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Serf City USA: Malibu, a Sanctuary City, Tires of Sharing the Wealth with Santa Monica Losers, Wants to Secede
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Screenshot 2017-04-08 15.07.47

From the NYT:

PTA Gift for Someone Else’s Child? A Touchy Subject in California
By DANA GOLDSTEIN APRIL 8, 2017

SANTA MONICA, Calif. — Of all the inequalities between rich and poor public schools, one of the more glaring divides is PTA fund-raising, which in schools with well-heeled parents can generate hundreds of thousands of dollars a year or more.

Several years ago, the Santa Monica-Malibu school board came up with a solution: Pool most donations from across the district and distribute them equally to all the schools.

This has paid big benefits to the needier schools in this wealthy district, like the Edison Language Academy in Santa Monica, where half the children qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. The campus is decorated with psychedelic paintings of civil rights icons such as Cesar Chavez and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the work of the school’s art teacher, Martha Ramirez Oropeza, whose salary is paid by the pooled contributions. That money has also funded the school’s choral program, teacher aides, a science lab and a telescope.

The funding program is considered a national model, and has many enthusiastic supporters. But for some locals it is a sore point that has helped fuel a long-simmering secession movement in which Malibu — more solidly affluent than Santa Monica

I’m not sure that the term “more solidly affluent” quite captures the level of wealth in either Malibu or Santa Monica.

Malibuites don’t want their servants living in the corners of Santa Monica, where they have to pick up the tab for them through the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District, they want them living in Boyle Heights and Compton, where other taxpayers have to pay to educated their kids.

— would create its own district, allowing it to keep all of its donations in its own schools.

On the other hand, the good burghers of Malibu, officially a Sanctuary City, want to control the immigration policies of the entire country so they can continue to employ cheap servants, all the while blocking development to keep Malibu extraordinarily exclusive (less than 13,000 residents for 21 miles of beaches).

Commenter Anon updates an old song:

Serf City, here we come.
Two serfs for every home.

 
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  1. OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    “Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature”

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    • Replies: @Johan Schmidt
    @Marie

    To be fair, Paul Kagame has really turned that place around.

    Replies: @5371

    , @Jonathan Silber
    @Marie

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature.".

    Wise not to put all your eggs in one basket.

    , @Alfa158
    @Marie

    Headlines like that are why I don't read The Onion anymore. There is no way The Onion can match the sheer genius of the mainstream press.

    , @anonimouse
    @Marie

    “Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature”

    Smart move. Mass murder just kills the tourist industry.

    , @El Dato
    @Marie

    I still don't know whether the Tutsis took out the Hutu trash after their sudden and utterly nasty "population fix" attempt.

    Still, you owe me a new keyboard.

    Replies: @Vendetta

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Marie

    Did they finally discover the Vibranium deposits?

    , @Olorin
    @Marie

    Pulsed energy weapons instead of sharpened strips of metal roofing nailed to handles?

    Yeah, I guess that would redirect attention.

  2. Serf City, here we come.

    Two serfs for every home.

  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Well at least the losers in Santa Monica are still alive.

    Meanwhile DNC whistleblower Seth Rich is still dead. #sethrich should be top trending on twitter today but they are blocking the tag…

    …because of screen grabs proving guccifer’s source was Seth Rich.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/850731822799626242

    Cernovich crowd is energetic and increasingly effective it would seem.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anonymous

    The Clintons had Seth Rich murdered for the DNC leak.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UFSu4z7gBU

    #ClintonCrimeFamily
    #LockHerUp

  4. “Globalism means: ten rich families and billions of serfs.”

    https://mobile.twitter.com/therealroseanne/status/838791987868229632

  5. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    To be fair, Paul Kagame has really turned that place around.

    • Replies: @5371
    @Johan Schmidt

    I can tell you are a dedicated consumer of MSM.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  6. Why don’t they just stop donating to the PTA?

  7. @Anonymous
    Well at least the losers in Santa Monica are still alive.

    Meanwhile DNC whistleblower Seth Rich is still dead. #sethrich should be top trending on twitter today but they are blocking the tag...

    ...because of screen grabs proving guccifer's source was Seth Rich.


    https://mobile.twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/850731822799626242


    Cernovich crowd is energetic and increasingly effective it would seem.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    The Clintons had Seth Rich murdered for the DNC leak.

    #ClintonCrimeFamily
    #LockHerUp

  8. By the way, Steve, have you checked out the recent HBO miniseries Big Little Lies? It takes place in Monterey, probably based on a novel. All about a ridiculously posh public school and its rich “helicopter parents.” Not very SJW-y, though there is an evil, spouse-abusing blond, Nordic alpha male, and it is by the awful David E. Kelley.

    I don’t remember seeing a single brown maid or groundskeeper, though they were probably around.

    • Replies: @DWB
    @guest

    The richie riches in Monterey actually live a bit further south on the peninsula (think: Carmel, Pebble Beach, etc.) Monterey High is decidedly not "WASPy". The school is 44% Latino, 32% white.

    Many of those who live within the gated confines of 17-Mile-Drive (note: NOT in Monterey) send their kids to private schools.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

  9. Santa Monica, a fraction of Malibu’s size, has 92,000 people as seen on that map. And it is less residential, with a number of shopping streets and office complexes.

    You would get the wrong impression about SM from the free school lunch stat. It is full of $2 million homes. The free lunch kids are in old rent controlled apartments or lie about their residence to get in.

    Also notwithstanding American History X, it is not a hotbed of NeoNazis.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Lot

    Here's an interesting news story about a white gang from South Orange County. One member of the gang was even Jewish (Micah Katz at 5:39).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba7BWo_B7VA

  10. Also notwithstanding American History X, it is not a hotbed of NeoNazis

    But wasn’t it full of corrupt pols and brutal cops when Raymond Chandler wrote about as “Bay City”?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @fnn

    Chandler wrote fiction.

    Replies: @cthulhu

  11. @Lot
    Santa Monica, a fraction of Malibu's size, has 92,000 people as seen on that map. And it is less residential, with a number of shopping streets and office complexes.

    You would get the wrong impression about SM from the free school lunch stat. It is full of $2 million homes. The free lunch kids are in old rent controlled apartments or lie about their residence to get in.

    Also notwithstanding American History X, it is not a hotbed of NeoNazis.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Here’s an interesting news story about a white gang from South Orange County. One member of the gang was even Jewish (Micah Katz at 5:39).

  12. Santa Monica school district allows any child whose parent works in the city to attend Santa Monica City schools

    The biggest industry of Santa Monica is medicine. There are 2 huge hospitals and thousands of medical offices.

    There are also thousands of entertainment industry attorneys, agents, managers and studios. SM school district wants the Hispanic poor kids so as to rake in the state and federal money for under achievers and the Drs, nurses, attorneys etc kids to raise text scores.

    Because there are more medical and attorney offices than restaurants and hotels the schools are reasonably civilized

  13. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I have to admit that if I lived in Malibu I’d probably feel the same way. A lot of effort and money goes into fundraising, and one reason for the great effort and generosity is the desire to help their own kids.

    Also, where do all of these poor Santa Monica students live? My family and I lived in a charming, modest-sized house in Santa Monica for about a year in the 1970s, and that house is now valued at about $3.4 million according to Zillow. At the time, my parents could have bought it for about $75,000.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Anonymous

    I would feel that way too.

    But would either of us have encouraged Malibu to join the "sanctuary city" nonsense?

    Malibu was just asking for (verbal) attacks on the city on account of hypocrisy.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  14. I remember back in the ’60s when Santa Monica,
    though already affluent, was a sleepy little village. RAND
    near the beach, however, part of SoCal’s vast defense
    industry, was already there. The Beach Boys were from
    Hawthorne, i.e., the sticks, and so they looked with envy
    toward Santa Monica. The Doors were just getting started,
    and actually lived in the Ocean Park section of SM, a couple
    of blocks from the beach, but it was cooler to say they
    were from Venice Beach so that’s how they advertised themselves
    on Sunset Strip. Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek would
    catch a bus to UCLA on Main Street (near the Ocean Park
    library that still exists). Right on the corner near the bus
    stop was a well-known eatery that became immortalized as
    the Soul Kitchen.

    Today People’s Republic of Santa Monica (and why not?
    It has its own foreign policy) is hopelessly overbuilt.
    A one-bedroom apartment south of Wilshire will run you
    $2200/month. North of Wilshire? Forget it. You can tell
    it’s still very liberal. In a city that’s perhaps 90% white(read:
    heavily Jewish), almost all employees at Von’s markets are
    proudly black. Not that they can afford to live in Santa Monica,
    of course.

    Santa Monica nowadays is also a retirement community so
    it’s full of hospitals and nursing homes. Who works in the
    nursing homes? Mostly Filipinos and young African women,
    very few whites

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Anon 2

    Did you ever eat in Olivia's soul food restaurant in Santa Monica? This was the Soul Kitchen in the Door's tune http://www.songplaces.com/Soul_Kitchen/Santa_Monica_California _____ One of my favorites by them.

    Replies: @Anon 2

    , @guest
    @Anon 2

    Jim Morrison was also the son of the Rear Admiral in command of naval forces in the Tonkin Gulf. It was cooler to hide that, too.

    He couldn't sing worth a darn, but I don't hold it against him. I was listening to Love Street recently. Where is Love Street? Venice? LA? Santa Monica? Our hearts?

    Replies: @Discard, @Anon 2

    , @Old Palo Altan
    @Anon 2

    My memories of Santa Monica "North of Montana", as it is now called, goes back to the Fifties and Sixties as well. It was both beautiful and quiet - and still is. Houses like my grandparents', which sold for $100,000 in the mid-Sixties, now go for 8-10 million and more. Strongly built, and beautifully crafted, those houses from the 1910s and '20s are well worth every penny.
    Venice was a tiny place and we sometimes rented a house there, right on the beach. One stepped out the front door, walked through the well-kept garden, and passed straight across the road onto the endless, burning sand before one arrived, finally (to my five year old sensibilities it seemed like crossing the Sahara), at the miraculous Pacific and its long, long and gentle, waves. Nobody much about - just us and our neighbours.
    It is a thousand times nicer than Malibu, which even then we considered a place for either the Hollywood crowd (the rougher sort) or the surfer types who, as someone here has pointed out, came from the badlands of the interior. On the other hand there was a splendid fish restaurant somewhere along that stretch: I still remember the superb swordfish steaks which I never failed to order.
    There was indeed Rand, and we knew some of its leading lights, in particular James Schlesinger, a truly outstanding man.
    But before Rand there was Douglas, which is what really brought a new kind of prosperity and significance to Santa Monica.
    In sum: it is a real place, which Malibu isn't and can never be. There's no "there" there, as Gertrude Stein so tellingly said of Oakland.

  15. B
    U
    T
    Surf City is Santa Cruz.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @athEIst

    I had always heard that Jan and Dean's Surf City was Huntington Beach.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  16. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    “Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature.”.

    Wise not to put all your eggs in one basket.

  17. Jumped in a little too late on the original thread, but someone should put up a copy of the Official Sanctuary City sign in Spanish.

  18. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    Headlines like that are why I don’t read The Onion anymore. There is no way The Onion can match the sheer genius of the mainstream press.

  19. @Anonymous
    I have to admit that if I lived in Malibu I'd probably feel the same way. A lot of effort and money goes into fundraising, and one reason for the great effort and generosity is the desire to help their own kids.

    Also, where do all of these poor Santa Monica students live? My family and I lived in a charming, modest-sized house in Santa Monica for about a year in the 1970s, and that house is now valued at about $3.4 million according to Zillow. At the time, my parents could have bought it for about $75,000.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    I would feel that way too.

    But would either of us have encouraged Malibu to join the “sanctuary city” nonsense?

    Malibu was just asking for (verbal) attacks on the city on account of hypocrisy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Frau Katze

    But would either of us have encouraged Malibu to join the “sanctuary city” nonsense?

    Absolutely not. I agree it's nonsense.

  20. From the NYT article, blank slate nonsense.

    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said. “They have more of a vocabulary gap before they even get to school, and their home environments are not as literacy-rich. They need greater investments in order to achieve their full potential.”

    • Replies: @guest
    @Frau Katze

    That's the Gap. Big Ed runs on it.

    , @Forbes
    @Frau Katze

    What's fascinating is that four decades of "more money" for schools has done essentially nothing to close The Gap. Yet, much like another tribune of leftwing thinking, communism/socialism, more money is gonna work any day now, just as soon as it's properly implemented. The experience of failure is all that's necessary to double down on the policy approach.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @Frau Katze


    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said.

     

    Tautology.

    Needier people have greater needs.

    Not really blank slate, just circular logic.

    A famous tautology from Dan Quayle, "If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure"
  21. @Anon 2
    I remember back in the '60s when Santa Monica,
    though already affluent, was a sleepy little village. RAND
    near the beach, however, part of SoCal's vast defense
    industry, was already there. The Beach Boys were from
    Hawthorne, i.e., the sticks, and so they looked with envy
    toward Santa Monica. The Doors were just getting started,
    and actually lived in the Ocean Park section of SM, a couple
    of blocks from the beach, but it was cooler to say they
    were from Venice Beach so that's how they advertised themselves
    on Sunset Strip. Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek would
    catch a bus to UCLA on Main Street (near the Ocean Park
    library that still exists). Right on the corner near the bus
    stop was a well-known eatery that became immortalized as
    the Soul Kitchen.

    Today People's Republic of Santa Monica (and why not?
    It has its own foreign policy) is hopelessly overbuilt.
    A one-bedroom apartment south of Wilshire will run you
    $2200/month. North of Wilshire? Forget it. You can tell
    it's still very liberal. In a city that's perhaps 90% white(read:
    heavily Jewish), almost all employees at Von's markets are
    proudly black. Not that they can afford to live in Santa Monica,
    of course.

    Santa Monica nowadays is also a retirement community so
    it's full of hospitals and nursing homes. Who works in the
    nursing homes? Mostly Filipinos and young African women,
    very few whites

    Replies: @Clyde, @guest, @Old Palo Altan

    Did you ever eat in Olivia’s soul food restaurant in Santa Monica? This was the Soul Kitchen in the Door’s tune http://www.songplaces.com/Soul_Kitchen/Santa_Monica_California _____ One of my favorites by them.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @Clyde

    I never ate at Olivia's but I walked by the place
    many times. I'm a big fan of The Doors as well,
    and finally got to see them a few years ago in their
    Doors of the 21st Century incarnation when Manzarek
    was still alive

    Replies: @Clyde

  22. @Frau Katze
    @Anonymous

    I would feel that way too.

    But would either of us have encouraged Malibu to join the "sanctuary city" nonsense?

    Malibu was just asking for (verbal) attacks on the city on account of hypocrisy.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    But would either of us have encouraged Malibu to join the “sanctuary city” nonsense?

    Absolutely not. I agree it’s nonsense.

  23. Sanctuary cities are really sundown towns.

    Sanctuary-sundown. What a policy.

    They’re not “illegal aliens”; they’re just breaking curfew!

    How vibrant of them.

  24. @fnn

    Also notwithstanding American History X, it is not a hotbed of NeoNazis
     
    But wasn't it full of corrupt pols and brutal cops when Raymond Chandler wrote about as "Bay City"?

    Replies: @Alden

    Chandler wrote fiction.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Alden

    It is widely acknowledged that in the 1930's, Santa Monica city government and police were infested with corruption. Chandler's characterization of Santa Monica as the fictional Bay City was essentially correct.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. @Anon 2
    I remember back in the '60s when Santa Monica,
    though already affluent, was a sleepy little village. RAND
    near the beach, however, part of SoCal's vast defense
    industry, was already there. The Beach Boys were from
    Hawthorne, i.e., the sticks, and so they looked with envy
    toward Santa Monica. The Doors were just getting started,
    and actually lived in the Ocean Park section of SM, a couple
    of blocks from the beach, but it was cooler to say they
    were from Venice Beach so that's how they advertised themselves
    on Sunset Strip. Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek would
    catch a bus to UCLA on Main Street (near the Ocean Park
    library that still exists). Right on the corner near the bus
    stop was a well-known eatery that became immortalized as
    the Soul Kitchen.

    Today People's Republic of Santa Monica (and why not?
    It has its own foreign policy) is hopelessly overbuilt.
    A one-bedroom apartment south of Wilshire will run you
    $2200/month. North of Wilshire? Forget it. You can tell
    it's still very liberal. In a city that's perhaps 90% white(read:
    heavily Jewish), almost all employees at Von's markets are
    proudly black. Not that they can afford to live in Santa Monica,
    of course.

    Santa Monica nowadays is also a retirement community so
    it's full of hospitals and nursing homes. Who works in the
    nursing homes? Mostly Filipinos and young African women,
    very few whites

    Replies: @Clyde, @guest, @Old Palo Altan

    Jim Morrison was also the son of the Rear Admiral in command of naval forces in the Tonkin Gulf. It was cooler to hide that, too.

    He couldn’t sing worth a darn, but I don’t hold it against him. I was listening to Love Street recently. Where is Love Street? Venice? LA? Santa Monica? Our hearts?

    • Replies: @Discard
    @guest

    I read that Love Street was Laurel Canyon. The "...store where the creatures meet" was an old roadside mom and pop grocery.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Anon 2
    @guest

    I believe Love Street was Laurel Canyon.
    Jim Morrison lived nearby on Rothdell Trail
    with Pamela Courson in 1966. When they had a quarrel
    and she would kick him out, he would decamp to
    Alta Cienega Motel which to this day has Jim's
    Room, covered with graffiti from all over the world.
    Being a diehard Doors fan, I stayed in Jim's Room
    once (you have to ask for it), maybe hoping to see
    his ghost but no such luck

  26. @Frau Katze
    From the NYT article, blank slate nonsense.

    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said. “They have more of a vocabulary gap before they even get to school, and their home environments are not as literacy-rich. They need greater investments in order to achieve their full potential.”
     

    Replies: @guest, @Forbes, @Massimo Heitor

    That’s the Gap. Big Ed runs on it.

  27. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    “Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature”

    Smart move. Mass murder just kills the tourist industry.

  28. @Johan Schmidt
    @Marie

    To be fair, Paul Kagame has really turned that place around.

    Replies: @5371

    I can tell you are a dedicated consumer of MSM.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @5371

    No, he really has. Unfortunately, and I think this is your point, his regime gobbles up $1B/yr in aid and the underlying human capital is still awful. It's a Potemkin village.

    His son went to West Point, so Kagame probably intends to make the presidency a family business. But putting all your eggs in the basket of a single nuclear family historically doesn't pan out well.

    Replies: @Vendetta

  29. @guest
    @Anon 2

    Jim Morrison was also the son of the Rear Admiral in command of naval forces in the Tonkin Gulf. It was cooler to hide that, too.

    He couldn't sing worth a darn, but I don't hold it against him. I was listening to Love Street recently. Where is Love Street? Venice? LA? Santa Monica? Our hearts?

    Replies: @Discard, @Anon 2

    I read that Love Street was Laurel Canyon. The “…store where the creatures meet” was an old roadside mom and pop grocery.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Discard

    There was a German couple's health food store in West Hollywood in the late 1940s that was the hang out for proto-hippie "Nature Boys:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0XJCJ1Srw

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  30. @Alden
    @fnn

    Chandler wrote fiction.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    It is widely acknowledged that in the 1930’s, Santa Monica city government and police were infested with corruption. Chandler’s characterization of Santa Monica as the fictional Bay City was essentially correct.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

  31. @athEIst
    B
    U
    T
    Surf City is Santa Cruz.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    I had always heard that Jan and Dean’s Surf City was Huntington Beach.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @cthulhu

    Dean Torrence was almost certainly involved in the planning of the Frank Sinatra Jr. kidnapping, although the decision was made not to prosecute him. He became a near-recluse after Jan's car wreck and many have stated he was in constant fear of the Sinatra family after that.

    The Sinatras still have a mafioso streak. When the driver of the car that crashed into and killed Jilly Rizzo was up for parole, they went on a campaign to deny the guy parole after 20+ years. Yes, the guy was drunk and attempted to evade arrest, and he should have been put in prison, but he didn't set out to kill the guy, and besides Jilly Rizzo was a known hood who almost certainly had participated in mob murders. Had Rizzo not been Frank's pal, the driver would have done five years or so. He's done over 20 and has been turned down for parole probably only because of the Sinatras.

  32. @cthulhu
    @Alden

    It is widely acknowledged that in the 1930's, Santa Monica city government and police were infested with corruption. Chandler's characterization of Santa Monica as the fictional Bay City was essentially correct.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Steve Sailer

    Isn't this something touched on in the LA Quartet as well?

    You got any more information on this though? It sounds like it would be an interesting read.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    , @Romanian
    @Steve Sailer

    This scouring of the shire thing sounds interesting to me, as an Eastern European. Can you elaborate in a future post? Were the men changed by military service or did they simply move around a lot with social mobility on the rise and spread wholesome values everywhere? So you had to have the pool of values in the first place. We had a conscript army until we entered NATO in 2004, but we never got that effect. Although I would be open to an argument that ending conscription cost my generation something in terms of formative experiences.

    Replies: @Venator

    , @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    You mean vets took all the jobs?

    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Steve Sailer

    As fate would have it, I'm half way through "The Long Goodbye" right now. By the end, I'll probably have a number of California-centric questions only you're honest enough to answer. I reckon that segues nicely into another panhandlin' reminder.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @cthulhu, @Forbes

    , @res
    @Steve Sailer

    The Scouring of the Shire type of process is fascinating (wasn't there a similar process after the Civil War?). I think that differentiates the overall meaning of the LotR books and movies significantly. Tolkien was perceptive and it is interesting to see his rendition of that and the importance assigned.
    http://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/11737/did-peter-jackson-ever-explain-why-he-left-out-the-scouring-of-the-shire

    It is also interesting that Tolkien denied the Scouring of the Shire was an allegory for post-WWII Britain: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scouring_of_the_Shire
    Tolkien cited his fin de siecle childhood instead.
    This book draws a connection with post-WWI destruction.
    More on Tolkien, WWI, and LotR: http://greenbooks.theonering.net/guest/files/040102_02.html


    The fates of Sam Gamgee, Frodo Baggins, Pippin Took and Merry Brandybuck after they return to the Shire are in many ways reflections of the fates that faced veterans returning after the war.

    Merry and Pippin did not experience the terror and the sheer physical ordeal of bearing the One Ring to Mount Doom. Although they fought and were wounded in battle, they were not subjected to the constant and unending stress that Sam and Frodo were. It is as if they were members of an armed service that did not spend time in the trenches. After the war, they resume life as well-connected, upper-class Hobbits. Their experiences have matured them and trained them to take on leadership roles – as can be seen in their military planning to remove intruders from the Shire and in their direction (with Sam Gamgee) of restoration efforts after the Scouring of the Shire.

    Sam and Frodo’s experiences during the war were much more hellish, resembling that of soldiers who had long tours of duty in the trenches. Of the two, Sam came through best.
    ...
     

    For a different take on this phenomenon in the context of the US and WWI: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_Ya_Gonna_Keep_%27em_Down_on_the_Farm_(After_They%27ve_Seen_Paree)%3F
  33. @Discard
    @guest

    I read that Love Street was Laurel Canyon. The "...store where the creatures meet" was an old roadside mom and pop grocery.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    There was a German couple’s health food store in West Hollywood in the late 1940s that was the hang out for proto-hippie “Nature Boys:”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    There was a German couple’s health food store in West Hollywood in the late 1940s that was the hang out for proto-hippie “Nature Boys:”
     
    Some of the eeriest photos from the 1950s are those of Cole with the composer* Eden Ahbez. They look like he blew in on a time machine from 1972.

    *Actually lyricist. He subconsciously plagiarized a Yiddish tune from his infancy in Brooklyn. He was adopted by a Kansas City couple, adding to the KC-NY Jewish musical axis of Lieber/Stoller, Burt Bacharach, and either (or both) Richard Rogers or Harold Arlen.
  34. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    I still don’t know whether the Tutsis took out the Hutu trash after their sudden and utterly nasty “population fix” attempt.

    Still, you owe me a new keyboard.

    • Replies: @Vendetta
    @El Dato

    UN interrupted them in a "frontlash" operation on the assumption they would, when in fact they actually didn't. Put boots on the ground between the RPF and the retreating Hutu forces to let them get away into Congo to maintain a perpetual cross-border insurgency, leading to the Congo Wars when the Rwandans started going into the Congo themselves to destroy these groups.

    Hutus are too overwhelming a majority of the population for Kagame to have gone and wiped them out even if he wanted to - much the same as the situation with Assad and the Sunnis in Syria.

  35. Wasn’t the Malibu “Sanctuary City” sign a hoax though?

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-malibu-sanctuary-city-sign-20170405-story.html

    Now listening to Santa Monica Dream: Destroyed dreams of a good life?

  36. @Clyde
    @Anon 2

    Did you ever eat in Olivia's soul food restaurant in Santa Monica? This was the Soul Kitchen in the Door's tune http://www.songplaces.com/Soul_Kitchen/Santa_Monica_California _____ One of my favorites by them.

    Replies: @Anon 2

    I never ate at Olivia’s but I walked by the place
    many times. I’m a big fan of The Doors as well,
    and finally got to see them a few years ago in their
    Doors of the 21st Century incarnation when Manzarek
    was still alive

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Anon 2


    I never ate at Olivia’s but I walked by the place many times.
     
    I am impressed in a six degrees of separation kind of way. If I had a time machine, one place I would go, still one place to go... would be to Olivia's and to see JM scribbling away in his notebooks. I saw them twice around 1969. I know the dates.
    I liked the Oliver Stone Doors movie even though it came in for heavy criticism.

    Replies: @Anon 2

  37. … the Edison Language Academy in Santa Monica, where half the children qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. The campus is decorated with psychedelic paintings of civil rights icons such as Cesar Chavez and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the work of the school’s art teacher, Martha Ramirez Oropeza

    Here’s one of her murals (via image search of her name): Standard garish Aztlán propaganda, complete with Temple of Doom faces and Thulsa Doom snakes.

    The search page also turned up this Armenian chica who recently majored in Gender Studies at UCLA and is now in real estate. With cheerful hottie academic competition like that, the uggo malcontent SJWs will be angrier than ever.

  38. @guest
    @Anon 2

    Jim Morrison was also the son of the Rear Admiral in command of naval forces in the Tonkin Gulf. It was cooler to hide that, too.

    He couldn't sing worth a darn, but I don't hold it against him. I was listening to Love Street recently. Where is Love Street? Venice? LA? Santa Monica? Our hearts?

    Replies: @Discard, @Anon 2

    I believe Love Street was Laurel Canyon.
    Jim Morrison lived nearby on Rothdell Trail
    with Pamela Courson in 1966. When they had a quarrel
    and she would kick him out, he would decamp to
    Alta Cienega Motel which to this day has Jim’s
    Room, covered with graffiti from all over the world.
    Being a diehard Doors fan, I stayed in Jim’s Room
    once (you have to ask for it), maybe hoping to see
    his ghost but no such luck

  39. My post was shortened. I had “no such luck lol”
    The phrase about Morrison’s ghost was meant to be ironic.

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

    Isn’t this something touched on in the LA Quartet as well?

    You got any more information on this though? It sounds like it would be an interesting read.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Jack Hanson

    Ellroy has plenty of characters who served in WW2 - e.g., LAPD lieutenant Mal Considine in The Big Nowhere, IMHO the best of the four books although it's the least known - but they are usually dirty in their own way. Considine is a war hero who married a woman he liberated, but there are deep secrets regarding how all that happened. Ellroy's LA is all about corruption.

    The same themes writ larger continue in his next three books, the Underworld USA Trilogy - American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand, and Blood's a Rover - which in some ways are better than the LA Quartet because they lack the mystery element which is always the weakest part of Ellroy's work. American Tabloid in particular is (again IMHO) his best fiction book by a large margin.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jack Hanson

  41. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

    This scouring of the shire thing sounds interesting to me, as an Eastern European. Can you elaborate in a future post? Were the men changed by military service or did they simply move around a lot with social mobility on the rise and spread wholesome values everywhere? So you had to have the pool of values in the first place. We had a conscript army until we entered NATO in 2004, but we never got that effect. Although I would be open to an argument that ending conscription cost my generation something in terms of formative experiences.

    • Replies: @Venator
    @Romanian

    That could garner important nature-nurture-insights. Possibly the better, idealistic men went into the army, the crooks and losers stayed at home, to collect the money and the women. Reminds me of that independence-war-movie, "Cold Mountain".

  42. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

    You mean vets took all the jobs?

  43. @5371
    @Johan Schmidt

    I can tell you are a dedicated consumer of MSM.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    No, he really has. Unfortunately, and I think this is your point, his regime gobbles up $1B/yr in aid and the underlying human capital is still awful. It’s a Potemkin village.

    His son went to West Point, so Kagame probably intends to make the presidency a family business. But putting all your eggs in the basket of a single nuclear family historically doesn’t pan out well.

    • Replies: @Vendetta
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In a better world, there'd have been no UN intervention to force him out of the eastern Congo. Rwanda could have gotten the perpetually untapped mining sites working and had its own independent source of income to wean itself off the aid machine.

  44. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    Did they finally discover the Vibranium deposits?

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

    As fate would have it, I’m half way through “The Long Goodbye” right now. By the end, I’ll probably have a number of California-centric questions only you’re honest enough to answer. I reckon that segues nicely into another panhandlin’ reminder.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    After you have read all of Raymond Chandler, read Dashiell Hammett.

    , @cthulhu
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    The Long Goodbye is Chandler's best book without a doubt.

    , @Forbes
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Robert Altman's screen adaptation (1973) contains Arnold Schwartzenegger's first screen appearance (uncredited) as a muscle-bound (shirtless) thug-enforcer.

  46. res says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    The Santa Monica /Bay City police force was cleaned up by returning WWII veterans in the later 1940s in the kind of Scouring of the Shire process that went on in a lot of American towns.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Romanian, @BB753, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @res

    The Scouring of the Shire type of process is fascinating (wasn’t there a similar process after the Civil War?). I think that differentiates the overall meaning of the LotR books and movies significantly. Tolkien was perceptive and it is interesting to see his rendition of that and the importance assigned.
    http://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/11737/did-peter-jackson-ever-explain-why-he-left-out-the-scouring-of-the-shire

    It is also interesting that Tolkien denied the Scouring of the Shire was an allegory for post-WWII Britain: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scouring_of_the_Shire
    Tolkien cited his fin de siecle childhood instead.
    This book draws a connection with post-WWI destruction.
    More on Tolkien, WWI, and LotR: http://greenbooks.theonering.net/guest/files/040102_02.html

    The fates of Sam Gamgee, Frodo Baggins, Pippin Took and Merry Brandybuck after they return to the Shire are in many ways reflections of the fates that faced veterans returning after the war.

    Merry and Pippin did not experience the terror and the sheer physical ordeal of bearing the One Ring to Mount Doom. Although they fought and were wounded in battle, they were not subjected to the constant and unending stress that Sam and Frodo were. It is as if they were members of an armed service that did not spend time in the trenches. After the war, they resume life as well-connected, upper-class Hobbits. Their experiences have matured them and trained them to take on leadership roles – as can be seen in their military planning to remove intruders from the Shire and in their direction (with Sam Gamgee) of restoration efforts after the Scouring of the Shire.

    Sam and Frodo’s experiences during the war were much more hellish, resembling that of soldiers who had long tours of duty in the trenches. Of the two, Sam came through best.

    For a different take on this phenomenon in the context of the US and WWI: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_Ya_Gonna_Keep_%27em_Down_on_the_Farm_(After_They%27ve_Seen_Paree)%3F

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Discard

    There was a German couple's health food store in West Hollywood in the late 1940s that was the hang out for proto-hippie "Nature Boys:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0XJCJ1Srw

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    There was a German couple’s health food store in West Hollywood in the late 1940s that was the hang out for proto-hippie “Nature Boys:”

    Some of the eeriest photos from the 1950s are those of Cole with the composer* Eden Ahbez. They look like he blew in on a time machine from 1972.

    *Actually lyricist. He subconsciously plagiarized a Yiddish tune from his infancy in Brooklyn. He was adopted by a Kansas City couple, adding to the KC-NY Jewish musical axis of Lieber/Stoller, Burt Bacharach, and either (or both) Richard Rogers or Harold Arlen.

  48. One amenity of a beachfront community is the length of beachfront per resident. For Malibu, it is 21 miles of beachfront/13,000 residents * 5,280 feet/mile = 8.5 feet of beachfront per resident. It is left to the reader to calculate this metric for other beachfront communities along Long Island, the Riviera, etc.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Miami Beach.

    Also, there are virtually no hotels in Malibu.

  49. @Romanian
    @Steve Sailer

    This scouring of the shire thing sounds interesting to me, as an Eastern European. Can you elaborate in a future post? Were the men changed by military service or did they simply move around a lot with social mobility on the rise and spread wholesome values everywhere? So you had to have the pool of values in the first place. We had a conscript army until we entered NATO in 2004, but we never got that effect. Although I would be open to an argument that ending conscription cost my generation something in terms of formative experiences.

    Replies: @Venator

    That could garner important nature-nurture-insights. Possibly the better, idealistic men went into the army, the crooks and losers stayed at home, to collect the money and the women. Reminds me of that independence-war-movie, “Cold Mountain”.

  50. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Steve Sailer

    As fate would have it, I'm half way through "The Long Goodbye" right now. By the end, I'll probably have a number of California-centric questions only you're honest enough to answer. I reckon that segues nicely into another panhandlin' reminder.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @cthulhu, @Forbes

    After you have read all of Raymond Chandler, read Dashiell Hammett.

  51. @Jack Hanson
    @Steve Sailer

    Isn't this something touched on in the LA Quartet as well?

    You got any more information on this though? It sounds like it would be an interesting read.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Ellroy has plenty of characters who served in WW2 – e.g., LAPD lieutenant Mal Considine in The Big Nowhere, IMHO the best of the four books although it’s the least known – but they are usually dirty in their own way. Considine is a war hero who married a woman he liberated, but there are deep secrets regarding how all that happened. Ellroy’s LA is all about corruption.

    The same themes writ larger continue in his next three books, the Underworld USA Trilogy – American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand, and Blood’s a Rover – which in some ways are better than the LA Quartet because they lack the mystery element which is always the weakest part of Ellroy’s work. American Tabloid in particular is (again IMHO) his best fiction book by a large margin.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @cthulhu

    Mal and Exley, off the top of my head. Dudley as well, if you consider his OSS time.

    Ill need to give Underworld a shot. LA Confidential and The Big Nowhere were excellent books, Black Dahlia less so, and the stream of consciousness writing made White Jazz unreadable.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    , @Jack Hanson
    @cthulhu

    I was thinking of the scenes specifically where Exley mentions "Parker's Reforms" after the Christmas Massacre, and that the LAPD wasn't a bunch of thugs anymore.

  52. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Steve Sailer

    As fate would have it, I'm half way through "The Long Goodbye" right now. By the end, I'll probably have a number of California-centric questions only you're honest enough to answer. I reckon that segues nicely into another panhandlin' reminder.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @cthulhu, @Forbes

    The Long Goodbye is Chandler’s best book without a doubt.

  53. @Anon 2
    @Clyde

    I never ate at Olivia's but I walked by the place
    many times. I'm a big fan of The Doors as well,
    and finally got to see them a few years ago in their
    Doors of the 21st Century incarnation when Manzarek
    was still alive

    Replies: @Clyde

    I never ate at Olivia’s but I walked by the place many times.

    I am impressed in a six degrees of separation kind of way. If I had a time machine, one place I would go, still one place to go… would be to Olivia’s and to see JM scribbling away in his notebooks. I saw them twice around 1969. I know the dates.
    I liked the Oliver Stone Doors movie even though it came in for heavy criticism.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @Clyde

    I liked the Doors movie as well. Whatever its shortcomings,
    at least it takes you back to the days of wine and roses, at least
    for me it does. I know some people involved in the LA movie
    scene, and one of them is a woman who was connected to The
    Go-Go's (I can't say more). Anyway, she and Danny Sugerman,
    former Doors manager, and a number of other people lived together
    in a big house in Hollywood, so what I know about the Doors I
    know through her. Sugerman, by the way, married Fawn Hall,
    who was a secretary to Oliver North in the '80s. Remember her?
    Well, Sugerman, poor guy, died in 2005, drug addiction and a life
    of excess didn't help, while Fawn Hall, his widow, is still in Hollywood
    leading a very private life.

    Replies: @Clyde

  54. “…paintings of civil-rights icons like Cesar Chavez..”

    Completely dropped down the memory hole is that he was a strong immigration restrictionist and in favor of deporting illegals.

  55. @Frau Katze
    From the NYT article, blank slate nonsense.

    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said. “They have more of a vocabulary gap before they even get to school, and their home environments are not as literacy-rich. They need greater investments in order to achieve their full potential.”
     

    Replies: @guest, @Forbes, @Massimo Heitor

    What’s fascinating is that four decades of “more money” for schools has done essentially nothing to close The Gap. Yet, much like another tribune of leftwing thinking, communism/socialism, more money is gonna work any day now, just as soon as it’s properly implemented. The experience of failure is all that’s necessary to double down on the policy approach.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Forbes

    Is closing the gap really the goal? I suspect it's more that teachers and parents want nice campuses, nice amenities and happy kids. You know, the HGTV approach to education. That takes moolah, Mr. Forbes. My friend with her kids in the local public school would just go on and on about the new classrooms and the nice flooring and the lush lawns.

    Then there's the sports programs. Those are crucial. And the band, and the dances, and the social scene.

    Whether or not they learn anything or even get high scores on tests is way down the list.

  56. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Steve Sailer

    As fate would have it, I'm half way through "The Long Goodbye" right now. By the end, I'll probably have a number of California-centric questions only you're honest enough to answer. I reckon that segues nicely into another panhandlin' reminder.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @cthulhu, @Forbes

    Robert Altman’s screen adaptation (1973) contains Arnold Schwartzenegger’s first screen appearance (uncredited) as a muscle-bound (shirtless) thug-enforcer.

  57. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    One amenity of a beachfront community is the length of beachfront per resident. For Malibu, it is 21 miles of beachfront/13,000 residents * 5,280 feet/mile = 8.5 feet of beachfront per resident. It is left to the reader to calculate this metric for other beachfront communities along Long Island, the Riviera, etc.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Miami Beach.

    Also, there are virtually no hotels in Malibu.

  58. @Forbes
    @Frau Katze

    What's fascinating is that four decades of "more money" for schools has done essentially nothing to close The Gap. Yet, much like another tribune of leftwing thinking, communism/socialism, more money is gonna work any day now, just as soon as it's properly implemented. The experience of failure is all that's necessary to double down on the policy approach.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    Is closing the gap really the goal? I suspect it’s more that teachers and parents want nice campuses, nice amenities and happy kids. You know, the HGTV approach to education. That takes moolah, Mr. Forbes. My friend with her kids in the local public school would just go on and on about the new classrooms and the nice flooring and the lush lawns.

    Then there’s the sports programs. Those are crucial. And the band, and the dances, and the social scene.

    Whether or not they learn anything or even get high scores on tests is way down the list.

  59. @cthulhu
    @Jack Hanson

    Ellroy has plenty of characters who served in WW2 - e.g., LAPD lieutenant Mal Considine in The Big Nowhere, IMHO the best of the four books although it's the least known - but they are usually dirty in their own way. Considine is a war hero who married a woman he liberated, but there are deep secrets regarding how all that happened. Ellroy's LA is all about corruption.

    The same themes writ larger continue in his next three books, the Underworld USA Trilogy - American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand, and Blood's a Rover - which in some ways are better than the LA Quartet because they lack the mystery element which is always the weakest part of Ellroy's work. American Tabloid in particular is (again IMHO) his best fiction book by a large margin.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jack Hanson

    Mal and Exley, off the top of my head. Dudley as well, if you consider his OSS time.

    Ill need to give Underworld a shot. LA Confidential and The Big Nowhere were excellent books, Black Dahlia less so, and the stream of consciousness writing made White Jazz unreadable.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Jack Hanson

    I liked White Jazz okay, L.A. Confidential a lot better. Thought that The Black Dahlia was overheated. But it all came together with The Big Nowhere; the trio of Buzz Meeks, Mal Considine, and Danny Upshaw as the leads combined with a taut story to be truly outstanding.

    My nickel review of the "Underworld USA trilogy: American Tabloid is a knockout, Ellroy cocky as hell and, at the height of his powers, able to back it up; he carried the momentum from writing this one forward to his nonfiction memoir My Dark Places, which is another knockout. It's a small but noticeable decline from there: The Cold Six Thousand starts off slow and muddled and doesn't really get going until its gets to Vietnam, where it does pick up significantly. Its prose style is also the most mannered of the three, a jackhammer of clipped, ultra-terse sentences that works some of the time and just gets in the way some of the time. But it very much has its magic moments. Blood's a Rover is quite different but quickly hooks the reader, and eventually ties into the other books satisfyingly; its main problem is a long wall-of-text expository section toward the end that is one of Ellroy's worst habits (Neal Stephenson is another really good writer who gets trapped in this bad habit regularly). Overall, given the stuff of his that you liked, it's a good bet you'll like these three books.

    Takeaway line, from the foreword to American Tabloid: "Jack Kennedy was Bill Clinton minus some flab and with a world-class haircut. The real Trinity of Camelot was: Look Good, Kick Ass, Get Laid."

  60. @cthulhu
    @Jack Hanson

    Ellroy has plenty of characters who served in WW2 - e.g., LAPD lieutenant Mal Considine in The Big Nowhere, IMHO the best of the four books although it's the least known - but they are usually dirty in their own way. Considine is a war hero who married a woman he liberated, but there are deep secrets regarding how all that happened. Ellroy's LA is all about corruption.

    The same themes writ larger continue in his next three books, the Underworld USA Trilogy - American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand, and Blood's a Rover - which in some ways are better than the LA Quartet because they lack the mystery element which is always the weakest part of Ellroy's work. American Tabloid in particular is (again IMHO) his best fiction book by a large margin.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jack Hanson

    I was thinking of the scenes specifically where Exley mentions “Parker’s Reforms” after the Christmas Massacre, and that the LAPD wasn’t a bunch of thugs anymore.

  61. @Clyde
    @Anon 2


    I never ate at Olivia’s but I walked by the place many times.
     
    I am impressed in a six degrees of separation kind of way. If I had a time machine, one place I would go, still one place to go... would be to Olivia's and to see JM scribbling away in his notebooks. I saw them twice around 1969. I know the dates.
    I liked the Oliver Stone Doors movie even though it came in for heavy criticism.

    Replies: @Anon 2

    I liked the Doors movie as well. Whatever its shortcomings,
    at least it takes you back to the days of wine and roses, at least
    for me it does. I know some people involved in the LA movie
    scene, and one of them is a woman who was connected to The
    Go-Go’s (I can’t say more). Anyway, she and Danny Sugerman,
    former Doors manager, and a number of other people lived together
    in a big house in Hollywood, so what I know about the Doors I
    know through her. Sugerman, by the way, married Fawn Hall,
    who was a secretary to Oliver North in the ’80s. Remember her?
    Well, Sugerman, poor guy, died in 2005, drug addiction and a life
    of excess didn’t help, while Fawn Hall, his widow, is still in Hollywood
    leading a very private life.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Anon 2


    I liked the Doors movie as well. Whatever its shortcomings,
    at least it takes you back to the days of wine and roses, at least
    for me it does.
     
    America was at its superpower peak and could handle all that Doors and counter culture and hippie stuff without breaking a sweat. America was flooded with white youth due to the baby boom and this is why rock (music) is pretty much dead today. Not enough white youth and too many of them are into black music and rap or whatever it is called. Back when the Doors were around all our industrial activity with all the men working and slaving away is what made for a vibrant white cultural scene. Aside from industry there were millions more man-type jobs that paid well. Kept the men yang so that American women had to follow their lead.
  62. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @cthulhu
    @athEIst

    I had always heard that Jan and Dean's Surf City was Huntington Beach.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Dean Torrence was almost certainly involved in the planning of the Frank Sinatra Jr. kidnapping, although the decision was made not to prosecute him. He became a near-recluse after Jan’s car wreck and many have stated he was in constant fear of the Sinatra family after that.

    The Sinatras still have a mafioso streak. When the driver of the car that crashed into and killed Jilly Rizzo was up for parole, they went on a campaign to deny the guy parole after 20+ years. Yes, the guy was drunk and attempted to evade arrest, and he should have been put in prison, but he didn’t set out to kill the guy, and besides Jilly Rizzo was a known hood who almost certainly had participated in mob murders. Had Rizzo not been Frank’s pal, the driver would have done five years or so. He’s done over 20 and has been turned down for parole probably only because of the Sinatras.

  63. @Jack Hanson
    @cthulhu

    Mal and Exley, off the top of my head. Dudley as well, if you consider his OSS time.

    Ill need to give Underworld a shot. LA Confidential and The Big Nowhere were excellent books, Black Dahlia less so, and the stream of consciousness writing made White Jazz unreadable.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    I liked White Jazz okay, L.A. Confidential a lot better. Thought that The Black Dahlia was overheated. But it all came together with The Big Nowhere; the trio of Buzz Meeks, Mal Considine, and Danny Upshaw as the leads combined with a taut story to be truly outstanding.

    My nickel review of the “Underworld USA trilogy: American Tabloid is a knockout, Ellroy cocky as hell and, at the height of his powers, able to back it up; he carried the momentum from writing this one forward to his nonfiction memoir My Dark Places, which is another knockout. It’s a small but noticeable decline from there: The Cold Six Thousand starts off slow and muddled and doesn’t really get going until its gets to Vietnam, where it does pick up significantly. Its prose style is also the most mannered of the three, a jackhammer of clipped, ultra-terse sentences that works some of the time and just gets in the way some of the time. But it very much has its magic moments. Blood’s a Rover is quite different but quickly hooks the reader, and eventually ties into the other books satisfyingly; its main problem is a long wall-of-text expository section toward the end that is one of Ellroy’s worst habits (Neal Stephenson is another really good writer who gets trapped in this bad habit regularly). Overall, given the stuff of his that you liked, it’s a good bet you’ll like these three books.

    Takeaway line, from the foreword to American Tabloid: “Jack Kennedy was Bill Clinton minus some flab and with a world-class haircut. The real Trinity of Camelot was: Look Good, Kick Ass, Get Laid.”

  64. @Frau Katze
    From the NYT article, blank slate nonsense.

    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said. “They have more of a vocabulary gap before they even get to school, and their home environments are not as literacy-rich. They need greater investments in order to achieve their full potential.”
     

    Replies: @guest, @Forbes, @Massimo Heitor

    “Kids that come from needier backgrounds need more money,” she said.

    Tautology.

    Needier people have greater needs.

    Not really blank slate, just circular logic.

    A famous tautology from Dan Quayle, “If we don’t succeed, we run the risk of failure”

  65. It’s such comical hypocrisy that Malibu wants to dictate mass immigration and open borders to the nation, yet they so blatantly exclude people from their city by price and get resentful when standard left wing redistribution schemes want access to their PTA donation dollars.

    I never would have heard of this kind of story without Sailer’s blog. This isn’t covered in any of the other news outlets that I read.

  66. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @5371

    No, he really has. Unfortunately, and I think this is your point, his regime gobbles up $1B/yr in aid and the underlying human capital is still awful. It's a Potemkin village.

    His son went to West Point, so Kagame probably intends to make the presidency a family business. But putting all your eggs in the basket of a single nuclear family historically doesn't pan out well.

    Replies: @Vendetta

    In a better world, there’d have been no UN intervention to force him out of the eastern Congo. Rwanda could have gotten the perpetually untapped mining sites working and had its own independent source of income to wean itself off the aid machine.

  67. @El Dato
    @Marie

    I still don't know whether the Tutsis took out the Hutu trash after their sudden and utterly nasty "population fix" attempt.

    Still, you owe me a new keyboard.

    Replies: @Vendetta

    UN interrupted them in a “frontlash” operation on the assumption they would, when in fact they actually didn’t. Put boots on the ground between the RPF and the retreating Hutu forces to let them get away into Congo to maintain a perpetual cross-border insurgency, leading to the Congo Wars when the Rwandans started going into the Congo themselves to destroy these groups.

    Hutus are too overwhelming a majority of the population for Kagame to have gone and wiped them out even if he wanted to – much the same as the situation with Assad and the Sunnis in Syria.

  68. It’s such comical hypocrisy that Malibu wants to dictate mass immigration and open borders to the nation, yet they so blatantly exclude people from their city by price and get resentful when standard left wing redistribution schemes want access to their PTA donation dollars.

    That’s pretty hypocritical.

  69. @Anon 2
    I remember back in the '60s when Santa Monica,
    though already affluent, was a sleepy little village. RAND
    near the beach, however, part of SoCal's vast defense
    industry, was already there. The Beach Boys were from
    Hawthorne, i.e., the sticks, and so they looked with envy
    toward Santa Monica. The Doors were just getting started,
    and actually lived in the Ocean Park section of SM, a couple
    of blocks from the beach, but it was cooler to say they
    were from Venice Beach so that's how they advertised themselves
    on Sunset Strip. Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek would
    catch a bus to UCLA on Main Street (near the Ocean Park
    library that still exists). Right on the corner near the bus
    stop was a well-known eatery that became immortalized as
    the Soul Kitchen.

    Today People's Republic of Santa Monica (and why not?
    It has its own foreign policy) is hopelessly overbuilt.
    A one-bedroom apartment south of Wilshire will run you
    $2200/month. North of Wilshire? Forget it. You can tell
    it's still very liberal. In a city that's perhaps 90% white(read:
    heavily Jewish), almost all employees at Von's markets are
    proudly black. Not that they can afford to live in Santa Monica,
    of course.

    Santa Monica nowadays is also a retirement community so
    it's full of hospitals and nursing homes. Who works in the
    nursing homes? Mostly Filipinos and young African women,
    very few whites

    Replies: @Clyde, @guest, @Old Palo Altan

    My memories of Santa Monica “North of Montana”, as it is now called, goes back to the Fifties and Sixties as well. It was both beautiful and quiet – and still is. Houses like my grandparents’, which sold for $100,000 in the mid-Sixties, now go for 8-10 million and more. Strongly built, and beautifully crafted, those houses from the 1910s and ’20s are well worth every penny.
    Venice was a tiny place and we sometimes rented a house there, right on the beach. One stepped out the front door, walked through the well-kept garden, and passed straight across the road onto the endless, burning sand before one arrived, finally (to my five year old sensibilities it seemed like crossing the Sahara), at the miraculous Pacific and its long, long and gentle, waves. Nobody much about – just us and our neighbours.
    It is a thousand times nicer than Malibu, which even then we considered a place for either the Hollywood crowd (the rougher sort) or the surfer types who, as someone here has pointed out, came from the badlands of the interior. On the other hand there was a splendid fish restaurant somewhere along that stretch: I still remember the superb swordfish steaks which I never failed to order.
    There was indeed Rand, and we knew some of its leading lights, in particular James Schlesinger, a truly outstanding man.
    But before Rand there was Douglas, which is what really brought a new kind of prosperity and significance to Santa Monica.
    In sum: it is a real place, which Malibu isn’t and can never be. There’s no “there” there, as Gertrude Stein so tellingly said of Oakland.

    • Agree: Anon 2
  70. @Marie
    OT: this is an actual headline at the Times of Israel:

    "Rwanda hopes high-tech can replace genocide as its defining feature"

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/rwanda-hopes-high-tech-can-replace-genocide-as-its-defining-feature/

    Replies: @Johan Schmidt, @Jonathan Silber, @Alfa158, @anonimouse, @El Dato, @Chris Mallory, @Olorin

    Pulsed energy weapons instead of sharpened strips of metal roofing nailed to handles?

    Yeah, I guess that would redirect attention.

  71. DWB says: • Website
    @guest
    By the way, Steve, have you checked out the recent HBO miniseries Big Little Lies? It takes place in Monterey, probably based on a novel. All about a ridiculously posh public school and its rich "helicopter parents." Not very SJW-y, though there is an evil, spouse-abusing blond, Nordic alpha male, and it is by the awful David E. Kelley.

    I don't remember seeing a single brown maid or groundskeeper, though they were probably around.

    Replies: @DWB

    The richie riches in Monterey actually live a bit further south on the peninsula (think: Carmel, Pebble Beach, etc.) Monterey High is decidedly not “WASPy”. The school is 44% Latino, 32% white.

    Many of those who live within the gated confines of 17-Mile-Drive (note: NOT in Monterey) send their kids to private schools.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @DWB

    As a former denizen of the 17 Mile Drive I am happy to confirm your observations. Monterey is the least desirable place on the Peninsula, and seemingly gets worse with each passing year. Seaside, of course, does not even count.
    One of the best private schools, Robert Louis Stevenson, is actually within the gates itself. Others are not far outside: my niece was sent to the York School; small and competitive, a friend told me that it is known as the "genius school" to outsiders. There is Santa Catalina too for girls only. Others go to Cate or even Thacher, both down South.
    But Carmel High was good enough for many within the Forest back in the '70s - perhaps it still is?

  72. @DWB
    @guest

    The richie riches in Monterey actually live a bit further south on the peninsula (think: Carmel, Pebble Beach, etc.) Monterey High is decidedly not "WASPy". The school is 44% Latino, 32% white.

    Many of those who live within the gated confines of 17-Mile-Drive (note: NOT in Monterey) send their kids to private schools.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    As a former denizen of the 17 Mile Drive I am happy to confirm your observations. Monterey is the least desirable place on the Peninsula, and seemingly gets worse with each passing year. Seaside, of course, does not even count.
    One of the best private schools, Robert Louis Stevenson, is actually within the gates itself. Others are not far outside: my niece was sent to the York School; small and competitive, a friend told me that it is known as the “genius school” to outsiders. There is Santa Catalina too for girls only. Others go to Cate or even Thacher, both down South.
    But Carmel High was good enough for many within the Forest back in the ’70s – perhaps it still is?

  73. @Anon 2
    @Clyde

    I liked the Doors movie as well. Whatever its shortcomings,
    at least it takes you back to the days of wine and roses, at least
    for me it does. I know some people involved in the LA movie
    scene, and one of them is a woman who was connected to The
    Go-Go's (I can't say more). Anyway, she and Danny Sugerman,
    former Doors manager, and a number of other people lived together
    in a big house in Hollywood, so what I know about the Doors I
    know through her. Sugerman, by the way, married Fawn Hall,
    who was a secretary to Oliver North in the '80s. Remember her?
    Well, Sugerman, poor guy, died in 2005, drug addiction and a life
    of excess didn't help, while Fawn Hall, his widow, is still in Hollywood
    leading a very private life.

    Replies: @Clyde

    I liked the Doors movie as well. Whatever its shortcomings,
    at least it takes you back to the days of wine and roses, at least
    for me it does.

    America was at its superpower peak and could handle all that Doors and counter culture and hippie stuff without breaking a sweat. America was flooded with white youth due to the baby boom and this is why rock (music) is pretty much dead today. Not enough white youth and too many of them are into black music and rap or whatever it is called. Back when the Doors were around all our industrial activity with all the men working and slaving away is what made for a vibrant white cultural scene. Aside from industry there were millions more man-type jobs that paid well. Kept the men yang so that American women had to follow their lead.

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