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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

What If I’m Right?
Steve Sailer

June 02, 2021

Since the previous century I’ve been articulating in the public arena an array of interconnecting ideas about how the world works. For example, I tend to suspect that racial differences in achievement in 2021 have more to do with nature and nurture, with culture and human biodiversity, than with unspecifiable malevolence on the part of white men as dictated by the theory of systemic racism.

(Note that I don’t put very much effort into telling you how I think the world should work, just how it does work. At least, the latter’s testable.) …

What if I’m right?

What if my way of thinking is, in general, more realistic, insightful, and reasonable than the conventional wisdom?

I dislike thinking of my concepts as an ideology. I don’t propound “Sailerism.” I lack the ambition and the ego. I am by nature a staff guy rather than a line boss. I like to think of my approach to understanding human society as one that will eventually seem obvious to everybody, so I shouldn’t claim credit now for what is simply solid empirical thinking applied to the more contentious subjects.

Instead, I like to tell myself, I should just keep coming up with more ideas that are (in declining order of importance to me) true, interesting, new, and funny. Eventually, people will notice how much better my approach to reality has been than that of the famous folks winning MacArthur genius grants and try to figure out for themselves how I do it so that everybody can do it too.

Or at least that’s what I hope.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. In your heart you know he’s right.

  2. Charon says:

    Biden today

    Silence? Did anyone hear the deafening silence? And don’t you dare call it a riot. Riots are what white people do. Also massacres of course.

    Also Biden today

    Does he get to drop $100 Billion wherever he wants?
    Who does he think he is, Bill DeBlasio?

    And does this count as reparations?

    None of the other hundreds of billions ever did.

    Also Biden today

    In my faith we call it harassing little girls.

  3. (a) I like to argue, and (b) I don’t like to lose.

    Ain’t that the truth, and the best way of getting at it.

  4. Achilleus says:

    Being right is not what matters any more; being “good” or “right-thinking” is.

    As smart and as right as you are, Steve, about so many things, your methods and standards are old-fashioned. You don’t start from facts, data, and evidence and come to conclusions; you start from unquestionable moral truths and exclude anything and everything that contradicts them.

    They’re just going to ignore, marginalize, and demonize you, and just wait you out. In the next generation and the one after, there won’t be any smart guys presenting inconvenient facts, because they will be educated, intimidated, and socialized out of the ability to do so.

  5. Polistra says:

    What if you’re right? It won’t matter. Just as history is being rewritten every day now, so scientifically provable facts can be swept under the rug. If they’re inconvenient to approved narratives, they won’t even be called facts any more.

    And the people here can enjoy their little alternet, but if it attracts too much attention it’ll be shut down without a trace. Even the Internet Archive is being edited. Meanwhile the NSA has every IP address for every post.

  6. genocide is the only rational alternative

    Indeed this is exactly what most liberals think and it’s always amused me. For such enlightened and scientific thinking people, they are utterly incapable of true objectivity or thinking beyond their own pathetically short lifespans.

    The only arbiter of “superiority” is time. I should not need to give examples of this. We can all advocate for our own (as well we damn should), but at the end of the day, we’ve been dead for centuries and perhaps even forgotten entirely (deliberately?).

    Nature gives zero fucks for our values if they do not induce our continuation.

    Liberal/leftism is simply a genetic mutation/disorder whereby the sufferer is unable to identify/belong to his own tribe and acts as a human pathogen to destroy that from which he is forever excluded.

  7. wren says:

    Steve Sailer: It’s okay to notice.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
  8. @AnotherDad

    “In your heart you know he’s right.”

    That comment deserves a Goldwater Box.

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
  9. El Dato says:

    Confirmed: The medical profession does not only have ethical problems with money-grubbing and overprescribing (if they are not removing boobs and doing similar Mengele stuff) but also racist. Or maybe just with BIPOCs wanting to press to the fore.

    Editor of leading medical journal to step down after failing to survive backlash over tweet daring to question racism narrative

    As an example, some random guy called Warren Desmond M.A. (Job description: Desmond Warren, M.A.🧠 Incoming Clinical Neuropsychology PhD Student @GeorgiaStateU Neuroimaging, Cognitive Interventions Social Justice #BLM) is apparently offended at the suggestion of a lack of racism.

    Do people really want to get a “cognitive intervention” by BLM hothead.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Thanks: Dissident
  10. black sea says:

    The thing that you have going for you is that, as the decades roll by, it becomes harder and harder to argue persuasively that only racism and the legacy of Jim Crow prevent Blacks from “catching up” in terms of education, career, law-abidingness, etc. Already, lots of liberals foresee a more or less endless stream of benefits and get-out-of-jail cards being distributed to Blacks in order to help them cope with their burdens, their burdens being largely their own way of life.

    The thing that you have going against you is the demographic tide of 21st century America, and of the world. The US is predicted to become non-White majority at mid-century, but well before then, the energy and “cultural tone” of the country will have become non-White. There are all sorts of notions of representative governance and individual rights which White middle-class Americans take largely for granted. This is probably naive in certain ways, but without most of them buying into the system to some degree, the system must become increasingly repressive to sustain itself. So it may be that you’ll be right, but being right will no longer matter.

  11. @Achilleus

    Achilleus wrote:

    In the next generation and the one after, there won’t be any smart guys presenting inconvenient facts, because they will be educated, intimidated, and socialized out of the ability to do so.

    One of the basic facts about human society is that old people die. And the next generation will have their own ideas.

    I am old enough to remember when Skinnerian behaviorism was all the rage.

    Now, Skinner is dead.

    I remember when, as physics students, we were not supposed to mention that there is something wrong with quantum mechanics.

    Now pretty much everyone knows there is something wrong with quantum mechanics (including, I am pleased to say, my old teacher, the Nobel laureate Steve Weinberg, who changed his mind without dying!).

    No, opinions change, and they often change far faster than anyone would expect.

    The current insanity will not last.

  12. El Dato says:

    On the other hand, the one thing that really scares me is that progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative. This malevolent insanity on the part of orthodox liberal thinkers terrifies me.

    Or rather, they assume that if the truth of relevant genetic differences comes out (because let’s face it, they damn well know the truth, that’s why they behave like rats about to drown), then Whites Will Rise Again and start to reap BIPOC bodies left and right.

    Therefore, the White Populace must release their grip on organizational power and slink away into sunset before the catastrophe happens. Apparently it’s also desirable to “inject new DNA” into white populations because they are apparently lacking that. Same as Vitamin D.

    The possibility that the jackboot could be on the other foot, or the casual machete in the other hand soon-ish (which actually is already the case) is not considered. Psychological blindness is wonderful.

    Genocide is certainly not a “rational alternative” but at some point something has to give, the World’s Most Important Graph is clear about that. Natural dieback and possibly violent replacement (in either order) will not be avoided. Humans are not going to take over Mars with Musk rockets to allocate more room.

  13. El Dato says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Now pretty much everyone knows there is something wrong with quantum mechanics

    I am sorry to disappoint, but I would say it is mostly thought that everything is exactly RIGHT with quantum mechanics – to the point where it is about to be harnessed for computation. People are just looking at the right perspective for its apparent “extravagance” (infinite-dimensional absolutely precise complex-valued probability density functions do not sound appealing; there is sure to be discreteness in there somewhere)

    The current insanity will not last.

    Insanity can last longer than civilizational viability.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    , @res
  14. Sailer has always been right because he reflects on outputs received. The problem is that we need hi-IQ people on inputs too. Once the type and range of inputs are known (to enable the desired outputs), then I assume policies and regulations can be put into place to ensure quality and reliability etc. One proposal is to have Time and Language as functional inputs to achieve safety and Production as functional outputs resulting in policies regulating limitations of language (pidgin) and safety (crime).

    It looks fairly straighforward of course, but it is mainly hi-IQ people that can do functional thinking.

    But the above is human centric, while things get a lot more complicated when one considers organization centric developments. For example, the world’s largest organizations are not-for-profit meaning income based – NOT profit based (tax eaters). This is a change from the Industrial age when the largest organizations were focussed on profits. Now add to the current tax-eating malaise the overwhelming Industry bodies and the overbearing “charity” drivers and the immense “Master” power excuded by the total, then one understand how human sciences are undermined in favor of machine sciences.

    We can’t even put people to work anymore, which is an inditement of our collective stupidity and it also explains why Sailer can’t seem to get through to the “right” people. Return to the beginning.

    • Replies: @PetrOldSack
  15. Achilleus says:
    @PhysicistDave

    The current insanity will not last.

    Agreed; there will just be a new insanity, and since Steve is far from insane, he will not be renovated.

    Old Soldiers never die; they just fade away.

    We are being set up for genocide; being clever or subtle in our vocabulary and syntax will not stop it, the fact that we must be subtle means that we no longer hold the whip.

    • Agree: AndrewR, Ragno
  16. Three simple truths that we are not supposed to utter:

    A) Lots of people really do not like to work at jobs that produce goods or services for which others will voluntarily shell out their own money (as the saying goes, “that’s why they call it ‘work’”).

    B) Governments exist to take wealth from the productive members of society and hand it over to those who are less productive.

    C) People who are living off the political gravy train will fight like hell, and even grovel and humiliate themselves, to stay on that gravy train and enable their kids to get on the gravy train.

    Why is the parasitic verbalist overclass pushing the critical race theory nonsense? Divide et impera. If the peasants ever unite, the nobles end up swinging from lampposts.

    Why all the nonsense about transgenderism? Simply a diversion from the fundamental class struggle between producers and parasites. And it gives the parasites a chance to prove their loyalty to the frat by their willingness to utter obvious lies.

    Keep your eyes on the money, folks. Behind all the verbiage and ideology, in the end, it is all about how the ruling elite rips off the rest of us.

    • Agree: Sean, Mark G., Harry Baldwin
    • Troll: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Dissident
    , @Alden
  17. Instead of noting that the hundreds of black inner-city riots last year have helped drive this year’s housing boom in suburbs and small towns…

    Buy when there’s blood in the streets– but buy in the “courts” and the “terraces” and the “circles”.

    That African-Americans seem to have a particular tendency toward criminal violence suggests that they need more, not less, law and order than do even the rest of us.

    Get a load of this white snowflake’s hissy fit:

    Visuals sealed Adrian Peterson’s fate

    What’s with white folks today? My mother didn’t believe in spanking– not when she had two good fists. But Peterson himself went all snowflake the next year:

    Adrian Peterson: ‘I won’t ever use a switch again’

    You mention Pat Moynihan. He beat James Buckley (who’s still with us at 98) who himself beat Charles Goodell, Roger’s father. That’s four degrees of separation.

    Speaking of silly suburban street names, near the Vikings’ old HQ in Eden Prairie is an Anagram Drive. It’s named for a balloon maker there. But do they realize the danger inherent in the name– literally?

    Anagram Drive = Danger via ram. Dear Mr Vagina. A raving dream. In grave drama. Ram vagina red.

    This street needs canceling.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
  18. The worst part of the “Hitler was right” mentality amongst progressive intellectuals is Hitler was sane enough to genocide minorities in his own country, not the majority.

  19. @PhysicistDave

    One of the basic facts about human society is that old people die. And the next generation will have their own ideas.

    Do you have evidence that younger people are ready to turn things around? Do show the court!

    When the Plutonnials– that generation born between 1930 and 2006— die off, will reason make a return?

    I am old enough to remember when Skinnerian behaviorism was all the rage.

    Now, Skinner is dead.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  20. LondonBob says:

    Had a chance to read Richard Hanania’s piece?

    Steve I think you are being optimistic, more likely things will go the way of South Africa, the brief Brexit and Trump counter revolutions have been completely quashed and rendered null, indeed they have just empowered the crazies. There will be an economic calamity, and sooner than you think, maybe that will wake things up but I am not optimistic.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
    • Thanks: Desiderius
  21. I shouldn’t claim credit now for what is simply solid empirical thinking applied to the more contentious subjects

    Humble. The ancient folks in Rome etc. knew what such a state of mind is good for: It helps you to connect with those who might be willing to hear what you have to say – or might even be even willing to look closely into what you dug up / found/ explained.
    They did even have a term for it: Captatio benevolentiae.
    You need a civilized public sphere to have sound public reasoning. – And that’s what you want, isn’t it? – If I could add something to what you wrote in your Taki’s Mag article, it would be the fact, that – maybe we all – should try harder to achieve this goal.

    (Jürgen Habermas has worked his way into the big mountain range of sociological and philosophical distinctions which allow (may I say: Some of us contemporaries)  to point out that public reasoning is what keeps modern societies on the right (the enlightened) track. Complex modern societies can’t (and shouldn’t – that’s China’s problem) ignore this insight. Donald Trump spoke out publicly for free speech. Joe Biden didn’t. – Advantage Trump with regard to  Jürgen Habermas’ Theory of Communicative Action! – Who would have guessed!?…)

    –  – My remarks in brackets are just another way to pin down what you have said in the last lines of your article: 

    My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    • Agree: vhrm
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Authenticjazzman
  22. My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    Maybe Steve’s column was prompted by reading this in ACX, or maybe it’s coincidence. Either way, this is an interesting read in light of Steve’s conclusion….

    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/your-book-review-humankind

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  23. This malevolent insanity on the part of orthodox liberal thinkers terrifies me.

    What terrifies me is the naivety of MidWestern types who didn’t see this 50 years ago.

    My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    Never going to happen. Fellas like Charles Murray always look out at the world with trusting blue eyes, trying to radiate their goodwill, as if it’s some kind of super power.

    Look, everyone knew about racial differences centuries ago. What’s really happened is that too many guys tried to “win over” liberals while basically throwing their White kin under the bus. Disaster ensued. No surprises here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  24. Equal rule of law is all we need. For centuries countries have had a penal code which doesn’t distinguish between men and women e.g. when it comes to homicide – even though everybody knows that the vast majority of homicides are committed by men. Some cultures have had other rules, but equal rules work and they are fair. All we need to do is to accept that people of some races are on average more successful on the partner market, others in academia, others tend to be more violent, others on average better in sports. Accept it and live with it. The next Einstein could be an Australian Aborigine and the next Mike Tyson a South Indian. Not likely, but possible.

    • Agree: vhrm
  25. AndrewR says:
    @black sea

    Dude it’s not mestizos and Koreans funding, promoting and enabling BLM. I’m no fan of open borders but the main cultural rift is the same one it was 60 years ago: white shitlibs + Jews + blacks vs “deplorables”

  26. @El Dato

    El Dato wrote to me:

    People are just looking at the right perspective for its apparent “extravagance” (infinite-dimensional absolutely precise complex-valued probability density functions do not sound appealing; there is sure to be discreteness in there somewhere)

    You really do not know what you are talking about: the words and phrases you use are not the problem at all.

    I’m an expert on this: I actually do have a PhD in physics and I actually have done research on the foundations of quantum mechanics.

    If anyone (not you, I assume!) wants to actually learn about this, I recommend John Bell’s still-classic Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics: Collected Papers on Quantum Philosophy 2nd Edition. Most of the book is readable by non-physicists. Bell is the giant in the field since 1950, discoverer of course of the eponymous Bell’s theorem.

    Also worth reading is the sections on foundations in the second edition of Lectures on Quantum Mechanics by my former teacher (and Nobel laureate) Steve Weinberg.

    But, El Dato, don’t bother: correcting your ignorance would only upset you.

  27. My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    My suggestion: Americans should never elevate the ideas of dominant intellectuals over their own good sense and instincts. They should think back on when we had a country in which the dominant intellectuals could only do limited damage, no matter how stupid they were.

    On Social “Science”, it’s been a farce since the existence of that term. It’s just been the one of the easiest areas of academics for the ctrl-left to infiltrate, so they took it first. You don’t need to be smart to be in it, which made it much easier for them.

    Granted, I have the usual human reluctance to admit I was wrong.

    Really?? I’d never have noticed! Perhaps too much faith in non-social scientists and officials having Americans’ interests in mind explains why you fell for the huge Kung Flu PanicFest last Spring. (I give you lots of credit for being analytical while you were at it, though.)

    That was critical to some degree, but I really do like your writing and ideas as near tops on the whole internet and am glad you are here.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Bert
    , @Prester John
  28. Does anyone believe liberals are fretting about the facts not supporting them? Seriously? I don’t think they care.

    It’s just the desire to have power and to work out their grudges. They probably frame it as “social justice” to themselves.

    Does anyone notice how liberals are assumed to be good hearted by HBD’ers?

  29. Being right won’t keep you out of the gulag.

  30. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg Cæsar asked me:

    Do you have evidence that younger people are ready to turn things around? Do show the court!

    In the next year, no.

    In the next couple decades? Don’t you think there are gonna be quite a few young pranksters twenty years from now who just love upsetting their humorless, woker-than-thou middle-aged elders?

    • Disagree: Polistra
    • Troll: JohnPlywood
  31. @PhysicistDave

    Don’t you think there are gonna be quite a few young pranksters twenty years from now who just love upsetting their humorless, woker-than-thou middle-aged elders?

    Not the Asian, Brown or Black young people.

    See all of human history for evidence.

  32. @PhysicistDave

    Don’t you think there are gonna be quite a few young pranksters twenty years from now who just love upsetting their humorless, woker-than-thou middle-aged elders?

    Yeah, that could be fun!

    • Replies: @Polistra
  33. G. Poulin says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Another masterpiece from the Reg. Hail Caesar !

  34. Anonymous[474] • Disclaimer says:

    All I can say is this:

    “Ken Beefman’s Universal Iron-Clad Gold-Plated 21st Century Western Political Prognosticator, (Infallible)”.

    Which is due to veteran iSteve commenter – and pest – “Ken Beefman’, (Anonymous), who has been variously posting, banned and electronically delayed here for years.

    1/. Basically, the power people can be gauged through the Economist Editorial Board.
    2/. The Economist Editorial Board are unbelievable, ineffably stupid, ignorant and just plain wrong about *everything* as well as being evil. The wise man should always take the opposing view as the default condition.
    3/. The Economist Editorial Board always get their way.

  35. Anonymous[115] • Disclaimer says:

    Replace ‘Matt Damon’ with ‘Tom Stoppard’.

  36. Anonymous[474] • Disclaimer says:

    Also, basically, the raison d’etre of the American Democrat Party has evolved to the point that it has become the ‘Black Representation Front’ – everything else has degenerated into becoming an also-ran. Thus, in the two party duopoly of American politics, one half has been solidly bought by the people Steve detests – by that I mean the race hustlers and wokeists.

    The other cheek to the ass of American politics, the Republicans, *always* prove to be abject cowards regarding Democrat Party race hustling. Hence, the most extreme element of Democrat wokery and hustling basically sets the pace. Not a case of the slowest boat in the convoy, but the fastest, so to speak.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Reg Cæsar
  37. Bert says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I agree with your faith that simple observations of non-White behavior will eventually carry the White population to effective action, and that Steve Sailer’s spotlight facilitates that eventuality.

    However, regarding the SARS-2 epidemic you are off track, and it doesn’t help any point you intend to make to refer to it dismissively. This was a real public health emergency. For those wishing to defend Western Civilization and the gene pool which created it, the reaction of the authorities to the epidemic is an enormous stick with which to beat them. The authorities used the already corrupt medical establishment to deny the evidence in favor of effective early treatment via a substantial set of existing drugs and supplements, and to block such treatment when offered by a few dozen courageous independent-minded physicians. No more effective argument to the White population in the U.S. exists than that the authorities, all Woke as hell, are willing to let your elderly or sick relatives die in service of Big Pharma’s profits, so aren’t they also willing to let the Civilization upon which your grandchildren will depend also die if they can enrich themselves thereby as servants of the billionaires.

    • Replies: @Redmen
  38. anonymous[358] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been checking your blog every day for the last 15 years. I think you are motivated by a grudge against blacks more than finding what’s “true, interesting, new, and funny”.

  39. @wren

    Do you think he should notice that the very people he puts on a pedestal are the ones who destroyed the country? And do you think he should notice that White societies and polities have a quality that sums up to more than IQ scores?

    Here is Walter Mondale, the kind of goober Steve no doubt really admires. At this clip starting at 11.30, he talks about how horrible it is for non-Whites in this country and how evil it was White men had it good. Steve’s been talking to guys like that over his racial kin.

  40. Altai says:

    Instead, I like to tell myself, I should just keep coming up with more ideas that are (in declining order of importance to me) true, interesting, new, and funny. Eventually, people will notice how much better my approach to reality has been than that of the famous folks winning MacArthur genius grants and try to figure out for themselves how I do it so that everybody can do it too.

    Or at least that’s what I hope.

    I think the term Steve is looking is ‘appalling vista’. Since I know he likes the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. To accept many of these things comes with very serious implications.

    https://www.mactheknife.org/Quotations/Appalling_Vista.html

    In fact Ta-Nehisi Coates articulated this very point in why he rejects the notion that blacks might be less intelligent on average than others.

    Steve thinks that if we accept this, it will just mean that now we’ll focus on improving everyone’s education and chances. I’m not so sure about that. A very important element of education is it’s role in populating the elites, in a very very real sense, affirmative action isn’t so much about helping blacks but about ethnic power sharing. It is to ensure there are more blacks in the higher socioeconomic strata to potentially offset decisions being made without input from or sympathy for blacks.

    Does it look like Bantu peoples are on average less intelligent or at least more impulsive than others? Yes. Would formalising that reality make the lives of blacks better? I’m not so sure you can say this isn’t an existential issue for blacks.

    • Disagree: Spud Boy
  41. JackOH says:

    Steve, I think your penultimate paragraph in your Taki’s essay hints at the elephant in the room:

    On the other hand, the one thing that really scares me is that progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative. This malevolent insanity on the part of orthodox liberal thinkers terrifies me.

    Black Supremacism, added to which the White provocateurs and hangers-on, including major corporations for their own unspoken reasons, is the elephant in the room I’m thinking of.

    When I had a bit more commenting energy, I tried alerting readers to this very dangerous folk philosophy. Also, there’s an Unz writer (Nicholas (?) something-or-other, possibly based in NYC) who did a pretty good “intro to” on the subject a few years back.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  42. gent says:
    @Polistra

    Just as history is being rewritten every day now, so scientifically provable facts can be swept under the rug.

    The consequences of those facts can not be hidden. Every additional lie that is heaped on, the structure becomes more and more unstable.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  43. Polistra says:
    @Dieter Kief

    The ones in a couple of decades will be unrecognizable and, with few exceptions, wypipos will be they slaves.

    The Flight From White is a real thing, with good reasons behind it.

    Superannuated blowhards with brown kids needn’t worry.

  44. Thoughts says:

    Oh come on Steve. This has to do with the simple fact that a certain group of people want to ((Expand))…and they don’t want to have borders…because they will control everything

    This is just a simple world domination play. All of the irrationality is totally rational when looking at the end game.

    And as far as the average twitter people who splutter and get angry when hearing the truth…Do those people matter? They are just human flotsum placed in front of you to slow you down.

  45. OT but of interest, something I found on a quiescent UK blog from 2015.

    https://fountain.blogspot.com/2015/02/culture-clashes-encourage-immigration.html

    It is good to learn something new and unexpected about a subject which you believed you had thought about it some depth. The economist Paul Collier’s book about immigration, Exodus, revealed something counter intuitive but actually very logical about how immigration works:

    All things being equal, more immigrants will come from cultures that integrate poorly into the host society than from those that integrate well.

    This is surprising but makes sense when considering it from the point of the migrant. It is known that the presence of a diaspora facilitates the ease with which people can settle in a country, so if a community integrates quickly into society there will be little or no diaspora with extremely close ties to the country of origin, which will slow down migration. This makes sense, there is no functioning Australian diaspora in the UK beyond first generation short term migrants because our cultures are so close that integration is nearly inevitable, on the other hand there is a distinct Bengali diaspora that acts as a magnet for further Bengali immigration.

    The implications for immigration policy are profound, without either restrictions on immigration or some method of hastening integration, migrants will, over time, come from cultures that are hardest to integrate into society.

  46. @PhysicistDave

    I feel there is something about the word “quantum” that causes people to pretend understanding to themselves, so as to prove their intellectualism.

    It is like particles of light, hit the waves of matter, that the word is printed on, and bounce back, to stimulate their brain, at staccato speeds, set like clicks on a dial, making them regurgitate misunderstood buzzwords, as elaborate nonsense.

    Lol

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  47. Polistra says:
    @El Dato

    The Desmond Warrens are on the ascendant, and they know it. Your very breathing is an offense, which will not go unremarked–or unpunished.

    The way was paved for these people by the One Tribe, most of whose members still think they can control their golems. We’ll see.

  48. Polistra says:
    @Altai

    ideas that are (in declining order of importance to me) true, interesting, new, and funny.

    Now that’s an amusing game. I’d have: funny, true, interesting, and new.

  49. Spud Boy says:
    @LondonBob

    “Had a chance to read Richard Hanania’s piece?”

    Thanks for the tip. It’s a fine piece that supports a theory I’ve held for a long time: Our current problems can be traced back to Affirmative Action and the application of the concept of “disparate impact.”

    What can conservatives do from a policy perspective? How about a constitutional amendment prohibiting race/sex discrimination FOR or AGAINST any individual in any public or private institution? This would imply no more check boxes for race/sex on any form, for any reason.

    I’d like to see the Left try to argue against a broad-based anti-discrimination amendment.

    If we don’t do something bold like this now, the country is toast.

  50. I first found out about Sailer from his “Is Love Colorblind?” article, which I’m guessing may have been his single most read article up to that point. Being half-Asian myself, I had a particular interest in that subject, and even though I found that article profoundly disturbing on many levels, in my heart I knew he was right. So rather than obsess about group differences and how they might apply to me, I just decided to move on with my life and do the best I can. And in the meantime check out more of that Sailer fellow’s articles, since he seemed to be way more observant than most other pundits and bloggers.

  51. gent says:
    @Altai

    Would formalising that reality make the lives of blacks better? I’m not so sure you can say this isn’t an existential issue for blacks.

    That’s not our fucking problem.

  52. Ganderson says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg- help is available, but you have to want it! 😀

    In Newburyport, MA there’s the corner of Christopher and Plummer streets. As one might imagine, the vibrancy quotient in that neighborhood is quite low.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  53. @El Dato

    Howard screwed up. You should never apologize to these people.

    • Replies: @Russ
  54. Pericles says:

    You could be wrong … you could be right.

  55. Rob McX says:
    @PhysicistDave

    The current insanity will not last.

    People from every race that vanished from the earth probably comforted themselves with these words.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  56. Rob McX says:
    @Redneck farmer

    It takes more patience to liquidate the majority, but it can be done.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @Anon
  57. Gamecock says:

    From my new column in Taki’s Magazine

    After Taki’s and Cole’s latest posts, may I suggest you start looking for a different place to post?

    • Replies: @Redmen
  58. Dan Smith says:

    Of course you’re right. Systemic racism theory ought to be a nothingburger, but it isn’t because of the intellectual laziness of the 21sr century. Spend a few minutes on Twitter to establish that fact.

  59. Of course you are right; the liberal elite class has known for a long time. That is why we have welfare, because they know there is no charter school that can cure the backside of the Bell curve. Welfare was holding back the tide for a little while. Why libertarian/ civnats think we can bark about this sad fact all over the internet without consequences beats me. Now there’s nothing to be done for it, and it isn’t going to well.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  60. Polistra says:

    Trouble in Paradise

  61. Anon[191] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I believe you, Dave.

    But … It does seem that quantum computers are “just around the corner.” The NSA seems worried. Can you explain that?

    I just want to make sure this isn’t like the woke genetics guys who assure us that clustering and STRUCTURE don’t do what we think they’re doing, nothing to see here, yet 23 and Me can accurately cluster your spit and know your race.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  62. dearieme says:
    @AnotherDad

    In your heart you know he’s right.

    And in your bowels you know they’re shite.

  63. @Altai

    You can have HBD and Ethnic Balance at the same time. I agree that you can’t totally put the screws to black representation, but shouldn’t we at least try to make their elites sympathetic to reality?

    Steve has even gone on the record proposing permanent concessions for slave descendants.

  64. Hibernian says:
    @Rob McX

    Certainly the Stalinists were good at enslaving the majority.

  65. Altai says:
    @LondonBob

    How do you wake up from a terrible marriage you can’t escape?

  66. countenance says: • Website

    He’s 14 years old and using the word “egalitarian” in a letter to the editor of a politically conservative magazine. Predict his life and career track.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  67. JMcG says:

    OT -Steve, are you getting PayPal contributions? There’s usually an acknowledgment, but I didn’t get one this time. Just want to make sure it’s getting through. And Thank You.

  68. Art Deco says:

    Whether you were right or not would be of academic interest and only that if the professional-managerial element in our society were thoroughly committed to principles of careers-open-to-talents and advancement as a function of impartial performance assessments. That hasn’t been the case since 1970, and over 50 years, the impulse to turn every transaction into a madcap (and often vicious) social work project has gotten increasingly worse. No one knows where the bottom is.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Charon
  69. Rob McX says:
    @countenance

    All I can say is I’m glad he got the National Review thing out of his system while he was still in his teens and didn’t end up writing for them regularly. They totally cucked out and dumped on every decent writer they had who noticed the truth.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Barnard
  70. @Redneck farmer

    Genocide is not an active verb. The correct word is exterminate.

    • Troll: Charon, AndrewR
  71. Anonymous[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer

    The anti-white policies, which many call genocidal, will continue as whites become a minority. In fact, they will intensify as white children became a minority in schools the hatred against them increased dramatically.

    See, in order to stop it, the usual suspects who know better but keep trying to curry favor with liberals, would have to start working for their white brothers and sisters. And a white liberal from Minnesota hates white people more than he minds knowing his daughter might get raped.

  72. To paraphrase Keynes, the irrational and emotive young can stay irrational longer than the rational, older generation can stay alive.

    The lights on Anglo-Saxon civilization can go out faster than we think.

    All you need is a one generation long break in fact-oriented ratiocination and the lights may not come back on for centuries.

  73. Of course it is nature and nurture. Not the nature that is the surrounding you, but the nature of your surroundings and life made by your ancestors. Generations, if not thousands of years, makes each one of us. Out of Africa is a load of cow manure from cows with the scours. Blacks if anything are the youngest modern humans, not the oldest. Their lone historical accomplishment was preserving the exotic animal biodiversity of sub-Saharan Africa just by being primitive. That is something I can actually respect. Sadly they want the money, and the Chinese are locusts.

    We Europeans got haughty by our successes. Our nobility and leaders became mutts by breeding, and less tribal due to that breeding. Exploiting their people became a thing until in most cases the people eventually fought back. So they educated us, and looked elsewhere for cheap labor. We are at this point of all white countries to become South Africa because of our current nature and nurture. Specifically the later via schooling. Until we dispense some old school way justice on our current nobility, we will rabidly sliding down the de-evolution slide which ends in death. But hey… we won’t be called a name or two even though we are.

  74. @Rob McX

    All I can say is I’m glad he got the National Review thing out of his system while he was still in his teens…

    Haha, for some of us it takes till our 30’s … also to learn what “egalitarian” means. Now, they got “equity”. I was told there would be no more vocabulary!

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  75. @reactionry

    But the Democrat come-back was: “In your guts you know he’s nuts.”

  76. Since the previous century I’ve been articulating in the public arena an array of interconnecting ideas about how the world works. For example, I tend to suspect that racial differences in achievement in 2021 have more to do with nature and nurture, with culture and human biodiversity, than with unspecifiable malevolence on the part of white men as dictated by the theory of systemic racism.

    What if I’m right?

    I think we are probably in a period of history much like others we may have studied as schoolboys (i.e., Bolshevik Revolution, Post WWII Iron Curtain, French Revolution) in which the audacious craziness of power is obvious but everyone who would object to it is too powerless to make any effort to stop it. The tanks are rolling down the streets and people are being summarily shot but we’re encouraged to declare that this is a glorious liberation.

    In these times, the truth of things is a scandal.

    • Agree: Redmen
  77. Charon says:

    Steve’s massaging the posts in this thread even more than usual. Who knows what wisdom languisheth in purgatory? Who knows

  78. Ralph L says:

    Do you get much feedback from those who disagree? I assumed you were cancelled long before it was cool.

    I’m still trying to figure out the penultimate paragraph; perhaps I’m distracted by the godwinning. Another answer is dilution of the gene pool instead of draining it.

  79. Charon says:
    @Art Deco

    No one knows where the bottom is.

    Perhaps not, but it probably resembles Kolkata or Kinshasa.

  80. My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/your-book-review-humankind

    You can do surveys asking people how they will behave in certain situations, and how they think people in general will behave, and the answers are very consistent: people say they will behave well, as will the people they know well, but they expect people in general to behave badly. When shown people behaving altruistically subjects assume they have ulterior motives. When shown data about how often humans are altruistic, they come up with increasingly elaborate theories about how the behaviour is cynical really.

    • Agree: Polemos
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  81. bomag says:
    @Altai

    …affirmative action isn’t so much about helping blacks but about ethnic power sharing. It is to ensure there are more blacks in the higher socioeconomic strata to potentially offset decisions being made without input from or sympathy for blacks.

    Looks like an argument for separate countries. Let Congo do their thing; let Norway do theirs. Problem is that the TNCs of the world want what Norway has and demand that the Norwegians give them stuff in the name of fairness. Current day madness ensues with the end result that everyone is worse off.

  82. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Now pretty much everyone knows there is something wrong with quantum mechanics (including, I am pleased to say, my old teacher, the Nobel laureate Steve Weinberg, who changed his mind without dying!).

    Seems Einstein was right after all? Unfortunately, thanks to a Murray Gell-Mann YouTube interview, I have an image of him as a doddering old fool out of touch with the new physics.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  83. Well you’re wrong in (at least) one aspect. “Conventional wisdom” is not that of malevolence being the driver of success , malevelolence is the Johnny-come-lately innovative stupidity of those with destructive intent.

    Conventional wisdom is contained in the answer to Ghandi when he asked how 5,000 British could rule over 300 million Indians: “Because we are better than you”.

  84. Rebunga says:

    Steve, I think you are more or less right. People if all races more or less agree with you and act accordingly, and the world is more or less the way it is.

    Case in point – Whites and Asians go to great lengths to avoid having their kids in majority black public schools. Not so much out of outright racism, but because they don’t want their kid to be caught up in lame beefs that lead to them getting shot at a BBQ. They follow the school performance stats. They watch the news. It is known. They act accordingly and go private or move to another district.

    People cross the street when they see the fellas coming in hoodies. Cops know who to look for when drive bys happen. Banks have a spanking machine of underwriting that weeds out people who don’t do paperwork. When money or health is on the line, people act accordingly.

    The dissonance you so frequently encounter comes from the press, academia, big corporate, and politicians. They are obviously pushing some nonsensical ideas that a toddler could see through. They endlessly cite ever more contrived terminology (intersectionality, critical race theory, privilege backpack, etc) for racism, while meanwhile their race can’t manage the basics like don’t shoot up a birthday party.

    Why this dissonance from the elites? First of all they have no skin in the game. It costs them nothing to virtue signal. No dean is gonna get fired for browning his college now that there are no objective measures of performance. Want to prove your a woke dean? Cancel your Div I football and basketball programs. Costs nothing to obfuscate the obvious in the NYT. People already KNOW the truth. I imagine the corporate woke signalling in commercials has zero impact on sales. They get to book some woke cred for the future.

    Second, it’s a quick and cost free way to smoke out the nonbelievers through agitprop. You single out these unfashionable thinkers so you can cancel them. And move the line of discourse. Basically anybody who pushes back gets mau maued.

    • Agree: Travis
  85. Luke Lea says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Sorry, Physics Dave, but yours (and Weinberg’s now that he is well past his prime) is a decidedly minority opinion among today’s leading theoretical physicists who are still in their prime. (Read Lubos Motl’s blog for details on why this is so.)

    A better explanation is that quantum mechanics is so violently counterintuitive to the everyday experience of a species whose brains have evolved in a “classical” world composed of macroscopic objects (in which quantum effects are vanishingly small and completely irrelevant) that even some of the smartest physicists who ever lived (starting with Einstein himself) find it impossible to believe.

    You can blame it on our commnon human nature.

  86. “What if I’m right?”

    Then the only solution is to arrest you, put you through a show trial, and then shoot you behind the ear.

    • Replies: @bomag
  87. Anon[113] • Disclaimer says:

    The one thing that really scares me is that progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative. This malevolent insanity on the part of orthodox liberal thinkers terrifies me.

    My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    The dominant intellectuals are not capable of this unless you pick apart their psychology, hold up a minor to them and suggest rational alternatives to their mindset. David Horowitz did this to himself and his contemporaries in his 1997 autobiography, Radical Son:

    “My parents and their comrades had given their hearts to a foreign power. The Soviet Union was the land of their dreams, and they pledged their allegiance to its political future. It was not my parents’ idealism that elicited fear and provoked hostility from the goyim. It was their hostility toward the goyim, and indeed everything the goyim held dear, that incited the hostility back. Of course, if my parents were right and America was as unjust as they were convinced it was, if its institutions could be changed only by violent means, if Marxism were the map of a radical future — then their persecution was inevitable, and they really had no choice. But my parents were incapable of entertaining the alternate possibility: that they were wrong about each of these points; that they could have lived different lives and still made moral stands; that the politics they had chosen was both a provocation and threat. To the end of their days, they remained incapable of self-reflection about the radical commitments that had defined their lives. In this they were typical among the inhabitants of the progressive ghetto, who believed in their truth with a ferociousness that left no room for dissent.”

    “Marx and Freud were strategies for dealing with their predicaments as members of a despised social group. European Jews had been given rights and were admitted to civil society only after the French Revolution. But they had been denied full acceptance through a kind of “institutional racism,” a code of civility that continued to put them in their place … The revolutionary ideas of Marx and Freud were attempts to deconstruct these civil orders, and replace them with a universal one in which they would finally be granted the acceptance they craved. Thus Freud claimed to show that bourgeois civility was a mask for sexual repression, while Marx argued that it mystified economic exploitation. Each had a vision of liberation – science for Freud, socialism for Marx – that would provide a universal solvent in which the significance of ethnic identities disappeared.

    [MORE]

    “Earlier in my life I would have thought [this] idea merely peculiar. But the events of the past year had made me acutely conscious of my own ethnicity. In the aftermath of Betty’s and Ellen’s deaths [one a murder by Horowitz’s friend Huey Newton of the Black Panthers, which Horowitz felt personally responsible for], I thought about how vulnerable we were because we were white; how this had made it difficult for me, for example, to plead Betty’s cause. For the first time in my life, I had felt isolated and made helpless by my race.

    “I thought of how we had extended ourselves to bring justice to others because they were black. How for myself and Ellen this had begun when we were adolescents, and yet how little this care seemed to be reciprocated. I thought of how Troy Duster had known the Panthers were dangerous, but had done nothing to warn me. Nor could I have reasonably expected him to do anything to help me after Betty was killed. In all my efforts on behalf of black people, I had never thought to ask: Would my black comrades extend themselves to gain justice for me?

    “I began to review events of the past to which I had paid little attention before, like the expulsion of the Jews from the civil-rights movement in 1966. Jews had funded the movement, devised its legal strategies, and provided support for its efforts in the media and in the universities – and wherever else they had power. More than half the freedom riders who had gone to the southern states were Jews, although Jews constituted only 3 percent of the population. It was an unprecedented show of solidarity from one people to another. Jews had put their resources and lives on the line to support the black struggle for civil rights, and indeed two of their sons – Schwerner and Goodman – had been murdered for their efforts. But, even while these tragic events were still fresh, the black leaders of the movement had unceremoniously expelled the Jews from their ranks. When Israel was attacked in 1967 by a coalition of Arab states calling for its annihilation, the same black leaders threw their support to the Arab aggressors, denouncing Zionism (the Jewish liberation movement) as racism. Rarely had a betrayal of one people by another been so total or swift. Yet radical Jews like myself had continued our dedication to the black movement for civil rights – to their struggle and their cause. What was it that made us so willing to support those who would treat us like this, who would not support us in return? Why did we think it was alright, even noble, to operate according to standards so different from those that governed others?

    “Just two months before Betty’s disappearance, I had written a cover story for “Ramparts”, “The Passion of the Jews,” in which I defended the denial engaged in by progressives like myself. It opened with an encounter that posed the same question. A Jewish doctor had asked me: “Do you have any Christian friends whom you could trust with your life?” I was appalled by his question, by the implication that there could be none. It was such a “plummet into tribal depths,” I wrote, that I did not want to confront it. Comfortable and safe as he was in American, this doctor could not forget the fate of Germany’s Jews, who had also felt comfortable and safe before being turned in by their Christian friends. In my answer, I attempted to place his anxiety in the frame of the revolution I still believed in and which I still believed would provide a solution. By rejecting their own societies, Jews had entered a stateless diaspora, like the Jews before the creation of Israel. Having no state to defend them, they identified with those who were powerless and oppressed. Out of this identification, a new community was forming – a community of faith in the revolutionary future which would rescue us all from this dilemma.

    “The revolutionary belongs to a community of faith that extends beyond the classes and the nations and reaches across the boundaries that divide and oppress. Within every national group if forms the basis of a new human community and a new human identity. Today, the revolutionary is isolated, obstructed by the divisions that form the cultural and political legacy of the past; the revolutionary is of the nations but not in them. For the revolutionary’s eye is on the future. Today there is Black and Jew, American and Russian, Arab and Israeli. But within each nation – Russia, America, Israel, Egypt – there are aliens, the persecuted, the unassimilated, the “Jews” who know the heart of the stranger and who struggle for human freedom. Today they are separated; tomorrow they will be joined.”

    “Betty’s death killed this fantasy in me. There was no revolutionary community. There would be no redemptive future. There is no one to save us from who were are.

    “Far from being part of a homogeneous society, Marx belonged to a despised minority that had only recently won its civil rights … He had built his entire political edifice on a concept – class – which was pointedly free of ethnic and national characteristics, in order to formulate the idea of socialism as a community liberated from these distinctions … What we had to ask ourselves was whether Marx wasn’t a self-hating Jew, and whether socialism wasn’t anything more than a wish to be included.”

    The rational alternative to this mindset that Horowitz offered: “Bourgeois morality was not all that we would have to accept. If there was indeed an element in human nature that could not be reshaped by socialist ideas, then not only was the rule of law necessary, but the rule of the market as well. As radicals, we had decried the absence of a social plan, and what Marx called the “fetishism of commodities”—the fact that in capitalist economies “things were in the saddle” and the market ruled, instead of man. But if human beings were corrupt in their nature, they would corrupt the plan as well. How could there be a social plan not driven by ego and self-serving desire? Better to be governed by markets that were impersonal, by neutral rules that were not subject to human will.”

    https://archive.org/details/radicalsongenera00horo_0

    • Replies: @Rob
  88. Travis says:

    most Americans know Steve Sailer is correct, that race exists and explains much of the difference in Black and white behaviors and rates of success. Most Americans today realize that the last 50 years of affirmative action and government programs to help Blacks have not closed the gaps. This is why Whites pay significant sums of money to live away from Blacks and send their children to schools with few Blacks. Looks at what they do not what they say. White Americans have been fleeing Blacks for decades and will continue to flee towns when Blacks move in. Nobody actually believes that race is a social construct, which is why transracial fakes are mocked and attacked by everyone on the left and right.

    The big American question has always been what to do about the inequality which exists between Blacks and Whites. Since affirmative action and welfare grants have failed, progressives are now reverting to blaming Whites for the failures of Blacks. The solution is to eliminate whites.

    For a significant number of Americans the solution is to promote mixed raced couples and miscegenation. This is how Mexico eliminated their Black population. In 1800 Mexico was 10% Black, the residual effect of importing 300,000 slaves into Mexico. Yet by 1900 the Black population of Mexico had fallen to 1%. Yet the United States now has too many Blacks and too few whites for miscegenation to eliminate Blacks so the intention is to eliminate Whites from America. This will be achieved in the near future, as White fertility will result in the white population falling by 50% in the next 50 years and 12% of whites are having non-white children. the end of White people in America is coming and will arrive much sooner than people realize.

    So the solution of Black pathology is to eliminate whites from America, since whites the cause of Black failures. Many progressives also hope than enough Blacks will produce mulatto children to help improve the performance of Blacks, while eliminating the production of White children. It is actually not a horrible plan if all Black females were restricted from mating with Black males. Maybe the Chinese will implement this plan when they are running North America. If 100% of the Blacks born in the United States had one Non-Black parent the performance of Blacks would improve significantly. The United States could create a better version of the Cosmic Race. Basically we could mimic what Mexico did to eliminate racial tensions by creating the Cosmic race and eliminating racial tensions by claiming mixed raced Americans created a new race of people, superior to the inbred Caucasoid, Negroid and Mongoloid races.

    The progressive solution is to eliminate Whites from North America, What is the Sailer solution ? What is the Alt-Right solution ? What is the conservative solution ?

    • Replies: @anon
  89. Redmen says:

    Nice piece Steve.

    Slightly OT-More white supremacist anti-Asian attacks here in NYC. There seems to be no end to these in sight.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/bigot-bashes-woman-with-cane-in-another-hate-crime-on-manhattan-subway/ar-AAKDaFX?ocid=entnewsntp

    From the article:

    Regarding the Morningside Heights attack, police describe the suspect as a 60-year-old man with a dark complexion, standing about 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighing about 150 pounds, with a medium build, brown eyes, close cut salt-and-pepper hair, a mustache and a goatee

    .

    I’m figuring the guy must have just gotten back from Florida and has a bit of a suntan.

  90. theMann says:

    What if anybody is right?

    Irrelevant in a nation of people too prideful to admit that they are ever wrong, about anything.

  91. Anon7 says:

    “The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.”

    Your process is different from theirs, Steve. Don’t be fooled by the format of their Directives, which may seem to resemble reasoned argument.

    The “dominant intellectuals” are nothing more than the Stalinist Mean Girls who ran the social scene in your high school. They want to set down what is correct, not search for what is right. Like Stalin, they’re focused on power, not truth.

  92. Sean says:
    @PhysicistDave

    El Dato looking forward to an unprecedently powerful computer with quantum technology without worrying that the rules underlying it are not known seems an example of unwisdom. I know you don’t think much of the Superintelligence as existential threat to humanity idea though.

    I actually have done research on the foundations of quantum mechanics.

    I have read research in that area is not very good for one’s career. That is what outsiders call interpretations of quantum mechanics; what is actually going on to make the wave function swimmingly indeterminate in entire accordance with the Schrödinger equation, up until the point we look at what is happening whereupon it collapses on what had been measured as if all the previous supposed possibilities were never really there at all. An analogy with Steve’s ‘noticing’ suggests itself.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  93. My suggestion: The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    Highly, even unrealistically, optimistic.

    That raises the more general question: What if I’m right?

    Tongue-in-Cheek: “No Sailer, No problem!”

    An honest answer: it will come down to one thing where I think you are off-mark, if not wrong about, namely federalism or some other form of separation – where in the past you’ve argued that you didn’t seem much hope in that route.

    My entire adult life – experiences in all dimensions – reinforces my belief that: God help the man who relies on persuasion. Two examples:

    [MORE]

    1. Corporate – in the corporate world (including public sphere, including start-ups) – no argument, no stack of data, persuades on the business case – you can combine good arguments and data with the right political forces and get somewhere, sometimes, but it is at best, somewhere/sometimes – and it is not like a low-yield fund you keep investing in that eventually brings long-term prosperity – it looses in the long-game and that’s why we need start-ups or nothing would ever be new or innovative, ever

    2. Current events and media – check this article out in the Federalist: https://thefederalist.com/2021/06/01/biden-administrations-blatant-institutional-racism-gets-rebuke-from-sixth-circuit/

    Most telling is the argument of the dissenting judge.
    Outside of court – in school board meetings, in legislative debates, in Congressional hearings and throughout the entire MSM you will notice the practiced, studied consistency of those “on the left” who when pressed on questions of CRT – feign perfect ignorance and with perfect message control, they deflect direct and specific questions and answer with platitudes that their antagonists are squelching speech and these “diversity efforts” (or other positive generalization) result in better understanding and more people, getting along, better.

    In the rare case of court where the judge is compelled to give an answer – her response is to attack first principles. We need to pay attention to that.

    Hers is not an effective attack on first principles. It’s a pathetic one really, but it’s what she has to do.

    This is a difference over first principles, but not any first principles, these are first principles with civilizational stakes. There’s been more than one war in the past over these exact first principles. Hobbes and the English Civil War come to mind.

    Did people suddenly change and now we’ll resolve these with argument? When it wasn’t resolved with argument in the past, is that just because they didn’t know how to argue, or persuade, or reason? Don’t you think the intent behind the mass-consciousness, perfect-message-control, obviates persuasion?

    The people, like the judge, who advance it – apparently think there is a mass of people who will agree to be enslaved. That will not happen. What will eventually happen is a shooting war, or separation (see: https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2021/05/20/culture-war-politics-2021-democracy-analysis-489900).

    This is a matter of irreconcilable differences. A considerable fault of otherwise very smart people is a persistent belief in the reasonableness of others. There is a reason why good, strong people, sometimes divorce. Separation, the latter of the two paths, is the peaceful means the cordons off the disease and let’s it die on its own.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  94. anon[263] • Disclaimer says:

    “…the Tulsa riot of 100 years ago (which was started by blacks but ended by whites).” Does anybody have a link to some actual history on this topic?

    • Replies: @Alden
  95. Off topic and a not so gentle reminder:

    Chinese Legal immigrants brought the Corona Virus to America…and everyone knows they were the viral vector…

    1+1=2…..

    We are suppose to keep our mouth shut about this so that the Chinese Democratic Party Voting Bloc can vote Our People into a White racial minority within the borders of America….

  96. Note that I don’t put very much effort into telling you how I think the world should work, just how it does work. At least, the latter’s testable.

    But that is the whole problem!

    Yes, it is good to read some reporting and discussion based on reality as a healthy antidote to political correctness, wokeness and so on, but you are actually reporting on things that are already known, but not discussed much in public for reasons of keeping the peace.

    Do you really think that the nation’s top politicians, law enforcement officials, chiefs of police, prison wardens, judges, lawyers, probation officers, psychiatrists, psychologists, are not aware of the black crime problem?

    What is more interesting is how to handle it? What do they do in Jamaica which has the highest murder rate in the world, all black police, all black schools?

    https://www.jamaicaobserver.com/latestnews/JLP,_PNP_members_in_Parliament_clash_over_crime?profile=1228

    KINGSTON, Jamaica — Prime Minister Andrew Holness has branded as hypocritical criticism from the Opposition People’s National Party that his administration has lost its handle on crime and that the island’s airspace and borders are a free for all.

    There is a feeling that the government needs to speak to the nation as to how it will tackle those issues especially at this time when the States of Emergency option is not on the table, the Courts having ruled that it is not constitutional…

    That opinion however earned him a stinging rebuke from the prime minister who went to great lengths to detail steps taken by his administration to reduce crime.

    “I am asking the leader of the Opposition to help us to quarantine some of the criminals who are killing the people in Kingston Western which includes St Andrew South. I am asking the leader of the Opposition to give support measures that give emergency powers to the government to control the crime that is happening,” Holness retorted.

    During the resulting interchange which saw chaos reigning in the House as members on both sides of the House exchanged verbal insults…

    We have a deputy President in the US who has Jamaican family connections, but what is she doing to provide leadership to address issues of black crime and racial conflict in the hemisphere?

    Do countries like Guyana and Trinidad that are 50/50 dot Indian versus blacks have the same problems?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Trinidad_and_Tobago

    A not common explanation is that the outbreak in murders is due to drugs and gang related issues, especially in the depressed communities of East Port of Spain.

    https://www.worldnomads.com/travel-safety/south-america/guyana/staying-crime-free-in-guyana

    The country has a murder rate that is three times higher than that of the United States…

    …if you plan on playing golf at the public course in Lusignan, it is advised that you do so in the safety of groups and only during daylight hours.

    So how is the US doing relative to other countries with black populations, including Canada, most of the Caribbean, Haiti, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, etc.

    Should there be a Western hemisphere summit on black crime and migration to put together a new set of universal rules in which allies would support each other in testing and implementing strategies to combat domestic and international violent crime. Or a meeting of conservative party leaders to work on common strategies?

    Where is the US in providing hemispherical leadership?

    Stating the problem is easy, but providing solutions or even approaches to solutions is so much harder. Should areas of high crime be physically quarantined to keep the most murderous citizens at home as Prime Minister Holness of Jamaica wants?

    I have no opinion as to whether Holness is right or wrong, but it is worth noting that Holness was reelected in 2020 at a time when Jamaica’s tourism industry was devasted by COVID-19 with a massively increased majority that decimated the opposition party (but the voter turnout was only 37%, probably because of COVID-19.

    His JLP is a conservative party.

  97. @John Derbyshire

    Is that true? Ha! Even as much as they were in the process of greatly accelerating the destruction of America, at least the ctrl-left were civil and more clever back then.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  98. @Achilleus

    Old-fashioned is the only fashion worth a good goddamn. Time will test us all.

    Despair is arrogance.

    • Agree: JMcG
  99. @Achmed E. Newman

    When it comes to Goldwater they were right.

    Should have gone with Hatfield. He was undefeated for a reason. Antifa didn’t pick that courthouse by mistake.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  100. Anonymous[737] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I remember when, as physics students, we were not supposed to mention that there is something wrong with quantum mechanics.

    Now pretty much everyone knows there is something wrong with quantum mechanics (including, I am pleased to say, my old teacher, the Nobel laureate Steve Weinberg, who changed his mind without dying!).

    Just in time for truth to no longer matter. Science has now become politicized and a bludgeon. This went into overdrive since March 2020. 😷 Drive the 101 into San Francisco and you’ll see billboards like the one I saw yesterday, a giant one from Airbnb with the message” “Thank you science”.

    But I guess it’s only natural for Silicon Valley to be loyal servants to the Narrative as trillions of federal/DARPA/Black Budget dollars have propped up tech over the past decade(s). In my prior life I was an investigator contracted with the U.S. government. When I first started I used to ask myself, “Now why am I doing security clearance background investigations on members of the board of directors, etc., of a tech/software/AI companies with no publicly known connections to federal government/DOD contracting work?? And why are they priority cases??” 🤔 After a few years I knew to stop asking questions except for, “I wonder how few geeks working there know who they’re actually working for??”

    • Replies: @Getaclue
  101. @LondonBob

    Man, I’ve been working on that for years and he just… tweeted it out.

    That graph is up there with Steve’s most dangerous one.

    This is also pretty good:

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
  102. anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Don’t you think there are gonna be quite a few young pranksters twenty years from now who just love upsetting their humorless, woker-than-thou middle-aged elders?

    Que?

    • LOL: Rob McX
  103. Neoconned says:

    So Steve — is this your “Theory of Everything?”

  104. SF says:

    So far, I have not been able to Google any articles or studies giving any other viewpoint on Tulsa than that it was an unprovoked massacre. Anybody have any suggestions?

  105. Svevlad says:

    My world view is simple. Whatever causes the largest collective butthurt in the biggest portion of humanity, is good, correct and commendable.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  106. @black sea

    black sea, biden, et.al., are going to run with racism as the biggest problem in America, actually superceded by the terroristic threats of “White Supremacy.” I saw snippets of biden’s Tulsa eulogy. America is full of KKK members carrying torches with their eyes bulging from hate…slightly paraphrased. Anything to distract from sky rocketing murder rates, lax enforcement of basic societal laws, rising prices, diminished oil supplies and proposed new tariffs on lumber that will harm home building(*). There is a plot here I have not quite figured out. (*) The Dems and the MSM went ballistic when trump wanted to renegotiate NAFTA but are silent on biden and whitmer’s attack on Canadian oil and now lumber.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    , @Anonymouse
  107. @PhysicistDave

    Thanks for the sources, but can you give a summary of what is “wrong” with quantum mechanics? Do you just mean that it’s so counter-intuitive that it can’t be the whole story, or that something is actually provably impossible about it? I just hadn’t heard this before, and I’ll try to look at your sources, but I’m curious what you mean.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  108. Alfa158 says:
    @Rob McX

    Yes, there is an old saying among emergency room medics: “The bleeding always stops”.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Thanks: Currahee, Rob McX, Charon
  109. Svevlad says:

    It doesn’t help a lot of rightoids give fuel to the fire for the entire liberal ultra-binary bipolar extreme-only world-view.

    My favorite tactic, as a result, is to bait them into more and more absurd extremism by amplifying whatever they say and see how far they go. It’s very similar to how Jews say antizionism is antisemitism, and I go even further than this.

    It seems though that this turboextremism is a general western thing. I even think it’s genetic at this point. Every fad is replaced with it’s utter opposite, there’s no sense of balance. Either we let in all the immigrants or start world war 3 and exterminate nearly all of humanity. Either we allow a horde of delusional imbeciles to self-castrate or we bring back witch burnings (seeing that was to get rid of annoying people, I say why not both). Ridiculous.

    The instant you suspect someone criticizing you or opposes you is doing it in bad faith – and always assume they are – immediately go out, say they masturbate at the thought of you failing and even dying. That always rattles them, and really brings out what they really are thinking.

  110. Redmen says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Don’t you think there are gonna be quite a few young pranksters twenty years from now who just love upsetting their humorless, woker-than-thou middle-aged elders?

    I would like to believe this will happen. But the almost total lack of humor today makes me think this may not always be the way things work. There may be some who engage in gallows humor, but not with any power behind it to change things. As woke ideology becomes more entrenched in bureaucracy, the force required to displace it grows.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  111. yarro says:

    “The reason for this long track record of futility is that American conservatism has always been dominated by bourgeois objectivism. Unlike Randian objectivism, bourgeois objectivism is the assumption that the world runs by a set of immutable laws and that the point of politics is to adapt to those laws. Discovering the right answer is the point of all political activity as once the answer is clear, everything falls into place.”

    https://www.takimag.com/article/a-history-of-failure/

    The nice bourgeois does not account for evil, a minor oversight…

  112. @Jonathan Mason

    I wonder if there is a country where the black population does not lead the ethnic cohorts by proportion engaged in crime?

    It would be a useful example to learn from.

    Not being able to speak about things means that answers to even simple questions like that are very hard to work out, and considered action is hard to take.

  113. Hi There says:

    I tend to suspect that racial differences in achievement in 2021 have more to do with nature and nurture, with culture and human biodiversity, than with unspecifiable malevolence on the part of white men as dictated by the theory of systemic racism.

    Of course this is true.

    The idea that all the ills of the world are to be blamed on white people is propaganda. It’s a lie.

    It’s amazing to see how aggressively this lie has dominated Western culture. All of the institutional media pushes this lie in perfect unison. All the universities. All of Big Tech + Business. All of the entertainment world. There is a political coalition that pushes this, and uses various dirty tricks to marginalize dissenting voices like Steve Sailer. This is what Marc Andressen calls a hyperconformist monoculture and it’s enforced by ruthless dirty tricks.

    One example: During 2020, there was a wave of BLM related riots and public violence. Many politicians and institutional media insisted the rioting wasn’t the peaceful BLM protesters, but rather white supremacist terrorists. They were lying. They knew they were lying. But they want to win their political fight and humiliate their political opponents by any means necessary.

    My advice is listen to your emotions, but make decisions with your calm and rational brain. This racial propaganda should make normal people angry; listen to that anger, but ultimately act with your rational brain.

    My second piece of advice: live a happy life, and don’t let the white haters, and the propaganda pull you down.

    The questions we should ask: How can we live happy productive lives given the state of the world as it is? How can we combat the hateful political propaganda? How can we build a better culture and better political systems? How can we profit off the mistakes that those in power are making?

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  114. res says:
    @El Dato

    Insanity can last longer than civilizational viability.

    The sociological version of the financial “the markets can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent” from Keynes.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  115. Another very good, thoughtful, column.

    The problem is, as many columnists and commenters have pointed out, most people can’t handle the Truth very well, so you’re peddling a bitter pill a lot of the time. This trait may in fact be useful in terms of natural selection: Most of us are average looking, not brilliant or interesting enough to have a huge following of people willing to make us rich or give us the attention humans crave. And let’s be even more brutally honest: Our kids and wives are only really special because they’re ours – They are not Miss America, will not win a Nobel Prize, will not play centerfield for the New York Yankees. But we believe we are special so we don’t throw ourselves off the roof in despair (hyperbole for effect). There’s a reason we have the saying, “The Truth hurts.”

    Make no mistake, there are times when truth wins out – “We’re sinking, better get in the life boats!” “How do we land on the Moon and bring the astronauts back alive?” But just as often, lies and falsehood win out. “I made a gazillion $$ trading on inside information!” “That COVID vaccine did wonders for my Pfizer stock!” And as Derbyshire points out, a lot of little lies help smooth over the day-to-day grind: “You look nice today” “Have a blessed day!”

    This propensity for delusion – confirmation bias, whatever you want to call it – is particularly strong with young women. Women like romance novels; men like history books.

    Hence, we have a society steeped in untruths, policed by unstable delusional young women, with scads of underperforming minorities and clever grifters from Asia and the sub-Continent playing along with the lies so as to line their pockets and achieve totally unmerited status. (See Michelle Obama).

    And it gets worse.

    The top 20% of white males – the ones who actually get into prestigious schools despite the discrimination – play right along with it. And why not? Better to compete with less competent affirmative action cases than hungry, ambitious and talented fellow white guys who got nosed out in the admissions process.

    So, in sum, you have the somewhat healthy human propensity for delusion, particularly strong amongst females, a burgeoning and prosperous grievance industry embraced by easily half the population (and growing), which is endorsed and advanced by the best and brightest of the group getting elbowed out of the way (the sell outs).

    “Truth” stands no chance.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
  116. J.Ross says:

    Almost no problem we currently suffer is natural (including WuFlu): almost all are the deliberate, destructive effects, direct and indirect, of powerful morons in denial regarding how things work. Biden flooding a damaged economy with slaves, regulations, free money we can’t pay for, and killing the new pipeline. All it would take to avoid all that is fifteen minutes with Hazlitt (or Biden not wanting people to suffer). Biden’s misanthropy doesn’t remove the sincere supporter (NPR listeners, CNN believers) who honestly think these policies are good ideas. In such criminality, insisting on the way things work is the noblest position, the goal most likely to being the most peace and health to the greatest number of people.

  117. res says:

    Good stuff, Steve. Regarding this:

    — Look for a synthesis that makes sense of both your thesis and the other guy’s antithesis (usually, the hardest but most productive).

    For example:

    —Thesis: A racial group is a taxonomical subspecies.

    —Antithesis: A racial group is a biologically nonexistent social construct!

    —Synthesis: A racial group is a partly inbred extended family.

    I tend to prefer my synthesis: “Race is a social construct overlaid on a biological reality.” But both versions provide a useful perspective. One difference is I think my version is more abstract with yours being more concrete. Those tend to appeal to/reach different people.

    • Replies: @Bert
    , @al gore rhythms
  118. J.Ross says:
    @Dieter Kief

    The dominant intellectuals have nothing but viciousness, and they have nothing but viciousness because they’re not real intellectuals.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  119. Yogi Berra said, “’It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future” My guess is that this nonsense will last longer than we will and probably even longer than our kids, unfortunately. 40% of Americans still believe that evolution is a hoax and take Genesis literally. Fortunately, that belief isn’t really harmful like Critical Race Garbage, but it illustrates how people will believe what they want.

    There’s no doubt that your general view is correct and that a significant number agree with you, but the trick is to translate that into effective public policy, and that will take an entirely different set of skills.

    Before the Obama era BLM nonsense, it really looked like we were getting a handle on crime, a real consensus for effective anti-crime policy. But, no, we’re doomed to repeat the cycle and hopefully get it right decades from now. Sigh.

  120. Anonymous[846] • Disclaimer says:

    You mean what if The Bell Curve is basically right?

    The socioeconomic disparities between Jews, Asians, white gentiles, American Indians (most Hispanics) and blacks perfectly parallels the IQ averages of these aforementioned groups.

    So if the IQ gap between say Asians and blacks is largely a result of genetic differences between these two groups, our elites are basically trying to bang a round peg into a square hole, with the predictable results. The only problem is they keep banging that round peg, and as it naturally refuses to slide into that square hole, they keep getting more frustrated and more outrageous and more desperate. Hence all this mumbo jumbo about “systemic racism” and the like.

    So if you’re right, this country is due for one hell of a reckoning one way or the other. Either we keep going as we are and end up as a Soviet-style third world sh!t hole or we will be forced to confront the ugly truth and then have to deal with the complex fallout afterwards. Our entire present universe is now built on this egalitarian dogma- we’ve spend trillions of dollars based on it, we’ve opened our doors to tens of millions of immigrants based on it, forever altering the character of this country and many others in the West. It is a as deeply entrenched as Catholicism was in circa 1400s Western Europe, so to change course now would be an difficult and perhaps quite ugly affair.
    I use to remain confident that advanced in genetics would sooner or later render the egalitarian dogma untenable, but it now seems like that development may never happen, and even if it does, how do you do a re-boot after you’ve brainwashed minorities (and quite frankly a lot of whites) that their shortcomings are the fault of “systemic racism” and all its related poppy cock. And what about all the millions of low-IQ denziens the elites have allowed into the castle gates? If you think the debate on immigration is explosive now, just wait…

    So two roads lay ahead:

    1)Either with face the probable truth, perhaps only b/c advances in genetics make the current dogma untenable (BTW, these advances in genetics never in fact come, due to IQ being to both environmental and the result of numerous genes all working in concert with each other and environ. forces; or these DNA advances do come but are suppressed, at least here in the West)

    -or-

    2) we continue on our current path and the madness and the decline just intensifies.

    Either way the road ahead is likely to be an ugly one.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @anon
  121. @Chrisnonymous

    To be clear, while the article is hosted at ACX, Scott himself didn’t write it.

  122. Alfa158 says:
    @black sea

    Demography is Destiny.
    Steve is our Thomas Andrews, the naval architect of the Titanic. Andrews sailed with the ship to take notes on how his design was performing. When it hit the iceberg, he went below decks, noted which compartments were taking on water and the rate of rise of the water level. He then went back to his design notes, projected the water inrush rate as a function of the ship settling, maximum pumping capacity, reserve buoyancy, and told Captain Smith exactly when the ship would go under.
    He also went down with the ship.
    Demography is Destiny. There isn’t going to be a backlash where the kids realize the ship is sinking, rebel against their foolish elders and pump it back up. The geographical area known as the USA is not going back to where it used to be. The great question for the 21st century is how to adapt and make the best of the new Brazil. It may be possible to establish some islands of safety and prosperity as we see in other countries, after the Empire collapses of its own weight and rot.
    The wealthy of course will always be fine. At worse they commute by helicopter or armored limos between their office towers and garrison communities. But even regular people could establish secure, functional communities, particularly if the governmental systems lose effectiveness as a function of financial bankruptcy and staffing incompetence. The new Americans can survive because the Feds will no longer be able to fund the black helicopters, surveillance systems and storm troopers needed for total control.
    In the case of our country, China might play a positive role. North America can still be a useful resource they want to keep functioning. It would remain a large market, a place with desirable real estate for primary and secondary homes and recreational, natural resources to exploit, and there will still be some number of smart, creative people to staff their businesses. I would think they would want to preserve some part of that, if they can somehow contain and control the dysfunctional parts.

    • Troll: Bert
    • Replies: @Currahee
    , @Joe Stalin
    , @Charon
  123. Barnard says:
    @Rob McX

    Most of the writers for National Review at that time would be purged from it today, assuming they didn’t proactively quite. Most of their readers from that era who are still alive have canceled their subscriptions and quit reading it too.

    • Agree: JMcG
  124. Sean says:
    @Luke Lea

    A better explanation is that quantum mechanics is so violently counterintuitive to the everyday experience of a species whose brains have evolved in a “classical” world composed of macroscopic objects (in which quantum effects are vanishingly small and completely irrelevant)

    Bees can distinguish between chemically identical odorants when the only difference was in one odorant hydrogen was replaced with deuterium.

    https://physicsworld.com/a/do-quantum-effects-play-a-role-in-consciousness/
    This seems extraordinary, that changing something as small as the spin of a nucleus might result in macroscopic changes on the level of something as complex as the mothering instinct or, indeed, consciousness itself.

  125. Dave says:

    Steve, you’re absolutely 100% right about everything, quite obviously so, and you have a humorous way of pointing it out.

    Unfortunately, you live in 21st-century America, where that and five dollars will get you coffee. Being right doesn’t matter; only raw power matters, i.e. who has the power to send a 50-man SWAT team to whose house at 3am. Or the power to dump a pile of fresh ballots on the counting table and say, “Fuck you, we win.”

  126. @Achmed E. Newman

    But, “THIS” really does go on your permanent record!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  127. Achilleus says:
    @AnotherDad

    In your heart you know he’s right.

    Any man who has been married knows the limited utility of being “right”.

    The US population is more than half female, 13 percent violent sub-rational obsolete farm implements, and who knows how many South-of-the-Border illiterate (in ANY language) and innumerate Pedros.

    A little over a century ago, these groups had almost no control over the running of the country. Now they hold the whip.

    Your charts, stats, and citations may be “right”, but to the above they are:

    “Mean” (women)
    “Rayciss” (negroes)
    “¿Que?” (Pedros)

    And don’t forget the growing number of feminized men.

    Someone who understands numbers as well as Steve should see that the percentage of the current population that can understand, accept, and publicly acknowledge his facts is, in our heterogeneous liberal democracy with universal suffrage, insufficient.

    • Replies: @Pixo
  128. Dissident says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Governments exist to take wealth from the productive members of society and hand it over to those who are less productive.

    That’s all? Governments don’t also maintain critical infrastructure; uphold law and order (at least to some degree); maintain borders (again, at least to some minimal degree); maintain a certain standard of safety for the food, water and medicine supply; for the competency of medical and other professionals, via licensing; manage and direct responses to critical emergencies and disasters (earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, epidemics, etc.) and a few other things? Would you have all of those functions completely left to the whims of the profit-driven private sector?

    Why all the nonsense about transgenderism? Simply a diversion from the fundamental class struggle between producers and parasites.

    What about the producers of the hormones? The physicians and surgeons who perform and administer the “treatments”? The producers and suppliers of the various medical technologies and supplies? The “counselors” who steer children and adolescents toward “transitioning”? And any number of other entities who directly profit from Transmania? You don’t think any of them have anything to do with its promotion?

    You don’t think any True Believers who are situated in influential positions, might also play a role?

    Keep your eyes on the money, folks.

    See above.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  129. Anon[365] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX

    This majority will eventually be forced to fight. The reason is, there’s no other country for whites to run away to.

  130. If you’re right then this guy and his ilk will have to find honest work:

    Stanley doesn’t have to make up anybody – he’s staring at him in the mirror.

  131. Jack D says:
    @black sea

    Non-white is not the same thing as black. Whites are vulnerable to guilt tripping – “you brought us over as slaves and now you owe us reparations.” Asians and Latinos feel zero guilt about having been responsible for American slavery. For now, they are mostly on the Democrat bus because they want to get in on the gibmedats as “fellow minorities” but I don’t think that they are inextricably wedded to that position.

    While the MSM tries to hide the fact that most attacks on Asians are perpetrated by blacks so as not to divide the Coalition of the Fringes, Asians are not dumb and they can read between the lines (and see the videos) and they know who is attacking them. Nor is there any love lost between blacks and Latinos.

    It’s not at all clear that the new, majority non-white America is really going to be on board with treating blacks as extra special. If nothing else, other non-whites are going to assign themselves a spot on the diversity totem pole at the same level as blacks (whites of course will be lower) and so the gibmedats are going to have to be split up among a much greater pool. And the black gibmedats are increasingly going to smarter African-Africans and Caribbean Africans and mixed race (50%+ white) blacks so the low IQ ADOS blacks are going to get the short end of the stick as always.

    • Replies: @Achilleus
    , @Jonathan Mason
  132. Roger says:
    @PhysicistDave

    No, John Bell is not worth reading. He had a belief that quantum mechanics was wrong, and proposed a way to compare it to alternative theories using local hidden variables. Subsequent experiments proved that those alternative theories were wrong, and quantum mechanics was just fine.

    Bell has a cult following among those who still don’t want to accept quantum mechanics, but he is just a footnote in the textbooks. Most physicists do not accept his views.

  133. • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  134. Bumpkin says:

    apparently, the fear “What if Sailer is right?” is infuriating and/or terrifying to many. It’s almost as if what gets people mad is my being correct so often.

    Thus, when I point out the facts, I’m often greeted with incoherent anger centering on the allegation that I must be a bad person for being so well-informed.

    You’re probably incorrectly personalizing what is the reverse causation: they’re probably thinking instead, “it can’t possibly be true that ‘African-Americans seem to have a particular tendency toward criminal violence’ so why is this guy saying it? Oh, I know, he’s a bad person!” In other words, they don’t want to believe the facts, so they demonize you instead.

    progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative. This malevolent insanity on the part of orthodox liberal thinkers terrifies me.

    I don’t think any of them actually believe that, genocide is merely the boogeyman they trot out to justify keeping the racial premise outside the Overton window.

    The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    This coda is simplistic and not befitting the rest of your well thought-out post. I think it’s more that they’re scared that talking about genetic differences will lead to more tribalism and eventually violence, which some exaggerate as possible “genocide.” It is a reasonable concern, though probably overblown, but it certainly shouldn’t keep us from pursuing and proclaiming the truth.

  135. Achilleus says:
    @Jack D

    It’s not at all clear that the new, majority non-white America is really going to be on board with treating blacks as extra special.

    I think that’s behind at least part of the recently revived and desperate push for reparations. Future POTUS Juan Carlos Alejandro Jesùs Mudarra-Jimenez is not likely to be very sympathetic to black financial claims against the Old America.

  136. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Another fake hate hoax. A BLM activist starts a fire, blames whites, gets caught on camera setting the fire herself. The arsonist is called Victoria Unanka. Unanka is not a typical black American surname. She sounds like her parents are straight from Africa, and she’s figured out the whole native U.S. black scammer game.

    https://thepostmillennial.com/hate-hoax-blm-activist-claimed-she-was-the-victim-of-hate-crimes-including-arson-video-shows-she-started-the-fire

  137. Currahee says:

    Stevo: my cultural history prof., George Mosse, frequently said “The only logical denouement of racism is murder.” My silent rejoinder always was “or get the hell out of Dodge.”

    But Mosse, a Jew, had escaped Nazism as a child; so that is what he knew.

  138. @PhysicistDave

    No, they would rather throw you in jail. Jokes on you, buddy hoy (sorry you don’t get the humor).

    • Troll: Realist
  139. @Desiderius

    Email Shows Researcher Who Funded Wuhan Lab, Admits Manipulating Coronaviruses, Thanked Fauci For Dismissing Lab-Leak Theory

    https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/email-shows-researcher-who-funded-wuhan-lab-admits-manipulating-coronaviruses-thanked


    “Not Really Effective”: Fauci Panned Masks For Preventing COVID-19 Infection In Email

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/not-really-effective-fauci-panned-masks-preventing-covid-19-infection-email

  140. kihowi says:
    @AnotherDad

    In my heart I think he’s jerking himself off thinking that the prestige press is following him on the sly and either getting triggered or secretly agreeing.

  141. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Tulsa riot commemoration cancelled because three blacks wanted massive cash payments from the organizers. It’s pretty funny.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/tulsa-remember-rise-event-canceled-days-centennial-race-massacre-n1269028?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

    • Replies: @anon
  142. bomag says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    …and soon this will be done in reverse order.

    • LOL: Nicholas Stix
  143. anon[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t you just miss the days when you could beat the shit outta children? I mean, what kind a freedom does a man really have if he can’t leave switch welts on a boy’s testicles?

    A much better take of the Peterson situation: https://www.unz.com/isteve/adrian-petersons-random-family/

  144. @Desiderius

    Since my search for this Hatfield got me to this page* about the 1964 election on the GOP side, I disagree with you even more than I did 10 minutes ago, Desiderius.

    What do you want? Oh, you want a guy who will WIN? Yeah, we got that in Jerry Ford over Ronald Reagan in 1976. We got that with George W. Bush in 2000. Sure, that worked just great …

    From this article:

    If in 1964 you thought the US should pull out of the “satanic UN” because it posed an existential threat to your church and your family, then Goldwater was your man. If in 1964 you thought disgraced Senator Joseph McCarthy was a great American patriot who had been given a raw deal by a witch hunting press then again, Goldwater was your guy. Not all Goldwater supporters were deeply reactionary racists or antisemites who believed in outrageous conspiracy theories, but it appeared that the nation’s most outspoken, reactionary bigots and conspiracy theorists were all Goldwater supporters.

    Yes, imagine if we had pulled out of the satanic UN. We’d have not had to hear the bitching from ungrateful bastards from all over the globe right there in NYC**. Yes, it would indeed have been better if Joe McCarthy was seen as the great American patriot he was. We may have seen the internal Cold War being waged underneath our noses.

    Oh, and I guess they didn’t know Mr. AuH2O was 1/2 Jewish when they came out and supported him either, sure … what an idiot (the writer linked-to).

    Mr. Goldwater famously said “Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue. Fuckin’ A, Barry! If I had been able to be there, I’d have been the one yelling the loudest.

    BTW, hell with all this RIP for this celebrity, sportsball players, and politicians crap. R.I.P., Barry Goldwater – a man who would have saved the nation for another few decades.

    You’re wrong on this one, Desiderius. Don’t be a sqush. That’s the problem we keep running into.

    .

    * It is written from the idiot-left perspective, but I got the facts I needed.

    ** Not just get US out of the UN, but get the UN out of the US.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  145. @PhysicistDave

    ‘…The current insanity will not last.’

    So one hopes.

    The problem I see is how are we going to work our way back to any kind of sane consensus? Humpty-Dumpty has definitively fallen off the wall, and we’re not going to be able to put him together again.

    Here, I’ve noticed that while we can all agree about what’s wrong, when one looks at everyone’s shopping list for a solution…they don’t have the same items on it.

    Some people seem to want some kind of religious authoritarian state, for example. Well, I don’t, and that’s the point. It’s not a question of whether that would be good or not — but that we don’t agree about it.

    So where are you going to go where most people will be satisfied with the outcome? Is there still such a place?

    …or are we really, finally, definitively screwed?

  146. @Achmed E. Newman

    Glad you put those quotation marks around “science.”

    “Social science” has always been a contradiction in terms.

    • Replies: @tr
  147. @Achmed E. Newman

    No I want a candidate who wanted us out of Vietnam in 1964.

    And one who wasn’t a libertarian idiot.

    Libertarians are the squishes.

  148. @PhysicistDave

    Glad you put those quotation marks around “science.”

    “Social science” has always been a contradiction in terms.

  149. cthulhu says:

    Maybe I’m over optimistic, but I see what’s going on now as the last gasp of the blank slate devotees, before being crushed by the rogue wave of GWAS and psychometric studies. It will probably be a tough next 10-15 years, but there will just be too much evidence to deny anymore. The trick will be to survive the ongoing Crazy Years relatively intact.

    Steve, I don’t see much different with what you’ve been saying and what Steven Pinker said in his masterpiece, The Blank Slate. Pinker has been able to thread the needle and avoid cancellation – witness the attempt last year which fell so flat – and so has David Reich. Eventually, I expect Pinker to take the road that Watson and Murray have taken / are taking, when he is at the point where he doesn’t care anymore. I fully expect the MSM to ignore Murray’s upcoming book, as they did his last one, but some ignoramous on the left won’t be able to resist and will decide to make it a cause celebe, and the resulting publicity will get some hidden converts now and more over time. The lust for power and retribution among the “woke” will turn off more and more people, and “woke” will eventually be seen as that worst of American sins…bad for business.

    Maybe I’m wrong, and should focus my energies on making an escape plan from a doomed country. Maybe I’ll spend some time on a backup plan. But I think we’re not quite dead yet.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  150. @Desiderius

    I doubt a President Goldwater would have ramped up the war and prosecuted it like the scumbag Johnson. He was an honest guy, not out for the votes for next time, but for what is right. You don’t see that too often.

    Goldwater was the best GOP candidate since Calvin Coolidge a century ago, who won. It was too late by 1964 – Americans had gotten too stupid already, or it was the TV. No, Libertarians are far from being the squishes, no matter what stupid open-borders crap the modern Reason magazine types believe in.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Getaclue
  151. @PhysicistDave

    All living things, from people to ideas, have a finite amount of energy. The question is what will the “current insanity” mutate into: a calming of the waters or a descent into genocidal madness. Maybe something between those two options. Steve mentioned the genocidal impulse of his/our adversaries near the end of his essay; it’s real, but how much of it is confined to social media? Twitter is a magnet for drama queens.

  152. Currahee says:
    @Alfa158

    Support your local sheriff.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  153. @Buffalo Joe

    This system of ours is dysfunctional.

    Time to consider a Second Constitutional Convention.

  154. @John Derbyshire

    That comment deserves a Goldwater Box.

    But the Democrat come-back was: “In your guts you know he’s nuts.”

    Considering that he (and Ayn Rand and Hugh Hefner) was ahead of their own curve on elective abortion, they might have had a point– one the party won’t appreciate being reminded of.

    America has adopted his view on that and on guns. The pioneer state on both was not his Arizona but Washington. In the same year, 1967.

    • Replies: @Getaclue
  155. Spent most my life believing that. I was mistaken.

    Proof is in the pudding and Libertardianism has given us an entire judiciary shitting it’s pants in unison among other jaw-dropping wonders. I’m done.

    Hatfield wasn’t good because he won, he won because he was good. Goldwater’s legacy is McCain, Sinema, and the Poz.

  156. joe_mama says:

    If you’re right, and you can stop this thing, Steve… you will have saved the lives of millions of registered voters.

    If you’re wrong, you’ll go to jail – peacefully, quietly. You’ll enjoy it.

  157. @Desiderius

    And one who wasn’t a libertarian idiot.

    Concealed carry, end the draft, pensions funded by assets rather than taxes, freedom of association… Yeah, he was a real lunatic. Perhaps that’s why George McGovern liked him.

    Libertarians are the squishes.

    The younger ones are as PC as their peers. They sure weren’t 50 years ago. Read the literature of the day.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Desiderius
  158. @Prester John

    Time to consider a Second Constitutional Convention.

    How do you propose to keep the Bolsheviks out of this Convention, and thereby from seeding the new Constitution with all of the things that they want?

  159. @Prester John

    Time to consider a Second Constitutional Convention.

    Didn’t Phyllis Schlafly and the Birchers warn us about this decades now? In a much saner environment? Such a thing would be out of control, by design, like the election that gave California Gov Arnold.

    That’s why none of the 27 amendments, nor near-amendments like the ERA, have taken this route.

  160. JimDandy says:
    @Svevlad

    Good. So, you can easily trim the position down this this:

    When it comes to the plight of black America, white racism is not a factor.

  161. @Luke Lea

    “impossible to believe”

    Quantum theory is so wonderfully weird that it has to exist. And if it doesn’t exist I’ll plug my ears and go “la-la-la” when the “smartest physicists who ever lived” attempt to convince this handsome caveman that it doesn’t.

  162. JimDandy says:
    @Red Pill Angel

    And the Mexicans take the only jobs that backside of the bell can do.

    • Replies: @Red Pill Angel
  163. @Johann Theron

    Johann Theron says:
    June 2, 2021 at 7:14 am GMT • 10.9 hours ago

    Please elaborate. The first paragraph sounds bright. The third one contradicts my intuitions, contradicts the conclusion of yours, …then you go on to paragraph four out in the clear.

    The “bug” is more aggravating than the bend in the Sailer title note, since your mention is essential in understanding “smarts” as to “intelligence”. Admittedly, probably the catch is in language as a functional(non) input –and direct(non) to comprehension.

  164. Alden says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Wonderful post thank you. Personally, just my opinion, I’m not anti government. Society needs certain things and government provides them including welfare. Then government should provide those things directly. Instead of funding endless non profit organizations to take the money to support their subversive activities.

    What we have today is the American government subsidizing revolutionaries. It’s really unprecedented in human history. That a government funds the people planning to overthrow it.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  165. J.Ross says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sad Agree: Radley Balko, who was one of the best journalists at Reason (the main Libertarian magazine), is into BLM.

  166. Alden says:
    @PhysicistDave

    OT Dave, any progress on your daughter problems with UCLA ?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  167. Dear Mr. Sailer Sir,

    1) You’re right. That’s why I read your column.

    2) They’re wrong and they fear the truth. That’s why they attack you.

    3) This is fiction, but can reality be far behind?
    https://worldnewsdailyreport.com/trans-species-man-who-self-identifies-as-a-deer-accidentally-shot-by-hunters/

  168. J.Ross says:
    @gent

    I want to believe, especially since the flurry of urinalists pleading that they had any business memory holing hydroxychloroquine and lab origin solely because Trump talked about them. People who could have been saved were allowed to die because of the defamation of hydroxychloroquine.

  169. Anonymous[114] • Disclaimer says:

    Actually, while I’m of course highly biased, my impression is that I am, at least compared with most of my fellow opinionators, rather a good person, more Orwell than Waugh.

    Replace ‘Matt Damon’ with ‘Tom Stoppard’.

  170. Getaclue says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ayn Rand was a complete and total nutter (on top of being a major league hypocrite– welfare recipient while viciously arguing in the opposite direction for the rest of us poor slobs who needed to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps or die and go to hell….) — here’s her idea of the “ideal man” — guy who kidnaps a little girl and cuts her legs off and dismembers her– yes, I really care about anything Ayn Rand might have to say about anything…. I can never understand why anyone EVER cites Ayn Rand for ANYTHING?:

    http://michaelprescott.freeservers.com/romancing-the-stone-cold.html

    Hugh Hefner was so proud of his life/lifestyle that he had all his videos made sealed in concrete and sunk to the bottom of the Ocean, you’d think he’d want them to live on as a testament to his “love” of his great “lifestyle”? — his actions are probably the real testament to his “life’s work” (Inventor and popularizer of Herpes?) and what it amounted to as he looked back on what he wrought? Him and Ayn….:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6424255/Hugh-Hefner-dumped-casket-private-sex-tapes-SEA-passed-away.html

  171. Getaclue says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Libertarians — Heroin/Cocaine for 15 year olds after the abortion…. They’re also the spoilers in a number of elections where we then get a Bolshevik — funny how that works?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  172. @PhysicistDave

    I would add, read Hugh Everett and John von Neumann while you’re at it.

  173. Getaclue says:
    @Anonymous

    Nearly all these “Genius Billionaires” are creations of the hidden hand — total bs narratives as to them and their past “achievements” and all of them used as chess pieces set up to be used against the rest of us by the Bolsheviks to crush the average Peons freedoms into dust…Gates, Bezos, Google Creeps, Zuck etc…. lots of DARPA and CIA “funding” — but they are all “entrepeneurs” and “geniuses”

  174. Redmen says:
    @Bert

    No authorities allowed any of my elderly or sick relatives to die. I’ve heard of a few people (none that I know personally) who have gone to the hospital and/or died from Covid, allegedly. Forgive me if I’m dubious about these anecdotes. The last year was an orchestrated propaganda blitz by the MSM, mainly designed to jettison Trump.

    I agree that the MSM also censored news of likely effective and cheap therapeutics. That’s sort of par for the course since the media depends quite a bit on big pharma.

    While America experienced some excess deaths last year, places like Sweden and Germany had close to none. And although Germany and Sweden tried very different response measures, they had pretty similar results.

    • Replies: @Bert
  175. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    the answer to “what if i’m right?” that you steve your own self have given is WRONG.

    all the “science” and facts support mette frederiksen style national democratic socialism/social democracy.

    a kinder gentler hitler for our time (which has no stalin):

    much better than mette world peace.

  176. Redmen says:
    @anonymous

    “Checking”? Sounds very STASI.

  177. Middlebury College, Vermont.

    Charles Murray.

    Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

    M-1 Abrams Battle Tank.

    Steve Sailer must show some leadership in making sure Charles Murray avoids Middlebury College. But if Murray is stubbornly determined to go back to Middlebury College, Vermont, I hope Sailer will suggest going in a M-1 Abrams Battle Tank rather than a Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

    I think the Abrams Tank has better armor and will be better able to withstand the ferocity of the Snot Brats at Middlebury College.

    Don’t let us down, Steve Sailer!

    Godspeed!

  178. @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    Good post, thanks.

    What is forgotten by people like Hunter is that, in attempting to understand the other side’s point of view, what matters isn’t what Hunter thinks is true, what matters is what the other side thinks is true. Whether it is true or not.

    Imagine a married couple arguing. The husband thinks the wife is bossy and controlling. The woman argues that she isn’t bossy and controlling. But it doesn’t really matter if she is or if she isn’t bossy or controlling, what matters is that the husband thinks she is.

    [MORE]

    Hunter reveals himself with this:

    “Democracy, in my view, is an agreement that we will not kill each other over our differences, but instead we’ll talk through those differences. And part of what’s troubling is that I’m beginning to see signs of the justification for violence on both sides. Obviously, on January 6, we not only saw an act of violence—I mean, talk about a transgression—but one that the people who were involved were capable of justifying.”

    He’s just now noticing violence? Did what happen with Steve Scalise escape his notice? Does Eric “Bike Lock” Clanton not exist?

    He makes reference to “both sides”, but then the only act of “violence” he can think of is the non-violent (unless you’re Ashlee Babbit) Jan 6th. Trump supporters being violently attacked in San Jose, the endless Antifa nonsense, blacks burning down cities and looting…none of this was “violence” to Hunter. Employed by U-VA, he works right there in Charlottesville and apparently failed to notice protesters being violently attacked by the left.

    Hunter says “I have this old-fashioned view that what we’re supposed to do is to understand before we take action”.

    To understand someone you have to listen to them. These people don’t listen.

  179. Redmen says:
    @Gamecock

    Cole has written some good stuff. But he seems to be going off the deep end trying to defend the “wet market” theory on the issue of where Covid-19 originated from. Not sure why he’s so dug in on this while the evidence seems to point towards it having been manmade.

    He’s more interested in winning the argument, than in knowing the truth.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  180. @SF

    I have not been able to Google any articles or studies giving any other viewpoint on Tulsa than that it was an unprovoked massacre.

    Google. That’s funny.

    Wikipedia (far from a great source itself) doesn’t even try to hide it:

    After the arrest, rumors spread through the city that Rowland was to be lynched. Upon hearing reports that a mob of hundreds of White men had gathered around the jail where Rowland was being kept, a group of 75 Black men, some of whom were armed, arrived at the jail in order to ensure that Rowland would not be lynched. The sheriff persuaded the group to leave the jail, assuring them that he had the situation under control. A shot was fired, and then, according to the reports of the sheriff, “all hell broke loose.” At the end of the exchange of fire, 12 people were dead, 10 White and 2 Black. As news of these deaths spread throughout the city, mob violence exploded.

    “Rumors spread…that Rowland was to be lynched”… IOW he wasn’t going to be lynched, at least if the Sheriff had anything to say about it. This was the “hands up, don’t shoot” of that era. Blacks working themselves into a lather based on hearsay, rather than remaining calm and gathering facts.

    “Upon hearing reports that a mob”…IOW there wasn’t a mob of whites. Blacks working themselves into a lather based on hearsay.

    “12 people were dead, 10 white, 2 black”….So 10 whites, at least some of which can be assumed to be sheriff’s deputies, are murdered by a mob of blacks. However, according to the narrative, only at this point does the violence start.

    Narrative: the enraged whites reacting to black mob violence and murders was a “race massacre”. It just happened one day, for no reason at all.

    • Thanks: Bert
    • Replies: @Alden
  181. Bert says:
    @res

    “Race is a social construct overlaid on a biological reality.”

    Race is a social construct only in the sense that hundreds of professional biologists, specifically taxonomists, gathered data on thousands of species and found that a correlation exists between the extent of the geographic range and the phenotypic differences observable across the geographic range. Species with extensive geographic ranges are almost always polytypic, i.e., have obvious subspecific differentiation.

    If anyone cares enough to try to educate the Woke, show them Roger Conant’s Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians: Eastern and Central North America, or Stebbins’ work for the Western U.S. Shuttle between the range maps, the illustrations, and the subspecific descriptions to demonstrate the routine existence of polytypic species. Then ask them whether human phenotypes are distributed in the same manner. If the “student” is honest, he must answer yes. Abstraction is not an effective way to reach the deluded. The more concrete the better. The Woke will twist any abstraction to their advantage with specious arguments.

  182. @Jonathan Mason

    Can one ramble for thirty years about what is most evidenced and true, and not suggest a path of action? From reading the output, what must then loop into the input. No input corrected for corrected output, as suggested is like pissing up the wall. He (Steve and cohorts) is.

  183. StevenZ says:

    I think much of this has to do with the blanket hatred of White males who are not elite. Much of the world want to view those males as interchangeable with immigrants with a 75 IQ; the problem is that non-elite White males are the reason we have first-world living standards.

    • Agree: Bert
  184. @El Dato

    Editor of leading medical journal to step down after failing to survive backlash over tweet daring to question racism narrative

    In other words, Dr. Bauchner failed to exhibit “adequate” levels of anti-White hatred in the current year, and was ejected by those in power. He not only made a mild suggestion that not all Whites are evil — he even questioned the validity of the semitic construct of “structural racism”, which is an essential tenet of the currently-hegemonic ideology. Clearly a rank heretic.

    Note also that “right wing” RT simply parrots the “racially offensive tweet” canard, automatically accepting it as valid. RT does not have the power to question The Ban; they simply accept it.

    Mr. Warren’s whinging is irrelevant. They need stuff like that coming from the “powerless and oppressed” to support the false narrative that “the people” are driving the anti-White agenda.

    If Warren’s attacks were directed at an unapproved target, he would be immediately banned from Twitter, demonized by the “news” media, dropped from his PhD program… and possibly charged with “desecrating the sacred temples of medicine” and “trying to usurp Dr. Bauchner’s seat in a highly terroristic, coup-like manner” or some s**t.

    Meanwhile, the hegemonic narrative promotion agencies will tell people that the attacks on Bacuhner were a “grass roots reaction” that “went viral” and blablabla. Victimhood-claiming is how power is asserted under the current system; they have to claim that this kind of attack, which is clearly a top-down exercise of power, is actually an example of weak, oppressed, marginalized people rebelling against the cisheteronormative White racist patriarchy or something.

  185. anon[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Travis

    The progressive solution is to eliminate Whites from North America, What is the Sailer solution ? What is the Alt-Right solution ? What is the conservative solution ?

    What is your solution?

    • Replies: @Travis
  186. @Anonymous

    FourSevenFour, I am not going to disagree with you but in a limp defense of the republicans, the MSM stands strongly opposed to them and with the left.

  187. @anonymous

    ThreeFiveEight, and in Steve’s defense, not much has changed in the black community in the last 15 years. Try ‘The Root’ for the black opinion on everything and be surprised at how a black blog site can be racist.

  188. @cthulhu

    The problem when half the country is less than 1% of the globe is that pissing off that half tends to have trouble NOT finding a lucrative market somewhere in that 99%.

  189. Did I mention my favorite quote from Mircea Eliade’s The Myth of the Eternal Return?

    The primitive… cannot conceive of an unprovoked suffering; it arises from a personal fault… or from his neighbor’s malevolence… but there is always a fault at the bottom of it[.]

    In other words, if your world-view requires you to believe in your neighbor’s malevolence, maybe you have a problem, you primitive.

  190. @anonymous

    I think you are motivated by a grudge against blacks

    – So – you like that – or what? – I don’t quite get what you’re after.

  191. @William Badwhite

    He makes reference to “both sides”,

    There seems to be margin opening up in that corner to acknowledge things are out of whack in both columns – admittedly a big step since anytime before January 20.

    But caveats aplenty. “Antifa” is now replaced with “anarchists”. January 6 is front-in-center 24×7 with Congressional hearings and acts, meanwhile 500 riots and $2+ billion damages, Portland and Seattle – reported with maximum mistiness.

    FWIW (and it isn’t worth much) – I take it to mean there are adults in the room, but they probably aren’t in charge.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  192. @Ganderson

    Gandi, the annual, but cancelled this year, Dyngus Day Parade in Buffalo starts at Superman corner…Clark and Kent Streets…true fact. And great D-I lax championship but I wanted Maryland to win. Great game.

  193. Alden says:
    @anon

    Tulsaraceriotwordpress.com

    1918 communist party USA formed by Ellis Island immigrants and a few idiot WASPS like John Reed. Son of evil capitalist pigs who exploited lumberjacks and destroyed forests.

    The White goyim working class weren’t dumb enough to fall for Yiddish speaking communist lies. But a few black leaders were. The CPUSA funded and organized some black organizers.

    A black boy was arrested and jailed for sexual assault. No one noticed. Some English speaking communists arrived and rented a black mob. The black mob started the riot the Whites finished it.

    The black Wall Street that was destroyed by the black, not the White rioters was nothing more than the black part of the downtown business district. Near city hall police headquarters and the jail where the poor innocent baby black boy was held. As usual in every riot, blacks destroyed their own neighborhoods.

    In another 25 years school texts will claim that evil White supremacist KKKers from Grosse Point invaded the black neighborhoods of Detroit in 1967 to burn them down. And S Central Los Angeles was invaded and destroyed by White supremacists from Palos Verdes and Beverly Hills during the Rodney King riots.

    Whatever happened to Grosse Point now that Detroit is gone and the auto industry moved overseas?

    • Replies: @anon
  194. @Reg Cæsar

    You mention Pat Moynihan.

    Yeah, he does. Kinda mischaracterizes him, though. Sailer wrote:

    …with me being closer to the domestic neoconservatives like James Q. Wilson and Richard Herrnstein. But I also admired liberals like Daniel Patrick Moynihan

    Moynihan was a neocon as well. Sure, he didn’t like the label, and he stayed in the Democrat Party, but let’s be serious here. He was a fanatical Israel Firster — both sides would agree on that:

    https://www.wrmea.org/1994-june/election-watch-daniel-moynihan-faces-pro-israel-competition.html

    https://mosaicmagazine.com/picks/israel-zionism/2018/02/when-daniel-p-moynihan-stood-for-israel-and-for-truth-at-the-un/

    He literally wrote the cover article for the first issue of The Public Interest [The Weekly Standard of its day — run by Irving Kristol instead of Bill], and a lot of his other work was published in it.

    He was personally and intellectually close to people named Kristol, Himmelfarb, Podhoretz, and Decter. Not to mention Elliott Abrams and Checker Finn.

    He literally co-authored a book with Nathan Glazer. Etc. So calling him a “liberal” seems… a little inaccurate here, no matter what title Moynihan himself would have preferred.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  195. @JackOH

    Black Supremacism, added to which the White provocateurs and hangers-on, including major corporations for their own unspoken reasons, is the elephant in the room I’m thinking of.

    I don’t see this specific elephant. I mean that literally – your elephant does not take shape in the way a real elephant would. – So: It might be more of a nightmare, what you’re after here.
    (Could be even scarier than an elephant).

    • Replies: @JackOH
  196. Alden says:
    @William Badwhite

    It was Bolsheviks who spread the news that the black would be lynched by Whites. English speaking bolsheviks. There was a great demand for English speaking Bolshevik riot instigators in those days. As so few Bolsheviks spoke English, Yiddish being the official language of the CPUSA.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  197. anon[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    our elites are basically trying to bang a round peg into a square hole,

    Nitpick. It is the other way around. The square peg refuses to fit in the round hole because of physical reality. The obvious solution?

    Get a bigger hammer.

  198. anon[394] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    It’s the gibs. Any of these big, public events reduce down to the gibs.

    Gibs on top of gibs on top of gibs. Gibs all the way down…

  199. @SF

    As William Badwhyte noted, even wiki doesn’t manage to disguise that it began with Blacks shooting a bunch of Whites. This podcast covers it pretty well [probably has some NSFW language]:

    https://therightstuff.biz/2019/10/28/tds511-anti-citation-remarks/

    I haven’t come across any written sources that review it as thoroughly — but I haven’t really looked, either.
    “I have not been able to Google any articles or studies giving any other viewpoint on Tulsa than that it was an unprovoked massacre”

    Yeah, you’re pretty unlikely to find any significantly heretical information using Google’s algorithm when researching a narrative that’s getting such heavy promotion from the “news” media. It’s less effective as a weapon of anti-White “epistemic violence” [as the woke refer to it] if it’s easily refutable. Yandex [Russian Google] is often decent for finding stuff that Google is suppressing, since their priorities for censorship are different. Or you could try Qwant, Swisscows, etc.

  200. @Chrisnonymous

    Steven Pinker seemed to have made many people (from the left and right) angry, because they do not want to accept his basic argument in Enlightenment Now! – that people do like to cooperate and that things are indeed getting better – big scale. I think conservatives don’t like Pinker’s – facts which do show that lots of things are getting better, because this optimistic worldview strips them from their monopoly for doom – and maybe many leftists don’t like what Pinker says in Enlightenment Now! for the same reason: Lots of – Marxist not least – leftists are doomsayers too – in the first place even.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  201. anon[156] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    The link didn’t work, but thank you for the synopsis. Sounds about right.

    • Replies: @Alden
  202. @Getaclue

    They’re also the spoilers in a number of elections where we then get a Bolshevik —

    That’s not the fault of the people voting L. It’s the fault of the people voting for the Red Team Bolsheviks over the Blue Team Bolsheviks. Funny how that never works.

    That bit about “spoiling” it doesn’t fly with me. BTW, in 1968, Wallace got a very significant number of votes, and per the Pat Buchanan book The Greatest Comeback, his presence in the election brought Nixon further to the right on some issues. (That didn’t stop Nixon from being a squish, though. It’s pretty clear from Pat’s story, that Nixon wanted to be elected, PERIOD. He didn’t care what it took, principals-wise, to get there.)

  203. @Redneck farmer

    Haha! What does, Redneck, writing comments here, or writing letters in to cucked-out Conservative, Inc magazines while underage? If it’s the former, they’re gonna need a bigger ream of paper.

  204. I think Steve’s main weakness is a statement like this…

    The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    I disagree. I think that dominant intellectuals, such as these, should be removed from their positions and barred from ever holding such positions again. Those like them should be prohibited from holding such positions, in the future. Stop arguing with these people and meet them with legal and ruthless force.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @James Speaks
  205. @JimDandy

    Don’t forget automation! We need more automation so both Central American immigrants and those Bell Curve backenders will have more free time. What could go wrong?

  206. vinteuil says:

    Maybe that’s my fault?

    In England, there’s this whole school of Tory pussies who blame everything on Enoch Powell.

    In his “Rivers of Blood” speech, he used the phrase “charming, wide-grinning piccaninnies!” – thereby tarring, forever, the cause of immigration restriction with the taint of racism.

    After that, one simply couldn’t oppose mass immigration, for any reason whatsoever. The position was toxic.

    In America, it was Steve Sailer instead of Enoch Powell, and the toxic phrase was “African-Americans tend to possess poorer native judgment than members of better-educated groups, and thus need stricter moral guidance from society.”

    …at which point all the pseudo-conservatives on the planet swarmed all over each other to prove how much they loved black people and how much they hated Steve Sailer.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  207. @black sea

    Whites will be a minority in the US in twenty years. Whites are already a minority at our Universities, high schools and grade schools.

    The number of Whites under the age of 40 has shrunk 27% since 1990. From 120 million whites in 1990 to just 88 million whites under the age of 40 today. The working age population will be majority non-White in 10 years time. If we start counting Arabs, Syrians , North Africans and Persians as non-white it will occur sooner.

  208. @Jack D

    For 400 years America was the place where people came to get rich because there was almost unlimited land and resources relative to the existing population.

    And get rich they did, partly because wealthy businessman and landowners found that they were able to shape the laws of this new country to favor them getting rich.

    And then in the 20th century large corporations realized that the US had become such a large single market, that if you could corner the market in a particular product or service, or even in a particular type of sandwich, you could become immensely rich.

    Most of the people who got here first happened to be white, and although quite a few Africans also came in the early yes, they seemed to have a hard time getting ahead, and even when they tried to strike out on their own, there were laws instituted by white people with Second Amendment rights that put them right back where they came from.

    However with a population of 300 million people now, I’m not sure that everything is still up for grabs in this new nation and that everybody can become wealthy if they work hard.

    At least not unless the population is substantially increased by bringing in more people at the bottom, just like in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Now is surely a time for consolidation. America has become very rich, but it has also become very ugly. Where are the beautiful cities of America?

    Will future archaeologists marvel at the trailer parks and airports of America in the way that we look at the Parthenon in Athens or the Colosseum in Rome?

    Now is the time to share the wealth of it and find work for everybody using all the technologies that we’ve developed to make a better environment a better place to live a better place to raise families.

    I was looking at a billboard yesterday in Ecuador advertising regular child birth for $400 and a cesarean section for $500. I mentioned this to a friend in the US, and she said that in the US it was $5,000 to $7,000 for a regular birth and about $11,500 for a cesarean.

    Well, that’s fine, and the US is a much wealthier country than Ecuador even though they both use the US dollar, but I do wonder whether most young women in the early twenties in the US really have $5,000 to $7000 on hand to pay for a childbirth.

    It seems like they may not, because 43% of the births in the US are paid for by Medicaid. Let’s just get rid of Medicaid, but let’s also pay obstetricians what we think they are worth.

    If we want a society that is going to make obstetricians wealthy, then it needs to be a society in which the average young couple of childbearing age are also wealthy.

    If lawyers want to operate cartels so they can earn as much as $300 an hour, then the minimum wage needs to be at least $50 an hour. Or else let the clients decide how much attorneys are worth, and force attorneys to accept all reasonable bids if they want a license to offer services to the public.

    • Disagree: Etruscan Film Star
  209. CORRECTION: ” That African-Americans seem to have a particular tendency toward criminal violence suggests that they n̴e̴e̴d̴ [would disproportionately benefit from] more, not less, law and order than do even the rest of us.

  210. JimB says:

    Maybe as a goof Steve should run for Congress in a conservative California district, one with only a few thousand voters. When Steve gets to the Capitol he can read his daily column every day to Nancy Pelosi and the Congressional Black Caucus.

    • LOL: Dissident
  211. @LondonBob

    Critics of “wokeness” should redirect their anger away from private companies and toward the explicit government policies that created this situation.

    That’s kind of an odd take. I mean, porque no los dos? Don’t these people realize that politicians are dependent on money from “private” megadonors, and on favorable press coverage from “private” mass media? Conversely, have they ever looked into the intersection between “private” Big Tech companies and the “public” espionage community?

    Steve I think you are being optimistic

    Yeah, so is Hanania. He’s right about the GOP’s lack of a plan to oppose this stuff, of course. What he doesn’t get — or deliberately avoids mentioning — is that the GOP is not incompetent or lacking in vision. Their ineffectiveness on this issue is the system working as designed. They’re deliberately ineffective. They’re the Washington Generals to the Dems’ Harlem Globetrotters. And when the issue is something like antitrust enforcement or welfare payments to Israel to subsidize their aggression, the roles reverse — “The Squad” is equally ineffective.

    And this?

    Rolling back overbroad interpretations of the Civil Rights Act and previous Executive Orders won’t change the culture overnight for a movement that has let things get this far. But that is the obvious place to start, and would at least give conservatives a chance in the fight for institutions.

    Yeah that’s not gonna work, because it’s not an “overbroad interpretation.” Caldwell was correct to point out that the “Civil Rights” Act essentially set up an alternate “Constitution” that trumps our ostensible one whenever the two conflict, and that the gradual downhill slide was inevitable. All of this stuff flows from the original intent of forced integration law. You can’t just get rid of systematic anti-White racial preferences in employment and college admissions, drop the “disparate impact” standard, and keep the “core” of so-called “civil rights” law.

    And of course, the media/ academia/ NGO complex is not going to stop promoting ever-increasing anti-White hatred.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  212. @Buffalo Joe

    And Biden at that speech referred to the Jan. 9 events at the Capitol
    which in fact occurred on Jan. 6. Doesn’t say much for his memory of detail. It’s like Reagan in his later years falling asleep at meetings.

  213. @Anonymous

    Thus, in the two party duopoly of American politics, one half has been solidly bought by the people Steve detests – by that I mean the race hustlers and wokeists.

    Bought with what? Credit? What do these chicks have? (Besides $3m in real estate…)

    This is almost five years old:

    ‘The Movement’s Been Hijacked’: A Black Lives Matter Leader Quits Over Public School Platform

  214. @Patrick in SC

    Good comment Patrick. I would add that it is often hard work digging the Truth out of the ground, and people, like any animal, avoid burning calories, even if they are mental calories. Intellectual laziness plays a large part in being a liberal. Note Steve’s comment:

    On the other hand, the one thing that really scares me is that progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative.

    With a little effort one can think of perfectly ethical alternatives to genocide in dealing with people who aren’t as advanced as yourself. But that little effort is more than most people want to make. Better to be “passionate about your beliefs”, as liberals like to say, especially when moral sanctimony and piety feel so good.
    It’s just low character all the way around on the part of liberals.
    Also very true that young women (and feminized men) are least able to rein in their emotional sanctimony and use their brain instead.

    • Replies: @anon
  215. @Dieter Kief

    ” things are indeed getting better”

    In China, yes. Not in the US, Canada, Australia, UK or Europe. Real male wages have been falling for 20-50 years while house prices go through the ceiling.

    50 years ago the average UK worker could afford a stay at home mum for his kids as well as a house and car. His US counterpart could afford to holiday in Europe.

    I could never afford (even at my top earnings which were three times UK median) the house I live in now. I’d need to be a City quant with a six figure annual bonus.

    https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/the-typical-male-u-s-worker-earned-less-in-2014-than-in-1973/

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    , @Art Deco
  216. @vinteuil

    “In his “Rivers of Blood” speech, he used the phrase “charming, wide-grinning piccaninnies!” – thereby tarring, forever, the cause of immigration restriction with the taint of racism.”

    As “pickney” the word is still used in Jamaica for a small child.

    Jump in a minivan we gwan a country
    Leave the wife and the hungry pickney
    We have fe travel over hills and valley
    Just to find this a good good sensi

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=h0_SsOu830k

    • Thanks: vinteuil
  217. @res

    “I tend to prefer my synthesis: “Race is a social construct overlaid on a biological reality.”

    Can you say a little more about this?

    • Replies: @res
  218. Sean says:
    @Roger

    Bell has a cult following

    That quantum mechanics calculations supply correct answers hasn’t been in dispute, but it was and still is not at all clear what is going on. Bell was heterodox inasmuch he questioned what the underlying reality was, but he was very careful to keep that aspect of his thinking hidden from his colleagues.

  219. AndrewR says:
    @Charon

    Lol well at least he’s openly cementing the concepts of pedophilia with BLM and #MeToo. When people hear BLM or gay pride or trans rights or whatever, it’s good that they associate that with a shameless sexual predator.

  220. AndrewR says:
    @Charon

    Lol well at least he’s openly cementing the concepts of pedophilia with BLM and #MeToo. When people hear BLM or gay pride or trans rights or whatever, it’s good that they associate that with a shameless sexual predator.

  221. Art Deco says:
    @James Forrestal

    He literally wrote the cover article for the first issue of The Public Interest [The Weekly Standard of its day — run by Irving Kristol instead of Bill], and a lot of his other work was published in it.

    The Public Interest was a small circulation quarterly journal which translated the content of academic journals for intellectual generalists. It was nothing like The Weekly Standard.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  222. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sam Malone

    He can’t. He couldn’t find work in his degree field and worked as an engineer. As the saying goes, all the scientists thought he must be brilliant in engineering while all the engineers thought he must be brilliant in science.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
  223. Art Deco says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    For 400 years America was the place where people came to get rich because there was almost unlimited land and resources relative to the existing population.

    Very few people will ever be rich and they did not get rich here. They were merely able to obtain a higher standard of living. Note, the most salient immigration wave commenced in 1890 after the country was comprehensively settled and at a point when the share of the labor force in agriculture was declining.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
  224. Pixo says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    “ in the US it was $5,000 to $7,000 for a regular birth”

    Medicaid pays for the majority of US births. Subsidized nearly free Obamacare much of the rest. My fiancée/babymama included, $70 a month though an Obamacare exchange, albeit with pretty big copays.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  225. @Alden

    We do that every generation with our kids. The trick is not letting them.

  226. @Art Deco

    Rarely has greatness skipped a generation so thoroughly.

    • Agree: vinteuil
    • Replies: @fnn
  227. Libertarianism will not be enough to meet this challenge, no matter how much it might be personally or theoretically appealing. We all know what the Romney people did to Paul in ‘12 too. It will take something a couple orders of magnitude bigger and broader than mere concealed carry or withdrawal from the UN or whatever.

  228. Ralph L says:
    @Achilleus

    As I recall, the protagonist goes insane.

    • LOL: Achilleus
  229. anon[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Roger

    Another little step towards quantum computing.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/06/210601155610.htm

    A pop-sci article on human consciousness, and possible roles quantum effects may play.
    https://physicsworld.com/a/do-quantum-effects-play-a-role-in-consciousness/

    Keeping up in a given field is not always easy. Let’s cut Dave some slack; respect our elders.

  230. Corvinus says:

    ISteve, what if you’re wrong?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @vinteuil
  231. Travis says:
    @anon

    I do not know of any viable political solutions. It is not too hard to notice the problems with America, but near impossible to discuss the real causes of Black criminality and Black under-performance in school and work. But since it is not possible to discuss the issues in public without being blacklisted it is difficult to come up with solutions.

    In a few years Whites will be a minority within the United States. There is no way to prevent this from occurring. Even ending Immigration will just postpone the demographic changes for another decade. The few remaining whites could from communities like the Amish have done to live within the United States segregated from the rest or choose to have inter-racial grandchildren and not have to worry about their progeny being targeted for being White.

    • Replies: @anon
  232. Gamecock says:

    there were laws instituted by white people with Second Amendment rights that put them right back where they came from.

    Contrived stupidity.

  233. Anonymous[658] • Disclaimer says:

    Youre not polemic but is it existentialism or social critique ?

  234. fnn says:
    @Desiderius

    Yes, Jews are not as smart as they used to be:

  235. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    You don’t have the slightest understanding of markets. If lawyers and obstetricians make 20x as much as floor sweepers (and CEOs and professional athletes makes 20x as much as lawyers and doctors), this all reflects the relative scarcity and demand for these skills in that society. Anybody can be taught to sweep a floor in a day, but the # of people who have the skill and talent and have undergone the years of training necessary to deliver a baby or score a 3 pointers is much much smaller.

    The government can no more decree a market price for anything than they can decree the level of the ocean. What happens when they do is that all of the people who can’t produce say $50 worth of goods and services in a hour won’t have a job at all and the government will have to pay them for doing nothing. Businesses will only hire people if it is profitable to do so.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Jonathan Mason
  236. What if I’m right?

    Cassandra was right. Nobody believed her, partly because of Apollo’s curse, but partly because Troy was doomed and the Trojan Ruling Class didn’t want to hear it — the Trojans had their own cognitive bias.

    Just like our Ruling Class.

  237. @Charon

    No joe, your administration will be hell.

  238. @Corvinus

    If he were he’d have a better class of detractor.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  239. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Where does your friend live, Povertyville Mississippi the poorest state in the USA?

    In California the charge for an American mother childbirth and 24 hour hospital stay for Mom and baby was $13,000 normal $15,000 cesarian. last time I checked

    For illegal immigrant moms and babies there’s no charge at all. Medi caid for the illegal immigrant indigents pays the hospital $ 1,100 after 3 years of the hospital harassing medi caid to pay the bill. And paying the clerks who do the billing. Some hospitals have given up harassing medi caid for payment because it’s too expensive.

    The Americans who pay $13,000 subsidize the illegals who pay nothing. Some American moms and babies use the free medi caid of course. But there’s not that many of them compared to the illegals.

    The cost of childbirth isn’t paid by the parents. It’s paid by the parents insurance companies. Of course the parents pay huge insurance premiums. But the insurance companies pay the costs. Including the costs of the gazillions of clerks and computers and software and printing and mailing bill collecting entails.

    Think of childbirth costs as an 8 unit apartment house. To cover mortgage property taxes utilities twice weekly cleaning of common areas pest control maybe gardening occasional painting washing machine repair and saving for the dreaded major maintenance and a very modest profit the landlord needs $4,000 a month. $500 a month for each apartment.

    But the government says there are poor Americans who can’t afford $500 a month. You must rent one apartment for $100 a month. Ok fine. I’ll just raise the rent on the other apartments $60 a month. I’m sure the tenants won’t mind. We’re all Americans and should help each other.

    But then the government takes over more and more apartments and pays only $100 a month. Soon there’s only one apartment that has to pay
    $3,300 a month to pay all the costs And all the $100 a month apartment tenants are illegal immigrants.

    That’s why medical care costs so much in America. Half the patients, people with insurance pay all the costs. Medical care requires buildings utilities mortgage and property taxes and the medical providers require wages so they can live.

    When half or in some areas more than half the patients pay nothing, the remaining patients pay the entire cost of the health care system.

    That’s why American health care costs so much.

    America health education welfare and pension system of the world.

  240. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    Great post. A good attorney is worth whatever he she charges. A good attorney is “ worth rubies “ . Attorneys are hired guns, protectors and we all need protectors and knights to do battle for us. And protect us from the predators.

    Of course opposition counsel are evil rogues and rascals. But hey, we got our guys or gals, the predators got theirs.

  241. @Alfa158

    In the case of our country, China might play a positive role.

    PRC has BIG problems.

  242. Corvinus says:
    @Desiderius

    When he is, and it is more than he cares to admit, NOTICE how he cagily avoids the detractors.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  243. vinteuil says:
    @Corvinus

    ISteve, what if you’re wrong?

    I.e., what if the conventional wisdom is right, and racial differences in achievement in 2021
    are mostly due to malevolent white guys and the racist system they’ve imposed on us all?

    Well, then, we’ll keep trying all the same stuff we’ve been trying for the last sixty years. ‘Cause it just hasn’t been tried hard enough.

  244. anon[323] • Disclaimer says:
    @rebel yell

    With a little effort one can think of perfectly ethical alternatives to genocide in dealing with people who aren’t as advanced as yourself.

    That’s one way to look at it. But consider another view: to the elites, all the ordinary wypipo are not as advanced, but are troublesome in various ways, including as potential competitors for elite status. Blacks are pets who can be co-opted. Whites are problematic, even when deracinated.

    Who do the elites therefore genocide? What would it look like?

    “Genocide has two phases: one, destruction of the national pattern of the oppressed group; the other, the imposition of the national pattern of the oppressor…

  245. Alden says:
    @anon

    Try using bing and typing in Marc Carlson Tulsa race riot word press. You should be able to find it among the endless sites about the evil Whites of Tulsa.

    Fun fact. Around 1900 Lenin looked at a map and demographics of the USA. He noted that most of the blacks lived in the compact south east section. A section surrounded by the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. He wrote it would be a good idea for any future communist take over to focus on the blacks if the south east. A ready made grievance group in a compact area.

    • Replies: @res
  246. @Art Deco

    Very few people will ever be rich and they did not get rich here. They were merely able to obtain a higher standard of living.

    Which, if you come from an Irish or Southern Italian or Eastern European shithole, is rich. Wealth is comparative.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  247. @fnn

    “@14HH ” (14 words + Heil H*tler)

    This could also be a reference to Woodrow Wilson and Herbert Hoover.

    …and someone who included a Jefferson Davis quote with their donation.

    It’s not too late to cancel Jimmy Carter for pardoning him. The cause could be led by his elders, Bob Dole and James L Buckley.

    The pardon of Jefferson Davis and the 14th Amendment

    Carter also wanted to register black women with Selective Service. Can’t imagine Davis doing that.

  248. J1234 says:
    @AnotherDad

    It’s obvious that his adversaries know he (and everyone else who’s on the same page) is right, at least on the racial stuff. This is why they cover their bases by promoting the idea (sometimes implicitly and sometimes explicitly) of race mixing, so that the world can eventually become raceless. As far as they’re concerned, that makes the Sailers of the world moot (in the long run.) Moot is the next best thing to wrong where political enemies are concerned.

  249. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    $300 an hour is a very moderate legal fee. The lawyers who are not government lawyers don’t earn whatever the fee is. They operate small businesses and have to pay for office space, utilities, printing and more printing gobbling up that expensive toner , employees, computers software, filing fees , expensive specialized legal search engines , court reporters for depositions, investigators including forensic accountants, other experts depending on what the problem is , maybe photographers, and hours of their own work. They also have to screen investigate clients. They can’t take just anyone who emails them about alleged legal problems.

  250. [AA’s] need more, not less, law and order than do even the rest of us.

    The reason why blacks as a group have fallen apart in past 50+ years is due to all the government policies that have been instituted, so we were told, to help them

    The solution to a problem caused by too much left-wing government is .. more right-wing government.

    Political conservatism at its finest.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  251. anon215 says:

    And what if bears shit in the woods?

  252. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:

    Intellectually, I’m basically an heir to the debates in the early 1970s among data-driven social scientists, with me being closer to the domestic neoconservatives like James Q. Wilson and Richard Herrnstein.

    Replace ‘Matt Damon’ with ‘Tom Stoppard’.

  253. @AnotherDad

    In your heart you know he’s right.

    1. Mostly. But in an important sense, it doesn’t matter if he’s “right” or not when it comes to the societal impact of his ideas. Man is not a rational animal; he’s a rationalizing one. For the most part, people don’t decide what to believe based on weighing the evidence and deciding which view has the strongest empirical support, reevaluating when new evidence appears, etc. They go with narratives that are perceived to be “high status,” that are backed by powerful people, or that appear to represent social consensus. Or those which are heavily promoted by mass visual media, which evokes these instincts at the “monkey brain” level.
    Generally speaking, smarter people aren’t any better at this ; they just generate more complex rationalizations for their beliefs. Being objectively “right” matters a lot if you’re building a bridge or an airplane, but very little when it comes to socially important issues, especially when they have quasi-religious significance. What matters is whether a narrative serves its intended purpose and whether you have the power to impose that narrative. You don’t successfully challenge an established narrative by “disproving” it — at least not when that that narrative is supported by people in positions of power who work very hard to promote their narrative, to punish heretics, and to eliminate dissent. The only way to do it is the way they did — working together to exercise financial and political power to advance your collective interests, to promote your narrative, to stage a “long march through the institutions,” to gain more narrative power and wield it more effectively.

    But wait — working together to promote your collective interests as White goys? That sounds pretty “racist.” And everyone knows that so-called “racism” is Very Bad. So you should never do that. Huh. That’s an odd coincidence.

    2. Judging narratives entirely by their internal truth content — i.e. on their own terms — skips over an important aspect, since it implicitly assumes that those promoting that narrative are entirely concerned with truth themselves. But there’s no principle of physics that mandates that the instrumental purpose of a narrative has to be identical to the content of that narrative, or even mentioned in it. It’s often useful to look as well at who is promoting a narrative, and why? What is its instrumental purpose? If that’s not obvious, what are its effects? Who gains — and who loses — as a result of it?
    The race-denialist narrative clearly targets people of European heritage — that’s who it’s wielded against. As to who is promoting it, the “Whiteness is a toxic social construct” trope is quite similar in form, and in effect, to the “Palestinians are an invented people whose only purpose is to destroy Israel” one.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  254. @YetAnotherAnon

    If

    50 years ago the average UK worker could afford a stay at home mum for his kids as well as a house and car. His US counterpart could afford to holiday in Europe.

    Absolutely not true. 50 years ago the average UK worker could not afford a car, and jobs that provided a car or van that could also be used for personal or family use were very much prized.

    No, let me put that another way. The average UK worker could not afford a new car, and when people did have cars they were mostly old and beaten up.

    Now when I say average UK worker, I am not talking about middle class workers like teachers and policemen, who could probably afford a small used car. At that time a car with a 2 liter or even 1600 CC engine was regarded as a real luxury.

    I don’t remember exactly what the relative value of the dollar versus the pound was 50 years ago, and it is true that there were some very cheap airline fares through Icelandic Air and so on and quite a few American backpackers came to Europe in the Summers, having saved up by working in part-time jobs in the US so that they could camp on the beach in Greece or Spain and live on a dollar a day.

    However I still think it is an exaggeration to say that the average US worker could afford to vacation in Europe. If he could he certainly wasn’t coming in any significant numbers.

    50 years ago a large proportion of British homes still didn’t have color TVs, which had been introduced two years earlier.

    The average UK worker was living in a row house built in the 19th century as factory worker accommodation with only a tiny paved yard, or in a “council” house on an “estate.” A foreman might have a slightly better house like on the end of the block that had slightly bigger rooms and more windows.

    As I recall it was normal for both husband and wife to work at that time. For example my aunt and uncle owned a typical 1920s three-bedroom home in a fairly pleasant North London suburb, and they both worked, she is a school teacher, and he in a chemicals business in a white collar job.

    Neither of them learned to drive until around 1980, and were often ferried around by my father who had a car provided by his job. In the sixties their home still had an outside toilet where there was no heating.

    However they were very thrifty, never bought anything on credit, and by the end of their lives they were very comfortably off, particularly as they were able to sell their London home for a ridiculous price and buy a very nice home in Cambridge.

    Also at that time all meals were home cooked, people took sandwiches and a thermos to work for lunch, and eating fast food or eating at restaurants was practically unknown unless you were traveling away from home.

    Fish and chips might be brought in sometimes, because people did not have deep fryers at home.

    Clothing was always hung out on the line to dry, and washing machines were not fully automatic. You probably had to lift the clothes by hand out of the washing part and into the spinner. So if you were going to wash clothes you had to check the weather forecast as you needed good drying weather. Nobody had indoor electric clothes dryers.

  255. @Polistra

    What if you’re right? It won’t matter. Just as history is being rewritten every day now, so scientifically provable facts can be swept under the rug. If they’re inconvenient to approved narratives, they won’t even be called facts any more.

    If Steve is right – and of course, he is – these pages will astonish future historians. They will marvel that people in the West were not ignorant of what was happening, but fully aware. That most people not only did nothing to prevent their social collapse, they actively tried to suppress any such efforts.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @JMcG
  256. @Alden

    Where does your friend live, Povertyville Mississippi the poorest state in the USA?

    She said she looked it up on Google. She lives in Chicago.

    • Thanks: Alden
    • Replies: @Alden
  257. @Art Deco

    The Public Interest… was nothing like The Weekly Standard.

    1. Thanks for implicitly acknowledging my main point, which is that Moynihan was a fanatical Israel Firster and a hardcore neocon.

    2. It’s clear that you feel your feelz very strongly, but surely you’re capable of comprehending that they’re no substitute for actual evidence?

    Let’s do a quick fact check on your naked assertion that The Public Interest and Irving Kristol had absolutely “nothing” to do with neoconservatism or his son Bill’s* late unlamented neocon rag The Weekly Standard:

    https://www.thepublicinterest.com/

    Farewell to ‘The Public Interest’
    By David Skinner
    From The Weekly Standard
    What everyone who’s worked at The Public Interest talks about is what a privilege it was to hang around Irving Kristol.

    That would be Irving Kristol, the guy they call the ““godfather of neoconservatism”, btw.

    30 Years Ago, Neocons Were More Candid About Their Israel-Centered Views:

    …neocon godfather Irving Kristol, writing in 1973 (in Congress Bi-Weekly, a publication of the American Jewish Congress):
    Senator McGovern is very sincere when he says that he will try to cut the military budget by 30%. And this is to drive a knife in the heart of Israel… Jews don’t like big military budgets. But it is now an interest of the Jews to have a large and powerful military establishment in the United States… American Jews who care about the survival of the state of Israel have to say, no, we don’t want to cut the military budget, it is important to keep that military budget big, so that we can defend Israel.

    Yeah that’s gonna be FALSE.

    *The “child of neoconservatism”?

  258. anon[316] • Disclaimer says:
    @Travis

    I do not know of any viable political solutions.

    Ok. So you’re just handing out black pills for the fun of it?

  259. @Stan D Mute

    The only arbiter of “superiority” is time. I should not need to give examples of this. We can all advocate for our own (as well we damn should), but at the end of the day, we’ve been dead for centuries and perhaps even forgotten entirely (deliberately?).

    Not for more than one century. One of the root causes is increasing prosperity. Around 1900, generally increasing prosperity, along with concomitant improvements in nutrition and sanitation, led to an important change: poor people began to have more surviving children than rich people; and the same for poor and rich countries. I suspect that this is the reason why so many progressives in the early 20th Century were eugenicists: they could see that the world had become dysgenic, and they could see where this would lead.

    And so the wealthy countries of the West lost their relative demographic strength: first gradually – so gradually that nobody really noticed – and now suddenly. The tragedy is that we could still defend our borders if we wanted to – but we have lost the will to do so.

  260. @Alden

    That sounds like one of those so-called “Red Scares.” Let’s see:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgen_Freiheit#Establishment

    The Freiheit was established in 1922 as a self-described “Communistic fighting newspaper” in the Yiddish language.[1] The paper’s chief goals included the promotion of the Jewish labor movement, the defense of the Soviet Union, the advancement of “proletarian culture,” and the defeat of “racism” in America.[1]

    Huh

  261. MBlanc46 says:
    @AnotherDad

    Where have I heard that before?

  262. Russ says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    Howard screwed up. You should never apologize to these people.

    If you’ll pardon a clumsy analogy, perhaps the strongest antithesis to Howard’s craven apology was Florida Governor DeSantis’ banning birth-boys from vying in girls’ sports – on Day One of the month glorifying all perversion of man, woman, their glorious differences, and their inherently procreative unification. The Corleones would’ve been proud.

  263. @fnn

    It seems dumb, but in a way it’s not. Enthusiastically over-enforcing taboos creates a climate of fear, where people will self-censor more. Sure, in this case they’ve got a rock-solid reason for choosing that, but if the account holder had just chosen more or less at random, and didn’t have an “acceptable” justification for the name? Exemplary punishment time.

    What’s the downside for them in overdoing it? None. It’s a flex — a demonstration of power to keep people on their toes. See also the OK sign thing — that started as a /pol/ troll, and the media just pretended it was real and ran with it. It worked.

    Plus it’s quite possible that she knew, and just felt like spewing some virulent Christophobia under the guise of “fighting NSDAP infiltrators.”

    The ability to police language and symbol taboos in this kind of detail — and with a presumption of “guilt” — is not a sign of weakness.

    The swastika was a commonly used symbol in American Indian art, especially in the Southwest, that long predated European contact. It [obviously] had nothing to with the NSDAP. They still had to give it up because jews [1940].

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    , @fnn
  264. @PhysicistDave

    No, opinions change, and they often change far faster than anyone would expect.

    The current insanity will not last.

    Politics between Team Brown and Team White is not ideological; it is visceral and territorial. Team Brown doesn’t want to engage your children and grandchildren intellectually; they want them enslaved or dead. Charles Murray and Steve Sailer, and you, are going to weep bitter tears.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  265. Charon says:
    @Alfa158

    All good points; I would only add that the USA will be fortunate indeed to end up like Brazil. I don’t think we’re going to be that lucky. From the recent trajectory I’d project a future that will make South Africa look like a utopia. We have a Ruling Class fairly bent upon it.

  266. @James Forrestal

    Read, and understood. Still, our culture, our way of life, is fucked if we buoy the attractive narrative above analysis of fact.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  267. @James Forrestal

    Maybe, but I think that Swastika is backwards.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @James Forrestal
  268. @Currahee

    Support your local sheriff.

    Yeah no kidding. That’s an underappreciated goal of the whole BLM terrorist movement. The anti-White message is obvious, but when have you ever seen one of these witch hunts that targeted a fed? Not just the FBI — the ATF, the DEA, and the many other federal law enforcement agencies seem to be immune as well. The Border Patrol is a partial exception to this rule, for obvious reasons. But even then, they tend to prosecute agents for aggressively enforcing the law, but without building much of a media narrative around any incidents.

    Resultant message — local law enforcement BAD, more centralization/ federal control GOOD.

    What’s the George Floyd “Justice in Policing Act” all about? There’s actually a few reasonable items in there, but the main thrust is increasing federal control over local police — including giving the “Justice” Department power to issue subpoenas to local/ state law enforcement whenever they feel like it. See also “national security letters.”

    Targeting local officers a few at a time with heavily-promoted anti-White media narratives is expensive and inefficient. It’s better — from their perspective — to have more centralized administrative control.

    Alternatively, they can always partially privatize law enforcement — domestic Blackwater/ Xe/ Academi:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20210522143917/https://interestingengineering.com/subscription-law-enforcement-is-upon-us-leaked-mails

  269. anon[975] • Disclaimer says:

    On the topic of “being right”, Second City Cop is back. Poasting at the “Chicago Contrarian” site.

    https://www.chicagocontrarian.com/blog/chicagos-descent-into-chaos

  270. @Stan D Mute

    if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative.

    But genocide of whom? If progressives have to recognize that that the races often differ genetically, the only rational alternative is genocide of all Nazis, AKA anyone who voted for Trump.

  271. anon[390] • Disclaimer says:
    @Neil Templeton

    I think that Swastika is backwards.

    Not to the Hopi or Navaho.

  272. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I’m guessing google averages out the nation wide cost. Adding the $1,000 medi caid with the $13,000 private health insurance cost for the average cost.

    Might not be a bad idea to pretend to be a poverty stricken single mom and apply for the medi caid Same level of care and for only 24 hours after the birth how bad can it be?

    There was an Agatha Christie story about an English woman who did that. 1950s very ambitious lower middle class couple. He had an engineering degree. She was a secretary. He went off to S Africa on a 2 year contract. She stayed in England, moved into a tiny nasty bed sit and saved every penny. Plan was he’d come back he’d start his own company they’d have a nice big house the successful dream Hard work professional education wise handling of money and their dreams would come true.

    Well 3 weeks after he left she realized she was pregnant. She figured that she’d make more money as a single mom in welfare. So she went on benefit and continued working as long as possible. After she had the baby she never went back to work. And had a bit more money than she had when working.

    Unfortunately she was the murder victim in that story. Miss Marple figured it all out and father finished his work in S Africa and the baby didn’t have to grow up in council care.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  273. @Anon

    Anon[191] wrote to me:

    I believe you, Dave.

    But … It does seem that quantum computers are “just around the corner.” The NSA seems worried. Can you explain that?

    Oh, quantum computers work. Already. I know of no physicists who, in recent years, doubted that they would work.

    The only question is how large (how many bits) they can be made as a practical matter. A “purely engineering” problem.

    That is not the issue. The problem is that QM is internally inconsistent or incomplete.

    To briefly summarize:

    The “textbook description” of quantum mechanics is that there are two separate dynamical processes for quantum systems. Most of the time, a quantum system evolves continuously in accordance with a differential equation discovered by Schrödinger.

    But every now and then a different, discontinuous process kids in when some device known as a “measurement apparatus” interacts with the quantum system. Then the state changes in a discontinuous manner, violating the Schrödinger equation (hence, the fabled “collapse of the wave function”).

    As a practical matter, all of us who are quantum physicists know how and when to switch between the two processes.

    But there is a logical problem here: the “measurement apparatus” is itself a physical system made of electrons, protons, and neutrons. In principle, it too should be describable by the Schrödinger equation. Logically, the “collapse of the wave function” must not and cannot occur.

    There have been a host of books and thousands of scholarly articles written on this. Lots and lots of physicists and philosopher have proposed an answer that they think works.

    But none of those attempts have succeeded in convincing most physicists.

    In the end, a theory that is logically inconsistent must be wrong.

  274. @Dr. Krieger

    I think Steve’s main weakness is a statement like this…

    The dominant intellectuals should do some soul-searching and stop projecting their own viciousness onto the rest of us.

    I disagree. I think that dominant intellectuals, such as these, should be removed from their positions and barred from ever holding such positions again. Those like them should be prohibited from holding such positions, in the future. Stop arguing with these people and meet them with legal and ruthless force.

    Major differences there. Mr. Sailer’s suggestion is that the dominant intellectuals should refrain from abusing power. You suggestion, though stated in the passive voice, mandates a more powerful agency to rule over the errant dominant intellectuals. I suppose dominant Creeps and Dullards more to your liking?

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
  275. res says:
    @al gore rhythms

    “I tend to prefer my synthesis: “Race is a social construct overlaid on a biological reality.”

    Can you say a little more about this?

    The idea is that biological race roughly maps to physical separation of the populations of origin with the coarsest granularity being the continental races. Careful observers have been able to see (and note in writing) the phenotypic differences for centuries if not millenia. More recently we have DNA data which makes this much more concrete.

    Razib Khan has done some good writing on this. Here is an article looking at race as a biological construct in the context of African Americans.
    https://www.discovermagazine.com/health/why-race-as-a-biological-construct-matters

    Here is a look at more populations showing the common PCA pattern of a triangle with Africans, Europeans, and East Asians at the vertices and various intermediate populations.
    https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/which-population-is-most-genetically-distant-from-africans

    So those phenotypic and genotypic differences establish the biological reality of race. Note that this biological reality is hierarchical. An important example being Africa where there is much biological diversity within the continent.

    The social construct of race layered on top of that is a more local phenomenon. Some useful examples.

    1. Primitive racial ideas based on skin color only. By this metric Africans, Australian aboriginals, and dark skinned subcontinentals are all considered “black.” This is nonsensical if you look at genotypes or more detailed phenotypic information, but nonetheless it seems to be how race is treated by some people in some places.

    2. The social categorization of mixed race individuals (in particular African European mixes) in the United States and Brazil. In the US the “one drop rule” has historically applied meaning any discernible African ancestry makes someone black. Brazil is more complicated.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_and_ethnicity_in_Brazil
    There is a separate mixed category (pardo) and my understanding is “white” is more flexible than it was historically in the US. Anyone who understands this better, please feel free to elaborate.

    So the same individual might be classified as different (social construct) races in the US and Brazil despite their genotype and phenotype (biological reality) remaining unchanged.

    Did that help?

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    , @Rob McX
  276. duncsbaby says:
    @Redmen

    I haven’t read Cole’s latest column and I didn’t know he was a wet-market truther. Even Ann Coulter was a bit of a wet-market origin booster last year which even w/the constant barrage of propaganda saying otherwise I thought was a pretty lame take. Anyway, if I could speculate as to why, maybe both David Cole and Ann are coming from a pro-animal perspective so they automatically look upon China’s egregious treatment of animals as pets and food as the reason for covid-19. I’m no expert on disease or China but I always thought it was pretty obvious that having a lab right there in Wuhan that did work on Sars diseases was a major red flag.
    My major problem w/David Cole’s writing is his essays go on for far too long, belaboring the initial point, which was usually pretty astute, so that one gave up on the idea and article all together. The man needs a good editor.

    • Replies: @Ragno
  277. @James Speaks

    The basic point, which is that it’s silly to treat these intellectuals as if they’re acting in good faith, is correct. Steve, Charles Murray, all those guys, imagine there’s some honest debate going on. There isn’t.

    I think we have overwhelming evidence that intellectuals are corrupt. They lie through their teeth routinely.

  278. Ragno says:
    @Achilleus

    Hope you’re wrong, fear you’re right.

  279. Anonymous[230] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Most families I knew of owned a car in the UK of 1970.

    Many only had a secondhand car, but a car they had.

  280. Ragno says:
    @duncsbaby

    He also shoehorns in Tribe-related ephemera, constantly. For the same reason they all do, I suppose.

  281. @Luke Lea

    Luke Lea wrote to me:

    Sorry, Physics Dave, but yours (and Weinberg’s now that he is well past his prime) is a decidedly minority opinion among today’s leading theoretical physicists who are still in their prime. (Read Lubos Motl’s blog for details on why this is so.)

    I have known Lubos for a long time and have long known his views on QM. Lubos is a very bright fellow who is a couple decades my junior.

    But if you think his views are typical, you need to meet more physicists. Lubos holds the view of QM that was the dominant view sixty years ago: in a nutshell, Lubos is satisfied with the goal of physics being to correctly predict experimental results even if it logically cannot be a complete view of physical reality.

    That is certainly the case with QM, and Lubos is happy with it.

    Most physicists in my generation, not to mention Lubos’ generation, are not happy with that.

    Luke also wrote:

    A better explanation is that quantum mechanics is so violently counterintuitive to the everyday experience of a species whose brains have evolved in a “classical” world composed of macroscopic objects (in which quantum effects are vanishingly small and completely irrelevant) that even some of the smartest physicists who ever lived (starting with Einstein himself) find it impossible to believe.

    You are simply mistaken.

    QM in its usual textbook formulation cannot be a complete theory of the physical world. Lubso is happy with that, as was Niels Bohr.

    Einstein was not happy and most physicists today are not happy.

    I suppose it all depends on your goals: do you want to simply predict experimental results with a a logically flawed theory that cannot be complete (see my explanation above about the problem with the measurement apparatus) or do you want a theory that is logically consistent and complete.

    I, and most physicists today, take the problems with textbook quantum mechanics to be a sign that we have more work to do. Bohr and Lubos do not think we should make that attempt.

  282. Bert says:
    @Redmen

    I’ve heard of a few people (none that I know personally) who have gone to the hospital and/or died from Covid, allegedly. Forgive me if I’m dubious about these anecdotes.

    Steve Sailer had a post reviewing the evidence for considerable excess mortality in the U.S. between April, 2020, and April, 2021. All the Red states, with Republican governors and legislatures, responded to the epidemic and tracked case numbers. Were they part of a conspiracy?

    It was not just the MSM that censored information on early treatment. The NIH, FDA, and CDC also censored such life-saving information.

    So your stance is that there is no evidence for a serious new disease, but early treatment for it was denied. Totally contradictory BS.

    You are what is wrong with Whites. Nit-pick other Whites with illogical criticisms. With people like you working your magic, we will never unite.

  283. @Sean

    Sean wrote to me:

    El Dato looking forward to an unprecedently powerful computer with quantum technology without worrying that the rules underlying it are not known seems an example of unwisdom.

    Well, as I explained in my post above on the “measurement problem,” we actually do know the underlying rules for quantum computers and we do know they will work. It is just a practical issue as to how big of a a quantum computer can be built.

    The real issue is that QM cannot be a complete theory of the physical world.

    Sean also wrote:

    I have read research in that area is not very good for one’s career.

    That was certainly true when I was young: I took QM from Feynman, and he sternly warned us against research on foundations. Have you read Adam Becker’s What is Real? : The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics? The book is controversial, but he does accurately portray the antagonism towards research in quantum foundations back in mid-century.

    I ended up leaving the academic world, so I can do what I want.

    Sean also wrote:

    That is what outsiders call interpretations of quantum mechanics; what is actually going on to make the wave function swimmingly indeterminate in entire accordance with the Schrödinger equation, up until the point we look at what is happening whereupon it collapses on what had been measured as if all the previous supposed possibilities were never really there at all.

    Yeah, that’s the problem. I have a model that avoids that problem (a bit like Bohmian mechanics), but of course my model has some unlovely features too.

    • Replies: @Sean
  284. @Roger

    Roger wrote:

    No, John Bell is not worth reading. He had a belief that quantum mechanics was wrong, and proposed a way to compare it to alternative theories using local hidden variables. Subsequent experiments proved that those alternative theories were wrong, and quantum mechanics was just fine.

    You have absolutely zero idea of what you are talking about.

    Bell proved that a certain sort of hidden-variable theory was inconsistent with the predictions of quantum mechanics (and, it turns out, experiment): i.e., theories that are “local” in a certain technical sense.

    However, the best known hidden-variable theory, Bohmian mechanics (AKA Bohm-de Broglie theory), is not “local” and is not ruled out by experimental data. For all we know, it could be true.

    For various aesthetic reasons, most of us physicists are not advocates of Bohmian mechanics: in a nutshell, the way it combines with relativity is really ugly (though consistent with experiment).

    Where on earth did you get the crackpot idea that experiments have ruled out theories like Bohm’s?

    You are just ignorant of the last sixty years of work in the field!

    • Replies: @Roger
    , @Bardon Kaldian
  285. @Anonymous

    No reason to be personal – he provided significant sources and obviously has is own ideas formulated, I was just curious to hear a precis.

  286. @Alden

    One of your best comments EVAH! Thanks, Alden.

    Jonathan Mason is something like 75 years old and hasn’t learned squat in all those years. He observes things, but he doesn’t have the mind to reason why. He should stay in Ecuador as a mutually beneficial arrangement for all of us.

  287. @Jonathan Mason

    People like to forget past miseries and shortcomings and all that.
    If I think of Allan Sillitoe’s fiction (The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner – one of my all-time favorites) or of O’Flaherty’s short stories. Or another favorite: The Princess in the Cabbage Garden by  Wulf Kirsten about an east German village in the late forties and fifties – incredible scarcities. Like: No bicycle tires. People used straw and cord instead – try that…
    But I vividly remember people in my own childhood in the sixties debating whether or not it was ok that a workingman in our neighborhood in a village near prospering Heidelberg should eat half a pound of sausage a day, or if that wasn’t selfish with regard to his family who had no meat but once a week.

    My grandfather walked to work in the fifties – eight kilometers every day back and forth – because he was not able to ride a bike like everybody else – but still would not want to spend his money for the bus.
    Have a look at the photographs of working-class Germans and Brits in the fifties by photographers like René Burri and Cartier Bresson et. al. Or – this is one of the best works of a photographer ever Raymond Depardon’s photos of French peasants: 

    • Thanks: JMcG
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  288. @PhysicistDave

    The “quantum system”, measuring apparatus, observer, and world evolve together according to the Schrödinger equation. The textbook description is a rationalisation of this evolution that allows us to think about the “quantum system” alone.

    Take away the “collapse of the wave function”, and you are left with a solution of the Schrödinger equation in which multiple macroscopic incoherent states coexist – requiring a “many histories” interpretation.

    Research into the interpretation of quantum mechanics is deprecated, because whatever scheme the researcher devises must agree with the usual experiments, especially Stern-Gerlach, whose results can be obtained by “collapse of the wave function”. It is literally impossible to use experiments to distinguish one scheme from another, and so it is doubtful whether such research even constitutes science.

    And in the end one is still left with God rolling dice: if not to determine how the wave function collapses, then to determine which of the many histories we experience.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  289. Anonymous[386] • Disclaimer says:

    (Note that I don’t put very much effort into telling you how I think the world should work, just how it does work. At least, the latter’s testable.)

    No, what is being described is how the world IS, not how the world WORKS. Noting racial differences is about how the world is, not how it works. Hundred years ago, racial differences existed as they do now, but the world WORKED differently because different people ruled it. ‘Is’ is about how reality is. ‘Works’ is how the powerful use, abuse, or obfuscate the knowledge to protect their interests and push their agenda.

    Noting that homosexuals exist is about how the world is. Homosexuals existed 1,000 yrs ago, 100 yrs ago, and today. But what is currently happening with all the propaganda and celebrations is not about the reality of homosexuality(that it exists) but how it is being used by the powerful to get their way. That is about how the world ‘works’, and much of this is ignored, willfully nor not, in the article.

    What if my way of thinking is, in general, more realistic, insightful, and reasonable than the conventional wisdom?

    [MORE]

    Again, that’s about reality. It is true that blacks are more violent and criminal and certainly don’t need encouragement in that department. Even many Democrats know this, at least privately.

    But the events of last year were not about what ‘is’ but what ‘works’ for the powers-that-be. The powerful worked to concoct a formula that would energize blacks and undermine Trump.
    So much of what is happening isn’t the result of real ignorance among the ruling elites but their power-lust. The upper echelons of power knew Russia Collusion charge was built on sand. But they pushed it just the same not because they favor power over reality. This ‘work’ is about the use of power to protect and increase the power, and truth or reality is of secondary importance to the agenda. WMD and Gulf of Tonkin were the same way. Never mind what really ‘is’ or ‘was’. The hawk wanted war, and they were going to get it one way or another.

    Of course, not everyone who pushes the lie is a liar. They may believe for one reason or another.

    The powerful don’t care if something is true or false or whether it’s good or bad for most people. They care about themselves and their inner circle. That’s how they ‘work’, and because they control the world, that’s how the world ‘works’.

    There are opportunists in the lower rungs of power. Many of them are skeptical of the lies but go along because they are driven by careerism. They will do whatever to belong to the club even if they’re barred from the top.

    There are people who are smart enough to figure out the truth. But their personalities could be prone to naivete or gullibility. Not every pair of brains, however good, comes with the spark of curiosity, let alone courage. Or they could be too lazy to ask their own questions and put the puzzle together on their own. Or, they live in a bubble and have no sense of reality beyond what they read from the prestige media.

    Then, there are truly dumb people who are easily suckered by whatever is presented to them.

    When it comes to how the world ‘works’, we need only to fixate on the powerful and the second tier. The reason why they push the lie is not due to ignorance or butt-hurt pride but simple power-lust and arrogance. For example, there’s no way that the owners of NBA teams don’t know about racial differences. There’s no way people like Michael Bloomberg don’t know why blacks commit more crime. They know and even implemented policies on that knowledge. Yet, they will not speak the whole truth because it would undermine their power. Blacks, as golden goose or symbols, are very useful to these people, and the reality would undermine this very utility by letting white people off the hook. After all, if the main reason for black pathologies is black nature and culture(gone ‘ghetto’), whites would have less to feel sorry and ashamed about.

    Eventually, people will notice how much better my approach to reality has been than that of the famous folks winning MacArthur genius grants and try to figure out for themselves how I do it so that everybody can do it too.

    But that is to assume that the powerful who control the institutions(and hand out prizes and degrees) are interested above all in reality and the truth. Of course, they would prefer truth and reality if they were apolitical in nature and as such would hardly threaten their power. But if truth and reality do carry moral or political implications and can undermine their grip on power, they will almost always choose power over truth.
    Was the Catholic Church any different? It had no problems with scientific discoveries until they threatened church doctrine, therefore church authority itself. That’s how the world ‘works’. It welcomes the ‘is’ of reality that is neutral but attacks anything with threatening implications. It can be an event in history. We now know the ‘is’ or ‘was’ of what really happened with USS Liberty, but it’s hardly discussed in the media and there won’t be a TV show about it any time soon. The powerful ‘works’ to suppress it, the what really ‘was’ of history.

    On the other hand, it’s now 2021 and public discourse has just gotten stupider and more self-destructive over the course of my career.

    With proper understanding of how the world really ‘works’, this should hardly be surprising. The powerful will do anything to keep its power. This is especially true if the ruling elites are especially arrogant, paranoid, and hostile toward the people, most of whom they don’t even identify with.
    Then, it’s only natural that the powerful will favor stupidity over sensibleness if the former is more useful to their power. Stalinism didn’t operate on the principle of favoring reality or the truth. Not even justice despite the Marxist ideology. It was mainly obsessed with keeping the power and control. Stalin may have believed himself to be a good communist and felt that what is good for him is good for world communism. Still, he did anything to keep the power, and if lies and stupidity were of optimal utility, they were favored over truth and intelligence.

    What if I had just kept my mouth shut and, instead of challenging popular pundits to be honest and intelligent, I’d let them work it out for themselves? After all, while people who know me tend to find I’m an admirable individual, people who don’t know me tend to hate me.

    Those who hate aren’t really concerned about issues pertaining to IQ and even race. It’s about political allegiances, ideology, and racial politics. People identified as pro-white are distrusted. Vdare is regarded as a ‘racist’ site.
    Steven Pinker has voiced views suggesting differences among racial groups and IQ differences, but he isn’t hated because he isn’t affiliated with pro-white groups. It could be that there are scientists in Israel who believe in racial and IQ differences, but they aren’t particularly hated or denounced by Western intellectuals. While race and IQ are touchy issues, they become downright toxic when held by people with the ‘wrong’ political leanings or affiliations. The powerful have a vested interest in dismissing all dissident rightist figures and groups as ‘hateful’ and ‘terrorist’. It’s a game of which side are you on? Among the less powerful intellectuals, there is the fear of being dismissed or ‘canceled’ if they aren’t with the program. Unwilling to hide the shame of their cowardice, they double down on the dogma to convince others and themselves that it’s about principle than demands of the much compromised profession.

    Admirable qualities on the individual level can be found in any group. Even if one finds another’s politics or ideology utterly detestable, one may discover he is nice guy as a person. Many who loathed to work with Pat Buchanan for his politics said he was wonderful as a colleague. Many individuals with admirable qualities worked for what came to be deemed as criminal organizations or evil movements. Surely, not everyone who worked under Stalin or Hitler was a psychopath. Many were well-meaning or patriots. So, this has less to with personal animus than political hatreds.

    Thus, when I point out the facts, I’m often greeted with incoherent anger centering on the allegation that I must be a bad person for being so well-informed.

    They believe that if a person with bad ideology is correct about certain matters, it may lend credence to the ideology.
    Of course, the solution would be to take those correct views and attach them to the ‘good’ ideology. If good people don’t want bad people to own what is true, they should adopt it and put it to good use. Steven Pinker and some others suggested as much. Science is coming out with certain facts about group differences, and it’s better than well-meaning Liberals own them because, otherwise, the bad guys will grab them and lend credence to their evil ideology.

    And they might pull this off but for one reason. They simply can’t process the fact that blacks are less intelligent and may be prone to be more violent. This is less about ideological commitment to racial equality than special sensitivity about blacks. After all, if findings suggested that blacks are more intelligent, the media would probably hail it as great news. Or, if the facts suggested black and white IQs are equal, and it is the Arab IQ that is lower, it’s unlikely too many people would get worked up. Given the special sensitivity, blacks can be said to be equal in all traits or superior in some traits. But they can’t be inferior in any or perceived as particularly dangerous. True or false, those are regarded as ‘racist’, the cardinal sin in the New West, and there’s consensus on this among Democrats and Republicans.

    And this is why the ‘good people’ cannot own the facts about race and differences. It isn’t so much the facts about racial differences that upset them but that blacks may be inferior or more problematic in some areas. Would anyone lose sleep or get outraged if a scientific study said the people of Turkmenistan are, on average, less intelligent or more prone to criminality? Of course not. But with precious blacks, it isn’t possible, and that is why the ‘good people’ cannot own the facts about race and IQ.

    …the passing of the years has only made the dominant discourse ever more absurdly antiquarian. For example, the failure of property values to boom in black neighborhoods in the 53 years since redlining was abolished has not made it more acceptable to point out that if blacks want higher prices in their neighborhoods, they should work harder on being better neighbors.

    Again, the special sensitivity about blacks. Rational discourse is impossible with people fixated on irrational devotion to a certain group. Blacks are special, and that means one must have extra-sympathy and respect for blacks to be a Good Person. Such charged emotions simply cannot tolerate facts, however truthful, that questions their sacred cows.

    Instead of noting that the hundreds of black inner-city riots last year have helped drive this year’s housing boom in suburbs and small towns, the prestige press has decided to obsess over the Tulsa riot of 100 years ago (which was started by blacks but ended by whites) as the reason blacks aren’t rich today.

    Media actions are just a power play. As the media are owned by six oligarchic corporations, their role is to push any narrative, however fantastic, to maintain the prestige and legitimacy of the ruling elites. It is naive to think that the media bosses fail to understand the truth for some reason or another. The chances are the elites in the media know the truth but push the lie to keep the power. They feel threatened by any counter-narrative that loosens their grip on power, psychological or political.

    My approach in explaining human society has been to follow the general line of Occam’s Razor that “It is vain to do with more what can be done with fewer,” or that the simplest feasible explanation is less likely to be contrived for political purposes than a more complicated Occam’s Butterknife rationalization.

    But this is to focus on the sheep and not the sheep herder. Society is made up of peoples and elites. They live in different worlds and think differently, especially if ethnic differences are involved. With Occam’s Razor, we may notice a lot of things about the sheep. But the main interest of the sheep herder is not the facts about the sheep but their market value. So, if certain facts are useful in to him, he will appreciate those facts. But suppose facts say the sheep are diseased and should be culled at great loss to the sheepherder. The chances are he will try to hide those facts and sell the sheep as fast as possible for a fast buck. So, Occam’s Razor on the sheep themselves is a different matter than the Occam’s Razor on the sheepherder’s psychology and interest. When applied to sheep, it’s a matter of science: What makes sheep healthy, what makes sheep sick. When applied to the sheepherder, the key issue is “what can he do to maximize his profits?” Thus, if it advantages him to hide the dire facts about the sheep, he will do so.
    Does the media exist as an instrument of facts and truth for the people. Or do they exist mainly as a control mechanism of the elites?

    And as more data continues to accumulate over the decades, my depiction of the way the world works seems to have a better track record than more fashionable theories.

    And if that depiction is at odds with the ideological foundations of the current power, it will be suppressed and vilified. Not because it’s false but precisely because it’s true. True or False is secondary to those committed to Power or No Power.

    Well, it wouldn’t. I’ve taken great pains to make my worldview correspond with how the world actually is.

    The article began by mentioning how the world actually ‘works’ but choses about how it actually ‘is’. Again, those stand in opposition to one another. They are not the same.

    What policies are implied by my realistic view of humanity? To my mind, nothing terribly new (although out of fashion): We need rule of law, equal protection of the laws, and other old-time principles. That African-Americans seem to have a particular tendency toward criminal violence suggests that they need more, not less, law and order than do even the rest of us.

    But this isn’t about social policy or new laws. It’s about power. It’s well to mention blacks and regular society, but neither governs America. Occam’s Razor on race indicates that blacks are less intelligent and more violent. But Occam’s Razor on power suggests that the current ruling elites don’t want white people to know the truth about blacks because it may delegitimize the logic of White Guilt, a useful tool in controlling the whites.

    On the other hand, the one thing that really scares me is that progressive intellectuals seem to assume that if modern science demonstrates that the races often differ genetically, well, that proves Hitler was right and therefore genocide is the only rational alternative.

    Some of the dumber ones really believe that, but the truly intelligent ruling elites do not and only pretend to. Why? They are addicted to supreme power. They are not content to be Fellow Americans and want to remain the permanent overclass. To keep the power, they must keep the majority whites morally defensive and spineless. If science says blacks fail due to genetic reasons, whites would be off the hook for all the black pathologies, at least more so than today. With less guilt, whites maybe bolder and more demanding. They won’t turn into Nazis, but they won’t be so easy to control. And that is threatening to the supremacism of the current power that looks upon whites as so many helots.

    Now, who would this ruling class be? Why isn’t it mentioned throughout the article? Why isn’t it mentioned that the lies about BLM were willfully spread by the media controlled this group? Why the Occam’s Razor on street violence that notes that blacks are doing the killing but the lack of Occam’s Razor on elite power that would note that THIS GROUP is spreading the lies?

    The reason brings us to psychology. There was the Great White Hope. Then, the Great White Defendant. But it seems there is also the Great White Jew. Among IQ-aficionados, Jews are so highly regarded that they dream of the Great White Jew who sees the light and is friendly toward whites. The Great White Jew fantasy is even willing to accept Jews as superiors as long as they are nice to whites.
    The Great White Jew mentality is aware of hostile Jews but cannot hate or denounce the Jew out of IQ-hero-worship and the Holocaust narrative. So, against the ample facts of Jewish hostility, they dream of the Great White Jew. Preferably, a pro-white Jewish Conservative or, if that’s asking for too much, a Jewish Liberal who isn’t overtly anti-white and shows a bit of patriotism. No wonder National Review gave a glowing review to Woody Allen’s autobiography. Allen’s not conservative but at least Allen seems a bit ‘old school’ compared to others. (Never mind he personally blesses black violence against whites.) In Spielberg’s E.T., the superior alien is kind and friendly to humans. In War of the Worlds, the aliens are hostile. So much of IQ-based HBD is like Elliot dreaming of E.T. amidst an attack by ruthless Martians.

    So, if we take an Occam’s Razor or X-ray to the psychology of IQ-based HBD, it comes down to the Great White Jew or ‘Tom Stoppard’. And just like the irrational devotion toward blacks makes it impossible for the intellectual class to accept truths about race and IQ, the irrational devotion to the Great White Jew prevents the calling out of Jewish power and its abuses by a big segment of the HBD crowd.

    While it must be acknowledged that the Holocaust surely soured many Jews to the Right, it’s no less true that it mellowed out the Right toward greater sympathy toward Jews, which has not been appreciated by Jews. Also, it was before World War II and the Holocaust that Jews took part in the bloody Bolshevik Revolution and caused all sorts of crazy havoc in Weimar Germany. At any rate, while conscientious Jews do exist, it’s a pipe dream that any serious segment of the Jewish Population will qualify as Great White Jews.

    This is why HBD folks need to be de-programmed. In Manchurian Candidate, the guy was finally shaken from the spell by a whole deck of queens. Thus, all the wires were pulled out.
    HBD folks need to watch 10 hrs of this video with ‘Matt Damon’ replaced with ‘Tom Stoppard’.

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @res
  290. JackOH says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Dieter, America’s “talented tenth” Blacks in journalism and the academy pretty much exercise an essential veto over characterizations of the Black community that they don’t wish to discuss. Disproportionate crime rates, poor school performance, and what-have-you are simply dismissed. When there are high-achieving Blacks, their achievements may by exaggerated and used to leverage the Black Supremacist notion that all Blacks could be equally high-achieving if it weren’t for, well, you guessed it—White racism.

    Black Supremacism is really a scurvy racket. When law enforcement in Black communities is lax, White racism is to blame. When it’s aggressive—White racism again. This goes on and on.

    There are dissenting Black voices, but they don’t hold the megaphone.

    Hope that clarifies my comment.

  291. SFG says:

    OT, but maybe not that off topic, here’s Hanania talking about disparate impact:

    https://richardhanania.substack.com/p/woke-institutions-is-just-civil-rights

    You covered this how many years ago?

    You read Steve, then you wait and see when the mainstream guys catch up.

  292. Corvinus says:
    @Desiderius

    Indeed, as iSteve sets up a strawman cloaked as argument.

    “For example:
    —Thesis: A racial group is a taxonomical subspecies.
    —Antithesis: A racial group is a biologically nonexistent social construct!
    —Synthesis: A racial group is a partly inbred extended family.”

    Why is there a need for this subspecies designation when humans share 99.9% of our DNA with one another! This fact makes us far too similar to one another to be considered different subspecies. Moreover, race is a social constrict predicated on biological concepts–remember, human beings created systems and categories by which to understand the natural phenomenon around us. And while Vincent Sarich posits that race is this large and partly inbred family, there are racial distinctions that have a degree of biological reality, even though they are not exact boundaries between fixed categories.

    Now, why isn’t Madison Grant’s “taxonomy”, rather than Mr. Sailer’s, considered to be the standard?

  293. @James N. Kennett

    James N. Kennett wrote to me:

    Take away the “collapse of the wave function”, and you are left with a solution of the Schrödinger equation in which multiple macroscopic incoherent states coexist – requiring a “many histories” interpretation.

    Well… that is indeed one theory that a lot of physicists believe in. A lot do not believe in it.

    It has some very serious technical problems, generally known as the “preferred-basis problem” and the “probability-measure problem.” I think those problems are insurmountable and that the theory is therefore false. At least, no one has suggested solutions to those problems that convince most physicists.

    Jim also wrote:

    Research into the interpretation of quantum mechanics is deprecated, because whatever scheme the researcher devises must agree with the usual experiments, especially Stern-Gerlach, whose results can be obtained by “collapse of the wave function”. It is literally impossible to use experiments to distinguish one scheme from another, and so it is doubtful whether such research even constitutes science.

    That is not true. The Bell inequality was a novel prediction that was experimentally testable.

    And trying to understand all of these issues has led to a deeper understanding of “entanglement,” which has been crucial, for example, in quantum cryptography. And it has led to theoretical advances in areas such as decoherence (see Schlosshauer’s book).

    To say it is not science is like saying that the search for extra-solar planets is not science because none had been discovered before the late twentieth century!

    In particular, we know that textbook quantum mechanics is wrong because it is logically inconsistent. That is progress, just as Edison was making progress when he had eliminated the first hundred possible substances for a filament in a light bulb.

    Knowing that your current theory is wrong is often the most important discovery you can make!

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
  294. @Corvinus

    Corvinus asked:

    Why is there a need for this subspecies designation when humans share 99.9% of our DNA with one another!

    and then added:

    there are racial distinctions that have a degree of biological reality, even though they are not exact boundaries between fixed categories.

    That’s the point, isn’t it? What race is Barack Obama? Well, no single race. On the other hand, if you are concerned about sickle-cell anemia or Tay-Sachs disease, concepts of race and ethnic group are indeed helpful.

    I think you are arguing against some of our White-nationalist friends who have a rather essentialist (and quite goofy!) concept of race. But that is not how Sailer thinks. I do not think you have distinguished your own approach from Sailer’s.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @res
  295. @Redmen

    Redmen wrote to me:

    I would like to believe this will happen [future generations will poke fun at Wokeness]. But the almost total lack of humor today makes me think this may not always be the way things work. There may be some who engage in gallows humor, but not with any power behind it to change things. As woke ideology becomes more entrenched in bureaucracy, the force required to displace it grows.

    Well, the driving engine of social dynamics in our society is the fact that far more people want comfy positions in the parasitic verbalist overclass than the number of comfy positions that do or can exist.

    And so they experience great anxiety. They try to prove their loyalty to the ruling elite hoping to get some crumbs. They try to prove their social and mental agility by proving they can jump on to the latest pseudo-intellectual fad at just the right time.

    In concrete terms, almost all upper-middle-class parents want their kids to be lawyers or university professors or even HR directors rather than plumbers or electricians. And, yes, I know that plumbers and electricians can make more money than HR directors: that’s the point.

    (Why not physicians or engineers? Most people are just not good enough at STEM subjects.)

    The dynamics are unstable. The pressure on the economy and the federal fiscal situation can only worsen. There are going to be more and more angry people who do not get the positions they “deserve.”

    And young people are just plain ornery.

    How and when the crack-up will come, I do not know. But it will come, and I am pretty sure young people will be key.

    Stein’s law: “If something cannot go on forever, it won’t.”

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  296. JMcG says:
    @James N. Kennett

    One important thing I’ve learned from Ron Unz is how thoroughly things can be memory-holed. The principled stance of American Conservatives in opposing our intervention in the Second World War is all but forgotten and certainly unremarked these days.
    My son had to correct a history teacher; pointing out the actions of the Soviet Union from 1939-1945. The teacher refused to believe that the Soviets partnered with Hitler until Barbarossa, or that they shipped Hitler the oil he used to attack France and fight the Battle of Britain. She looked it up and acknowledged that he was correct, then never called on him again.
    My daughter had the same teacher the next year: The Soviets were back to being our allies for the entire war.
    Future historians will have nothing to work with as far as the decline and fall of the American Empire goes.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    , @dearieme
  297. Sean says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Haven’t read Becker’s What is Real? : The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics?, but Bell kept his physicist colleagues in the dark about what he thought so he believed having it become known would bring repercussions, even though he thought Von Neuman’s view actually “foolish”. I suppose a lot more people think Steve is espousing plain common sense than are willing to publicly say so.

    I took QM from Feynman, and he sternly warned us against research on foundations.

    Him apocryphally telling his students curious about foundations: “Shut up and calculate” which, as they were there to calculate, basically meant ‘Shut up!’ is quite accurate as to his attitude then.

    Feynman said he had a tested IQ of 125, and in one of his books he advanced the view that peoples originating in Third World countries had disappointing achievements in science and technology because they lacked a tradition of learning (i.e., nothing to do with genetic ‘hidden variables’).

    Bub provides evidence that von Neumann understood the limits of his proof, but there is no record of von Neumann attempting to correct the near universal misinterpretation which lingered for over 30 years and exists to some extent to this day.

    Yet it wasn’t challenged. because it supported an armistice with the truth and a non homogeneous account of the world.

    Heisenberg cut
    Below the cut everything is governed by the wave function; above the cut a classical description is used

    An analogy with white–black differences suggests itself. Whites are gazing across an epistemological cut into the black African indeterminacy in which data on their actual achievements and potential intelligence cannot both be simultaneously established, and attempts to relate them to one another exhibit decoherence.

  298. @PhysicistDave

    And young people are just plain ornery.

    Asia was stagnant for thousands of years. So was pre-Columbian America.

    India was dynamic long ago, but fell into a millennia of misery and stagnation (after the Aryans dwindled). The Levant sucked for thousands of years, very little change.

    When it comes to challenging the status quo, you’re think of White societies.

  299. @J.Ross

    I think I’m part of team Jürgen Habermas***** here (as I think is Steve Sailer is) and I would want to – hope at least, – that our fight must not be necessarily futile.

    *****Team John Stewart Mill (On Liberty), team Jonathan Haidt (The Righteous Mind / The Coddling of the American Mind (together with Gregg Lukianoff), team David Goodhart and Douglas and Charles Murray…Team James Thompson and Heiner Rindermann (Cognitive Capitalism/ Cambridge Univ. Press 2019).

    • Replies: @SFG
  300. @Jonathan Mason

    “the average UK worker could not afford a new car”

    If you think the median (not average) UK worker can afford a new car now, think again.

    I’ve earned more than average for most of my working life, and have never bought a new car. Nearly all new cars in the UK are either bought by company fleets or on credit, which hardly existed in 1970 outside of mortgages. Why would anyone pay say £24k for a new car when the same car is literally half the price three years later?

    Yes, there have been “hedonic changes” – automatic washing machines, dryers, dishwashers. You can buy a bottom-range 50 inch colour TV for a week’s wages at minimum wage.

    Eating out can be a function of a wealthy economy, or a function of a low-wage one. Plenty of eating out in Colombia or Ecuador, plenty in India too.

    But in Q3 1975 the average house cost £10,978 (Nationwide figures) when median male wages were £55.90 pw or £2900 a year (ONS AVERAGE GROSS WEEKLY EARNINGS 1968 – 2017). So the average house cost 3.75 x median male wages.

    By 2015 Q3 the average house cost £195, 733, nearly 20 times the 1975 price. But median male wages were £594.1 pw or just over 10x the 1975 figure.

    Real house prices had DOUBLED in that 40 year period – and since have accelerated further.

    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2021/jun/01/race-for-space-fuels-surge-in-uk-property-prices

    And I don’t know when you were last in the UK, but houses are getting smaller, while gardens often don’t have the room for a decent swing, let alone the 60-yard garden of the two-up-two-down Victorian house I grew up in.

    Working people in the UK are being progressively impoverished and young working people are seeing their life chances evaporate.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  301. @Dieter Kief

    The 1950s were 70 years ago, not 50, and Germany was still recovering from the RAF demolitions of WW2. Within the previous decade Britons had been on strict rationing and Germans fared even worse.

    But for both nations living standards rose rapidly from the 50s to the 70s, and beyond in Germany’s case. I think German wages only hit the buffers in the Great Suppression before Germany joined the Euro.

  302. @PhysicistDave

    Sounds like epicycles.

    Then again isn’t some inconsistency somewhere inevitable?

  303. Regret says:
    @Charon

    What does “getting rid of unfair housing appraisals” mean? Appraising black homes higher so they have to pay more property tax on a home that wont sell for that?

    I take it in 20 years this will be the next big injustice they’ll want reparations for.

  304. Texas

    Conservatives are the second time as farce tribe.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  305. SFG says:
    @Dieter Kief

    There’s sort of a liberaltarian-scientific mindset that’s very good for understanding the natural world (and is responsible for most of our advances over the past few centuries) but bad at playing politics.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  306. Oh there are rules alright, just not against what she did.

    The authorities (sic) aren’t cowardly or feckless or whatever cope you want to come up with. They’re on the other side.

    Same with Steve being right. He didn’t f*ck around but found out all the same.

  307. @PhysicistDave

    It has some very serious technical problems, generally known as the “preferred-basis problem” and the “probability-measure problem.” I think those problems are insurmountable and that the theory is therefore false. At least, no one has suggested solutions to those problems that convince most physicists.

    Until somebody devises an experiment whose results cannot be understood by conventional QM, these remain philosophical problems.

    it is doubtful whether such research even constitutes science.

    OK, I exaggerated a bit here. I’ve sat through too many talks that proposed a novel interpretation of QM that made no difference to actual measurements.

    IIRC, Bell’s greatest contribution was to devise experiments that would distinguish between conventional QM and certain hidden-variable theories. Very good work, but so far the experiments have agreed with conventional QM every time.

    Yes, it is true that new theories can lead to greater insight; but better still would be to devise an experiment whose results cannot be explained by textbook QM.

    In particular, we know that textbook quantum mechanics is wrong because it is logically inconsistent.

    I disagree. If you want to regard it as a description of how the universe works, it is clearly illogical. However, if you regard it as a “How To” set of instructions, it is brilliantly successful.

    Knowing that your current theory is wrong is often the most important discovery you can make!

    Agreed. But again, it depends what you mean by “wrong”. “Spectacularly successful, but with philosophical difficulties” is a world away from “predicts the wrong result for an experiment”.

    Perhaps the push for quantum computing will lead to some inexplicable experimental results.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  308. fnn says:
    @James Forrestal

    Sarah Silverman was widely mocked for mistaking construction symbols for evidence of a widespread neo-Nazi conspiracy in NYC. Some Jewish New Yorker fact checker lost her job for calling out a disabled US Army veteran working for DHS for having a “Nazi” tattoo that turned out to actually be his US Army unit tattoo.

  309. @Alden

    Might not be a bad idea to pretend to be a poverty stricken single mom and apply for the medi caid Same level of care and for only 24 hours after the birth how bad can it be?

    No doubt, but I think you have to fill out forms and provide paperwork to qualify for Medicaid. For example transcripts of tax returns.

    In post world war II England they would not be any charges associated with having a baby, and you would also have a mandatory Health Visitor coming to every home to check on the mental and physical welfare of both the mother and baby.

    That system seems to have broken down in the case of Meghan Markle. Possibly the Health Visitor could not get inside the walls of Windsor Castle.

  310. Art Deco says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Real male wages have been falling for 20-50 years while house prices go through the ceiling.

    They haven’t. And the proportion of people living in owner-occupied housing has not declined, either.

  311. Art Deco says:
    @Pixo

    Medicaid pays for the majority of US births.

    It doesn’t. There were in 2017 76 million people enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP. About 20% were women between the ages of 14 and 40, or just north of 15 million. There were 56 million women in those age brackets that year.

  312. @PhysicistDave

    Excellent comment, and I want to add that I found your discussion of quantum mechanics oddly fascinating despite understanding barely a word of it. I say that because I am intrigued that there is an enormous aspect of our reality that is well beyond my ability to comprehend.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  313. @Art Deco

    “They haven’t.”

    Argument by assertion, always a good-un.

    https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/the-typical-male-u-s-worker-earned-less-in-2014-than-in-1973/

    Just imagine if in 1970 real wages were still at 1929 levels.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  314. Anonymous[261] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Widescale color television broadcasting began in the UK around year 1970.
    Prior to then, there was little point in owning a color set – they were on available since the late 1960s, since only a minority of programming was in color.

    In the early 1970s a color TV set was a very very sophisticated piece of electronic engineering which required a tube with three electron guns, a ‘shadow mask’ and the insertion of three color phosphor dots in the tube interior screen – plus elaborate electronic control enabled by all kinds of thermionic valves. Reflecting this tough engineering problem, the cost price of a color TV set was pitched high, roughly equivalent to £6000 for a standard 22″ inch model in the UK in 1970 in terms of today’s money.

    Yet, by 1975 a clear *majority* of British homes had one – I, personally, can remember them being ubiquitous in the homes of ordinary working class folk, granted, many were rented, but still …….., It was an awful lot of money, but the grip of TV on the public imagination was *that* strong.

    Incidentally, the modern, solid state, high definition, flat screen low priced color TV – which knocks the spots off the old version – is actually a very recent development.

  315. @PhysicistDave

    Dave, what is the point of feeding the troll Coronavirus? He argues in bad faith, nail him on one point and he’ll skip off to another or deny he ever made it. He’s not here “to learn, to teach or a bit of each”.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  316. @Art Deco

    The prospect of giving birth is a mighty strong incentive to sign up, and an unprecedented proportion of those women are still single. Your sadistics don’t refute the original claim.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  317. “Show me a reactionary and I will show you a heartbroken futurist”.

    Can’t tell where you’re heading unless you know where you’ve been.

  318. @SFG

    Wait until we stop playing.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  319. res says:
    @Anonymous

    Good comment overall. I wanted to call this part out for particular attention.

    Thus, when I point out the facts, I’m often greeted with incoherent anger centering on the allegation that I must be a bad person for being so well-informed.

    They believe that if a person with bad ideology is correct about certain matters, it may lend credence to the ideology.
    Of course, the solution would be to take those correct views and attach them to the ‘good’ ideology. If good people don’t want bad people to own what is true, they should adopt it and put it to good use. Steven Pinker and some others suggested as much. Science is coming out with certain facts about group differences, and it’s better than well-meaning Liberals own them because, otherwise, the bad guys will grab them and lend credence to their evil ideology.

    And they might pull this off but for one reason. They simply can’t process the fact that blacks are less intelligent and may be prone to be more violent. This is less about ideological commitment to racial equality than special sensitivity about blacks. After all, if findings suggested that blacks are more intelligent, the media would probably hail it as great news. Or, if the facts suggested black and white IQs are equal, and it is the Arab IQ that is lower, it’s unlikely too many people would get worked up. Given the special sensitivity, blacks can be said to be equal in all traits or superior in some traits. But they can’t be inferior in any or perceived as particularly dangerous. True or false, those are regarded as ‘racist’, the cardinal sin in the New West, and there’s consensus on this among Democrats and Republicans.

    And this is why the ‘good people’ cannot own the facts about race and differences. It isn’t so much the facts about racial differences that upset them but that blacks may be inferior or more problematic in some areas. Would anyone lose sleep or get outraged if a scientific study said the people of Turkmenistan are, on average, less intelligent or more prone to criminality? Of course not. But with precious blacks, it isn’t possible, and that is why the ‘good people’ cannot own the facts about race and IQ.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  320. res says:
    @Corvinus

    Funny that you accuse Steve of a strawman when you needed to engage in a massive shifting of goalposts to make your “point.”

    From a description of reality to (emphasis mine): “Why is there a need for this subspecies designation”

    P.S. Do they sell wheels for goalposts to make things easier for people like Corvinus?

    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  321. res says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I think you are arguing against some of our White-nationalist friends who have a rather essentialist (and quite goofy!) concept of race. But that is not how Sailer thinks. I do not think you have distinguished your own approach from Sailer’s.

    Right. It’s funny that Corvinus’ comment is more of a strawman than what he was responding to. But unintentional entertainment like that is what we have learned to expect from Corvy.

    That’s the point, isn’t it? What race is Barack Obama? Well, no single race. On the other hand, if you are concerned about sickle-cell anemia or Tay-Sachs disease, concepts of race and ethnic group are indeed helpful.

    Right. As GWAS become better and more comprehensive hopefully we can have more specific information, but given the current state of the GWAS art the concept of biological race can give useful medical information. Especially since current GWAS have problems handling multiple races and mixed race individuals.

    • Replies: @Sean
  322. @Art Deco

    Medicaid paid for 43% of births in the US in 2018, however it was more than 50% in some states.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  323. @Neil Templeton

    Still, our culture, our way of life, is fucked if we buoy the attractive narrative above analysis of fact.

    I was not really making normative statements about the way things “should” be in a perfect world, but positive ones about the way things are.

    It’s not a matter of buoying the “attractive” narrative, it’s that truth and a couple of bucks will get you a cup of coffee. A matter of what it takes in practical terms to promote/ impose/ police your desired narrative — especially in an overly “diverse” society. Being “right” counts for very little in the sociopolitical realm.

    Sure, it’s better to have a high trust society where truth is actually valued, and open debate is a strong norm. But in a “diverse” society, that kind of system is vulnerable to exploitation by highly ethnocentric groups:

    The Evolutionary Dominance of Ethnocentric Cooperation:

    Here we show that ethnocentrism eventually overcomes its closest competitor, humanitarianism, by exploiting humanitarian cooperation across group boundaries as world population saturates.

    The only way to prevent that is to effectively police the boundaries of that society against groups that engage in this sort of behavior. Whoops, that comes up against another modern taboo: “xenophobia”/ “nativism.” Taboos are a universal component of all known human societies. Who determines those taboos? Where were the tropes of so-called “racism” and “xenophobia” 150 years ago? Cui bono?

  324. anon[951] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Why is there a need for this subspecies designation when humans share 99.9% of our DNA with one another! This fact makes us far too similar to one another to be considered different subspecies.

    Indeed, why this species difference between humans and chimpanzees? Aren’t we far too similar to be considered difference species?

    lol

  325. @Corvinus

    when humans share 99.9% of our DNA with one another!

    As usual, the ignorant, hate-filled anti-White “Bela Kun” is spewing a long-debunked anti-White canard in a failed attempt to buttress his semitic supremacist beliefs.

    The false “99.9%” claim dates from the early days of genetic sequencing, more than 20 years ago, and was based on the false assumption that all meaningful genetic variation stems from single nucleotide polymorphisms. With the development of more effective [and cheaper] high-throughput DNA sequencing, and the realization that non-SNP variants such as insertions and deletions account for the majority of genetic variation, it became clear way back in 2007 that the correct figure was about 99.5%.

    Yet ignorant, hate-filled race-denialists like Bela Kun continue to spew the long-discredited “99.9%” trope across the interwebs — clearly because they value ignorance and lies over knowledge and truth.

    Sad!

    OK, but who cares if he — whether through sheer ignorance, or malign intent — was understating the actual genetic variation across the human species by a factor of 5? 99.5% is still a pretty large percentage, right? Well, if you compare humans to chimps, the same number is right around 98.7%. Gorillas? 98.4%

    Oy vey! Speciesism! There’s only one race — the great ape race!

    SCIENCE has proven it!

    • Thanks: Desiderius, Rob
  326. @Art Deco

    They haven’t

    Fact check: FALSE

  327. @Neil Templeton

    Clearly the Tribe didn’t care that it didn’t exactly match the form of one of their taboo symbols. It was close enough, so it had to go. See my point about the effectiveness of over-enforcing/ capriciously enforcing taboos in encouraging self-censorship.

  328. Rob says:
    @Anon

    What was it that made us so willing to support those who would treat us like this, who would not support us in return? Why did we think it was alright, even noble, to operate according to standards so different from those that governed others?

    Even though he asks the question, he does not answer it.

    Jews supported blacks because it harmed white Gentiles.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  329. Anonymous[305] • Disclaimer says:
    @RichardTaylor

    When it was working class whites getting hammered by immigration and the multicult, middle class whites liked to signal their status/virtue by siding with blacks/immigrants and expressing contempt for their ‘racist’ opponents.

    Now it’s middle class getting hammered, and it’s the turn of rich whites to status/virtue-signal.

    The third and final stage of this drama will be the destruction of rich whites, who will follow their lower class kinsfolk into oblivion.

    Future historians of these events will marvel at how these people could be so stupid.

  330. Art Deco says:
    @Desiderius

    Your sadistics don’t refute the original claim.

    27% of the female population between the ages of 14 and 40 are enrolled in Medicaid; roughly 12% are uninsured. And it’s his job to demonstrate the claim he made is true.

    • Replies: @Pixo
  331. Corvinus says:
    @res

    “From a description of reality to (emphasis mine): “Why is there a need for this subspecies designation”

    Thanks for your fallacy of omission. What’s your next trick in that magic bag of yours?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  332. Sean says:
    @res

    In the 1920s Hitler had no problem with talking about the Poles as Aryans. Poland was invaded because it refused to join in his attack on the USSR. War is an event stemming from conflicts of interest and the balance of forces on either side. It’s the continuation of politics, which is based on the essential distinction: between friend and enemy. PhysicistDave correctly identifies “the driving engine of social dynamics in our society is the fact that far more people want comfy positions in the parasitic verbalist overclass than the number of comfy positions that do or can exist.” Corvinus concentrates on biological race concepts because he correctly thinks they are the weakest part of Steve’s argument:

    “Look for a synthesis that makes sense of both your thesis and the other guy’s antithesis (usually, the hardest but most productive). For example:
    —Thesis: A racial group is a taxonomical subspecies.
    —Antithesis: A racial group is a biologically nonexistent social construct!
    —Synthesis: A racial group is a partly inbred extended family.”

    This is wrongheaded in my opinion, the thesis of Steve as far as I can see is that a Black individual with American citizenship (Black in the way Barak Obama is generally regarded as being) is not currently discriminated against relative to their demonstrated capabilities, which are assumed to be the same as anyone else, and that should remain so in the future. Why then does Steve set out his stall as taxonomy-centric one, whereby being an African American involves membership in a genetic community? The allegation is that Blacks are in an identifiable community being discriminated against by whites.

    Being the subject of an accusation does entail a right to bring up matters that exculpate one from the accusation, even if the accuser objects, but I think should be a last resort. Steve is too quick on the draw in my opinion; he does not always preface the unpleasantness with a disclaimer that it was not something he wished to broach. General hard truths need to be brought up only in response to presumption of overarching white guilt in the matter of racism being responsible for black norms being– on average–not identical to white ones all other things being equal. I think it is better to let them bring racism into it, and make them prove their case; they cannot do to a criminal law standard of proof, although possibly they can win by the lesser civil judgement requirement.

    Why not use Blacks are allies against the Africans still in Africa to prevent their mass immigration into the West. That would entail African Americans retaining all their affirmative action rights and immigrants not being eligible. Reparations could be looked in a different light: necessary to prevent the arrival of a hundred million Sub Saharan Africans.

    • Disagree: Desiderius
  333. @res

    There isn’t consensus on that – there’s a Westphalian consensus not to think much about it at all.

  334. J.Ross says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Can Medicaid pay for a birth from a woman not enrolled in it? If yes, you have a point, if not, Art’s comment about percentage enrolled wins.
    If we worry about Medicaid enrollment we can limit who enrolls. When I had medical bills I couldn’t pay for, there was a whole process (something like paying for college) to makes cases and claim statuses to get bits of the bill carried by different groups. Is there an ACORN fitting people into the Medicaid tent temporarily, the way foreigners fit themselves into the country just long enough to have a baby?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  335. Passive voice will do that to you. If you don’t even know who the mark is you’ve got no hope spotting the sharp.

  336. Roger says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Bell proved that a certain sort of hidden-variable theory was inconsistent with …

    Yes, he proved that about local hidden variable theories, just as I said.

    Where on earth did you get the crackpot idea that experiments have ruled out theories like Bohm’s?

    I only said that the local hidden variable theories have been ruled out.

    Now Bohm’s theory really is a crackpot idea. It is not really testable, and not really a physical theory. Bohm himself did not believe in it. It is only interesting as a mathematical curiosity.

    • LOL: Sean
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  337. Pre-Pong/post-Pong

  338. @Corvinus

    What’s your next trick in that magic bag of yours?

    True. Can’t reasonably answer this one. Ya know: If : – : I : Could, – – the magic in the bag would be gone (and the fun with it as well. and that’d be sad). I prefer things being vibrant and surprising too (filled with potentiality and reason), in our big bag (which others call: Existence and/or the world / or the universe, even). Can’t help it.

  339. @Desiderius

    Thinking with Schiller (I oftentimes think with Schiller), I’d want to think that this sentence of yours has not found its definite form yet.
    (The definite form would include playing (or: play) as an essential kind of being in this world (in der Welt sein M. Heidegger) and would never totally or absolutely or eternally or essentially even want to abandon (or: downplay/ neglect/ underappreciate) this realm (= this mode of being).
    (I might break into an open door here. I was just not sure, whether that would be the case or not, so: If I did: It sure was in a rather playful mode, nedwahr.)

  340. @res

    Yes it did. I’ve been thinking about some of the issues you’ve raised, particularly about the way mixed race people are treated as ‘black’ in the West, and how this lends itself to an idea of race as a social construction, so your comment is timely. Thanks.

    • Thanks: res
  341. “the Tulsa riot of 100 years ago (which was started by blacks but ended by whites)”

    Until this is again commonplace and unremarked we aren’t anywhere near to being out of the woods.

  342. @Roger

    No, John Bell is not worth reading.

  343. BB753 says:
    @Charon

    “In my faith we call it harassing little girls.”
    What are you, a bigot? You know they’ve been pushing for the legalization of pedophilia for decades, right? Doesn’t Biden have the right to live his sexual orientation openly? You know, like the rest of the LGTB crowd?
    Let no deviancy live in the closet! That’s the rule of the land!

  344. @PhysicistDave

    Bohmian mechanics is, of course, true- but unsatisfactory.

    I am not in the mood of writing long comments, so:

    1. the problem with Bohm is that he hadn’t developed a more radical theory. He just wrote a chapter in his “The Undivided Universe”. His holomovement/implicate & explicate order, which is a truly revolutionary idea, remained not more than a metaphor.

    2. in my opinion, both Einstein & the founding fathers of QM were not wrong, but limited. It is useless to try to unite GR with QFT (or anything similar). We simply need a new theory that will give both branches of modern fundamental physics as rough approximations, just like thermodynamics is basically statistical physics. Simply, Einstein’s thoughts about space, gravity,… need to be replaced. How- I don’t know. There are not enough experimental data.

    3. with regard to counter-intuitive approach I’d agree. But, it is questionable what is intuitively acceptable. Words like energy, power, force… are parts of Western languages lexicon. Just- only through mathematical formulation (for instance, in classical mechanics) do they acquire empirically testable meaning. On the other hand, Schroedinger’s wave function is completely meaningless. It is not counter-intuitive, but simply something that came out of blue. Before Born, most physicists thought that it was about waves of matter. But, anyway- what is “probability density”?

    Popular counter-intuitive examples (quantum tunneling, entanglement (EPR), that poor murdered cat,..) are nice, but- in my view- not something extremely spectacular. What we need is something even more anti-common sense, but still rational. As far as we can.

    Just, to play the Devil’s advocate: what if Nature is essentially supra-rational & supra-causal, so that human mind that works according to well established rules of logic- even quantum logic, when it comes to the pinch- cannot explain, even in highly counter-intuitive terms, the Big One Thing?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  345. @Rob

    Not all white gentiles. Hell it was white gentiles they learned it from. What’s the Early Life on John Brown? Wilberforce? Rousseau?

    Not that those distinctions are as fine as your below average wignat might want them to be:

    Why do they do it (if you say status why would David French adopting black kids enhance his status in the first place which is the same question)? Because forsaking God they set themselves up as God and seek to (re-)create the noble savage in their own image.

    Scratch a wokel find a would-be wignat if the whole status thing doesn’t work out.

    • Replies: @Anon
  346. “We’re not going to have arguments with these people.”

  347. Rob McX says:
    @res

    Another way you could say race is a “social construct overlaid on a biological reality” is that the society and culture people live in is partially a product of their genes, what Dawkins calls the extended phenotype. There’s a continuing feedback loop between genes and environment, a trait that may be peculiar to humans, as they have greater power to shape their environment.

    The interaction between races is also part of the social construct. In a race realist society, people are wary of races known to be violent or otherwise criminally inclined, and this will adversely affect even people who are atypical of their race. What we see nowadays is mostly the opposite of that, where people are afraid to criticise or express fear of other races (except whites). This is socially constructed too, but is a reflection of genetic traits in various races nonetheless.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @res
    , @Bert
  348. @JMcG

    My daughter had the same teacher the next year: The Soviets were back to being our allies for the entire war.

    Yep, these people aren’t honest. We keep treating them like they’ve made a mistake and if we just provide enough facts and logic, they’ll change.

    But if you hate someone and consider yourself at war, you’ll make up any lie to harm them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  349. @Bardon Kaldian

    what if Nature is essentially supra-rational & supra-causal so that the human mind that works according to well-established rules of logic- even quantum logic, when it comes to the pinch- cannot explain, even in highly counter-intuitive terms, the Big One Thing?

    Nature essentially here is what Kant called nature beyond its boundaries.
    Such a nature would indeed be unpenetrable because we can’t explain things outside the range of our limitations, he said (cf. Critique of Pure Reason). – – – – If we would nevertheless try to achieve such a goal, we would necessarily touch a realm that would not exist (= be real or wrong/right).

    Same with history (and ….time). To make real sense of all of history (= of time itself) means to leave the limitations of the real world behind in favor of – a transcendental longing (which is not necessarily a bad thing (it is the core idea (or ideal) of – – – (the Christian not least) religion).

    II

    It might well be true that the limitations of well-understood physics are such that a real understanding of physics can never deliver more than – a kind of control over “the necessities (=the laws, dk) of nature” (Kant). – Physical inquiries are therefore structurally (=unescapably) practical – that is the idea behind Wittgenstein’s claim, that the real (=our existential) problems lie beyond the field of (rational) explanations. – The connection between physics and religion is the (imaginary) point where these two extremes meet (in Nikolaus’ von Kues’ (=Cusanus’) sense of th coincidentia oppositorum).

    III

    From the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals:  

    “Um deswillen muß ein vernünftiges Wesen sich selbst als Intelligenz […], nicht als zur Sinnen-, sondern zur Verstandeswelt gehörig, ansehen; mithin hat es zwei Standpunkte, daraus es sich selbstbetrachten […] kann, einmal, so fern es zur Sinnenwelt gehört,unter Naturgesetzen (Heteronomie), zweitens, als zur intelligibelen Welt gehörig, unter Gesetzen, die, von der Natur unabhängig,nicht empirisch, sondern bloß in der Vernunft gegründet sind.“(GMS, IV //452).

    – I sum this up: The boundaries of nature are ones we can’t overcome because we too are subjected to them. The fact that we are able to think about nature does not imply that we can overcome our dependency on nature. As a genuine part of this realm, we inherit natural (sigh) limitations, and what makes us rational human beings is to understand that being reasonable means to accept limitations. This idea works the other way round too: Only those willing to accept our intellectual limitations can be looked upon as rational humans. – Rationality = Limitation (a dependence on our forms (= intellectual tools) of reasoning (Anschauung)).

    IV

    He who longs for more has to leave this realm of rationality and sound reasoning behind and – sail to the higher (just like the missionaries did, so many years ago (Eagles/ The Last Resort).

  350. @Rob McX

    What difference would it make, if you would leave the genes out of your thesis?

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Rob McX
  351. Pixo says:
    @Art Deco

    I was somewhat wrong, looks like Medicaid pays for about 42-44% of births the last few years, a majority in several states though including my own.

    https://www.kff.org/medicaid/state-indicator/births-financed-by-medicaid/?currentTimeframe=0&sortModel=%7B%22colId%22:%22Location%22,%22sort%22:%22asc%22%7D

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/births.htm

    Seems like it went up when Obama expanded medicaid, but is steadily going down because hispanic fertility is dropping faster than white and asian.

    Medicaid plus subsidized aca plans might make it up to 50%.

  352. res says:
    @Rob McX

    Good points. Thanks.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  353. @J.Ross

    I can see that you have given a lot of thought to this. Perhaps you are a legislator?

    But how much research have you done? I don’t know if you have heard of the Kaiser Family Foundation, but it is a think tank that does research on issues just like this. Yes, there are people who add up numbers. It is not all guesswork.

    https://www.kff.org/medicaid/state-indicator/births-financed-by-medicaid/?currentTimeframe=0&sortModel=%7B%22colId%22:%22Location%22,%22sort%22:%22asc%22%7D

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  354. Hibernian says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    …there was almost unlimited land and resources relative to the existing population.

    The same was true of Tsarist Russia. Culture and the political/legal system count for a lot.

  355. J.Ross says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    So can births financed by Medicaid moot number of heads enrolled in Medicaid?

  356. @Corvinus

    My point was the poor class of detractor his argument elicits suggesting the rectitude thereof.

    You being the case in point.

  357. @Alden

    Alden asked me:

    OT Dave, any progress on your daughter problems with UCLA ?

    I appreciate your asking.

    For anyone not aware of the case, my daughter was brutally assaulted and injured (medically-documented broken bone and bruises all over her body) by a disturbed roommate when my daughter was moving out of the room to escape the crazy girl. Crucially, the criminal confessed to the UCLA police and other UCLA authorities to committing multiple crimes against my daughter (yes, we have the documents indicating the confessions!). And, yet, UCLA has punished my daughter, the victim of the violent crimes, and allowed the criminal to go off scot free!

    Of course, I have never heard of a case in the USA in my lifetime in which the criminal confessed to multiple crimes against the victim and yet the victim was punished and the criminal let off scot free.

    The major “evidence” used against my daughter in the official UCLA Student Conduct Hearing was a lawsuit filed on her behalf by the Disability Legal Rights Center of Los Angeles to get testing accommodations for her medical disability, so it it pretty clear that this is (highly criminal!) retaliation against my daughter for asserting her rights under federal law.

    Legally, it is open and shut. The problem is how to get justice without bankrupting our family paying lawyers’ fees.

    The federal Department of Education has opened a formal investigation into UCLA’s misconduct in my daughter’s case. The evidence is pretty conclusive that UCLA violated multiple federal laws: specifically, they violated FERPA (explicitly demanding in multiple emails that my daughter surrender her FERPA rights or face retaliation) in a way that DofEd has ruled to be illegal in the past.

    We’re also in touch with a retired member of the Board of Regents who is urging us to contact the national media — people like Robby Soave at Reason and of course Tucker, who have shown an interest in exposing university corruption.

    And the pretty clear retaliation is a federal felony (18 USC 241) punishable by up to ten years in federal prison. So, if necessary my daughter will have to file federal criminal charges against the top administrators at UCLA, especially Vice-Chancellor of Student Affairs, Monroe Gorden, and Dean of Students Maria Blandizzi.

    My daughter would rather just have the whole thing go away and have UCLA remove the punishment against her.

    But it seems that UCLA administrators prefer the risk of ten years in federal prison.

    I did not think this could happen in the USA. It couldn’t have happened in the USA I grew up in.

    Again, thanks for asking.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Anon
  358. @Jack D

    I don’t think it is all a matter of free markets.

    Here in Ecuador I had a consult with a vascular surgeon today the cost for the 45 minute appointment was $30. The hematologist I saw Monday was $15 for a follow-up visit. (This is just cash, not insurance.) I have an appointment with an attorney next week which is $35 for 1/2 hour.

    Now the minimum wage in Ecuador is $400 per month ($2.50 per hour vs approx $10 in the US, depending on state) and the average earnings is said to be 1,360 USD per month ($9 per hour).

    When you look at the fees to see a doctor or a lawyer in the US vs the cost in Ecuador in terms of the multiples of the minimum way or the average wage, it seems to me that the price is much higher in the US.

    For example a person earning an averageish $20 per hour in the US would have to work for 15 hours to get 1 hour of advice, or physical presence, from a lawyers, and 10 hours to see a doctor, whereas the person in Ecuador on average wage would have to work for about 8 hours to see a lawyer, and 2 to 3 1/2 hours to see a doctor.

    Under your theory of supply and demand, it would appear that Ecuador has twice as many lawyers as the US, and four times as many doctors.

    I realize that these are very crude back-of-the-envelope calculations, but if your theory is correct, then the US needs a massive influx of new doctors, so as to bring down the price of medical care relative to average wages.

    However the reality is that medical care in the US is exhorbitantly expensive because the way of paying for it is so inefficient. The US does not have the highest cost-of-living in the world, but it has the most expensive medical care, so something is out of whack, and I don’t believe that is just due to a shortage of doctors.

    Incidentally, since all printers are imported in Ecuador, and printer ink is very expensive in Ecuador, the high amount charged by US lawyers cannot really be explained by the cost of printer ink as Alden has suggested in another comment.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Alden
  359. @Desiderius

    Oddly, it was extremely poorly attended. Berkner High School had its graduation in the same place 11 hours earlier at 8 a.m., and cars were parked all over the neighborhood, but there was no evidence that anything was happening that evening when the Lake Highlands commencement occurred.

  360. @RichardTaylor

    I think we have overwhelming evidence that intellectuals are corrupt. They lie through their teeth routinely.

    Especially Corvinus.

  361. @Jonathan Mason

    Incidentally, since all printers are imported in Ecuador, and printer ink is very expensive in Ecuador, the high amount charged by US lawyers cannot really be explained by the cost of printer ink as Alden has suggested in another comment.

    Ecuador also has the world’s most expensive Legos. Before you buy any there, check with the Last Real Calvinist. He can get you the world’s cheapest.

  362. @Roger

    Roger wrote to me:

    I only said that the local hidden variable theories have been ruled out.

    But it did not rule out Bohmian mechanics, which was actually the only hidden-variables theory out there!

    All Bell’s theorem shows is that any successful version of QM must be at least as weird as Bohm’s theory in terms of non-locality. It does not rule out any hidden-variables theory that has actually been seriously proposed.

    Roger also wrote:

    Now Bohm’s theory really is a crackpot idea. It is not really testable, and not really a physical theory.

    You are a crackpot.

    Bohm’s theory is exactly as testable as textbook quantum mechanics. All experimental tests to date agree with Bohm’s theory.

    Bohm’s theory has one major advantage over textbook QM: Bohm’s theory could in principle be true of everything. Textbook QM cannot be.

    That puts Bohm ahead of textbook QM.

    I honestly do not think you are bright enough to grasp this.

    (Most physicists, myself included, do not like how Bohm’s theory incorporates relativity. But it is better than textbook QM in that it is, in principle, consistent and complete.)

    So, here is the score so far:

    Bohmian mechanics +1
    Textbook QM 0
    Roger -3

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    • LOL: Bumpkin
    • Replies: @Roger
  363. @James N. Kennett

    James N. Kennett wrote to me:

    Until somebody devises an experiment whose results cannot be understood by conventional QM, these remain philosophical problems.

    A logical inconsistency in a scientific theory is not generally considered a merely “philosophical” problem!

    Classical physics could not explain black-body radiation. Hence, we physicists had a problem. Hence, quantum mechanics.

    QM cannot explain how to analyze the measurement apparatus. Hence, we have a problem.

    When there is something in nature your theory cannot accommodate, scientists have a problem. This is good. Trying to understand problems advances science.

    Saying “Hey, I don’t care about the problem: it has no practical value!” means the end of science.

    Jim also wrote:

    If you want to regard it as a description of how the universe works, it is clearly illogical. However, if you regard it as a “How To” set of instructions, it is brilliantly successful.

    By that criterion, the Ptolemaic theory was just perfect: by tweaking the epicycles, you could make it agree with observation at least as well as the Copernican theory.

    But Ptolemy could not explain why a bunch of the epicycles all had the same period: 365 1/4 days. Copernicus could.

    The goal of physics (and evolutionary theory and historical geology and cosmology and all serious scientific endeavors) is not just to “save the appearances” but to tell us what is really there.

    We do not applaud Darwin because, hey, we can now predict in what layers we will find what kind of fossils.

    We give Darwin credit because we think he told us something that is true about the history of life.

    Most experiments in physics would just be truly autistic navel gazing unless they tell us something about the nature of reality.

    For example, suppose the only purpose of the theory of the Higgs boson were to allow us to easily predict the results of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    That would have things exactly backwards: the only reason to build the LHC was to get data that might tell us if the Higgs really exists. There is no need to be able to predict experimental results at the LHC (it has no practical economic value) except to test our theories of how the universe really is.

    Again, if scientists had followed your approach, we would still be followers of Ptolemy.

    • Thanks: Sean
    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
  364. Sean says:
    @Luke Lea

    Past his peak Weinberg makes a mistake.

  365. @Dissident

    Dissident asked:

    Governments don’t also maintain critical infrastructure; uphold law and order (at least to some degree); maintain borders (again, at least to some minimal degree); maintain a certain standard of safety for the food, water and medicine supply; for the competency of medical and other professionals, via licensing; manage and direct responses to critical emergencies and disasters (earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, epidemics, etc.) and a few other things?

    Have you visited California recently?

    The answer is no, governments do not do those things, at least not out here.

    Dissident also asked me:

    You don’t think any True Believers who are situated in influential positions, might also play a role?

    I think there are almost no real True Believers.

    Yeah, I know: lie enough and you start believing your own lies.

    I think long ago there may have been people who truly believed in classic Marxism: if you were not too bright or too analytical, Marxism did sort of seem to make sense.

    But is there anyone who truly thinks that the distinction between males and females is purely a social construct and has no biological basis? I don’t think so. I think anyone with an IQ high enough to grasp the concept of “social construct” knows that of course it is a lie.

    They lie to prove their loyalty to the team and to prove their power over the rest of us who are not willing to lie.

    You know Havel’s point about life under Communism? The point was not to get the populace to believe the lies but to humiliate the populace by forcing them to surrender their humanity by mouthing what were obvious lies.

    • Thanks: Dissident
  366. Roger says:
    @PhysicistDave

    In case anyone is trying to follow PhysicistDave’s ad hominem attacks, let me just point out that he is promoting an obscure physics theory as being superior to what is in the textbooks.

    Did Bohm get a Nobel Prize for his discovery? Nope. He was a Communist who fled the country in disgrace.

    He does still have a small cult following, but nearly everyone else regards Bohm’s theory as a foolish and failed idea. Even Bohm did not really believe in it.

  367. Anonymous[986] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Bear this in mind:

    Typical Chinese wages reliably double every five years, as they have done for decades, now.
    There is no indication this trend will change in the foreseeable future.

  368. @YetAnotherAnon

    The house prices are on the way up into the sky in Germany too. University Professors who once lived in a comfortable villa with a big garden in Heidelberg for example, are now rather living in apartment-buildings with a garage in the basement and an escalator – and that’s about it, comfort-wise.
    Less work for them though. No hassle with the garden.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  369. Sean says:
    @PhysicistDave

    The problem is how to get justice without bankrupting our family paying lawyers’ fees.

    Get a left wing lawyer who will present the case as as protecting a minority from the majority, which is increasing interpreted by courts as the purpose of the legal system.

    • Replies: @JackOH
    , @Alden
    , @PhysicistDave
  370. @Roger

    Roger wrote to me:

    In case anyone is trying to follow PhysicistDave’s ad hominem attacks, let me just point out that he is promoting an obscure physics theory as being superior to what is in the textbooks.

    It is not obscure and I am not “promoting” it.

    But Bohm’s theory could be true. It is logically consistent and agrees with all experimental tests.

    Which is more than can be said for textbook QM, which cannot be true.

    The real problem here is that there are in fact an infinite number of theories which agree with the existing experimental evidence, and so we have an embarras de richesses. Bohm’s was the first, but there are a lot more.

    How can we decide among these? That is the core problem. The other problem is that all of the known theories accommodate relativity in consistent but very strange ways.

    The one theory that is not a contender is textbook QM. It cannot be true.

    So, here is the score so far:

    Bohmian mechanics +1
    Textbook QM 0
    Roger -5

    Note that Bohm is just a hair above textbook QM: not great but at least not provably wrong. And our pal Rog just sinks lower and lower.

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    • Replies: @Roger
  371. @Roger

    Our pal Rog wrote:

    Did Bohm get a Nobel Prize for his discovery? Nope. He was a Communist who fled the country in disgrace.

    Well, he did discover the Bohm-Aharonov effect. Have you discovered anything that important (I ask in jest)?

    And his reformulation of EPR in terms of spin has been crucial to all of the modern work that involves entanglement: the whole enterprise of quantum computing, quantum cryptography, etc.

    Have you done anything even half as important, Rog?

    And perhaps you have heard that you cannot judge a person’s scientific work by his politics, eh, Rog?

    I mean, Heisenberg was a Nazi.

    Look: you are very eager to disparage John Bell and David Bohm, who did crucial work that led to all of the modern “entanglement” technology: quantum cryptography, computing, etc.

    And, you, Rog, what are your great contributions to modern science?

    You are a little, bitty acorn, Rog, trying to attack some big oak trees.

    Not a pretty sight.

    Though awfully funny.

    But what do you expect from a guy named “Roger”?

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  372. Rob McX says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Leaving genes out would mean positing a species with no genetic differences among its members, like twins or clones. Their offspring would also have the same DNA. This isn’t very far removed from the current orthodoxy on race. You’re allowed to admit genetic differences, but only those that don’t affect anything relevant – or, at least, contentious – such as intelligence or criminal tendencies.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  373. JackOH says:
    @Sean

    +1 on your suggestion that PhysicistDave seek counsel bankrolled by a deep-pockets foundation. (That’s how I’m reading your comment at least). University admins as I’ve seen them will spend enormous sums to protect their no-accountability featherbed, and the individuals I know who’ve been successful in actions against our local Podunk Tech have been repped by counsel paid for by a third party.

  374. @PhysicistDave

    Werner Heisenberg was a conservative German and under the attack of Nazis more than once – from wikipedia:
    There had been many failed attempts to have Heisenberg appointed as professor at a number of German universities. His attempt to be appointed as successor to Arnold Sommerfeld failed because of opposition by the Deutsche Physik movement.
    (Deutsche Physik = Nazi Physics).

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  375. Anonymous[525] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Just a general, empirical point, but I’ll throw it in, anyway:

    Regardless of a nation’s ethnic base, wars, geography, culture, political structure, sudden crises, policy dilemmas, popular movements etc etc, historically speaking, a very good indicator of future political turmoil up to and including revolution, is a long, indefinite and apparently unceasing period of actual wage stagnation.

    Human behaviour is really as low and simplistic as that.

    The corollary is that nation which consistently posts year on year substantial wage increases, such as China, is more or less guaranteed political stability and popular consent and contentment.

  376. @Rob McX

    My idea runs thus: – If differences in behavior would be acknowledged, genes might not matter much.

    I mention this because I do run into people every once in a while who are willing to accept behavioral differences, just not on a biological basis. – In a way, you could read and accept quite a bit of what Steve Sailer says about behavioral differences and the necessity to react properly to them in such a way – i. e. – without biology. Reacting properly meaning: Unequally. – More guidance for those individuals who need it, no matter what – genes they might inhabit.

    My argument is not just a thought experiment.

    One example: The Swiss spend much more money on kids of immigrants per capita than on the regular Swiss kid (in many a city or village (these budgets are set up locally – by the autonomous, elected (!) school board members) for example. This is very expensive – and very successful. No jobless immigrant kids, down to the 85 IQ points range. Gens and IQ are not taboo though in the Swiss public sphere. The leading conservative newspaper NZZ in the German-speaking part of the country does review (positively) the books of Robert Plomin or Charles Murray.
    This system would not work with open borders though. Because it already binds an impressive amount of resources (money and steering capacity not least) and goodwill on quite some levels of society.

  377. @Dieter Kief

    You know-it-all Germans : Deutsche Besserwisser” simply do not grasp the sheer lunacy of having a nut-case such as JB now in the WH as you are unable to recognize the true lunacy of the Greens and that which they have planned for your open-air looney-bin otherwise know as Deutschland. Germans have always been loathe to call a spade a spade and to recognize someone as a nut-case in Germany is a total no-go.
    Years ago I was witness, in Germany, to a deranged guy running around in a train station and dropping his pants and masterbating in front of unsuspecting women. When the Polizei arrived they were asking for renditions of this strange occurance, to which I, as a first-hand witness, informed a lady cop to the events involving the insane ” wahnsinnig”, guy standing there in handcuffs, to which she hysterically countered : Nein, Nein, Nein , you can’t label this person as insane, only the “experts can do that.

    Authenticjazzman.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  378. @PhysicistDave

    Classical physics could not explain black-body radiation.

    I.E. an experiment whose results could not be explained. Show me the same in quantum mechanics.

    QM cannot explain how to analyze the measurement apparatus.

    Yes, it can. The measurement apparatus obeys the Schrödinger equation.

    Again, if scientists had followed your approach, we would still be followers of Ptolemy.

    I think you have misunderstood my point.

    I have not met a physicist who does not believe that the world is governed by the Schrödinger equation (appropriately generalised for relativity and fields). “Textbook Quantum Mechanics” (Dirac’s postulates) is a way to express this fact without having to solve the Schrödinger equation every time for the “quantum system” + apparatus + observer. When the quantum system is large or entangled, or the boundaries between these three layers are blurred, it may be necessary to rethink the Textbook QM, but only so far as producing a more appropriate solution of the Schrödinger equation for the combined system.

    It is hard to produce general rules for the “preferred-basis problem” and the “probability-measure problem.” However, there is a good chance of working out the rules when trying to interpret a specific experiment.

    Any comparison with Ptolemaic epicycles is fraudulent. The results of Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, and ultimately Newton taught us things that we could not have worked out with epicycles. The goal of Bohm’s theory is quite different: it is merely to predict the same results as Textbook QM. It makes us stop and think about the interpretation of QM, but in practical terms it is nearly always an obfuscation.

  379. Art Deco says:
    @Paperback Writer

    In any society, wealth is something accumulated by the few except in modest amounts: your home equity, pension rights, &c. In this country, most of the salable assets (by value) are held by households encompassing 3% of the population.

    Income is another matter. If the Maddison Project is correct, the per capita product of just about every European country in 1907 was lower than that of the United States. (Ireland and Italy were comparable with Scandinavia at that time and maybe 20% shy of Germany and France; ditto the Southern Cone of South America).

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
  380. Roger says:
    @PhysicistDave

    There have been 60 Nobel Prizes for textbook QM, and trillions of dollars of economic activity, and 0 for Bohm, Bell, and their followers.

    And yet you rate textbook QM as “0” because “It cannot be true.”

    For anyone who might be following, I am just pointing out that PhysicistDave is expressing some fringe views.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  381. Alden says:
    @Sean

    It’s not that easy to find a left wing legal foundation willing to accept a nice normal plaintiff abused by a left wing institution. A personal injury attorney is the way to go. Claim daughter was so traumatized she’s unable to work. Whites have no rights in this country. Parents of hapa kids should give the kids the asian parents surname.

  382. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Surely if minimum wage in the US is 3 times the minimum wage in Ecuador it’s reasonable that cost of goods and services in the US is 3 times more than in Ecuador?

    I don’t feel like being my usual bitchy self today. But I really despise jumped up prole Europeans and their ignorant criticism of every aspect of life in America.

    What next, will you claim that American pedestrians hit by a car die in the street because “there is no medical care in America”?

    Anyone who thinks America’s so bad and Britain is so great should watch a you tube video St Anne’s Nottingham University 1969. It’s about Nottingham Council Housing built 1930-1960. Outhouses instead of toilets and sewers. 2 bedrooms only. No conception by the County Council that some families might have more than 2 or 3 kids at a time before reliable birth control. No real kitchen or place to prepare it store food. Mildew covered walls because what with Dad working 5 or 6 days a week, Mom doing piece work at home and a pound a week child benefit per kid they still couldn’t afford heat to keep the house dry.

    Outhouses in 1969 in big city council housing built between 1930 and 1960. Fix your own house before trying to fix the village. Old Chinese proverb.

  383. @Dieter Kief

    My understanding was that most Germans historically rented rather than owning houses, their DM in the bank constituting their store of value. This had the odd effect, as UK house prices started their inexorable rise, that measures of national wealth consistently showed the average Brit to be wealthier than the average German, despite the higher German standard of living.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  384. dearieme says:
    @JMcG

    The Soviets were back to being our allies for the entire war.

    That’s true, for the shortened version of WW2 fought by the USA.

  385. @Authenticjazzman

    Hey Autheticjazzman – did you play some music in Germany?
    (Your story sounds just too true man. We have experts now for everything, it seems like).

  386. @YetAnotherAnon

    My understanding was that most Germans historically rented rather than owning houses

    Most of them do – in Switzerland too. But that varies a lot.
    The median savings account in Germany is lower than in Italy or in Greece. Greeks don’t like to pay taxes – and Italians, like the Greeks – do own on average more houses than the Germans and are taxwise a bit more on the flexible side too.
    What’s new is, that in some German regions your average hairdresser with a decent salon and two or three employees or a medical doctor or schoolteacher has trouble paying for a house.
    Nice houses in Heidelberg, as I’ve mentioned above already, are off-limits now even for university professors. Stefi Graf has a house there. – And lots and lots f other anywheres.
    Your average sheik loves to have some houses in Heidelberg, to be close to perfect hospitals, when the time has come.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  387. @Art Deco

    “If the Maddison Project is correct, the per capita product of just about every European country in 1907 was lower than that of the United States.”

    Yeah, just what I said. Wealth is comparative. To a peasant, a house in Massapequa is rich.

  388. tr says:
    @Prester John

    Christian Science, domestic science, political science, social science.
    No real science contains the word science in its name.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  389. @Roger

    Roger wrote to me:

    There have been 60 Nobel Prizes for textbook QM, and trillions of dollars of economic activity, and 0 for Bohm, Bell, and their followers.

    And a number of those who won Nobel prizes for their key contributions to quantum mechanics — notably Einstein, de Broglie, Planck, Wigner, and Schrödinger — had doubts almost identical to those I am expressing here.

    You are either very stupid or intentionally lying.

    Yes, Heisenberg, Born, and Bohr had views similar to yours. But a large number, probably a majority, of those who made the key contributions to QM disagreed, as I have just documented. And the contemporary work on quantum cryptography and computing owes a lot to Bohm and Bell (yea, I know you are ignorant of that fact because you are ignorant of physics!).

    Why on earth do you insist on making a fool of yourself in public posting stuff on a subject of which you are woefully ignorant?

    Look: when I teach QM, I of course start out with textbook QM, because it does indeed “work,” more or less, and, most importantly, because no one knows what the right theory is that replaces the incomplete theory presented in textbooks. If you read the textbook by my former prof Steve Weinberg, you will see that of course he does the same thing. But neither Steve nor I hide the fact from the student that textbook QM is a provisional theory: it must be wrong.

    The same thing is true of General Relativity, by the way: it must be wrong, simply because the true theory of gravity must be compatible with quantum theory, and GR is not. But of course we still teach GR, even though we know it is wrong, simply because we do not know yet what the correct theory is.

    Roger also wrote:

    For anyone who might be following, I am just pointing out that PhysicistDave is expressing some fringe views.

    For anyone, who might be following, I am just pointing out that it is Roger’s views which are the fringe views. He seems to know a very tiny amount about textbook QM but next to nothing about the views of living physicists or of those who historically created QM.

    Specifically, his claim that those who won Nobels for their contributions to QM agree with him is either an expression of incredible ignorance or an intentional lie, considering the large number of those physicists, from Einstein, Schrödinger, and de Broglie to Wigner and Weinberg, who have publicly expressed the opposite view.

    I, thankfully, do not know Roger from Adam. Our exchange began when he posted arrogant and insulting comments about John Bell and David Bohm, physicists whose work dwarfed anything that Roger will ever achieve in life.

    I have simply been replying to Roger’s bizarre and insulting attacks on other physicists.

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    • Replies: @Roger
  390. @Sean

    Sean wrote to me:

    Get a left wing lawyer who will present the case as as protecting a minority from the majority, which is increasing interpreted by courts as the purpose of the legal system.

    Alden’s reply above is correct. My wife and I have interacted with a number of lawyers over the past few decades, including some “public-interest” lawyers and some self-proclaimed leftists.

    The leftists and public-interest lawyers were even more greedy than the run-of-the-mill attorneys (who were also pretty greedy, to be sure!).

    More broadly, you have to assume a lawsuit will normally last two to five years. My daughter wants to get on with her life: winning a lawsuit after she graduates from UCLA in a year would not do her any good, and the stress of a trial would interfere with her starting a career and family.

    No, I think national publicity and a federal criminal complaint are the only real options. UCLA gets a big portion of its money from the state and federal governments, and our rep in the state legislature runs the committee that controls UCLA’s state funding. So, we will also be asking his help.

    But my daughter really wants UCLA to just back off and leave her alone.

    It is very strange that UCLA administrators seem to prefer the possibility of ten years in federal prison.

    By the way, the lead administrator, Hilary Crocker, who retaliated against my daughter left UCLA shortly thereafter, we suspect, because her superiors realized that her actions created legal liability for UCLA. But we kept her superiors well-informed of her criminal actions: they cannot escape legal responsibility themselves.

    • Replies: @Sean
  391. @Dieter Kief

    Diere Kef wrote to me:

    Werner Heisenberg was a conservative German and under the attack of Nazis more than once – from wikipedia:

    Well, as you probably know, there has been a long historiographical debate about Heisenberg and his role in the Nazi A-bomb project.

    Heisenberg claimed he intentionally messed it up. I think the consensus among physicists is that he was trying to build the Bomb, but just screwed up.

    Anyway, my point to Rog was simply that we should not judge either Heisenberg’s or Bohm’s scientific work based on their political views. That really is the ad hominem fallacy (unlike msot claimed examples of the ad hominem fallacy: pointing out that someone is ignorant or lying is not a logical fallacy).

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Dieter Kief
  392. anon[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    That really is the ad hominem fallacy (unlike msot claimed examples of the ad hominem fallacy: pointing out that someone is ignorant or lying is not a logical fallacy).

    Previously Dave wrote:

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯¯

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  393. @Reg Cæsar

  394. Anon[439] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    What’s a wignat?

  395. Roger says:
    @PhysicistDave

    notably Einstein, de Broglie, Planck, Wigner, and Schrödinger — had doubts almost identical to those I am expressing here.

    No, none of them supported Bohmian mechanics or agree with Bell about QM.

    I doubt that Weinberg has either. He has babbled in his old age about finding better theories and complaining about QM, but I doubt he agrees with you.

    You can adopt a philosophical view that all scientific theories are wrong, because they might be replaced by better theories in the future. It is a funny idea of “wrong”. But regardless, nothing from Bohm or Bell ever made QM any better.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    , @PhysicistDave
  396. @anon

    anon[337] wrote to me:

    [Dave]: That really is the ad hominem fallacy (unlike msot claimed examples of the ad hominem fallacy: pointing out that someone is ignorant or lying is not a logical fallacy).

    Previously Dave wrote:

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    Exactly. Roger is either an ignoramus or a pathological liar (or both). And it is not an ad hominem fallacy to point this out.

    But what would you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    • Replies: @anon
  397. @Dieter Kief

    “Nice houses in Heidelberg, as I’ve mentioned above already, are off-limits now even for university professors.”

    Same in Oxford (and Cambridge). And London. Do German academics still mostly have tenure, though? Even that’s no longer guaranteed in the US and UK.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  398. @PhysicistDave

    I agree with what you say about ad hominems.
    I think you are unfair to Werner Heisenberg because somebody who opposed Nazism is no Nazi. It is as simple as that and you seem to rather obfuscate that by your dark hints about whether or not Heisenberg did willfully screw up his attempts in constructing the A-bomb in Nazi Germany. – You can’t really prove your point – and you admit that, too, and I think that is enough evidence to be rather reluctant with your judgment about Wener Heisenberg.

    You might even want to think about this Heisenberg problem this way:
    I would never (never) claim that since your daughter is in dire straits in a deep conflict over the woke value system and tries to be working for the UCLA even though, that that would make her a supporter of wokism.
    (Note, please: My PS remark contains not the least bit of cynism or schadenfreude on my part. I wish you and your daughter all the best in this incredible case – and very good nerves).

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @PhysicistDave
  399. Corvinus says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Politics between Team Brown and Team White”

    Categorical error.

    “is not ideological; it is visceral and territorial.”

    It is visceral and territorial because the conflict is rooted in ideology.

    “Team Brown doesn’t want to engage your children and grandchildren intellectually; they want them enslaved or dead.”

    Hasty generalization.

    “Charles Murray and Steve Sailer, and you, are going to weep bitter tears.”

    LOL, from who, YOU? Are you going to personally lead this charge by “Team White”?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  400. Bert says:
    @Rob McX

    There’s a continuing feedback loop between genes and environment, a trait that may be peculiar to humans, as they have greater power to shape their environment.

    No, many species of both animals and plants shape their environment in ways that facilitate the survival of their mean phenotypes and, of course, genotypes. The evolutionary course of such interactions over time is termed niche construction, the process of natural selection favoring genotypes that produce phenotypes which impact the environment in ways that facilitate their survival, and, crucially for evolution, facilitate the survival of even more extreme genotypes/phenotypes.

    Examples of niche construction:

    An example from plants would be the evolution of shade tolerance in a tree species such that its seeds dispersing into a forest composed of other species can grow despite the shady understory condition. When adults of that species are later casting shade into the understory, their seedlings have an advantage over seedlings of other species that are less shade tolerant. On the Southern U.S. Coastal Plain, beech, magnolia, and Shumard Oak would be examples of shade tolerant species which ultimately form a climax forest that persists unless destroyed by a tornado or hurricane. If such destruction happens, the forest that regrows will initially have more shade intolerant species, e.g., pines and Post Oak, which grow faster. There is a trade-off between maximum insolated-growth-rate and the ability to tolerate shade. But eventually the shade-tolerant species dominate the forest again.

    A valid but overused example of niche construction in animals is dam and lodge building by beavers. It is assumed to have evolved from a more muskrat-like ancestor in which the proto-beavers tended to leave the limbs from which they stripped edible bark in piles which fortuitously dammed small streams.

    Obviously human beings are one of the apices of evolution via niche construction. In human beings the environment consists both of non-social and social aspects. An example of the former, is the type of vegetation in which resources are sought, which can be manipulated by human-caused fires. It is probable, in my opinion certain, that human races differ in the end point of niche construction as it pertains to social interactions. Indo-Europeans and Northeast Asians were selected for cooperativeness to a greater extent than were Black Africans. The coevolution between genotypes and the social environment led to high civilization in the former via an evolutionary process of niche construction focused on the social niche. Black Africans with their R-selected phenotypes reestablish, wherever they are free to do so, e.g., Detroit, a social environment in which those phenotypes have the highest reproductive success. A Black gangbanger in Detroit most likely has more offspring, even over a shorter life, than a Black nerd in the same city. Paul Kersey has made a career of lamenting Black behavior. Niche construction theory would suggest that the endpoints of niche construction in regard to social organization differ among the races, and that Black inner-city social life is one of the mechanistic outcomes.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @anon
  401. Sean says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Because you are so set on taking it to court, please be aware that lawyers live in a surprisingly small world and oft times they may have connections that mean they don’t have the best interests of the client at heart in a case like this. I’d research even tangential affiliations of the lawyer and his firm very carefully.

    https://www.unz.com/pfrost/french-canadians-evolving-gene-pool/
    In French Canadians, Tay Sach’s is caused by 2 different mutations that arose within a relatively small geographic area and short time frame (neither mutation is reported in France). This area (Bas St-Laurent and Charlevoix) is also the one where English Canadian merchants and managers were historically the least present.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  402. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @anon
  403. Sean says:
    @Dieter Kief

    In January of 1939, the technically adept but theoretically changed Nazi Germany made a serious mistake by allowing Hahn and Strassmann to publish the results of bombarding uranium with neutrons. Jewish former colleagues living abroad realised the implications and the race was on. At first Heisenberg was well up to speed, but in 1941 (when Hitler blew his chance to win the war) Heisenberg became half hearted and in the light of post war bugged discussions, he seems to have began avoiding giving the project coordinator (Gerlach) any good news, because a week after the news of the A bomb was given to them in Allied captivity:

    Heisenberg gave a seminar on this topic to the assembled scientists. Most of them, especially Gerlach, seemed to be hearing about the possibility of atomic weapons for the first time. According to Goldberg, the transcripts show that ‘for a lot of Heisenberg’s colleagues, this was new. Therefore, he must not have told them.”

    I don’t believe Heisenberg came up with the A bomb ideas he gave in his his lecture few days after Hiroshima in those few days. I think it more likely that he just started articulating them. Moreover, in the first conversation Werner Heisenberg had after the news of Hiroshima was given to the German scientists, by way of downplaying the practicality for Germany Heisenberg dismissively said it would take about half a ton of uranium to make a bomb; a third person who was listening interjected to ask Heisenberg ‘Then why did you tell me in 1938 it would only take a few dozen kilograms’. This showed Heisenberg began dissimulating about a how easy it would have be be to make an atomic bomb after everyone understood what Nazi Germany was about . Had he gone the other way and said a militarily useable Bomb was a possible in a WW2 timeframe with resources German could afford and convinced the scientific advisors to tell Hitler of that, then Heisenberg might have been given a team and resources to for obtaining the Uranium with a broad based approach using all five suggested methods instead of just one, which was a bad one.

    [MORE]

    During the Cold War conservative Franz Josef Strauss wanted the West German army to be equipped with the Davy Crockett nuclear bazooka. Heisenberg was very much opposed to West Germany having that tactical/battlefield thermonuclear weapon. or any kind of thermonuclear weapons, he did not work on them for the Americans either as far as I know, and he was politically opposed to the Eisenhower (then JFK) era move to give Germany nuclear weapons so the expensive US taxpayer funded forces defending West Germany could be reduced. The US and German establishment had no motive for burnishing Heisenberg’s reputation thus added to his prestige and ability to affect post war defence policy by allowing him to say he had deliberately not tried to make Hitler a bomb.

    There were plenty of people capable of solving the applied problems in Nazi Germany as shown by how anti Nazi Gentile Klaus Fuchs developed many of the designs, equations and techniques used to build the first atomic bombs. If Heisenberg’s theoretical ideas had been fructifying in discussions with his fellow scientists like (SA member) Jordan who ought to have got a share of Heisenberg’s Nobel, then working as a team they would had been able to come up with far more that he did while just thinking on his own.

    Heisenberg surely understood after the 1941 failure in front of Moscow and America coming in that Germany could not win conventionally. Germany having an atomic bomb in WW2 would not stop America developing one in around the same timeframe. Indeed a German crash program would be likely to result in the American bomb being ready much faster than would otherwise be the case. I expect Heisenberg would be unlikely to be so naïve as to think only Germans could build an atomic bomb. I suspect Heisenberg did not think building a bomb could win anything but a pyrrhic victory for Germany. As to whether any such supposition by Heisenberg that getting a bomb built in Germany would pose an unacceptable risk of Germany getting into an atomic Armageddon was correct, it seems not unlikely in view of his Cold War opposition to Germany becoming a nuclear battlefield. Ultimately, his loyalty was to his country; he was a German for good and ill.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
  404. anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    But what would you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

    Do you see any difference between “one”, “some” and “all” ?

  405. anon[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910

    “Shouldn’t”, lol. Business guys are often naive. Even more so in the Current Year.

  406. @YetAnotherAnon

    Do German academics still mostly have tenure, though?

    Yeah, that’s still the case.

    Comes to my mind: Jürgen Habermas built a Bauhaus-style nice and cool villa on a hill overlooking Lake Starnberg near Munich.

    This house is now worth – let me guess: Over 3 million Euros.
    He struggled financially to build it (he wrote about it) when he was 60 – even though his wife had been working as a psychotherapist and he was not only a well-known public intellectual and a tenured university professor but also a worldwide read author. The house might have cost them maybe 900 000 Deutschmark (=450 000 euros) ca. 1995.

    The couple could not afford this house now.

    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
  407. anon[440] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bert

    “Niche construction” – perfect.

    Gold Box.

  408. Anonymous[209] • Disclaimer says:
    @RichardTaylor

    That’s exactly why I stopped responding to Corvinus. I once corrected him on a historical point he had wrong and assumed it was an honest mistake. But a few days later he was back making the same erroneous point as though nothing had happened. That’s when I realized he’s just here to waste time and cause confusion.

    • Agree: res
  409. cthulhu says:
    @Roger

    You can adopt a philosophical view that all scientific theories are wrong, because they might be replaced by better theories in the future. It is a funny idea of “wrong”.

    Actually, it’s the way of thinking used by scientists and engineers all the time. There’s a famous quote from statistician George Box that encapsulates this viewpoint: All models are wrong; some models are useful. And, I would add, the trick is to know which elements of one’s current model (aka theory) are wrong at any given time, and what effect it has on your current problem.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  410. @Sean

    Sean wrote to me:

    Because you are so set on taking it to court…

    Oh, no, you misread me. I was explaining why my daughter would rather resolve it without going to (civil) court.

    That is why we plan on releasing all of the documents not only to the national news media but also to the general public. The documents are quite damning for UCLA: the attacker confessed to multiple crimes, and yet UCLA let the attacker off and punished my daughter. We want to spread the word so that any family thinking of sending their daughter to UCLA knows that UCLA actively encourages violence against women. (This antedates my daughter going to UCLA, by the way: they kicked out the head of the assault-counseling center several years ago because she told the UCLA Administration that there was a real problem with violence against women at UCLA.)

    And then all this is a clear criminal violation of 18 USC 241: the main “evidence” UCLA used against my daughter was her complaint under the ADA. That is punishable by up to ten years in federal prison.

    UCLA administrators are far greater criminals than Felicity Huffman: I want them in jail for the rest of their lives.

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  411. @cthulhu

    Actually, it’s the way of thinking used by scientists and engineers all the time. There’s a famous quote from statistician George Box that encapsulates this viewpoint: All models are wrong; some models are useful.

    Yeah. Most importantly, scientific progress occurs by identifying something that is wrong and trying to see how to fix it.

    Noticing something wrong in a theory is a goldmine for a scientist.

    The problem with Roger is that he seems to know nothing at all about actual science.

    But what do you expect of a guy named “Roger”?

  412. @Dieter Kief

    Dieter wrote to me:

    I agree with what you say about ad hominems.
    I think you are unfair to Werner Heisenberg because somebody who opposed Nazism is no Nazi.

    Well, I am not an expert on the matter: what I have seen from those who are experts suggests that Heisenberg was not innocent. But perhaps you are right.

    Anyway, my point was simply directed to our rather strange friend Roger that even if Heisenberg had been a Nazi and even if David Bohm was a Communist, no serious physicist allows such considerations to affect his judgment of their scientific work.

    Roger has some bizarre animus against John Bell and David Bohm, even though he is a dwarf intellectually (okay, more like an ant!) compared to either physicist. I think what is happening is that Roger follows Lubos Motl, who is a very bright and extremely opinionated fellow, with whom I myself am friendly. Lubos does not like Bell or Bohm, but then Lubos is extremely splenetic on almost every subject — part of his Central European charm, a modern-day Karl Kraus, perhaps.

    But Roger is so ignorant that he seems to take Lubos’ opinions as being representative of contemporary physicists in general.

    And that is an error: Lubos is an eccentric, a lovable eccentric in my opinion, but still an eccentric not at all representative of the attitudes of most physicists.

    Roger should stop being so arrogant on a subject about which he knows very little.

    • Replies: @Bumpkin
  413. @Roger

    Roger wrote to me:

    No, none of them supported Bohmian mechanics or agree with Bell about QM.

    As I keep trying to say, I do not “support” Bohmian mechanics. Bohm did not support Bohmian mechanics.

    The main interest of Bohmian mechanics is that it proves that a widespread belief prior to his work, based on a mathematical error by John von Neumann, was in fact wrong. Von Neumann thought he had proved that it was impossible to have any deterministic theory that reproduced the predictions of quantum mechanics.

    Bohmian mechanics is a counter-example to that claim. And Bell explained the specific error in von Neumann’s supposed proof.

    Merely proving Johnny von Neumann wrong on a significant matter is a greater accomplishment than most physicists manage in their entire career. When I entered college five decades ago, von Neumann’s error was still widespread among physicists. This actually mattered.

    And you are simply mistaken about Weinberg and the others disagreeing with Bell and me.

    You wrote:

    I doubt that Weinberg has either. He has babbled in his old age about finding better theories and complaining about QM, but I doubt he agrees with you.

    What he says in his textbook on the foundations of QM and also what he told my friend Sabine Hossenfelder in her book Lost in Math is exactly my own view and an excellent expression of Bell’s concerns (and Einstein’s and Wigner’s and Schrödinger’s and de Broglie’s…).

    You are an arrogant jerk who throws around statements such as that Steve Weinberg has “babbled in his old age” about a subject that you are simply too dumb to understand.

    You think I am not as smart as you? Fine. You think you are smarter than John Bell and David Bohm, who disproved a supposed theorem by Johnny von Neumann and who laid the foundations for quantum cryptography? Okaaay…

    And now you tell us you are smarter than Steve Weinberg in his old age. Uh-huuuuh..

    Of course
    , Einstein agreed with me and Bell and Weinberg that QM is incomplete. Perhaps you have heard of the EPR paper in which he laid this argument out in detail?

    That is my and Bell’s and Weinberg’s point — the same as Einstein’s in EPR. (In fact Bohm’s and Bell’s work on testing QM was simply an extension of EPR to deal with spins, which happens to be easier to test experimentally.)

    But I am sure that you are also smarter than Einstein.

    Or at least you believe you are.

    Do you see any problem here, Rog?

    No, of course you don’t!

    • Thanks: Sean
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  414. Anon[110] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, the situation with your daughter has a “rest of the story” problem. I appreciate that there may be privacy concerns.

    At any rate, here’s how I understand the story:

    1. Your daughter’s roommate was a white female, who is “disturbed.”
    2. Your daughter is disabled in some way or has some sort of medical concerns.
    3. Your daughter decided to move out (because she and her roommate didn’t get along?)
    4. Your daughter packed up and was waiting for moving help, in the presence of, but without any interaction with, her roommate.
    5. Your daughter’s roommate violently attacked your daughter before she could move out.

    There’s just something missing here.

    – What is the nature of the roommate’s disturbance?
    – Was your daughter’s disability or medical needs in any way, however irrational, a possible contributor to the roommate’s freak-out?
    – Why did your daughter decide to move out, and move out at that point?
    – Do you have any idea what prompted the roommate to get violent in the room that day, at that time? Is your story that it was just a random explosion of unprovoked violence (with no meaning of blaming your daughter intended by the word “provoke,” English is inadequate here).
    – It’s not clear to me how the FERPA comes into play here. Do investigators want to, for instance, access your daughter’s email and possible include portions in a report that would be publicly available?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  415. MEH 0910 says:

    Joe Biden: Young, Black Entrepreneurs Don’t Have Lawyers or Accountants Like Whites

    Jun 1, 2021

    During a speech in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Tuesday, President Joe Biden told a crowd that black entrepreneurs are as successful and capable as white entrepreneurs, but need more resources.

    • Replies: @anon
  416. @Corvinus

    Exactly. White flight happens because we can’t stand those darned black people’s ideas.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  417. @Dieter Kief

    I hate Bauhaus with a purple passion. Bauhaus was responsible for the demise of true artistic architecture.
    When one considers the magnificent stonework of such structures as the Uni-library in Heidelberg, or of all of the wonderful Sandstone Villas in Wiesbaden, Heidelberg and elsewhere, and then views the ugly non-artistic creations of the Bauhaus school, one can arrive at no other conclusion.

    In the US Garrison town of Kaiserslautern there is, in my humble opion, a sandstone Villa which is unsurpassed in creative endeavor, the so-called “Villa Krueckel”.

    Yes I did perform music in southern Germany late seventies, early eighties, with various Jazz/Blues formations, and I was located in Heidelberg during the formation of the “Gruenen”, a conglomerate of the nut-case “Dauerstudenten” and local crazies and we now see the results.
    My favorite town in Deutschland is : Saarbruecken.

    AJM

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  418. @Authenticjazzman

    I was a member of the Jazz-Club in Heidelberg and at times daily in the Haus Buhl and a frequent visitor of the Cave 54

    https://www.cave54.de/

    – These were the two most vivid clubs in town, that saw close to everybody in the Jazz world – I remember Albert Mangelsdorff playing there and John Mclaughlin and the young Jan Garbarek? if memory serves in an ultimately overcrowded concert (maybe 200 people in a club that was packed densely already with 120 visitors).
    Did you hit this incredibly small stage too? – If so – we’ve shared a room together, that’s almost sure then, if only for some hours.
    I am in Kaiserslautern at times and will have a look at Villa Krueckel, thanks for the hint.

    Well Bauhaus can be all kinds of things ( – ugly too)  – here it’s rather cool, I’d hold (a bit like Charles Lloyd’s Forest Flower album too – touchy): 

    https://myscissorella.blogspot.com/2012/03/pierre-koenig-case-study-house-22-los.html

    Or here

    https://myscissorella.blogspot.com/

    (Scissorella is a German fashion designer and architectural blogger – she designed and sewed the lovely dresses she wears here. She is a bit like the young blogger in John Updike’s great novel “Seek My Face”)

  419. MEH 0910 says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Wouldn’t Einstein have been dismayed by the results of EPR-type experiments had he lived to see them? Didn’t he have his heart set on local hidden-variables?

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @PhysicistDave
  420. Corvinus says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    When measuring white flight today, it is not necessarily a strict matter of looking at one’s racial and ethnic attitudes. There are a myriad of factors involved–for starters, housing stock/availability and education impact people’s movement in and out of communities. White flight is more common when the share of minorities of one group increases in a neighborhood, and less likely if it is multiple minority groups moving in. Of course, there is a silver lining, my fellow white: the decades of propaganda by our social betters–aka Jewish elites–that has duped millennials to live in more diverse neighborhoods than in past generations, whether it be in central cities or in more integrated suburbs.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  421. @Corvinus

    White people aren’t always telling other white people they are “goy, pure goy,” and constantly reiterating their fellow whiteness. So I’m sticking with my thesis that you’re a mischling who’s still mad because the Anglos were rude to bubbe.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  422. Sean says:
    @MEH 0910

    Einstein believed reality was past present and future existing simultaneously as gaps between space time events. Heisenberg seems to have been saying that it isn’t turtles all the way down because under the cut-(quantum level) human observation would collapse the wave function, and Bohr enthusiastically promoted that aspect of the Copenhagen interpretation, but experiments show a human observer is redundant, it’s the interaction with any kind of stuff in the rest of the universe that causes decoherence and the reality we live in.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  423. MEH 0910 says:
    @Sean

    it’s the interaction with any kind of stuff in the rest of the universe that causes decoherence and the reality we live in.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interaction-free_measurement

    In physics, interaction-free measurement is a type of measurement in quantum mechanics that detects the position, presence, or state of an object without an interaction occurring between it and the measuring device. Examples include the Renninger negative-result experiment, the Elitzur–Vaidman bomb-testing problem,[1] and certain double-cavity optical systems, such as Hardy’s paradox.

    It is measurement that collapses the wave function, even without interaction. I agree that it doesn’t have to be human.

    • Replies: @Sean
  424. @MEH 0910

    MEH 0910 asked me:

    Wouldn’t Einstein have been dismayed by the results of EPR-type experiments had he lived to see them? Didn’t he have his heart set on local hidden-variables?

    Well, it is an interesting question. I do not know of any physicist who was really surprised by the results of the EPR type experiments. The predictions of QM are quite unambiguous for such experiments, and QM has never failed experimentally. Once Bell had derived his inequality, it became pretty certain that Nature just is non-local.

    Einstein did make clear that his real concern was neither indeterminism nor locality but rather reality. I.e., there is a real world out there, and the job of physicists is not simply to predict experimental results but rather to come up with a description of the real world that is consistent with experiments and logically coherent. QM does not do that: it cannot be a complete theory of the physical world.

    Einstein did opine that he felt that Bohmian mechanics was “too cheap,” a view I and most physicists share.

    The real problem now is that Bohmian mechanics and other known realist approaches to QM (I myself have discovered an infinite family of which Bohmian mechanics is a limiting case) all accommodate relativity in a very strange way. So, how do we come up with a realist approach to QM that fits nicely with relativity? Of course, I and many other physicists have some ideas (superdeterminism, temporally bi-directional causality, block-universe determinism, etc.), but no one has been able to make any of those ideas work.

    Yet.

  425. @Anon

    Anon[110] asked me:

    – What is the nature of the roommate’s disturbance?

    I cannot go into all the details for legal reasons: the former roommate has multiple psychological and familial problems.

    The one thing I can say publicly is that the roommate believed she could have her boyfriend stay overnight in the room and have sex with the boyfriend, when my daughter was trying to sleep and without my daughter’s consent. Aside from being pretty icky, that is a violation of UCLA rules and various laws.

    Anon also asked:

    – Was your daughter’s disability or medical needs in any way, however irrational, a possible contributor to the roommate’s freak-out?

    See above: the immediate issue was the roommate insisting she could have the boyfriend stay in the room overnight and have sex with the boyfriend when my daughter was present: this kept my daughter from sleeping for obvious reasons (the sex plus his loud snoring once the sex was over) — the lack of sleep worsened my daughter’s medical condition.

    Anon also asked:

    – Why did your daughter decide to move out, and move out at that point?

    See above.

    The roommate has other serious psych problems which I am not free to go into here, but the roommate’s boyfriend staying overnight and the roommate’s intransigence on this issue was the immediate reason for my daughter moving out.

    Anon also asked:

    – It’s not clear to me how the FERPA comes into play here. Do investigators want to, for instance, access your daughter’s email and possible include portions in a report that would be publicly available?

    No. My daughter, in order to prove her own innocence, needed to show UCLA her own medical records documenting the injury etc. UCLA insisted that if my daughter did not formally waive her FERPA rights and hand all of these records over to the assailant who had injured her then my daughter would not be allowed to use any evidence at all to show my daughter’s own innocence.

    Of course, UCLA’s own rules (and federal law) allow my daughter to present any evidence she wishes in order to defend herself, and these same rules allow my daughter to decline to waive her FERPA rights with regard to the criminal who assaulted her. Obviously, FERPA allows a student to give documents to a university but decline to share those documents with other students!

    The law (and UCLA rules) do allow the assailant to see any documents my daughter chose to present against the assailant, but the law and UCLA’s own rules do not allow the assailant to see documents my daughter chose to present in my daughter’s own defense unless my daughter waives her rights under FERPA.

    UCLA formally acknowledged this fact, in writing, with regard to the assailant. I.e., UCLA told my daughter that they would not allow my daughter to see any of the documents the assailant presented in the assailant’s own defense.

    UCLA ended up simply passing on to the assailant some of the documents provided by my daughter in my daughter’s defense without my daughter’s consent and without allowing my daughter to redact those documents, even though UCLA had agreed that this violated FERPA.

    These multiple violations of FERPA constitute pretty serious stuff: under applicable federal law, various federal funds can and should be withheld from UCLA as a result (withholding all federal funds would actually shut down UCLA).

    In short, UCLA broke their own rules and federal law with regard to my daughter, applying completely different rules to my daughter than to the assailant: they let the assailant off scot free, despite the assailant’s confessing to multiple crimes against my daughter to the police and to UCLA. But they punished my daughter, the victim of the violent crimes to which the criminal had confessed.

    I know that what you are getting at is why responsible adults at UCLA would act this way.

    The short answer is that they are not responsible adults: UCLA administrators have a long record of contempt for the law. UCLA actively enables violence and harassment against women: for example, as long ago as 2016, before my daughter entered UCLA, UCLA forced a female student to write an apologetic essay for complaining about a guy who had accosted her while she was showering. This is what UCLA administrators do.

    UCLA administrators on the whole (I have now unfortunately gotten to know quite a few of them, enough to be statistically representative) are dangerous thugs who have contempt for all of the standard norms of human society.

    The slightly longer answer is that all this was clearly in retaliation for my daughter’s filing formal complaints under the ADA, Title IX, etc. against UCLA. For example, over two-thirds of the page count of the “evidence’ used against my daughter was my daughter’s lawsuit against UCLA under the ADA.

    To put it bluntly, complain about UCLA administrators breaking the law, and they will figure out six ways from Sunday to get you, breaking their own regulations and whatever federal laws they wish.

    I’d feel safer with a capo from the Mafia as my next-door neighbor than a UCLA administrator.

    (By the way, thanks for your questions: they have caused me to go back over the documents that we have. All the details I have given above are confirmed by documents from UCLA that we are turning over to federal investigators. These UCLA administrators need to go to jail, and we can prove it in a court of law using the documents they themselves provided, in their own words.)

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Anon
  426. Corvinus says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    White people normally don’t accuse other white people on online forums they are Jewish or half-breeds merely because they oppose their ideology about race and culture. It’s rather boorish, but it’s in-born, so you can’t help yourself.

    • Agree: Dissident
  427. Sean says:
    @MEH 0910

    No. The strange experimental results are achieved through avoiding disturbance to the rest of the universe, then disturbing by measurement, which happens to entail a consequential interaction. Any kind of interaction whether by measurement or not (definition of interaction in this context includes leaving traces that could, in principle, be used for measurement by a vastly more advanced technology than humans now possess) collapses the wave function. Measurement is merely a corollary of an interaction registering, thereby collapsing the wave function..

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  428. Anon[409] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks for the clarification.

    I lived in the UCLA dorms for two years in the late 1970s, Sproul and Dykstra. I can’t imagine my roommate having an overnight guest in those tiny rooms. During the day: by negotiation and with prior notice, at least for male student’s rooms, in practice if not officially recognized. The University Research Library was open to midnight, however, and the Hollerith keypunch room and IBM 360 card reader room and tractor printer in the engineering department were 24/7, so occasionally it might have been possible for early evening arrangements.

  429. MEH 0910 says:
    @Sean

    In the interaction-free measurement, there is no interaction occurring between the object and the measuring device, and yet the wave function collapses as a result of the measurement.

    ******

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_eraser_experiment

    In quantum mechanics, the quantum eraser experiment is an interferometer experiment that demonstrates several fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics, including quantum entanglement and complementarity.[1][2][3] The quantum eraser experiment is a variation of Thomas Young’s classic double-slit experiment. It establishes that when action is taken to determine which of 2 slits a photon has passed through, the photon cannot interfere with itself. When a stream of photons is marked in this way, then the interference fringes characteristic of the Young experiment will not be seen. The experiment also creates situations in which a photon that has been “marked” to reveal through which slit it has passed can later be “unmarked.” A photon that has been “marked” cannot interfere with itself and will not produce fringe patterns, but a photon that has been “marked” and then “unmarked” will interfere with itself and produce the fringes characteristic of Young’s experiment.[1]

    Undoing the measurement undoes the wave function collapse.

    • Replies: @Sean
  430. Sean says:
    @MEH 0910

    But if the measurement is just recorded without being looked at it has the same contemporaneous effect as someone watching a detector’s results . You can observe a lot by just not watching.
    —-
    No the photon was half of an entangled pair. It’s still a la Bell. For Pilot Wave the particle had a normal causality-consistent path, but the wave function is affected by the twin entangled particle. Er, …

  431. Bumpkin says:
    @PhysicistDave

    You say you’re friendly with Motl and friends with Hossenfelder, where do you come down on their giant beef? 😉 What do you think of her book, as positive as this review?

  432. Bumpkin asked me

    :You say you’re friendly with Motl and friends with Hossenfelder, where do you come down on their giant beef?

    I actually had not seen that!

    Sabine and Lubos are both extremely strong-willed, opinionated people. As the article states, Lubos is indeed often “over the top,” and so I think anyone who follows Lubos knows to take his diatribes with a grain of salt.

    I do not think Sabine’s suit would have any chance in the USA where we have a First Amendment, and I think she is probably unwise to pursue it. If anything, Lubos’ ongoing vendetta probably gives her some free publicity!

    This is a bit like suing the comedian Don Rickles.

    Lubos also has an ongoing vendetta against Peter Woit, with whom I am also friendly. I know Peter finds this irritating, but it probably actually gets Peter more attention on the Web.

    By the way, I think Sabine and even Peter have probably been more critical of me personally than Lubos has been (it’s okay: nothing important, and I’m a big boy and I can take a bit of criticism).

    But sooner or later, I will probably say something to tee Lubos off and he’ll vent his spleen on me

    Which is also okay.

    Bumpkin also asked:

    What do you think of her book, as positive as this review?

    I’ve read Lost in Math and I liked it.

    Specifically, Sabine really captured the perspective and tone of the two people she interviewed whom I knew personally: Joe Polchinski and Steve Weinberg. In reading her interviews with those two guys, I could actually hear their speech patterns and tone of voice in my head: that is who Steve and Joe are.

    I found her book to be interesting, well-written, and surprisingly readable.

    Which of course does not mean I agree with everything Sabine has ever said, and similarly for Lubos and Peter.

    All threes, by the way, are competent physicists: on strictly technical questions of physics (e.g., how to solve a homework problem in an advanced physics class), they are all likely to agree. And each of the three is honest by his or her own lights.

    • Thanks: Bumpkin
    • Troll: R.G. Camara
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