eds.

    The authors don’t say how I misused their work. Instead, they attribute to me a position I have never taken: that the “probability of being shot by police did not differ between Black and White Americans.” To the contrary, I have, like them, stressed that racial disparities in policing reflect differences in violent crime rates. The only thing wrong with their article, and my citation of it, is that its conclusion is unacceptable in our current political climate.

    This retraction bodes ill for the development of knowledge. If scientists must disavow their findings because they challenge reigning orthodoxies, then those orthodoxies will prevail even when they are wrong. Political consensus will drive scholarship, and not the reverse. The consequences for the policing debate are particularly dire. Researchers will suppress any results that contravene the narrative about endemic police racism. That narrative is now producing a shocking rise in shootings in American cities. The victims, including toddlers, are almost exclusively black.

    Ms. Mac Donald is a fellow at the Manhattan Institute.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-cited-their-study-so-they-disavowed-it-11594250254

  193. @James Braxton

    I should have added Brett Easton Ellis (“White”, “American Psycho”) and – German musician and novelist Sven Regener who praises Theodor Mommsen’s “Roman History”.

  194. guest007 says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    But her on-air persona only appeal to those who are already supporters of her position. Ann Coulter has no ability to convince anyne who is not with her to begin with.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  195. res says:
    @wren

    It has been interesting to see that THIS is what seems to have resulted in his defenestration. With all of the other issues raised (e.g. IQ genetics, various associations) seemingly just being grist for the outrage mill.

  196. res says:

    One interesting wrinkle is PNAS initially rejected Knox and Mummolo’s critique letter. I wonder if whoever was responsible for that will be the next to be canceled.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/01/28/it-took-us-months-contest-flawed-study-police-bias-heres-why-thats-dangerous/

    Given this glaring flaw, we anticipated that the record would be swiftly corrected. On the contrary, PNAS promptly rejected our critique last year. An editor at the journal told us the clear logical errors we highlighted merely reflected our “preferences” over how to best study this question, and that the tone of our critique was “intemperate.”

    Determined to correct the record, we turned to a venue that has, for better or worse, become a primary locus of academic debate: Twitter. Our post was met with outrage, both from supporters of the study and other researchers who were perplexed as to how a leading scientific journal could allow such an obvious error to stand.

  197. @Old Palo Altan

    Linguistic. On the back of food packages, ingredients have to be listed in the different European languages, which usually looks like this:

    UK:…
    NL/BG:…
    F/BG/CH:…
    D/A/CH:…
    I/CH:…
    etc

  198. @guest007

    Name one scribe appearing on TV who does.

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The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Our Reigning Political Puppets, Dancing to Invisible Strings