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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

Let’s Not Break Up the USA
Steve Sailer

March 02, 2022

Out of understandable frustration with their countrymen, Americans increasingly assert that if their own side fails to win the current domestic political struggle, the United States of America, history’s mightiest country, should (and/or must) break up into separate sovereign territories. After all, nobody gets on our nerves like our fellow citizens.

For instance, a columnist for the San Jose Mercury-News reviewed David French’s book about how California or Texas might secede, setting off a chain reaction of secessions, and concluded:

But by this Californian’s lights, the final results of French’s Calexit scenario don’t sound so bad. New England creates its own democratic nation. Millions of Americans relocate to places better aligned with their politics. And Californians seem happier.

Similarly, numerous conservatives have fantasized about carving out a Red America in the hinterlands.

But the war in Ukraine is a reminder that this impulse is unwise. When you believe that things can’t get any worse, it’s worth noting that, yes, they can, such as an outbreak of armored warfare. (And even that can get worse too, with the possibility of nuclear exchanges.)

… Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

Whether you blame poor Ukraine’s current agony most on Russia’s obvious aggressions or NATO’s subtle machinations is a matter of opinion, but the lesson is clear: If you can avoid it, don’t be Ukraine.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I’m glad that you’ve pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they’ll be better off under “national divorce” circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it’s true.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Nathan

    Everyone knows the US has the best real estate on earth. Two oceans on either side, weak neighbors to the north and south (which might as well be annexed), plus the Great Lakes and the mighty Mississippi, among other geographical blessings.

    But barring a revolution in DC, or major devolution of power to the states, of course we would be better off in a "divorced" nation. We cannot live with Democrats.

    Replies: @Nathan

    , @Ben tillman
    @Nathan

    The alternative is death. It’s a simple choice.

    , @SaneClownPosse
    @Nathan

    Ports that only served their host states would be entry into limited markets.

    Deals would be made, they might provide more profit than benefits. BAU.

    , @Alden
    @Nathan

    The central part of the United States has one of the busiest ports in the world New Orleans . Plus the Mississippi Missouri River route to the Great Lakes the st Laurence Seaway and the N Atlantic ports of Canada, Halifax etc. plus there’s Biloxi and Galveston.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Nathan

    Said it before, in my role as the "separate nations!" guy:

    If you want to keep America intact, then you better start talking about secession.

    It's the same reason, if you want law+order you better be willing to dole out punishment.

    For the past 60 the minoritarians have been gathering strength, running roughshod over us and trashing the nation. But ... it's a fundamentally parasitic ideology. And at root an alliance of parasitic forces who want to tax, rent-seek and loot the America--the prosperity--built up by our ancestors.

    The bottom line is "they need us, we don't need them". So if there's any hope of reining them in, it's telling them that what they are doing is unacceptable and we are prepared to leave if it does not stop.

    Replies: @Drapetomaniac

    , @Cato
    @Nathan

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers. However, for the US, secession would only be a sound idea were it permitted sub-nationally. Neighborhoods should be allowed to join and then secede from their current counties to form a new county. Counties should be allowed to join and then secede from their current states and form a new state. This would accelerate The Big Sort, and create localities sufficiently homogenous in political preferences that national representation in Congress and state representation in legislatures would truly be representative.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Richard B
    @Nathan


    I’m glad that you’ve pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is.
     
    What's the point of talking about breaking up the United States when it's already disintegrating right before our eyes? And in the one place no one's looking or talking about, our social institutions - all of them.

    Orwell once wrote about the power of facing unpleasant facts. From this perspective the point of talking about the break up of the United States would be to keep from facing the unpleasant fact that it's disintegrating right before our eyes.
    , @Moses
    @Nathan

    My Democrat neighbor hates me more than any Russian or Chinese ever will.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  2. Speaking from the point of view of the human world, which has been subjected to American terrorism for some time between a century and two centuries, I couldn’t disagree more.

    My white American colleagues agree.

    • Agree: neutral, Angharad
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @John White

    Bit on the nose to make your pseudonym for this comment "John White"

    Replies: @fish

  3. The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    • Disagree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Kylie
    @PaceLaw

    "The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays."

    Apparently your mind has become unhinged. I can't even begin to imagine what your family holidays are like in whatever alternate reality you occupy.

    Replies: @PaceLaw

    , @BluEidDvl
    @PaceLaw

    Well, breakup might seem like an insane idea but if we remain on this insane trajectory that we’re on, it’s inevitable.

    The dollar is nearing collapse. Our industrial base has been gutted. We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population. We have a political (((elite))) that is racing us toward a cliff, bullying any other country we have a disagreement with, creating enmity & hatred around the world. We have an “educational” establishment that teaches White children to hate themselves, their history & their country.

    We didn’t have to go down this route. But we did. If we don’t do an immediate 180 on our current path then collapse & breakup is as inevitable as the sun rising in the east..

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @R.G. Camara
    @PaceLaw


    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.
     
    lmao. Because one war fought 160 years ago dictates all the future.

    Your normalcy bias is showing, little denialist.
    , @Catdog
    @PaceLaw

    "The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays."

    Such people would be disowned in my family.

    , @J1234
    @PaceLaw


    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea.
     
    There are some issues that don't seem resolvable, like which side would get the nuclear arsenal (or what percentage of the nuclear arsenal.) As with divorce in a marriage scenario, the two sides would likely split with a great deal of animosity, and you can be sure they would have their nukes pointed right at each other across the border. Of course, if one side didn't get any nukes, they could build their own, but that would only provide the pretext for those with nukes to attack.

    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?
     
    Yes, your history is off. We had two wars of secession, the first was successful, the second wasn't. The secessionists in both of those wars had geography working in their favor. Modern secessionists wouldn't have that advantage.

    ....it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.
     
    A poor analogy. Much more likely - in the long run - is a Northern Ireland type scenario, with violence and killing going on for generations. In fact, I suspect that such violence in the US will make Northern Ireland look like a walk in the park (and last much longer.) If the establishment left were to maintain it's hold on power at the federal level, it would feel justified in becoming the Stalinist (or Putinist) regime it needs to be in order to crack down on the "terrorism" of secessionists.

    The left in the US, at least through its most ubiquitous incarnations (the Democratic party and labor unions), did something pretty admirable for a century or so: it largely rejected the most radical and extreme elements of Marxism/communism while pursuing its progressive goals. That's no longer the case. The stated objectives of the strong left today read something like the Symbionese Liberation Army manifesto, and extremism begets extremism, radicalism begets radicalism. All of it oppositional.

    , @Juvenalis
    @PaceLaw


    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.
     
    That war was an unjust war of aggression; it's laughable for anyone criticize Vladimir Putin for trying to preserve his 'Union' when Abraham Lincoln did much worse killing 750,000+ Americans in a bloody war of aggression to force a peacefully-seceded Dixie to remain in his 'Union' against their will. Many of the same U.S neocons (like Mark Levin on Fox News) kvetching loudest about Putin celebrate Lincoln as the "the greatest president in history." That would be Lincoln the despot who suspended basic rights to free expression and habeas corpus, arrested dissident journalists, ordered 4-year bloodbath to forcibly annex a neighboring country that had seceded according to the same principles upon which the United States had seceded from British rule in 1776.

    All the 1861-1865 war settled was that the right of secession is contingent upon having superior firepower to enforce that self-proclaimed right. Had USA and CSA been allowed to go separate ways in 1861, that may have been a successful 'national divorce'. However too much has changed since then; U.S. political and cultural divides no longer fall along neat sectional geographic lines as they did in 1865 or even 1965. Attempting a geographic-political 'national divorce' today would be a catastrophic epic fail for practical reasons.

    Despite what some Western media figures (mostly on "the right") say, Putin did not call the collapse of the U.S.S.R. 'the greatest geopolitical disaster of the 20th century' because he is secretly still a KGB Communist Party loyalist who misses Marxism-Leninism. Since the 1991 breakup, Russia has never recovered from massive overall decline in power, prestige, social and economic standing that the Soviet Union superpower had commanded. Some might also consider allowing Warsaw Pact puppet states to go free in 1989-1990 as a sort of 'national divorce' that weakened the Soviet Union itself, which in turn encouraged secession of 14 Soviet republics that left behind a vastly weakened Russian Federation.
    , @Anonymous
    @PaceLaw

    No,we're not a family. You sound like woman!😉
    A break up seems unlikely now,even with such a fractitious population. But if we dont stop the African surge,what kind of nation will we be?
    As Dear Leader says,predictions are hard,especially about the future

    , @AnotherDad
    @PaceLaw


    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?
     
    Yeah, insisting we stop secession ... turned out to be such a great idea last time.
    , @Drapetomaniac
    @PaceLaw

    ", but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession"

    No. It was about control as is everything about government.

  4. ethnonationalism will break the USA apart eventually. Only problem is that blacks are totally dependent on white Americans for any meager civilization that they possess right now. Whites could go their own way but blacks will resist with everything they have.

    Blacks without white people= Jamaica

    Hispanics without white people= central Mexico

    White people without minorities= Denmark

    Ethnonationalism= Destiny of USA

    • Thanks: Angharad
    • Replies: @Joe Walker
    @White refugee in usa

    Good point. If you really want to keep the United States intact then you have to keep out all the troublesome non-white immigrants. Racial diversity will ultimately lead to the breakup of the United States whether we want it to or not.

    , @Charon
    @White refugee in usa


    Jamaica
     
    Jamaica is only as advanced as it is, courtesy of the British Empire. Mali is more like it, and even Mali benefited from the largesse of Europeans.
    , @Recently Based
    @White refugee in usa

    I think Steve's point is that Denmark was occupied by the Nazis. An it was not overrun by the Soviets only because of US military backing.

    , @Slugsmagee
    @White refugee in usa

    Valid point. Obviously, blacks have been gifted vast political and institutional power over the last twenty years. They aren't letting us crackers go anywhere. Steve in particular has detailed, rather exhaustively, just how emboldened they feel. We need to be kept around as a permanent source of reparations. Or else it all falls apart.

  5. When I was a little boy, my concept of apocalypse was clearly defined and absolute–My Parents Getting Divorced. I lived in perpetual prayer that it would never happen. But it did. And whattya know–my quality of life improved, dramatically. Citing current events in Ukraine is reductive. Think Czech and Slovakia.

    • Agree: Spect3r
    • Thanks: Old Prude, Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Anon
    @JimDandy

    This matricuck actually believes divorce can improve a child's quality of life, against all statistical evidence.


    Proof again that all of this separatist bullcrap is motivated by feminism and the hatred of male authority.

    All I want to know is: what went wrong? What made everybody so afraid of the Father?

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Thelma Ringbaum
    @JimDandy

    Chezch and Slovaks were not forming completely separate states , but joining the EU. Thats why their separation was peaceful.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @West reanimator

  6. A formal breakup may be impractical, but we could go a long way toward a de-facto breakup if conservative governments would be hardnosed about certain things. For example I read that Wyoming just killed the Department of Sexual Twistedness Studies, or something, in its state colleges. That kind of thing should happen a lot more often.

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Mike_from_SGV

    Wait til the Supreme Court forces them to re-fund it.

    Replies: @Gross Terry

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike_from_SGV

    Mike, along with Mr. McG's point, I'll add the main reason that this stuff doesn't happen, or if it happens, it doesn't "take" - not for long.

    It's the money, stupid! No, wait, it's the FLOW of the money, stupid! (not you, personally, of course -- it's an expression) Because unaware American imbeciles back a hundred years ago let Amendment XVI and income tax laws come into being, along with American imbeciles right now who should freaking know better never fighting it, the flow of the money is from the People to the Feds, and then to the States or back to the people ... if you are nice and be good.

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov't now, that they can't do very much on their own. It takes more guts, anyway, as in having to put up with residents and other politicians noting that YOU are the reason we don't have our (cookies and milk) money! How are you going to withhold personal income tax money from your residents from the Feds?

    That's why Peak Stupidity's coming proposal for an Amendment XXVIII - that's 28, errr, veintiocho, for those of you in Pico Rivera - is so important.


    All money for the Federal Gov't is to be raised by the various States, in the manner they see fit. The monies to be transferred by each of the various States shall be determined by its proportion of the US population as determined by the most recent census multiplied by the most recent year's national budget expenditure.

    All debt incurred in the national budget shall be covered by the Senators and Congrefsmen of the previous session and their estates; those not making whole their portion of the deficit budget will be subject to drawing and quartering or povnd-me-in-the-aff gaol.
     

    Peak Stupidity is still working on some of the wording and olde-timey speffing. This is urgent, so we've got a whole legal team on it. They're working in shifts.

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @Art Deco

    , @res
    @Mike_from_SGV

    It looks like that Wyoming situation is far from a done deal. It will be an interesting case study to watch what happens.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20220301021243/https://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/senate-vote-to-cut-uw-gender-studies-funding-prompts-debate-about-legality-lawmakers-role/article_fdf1abc4-4adb-5772-95f0-551959bc6a23.html

    Replies: @Exile

  7. Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    , @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    Do you not view most leftist agitation as the equivalent of the mobs of Ancient Rome? As a fellow Californian I have little doubt that urban Californians lack both the ability and will to control most of the territory of this great state.

    This current arrangement is the best the left will ever have...BLM rioters may look scary en mass in the Bay Area, but mobs are pretty worthless in the countryside, as most people in a mob are worthless in the countryside.

    I certainly don't want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Marquis
    @PhysicistDave

    The best course of action would be a constitutional one whereby power is returned to the states—much like the way we started. Certain military, diplomatic and even economic realities would have to remain at the federal level. But all the civil rights and social decisions should be returned to the states. Most revenue and spending should revert too. Social sec, medicare and medicaid should be disbanded and done at the state level. So on and so forth.

    , @S. Anonyia
    @PhysicistDave

    The division can’t be “cities vs. countryside” unless you are counting suburban areas and small to mid-sized cities as countryside. Less than 20 % of the US is rural, but the amount of conservatives is way higher.

    , @Ralph L
    @PhysicistDave

    city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece

    They fought each other constantly between Olympic games and Persian invasions. The golden age of Athens was a lot shorter than Rome's or ours for that reason.

    A rebirth of federalism is our best hope for continued Union, but that's completely counter to Progressivism, which must save the whole world. The coming bankruptcy of the federal govt may make it all moot.

    , @AndrewR
    @PhysicistDave

    Your reading of history is weak. The Soviet military didn't even allow Hungary or Czechoslovakia to have real independence. Then eventually they were forced to allow even the SSRs to be free. They couldn't even put down the Chechens the first time they rebelled.

    The US military grows weaker by the day. It turns out that openly glorifying black trans women and demonizing white men isn't great for combat readiness.

    And the dollar and economy are set for collapse. At some point, it won't matter one lick what some pathetic affirmative action military officers in DC think.

    , @turtle
    @PhysicistDave


    independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area
     
    Not bloody likely, mate. Best thing would be to dissolve the legislature in Sacramento, abolish the 0ffice of "Governor," and let we, the people, live our own lives.

    Here in western Riverside Co., where I live, we are not interested in what they do in the Bay Area, or Even in (total) Los(s) Angeles. Please just leave us alone, political busybodies.
  8. Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    Ruled by China or Russia? How would we handle such freedom?

    Anyway, I’d say it’s on those indifferent Americans in the MidWest and other areas to figure out if they have any loyalty to the rest of us. Otherwise, it’s getting so hard to keep this thing together. Being tired can be a force too.

    • Replies: @David Davenport
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest

    The new nation of Heartland America must avoid the mistake Ukraine make, and keep plenty of nukes and nu-klur delivery systems.

    Local neighbors? Are we supposed to fear Mexifornia or the Canuckistan military machine? Heartland America conventional forces could easily defeat those local neighbors.

  9. Anonymous[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @John White
    Speaking from the point of view of the human world, which has been subjected to American terrorism for some time between a century and two centuries, I couldn't disagree more.

    My white American colleagues agree.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Bit on the nose to make your pseudonym for this comment “John White”

    • Agree: MEH 0910
    • LOL: Recently Based
    • Replies: @fish
    @Anonymous

    Notorious sock Tiny's Duck would have been too obvious so Tiny's employed a new sub-sock for his usual retardery.

    Replies: @Alfa158

  10. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    “The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.”

    Apparently your mind has become unhinged. I can’t even begin to imagine what your family holidays are like in whatever alternate reality you occupy.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara, Angharad
    • LOL: Rosie
    • Replies: @PaceLaw
    @Kylie

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    Replies: @houston 1992, @R.G. Camara, @Brutusale, @Kylie

  11. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada.

    Until a few decades ago, Canada was forced to go through Portland, Maine in the winter, as all their Atlantic ports were frozen.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Reg Cæsar

    We stay at a lovely hotel near the Grand Trunk Building when we visit Portland.

    https://www.portlandlandmarks.org/grand-trunk-railroad-office-building

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, and the Canadian Pacific RR kept parts of Canada from secceeding to the USA. They lacked coast to coast transportation.

  12. Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.

    Russia could take over Mongolia, but it doesn’t. So could China, but it doesn’t. The US could take over the Caribbean and Central America, but it doesn’t. The South American ABC powers could carve up the place among themselves, but they don’t.

    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.

    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.
     
    The danger is that the newly formed Republic of Woke (i.e. the seceded states of California, Oregon, and Washington), would turn to China for protection, ultimately concluding a military alliance with them. That would given China a military presence on the North American mainland.

    I know - it sounds farfetched.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to certain British Chieftans who invited German mercenaries to their islands to help them fight their wars, that their country would soon come to be ruled by them, speak their language, and that virtually every place name in "England" (Land of the Angles) would end up being germanic instead of celtic.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to the Greek city states that invited the Romans into the Peloponnese to adjudicate their disputes that they would end up as provinces ruled by Rome for the next six hundred years or so.

    Despite what Francis Fukuyama said, history doesn't end.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @epebble

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.
     
    Agreed with the latter most certainly. Whether any military might get involved is one thing, maybe doubtful as you say. Economic might is what matters. We all know who's numero uno now in that sense.

    Russia got looted in the 1990's by people from New York.* American may be looted once things fall apart, not necessarily political-division-wise, but economically. The way it worse is described by the other Golden Rule: He who has the gold, makes the rules.

    See Peak Stupidity's series "Will America be looted by China?":

    Part 1: Intro.
    Part 2: Housing
    Part 3: Big Biz
    Part 4: The Fruited Plain
    Part 5: The Wilderness
    Part 6: Conclusion - The Golden Rule


    .


    * A friend of mine talked to a Russian guy on a plane in the 1990s who told him that a steel plant he knew about got bought up for just the price of the steel inventory on hand!

    , @Dennis Dale
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I don't find them baffling at all.

    But I find us as baffling as they find us.

  13. Steve said in the previous article:

    My impression is that the U.S. military very much enjoys representing the strongest, most ass-kicking country on earth

    Sad. Our whole military is going to Russia.

  14. Speaking for myself, I have no intention of settling for only part of the United States.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Charon
    @Colin Wright

    Don't worry. You won't get part of it.

  15. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    “the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside”

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    “My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?”

    My history might be a little off, but wasn’t there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    “the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,”

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don’t get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It’s just math at this point.

    • Agree: Ben tillman, Slugsmagee
    • Replies: @Alrenous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It’s just math at this point.
     
    Just the way the Moors wiped out all native Spanish and the Ottomans wiped out every Greek.
    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    “the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside”

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc)
     

    I don't think so, the white political divide is real. Urban whites align with smaller groups to outvote country whites. The rest is balance of power politics where the smaller groups exercise strength through block voting with one of the dominant blocks.

    My overarching comments for iSteve are as follows
    1) A scary portion of brutality and murders occur within the family. The proximity creates expectations and exaggerates differences. Dividing won't fix this problem, only shift it. Better to find mechanisms to learn to live together. (stop crying to the courts to legislate is a start)
    2) when you say "things can't get any worse", nature takes it as a challenge.

    , @AndrewR
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    A solid majority of powerful, anti-white people in the US are non-Hispanic white goyim. They aren't going to let you have your delusional ethnostate purged of everyone you deem a "looter."

    In reality, unlike wignats' Talmudic false dichotomy of white vs non-white, the real division in the US is anti-white vs non-anti-white.

    , @guest007
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Look at the voting results. Even in the reddest large cities such as Lubbock Texas, Biden still received about 33% of the vote. And in the bluest districts, San Francisco, Trump received 12% of the vote. The idea that there is an all red county or city that would love to be in a different country is laughable.

    Look at a map of the 2020 election results by county. Almost any state of size has blue countries and usually those blue counties are the largest counties by population.

    , @Travis
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The white population is in steep decline, the white demographic death spiral has begun. The white population has fallen from 197 million to 189 million over the past decade. But more significant is the decline in the number of fertile whites, falling from 75 million in 1990 to just 50 million today. To maintain the white population at the current 189 million we would need white fertility to double to 3.2. The math indicates that the white population will decline from the current 189 million to 175 million over the next 20 years, as the non-white population increases to 180 million. Whites will be a minority of Americans around the year 2043.

    Very few whites would choose to form a white nation. Even if a white nation was somehow created, not even 1% of US whites would choose to move to a separate white nation in North America. Maybe 50,000 white Americans would re-locate to a white state if the state was given autonomy. We already have a White state called Maine , yet few whites relocate to the whitest state in the nation to escape all the non-whites. Currently there is nothing stopping any of the white nationalists from moving to Maine to establish a white ethnic state within the US. Maine would be the ideal state, since it is already 95% white and only shares a border with 92% New Hampshire and Canada. Yet nobody talking about forming a separate white nation is even willing to relocate to Maine. Fewer would be willing to wage a war to form their own nation state. Maybe 1,000 whites in the entire United States would take up arms to form a separate white nation. 90% of whites are content to live among non-whites and have non-white grandchildren (just being thankful to have any grandchildren at this point)

  16. Thanks, Steve. You know I agree. Imagine some here calling themselves “American” and also willing to cede American territory. Couldn’t be me. “Separate nations” within current US borders? Hell no. Join or die.

    • Troll: Eric Novak
  17. @Mike_from_SGV
    A formal breakup may be impractical, but we could go a long way toward a de-facto breakup if conservative governments would be hardnosed about certain things. For example I read that Wyoming just killed the Department of Sexual Twistedness Studies, or something, in its state colleges. That kind of thing should happen a lot more often.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @res

    Wait til the Supreme Court forces them to re-fund it.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Gross Terry
    @JMcG

    and if the state's had control over their own currency and their own national guard units, the jewish ayatollahs could make as many rulings as they felt like being ignored.

  18. Keep telling yourself things will go back to normal in another two weeks. Trump was an ineffective scream in reaction to the breakneck speed of the Overton window as it is transformed into the Overton guillotine. We have no partner to make peace with and internal economic group punishment was just experimented with complete success: with ports, we’ll have no ports.
    ——-
    … Are we not allowed to post links to twitter?

  19. Break up the public school districts, but do NOT let them re-solidify. If a district were a pure substance, its pressure/temperature should be kept below/way_above the triple point.

    To understand why this is so, look no further than recent school bond referenda. On 2/8, voters in Marlow, OK approved a \$34M bond (a 10% increase in property taxes), including \$7M for upgraded football facilities. Today, voters in Olathe, KS passed a \$298M bond. The margin was suspiciously > 2:1. The district touted the usual, fraudulent claim that the debt won’t raise taxes, but in the fine print buried the fact that had the bond measure failed, local school taxes would have gone down, i.e. an old bond is soon to be paid off.

  20. @Kylie
    @PaceLaw

    "The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays."

    Apparently your mind has become unhinged. I can't even begin to imagine what your family holidays are like in whatever alternate reality you occupy.

    Replies: @PaceLaw

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    • Disagree: houston 1992
    • Troll: R.G. Camara, Kylie
    • Replies: @houston 1992
    @PaceLaw

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigniorage

    USA is gliding on the profits of our old reserve currency status. The engine is out of fuel , but it can still glide for a long period.
    Reserve currency has allowed us "deficit financing without tears" but that, too, will pass. And given our recklessness perhaps sooner than we think.

    USA loses respect:
    India voted neutral on RU sanctions despite all the jobs, tech we have outscored to them. So, too, did UAE take a neutral stance. Mexico has declined to sanction RU.
    https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/ukraine-russia-putin-news-03-01-22/h_16ea9365f2eb3f81a9b5c09f85de66b9

    Brazil's primary concern is securing fertilizer supplies and they appear lukewarm on sanctions.

    Two weeks from now, Putin will have secured the Eastern Ukraine, a wider land bridge to Crimea, and will hold Kiev. Yes, the invasion has aspects of a debacle, but he will have secured some negotiating chips, and I suspect that we will accept his terms of a neutral Ukraine rump state with the eastern regions being annexed.

    The net result is further loss of credibility for the USA, and a migration as fast as possible away from SWIFT, and reserve currency status that we have had since 1939. It will be hard for USA's "advanced services economy" as Nat Review's Lowry described it, to pay its way on its intrinsic merits.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JMcG, @Mr. Anon

    , @R.G. Camara
    @PaceLaw


    What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?
     
    lmao. "Everyone has a tranny cousin and sleeps outside their race! That's what TV says, so it must be true!"


    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit.
     
    lol. Citation needed, little denialist.
    , @Brutusale
    @PaceLaw

    Some of us have decided that we're part of a large and fractious family that we've stopped getting together with.

    , @Kylie
    @PaceLaw

    'As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit."

    No, we are not functioning as a unit. Various fragments and factions are functioning and you, like millions of useful idiots, have bought the b.s. the left, having an iron grip on the MSM, is peddling that this means the country is still united.

    The United States is "functioning" like a chronic alcoholic who still manages to make sure he has that crucial wake-up half-pint to keep from going into withdrawal, who still only loses bladder control in private and who can still count on gullible friends and family to help (enable) him to stumble down the path of self-destruction.

    Yeah, you probably do consider that "functioning". But it's functioning only in the sense of surviving, not thriving. Our country is in a state of chronic malaise. Just wait till it enters the acute phase. You'll be eating your words--and not much else.

    And there is no "we". So shut up already.

  21. Let’s Not Break Up the USA

    That is of course a wise sentiment.

    However…………….a lot of people (like me) look at Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, Kamal Harris, Eric Swalwell, etc., and think: “I don’t want to be governed by that. And I don’t want to be governed by anybody who would vote for that. It’s not an unreasonable sentiment.

    When your government spends most of its time vilifying you, blaming you for everything, making vague noises about extracting reparations from you, silencing your opinions, outlawing your political views and your ability to politically organize in your own defense – when it craps on your beliefs, and promotes the most appalling degeneracy (for example, appointing dudes in dresses and deviant transvestites with dog-f**king fetishes to responsible government offices and encouraging young people to mutilate and chemically castrate themselves), then national divorce begins to look like your best option.

    Whether you blame poor Ukraine’s current agony most on Russia’s obvious aggressions or NATO’s subtle machinations is a matter of opinion, but the lesson is clear: If you can avoid it, don’t be Ukraine.

    What if the alternative to being Ukraine in 2022 is being Cambodia in 1976?

    • Thanks: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Glaivester
    @Mr. Anon

    Exactly.

    , @Charon
    @Mr. Anon


    national divorce begins to look like your best option.
     
    Do you remember the signs in the mostly peaceful protests of 2020? "We don't want Biden--We want Revenge!"

    You're not going to get an amicable divorce with people like that. Not even sure you should want one.

    , @guest007
    @Mr. Anon

    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy. If one does not want to be ruled by those listed, then run candidates who can win with ideas and policies that appeal to the majority. That is the point of a democracy. Not claiming to be silenced politically because one's favored fringe candidate did not win.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  22. Anonymous[273] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    Do you not view most leftist agitation as the equivalent of the mobs of Ancient Rome? As a fellow Californian I have little doubt that urban Californians lack both the ability and will to control most of the territory of this great state.

    This current arrangement is the best the left will ever have…BLM rioters may look scary en mass in the Bay Area, but mobs are pretty worthless in the countryside, as most people in a mob are worthless in the countryside.

    I certainly don’t want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous[273] wrote to me:


    I certainly don’t want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.
     
    Well, the state lines are already drawn, so it is easier to break things up that way. That is of course basically what happened with the Soviet Union, and the result is less than perfect, as the world is now learning.

    There is an entertaining series of novels by conservative author Kurt Schlichter about the country breaking up due to the Left choosing to secede: he predicts bitter fighting within states that are divided by the Split.

    Initially, the novels were intended to be over-the-top satires of the Left. Unfortunately, in 2022 they no longer seem so over-the-top.

    Schlichter started out as a non-Trumper who got red-pilled. He is ex-military (served in Desert Storm and Kosovo), so the fighting scenes ring true (except, of course, our hero always survives!).

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle

  23. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada "meddling" in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada's western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.

    Russia could take over Mongolia, but it doesn't. So could China, but it doesn't. The US could take over the Caribbean and Central America, but it doesn't. The South American ABC powers could carve up the place among themselves, but they don't.

    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dennis Dale

    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.

    The danger is that the newly formed Republic of Woke (i.e. the seceded states of California, Oregon, and Washington), would turn to China for protection, ultimately concluding a military alliance with them. That would given China a military presence on the North American mainland.

    I know – it sounds farfetched.

    I’m sure it seemed farfetched to certain British Chieftans who invited German mercenaries to their islands to help them fight their wars, that their country would soon come to be ruled by them, speak their language, and that virtually every place name in “England” (Land of the Angles) would end up being germanic instead of celtic.

    I’m sure it seemed farfetched to the Greek city states that invited the Romans into the Peloponnese to adjudicate their disputes that they would end up as provinces ruled by Rome for the next six hundred years or so.

    Despite what Francis Fukuyama said, history doesn’t end.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Mr. Anon

    And it seemed far-fetched to this guy in 1166 that the Normans he brought in as mercenaries would run all of Ireland until 1922, and would still have the northern part in 2022.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diarmaid_mac_Murchadha

    , @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Mr. Anon

    There is a small part of me that would enjoy seeing that happen, because the Chinese would undertake construction projects with dirty diesel and coal equipment.

    It would be fun to watch the green Wokesters complain and protest about environmental impact, only to have the Woke government in San Francisco shut it down by saying that the Chinese are not white, and therefore cannot possibly harm the environment.

    , @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_(independence_movement)

    But the two/three States + Province do work together for some public policy issues:

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/MOU-Final%20Draft%20for%20Distribution.pdf

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/british-columbia-california-oregon-washington-join-forces-combat-climate-change

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  24. For the sake of world peace (and sanity), the US regime must be and ultimately will be broken up. Here is how I think it should be broken up:
    – The states that were conquered from Mexico will be returned to Mexico (except for California)
    – California will have to broken up in a lot of little bits, turn the cities into independent city states, and the rural areas into a lot of separate entities.
    – Emulate an India style partition by having large movements of various ethnic group
    – Blacks will be moved to the Southern states
    – Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
    – Latins will move back the Mexico ruled states
    – A lot of the more recent immigrants will not want to stay and move back to where they came from
    – Washington DC will have to reduced to rubble to prevent the idea of reforming the US regime
    – Alaska will be returned to Russia
    – Haiwai will become independent
    – Overseas military outposts such as Guam will be run by China
    – All nuclear weapons will be dismantled

    I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.

    • Thanks: Ghan-buri-Ghan
    • Replies: @bomag
    @neutral


    – Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
     
    Why let the enemy consolidate their gains while we retreat to a weaker position?

    If we are going to hand-wave population transfers, let's deport those and their descendants who are here post 1965.
    , @S. Anonyia
    @neutral

    Whites in the South will never leave the South in any breakup scenario. Same probably goes for the Southwest. People like living in these places (look where people have moved during the pandemic) and aren’t giving it up for inferior geography and climate.

    , @Old Prude
    @neutral

    I don't mind living around "good whites". Sure they have unsound opinions, but hey. I don't even much mind by being bossed around by good whites. What I do mind is living around blacks, latinos, orientals, hindus and moslems.

    If America fractures, it may not be a dissolution of the Union, but rather the races building their own enclaves within the "country". I won't say "nation", because it will just be a bunch of squabbling races and ethnicities who can't stand each other.

    The problem is those blasted good whites will keep inviting diversity, and the non-whites will keep wanting whatever nice things the whites have going.

    I don't want a separate country, I just want to be left alone to live with my people.

    Replies: @Nick Granite

    , @Colin Wright
    @neutral

    'I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.'

    Set aside about two square feet somewhere in North Dakota.

    Move you there.

  25. Let those White people and POCs who hate working-class Whites have nuclear weapons?

    Let China take over the west coast by mass immigration, because the loonies would not resist because that would be racist? China could spare the 50 million or so to make it happen.

    Would the useless eaters in charge allow the productive people to escape? Would they actually bring themselves to do real labor? How would the Progs deal with Blacks, once all the BadWhites are in another country and they have to give up their own stuff instead of ours to placate them?

    You have written, Steve, about the only force binding the Coalition of the Fringes together being hatred of normal White people. Giving them anything simply means they’ll be after everything next week. How long after the break up before they declare war on us, with foreign support?

    My personal forecast is economic collapse, followed by a vicious scramble in the ruins. I hope the foreigners stay out of it, for fear of nukes if nothing else.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @PattyMax


    My personal forecast is economic collapse, followed by a vicious scramble in the ruins.
     
    The money printer is the true heart of GAE's power. It is how they pay for all the rackets and grift.

    Russia has yet to employ her best economic weapons by restricting commodity exports.
  26. During the Wars of the French Revolution, George Washington explained in his Farewell Address the high risk and low reward of foreign entanglements for us lucky Americans

    The people who rule this country today do not care about risks or rewards for Americans.
    Foreign entanglements are just another name for global investments. As capital is global the owners of it have no loyalty to any place or people. Bill Gates and George Soros are loyal to their bank accounts, which are digital and reside around the world.
    A large part of our national demise is due to the fact that our elites have become, in essence, traitors. This was not true of earlier generations of American elites. Ruthless as they may have been, their personal success was tied to American success. Not so today. If America turns into a shithole they are not affected and don’t care.

  27. Steve Sailer:

    ” the United States of America, history’s mightiest country”

    The “mightiest country in history” that got wrecked in Vietnam, the “mightiest country in history” that got wrecked in Mogadishu in 1993, and the “mightiest country in history” that just a year ago withdrew from Afghanistan after 15 years of getting wrecked by a bunch of trebesman with little more than AK-47s. You know, for the “mightiest country ever”, you do have a really bad record of getting wrecked by countries about 100 X smaller than you in resources. If this is the track record of America as the “mightiest country ever”, then imagine how bad it would be if it weren’t. Thank goodness that it is the “mightiest country ever” ! Thank goodness that it is the “mightiest country ever” otherwise it would be in big trouble!

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Zero Philosopher

    Look at the whining about civilian casualties in Ukraine. Other than Operation Meetinghouse every city and village in Afghanistan and Vietnam, we couldn't win in a timeframe American voters would tolerate. And most voters won't tolerate that.

    , @Old Prude
    @Zero Philosopher

    "Thank goodness that it is the “mightiest country ever”

    More of a curse than a blessing. If the country didn't have such high self esteem, maybe it would avoid the folly of meddling all over the world. [And the world would be better for it.]

  28. If you’re a dissident reactionary who is alienated by the wider culture, there are plenty of other solutions you could pursue before considering secession. Eg, various forms of political devolution. The talk about a “national divorce” (a strangely cloying, feminized term) is just a LARP.

    • Troll: 3g4me
    • Replies: @Glaivester
    @IHTG

    The problem is that it is becoming increasingly obvious that t he Left will not allow political devolution. When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex "marriage" maybe that will be a solution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Thea
    @IHTG

    Alienation hits both left and right. Antifa and such are the left’s response. Daydreaming about separate nations is apparently the right’s way to cope. Something more productive and unifying would be nice from both sides.

    The tragedy is that occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party never realized they were on the same side.

    Replies: @Joe Walker

  29. Steve Sailer:

    “and, most of all, the United States with its continent-spanning temperate zone”

    I wouldn’t say that a climate where winter temperatures routinely drop to -22 F and reach 104 F during Summer is “temperate”. That is quite harsh. Compare that to, say, western Europe and the difference is obvious. Not to mention tornados that are pretty common in a lot of the U.S, as well as earthquakes in the west coast. Very, very little of the U.S actually has nice weather. The San Francisco Bay Area, some parts of the Appalachians, the northernmost part of Florida, etc.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Thea
    @Zero Philosopher

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    Replies: @Barnard, @AndrewR, @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack P

  30. anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:

    What would your idea of the break up of the US look like? You can use this map making tool: https://paintmaps.com/map-charts/229/United-States-of-America-map-chart

  31. A breakup may eventually happen (countries always do, eventually), but it will first be preceded by severe economic decline.

    Once the USA loses the ability to finance the welfare state with deficit spending a whole lot of disruption is going to follow. Much of the current madness is driven by people who think the government should be able to finance anything without needing to levy taxes to pay for it. The collapse of that system will cause further madness.

    What happens then is anyone’s guess, but the breakup of the United States will probably result from various factions fighting over the carcass.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Wilkey

    I don't know why severe economic decline should lead to breakup. We've been there before (Great Depression) and wound up adding states and territories afterward.

    The future is very hard to predict, but human nature is very consistent. The entire world wants a generous welfare state without actually paying for it.

    , @Alfa158
    @Wilkey

    I think you are right about there being more of a collapse than a breakup. A problem with a formal breakup is that there aren’t enough viable geographical areas where the cleave lines would occur. People can talk about a Red state like Texas seceding, but what would do you do with Austin, Houston and the southernmost areas that are effectively areas of Mexico that happen to be under US administration?
    The hypothetical maps showing a northwestern White, conservative new country are already obsolete. Washington, Oregon and soon Idaho are Blue states with dissident rural Red areas.
    You can look at many areas of the US similarly and see there are almost no equivalents of modern Mason-Dixon lines along which you could divide it up.
    As the country becomes more racially, politically and economically fragmented and the central economic power of being able to print Monopoly money declines we will see more chaos. Independence of a sort will manifest itself as small areas continuing to work inside a common economy, but ignoring the overreaches of a Federal system that won’t be able to afford forcing them to comply. A state or local government will ban transgender education in schools, a Federal judge blocks the ban and the Supreme Court agrees. The locals tells the kritarchy to go boil their heads, we’re doing it anyway , and what are you going to do about it.

    Replies: @Thea

  32. Where is AUDACIOUS EPIGONE for the quality direct pundit rebuttal? (I think dissolution is the best theme search word: https://www.unz.com/?s=dissolution&Action=Search&authors=audacious-epigone&ptype=all) Best I can muster is sure, “don’t be Ukraine”, be Switzerland.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @GLT

    > Where is AUDACIOUS EPIGONE for the quality direct pundit rebuttal?

    It was my understanding that AnotherDad had reserved that role, on this particular iSteve talking point.

  33. anonymous[351] • Disclaimer says:

    OT but funny – Retired German Chancellor Angela Merkel, age 67, has been robbed whilst shopping in Berlin at a delicatessen grocery, no word on whether the thief might have been one of the ‘Merkel’s million migrants’ she invited into Germany

    Merkel’s bodyguard from the German Federal Criminal Police was unable to prevent the theft … Her stolen wallet contained Merkel’s ID card, debit card, driver’s license, and cash … Merkel went down to the police station to report the theft herself

    Quite a trophy for some ruffian in Germany to have Merkel’s personal ID card framed on his wall

    https://rmx.news/article/merkel-robbed-while-shopping-in-berlin/

    • LOL: Alrenous
    • Replies: @theMann
    @anonymous

    The first business of Government is the maintenance of order. Talk about an action delegitimizing government........

    , @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    In the macrocosm, Merkel robbed Die Deutsche Volk of their Fatherland.

    , @Alden
    @anonymous

    That is sooo cool. Imagine anyone trying to rob Obama Bush Trump Clinton. They’d be swarmed by 10 secret service men if they got within 15 feet.

    Ha ha ha ha ha. She’s just another old woman now, prey for the immigrant Muslim criminals she loved so much.

  34. @PaceLaw
    @Kylie

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    Replies: @houston 1992, @R.G. Camara, @Brutusale, @Kylie

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigniorage

    USA is gliding on the profits of our old reserve currency status. The engine is out of fuel , but it can still glide for a long period.
    Reserve currency has allowed us “deficit financing without tears” but that, too, will pass. And given our recklessness perhaps sooner than we think.

    USA loses respect:
    India voted neutral on RU sanctions despite all the jobs, tech we have outscored to them. So, too, did UAE take a neutral stance. Mexico has declined to sanction RU.
    https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/ukraine-russia-putin-news-03-01-22/h_16ea9365f2eb3f81a9b5c09f85de66b9

    Brazil’s primary concern is securing fertilizer supplies and they appear lukewarm on sanctions.

    Two weeks from now, Putin will have secured the Eastern Ukraine, a wider land bridge to Crimea, and will hold Kiev. Yes, the invasion has aspects of a debacle, but he will have secured some negotiating chips, and I suspect that we will accept his terms of a neutral Ukraine rump state with the eastern regions being annexed.

    The net result is further loss of credibility for the USA, and a migration as fast as possible away from SWIFT, and reserve currency status that we have had since 1939. It will be hard for USA’s “advanced services economy” as Nat Review’s Lowry described it, to pay its way on its intrinsic merits.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave, PaceLaw
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    , @JMcG
    @houston 1992

    Yes, just as the decision by Trudeau to shut down banking for donors to the truckers’ convoy led to an apparent bank run, a lot of countries are going to be looking at their reliance on the SWIFT system with a gimlet eye.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @houston 1992

    A couple of Russian banks have been spared from being kicked off of SWIFT: Gazprombank and Sberbank.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-03-01/eu-agrees-to-block-russian-banks-from-swift-sparing-key-firms

    Sberbank is a huge concern that has it's fingers into everything, and has recently been branching out to become something akin to Google or Amazon. It was a major backer of Russia's "Sputnik V" COVID vaccine. Sperbank is run by a guy named Herman Gref. Who is Herman Gref?

    https://www.weforum.org/press/2021/02/world-economic-forum-appoints-new-member-to-board-of-trustees-4c1068e22b/

    Yes - of course - he is also a FoK (Friend of Klaus).

  35. outbreak of armored warfare

    Sure but our crime rate is pretty much the same as a low intensity war. The citizens of Baltimore live in a war zone that ExgarAllen Poe would not recognize as his home.

  36. @Zero Philosopher
    Steve Sailer:

    "and, most of all, the United States with its continent-spanning temperate zone"

    I wouldn't say that a climate where winter temperatures routinely drop to -22 F and reach 104 F during Summer is "temperate". That is quite harsh. Compare that to, say, western Europe and the difference is obvious. Not to mention tornados that are pretty common in a lot of the U.S, as well as earthquakes in the west coast. Very, very little of the U.S actually has nice weather. The San Francisco Bay Area, some parts of the Appalachians, the northernmost part of Florida, etc.

    Replies: @Thea

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    • Agree: Alrenous, Mark G., Rosie
    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Thea

    I commented when visiting Florida in the heat of summer was "how did the original settlers handle this?" For the Spanish maybe it was not as bad, but it amazes me that English and Scots adapted well enough to stay in Florida long term.

    Replies: @Thea, @S. Anonyia

    , @AndrewR
    @Thea

    Halloween through mid April is a decent time to be in South Florida, no A/C needed, but keep a fan or two around. Hurricane likelihood: low.

    Coincidentally, mid spring through mid fall is a nice time to be in the midwest or northeast. Northern Michigan in particular is heavenly in the summer.

    Replies: @Thea

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Thea

    The Spaniards that first colonised the Americas were overwhelmingly from the hottest and poorest Spanish regions like Extremadura (the name tells you everything) and Andalucia. Not that many from the rainier, greener, milder climates of Galicia/Asturias/Basque Country (inside the Hajnal Line). They could perhaps stand the climate better.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/atlantic-how-should-we-talk-about-migration-policy/#comment-2320025

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hapalong Cassidy

    , @Jack P
    @Thea

    You're probably right, but why are there blacks in Minnesota and Wisconsin? Is the welfare really worth it?

    Replies: @Alrenous

  37. @Zero Philosopher
    Steve Sailer:

    " the United States of America, history’s mightiest country"

    The "mightiest country in history" that got wrecked in Vietnam, the "mightiest country in history" that got wrecked in Mogadishu in 1993, and the "mightiest country in history" that just a year ago withdrew from Afghanistan after 15 years of getting wrecked by a bunch of trebesman with little more than AK-47s. You know, for the "mightiest country ever", you do have a really bad record of getting wrecked by countries about 100 X smaller than you in resources. If this is the track record of America as the "mightiest country ever", then imagine how bad it would be if it weren't. Thank goodness that it is the "mightiest country ever" ! Thank goodness that it is the "mightiest country ever" otherwise it would be in big trouble!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Old Prude

    Look at the whining about civilian casualties in Ukraine. Other than Operation Meetinghouse every city and village in Afghanistan and Vietnam, we couldn’t win in a timeframe American voters would tolerate. And most voters won’t tolerate that.

  38. For the moment, the secession and break up of the US is just a fantasy. If anything, the trend has been towards the opposite, increasing centralization and less independence to each state. While the US remains a military/cultural power, it will remain united.

    Although, paradoxically, in an increasingly globalized world, frontiers and nations mean less and less.

    What is the point of being a “united country” is its population is a diversified Babel?

    But if things get really bad, in terms of economic crisis and foot shortages, I don’t see the US remaining united for very long. I think within a 100 years or so, we will see very different maps emerging, both in Europe and in America. But I cannot say exactly how it will be.

  39. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    Well, breakup might seem like an insane idea but if we remain on this insane trajectory that we’re on, it’s inevitable.

    The dollar is nearing collapse. Our industrial base has been gutted. We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population. We have a political (((elite))) that is racing us toward a cliff, bullying any other country we have a disagreement with, creating enmity & hatred around the world. We have an “educational” establishment that teaches White children to hate themselves, their history & their country.

    We didn’t have to go down this route. But we did. If we don’t do an immediate 180 on our current path then collapse & breakup is as inevitable as the sun rising in the east..

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @BluEidDvl

    Why do you think the dollar is collapsing? Why can't gross national debt to GDP reach 300% like in Japan? Japan hasn't collapsed yet either. It's been unhealthy for 30 years and will be for the long term future but no collapse is on the horizon.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @BluEidDvl


    We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population.
     
    This will be a key part of the collapse as Boomers and older Xers age out of the workforce and are replaced by younger deviant and vibrant snowflakes.
  40. It is not a question of intent, but of historical inevitability.

    Of course there is no “scientific” explanation, but I’ll use analogies.

    From the beginning to the assassination of JFK, the US was basically a nation. It was founded by Anglo-Protestants with some other NW Europeans thrown in, and later with other Europeans added (which caused friction), but they’ve more or less assimilated. Blacks were not Americans, but they were an American national minority.

    When Churchill and Roosevelt met to sign the Atlantic charter in 1941, they clearly indicated that Americans and British share the essential common heritage.

    In the past 60 or so years the US has been transformed beyond recognition. This is not a nation; there is not an American people anymore; various other visibly different groups (Muslims, Chinese, Indians, …) are not supposedly new Americans.

    When newly arrived non-European immigrants arrive, they may pledge the allegiance, but they are not the new “we” who will consider Washington, Franklin, Lincoln, …. as their historical heritage & identity. I know it’s a bit funny when Italian-Americans say “we” and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.

    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.

    In other words, multicultural Americans don’t have much in common with historical Americans- and this is a definite divide no one can bridge.

    • Agree: fish, Old Prude
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote:


    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.
     
    You don't live in the US, do you, BK?

    It's more complicated than you claim.

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as "American" as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It's true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large. Furthermore, it is also true that Europeans tend to acculturate fastest, followed it seems by East Asians.

    But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We -- or rather our elites -- are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly White, ruling elite.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Rex Little, @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    A lot of old stock Anglo Americans consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Truth

    , @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    @Bardon Kaldian


    I know it’s a bit funny when Italian-Americans say “we” and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.
     
    IIRC it was about 5 million Italians who migrated to the US from 1880-1920, so it's generations down the line now that's many tens-of-millions in descent - if you're going with the Soprano / NJ stereotypes it's pretty far off from the reality of the millions. Italian immigrants have been very successful on a multi-generational basis.

    And, it wasn't Washington, but it's worth noting since you raise the point that long before Grant was a glimmer in Lincoln's eye, Lincoln reached out to Giuseppe Garibaldi and asked him to lead the union army against the rebellion. Garibaldi, who had once lived on Staten Island, had distinguished himself multiple times including in the Uruguayan Civil War, among other conflicts and seemed to have a knack for an American form of war and was popular in the states - a contemporary unit of the US Army was named for him: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/39th_New_York_Infantry_Regiment.

    He refused the commission that was offered to him as the union still had slave-holding states in its number. He ended up back in Italy, took a key role in expelling the Austrians and forming the unified Italian nation state ... which: promptly - fell into chaos.

    Facing that chaos many Italians gave up - not so much on Italy as on the nascent nation-state, and spent the next 40 years migrating here. It's a misnomer to think of them as coming from the Italian nation state, they came from the Italian peninsula which hadn't been unified for well over 1000 years.

  41. @anonymous
    OT but funny - Retired German Chancellor Angela Merkel, age 67, has been robbed whilst shopping in Berlin at a delicatessen grocery, no word on whether the thief might have been one of the 'Merkel's million migrants' she invited into Germany

    Merkel's bodyguard from the German Federal Criminal Police was unable to prevent the theft ... Her stolen wallet contained Merkel’s ID card, debit card, driver’s license, and cash ... Merkel went down to the police station to report the theft herself

    Quite a trophy for some ruffian in Germany to have Merkel's personal ID card framed on his wall

    https://rmx.news/article/merkel-robbed-while-shopping-in-berlin/

    https://i.4pcdn.org/pol/1646141573263.jpg

    Replies: @theMann, @Anonymous, @Alden

    The first business of Government is the maintenance of order. Talk about an action delegitimizing government……..

  42. Here’s your handbook for the next few decades….

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Thanks: BB753
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Thank you, GToD. Lionel Shriver is a GREAT writer. This prepper novel was written with a women's perspective (Lionel changed her name from Margaret or something as a teenager, but no funny stuff).

    If you want a man's perspective on how we will have to deal with the collapse in the future, regarding materiel, power, security, etc., this book doesn't cut it. However, when it comes to how it may very well go down economically, she does an excellent job - she even understands precious metals!

    I thank John Derbyshire for recommending The Mandibles, and I would like to spam the readers again with 6 links, as I got so into this book, that the review took that long:

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4
    Part 5
    Part 6

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Bill Jones
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I read it. It seemed to me to get so many things dead right.
    Especially the financial aspects.

  43. @houston 1992
    @PaceLaw

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigniorage

    USA is gliding on the profits of our old reserve currency status. The engine is out of fuel , but it can still glide for a long period.
    Reserve currency has allowed us "deficit financing without tears" but that, too, will pass. And given our recklessness perhaps sooner than we think.

    USA loses respect:
    India voted neutral on RU sanctions despite all the jobs, tech we have outscored to them. So, too, did UAE take a neutral stance. Mexico has declined to sanction RU.
    https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/ukraine-russia-putin-news-03-01-22/h_16ea9365f2eb3f81a9b5c09f85de66b9

    Brazil's primary concern is securing fertilizer supplies and they appear lukewarm on sanctions.

    Two weeks from now, Putin will have secured the Eastern Ukraine, a wider land bridge to Crimea, and will hold Kiev. Yes, the invasion has aspects of a debacle, but he will have secured some negotiating chips, and I suspect that we will accept his terms of a neutral Ukraine rump state with the eastern regions being annexed.

    The net result is further loss of credibility for the USA, and a migration as fast as possible away from SWIFT, and reserve currency status that we have had since 1939. It will be hard for USA's "advanced services economy" as Nat Review's Lowry described it, to pay its way on its intrinsic merits.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JMcG, @Mr. Anon

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.
     
    Jack, the ruble was already worth less than 2 cents in 2015.

    Russia had hyper-inflation back in the '90s.

    It's percentage changes that matter. The current crash in the ruble is reversible if Putin pulls this off.

    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now. (Warning: currency speculation is financially dangerous!)

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Bill Jones

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.
     
    AMLO has said he wants Mexico to be neutral. And Israel has been rather cagey.

    If Ukraine wins militarily (extremely unlikely) or if Russian opposition forces Putin to withdraw (unlikely unless it turns out to be a quagmire), then most countries will turn on Russia.

    But if Putin pacifies Ukraine in the next few months, then most of the world, including the West, will eventually return to business as usual with Russia (the oligarchs may not be able to vacation on the Riviera for a while).

    The West has an attention span a bit longer than the Superbowl.
    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Here is the nicest place I have found to show the ruble behavior since the mid-2000s.

    Click on "All" to see it back to 2006.

    Playing around with the interface shows that, during that time, the ruble has never been worth much more than 4 cents. (Note that the vertical axis does NOT start at zero!)

    And it has been under 2 cents most of the time since 2015.

    For the last couple years it has been generally running under 1 1/2 cents.

    Yeah, it has fallen recently, but the news media saying that it is now under 1 cent gives people the impression that it has recently fallen from a "reasonable" value, say a dollar or so, to below a cent.

    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.

    Replies: @res, @Paperback Writer

    , @res
    @Jack D


    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.
     
    Some numbers on that.

    The ruble had been fairly stable for a year or more at 70-some to the dollar. It is now at 110 to the dollar.
    https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/fx/USDRUB/historical-prices

    A significant change to be sure, but what interests me is what happens next. If the market is not being interfered with (is it?) people stand to make/lose significant money depending on how this goes.

    This site has a useful synopsis.
    https://tradingeconomics.com/russia/currency

    The Russian ruble remained under pressure at the 110 per dollar mark on Wednesday, having fallen as low as 120 earlier in the week, as stabilizing measures were not enough to counteract a series of Western sanctions against Russia for invading Ukraine. Western allies largely limited Russian entities' ability to do business internationally after agreeing to remove key Russian banks from the SWIFT interbank system and freeze the assets of Russia’s central bank. The US also dealt another blow against Moscow by barring Americans from doing business with Russia’s central bank, ministry of finance and its sovereign wealth fund. The Bank of Russia responded by raising its key policy rate to 20% from 9.5%, ordering export-led businesses to sell 80% of their foreign currencies and banning foreigners from selling Russian securities to stabilize its currency.
     
    , @Ben tillman
    @Jack D

    Buy low; sell high.

    Replies: @res

  44. @White refugee in usa
    ethnonationalism will break the USA apart eventually. Only problem is that blacks are totally dependent on white Americans for any meager civilization that they possess right now. Whites could go their own way but blacks will resist with everything they have.

    Blacks without white people= Jamaica

    Hispanics without white people= central Mexico

    White people without minorities= Denmark

    Ethnonationalism= Destiny of USA

    Replies: @Joe Walker, @Charon, @Recently Based, @Slugsmagee

    Good point. If you really want to keep the United States intact then you have to keep out all the troublesome non-white immigrants. Racial diversity will ultimately lead to the breakup of the United States whether we want it to or not.

  45. @Anonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    Do you not view most leftist agitation as the equivalent of the mobs of Ancient Rome? As a fellow Californian I have little doubt that urban Californians lack both the ability and will to control most of the territory of this great state.

    This current arrangement is the best the left will ever have...BLM rioters may look scary en mass in the Bay Area, but mobs are pretty worthless in the countryside, as most people in a mob are worthless in the countryside.

    I certainly don't want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Anonymous[273] wrote to me:

    I certainly don’t want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.

    Well, the state lines are already drawn, so it is easier to break things up that way. That is of course basically what happened with the Soviet Union, and the result is less than perfect, as the world is now learning.

    There is an entertaining series of novels by conservative author Kurt Schlichter about the country breaking up due to the Left choosing to secede: he predicts bitter fighting within states that are divided by the Split.

    Initially, the novels were intended to be over-the-top satires of the Left. Unfortunately, in 2022 they no longer seem so over-the-top.

    Schlichter started out as a non-Trumper who got red-pilled. He is ex-military (served in Desert Storm and Kosovo), so the fighting scenes ring true (except, of course, our hero always survives!).

    • Thanks: res
    • Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    @PhysicistDave

    I think what he means is that it can be by state and county.

    If California seceded, most of inland California would not wish to go the way of coastal-elite California, and that's a lot of California. You could exclude too northern Cali, Shasta county, which is hard-core Trump country.

    And no reason to stop there - geographically the majority of Oregon is red-state including most of the coast, just two highly dense blue spots tilt it the other way when measured whole. Washington state is mostly the same story.

    Certainly it's anyone's guess if it's going to come to that, enough so I wouldn't put hard bets either way, but if there was a split the whole western coastal corridor would break down by county, no way you'd hold those together.

  46. “Subtle”? LOL, Steve.

  47. Since when does anyone want to break up the USA?

    No no no Steve…we want to kill each other.

  48. @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    Jack D wrote:

    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Jack, the ruble was already worth less than 2 cents in 2015.

    Russia had hyper-inflation back in the ’90s.

    It’s percentage changes that matter. The current crash in the ruble is reversible if Putin pulls this off.

    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now. (Warning: currency speculation is financially dangerous!)

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @PhysicistDave

    If the sanctions destroy the oligarch class, average Russians won't care. There's a lot of smart stuff being written about the boomerang effect. Look: it's going to hurt Russia. No doubt. But when you're in an existential battle, you fight. The cost of giving in is worse than the cost of fighting.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Bill Jones
    @PhysicistDave


    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now.
     
    Or Lukoil ADR's.
  49. The argument here is entirely premised on the idea that preserving the union is necessary in order that “we” are powerful enough to guard against adversaries meddling in our affairs. The problem is our adversaries are not outside our borders; they are here, and they do not simply meddle in our affairs, but have almost total control of them. This is like the Tibetans worrying that if they escaped the Chinese yolk they might fall prey to the Americans.

    Conservative and right-wing Whites need to purge from their mind the thought that they have any say in the United States whatsoever. The GOP can win 90 seats in the senate and 400 in the house every cycle for the next twenty years, and the culture and every institution that matters still will be further to left and more anti-White than they are now. Every one of us knows this in our bones.

    The only way out of this grim arrangement, is to get out. As long as we are yolked to the United States, our country will never represent us. It is as simple as that.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Thanks: Rosie
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Ryan Andrews

    Absolutely true. The hard left has been in control for a long time.

  50. @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    Jack D wrote:

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    AMLO has said he wants Mexico to be neutral. And Israel has been rather cagey.

    If Ukraine wins militarily (extremely unlikely) or if Russian opposition forces Putin to withdraw (unlikely unless it turns out to be a quagmire), then most countries will turn on Russia.

    But if Putin pacifies Ukraine in the next few months, then most of the world, including the West, will eventually return to business as usual with Russia (the oligarchs may not be able to vacation on the Riviera for a while).

    The West has an attention span a bit longer than the Superbowl.

  51. Sorry, you are living in the past. There is no common culture any more that you refer to. Do your best to live the remainder of your years hiding in your closet, but for those of us who do not want to live in a closet, there is very little worth preserving.

    KNOW YOUR ENEMY.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  52. Trying to keep USA together? I wonder if forced anti-White policies help. Here we see an ad for HR that 10 seconds has a woman refer to herself as the “Chief why is this place so White officer”.

    Every corporation must be anti-White to comply with federal law.

    • Agree: Alden
  53. Thread at bottom of Americans and others who considered extending NATO to Russian borders to be a very bad idea likely to lead to conflict. Useful when you get accused of being a Russian troll or Putin’s accomplice.

    George Kennan in 1998

    Henry Kissinger in 2014

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/henry-kissinger-to-settle-the-ukraine-crisis-start-at-the-end/2014/03/05/46dad868-a496-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html

    US Ambassador to SU Jack F. Matlock Jr in 1997

    “the most profound strategic blunder, [encouraging] a chain of events that could produce the most serious security threat […] since the Soviet Union collapsed”

    Clinton Defence Secretary William Perry, “explaining in his memoir that to him NATO enlargement is the cause of “the rupture in relations with Russia” and that in 1996 he was so opposed to it that “in the strength of my conviction, I considered resigning”.”

    UN Deputy Sec-Gen Pino Arlacchi (“NATO is the root cause of the Russian crisis”)

    CIA Director Bill Burns in 2008 – “Ukrainian entry into NATO is the brightest of all redlines for [Russia]” and “I have yet to find anyone who views Ukraine in NATO as anything other than a direct challenge to Russian interests

    Aussie PMs Fraser “the move east [by NATO is] provocative, unwise and a very clear signal to Russia”. He adds that this leads to a “difficult and extraordinarily dangerous problem.”

    and Keating

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/03/ukraine-theres-no-way-out-unless-the-west-understands-its-past-mistakes

    US Defence Sec Robert Gates

    Sir Roderic Lyne, former British ambassador to Russia, warned a year ago that “[pushing] Ukraine into NATO […] is stupid on every level.” He adds “if you want to start a war with Russia, that’s the best way of doing it.”

    Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, John Mearsheimer, Stephen Cohen, economist Jeffrey Sachs (“”NATO enlargement is utterly misguided and risky. True friends of Ukraine, and of global peace, should be calling for a US and NATO compromise with Russia.””), as well as people like Chomsky.

    • Thanks: Coemgen, ic1000, J.Ross
    • Replies: @HA
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, John Mearsheimer, Stephen Cohen, economist Jeffrey Sachs..."

    Aww, so nice to see Jeffrey Sachs finally get some love on iSteve. That's a new one. As for NATO membership for Ukraine, it never had much traction at all internally.


    According to a poll conducted by Solomon, Center for Strategic and International Studies] A Ukrainian public opinion poll of May 6 [1997] showed in favor of joining NATO with 28% opposed and 34% undecided.
     
    I recall seeing a timeline at one point of similar polls during previous years that indicated that was kind of the longstanding consensus -- i.e. considerably less than half Ukrainians were in support. But the story doesn't end there, does it? Op. cit.:

    Relations between Ukraine and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) started in 1992.[1] Ukraine applied to begin a NATO Membership Action Plan (MAP) in 2008.[2][3] Plans for NATO membership were shelved by Ukraine following the 2010 presidential election in which Viktor Yanukovych, who preferred to keep the country non-aligned, was elected President.[4][5] Amid the Euromaidan unrest, Yanukovych fled Ukraine in February 2014.[6] The interim Yatseniuk Government which came to power initially said, with reference to the country's non-aligned status, that it had no plans to join NATO.[7] However, following the Russian military invasion in Ukraine and parliamentary elections in October 2014, the new government made joining NATO a priority.
     
    What's that? Even Yatsenuk, Victoria Nuland's pet candidate, expressed no interest in having Ukraine join NATO? It's weird how Russia's swiping off a chunk of Ukraine, after previously having agreed in writing to respect Ukraine's borders in exchange for Ukraine giving up nuke materials, boosted the Ukrainians' previously lukewarm interest in actually signing up. It was my understanding from reading the Putin experts on Unz-dot-com that Victoria Nuland's magic pastries was what caused that turnaround.

    Now, even Finland and Sweden want closer ties with NATO. Are the same "experts" and peace advocates (none of whom seem to have any interest in what the Ukrainians themselves might have to say on this topic, as bizarre as that may seem) going to pretend that it's NATO's manifest destiny in pushing eastward that is primarily to blame for that? It doesn't mean Nuland isn't scum -- I never claimed she wasn't. But so far, she seems to be the real winner here, which makes me think Putin, no matter how this debacle turns out for him, isn't nearly as on the ball as he thinks he is. Too bad his yes-men will never allow him to see that.

    , @Anonymous
    @YetAnotherAnon

    You could compile a similar collection of quotes from notable people in the 1990s who opposed invading Iraq and overthrowing Saddam.

  54. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    lmao. Because one war fought 160 years ago dictates all the future.

    Your normalcy bias is showing, little denialist.

  55. Either way the US goes, it will end up with right-wing death squads roving the land, because the left won’t let anyone live in peace.

  56. While many fantasies about separation are out there, its really not that a bad idea or unprecedented, most of us just have a normalcy bias. I believe the country will crack up by or before 2032.

    History will view the the 250 year experiment of the United States as an anomaly, and then focus on the various warring city-states that emerge. It will be like the brief times when Greece was under the thumb of one or more empires and then broke apart and quarreled with one another.

    California will end up like ancient Israel/Judah, two separate entities that pretend to be one from time to time but really are different countries, until the Big One hits and wipes out all of Southern California. Texas will take Louisiana and thus dominate trade throughout Latin America and become the wealthiest section.

  57. @PaceLaw
    @Kylie

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    Replies: @houston 1992, @R.G. Camara, @Brutusale, @Kylie

    What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    lmao. “Everyone has a tranny cousin and sleeps outside their race! That’s what TV says, so it must be true!”

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit.

    lol. Citation needed, little denialist.

  58. Let those White people and POCs who hate working-class Whites have nuclear weapons?

    They already have them. All of them. I presume that a Red-state America would get some share of the nuclear stockpile, but if not, they’ll have at least as many as they do now, which is zero.

    You have written, Steve, about the only force binding the Coalition of the Fringes together being hatred of normal White people. Giving them anything simply means they’ll be after everything next week. How long after the break up before they declare war on us, with foreign support?

    Yes, we are ruled over by a coalition that is held together by a shared opposition (hatred is probably putting it too strongly) to us, I agree. To me, that is obviously a point in favor of separation, not against it.

    Conservative quislings often talk about all the nasty things that leftists would do to us if we were a separate country, including waging war. I think these fears are exaggerated, as polls show they are nearly as in favor a national divorce as we are. But again, if they hate us that much, it is all the more reason that we should want to be out from under their direct control. As it stands now, they have an army and we don’t. At least if we had our own country we would have some tangible means of defending ourselves, and not be left to impotently wailing about the hypocrisy of them using their power against us illiberally.

  59. Ok Steve, how about Califirnia and other blue states take back all of the immigrants and transplants that they have flooded my state with. There should also be a real move to take power away from Washington, and we both know none of that will happen.

    I assume that most people understand that a break-up would have problems like resource wars, long-running feuds, regional domination, foreign meddling….but we already have all of that as a nation. Americans just haven’t started killing each other yet. Considering our undeclared one-sided race war that the Establishment accepts and pushes, and the fact that the blue side is committed to replacing the rest of us with immigrants it’s pretty obvious that we are already in an undeclared war. Why not break up? Some sort of new order seems to be in the making whether anyone likes it or not.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @OilcanFloyd

    how about Califirnia and other blue states take back all of the immigrants and transplants that they have flooded my state with.

    What would be even less sucky is if those inflow states refused to provide tax-funded freebies to the newcomers; then they can get around to separating natives from the tax teat.

    I'm following Idaho school bond referenda. There's a bunch coming up this month (though with relatively small, face-value amounts). The typical, district pleading is ".. but our population is growing like gangbusters!" Also, the DEMs there (like DEMs everywhere) are working to tie school funding to enrollment rather than to the # of warm bodies that actually show up. The teachers union demands a credentialed babysitter in every, empty classroom.

  60. No SOTU thread?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10567679/Biden-confuses-Ukraine-Iran-State-Union-address.html

    Putin may circle Kiev with tanks, but he’ll never gain the hearts and souls of the Iranian people,’ Biden said.

    Just after he finishes saying ‘Iranian,’ Vice President Kamala Harris can be seen behind Biden mouthing the correct word, ‘Ukrainian.’

    Freudian slip?

    Best comment – “60 million Joe Biden voters will be turning in their graves

  61. anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @BluEidDvl
    @PaceLaw

    Well, breakup might seem like an insane idea but if we remain on this insane trajectory that we’re on, it’s inevitable.

    The dollar is nearing collapse. Our industrial base has been gutted. We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population. We have a political (((elite))) that is racing us toward a cliff, bullying any other country we have a disagreement with, creating enmity & hatred around the world. We have an “educational” establishment that teaches White children to hate themselves, their history & their country.

    We didn’t have to go down this route. But we did. If we don’t do an immediate 180 on our current path then collapse & breakup is as inevitable as the sun rising in the east..

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Why do you think the dollar is collapsing? Why can’t gross national debt to GDP reach 300% like in Japan? Japan hasn’t collapsed yet either. It’s been unhealthy for 30 years and will be for the long term future but no collapse is on the horizon.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous

    Who cares about silly minor things like birthrates?

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @anonymous

    I'm literally embarrassed for you. Twin deficit countries running the Japan playbook don't become Japan; they become Argentina.

    Replies: @anonymous

  62. “we still keep managing to function”

    “to function” seems like a rather low bar to me. A recent survey of skill and competence of medical staff” placed the U.S. number 27 among countries. (Japan was number one.). The “Democracy Index” of The Economist placed The U.S. also at 28th. (Norway was number one.) PISA scores, the same number. Hmmm, a pattern, the 28th-ness of us. But of course, 28th is an aggregate. There are places where you might get pushed from the subway platform onto the tracks, and there are places where that’s not a worry you have on your way to work. This comes down to the frustrations, humiliations, and compromises of everyday life. In some places, sorry, you must endure those, while in some places you do not.

  63. You’re right, of course. War is almost always worse. But right now it does seem some sort of low-level conflict: Attacks in the streets and schools (or the fear thereof), white women paraded as war trophies, taboos on speaking or acting in your own group interest.

    But yes, it could be worse. I have to remember: things can (and will) change.

  64. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    The best course of action would be a constitutional one whereby power is returned to the states—much like the way we started. Certain military, diplomatic and even economic realities would have to remain at the federal level. But all the civil rights and social decisions should be returned to the states. Most revenue and spending should revert too. Social sec, medicare and medicaid should be disbanded and done at the state level. So on and so forth.

    • Agree: Abe
  65. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It’s just math at this point.

    Just the way the Moors wiped out all native Spanish and the Ottomans wiped out every Greek.

  66. The U.S.A. is in a lot more danger of being absorbed into the globalist borg, where one “better get their pronouns correct” or one will lose access to one’s bank account, than of breaking up into multiple independent, locally ruled, states.

  67. @GLT
    Where is AUDACIOUS EPIGONE for the quality direct pundit rebuttal? (I think dissolution is the best theme search word: https://www.unz.com/?s=dissolution&Action=Search&authors=audacious-epigone&ptype=all) Best I can muster is sure, "don't be Ukraine", be Switzerland.

    Replies: @ic1000

    > Where is AUDACIOUS EPIGONE for the quality direct pundit rebuttal?

    It was my understanding that AnotherDad had reserved that role, on this particular iSteve talking point.

  68. @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    Here is the nicest place I have found to show the ruble behavior since the mid-2000s.

    Click on “All” to see it back to 2006.

    Playing around with the interface shows that, during that time, the ruble has never been worth much more than 4 cents. (Note that the vertical axis does NOT start at zero!)

    And it has been under 2 cents most of the time since 2015.

    For the last couple years it has been generally running under 1 1/2 cents.

    Yeah, it has fallen recently, but the news media saying that it is now under 1 cent gives people the impression that it has recently fallen from a “reasonable” value, say a dollar or so, to below a cent.

    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.

    • Replies: @res
    @PhysicistDave


    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.
     
    Right.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_ruble

    The ruble's exchange rate versus the U.S. dollar depreciated significantly from $1 = 125 RUR in January 1992 to approximately $1 = 6,000 RUR when the currency was redenominated in 1998.
     
    BTW, that's what it looks like when an economy breaks (or is destroyed/looted?). Hope it never happens here.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Paperback Writer
    @PhysicistDave

    As far as Ivan and Masha are concerned, the oligarchs can f#ck the f*ck off.

    And they are:

    https://twitter.com/avischarf/status/1498979412481658885?s=20&t=qJyHJ-svHv7nLG-MEgoSmA

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium.HIGHLIGHT-u-s-losing-patience-as-israel-backs-ukraine-but-pulls-punches-on-russia-1.10646758

    Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, generally considered the most pro-Israel senator in Washington, condemned Israel on Monday, accusing it of declining to sell Stinger missiles to Ukraine following a plea by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to Bennett.

  69. I haven’t read the column yet but just did a quick ctrl-f (in the iPad sense) for the word “Federalism”. Nada. How ’bout in the comments here? Nada.

    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called ’em “States”, and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov’t.

    The Founders of this country were smarter than most. Even though this country was run entirely by White Men, a big majority of British extraction, with real Federalism again, this ultra-diverse Tower of Babel might be able to hang together. The Founders created the Federal Gov’t for the main purpose of a common defense. That’s all it SHOULD be for!

    There is far too much diversity at this point for this place to stay together as it is. I would not want to be part of the Totalitarian Police State, a Yugoslavia on steroids, that it’s going to take to keep it together. (That’s what it’s been becoming for a long while, accelerated by the problems of the immigration invasion and “civil rights”.)

    I want no part in BEING together with many of these people period. It’s not just the policies but the fact that my labor is being stolen for the use of those with opinions and lifestyles anathema to me that makes me want out. Simple solution: Devolve the power back to the State and people where it belongs, per Amendment X.

    One of the silver linings to have come out of the Covid PanicFest was the visibility of, and a modicum of respect for, Federalism again. Go Gators! Go DeSantis!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts. That's true. It might take a decade or a generation, but "experiments in democracy" (in some cases now, something else entirely) CAN STILL WORK.

    Federal power would have to be taken. That's where the worries about violence come in. It will not be given up easily. The stupid bastards that let the Feds usurp State power over the years are wholly responsible for any bloodshed involved there.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Glaivester

    , @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called ’em “States”, and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov’t.
     
    Thanks Achmed.

    I had an unwritten comment, with a similar thrust--in my head in reaction to Steve's "World Cup" post. The Brits indeed had evolved--over time and with some big mistakes--at least a semi-reasonable of handling the natural "diversity" within their kingdom.

    And our founders--no idiots--were both well aware of that, but also of the tyranny that the central state could dish out. The founders knew that any peaceful and voluntary association in a large nation--especially with the variation among the various Anglo-Saxon and Germanic peoples that were the polity, and with our large regional variations--required federalism. People would locally govern themselves in their own states according to their own norms, values and circumstances. And the federal state would handle the common stuff--mostly defense, keeping the foreigners out.

    There's absolutely no reason the good folks in Pigsknuckle, Arkansas, must have the same norms and the same laws as in Baghdad By the Bay. Each could--in theory--live according their community norms. But this is simply an anathema--hate!--to minoritarians, and they absolute love central state power to make ordinary Americans--whom they have contempt for- behave as they wish.

    Our "cosmopolitan globalist" elite are not only the most parochial "cosmopolitans, and not only have the most stupid and toxic ideology in minoritarianism, but they also have the most deformed and toxic personalities--incredibly obnoxious and aggressive imposing minoritarianism upon everyone else. In a word--*assholes*.

    That's our problem. That's what motivates secession.

    Replies: @res

    , @Dmon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    What do you guys think of the Convention of States initiative?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Known Fact

  70. The first reason America can’t break up is nukes.

    Who gets the nukes?
    Why would the less-nuclear territory agree to leave the nuclear umbrella? Why would the more-nuclear territory not simply annex the lesser for the tax revenues? This isn’t a breakup, it’s just moving the capital.

    The second reason America can’t break up is the Fed and reserve currency.

    Who gets the Eccles Building?
    If the new countries don’t retain control of the Fed, they need their own currency or they’ll get jacked by default. Except they can’t have their own currency because it won’t have reserve status and they’ll have to balance their budget or they will rapidly descend into South American and/or Greek status. Total basketcase. Do I have to mention how laughable a balanced budget is as an idea? Genuinely kind of funny.

    The third reason America can’t break up: where would they go?

    The American empire is world-spanning. Won’t even let places like Ukraine or Taiwan out of its grasp. The idea of having the next-door-neighbour leave is also genuinely kind of funy. Even if there were de jure divisions there would be no de facto divisions.

  71. So do you think the breakup of the USSR was a bad thing, Steve?

  72. @Mr. Anon

    Let’s Not Break Up the USA
     
    That is of course a wise sentiment.

    However................a lot of people (like me) look at Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, Kamal Harris, Eric Swalwell, etc., and think: "I don't want to be governed by that. And I don't want to be governed by anybody who would vote for that. It's not an unreasonable sentiment.

    When your government spends most of its time vilifying you, blaming you for everything, making vague noises about extracting reparations from you, silencing your opinions, outlawing your political views and your ability to politically organize in your own defense - when it craps on your beliefs, and promotes the most appalling degeneracy (for example, appointing dudes in dresses and deviant transvestites with dog-f**king fetishes to responsible government offices and encouraging young people to mutilate and chemically castrate themselves), then national divorce begins to look like your best option.


    Whether you blame poor Ukraine’s current agony most on Russia’s obvious aggressions or NATO’s subtle machinations is a matter of opinion, but the lesson is clear: If you can avoid it, don’t be Ukraine.
     
    What if the alternative to being Ukraine in 2022 is being Cambodia in 1976?

    Replies: @Glaivester, @Charon, @guest007

    Exactly.

  73. @Bardon Kaldian
    It is not a question of intent, but of historical inevitability.

    Of course there is no "scientific" explanation, but I'll use analogies.

    From the beginning to the assassination of JFK, the US was basically a nation. It was founded by Anglo-Protestants with some other NW Europeans thrown in, and later with other Europeans added (which caused friction), but they've more or less assimilated. Blacks were not Americans, but they were an American national minority.

    When Churchill and Roosevelt met to sign the Atlantic charter in 1941, they clearly indicated that Americans and British share the essential common heritage.

    In the past 60 or so years the US has been transformed beyond recognition. This is not a nation; there is not an American people anymore; various other visibly different groups (Muslims, Chinese, Indians, ...) are not supposedly new Americans.

    When newly arrived non-European immigrants arrive, they may pledge the allegiance, but they are not the new "we" who will consider Washington, Franklin, Lincoln, .... as their historical heritage & identity. I know it's a bit funny when Italian-Americans say "we" and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.

    New, multicultural "Americans" are a hollow entity. What is "American" about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or "advanced" among them don't see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being "them", or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.

    In other words, multicultural Americans don't have much in common with historical Americans- and this is a definite divide no one can bridge.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous, @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    Bardon Kaldian wrote:

    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.

    You don’t live in the US, do you, BK?

    It’s more complicated than you claim.

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as “American” as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It’s true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large. Furthermore, it is also true that Europeans tend to acculturate fastest, followed it seems by East Asians.

    But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We — or rather our elites — are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly White, ruling elite.

    • Agree: ic1000, rebel yell, Alden
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @PhysicistDave

    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans; also, if this society is not under great stress of poverty or some other crisis.

    One must take into account historical culture & various classes.

    You may say whatever you want, but the general culture of a real country is multilayered & there has to be some core group, if this country is to be treated as something real, and not as de Gaulle thought of Americans- a bunch of rootless individuals or segments of tribes bent on economic exploitation and nothing more.

    The US is an extension of, first, Britain & later, Europe. And then- stop. Teddy Roosevelt was right when he halted Asian immigration in the US. This is as far as one can go.

    First- race. Blacks, with very few exceptions, cannot- even if they wanted to - feel to have anything in common with historical America, let alone with roots of that country, from Aristotle to Caesar and Britain. It is the same in a more colored country like Brazil. Blacks there don't give a hoot about the history of that country, as a meaningful entity. Putting sensitive IQ question aside, there is no black intelligentsia, or middle class anywhere, that would possess any emo connection with anything Western (Greek heritage, Christianity & scientific rational spirit). What you are writing about is not a reality of Jamestown Americans, nor of Ellis Island Americans.

    You write about the likes of Maz Jobrani, Iranian-American comedian (whom I like, although I disagree with him on many points- which doesn't matter, because he's a comedian). The guy is married to an Indian, is your typical urban newer American, but has nothing in common with "deep roots" of American identity.

    Let's take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You'll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews. You won't find blacks interested in French literature; you won't find Muslims interested in Catholic philosophy; you won't find Hindu Indians writing encyclopedic works on Western musicology.

    And without the field one could call the humanities & the way of life -there is no nation. No nation can remain founded mostly on STEM or, at the lower level, popular culture.

    Ricardo Duchesne was right in his critique of Nial Ferguson's neo-con liberal delusions: for a culture to flourish & continue, you have to have a combination of race and culture, which, in the case of the West- and the US in particular- is not replaceable, nor universal, and not as superficial as many seem to think.

    https://reviews.history.ac.uk/review/1225

    Civilization: The Six Ways the West Beat the Rest

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Rex Little
    @PhysicistDave


    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as “American” as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It’s true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.
     
    I know a Chinese couple who came here in their 20s and had two sons. The kids were raised in mostly white communities, went to mostly white schools, had mostly white friends, eventually married white women. Now in their 40s, they (the kids) are as American as anyone whose ancestors came over on the Mayflower. It's been awhile since I've been in touch with them, but I'll bet they voted for Trump.

    I know a blonde, blue-eyed California girl (my ex-wife) whose grandparents all came from other countries (Sweden, Germany, Mexico).

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large.
     
    What happens when the numbers get large is that enclaves form. The children born into and raised in these enclaves don't assimilate into the larger American culture.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon, and American culture no longer has a lot of gravity. Oh sure, Team Brown will take the video games, the Dodge Chargers, the twerking, the R&B/gospel National Anfum. But they have no interest in Team White's Adam Smith, Locke's Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays. Actually they do have an interest in them: they want them tossed into history's trash can.

    You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus, @PhysicistDave

  74. @Achmed E. Newman
    I haven't read the column yet but just did a quick ctrl-f (in the iPad sense) for the word "Federalism". Nada. How 'bout in the comments here? Nada.

    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called 'em "States", and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov't.

    The Founders of this country were smarter than most. Even though this country was run entirely by White Men, a big majority of British extraction, with real Federalism again, this ultra-diverse Tower of Babel might be able to hang together. The Founders created the Federal Gov't for the main purpose of a common defense. That's all it SHOULD be for!

    There is far too much diversity at this point for this place to stay together as it is. I would not want to be part of the Totalitarian Police State, a Yugoslavia on steroids, that it's going to take to keep it together. (That's what it's been becoming for a long while, accelerated by the problems of the immigration invasion and "civil rights".)

    I want no part in BEING together with many of these people period. It's not just the policies but the fact that my labor is being stolen for the use of those with opinions and lifestyles anathema to me that makes me want out. Simple solution: Devolve the power back to the State and people where it belongs, per Amendment X.

    One of the silver linings to have come out of the Covid PanicFest was the visibility of, and a modicum of respect for, Federalism again. Go Gators! Go DeSantis!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Dmon

    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts. That’s true. It might take a decade or a generation, but “experiments in democracy” (in some cases now, something else entirely) CAN STILL WORK.

    Federal power would have to be taken. That’s where the worries about violence come in. It will not be given up easily. The stupid bastards that let the Feds usurp State power over the years are wholly responsible for any bloodshed involved there.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed E. Newman wrote:


    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.
     
    Oh, I agree with you. Federalism is far from perfect, simply because nothing human is perfect.

    But federalism is far, far better than any known alternative.

    Replies: @Dr. DoomNGloom

    , @Glaivester
    @Achmed E. Newman


    we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.
     
    There's a solution for that. It rhymes with "clethnic eansing."

    Replies: @J.Ross

  75. @IHTG
    If you're a dissident reactionary who is alienated by the wider culture, there are plenty of other solutions you could pursue before considering secession. Eg, various forms of political devolution. The talk about a "national divorce" (a strangely cloying, feminized term) is just a LARP.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @Thea

    The problem is that it is becoming increasingly obvious that t he Left will not allow political devolution. When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex “marriage” maybe that will be a solution.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Glaivester


    When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex “marriage” maybe that will be a solution.
     
    No state is, but many statelets are. Apparently, some Americans still have [*ahem*] reservations:


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States.svg/800px-Same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States.svg.png

    Legend here: Map of same-sex marriage in the United States

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

  76. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts. That's true. It might take a decade or a generation, but "experiments in democracy" (in some cases now, something else entirely) CAN STILL WORK.

    Federal power would have to be taken. That's where the worries about violence come in. It will not be given up easily. The stupid bastards that let the Feds usurp State power over the years are wholly responsible for any bloodshed involved there.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Glaivester

    Achmed E. Newman wrote:

    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.

    Oh, I agree with you. Federalism is far from perfect, simply because nothing human is perfect.

    But federalism is far, far better than any known alternative.

    • Replies: @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @PhysicistDave


    Oh, I agree with you. Federalism is far from perfect, simply because nothing human is perfect.

    But federalism is far, far better than any known alternative.
     
    My third overarching comment for Steve is that the Madison intersectional model of a republic.
    Madison was perhaps the original intersectionalist.

    The smaller the political unit, the more easily it will be captured by a specific interest group. Note how easily school boards are captured by the Teachers Union. As we scale up the political unit, two things happen
    1) more interest groups emerge that will compete with each other,
    2) more people find they have interests in more than one group.

    Madison conceived of political systems that would make permanent change hard, thus leveraging the constantly shifting interest blocks. He wasn't far from modern chaos or game theory where decentralized decisions can achieve an equilibrium. At least he seemed to think of it at an intuitive level.

    Obviously ethnic or racial identarian politics poisons the body politic,(unless one's ethnicity, race or sex is changeable ;) . Idenitarianism is a path towardpolitical madness. Also poison are single points of control, such as capturing courts to replace the legislative process. The decentralization is what allows equilibria to be reached.
  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts. That's true. It might take a decade or a generation, but "experiments in democracy" (in some cases now, something else entirely) CAN STILL WORK.

    Federal power would have to be taken. That's where the worries about violence come in. It will not be given up easily. The stupid bastards that let the Feds usurp State power over the years are wholly responsible for any bloodshed involved there.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Glaivester

    we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.

    There’s a solution for that. It rhymes with “clethnic eansing.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Glaivester

    If we do to the law talkers what Henry VIII did to the monks, and in their welcome absence erect an unapologetic apartheid system within a reasonable civic nationalism framework, not one ethny need be cleansed, not one district map redrawn, not one neighborhood need be bothered. The interlopers can keep their loot, which is really all that most care about. They could even spend their free hours in a fake and thoroughly day-glo suffrage movement.
    MAKE THE VOTE REAL
    REQUIRE PHOTO ID
    TAKE THE VOTE AWAY FROM THE ENEMIES OF THE CONSTITITION
    One step and you're done without violence.

  78. @houston 1992
    @PaceLaw

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigniorage

    USA is gliding on the profits of our old reserve currency status. The engine is out of fuel , but it can still glide for a long period.
    Reserve currency has allowed us "deficit financing without tears" but that, too, will pass. And given our recklessness perhaps sooner than we think.

    USA loses respect:
    India voted neutral on RU sanctions despite all the jobs, tech we have outscored to them. So, too, did UAE take a neutral stance. Mexico has declined to sanction RU.
    https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/ukraine-russia-putin-news-03-01-22/h_16ea9365f2eb3f81a9b5c09f85de66b9

    Brazil's primary concern is securing fertilizer supplies and they appear lukewarm on sanctions.

    Two weeks from now, Putin will have secured the Eastern Ukraine, a wider land bridge to Crimea, and will hold Kiev. Yes, the invasion has aspects of a debacle, but he will have secured some negotiating chips, and I suspect that we will accept his terms of a neutral Ukraine rump state with the eastern regions being annexed.

    The net result is further loss of credibility for the USA, and a migration as fast as possible away from SWIFT, and reserve currency status that we have had since 1939. It will be hard for USA's "advanced services economy" as Nat Review's Lowry described it, to pay its way on its intrinsic merits.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JMcG, @Mr. Anon

    Yes, just as the decision by Trudeau to shut down banking for donors to the truckers’ convoy led to an apparent bank run, a lot of countries are going to be looking at their reliance on the SWIFT system with a gimlet eye.

    • Agree: Coemgen, LondonBob
  79. Transnistria in Moldova

    Odessa was the easternmost and last major stop on our honeymoon in July 2020. On our way between Transylvania and there, we passed through Moldova and the Transnistria disputed region.

  80. @neutral
    For the sake of world peace (and sanity), the US regime must be and ultimately will be broken up. Here is how I think it should be broken up:
    - The states that were conquered from Mexico will be returned to Mexico (except for California)
    - California will have to broken up in a lot of little bits, turn the cities into independent city states, and the rural areas into a lot of separate entities.
    - Emulate an India style partition by having large movements of various ethnic group
    - Blacks will be moved to the Southern states
    - Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
    - Latins will move back the Mexico ruled states
    - A lot of the more recent immigrants will not want to stay and move back to where they came from
    - Washington DC will have to reduced to rubble to prevent the idea of reforming the US regime
    - Alaska will be returned to Russia
    - Haiwai will become independent
    - Overseas military outposts such as Guam will be run by China
    - All nuclear weapons will be dismantled

    I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.

    Replies: @bomag, @S. Anonyia, @Old Prude, @Colin Wright

    – Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states

    Why let the enemy consolidate their gains while we retreat to a weaker position?

    If we are going to hand-wave population transfers, let’s deport those and their descendants who are here post 1965.

  81. If the USA breaks up, then there is no more USA to meddle in internal affairs with color revolutions and start wars.

    The rest of the world prays to be free from us. Only the stupid and those who can’t see past gibs and toys want to be here.

  82. OT Stuff the Ukraine is meant to distract you from: the Merkelboner continues apace. Morocco, which was decades ago allowed to invade a Spanish North African territory by boldly sending civilians and just defying the Spanish to shoot them (as India does at the Bangladesh border), has now invaded a mainland Spanish city by boldly sending civilians and just defying the Spanish to shoot them.
    I’m still not getting why we don’t shoot them. You wouldn’t be killing all of them. They’re famously cowardly people. You would shoot one, and the rest would flee, and stay away.


    That’s Mexico tomorrow. This is why our scum leadership caste is talking about Ukraine.

  83. @Reg Cæsar

    A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada.
     
    Until a few decades ago, Canada was forced to go through Portland, Maine in the winter, as all their Atlantic ports were frozen.

    https://i.etsystatic.com/26429015/r/il/52e9f1/2946172866/il_794xN.2946172866_mwfr.jpg

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Buffalo Joe

    We stay at a lovely hotel near the Grand Trunk Building when we visit Portland.

    https://www.portlandlandmarks.org/grand-trunk-railroad-office-building

  84. anonymous[389] • Disclaimer says:

    My idea for breaking up the US.

    I think it starts with a MAGA country that wishes to be mostly rural, whiter, live according to socially conservative values, and free from election cheating. The last part will be the trigger for secession. It will include Texas because a sovereign country needs ocean access (or else surrounding countries can block the borders if MAGA decides to ban abortion, etc.) Texas has cities and racial diversity but at least the big cities are more conservative than other big US cities and the diversity is mostly better-assimilated Latinos.

    Greater California takes shape because MAGA split the USA apart.

    The State of Deseret because the Mormons want to be both socially conservative and racially inclusive.

    The remainder of the US will be huge because I think the biggest inconvenience problem to deal with after deciding on the split is the management of the nuclear forces. Two weeks ago this wasn’t a big concern but now it will preoccupy minds. The remaining part of the US has to be big enough to maintain the deterrence and even operate the missile fields in MAGA as foreign bases.

    This map is made to get the conversation started on what a breakup could sensibly look like and most importantly what goals the MAGA country sets to secure. Create your own map.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anonymous

    Texas has almost ¾ of the population in your orange bloc. That's more than Russia in the USSR, and like England in the UK.

    , @Thea
    @anonymous

    While you mess around in fantasyland Antifa is teaching recruits street fighting and propaganda techniques. This is why we lose.

    Replies: @anonymous

  85. Devil’s Advocate.

    World government for world peace.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @countenance

    Indeed, the Devil's has got his money's worth in legal council. I'd like a world in which the Devil was only appointed an AA Pubic Defender.

    "Listen, the deal we made is you go back to your lair in George Soros' basement in return for the remaining souls of the members of the US Congress." "Wait, but that's, like, only 17!" "Hey, I just work here. I gots fried chicken to pick up for the chillens. We done here."

    , @res
    @countenance


    World government for world peace.
     
    I think an increased emphasis on federalism would help the US by letting states agree to disagree more often. And letting people (with their feet, not only ballots) and markets (do these decisions work financially without the ability to print money?) vote on their decisions.

    If US states can't agree on things (not to mention the voter precinct levels we are discussing), what makes you think country level populations could? And who would you trust to operate a world government?!
  86. @Glaivester
    @Achmed E. Newman


    we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.
     
    There's a solution for that. It rhymes with "clethnic eansing."

    Replies: @J.Ross

    If we do to the law talkers what Henry VIII did to the monks, and in their welcome absence erect an unapologetic apartheid system within a reasonable civic nationalism framework, not one ethny need be cleansed, not one district map redrawn, not one neighborhood need be bothered. The interlopers can keep their loot, which is really all that most care about. They could even spend their free hours in a fake and thoroughly day-glo suffrage movement.
    MAKE THE VOTE REAL
    REQUIRE PHOTO ID
    TAKE THE VOTE AWAY FROM THE ENEMIES OF THE CONSTITITION
    One step and you’re done without violence.

  87. @IHTG
    If you're a dissident reactionary who is alienated by the wider culture, there are plenty of other solutions you could pursue before considering secession. Eg, various forms of political devolution. The talk about a "national divorce" (a strangely cloying, feminized term) is just a LARP.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @Thea

    Alienation hits both left and right. Antifa and such are the left’s response. Daydreaming about separate nations is apparently the right’s way to cope. Something more productive and unifying would be nice from both sides.

    The tragedy is that occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party never realized they were on the same side.

    • Replies: @Joe Walker
    @Thea

    Diversity is the enemy of unity.

  88. @PaceLaw
    @Kylie

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    Replies: @houston 1992, @R.G. Camara, @Brutusale, @Kylie

    Some of us have decided that we’re part of a large and fractious family that we’ve stopped getting together with.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  89. A Phlebotomist Party would strive
    For a Washington barely alive.
    Kill Amendment XVI:
    A New Switzerland seen
    With the sovereign states free to thrive.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    Agree, LOL, and Thanks

  90. @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote:


    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.
     
    You don't live in the US, do you, BK?

    It's more complicated than you claim.

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as "American" as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It's true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large. Furthermore, it is also true that Europeans tend to acculturate fastest, followed it seems by East Asians.

    But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We -- or rather our elites -- are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly White, ruling elite.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Rex Little, @The Anti-Gnostic

    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans; also, if this society is not under great stress of poverty or some other crisis.

    One must take into account historical culture & various classes.

    You may say whatever you want, but the general culture of a real country is multilayered & there has to be some core group, if this country is to be treated as something real, and not as de Gaulle thought of Americans- a bunch of rootless individuals or segments of tribes bent on economic exploitation and nothing more.

    The US is an extension of, first, Britain & later, Europe. And then- stop. Teddy Roosevelt was right when he halted Asian immigration in the US. This is as far as one can go.

    First- race. Blacks, with very few exceptions, cannot- even if they wanted to – feel to have anything in common with historical America, let alone with roots of that country, from Aristotle to Caesar and Britain. It is the same in a more colored country like Brazil. Blacks there don’t give a hoot about the history of that country, as a meaningful entity. Putting sensitive IQ question aside, there is no black intelligentsia, or middle class anywhere, that would possess any emo connection with anything Western (Greek heritage, Christianity & scientific rational spirit). What you are writing about is not a reality of Jamestown Americans, nor of Ellis Island Americans.

    You write about the likes of Maz Jobrani, Iranian-American comedian (whom I like, although I disagree with him on many points- which doesn’t matter, because he’s a comedian). The guy is married to an Indian, is your typical urban newer American, but has nothing in common with “deep roots” of American identity.

    Let’s take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You’ll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews. You won’t find blacks interested in French literature; you won’t find Muslims interested in Catholic philosophy; you won’t find Hindu Indians writing encyclopedic works on Western musicology.

    And without the field one could call the humanities & the way of life -there is no nation. No nation can remain founded mostly on STEM or, at the lower level, popular culture.

    Ricardo Duchesne was right in his critique of Nial Ferguson’s neo-con liberal delusions: for a culture to flourish & continue, you have to have a combination of race and culture, which, in the case of the West- and the US in particular- is not replaceable, nor universal, and not as superficial as many seem to think.

    https://reviews.history.ac.uk/review/1225

    Civilization: The Six Ways the West Beat the Rest

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote to me:


    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.
     
    For how long? Were you born here and did you grow up here?

    I did, and, as I have related, I married into an immigrant family, and my best friend in high school was half-Japanese.

    I suspect I have a more detailed perspective on this country than you do.

    BK also wrote:

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans...
     
    Y'know, the case you make would argue that the US could not survive the Irish/German/Italian immigrants of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

    In fact, my ancestors on the English side of my family did argue that, especially concerning Catholics, and, most especially, Irish Catholics.

    But we did assimilate them, as shown by the other side of my own family -- German and Irish.

    BK also wrote:

    Let’s take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You’ll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews.
     
    Indeed, but the people who are trying to destroy Western Civilization come from exactly those same groups.

    Socialism, progressivism, environmentalism, critical theory, transgendersim -- all of these are evil products of Western Civilization and of the ethnic groups you mention -- Europeans and Euro-Americans.. None of these evils are due to Blacks or Hispanics or any Third-World immigrants.

    The culture war is a civil war within the West.

    The enemy is within the gates.

    Yes, massive, overwhelming immigration is not a great idea for any society. But that is not our central problem. Our central problem is our corrupt, decadent, bizarrely incompetent -- and overwhelmingly White -- ruling elite.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  91. @countenance
    Devil's Advocate.

    World government for world peace.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @res

    Indeed, the Devil’s has got his money’s worth in legal council. I’d like a world in which the Devil was only appointed an AA Pubic Defender.

    “Listen, the deal we made is you go back to your lair in George Soros’ basement in return for the remaining souls of the members of the US Congress.” “Wait, but that’s, like, only 17!” “Hey, I just work here. I gots fried chicken to pick up for the chillens. We done here.”

  92. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    A Phlebotomist Party would strive
    For a Washington barely alive.
    Kill Amendment XVI:
    A New Switzerland seen
    With the sovereign states free to thrive.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Agree, LOL, and Thanks

  93. @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.
     
    The danger is that the newly formed Republic of Woke (i.e. the seceded states of California, Oregon, and Washington), would turn to China for protection, ultimately concluding a military alliance with them. That would given China a military presence on the North American mainland.

    I know - it sounds farfetched.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to certain British Chieftans who invited German mercenaries to their islands to help them fight their wars, that their country would soon come to be ruled by them, speak their language, and that virtually every place name in "England" (Land of the Angles) would end up being germanic instead of celtic.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to the Greek city states that invited the Romans into the Peloponnese to adjudicate their disputes that they would end up as provinces ruled by Rome for the next six hundred years or so.

    Despite what Francis Fukuyama said, history doesn't end.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @epebble

    And it seemed far-fetched to this guy in 1166 that the Normans he brought in as mercenaries would run all of Ireland until 1922, and would still have the northern part in 2022.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diarmaid_mac_Murchadha

  94. @PattyMax
    Let those White people and POCs who hate working-class Whites have nuclear weapons?

    Let China take over the west coast by mass immigration, because the loonies would not resist because that would be racist? China could spare the 50 million or so to make it happen.

    Would the useless eaters in charge allow the productive people to escape? Would they actually bring themselves to do real labor? How would the Progs deal with Blacks, once all the BadWhites are in another country and they have to give up their own stuff instead of ours to placate them?

    You have written, Steve, about the only force binding the Coalition of the Fringes together being hatred of normal White people. Giving them anything simply means they'll be after everything next week. How long after the break up before they declare war on us, with foreign support?

    My personal forecast is economic collapse, followed by a vicious scramble in the ruins. I hope the foreigners stay out of it, for fear of nukes if nothing else.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    My personal forecast is economic collapse, followed by a vicious scramble in the ruins.

    The money printer is the true heart of GAE’s power. It is how they pay for all the rackets and grift.

    Russia has yet to employ her best economic weapons by restricting commodity exports.

  95. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    The division can’t be “cities vs. countryside” unless you are counting suburban areas and small to mid-sized cities as countryside. Less than 20 % of the US is rural, but the amount of conservatives is way higher.

  96. @BluEidDvl
    @PaceLaw

    Well, breakup might seem like an insane idea but if we remain on this insane trajectory that we’re on, it’s inevitable.

    The dollar is nearing collapse. Our industrial base has been gutted. We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population. We have a political (((elite))) that is racing us toward a cliff, bullying any other country we have a disagreement with, creating enmity & hatred around the world. We have an “educational” establishment that teaches White children to hate themselves, their history & their country.

    We didn’t have to go down this route. But we did. If we don’t do an immediate 180 on our current path then collapse & breakup is as inevitable as the sun rising in the east..

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard

    We’re facing demographic catastrophe as the foundational stock is being displaced/replaced, try maintaining a first world country with a third world population.

    This will be a key part of the collapse as Boomers and older Xers age out of the workforce and are replaced by younger deviant and vibrant snowflakes.

  97. @neutral
    For the sake of world peace (and sanity), the US regime must be and ultimately will be broken up. Here is how I think it should be broken up:
    - The states that were conquered from Mexico will be returned to Mexico (except for California)
    - California will have to broken up in a lot of little bits, turn the cities into independent city states, and the rural areas into a lot of separate entities.
    - Emulate an India style partition by having large movements of various ethnic group
    - Blacks will be moved to the Southern states
    - Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
    - Latins will move back the Mexico ruled states
    - A lot of the more recent immigrants will not want to stay and move back to where they came from
    - Washington DC will have to reduced to rubble to prevent the idea of reforming the US regime
    - Alaska will be returned to Russia
    - Haiwai will become independent
    - Overseas military outposts such as Guam will be run by China
    - All nuclear weapons will be dismantled

    I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.

    Replies: @bomag, @S. Anonyia, @Old Prude, @Colin Wright

    Whites in the South will never leave the South in any breakup scenario. Same probably goes for the Southwest. People like living in these places (look where people have moved during the pandemic) and aren’t giving it up for inferior geography and climate.

  98. “Steve Sailer finally comes out and admits that his halcyon Boomer vision of America should be preserved on paper even if it’s totally dysfunctional and tyrannical in practice.

    The logical end point of Sailer’s civnattery is preservation of a failed multiracial nation for the sake of empire and status quo.”

    https://gab.com/kingofallnads/posts/107885506461821438

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Glaivester

    In addition, he's not big picture.

  99. @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote:


    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.
     
    You don't live in the US, do you, BK?

    It's more complicated than you claim.

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as "American" as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It's true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large. Furthermore, it is also true that Europeans tend to acculturate fastest, followed it seems by East Asians.

    But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We -- or rather our elites -- are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly White, ruling elite.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Rex Little, @The Anti-Gnostic

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as “American” as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It’s true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    I know a Chinese couple who came here in their 20s and had two sons. The kids were raised in mostly white communities, went to mostly white schools, had mostly white friends, eventually married white women. Now in their 40s, they (the kids) are as American as anyone whose ancestors came over on the Mayflower. It’s been awhile since I’ve been in touch with them, but I’ll bet they voted for Trump.

    I know a blonde, blue-eyed California girl (my ex-wife) whose grandparents all came from other countries (Sweden, Germany, Mexico).

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large.

    What happens when the numbers get large is that enclaves form. The children born into and raised in these enclaves don’t assimilate into the larger American culture.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Rex Little


    What happens when the numbers get large is that enclaves form. The children born into and raised in these enclaves don’t assimilate into the larger American culture.
     
    Enclaves form, but they are subsequently broken up. Infrastructure degrades and becomes outdated. Property values decay and a different class of people slowly take over. Eventually things are either abandoned or "renewed", depending on their location.
  100. Let’s Not Break Up the USA

    Now who’s the extremist?

  101. @Mike_from_SGV
    A formal breakup may be impractical, but we could go a long way toward a de-facto breakup if conservative governments would be hardnosed about certain things. For example I read that Wyoming just killed the Department of Sexual Twistedness Studies, or something, in its state colleges. That kind of thing should happen a lot more often.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @res

    Mike, along with Mr. McG’s point, I’ll add the main reason that this stuff doesn’t happen, or if it happens, it doesn’t “take” – not for long.

    It’s the money, stupid! No, wait, it’s the FLOW of the money, stupid! (not you, personally, of course — it’s an expression) Because unaware American imbeciles back a hundred years ago let Amendment XVI and income tax laws come into being, along with American imbeciles right now who should freaking know better never fighting it, the flow of the money is from the People to the Feds, and then to the States or back to the people … if you are nice and be good.

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov’t now, that they can’t do very much on their own. It takes more guts, anyway, as in having to put up with residents and other politicians noting that YOU are the reason we don’t have our (cookies and milk) money! How are you going to withhold personal income tax money from your residents from the Feds?

    That’s why Peak Stupidity‘s coming proposal for an Amendment XXVIII – that’s 28, errr, veintiocho, for those of you in Pico Rivera – is so important.

    All money for the Federal Gov’t is to be raised by the various States, in the manner they see fit. The monies to be transferred by each of the various States shall be determined by its proportion of the US population as determined by the most recent census multiplied by the most recent year’s national budget expenditure.

    All debt incurred in the national budget shall be covered by the Senators and Congrefsmen of the previous session and their estates; those not making whole their portion of the deficit budget will be subject to drawing and quartering or povnd-me-in-the-aff gaol.

    Peak Stupidity is still working on some of the wording and olde-timey speffing. This is urgent, so we’ve got a whole legal team on it. They’re working in shifts.

    • Thanks: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not)
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Congrefs no Law shall enact
    Using Force to keep Union intact;
    Nor shall States beggars be,
    Nor be serfs, but be free;
    Nor the Dollar by Magick be backed."

    , @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov’t now, that they can’t do very much on their own.

    About 20% of state and local expenditures are financed by federal appropriations. Of course the states and localities do things on their own. Fully 80% of all public employees work for state or local government. You can end this problem by phasing out federal grants over a period of a few years, allowing states to adjust or by replacing special purpose grants with general revenue sharing distributed by formula. Ditto state government financing of local government.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Achmed E. Newman

  102. anon[104] • Disclaimer says:

    The fallacy here is CIA’s standard subliminal message that change means violence. Right, don’t be Ukraine, be Czechoslovakia. No less a mind than George Kennan became a splittist. Part of his rationale was making the USA less of a menace to the world.

    But you’d have to combine dismemberment with Kevin Barrett’s idea up there of tribunals for CIA’s crimes against humanity and peace. Otherwise the Langley rump would just squirt everybody with variolabolarola till they get us nuked.

  103. The unspoken reality is that politicians on both sides don’t want to let go of the restraining influence of the others. Democrat politicians don’t want to actually do “climate action” and deal with the resulting 6\$ a gallon gas and Republican politicians don’t want to ban abortion and cause a baby boom among welfare mothers. The union allows them to virtue signal and then blame the other side for the signaling not being turned into action.

    • Agree: epebble
  104. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece

    They fought each other constantly between Olympic games and Persian invasions. The golden age of Athens was a lot shorter than Rome’s or ours for that reason.

    A rebirth of federalism is our best hope for continued Union, but that’s completely counter to Progressivism, which must save the whole world. The coming bankruptcy of the federal govt may make it all moot.

  105. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    “The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.”

    Such people would be disowned in my family.

  106. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    “the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside”

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc)

    I don’t think so, the white political divide is real. Urban whites align with smaller groups to outvote country whites. The rest is balance of power politics where the smaller groups exercise strength through block voting with one of the dominant blocks.

    My overarching comments for iSteve are as follows
    1) A scary portion of brutality and murders occur within the family. The proximity creates expectations and exaggerates differences. Dividing won’t fix this problem, only shift it. Better to find mechanisms to learn to live together. (stop crying to the courts to legislate is a start)
    2) when you say “things can’t get any worse”, nature takes it as a challenge.

  107. But Steve, you haven’t actually abolished power; the minor states ARE already being “meddled with”, are actually being dictated to. Its just they are being dictated to by the DC government. If we had control over our own national guard units (and perhaps our own regional currency) we’d be in a better position to negotiate with either the DC government or other foreign powers.

    • Agree: West reanimator
  108. The overwhelming majority of competent members of the U.S. military identify with Red States. So if (more likely when) Balkanization occurs, I suspect the Red State areas will be just fine in terms of deterring and repelling foreign militaries.

    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Huwhite Man


    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.
     
    Or for the Red States to just take them back, and exile all the Blue State inhabitants.

    Replies: @Huwhite Man

    , @Brutusale
    @Huwhite Man

    I have two acquaintances up here in the People's Commonwealth of Massachusetts with daughters attending military schools. Both have recently expressed concern that events over the past two years have made them nervous about the potential use of the military during an extended period of civil unrest, fearing that their daughters would be ordered to commit violence on their fellow Americans.

    Pollyanna that I am, I remind them where most of the enlisted men hail from and the shelf life of Lt. Muffy ordering her soldiers to open fire on civilians.

  109. @JMcG
    @Mike_from_SGV

    Wait til the Supreme Court forces them to re-fund it.

    Replies: @Gross Terry

    and if the state’s had control over their own currency and their own national guard units, the jewish ayatollahs could make as many rulings as they felt like being ignored.

  110. @PhysicistDave
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed E. Newman wrote:


    BTW, the first argument against my comment would logically be (what our Physicist Dave wrote) that we are mixed together right down to the level of voting precincts.
     
    Oh, I agree with you. Federalism is far from perfect, simply because nothing human is perfect.

    But federalism is far, far better than any known alternative.

    Replies: @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Oh, I agree with you. Federalism is far from perfect, simply because nothing human is perfect.

    But federalism is far, far better than any known alternative.

    My third overarching comment for Steve is that the Madison intersectional model of a republic.
    Madison was perhaps the original intersectionalist.

    The smaller the political unit, the more easily it will be captured by a specific interest group. Note how easily school boards are captured by the Teachers Union. As we scale up the political unit, two things happen
    1) more interest groups emerge that will compete with each other,
    2) more people find they have interests in more than one group.

    Madison conceived of political systems that would make permanent change hard, thus leveraging the constantly shifting interest blocks. He wasn’t far from modern chaos or game theory where decentralized decisions can achieve an equilibrium. At least he seemed to think of it at an intuitive level.

    Obviously ethnic or racial identarian politics poisons the body politic,(unless one’s ethnicity, race or sex is changeable 😉 . Idenitarianism is a path towardpolitical madness. Also poison are single points of control, such as capturing courts to replace the legislative process. The decentralization is what allows equilibria to be reached.

  111. Anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    OT but funny - Retired German Chancellor Angela Merkel, age 67, has been robbed whilst shopping in Berlin at a delicatessen grocery, no word on whether the thief might have been one of the 'Merkel's million migrants' she invited into Germany

    Merkel's bodyguard from the German Federal Criminal Police was unable to prevent the theft ... Her stolen wallet contained Merkel’s ID card, debit card, driver’s license, and cash ... Merkel went down to the police station to report the theft herself

    Quite a trophy for some ruffian in Germany to have Merkel's personal ID card framed on his wall

    https://rmx.news/article/merkel-robbed-while-shopping-in-berlin/

    https://i.4pcdn.org/pol/1646141573263.jpg

    Replies: @theMann, @Anonymous, @Alden

    In the macrocosm, Merkel robbed Die Deutsche Volk of their Fatherland.

  112. @White refugee in usa
    ethnonationalism will break the USA apart eventually. Only problem is that blacks are totally dependent on white Americans for any meager civilization that they possess right now. Whites could go their own way but blacks will resist with everything they have.

    Blacks without white people= Jamaica

    Hispanics without white people= central Mexico

    White people without minorities= Denmark

    Ethnonationalism= Destiny of USA

    Replies: @Joe Walker, @Charon, @Recently Based, @Slugsmagee

    Jamaica

    Jamaica is only as advanced as it is, courtesy of the British Empire. Mali is more like it, and even Mali benefited from the largesse of Europeans.

  113. @Colin Wright
    Speaking for myself, I have no intention of settling for only part of the United States.

    Replies: @Charon

    Don’t worry. You won’t get part of it.

  114. As recently as the 1960’s (my childhood), Americans could joyfully sing that “This land is my land…”, and since little kids don’t know anything about Woody Guthrie’s Communist leanings, we just sang it and meant it.

    No more.

    Now, this land is their land, a vast empty canvas upon which the world’s financiers can draw all their fantasies of big industrial parks full of busy, cheap foreign labor, making them rich.

    “If you travel 20 miles east of Columbus, Ohio, you’ll find 1,000 empty acres of land. It won’t look like much, but if you stop and look closely, you’ll see a “Field of Dreams,” the ground on which America’s future will be built. This is where Intel, the American company that helped build Silicon Valley, is going to build its \$20 billion semiconductor “mega site.” Up to eight state-of-the-art factories in one place. 10,000 new good-paying jobs.”

    Joe Biden, President, SOTU address 2022

    Also Joe Biden and the Democrats:

    The draft “America COMPETES Act of 2022” would allow foreigners to win an uncapped number of green cards by studying to become ordinary chemists, doctors, engineers, and statisticians — or accountants, tax experts, computer security experts, statisticians, ecologists, and many other types of professionals.

    So, by all means, let’s keep America as one big, beautiful office park for the world’s global financial interests, from sea to shining sea. After all, it could be worse; it could look like Beirut and now, Ukraine.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anon7

    “The business of America is business!” - President Calvin Coolidge (Republican) - January 1925

    "This Land Is Your Land" - Woody Guthrie (Socialist) - February 1940

  115. Forced myself to watch a gag worthy State of the Union. That used to be Steve’s job. Biden opened the vault and threw shovels full of money at every perceived slight in America. Framed by America’s two most powerfull women, he promised to spend our way to greatness. Something we used to earn. Harris, dressed in a brown suit that matched her skin color, looked like a stretched piece of leather over a skull. Strange way of holding her head. Pelosi looks skeletal, old skin over a hollowed eyed skull and the camera finding AOC, looking like a bobble head doll nodding in agreement as biden covered every fringe base. I thougth of the great scene in “Mars Attacks” when the Martian leader addresses the joint Houses of Congress and then vaporizes them all. Would we be worse off? And to paraphrase Roberto Duran, “no masks, no masks.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Buffalo Joe

    I am strongly tempted to listen to the audio because I am sure it is hilarious (I'm sure the Persians found it hilarious), but, yeah, the visual reminder that we are living in an away from keyboard vampire dystopia, and people close to or past a natural death crushed the young and healthy to extract one more year of deliberate evil and far-flung harm (and then to try to start a war), does call for vomit. Thing is, surely this was the least relevant iteration in a consistently irrelevant distraction. If the president wants to derail the Founders' simple enough order to report (say, in a letter) how things go, to sneak in an unmoderated campaign speech proposing legislation ideas, he should first have any option of getting legislation passed. Biden doesn't. May he die the next time he stumbles down the stairs.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buffalo Joe


    That used to be Steve’s job.
     
    It still is, Joe. It knocked him out on his ass, worse than a Kung Flu booster shot. He should be OK by end-o-bidness week.
  116. @Mr. Anon

    Let’s Not Break Up the USA
     
    That is of course a wise sentiment.

    However................a lot of people (like me) look at Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, Kamal Harris, Eric Swalwell, etc., and think: "I don't want to be governed by that. And I don't want to be governed by anybody who would vote for that. It's not an unreasonable sentiment.

    When your government spends most of its time vilifying you, blaming you for everything, making vague noises about extracting reparations from you, silencing your opinions, outlawing your political views and your ability to politically organize in your own defense - when it craps on your beliefs, and promotes the most appalling degeneracy (for example, appointing dudes in dresses and deviant transvestites with dog-f**king fetishes to responsible government offices and encouraging young people to mutilate and chemically castrate themselves), then national divorce begins to look like your best option.


    Whether you blame poor Ukraine’s current agony most on Russia’s obvious aggressions or NATO’s subtle machinations is a matter of opinion, but the lesson is clear: If you can avoid it, don’t be Ukraine.
     
    What if the alternative to being Ukraine in 2022 is being Cambodia in 1976?

    Replies: @Glaivester, @Charon, @guest007

    national divorce begins to look like your best option.

    Do you remember the signs in the mostly peaceful protests of 2020? “We don’t want Biden–We want Revenge!”

    You’re not going to get an amicable divorce with people like that. Not even sure you should want one.

  117. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    Everyone knows the US has the best real estate on earth. Two oceans on either side, weak neighbors to the north and south (which might as well be annexed), plus the Great Lakes and the mighty Mississippi, among other geographical blessings.

    But barring a revolution in DC, or major devolution of power to the states, of course we would be better off in a “divorced” nation. We cannot live with Democrats.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Nathan
    @AndrewR

    Mexico is not as weak as most people think. It has a fairly large conventional army and the technical ability to acquire nuclear weapons if it wanted to.

    If you think you can't live with Democrats, wait until you have to live with the PRI. Better learn enough Spanish to pay a bribe and hope you hold a currency that you can pay bribes with.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  118. @houston 1992
    @PaceLaw

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigniorage

    USA is gliding on the profits of our old reserve currency status. The engine is out of fuel , but it can still glide for a long period.
    Reserve currency has allowed us "deficit financing without tears" but that, too, will pass. And given our recklessness perhaps sooner than we think.

    USA loses respect:
    India voted neutral on RU sanctions despite all the jobs, tech we have outscored to them. So, too, did UAE take a neutral stance. Mexico has declined to sanction RU.
    https://www.cnn.com/europe/live-news/ukraine-russia-putin-news-03-01-22/h_16ea9365f2eb3f81a9b5c09f85de66b9

    Brazil's primary concern is securing fertilizer supplies and they appear lukewarm on sanctions.

    Two weeks from now, Putin will have secured the Eastern Ukraine, a wider land bridge to Crimea, and will hold Kiev. Yes, the invasion has aspects of a debacle, but he will have secured some negotiating chips, and I suspect that we will accept his terms of a neutral Ukraine rump state with the eastern regions being annexed.

    The net result is further loss of credibility for the USA, and a migration as fast as possible away from SWIFT, and reserve currency status that we have had since 1939. It will be hard for USA's "advanced services economy" as Nat Review's Lowry described it, to pay its way on its intrinsic merits.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JMcG, @Mr. Anon

    A couple of Russian banks have been spared from being kicked off of SWIFT: Gazprombank and Sberbank.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-03-01/eu-agrees-to-block-russian-banks-from-swift-sparing-key-firms

    Sberbank is a huge concern that has it’s fingers into everything, and has recently been branching out to become something akin to Google or Amazon. It was a major backer of Russia’s “Sputnik V” COVID vaccine. Sperbank is run by a guy named Herman Gref. Who is Herman Gref?

    https://www.weforum.org/press/2021/02/world-economic-forum-appoints-new-member-to-board-of-trustees-4c1068e22b/

    Yes – of course – he is also a FoK (Friend of Klaus).

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  119. @Anonymous
    @John White

    Bit on the nose to make your pseudonym for this comment "John White"

    Replies: @fish

    Notorious sock Tiny’s Duck would have been too obvious so Tiny’s employed a new sub-sock for his usual retardery.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @fish

    I think he should have used the pseudonym Johnson White to stay in theme with penis related names. He started as Tiny Du(i)ck, presumably to mock the un-manliness of SJWs, switched to Ebony Obelisk to make fun of their cuckold lust for Black sexuality, Johnson would provide better continuity.

  120. @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote:


    New, multicultural “Americans” are a hollow entity. What is “American” about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or “advanced” among them don’t see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being “them”, or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.
     
    You don't live in the US, do you, BK?

    It's more complicated than you claim.

    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as "American" as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It's true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large. Furthermore, it is also true that Europeans tend to acculturate fastest, followed it seems by East Asians.

    But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We -- or rather our elites -- are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly White, ruling elite.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Rex Little, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon, and American culture no longer has a lot of gravity. Oh sure, Team Brown will take the video games, the Dodge Chargers, the twerking, the R&B/gospel National Anfum. But they have no interest in Team White’s Adam Smith, Locke’s Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays. Actually they do have an interest in them: they want them tossed into history’s trash can.

    You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law."

    I've worked with a few Jewish guys over the years, and they're fine. I'm not overly paranoid about Jewish influence. But your comment is spot-on and big picture.* Most Jewish people are just trying to get through life, like us normal people. Babylon Inc. does seem to have Subversion Special Forces units embeded in Western media, education, and law.

    *Steve's not big picture.

    , @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.”

    And strong non-Jewish influence as well.

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    “But they have no interest in Team White’s Adam Smith, Locke’s Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays”

    Neither does Team White on average.

    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.

    Replies: @res, @Nicholas Stix

    , @PhysicistDave
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:


    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.
     
    That's true, but there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in political movements in general -- including libertarianism and conservatism.

    And of course there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in physics, medicine, etc.

    I think it can be explained simply by the fact that all of these fields tend to attract people with higher IQs, and (Ashkenazi) Jews do have, on average, higher IQs.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

  121. @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.
     
    The danger is that the newly formed Republic of Woke (i.e. the seceded states of California, Oregon, and Washington), would turn to China for protection, ultimately concluding a military alliance with them. That would given China a military presence on the North American mainland.

    I know - it sounds farfetched.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to certain British Chieftans who invited German mercenaries to their islands to help them fight their wars, that their country would soon come to be ruled by them, speak their language, and that virtually every place name in "England" (Land of the Angles) would end up being germanic instead of celtic.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to the Greek city states that invited the Romans into the Peloponnese to adjudicate their disputes that they would end up as provinces ruled by Rome for the next six hundred years or so.

    Despite what Francis Fukuyama said, history doesn't end.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @epebble

    There is a small part of me that would enjoy seeing that happen, because the Chinese would undertake construction projects with dirty diesel and coal equipment.

    It would be fun to watch the green Wokesters complain and protest about environmental impact, only to have the Woke government in San Francisco shut it down by saying that the Chinese are not white, and therefore cannot possibly harm the environment.

  122. Anonymous[412] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    It is not a question of intent, but of historical inevitability.

    Of course there is no "scientific" explanation, but I'll use analogies.

    From the beginning to the assassination of JFK, the US was basically a nation. It was founded by Anglo-Protestants with some other NW Europeans thrown in, and later with other Europeans added (which caused friction), but they've more or less assimilated. Blacks were not Americans, but they were an American national minority.

    When Churchill and Roosevelt met to sign the Atlantic charter in 1941, they clearly indicated that Americans and British share the essential common heritage.

    In the past 60 or so years the US has been transformed beyond recognition. This is not a nation; there is not an American people anymore; various other visibly different groups (Muslims, Chinese, Indians, ...) are not supposedly new Americans.

    When newly arrived non-European immigrants arrive, they may pledge the allegiance, but they are not the new "we" who will consider Washington, Franklin, Lincoln, .... as their historical heritage & identity. I know it's a bit funny when Italian-Americans say "we" and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.

    New, multicultural "Americans" are a hollow entity. What is "American" about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or "advanced" among them don't see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being "them", or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.

    In other words, multicultural Americans don't have much in common with historical Americans- and this is a definite divide no one can bridge.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous, @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    A lot of old stock Anglo Americans consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Anonymous

    And an old stock Anglo-American considered an ADOS marriage material. Weird that Steve hasn't talked about the new Supreme Court pick. Maybe because he can't say anything bad about her?

    , @Truth
    @Anonymous

    You mean a lot of old Stock "white nationalists" consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  123. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    Your reading of history is weak. The Soviet military didn’t even allow Hungary or Czechoslovakia to have real independence. Then eventually they were forced to allow even the SSRs to be free. They couldn’t even put down the Chechens the first time they rebelled.

    The US military grows weaker by the day. It turns out that openly glorifying black trans women and demonizing white men isn’t great for combat readiness.

    And the dollar and economy are set for collapse. At some point, it won’t matter one lick what some pathetic affirmative action military officers in DC think.

  124. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    A solid majority of powerful, anti-white people in the US are non-Hispanic white goyim. They aren’t going to let you have your delusional ethnostate purged of everyone you deem a “looter.”

    In reality, unlike wignats’ Talmudic false dichotomy of white vs non-white, the real division in the US is anti-white vs non-anti-white.

  125. Sailer:

    One ill I didn’t address then is that of foreign interference. Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    One of the main reasons, and maybe the most important one, for moving from the Articles of Confederation (1776) to the Constitution (1787), was the fear that the American states would become the playthings of European powers. The founders could easily compare united UK, France, Spain, to fractured Germany and Italy, for example. Italy in particular was almost continually cursed by wars, as the contending major powers took over or influenced one statelet or another.

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

    Even without external meddling, a formerly American territory of many small states would be tempted to petty wars motivated by raw ambition or fanatical ideology. A demagogue in the State of Washington, for example, might try to conquer Idaho in order to impose transgenderism, reverse discrimination, and abolition of the police.

    • Replies: @Gross Terry
    @New Dealer


    A demagogue in the State of Washington, for example, might try to conquer Idaho in order to impose transgenderism, reverse discrimination, and abolition of the police.
     
    Of course, under regional disarmament and dependence on the DC government, they are able to impose these things without incurring any sort of cost.

    Personally, I think America should be a Union of Regions, each consisting of its respective metropole and its surrounding area. Like the Northern Midwest nation (as for a name, I suggest Greater Wisconsin) would have as its capital Chicago, with its own central bank, treasury, semi-professional milita and standing green water navy. The Federal government would exist to maintain a national blue water navy, a modest airforce for external threats, and be a way of orchestrating disputes between the sovereign Regions.
    , @Barnard
    @New Dealer

    You have a good point, but in the event of a national breakup, there is no reason to think state borders would hold. The people of Eastern Washington, to use your example, would see themselves as having much more in common with the people of Idaho than with those in the Seattle metro area. I am somewhat surprised the Greater Idaho movement hasn't spread beyond Oregon into the Eastern part of Washington already.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

  126. Most potential problems that might happen in the future were foreseen by the founders of this country. They already had two thousand years of history to look back on and were well versed in the Greek and Roman classics. They attempted to build safeguards into the Constitution to prevent these potential problems, including dissolution of the union. I am a direct descendant of Isabella Pendleton. She was the sister of Edmund Pendleton, one of three Virginia delegates to the first Continental Congress alongside Patrick Henry and George Washington. Edmund Pendleton wrote the following in 1801:

    “Union is certainly the basis of our political prosperity, and this can only be preserved by confining, with precision, the federal government to the exercise of powers clearly required by the general interest or respecting foreign nations and the state governments to objects of a local nature; because the states exhibit such varieties of character and interests that a consolidated general government would be in perpetual conflict with state interests, from its want of local knowledge or from a prevalence of local prejudice or interest, so as certainly to produce civil war and disunion.”

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Mark G.


    “Union is certainly the basis of our political prosperity, and this can only be preserved by confining, with precision, the federal government to the exercise of powers clearly required by the general interest or respecting foreign nations and the state governments to objects of a local nature; because the states exhibit such varieties of character and interests that a consolidated general government would be in perpetual conflict with state interests, from its want of local knowledge or from a prevalence of local prejudice or interest, so as certainly to produce civil war and disunion.”
     
    Terrific quote MarkG--thanks. Suggest your Grand**n Uncle Edmond was a wise on-the-ball fellow.

    You don't see such wisdom from the plethora of babbling elite "experts" who feast on America today.
  127. Something’s gon’ need to change Steve; your peeps are losing it.

    https://worldstarhiphop.com/videos/video.php?v=wshhQ7v3GxkaP4m2UGkP

  128. @Wilkey
    A breakup may eventually happen (countries always do, eventually), but it will first be preceded by severe economic decline.

    Once the USA loses the ability to finance the welfare state with deficit spending a whole lot of disruption is going to follow. Much of the current madness is driven by people who think the government should be able to finance anything without needing to levy taxes to pay for it. The collapse of that system will cause further madness.

    What happens then is anyone's guess, but the breakup of the United States will probably result from various factions fighting over the carcass.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Alfa158

    I don’t know why severe economic decline should lead to breakup. We’ve been there before (Great Depression) and wound up adding states and territories afterward.

    The future is very hard to predict, but human nature is very consistent. The entire world wants a generous welfare state without actually paying for it.

  129. Trudeau = Honecker
    Biden = Andropov
    ??? = Ceaucescu

  130. We should think twice, and then we should secede.

    I would rather go down fighting than simpering like a Canadian, Australian, or Oceanian.

  131. But it is really crucial to admit that the real assault on Western Civilization has come from within. Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are (((Western))) inventions.

    No foreigners have done this to us.

    We — or rather (((our elites))) — are doing this to ourselves.

    The fact that too much immigration is not a good idea must not blind us to the blunt fact that the real enemy of our civilization is the, overwhelmingly (((White,))) ruling elite.

    That’s more like it.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  132. @Buffalo Joe
    Forced myself to watch a gag worthy State of the Union. That used to be Steve's job. Biden opened the vault and threw shovels full of money at every perceived slight in America. Framed by America's two most powerfull women, he promised to spend our way to greatness. Something we used to earn. Harris, dressed in a brown suit that matched her skin color, looked like a stretched piece of leather over a skull. Strange way of holding her head. Pelosi looks skeletal, old skin over a hollowed eyed skull and the camera finding AOC, looking like a bobble head doll nodding in agreement as biden covered every fringe base. I thougth of the great scene in "Mars Attacks" when the Martian leader addresses the joint Houses of Congress and then vaporizes them all. Would we be worse off? And to paraphrase Roberto Duran, "no masks, no masks."

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Achmed E. Newman

    I am strongly tempted to listen to the audio because I am sure it is hilarious (I’m sure the Persians found it hilarious), but, yeah, the visual reminder that we are living in an away from keyboard vampire dystopia, and people close to or past a natural death crushed the young and healthy to extract one more year of deliberate evil and far-flung harm (and then to try to start a war), does call for vomit. Thing is, surely this was the least relevant iteration in a consistently irrelevant distraction. If the president wants to derail the Founders’ simple enough order to report (say, in a letter) how things go, to sneak in an unmoderated campaign speech proposing legislation ideas, he should first have any option of getting legislation passed. Biden doesn’t. May he die the next time he stumbles down the stairs.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @J.Ross

    J. nice comment. Still gag worthy address. Stay safe.

  133. @New Dealer
    Sailer:

    One ill I didn’t address then is that of foreign interference. Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.
     
    One of the main reasons, and maybe the most important one, for moving from the Articles of Confederation (1776) to the Constitution (1787), was the fear that the American states would become the playthings of European powers. The founders could easily compare united UK, France, Spain, to fractured Germany and Italy, for example. Italy in particular was almost continually cursed by wars, as the contending major powers took over or influenced one statelet or another.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/16/Italian_States_in_1789.png/603px-Italian_States_in_1789.png

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
     
    Even without external meddling, a formerly American territory of many small states would be tempted to petty wars motivated by raw ambition or fanatical ideology. A demagogue in the State of Washington, for example, might try to conquer Idaho in order to impose transgenderism, reverse discrimination, and abolition of the police.

    Replies: @Gross Terry, @Barnard

    A demagogue in the State of Washington, for example, might try to conquer Idaho in order to impose transgenderism, reverse discrimination, and abolition of the police.

    Of course, under regional disarmament and dependence on the DC government, they are able to impose these things without incurring any sort of cost.

    Personally, I think America should be a Union of Regions, each consisting of its respective metropole and its surrounding area. Like the Northern Midwest nation (as for a name, I suggest Greater Wisconsin) would have as its capital Chicago, with its own central bank, treasury, semi-professional milita and standing green water navy. The Federal government would exist to maintain a national blue water navy, a modest airforce for external threats, and be a way of orchestrating disputes between the sovereign Regions.

    • Agree: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  134. This is by far the best analysis of the Russia/Ukraine debacle I have seen.

    Well worth the listen.

    https://tomwoods.com/ep-2074-russia-ukraine-and-nato/

    • Replies: @Exile
    @Bill Jones

    As libertarians go, Tom Woods in one of the best. Woods, Mercer and Hoppe (the paleo/realist vein) are the ones who make the most sense of the lot. Not enough sense, but way ahead of others.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  135. Civic nationalism is dead. It is not coming back.

    The revisionist elements within the territorial American corpse have made it impossible – Jews, Coloreds of Person, hard-left Whiteys and sexual deviants.

    They’re the ones engaged in social brinksmanship and “our way or die, Nazi.” Whites for better or worse tried to compromise, carve out space, mediate and get along. Then we tried moving away from them. None of it works.

    By every reasonable definition of what it takes to make a polity from the Greeks on down, America is not a viable single polity and hasn’t been for decades. I think it was already too late in 1992 when Pat Buchanan won only 1 state primary with the closest thing to a Sailer Strategy (some Sam Francis too).

    The fact that this was considered Neanderthal revanchist Nazism told us that the institutions had already been marched through.

    Separation or subjugation are the options on the table. Ugly reality.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  136. Armored warfare is not worse than extinction.

    • Agree: Coemgen
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Ben tillman


    Armored warfare is not worse than extinction.
     
    It's also better than the global digital slave plantation.
  137. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike_from_SGV

    Mike, along with Mr. McG's point, I'll add the main reason that this stuff doesn't happen, or if it happens, it doesn't "take" - not for long.

    It's the money, stupid! No, wait, it's the FLOW of the money, stupid! (not you, personally, of course -- it's an expression) Because unaware American imbeciles back a hundred years ago let Amendment XVI and income tax laws come into being, along with American imbeciles right now who should freaking know better never fighting it, the flow of the money is from the People to the Feds, and then to the States or back to the people ... if you are nice and be good.

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov't now, that they can't do very much on their own. It takes more guts, anyway, as in having to put up with residents and other politicians noting that YOU are the reason we don't have our (cookies and milk) money! How are you going to withhold personal income tax money from your residents from the Feds?

    That's why Peak Stupidity's coming proposal for an Amendment XXVIII - that's 28, errr, veintiocho, for those of you in Pico Rivera - is so important.


    All money for the Federal Gov't is to be raised by the various States, in the manner they see fit. The monies to be transferred by each of the various States shall be determined by its proportion of the US population as determined by the most recent census multiplied by the most recent year's national budget expenditure.

    All debt incurred in the national budget shall be covered by the Senators and Congrefsmen of the previous session and their estates; those not making whole their portion of the deficit budget will be subject to drawing and quartering or povnd-me-in-the-aff gaol.
     

    Peak Stupidity is still working on some of the wording and olde-timey speffing. This is urgent, so we've got a whole legal team on it. They're working in shifts.

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @Art Deco

    “Congrefs no Law shall enact
    Using Force to keep Union intact;
    Nor shall States beggars be,
    Nor be serfs, but be free;
    Nor the Dollar by Magick be backed.”

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  138. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    The alternative is death. It’s a simple choice.

  139. @Thea
    @Zero Philosopher

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    Replies: @Barnard, @AndrewR, @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack P

    I commented when visiting Florida in the heat of summer was “how did the original settlers handle this?” For the Spanish maybe it was not as bad, but it amazes me that English and Scots adapted well enough to stay in Florida long term.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Barnard

    The original Florida Crackers were a hard boiled bunch. I’m in awe of them but wouldn’t want to be them.

    The book Strawberry Girl is about a young girl early settler. Not a bad read.

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Barnard

    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  140. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike_from_SGV

    Mike, along with Mr. McG's point, I'll add the main reason that this stuff doesn't happen, or if it happens, it doesn't "take" - not for long.

    It's the money, stupid! No, wait, it's the FLOW of the money, stupid! (not you, personally, of course -- it's an expression) Because unaware American imbeciles back a hundred years ago let Amendment XVI and income tax laws come into being, along with American imbeciles right now who should freaking know better never fighting it, the flow of the money is from the People to the Feds, and then to the States or back to the people ... if you are nice and be good.

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov't now, that they can't do very much on their own. It takes more guts, anyway, as in having to put up with residents and other politicians noting that YOU are the reason we don't have our (cookies and milk) money! How are you going to withhold personal income tax money from your residents from the Feds?

    That's why Peak Stupidity's coming proposal for an Amendment XXVIII - that's 28, errr, veintiocho, for those of you in Pico Rivera - is so important.


    All money for the Federal Gov't is to be raised by the various States, in the manner they see fit. The monies to be transferred by each of the various States shall be determined by its proportion of the US population as determined by the most recent census multiplied by the most recent year's national budget expenditure.

    All debt incurred in the national budget shall be covered by the Senators and Congrefsmen of the previous session and their estates; those not making whole their portion of the deficit budget will be subject to drawing and quartering or povnd-me-in-the-aff gaol.
     

    Peak Stupidity is still working on some of the wording and olde-timey speffing. This is urgent, so we've got a whole legal team on it. They're working in shifts.

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @Art Deco

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov’t now, that they can’t do very much on their own.

    About 20% of state and local expenditures are financed by federal appropriations. Of course the states and localities do things on their own. Fully 80% of all public employees work for state or local government. You can end this problem by phasing out federal grants over a period of a few years, allowing states to adjust or by replacing special purpose grants with general revenue sharing distributed by formula. Ditto state government financing of local government.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Art Deco

    A lot of what the states do (education, social services, Medicaid) is required and/or controlled by federal law and bureaucracy. That's one reason much of the money comes from Washington. Clinton started throwing money, with strings attached, at local law enforcement.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Art Deco

    Really, are you sure about that, Art? Are you counting the influence of Federal money on universities in the form of guaranteed (US Gov-backed) loans, Federal money sent in grants for lower ed, Federal involvement in EVERY DAMN THING? Your idea won't work, because there will ALWAYS be strings and threats attached to the handouts.

    My Amendment stands as it is. What do you, fancy yourself a Founding Father, do ya?

  141. @JimDandy
    When I was a little boy, my concept of apocalypse was clearly defined and absolute--My Parents Getting Divorced. I lived in perpetual prayer that it would never happen. But it did. And whattya know--my quality of life improved, dramatically. Citing current events in Ukraine is reductive. Think Czech and Slovakia.

    Replies: @Anon, @Thelma Ringbaum

    This matricuck actually believes divorce can improve a child’s quality of life, against all statistical evidence.

    Proof again that all of this separatist bullcrap is motivated by feminism and the hatred of male authority.

    All I want to know is: what went wrong? What made everybody so afraid of the Father?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anon

    Jim Dandy wrote about his personal experience. You are just repeating. the screeds of the never married childless nerds who hate women in general.

  142. @New Dealer
    Sailer:

    One ill I didn’t address then is that of foreign interference. Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.
     
    One of the main reasons, and maybe the most important one, for moving from the Articles of Confederation (1776) to the Constitution (1787), was the fear that the American states would become the playthings of European powers. The founders could easily compare united UK, France, Spain, to fractured Germany and Italy, for example. Italy in particular was almost continually cursed by wars, as the contending major powers took over or influenced one statelet or another.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/16/Italian_States_in_1789.png/603px-Italian_States_in_1789.png

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
     
    Even without external meddling, a formerly American territory of many small states would be tempted to petty wars motivated by raw ambition or fanatical ideology. A demagogue in the State of Washington, for example, might try to conquer Idaho in order to impose transgenderism, reverse discrimination, and abolition of the police.

    Replies: @Gross Terry, @Barnard

    You have a good point, but in the event of a national breakup, there is no reason to think state borders would hold. The people of Eastern Washington, to use your example, would see themselves as having much more in common with the people of Idaho than with those in the Seattle metro area. I am somewhat surprised the Greater Idaho movement hasn’t spread beyond Oregon into the Eastern part of Washington already.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Barnard

    For a long time, there's been considerable support among both New Yorkers and NYCers to separate from each other. The only real problem seems to be that neither one wants Albany.

  143. @Mike_from_SGV
    A formal breakup may be impractical, but we could go a long way toward a de-facto breakup if conservative governments would be hardnosed about certain things. For example I read that Wyoming just killed the Department of Sexual Twistedness Studies, or something, in its state colleges. That kind of thing should happen a lot more often.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @res

    • Replies: @Exile
    @res

    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because "I still believe in limited government" shows why we can't have a united America.

    One side doesn't believe in limited government, they believe in clubbing guys to death with it.

    This poor sap doesn't know how to take his own side even when he has the votes to make policies that protect his kids.

    The neocon conservative-libertarian fusion we've seen from Reagan to the Tea Parties amounts to unilateral White political disarmament.

    Whites won't dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don't be shocked to see more McMicheals cases, more Chauvins, more BLM and antifa until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

  144. After reading this article, and his output on Ukraine, I just don’t think Steve’s a big picture guy. He’s a sports guy, a sports statistics guy, a pop culture guy, a badminton guy, a hair guy, a black crime guy, a golf course landscape architecture guy, an architecture guy, a gay guy, an IQ guy. Big picture? No.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @SunBakedSuburb

    So what is the big picture?

  145. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    Ports that only served their host states would be entry into limited markets.

    Deals would be made, they might provide more profit than benefits. BAU.

  146. @Thea
    @Zero Philosopher

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    Replies: @Barnard, @AndrewR, @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack P

    Halloween through mid April is a decent time to be in South Florida, no A/C needed, but keep a fan or two around. Hurricane likelihood: low.

    Coincidentally, mid spring through mid fall is a nice time to be in the midwest or northeast. Northern Michigan in particular is heavenly in the summer.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @AndrewR

    I lived in Palm Beach County and can count only a few days that life without AC was comfortable over all my years there. If you can do it, then hats off. You are stronger than I ever was.

  147. @res
    @Mike_from_SGV

    It looks like that Wyoming situation is far from a done deal. It will be an interesting case study to watch what happens.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20220301021243/https://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/senate-vote-to-cut-uw-gender-studies-funding-prompts-debate-about-legality-lawmakers-role/article_fdf1abc4-4adb-5772-95f0-551959bc6a23.html

    Replies: @Exile

    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because “I still believe in limited government” shows why we can’t have a united America.

    One side doesn’t believe in limited government, they believe in clubbing guys to death with it.

    This poor sap doesn’t know how to take his own side even when he has the votes to make policies that protect his kids.

    The neocon conservative-libertarian fusion we’ve seen from Reagan to the Tea Parties amounts to unilateral White political disarmament.

    Whites won’t dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don’t be shocked to see more McMicheals cases, more Chauvins, more BLM and antifa until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Exile

    Moreover, the bill itself would limit what the government can do. He’s a dumbass.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile

    Gee, freedom of association is a bitch, isn't it? Let's not even mention the anarchistic Bill of Rights, dubbed by a Brit of the day as "a conspiracy against government".


    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because “I still believe in limited government” shows why we can’t have a united America...

    ...until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.
     

    A bill refusing funds to a rogue department of a state university sounds awfully libertarian to me.

    Whites won’t dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don’t be shocked to see more McMicheals cases
     
    Again, the right to carry a weapon in public for self-defence is the libertarian position, "constitutional carry" even more so. You want to go back to the old-time Southern gun control, when concealment was a crime?

    Competent races don't need affirmative action or other government "programs" to thrive.

    You come across as yet another SPLC troll who detects a fault line among the otherwise unified commenters here-- in this case, weak vs strong government action-- then mocks one side while paying lip service to the other. Divide and conquer.

    Replies: @Exile

  148. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon, and American culture no longer has a lot of gravity. Oh sure, Team Brown will take the video games, the Dodge Chargers, the twerking, the R&B/gospel National Anfum. But they have no interest in Team White's Adam Smith, Locke's Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays. Actually they do have an interest in them: they want them tossed into history's trash can.

    You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus, @PhysicistDave

    “There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.”

    I’ve worked with a few Jewish guys over the years, and they’re fine. I’m not overly paranoid about Jewish influence. But your comment is spot-on and big picture.* Most Jewish people are just trying to get through life, like us normal people. Babylon Inc. does seem to have Subversion Special Forces units embeded in Western media, education, and law.

    *Steve’s not big picture.

  149. @Glaivester
    "Steve Sailer finally comes out and admits that his halcyon Boomer vision of America should be preserved on paper even if it's totally dysfunctional and tyrannical in practice.

    The logical end point of Sailer's civnattery is preservation of a failed multiracial nation for the sake of empire and status quo."

    https://gab.com/kingofallnads/posts/107885506461821438

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    In addition, he’s not big picture.

  150. res says:
    @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Some numbers on that.

    The ruble had been fairly stable for a year or more at 70-some to the dollar. It is now at 110 to the dollar.
    https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/fx/USDRUB/historical-prices

    A significant change to be sure, but what interests me is what happens next. If the market is not being interfered with (is it?) people stand to make/lose significant money depending on how this goes.

    This site has a useful synopsis.
    https://tradingeconomics.com/russia/currency

    The Russian ruble remained under pressure at the 110 per dollar mark on Wednesday, having fallen as low as 120 earlier in the week, as stabilizing measures were not enough to counteract a series of Western sanctions against Russia for invading Ukraine. Western allies largely limited Russian entities’ ability to do business internationally after agreeing to remove key Russian banks from the SWIFT interbank system and freeze the assets of Russia’s central bank. The US also dealt another blow against Moscow by barring Americans from doing business with Russia’s central bank, ministry of finance and its sovereign wealth fund. The Bank of Russia responded by raising its key policy rate to 20% from 9.5%, ordering export-led businesses to sell 80% of their foreign currencies and banning foreigners from selling Russian securities to stabilize its currency.

  151. @PhysicistDave
    Steve,

    Your current column does not mention the most important point, which I know you have made in the past: the US military will not tolerate a breakup of the USA.

    In the abstract, I myself favor secession: city states worked pretty well in ancient Greece (until Macedonia intervened), in ancient Sumer (until Akkad intervened), in Renaissance Italy, etc.

    But as a practical matter it cannot happen, because, as your current column mentions, the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside and also because the military will exercise a veto.

    Of course, since you and I live in California, there is also the little matter that an independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area and their many sympathizers in SoCal. We need Mississippi and Alabama to balance our moonbats.

    Of course, as a resident of the Central Valley, I can hope that if California secedes, the new country would then allow the Central Valley to secede.

    But somehow, I think they might not.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anonymous, @Marquis, @S. Anonyia, @Ralph L, @AndrewR, @turtle

    independent California means we are governed by the loons in the Bay Area

    Not bloody likely, mate. Best thing would be to dissolve the legislature in Sacramento, abolish the 0ffice of “Governor,” and let we, the people, live our own lives.

    Here in western Riverside Co., where I live, we are not interested in what they do in the Bay Area, or Even in (total) Los(s) Angeles. Please just leave us alone, political busybodies.

  152. res says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Here is the nicest place I have found to show the ruble behavior since the mid-2000s.

    Click on "All" to see it back to 2006.

    Playing around with the interface shows that, during that time, the ruble has never been worth much more than 4 cents. (Note that the vertical axis does NOT start at zero!)

    And it has been under 2 cents most of the time since 2015.

    For the last couple years it has been generally running under 1 1/2 cents.

    Yeah, it has fallen recently, but the news media saying that it is now under 1 cent gives people the impression that it has recently fallen from a "reasonable" value, say a dollar or so, to below a cent.

    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.

    Replies: @res, @Paperback Writer

    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.

    Right.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_ruble

    The ruble’s exchange rate versus the U.S. dollar depreciated significantly from \$1 = 125 RUR in January 1992 to approximately \$1 = 6,000 RUR when the currency was redenominated in 1998.

    BTW, that’s what it looks like when an economy breaks (or is destroyed/looted?). Hope it never happens here.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @res

    One of the key factors in South Vietnam's ultimate collapse was the hyperinflation that wrecked the country in 1973-1974. "Looting" was an appropriate word for what happened there, too. The bigwigs fled Saigon with bars of gold smuggled away. WWII-era China underwent hyperinflation, too, and that broke the KMT for good more than anything: a lot of the notorious corruption was rooted in that, when combined with Chiang's pre-existing limited ability to control subordinates. It took a fresh restart in Taiwan plus pressure from Communist land reform for that to change.

    So, hyperinflation is, to put on an intellectual level appropriate for our bien-pensants: a *really* bad thing. As for commentators here, the point I'm trying to make is strong, stable polities are defined by their ability to weather such crises, and that not everybody has that margin of error. Looks can be deceiving: the US was a lot more durable than the USSR was in the 1970s and 1980s.

    But what about now? Can't say that the PRC is in a similar position of only having the military as its saving grace to justify itself to its own citizens, unlike the USSR.

    Yugoslavia was able to avoid South Vietnam's fate with the oil shocks in the 1970s, but that was entirely dependent on NATO loans, as the 1980s showed. I can't avoid feeling a similar vibe with what the Fed is doing.

  153. @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    If you have lost the UAE, then you have lost Mexico.

    All the important Western nations have sanctioned Russia on a level never seen before. The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @PhysicistDave, @res, @Ben tillman

    Buy low; sell high.

    • Replies: @res
    @Ben tillman

    The interesting question is: where are all of the "Buy low; sell high" people on the buy side?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  154. @Achmed E. Newman
    I haven't read the column yet but just did a quick ctrl-f (in the iPad sense) for the word "Federalism". Nada. How 'bout in the comments here? Nada.

    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called 'em "States", and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov't.

    The Founders of this country were smarter than most. Even though this country was run entirely by White Men, a big majority of British extraction, with real Federalism again, this ultra-diverse Tower of Babel might be able to hang together. The Founders created the Federal Gov't for the main purpose of a common defense. That's all it SHOULD be for!

    There is far too much diversity at this point for this place to stay together as it is. I would not want to be part of the Totalitarian Police State, a Yugoslavia on steroids, that it's going to take to keep it together. (That's what it's been becoming for a long while, accelerated by the problems of the immigration invasion and "civil rights".)

    I want no part in BEING together with many of these people period. It's not just the policies but the fact that my labor is being stolen for the use of those with opinions and lifestyles anathema to me that makes me want out. Simple solution: Devolve the power back to the State and people where it belongs, per Amendment X.

    One of the silver linings to have come out of the Covid PanicFest was the visibility of, and a modicum of respect for, Federalism again. Go Gators! Go DeSantis!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Dmon

    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called ’em “States”, and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov’t.

    Thanks Achmed.

    I had an unwritten comment, with a similar thrust–in my head in reaction to Steve’s “World Cup” post. The Brits indeed had evolved–over time and with some big mistakes–at least a semi-reasonable of handling the natural “diversity” within their kingdom.

    And our founders–no idiots–were both well aware of that, but also of the tyranny that the central state could dish out. The founders knew that any peaceful and voluntary association in a large nation–especially with the variation among the various Anglo-Saxon and Germanic peoples that were the polity, and with our large regional variations–required federalism. People would locally govern themselves in their own states according to their own norms, values and circumstances. And the federal state would handle the common stuff–mostly defense, keeping the foreigners out.

    There’s absolutely no reason the good folks in Pigsknuckle, Arkansas, must have the same norms and the same laws as in Baghdad By the Bay. Each could–in theory–live according their community norms. But this is simply an anathema–hate!–to minoritarians, and they absolute love central state power to make ordinary Americans–whom they have contempt for- behave as they wish.

    Our “cosmopolitan globalist” elite are not only the most parochial “cosmopolitans, and not only have the most stupid and toxic ideology in minoritarianism, but they also have the most deformed and toxic personalities–incredibly obnoxious and aggressive imposing minoritarianism upon everyone else. In a word–*assholes*.

    That’s our problem. That’s what motivates secession.

    • Replies: @res
    @AnotherDad

    The best part of that is how much of it is done under the flag of "tolerance."

  155. @Wilkey
    A breakup may eventually happen (countries always do, eventually), but it will first be preceded by severe economic decline.

    Once the USA loses the ability to finance the welfare state with deficit spending a whole lot of disruption is going to follow. Much of the current madness is driven by people who think the government should be able to finance anything without needing to levy taxes to pay for it. The collapse of that system will cause further madness.

    What happens then is anyone's guess, but the breakup of the United States will probably result from various factions fighting over the carcass.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Alfa158

    I think you are right about there being more of a collapse than a breakup. A problem with a formal breakup is that there aren’t enough viable geographical areas where the cleave lines would occur. People can talk about a Red state like Texas seceding, but what would do you do with Austin, Houston and the southernmost areas that are effectively areas of Mexico that happen to be under US administration?
    The hypothetical maps showing a northwestern White, conservative new country are already obsolete. Washington, Oregon and soon Idaho are Blue states with dissident rural Red areas.
    You can look at many areas of the US similarly and see there are almost no equivalents of modern Mason-Dixon lines along which you could divide it up.
    As the country becomes more racially, politically and economically fragmented and the central economic power of being able to print Monopoly money declines we will see more chaos. Independence of a sort will manifest itself as small areas continuing to work inside a common economy, but ignoring the overreaches of a Federal system that won’t be able to afford forcing them to comply. A state or local government will ban transgender education in schools, a Federal judge blocks the ban and the Supreme Court agrees. The locals tells the kritarchy to go boil their heads, we’re doing it anyway , and what are you going to do about it.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Alfa158

    This makes more sense thank a break up. We will become kind of like Latin America where people ignore the corrupt government and do basically as they like. This will create a really low trust society but better than living in Pakistan or somewhere like that

  156. I see that Germany have now postponed closing existing coal-fired power stations, and are keeping open what nuclear power they have (3 power stations).

  157. @neutral
    For the sake of world peace (and sanity), the US regime must be and ultimately will be broken up. Here is how I think it should be broken up:
    - The states that were conquered from Mexico will be returned to Mexico (except for California)
    - California will have to broken up in a lot of little bits, turn the cities into independent city states, and the rural areas into a lot of separate entities.
    - Emulate an India style partition by having large movements of various ethnic group
    - Blacks will be moved to the Southern states
    - Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
    - Latins will move back the Mexico ruled states
    - A lot of the more recent immigrants will not want to stay and move back to where they came from
    - Washington DC will have to reduced to rubble to prevent the idea of reforming the US regime
    - Alaska will be returned to Russia
    - Haiwai will become independent
    - Overseas military outposts such as Guam will be run by China
    - All nuclear weapons will be dismantled

    I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.

    Replies: @bomag, @S. Anonyia, @Old Prude, @Colin Wright

    I don’t mind living around “good whites”. Sure they have unsound opinions, but hey. I don’t even much mind by being bossed around by good whites. What I do mind is living around blacks, latinos, orientals, hindus and moslems.

    If America fractures, it may not be a dissolution of the Union, but rather the races building their own enclaves within the “country”. I won’t say “nation”, because it will just be a bunch of squabbling races and ethnicities who can’t stand each other.

    The problem is those blasted good whites will keep inviting diversity, and the non-whites will keep wanting whatever nice things the whites have going.

    I don’t want a separate country, I just want to be left alone to live with my people.

    • Replies: @Nick Granite
    @Old Prude

    You have a group who actively work on nationalizing housing so they can pinpoint pockets of whiteness and darken the doorsteps by any means necessary. They will never leave us alone.

  158. @Buffalo Joe
    Forced myself to watch a gag worthy State of the Union. That used to be Steve's job. Biden opened the vault and threw shovels full of money at every perceived slight in America. Framed by America's two most powerfull women, he promised to spend our way to greatness. Something we used to earn. Harris, dressed in a brown suit that matched her skin color, looked like a stretched piece of leather over a skull. Strange way of holding her head. Pelosi looks skeletal, old skin over a hollowed eyed skull and the camera finding AOC, looking like a bobble head doll nodding in agreement as biden covered every fringe base. I thougth of the great scene in "Mars Attacks" when the Martian leader addresses the joint Houses of Congress and then vaporizes them all. Would we be worse off? And to paraphrase Roberto Duran, "no masks, no masks."

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Achmed E. Newman

    That used to be Steve’s job.

    It still is, Joe. It knocked him out on his ass, worse than a Kung Flu booster shot. He should be OK by end-o-bidness week.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  159. @Zero Philosopher
    Steve Sailer:

    " the United States of America, history’s mightiest country"

    The "mightiest country in history" that got wrecked in Vietnam, the "mightiest country in history" that got wrecked in Mogadishu in 1993, and the "mightiest country in history" that just a year ago withdrew from Afghanistan after 15 years of getting wrecked by a bunch of trebesman with little more than AK-47s. You know, for the "mightiest country ever", you do have a really bad record of getting wrecked by countries about 100 X smaller than you in resources. If this is the track record of America as the "mightiest country ever", then imagine how bad it would be if it weren't. Thank goodness that it is the "mightiest country ever" ! Thank goodness that it is the "mightiest country ever" otherwise it would be in big trouble!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Old Prude

    “Thank goodness that it is the “mightiest country ever”

    More of a curse than a blessing. If the country didn’t have such high self esteem, maybe it would avoid the folly of meddling all over the world. [And the world would be better for it.]

  160. @Reg Cæsar

    A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada.
     
    Until a few decades ago, Canada was forced to go through Portland, Maine in the winter, as all their Atlantic ports were frozen.

    https://i.etsystatic.com/26429015/r/il/52e9f1/2946172866/il_794xN.2946172866_mwfr.jpg

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Buffalo Joe

    Reg, and the Canadian Pacific RR kept parts of Canada from secceeding to the USA. They lacked coast to coast transportation.

  161. @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov’t now, that they can’t do very much on their own.

    About 20% of state and local expenditures are financed by federal appropriations. Of course the states and localities do things on their own. Fully 80% of all public employees work for state or local government. You can end this problem by phasing out federal grants over a period of a few years, allowing states to adjust or by replacing special purpose grants with general revenue sharing distributed by formula. Ditto state government financing of local government.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Achmed E. Newman

    A lot of what the states do (education, social services, Medicaid) is required and/or controlled by federal law and bureaucracy. That’s one reason much of the money comes from Washington. Clinton started throwing money, with strings attached, at local law enforcement.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Ralph L

    A lot of what the states do (education, social services, Medicaid) is required and/or controlled by federal law and bureaucracy. That’s one reason much of the money comes from Washington. Clinton started throwing money, with strings attached, at local law enforcement.

    Federal funding accounts for 7% of expenditure on primary and secondary schooling. You don't want the strings leave the money on the table. Politicians seem comically adverse to doing that under any circumstances and it's a reasonable wager that school officialdom like the strings to give them the excuse to do perverse things they couldn't sell otherwise.

    Medicaid actually is largely financed from the federal treasury. Well, why aren't state and local officials leaning on members of Congress to replace Medicaid funding with revenue sharing? Because they don't care when there isn't any candy in it for their clients.

  162. @PaceLaw
    @Kylie

    No Kylie, I’m quite in reality. The better question is, are you operating in today’s United States? What I described is the present reality. You may not like it, but that really doesn’t make a difference whatsoever, does it?

    As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit. Your subjective preferences really do not matter in this regard in any respect.

    Replies: @houston 1992, @R.G. Camara, @Brutusale, @Kylie

    ‘As I said, America has become much more distorted and fractured, but somehow we still keep managing to function as a unit.”

    No, we are not functioning as a unit. Various fragments and factions are functioning and you, like millions of useful idiots, have bought the b.s. the left, having an iron grip on the MSM, is peddling that this means the country is still united.

    The United States is “functioning” like a chronic alcoholic who still manages to make sure he has that crucial wake-up half-pint to keep from going into withdrawal, who still only loses bladder control in private and who can still count on gullible friends and family to help (enable) him to stumble down the path of self-destruction.

    Yeah, you probably do consider that “functioning”. But it’s functioning only in the sense of surviving, not thriving. Our country is in a state of chronic malaise. Just wait till it enters the acute phase. You’ll be eating your words–and not much else.

    And there is no “we”. So shut up already.

    • Agree: houston 1992
    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  163. @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The States are so beholden to the Feral Gov’t now, that they can’t do very much on their own.

    About 20% of state and local expenditures are financed by federal appropriations. Of course the states and localities do things on their own. Fully 80% of all public employees work for state or local government. You can end this problem by phasing out federal grants over a period of a few years, allowing states to adjust or by replacing special purpose grants with general revenue sharing distributed by formula. Ditto state government financing of local government.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Achmed E. Newman

    Really, are you sure about that, Art? Are you counting the influence of Federal money on universities in the form of guaranteed (US Gov-backed) loans, Federal money sent in grants for lower ed, Federal involvement in EVERY DAMN THING? Your idea won’t work, because there will ALWAYS be strings and threats attached to the handouts.

    My Amendment stands as it is. What do you, fancy yourself a Founding Father, do ya?

  164. this is an important essay because it perfectly embodies why we’ll never accomplish ANYTHING as long as boomers are still alive, and we won’t be able to make ANY progress until these people are all dead and gone. boomers are actively preventing younger generations from doing what needs to be done.

    here’s YET ANOTHER boomer telling us to not do anything, please don’t react, allow hostile enemy forces to continue to take control of the country, at least until i’m dead and gone. i want to live out my last decade in the peace and comfort i acquired after being gifted the greatest country in the history of the world by the previous couple generations, then spending 1960 thru 2020 accumulating money and property and job positions, while doing NOTHING to prevent America from being lost to hungry, determined outsiders.

    this boomer like most boomers wants you younger generations to continue to do nothing about it. they want younger generations to lose 2 years of their prime life living in a cave so that the boomers can eek out another few years and try to dodge a virus with a 99% survival rate. all the while also being priced out of property and locked out of job positions that boomers will hold until they’re 85, especially political positions that boomers will lock up until their dying breath, making sure only young leftists can rise to political power. young rightists are BLOCKED by career boomer politicians who don’t want anybody to screw up their last 15 years on earth and just want to make money while the country is turned into smoldering ruins.

    Steve thinks his essay is being smart, but it actually shows how incredibly SELFISH boomers actually are, proving every negative point about them. this is exactly the kind of essay old wealthy Tories were writing before the revolution. you’re gonna screw everything up for me, you stupid young idiots.

  165. res says:
    @countenance
    Devil's Advocate.

    World government for world peace.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @res

    World government for world peace.

    I think an increased emphasis on federalism would help the US by letting states agree to disagree more often. And letting people (with their feet, not only ballots) and markets (do these decisions work financially without the ability to print money?) vote on their decisions.

    If US states can’t agree on things (not to mention the voter precinct levels we are discussing), what makes you think country level populations could? And who would you trust to operate a world government?!

  166. From the post….”and Californians seem happier.” Can’t happen. California is the most dysfunctional place on the planet. Suffering from draught, demolish dams. Ban natural gas. ban combustion engines. Do allow open drug use. Do allow crime. Mandate that kids still wear masks in school, because, because, if masks were important yesterday, how could they be optional today? True statements from Cal Berkeley and SF School District. More poverty, horrible educational results, bigger fringe groups. But we need a west coast, so let’s try to keep them.

  167. @J.Ross
    @Buffalo Joe

    I am strongly tempted to listen to the audio because I am sure it is hilarious (I'm sure the Persians found it hilarious), but, yeah, the visual reminder that we are living in an away from keyboard vampire dystopia, and people close to or past a natural death crushed the young and healthy to extract one more year of deliberate evil and far-flung harm (and then to try to start a war), does call for vomit. Thing is, surely this was the least relevant iteration in a consistently irrelevant distraction. If the president wants to derail the Founders' simple enough order to report (say, in a letter) how things go, to sneak in an unmoderated campaign speech proposing legislation ideas, he should first have any option of getting legislation passed. Biden doesn't. May he die the next time he stumbles down the stairs.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    J. nice comment. Still gag worthy address. Stay safe.

  168. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada "meddling" in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada's western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.

    Russia could take over Mongolia, but it doesn't. So could China, but it doesn't. The US could take over the Caribbean and Central America, but it doesn't. The South American ABC powers could carve up the place among themselves, but they don't.

    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dennis Dale

    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.

    Agreed with the latter most certainly. Whether any military might get involved is one thing, maybe doubtful as you say. Economic might is what matters. We all know who’s numero uno now in that sense.

    Russia got looted in the 1990’s by people from New York.* American may be looted once things fall apart, not necessarily political-division-wise, but economically. The way it worse is described by the other Golden Rule: He who has the gold, makes the rules.

    See Peak Stupidity‘s series “Will America be looted by China?”:

    Part 1: Intro.
    Part 2: Housing
    Part 3: Big Biz
    Part 4: The Fruited Plain
    Part 5: The Wilderness
    Part 6: Conclusion – The Golden Rule

    .

    * A friend of mine talked to a Russian guy on a plane in the 1990s who told him that a steel plant he knew about got bought up for just the price of the steel inventory on hand!

  169. It has always struck me as odd that the preservation of the union in the 1860s is portrayed in U.S. history as an almost holy mission but we happily bombed Serbia in the 1990s to appease Mohammedan separatists.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @PSR

    we happily bombed Serbia in the 1990s to appease Mohammedan separatists.

    The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point. They were also in danger of an ethnic cleansing extravaganza.

    Replies: @HA

  170. “But, as Putin is finding in Ukraine, it’s not so easy to put Humpty Dumpty together again.”

    But this time, he needs Humpty Dumpty to buffer Moscow from the possibility of a NATO backed Ukraine with nuclear warheads pointed straight at them. This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia’s historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction. At first glance, Putin appears willing to go to the mat over Ukraine. Perhaps the US does not. after all, what does the US have to gain?

    2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US? Unfortunately, then the US would definitely have skin in the game and something to fight for; their very existence. Same thing more or less and the comparison holds.

    “Hence, American enthusiasts of going down the ex-Soviet path should think twice.”

    Except that there is historical precedent for it. The original government of the US was the Articles of Confederation, a loosely held together nation of semi-sovereign states, much like modern Canada has in fact. Perhaps the US could return to that form of government, albeit with a few modern modifications.

    And after all, this isn’t the ex-USSR, this is the United States of America. Different country, different borders, different people with different historical traditions of self-governance.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US?"

    Last I heard, Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead, and Cuba is still Cuba. Even Guantanamo remains on a "lease", in the same way that Crimea was before Russia took it over.

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.

    "This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia’s historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction."

    Oh, see how these Putin lackeys wail copious tears, not for Kiev buildings and citizens being blown apart, no -- but rather, for Russia not having enough in the way of "defensive buffers". They wail like a husky with separation anxiety. Did having enough defensive buffers get slipped into some UN charter while I wasn't looking? You know, maybe if Russia hadn't expanded to the size of an entire continent, it wouldn't need so much in the way of buffer states, has anyone ever considered that? Little Lichtenstein isn't exactly clamoring for buffer states. Maybe Andorra? There's the answer to Russia's "existential crisis". If you don't balloon in size the way gluttons do, you wouldn't have as much waistline or other "border issues" you need to worry about.

    What, you're telling me that not only does Russia get to keep its current borders (unlike, say, Ukraine), but on top of that, it also needs buffer states to ensure that it remains "protected"? I dunno, I would have thought with all that acquisition, it's rather Russias neighbors who might need protection. As of last week, I'm even more convinced of that. You Putin lackeys really need to step out of the echo chamber.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @JimDandy

  171. General question about comments. Is it too hard to set up comments so that replies appear immediately below the respective comment they are replying to?

    • Replies: @res
    @Enzo the Baker

    Think about how that would work for multiple replies (and replies to replies, etc.).

    The ability to hover over the reply hyperlinks and see the reply comment text is IMHO a better way of accomplishing what you are looking for. If you disagree, maybe give some more detail on what you desire?

  172. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea.

    There are some issues that don’t seem resolvable, like which side would get the nuclear arsenal (or what percentage of the nuclear arsenal.) As with divorce in a marriage scenario, the two sides would likely split with a great deal of animosity, and you can be sure they would have their nukes pointed right at each other across the border. Of course, if one side didn’t get any nukes, they could build their own, but that would only provide the pretext for those with nukes to attack.

    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?

    Yes, your history is off. We had two wars of secession, the first was successful, the second wasn’t. The secessionists in both of those wars had geography working in their favor. Modern secessionists wouldn’t have that advantage.

    ….it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    A poor analogy. Much more likely – in the long run – is a Northern Ireland type scenario, with violence and killing going on for generations. In fact, I suspect that such violence in the US will make Northern Ireland look like a walk in the park (and last much longer.) If the establishment left were to maintain it’s hold on power at the federal level, it would feel justified in becoming the Stalinist (or Putinist) regime it needs to be in order to crack down on the “terrorism” of secessionists.

    The left in the US, at least through its most ubiquitous incarnations (the Democratic party and labor unions), did something pretty admirable for a century or so: it largely rejected the most radical and extreme elements of Marxism/communism while pursuing its progressive goals. That’s no longer the case. The stated objectives of the strong left today read something like the Symbionese Liberation Army manifesto, and extremism begets extremism, radicalism begets radicalism. All of it oppositional.

  173. Steve would advise the colonists to not break away from the Crown. even if they’re successful (obviously they won’t be, they’ll be defeated and hanged, and i’ll go back to making a profit trading goods or publishing the town newspaper because i’m smart and revolutionaries are stupid morons with muskets), as soon as the colonies become independent, they’ll immediately be invaded and taken over by the French or the Spanish or indians or somebody else. breaking away from Great Britain is the stupidest, dumbest course of action possible. only a total idiot would think that’s a good idea.

    supposedly that’s the smart money talking, the adults in the room, the conventional wisdom that i have to hear every day from absolute losers like GOP leadership barnacles who are superglue ensconced in their positions.

    Steve thinks that trying to escape the subjugation of the DC regime, which is controlled by hostile aliens, and seeks to CRUSH me and my people, would be one of the biggest mistakes possible. he prefers you vote moar harder, that should work.

    • Replies: @bee steve is stupid
    @prime noticer

    That's because Steve is a college educated idiot.

    , @AKAHorace
    @prime noticer


    Steve would advise the colonists to not break away from the Crown. even if they’re successful (obviously they won’t be, they’ll be defeated and hanged, and i’ll go back to making a profit trading goods or publishing the town newspaper because i’m smart and revolutionaries are stupid morons with muskets),
     
    Are you sure that they would not have been better off with the British ? Australia and Canada are pretty good places to live by US standards. It is difficult to say.
  174. @neutral
    For the sake of world peace (and sanity), the US regime must be and ultimately will be broken up. Here is how I think it should be broken up:
    - The states that were conquered from Mexico will be returned to Mexico (except for California)
    - California will have to broken up in a lot of little bits, turn the cities into independent city states, and the rural areas into a lot of separate entities.
    - Emulate an India style partition by having large movements of various ethnic group
    - Blacks will be moved to the Southern states
    - Whites to the Mid West and North Eastern states
    - Latins will move back the Mexico ruled states
    - A lot of the more recent immigrants will not want to stay and move back to where they came from
    - Washington DC will have to reduced to rubble to prevent the idea of reforming the US regime
    - Alaska will be returned to Russia
    - Haiwai will become independent
    - Overseas military outposts such as Guam will be run by China
    - All nuclear weapons will be dismantled

    I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.

    Replies: @bomag, @S. Anonyia, @Old Prude, @Colin Wright

    ‘I am interested in what others think is the optimal way to break up the USA.’

    Set aside about two square feet somewhere in North Dakota.

    Move you there.

    • LOL: Kylie
  175. @Ben tillman
    Armored warfare is not worse than extinction.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Armored warfare is not worse than extinction.

    It’s also better than the global digital slave plantation.

  176. @Ralph L
    @Art Deco

    A lot of what the states do (education, social services, Medicaid) is required and/or controlled by federal law and bureaucracy. That's one reason much of the money comes from Washington. Clinton started throwing money, with strings attached, at local law enforcement.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    A lot of what the states do (education, social services, Medicaid) is required and/or controlled by federal law and bureaucracy. That’s one reason much of the money comes from Washington. Clinton started throwing money, with strings attached, at local law enforcement.

    Federal funding accounts for 7% of expenditure on primary and secondary schooling. You don’t want the strings leave the money on the table. Politicians seem comically adverse to doing that under any circumstances and it’s a reasonable wager that school officialdom like the strings to give them the excuse to do perverse things they couldn’t sell otherwise.

    Medicaid actually is largely financed from the federal treasury. Well, why aren’t state and local officials leaning on members of Congress to replace Medicaid funding with revenue sharing? Because they don’t care when there isn’t any candy in it for their clients.

  177. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Here's your handbook for the next few decades....


    https://www.amazon.com/Mandibles-Family-2029-2047-Lionel-Shriver/dp/006232828X

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Bill Jones

    Thank you, GToD. Lionel Shriver is a GREAT writer. This prepper novel was written with a women’s perspective (Lionel changed her name from Margaret or something as a teenager, but no funny stuff).

    If you want a man’s perspective on how we will have to deal with the collapse in the future, regarding materiel, power, security, etc., this book doesn’t cut it. However, when it comes to how it may very well go down economically, she does an excellent job – she even understands precious metals!

    I thank John Derbyshire for recommending The Mandibles, and I would like to spam the readers again with 6 links, as I got so into this book, that the review took that long:

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4
    Part 5
    Part 6

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    She also defended freedom of speech against the wokies.

  178. @PSR
    It has always struck me as odd that the preservation of the union in the 1860s is portrayed in U.S. history as an almost holy mission but we happily bombed Serbia in the 1990s to appease Mohammedan separatists.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    we happily bombed Serbia in the 1990s to appease Mohammedan separatists.

    The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point. They were also in danger of an ethnic cleansing extravaganza.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Art Deco

    "The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point."

    A dozen years, you say? As I recall, during one of my attempts to dig through Putin-lackey historical bunk, it turns out the plans to exterminate the Kosovar Albanians, go back way further than that. R

    Then again, that's kind of like Russian attempts to root out Ukrainian language and culture. Those, too, have been around for centuries. Remember that the next time someone wants to know why there haven't been any great novels written in Ukrainian.

    I'll say this again (not to you specifically, since I'm agreeing with you, but to the wider audience here), in case someone who knows"Hillbilly Elegy" guy J. D. Vance or other redneck supporters of Putin come across this. Any hillbilly or alt-righter or other so-called redneck who sides with Putin against the Ukrainians DESERVES to have the culture and way of life of his people trashed and belittled and sneered at. Because that's exactly how the Russian elite-and-powerful like Putin have been treating Ukrainian culture for centuries. It's eerily similar. Any of you alt-righters who think Putin is the enemy-of-my-enemy who's going to help you push back against your own sneering elites might one day get a wake-up call from Pastor Niemöller instead, but at that point, it may well be too late.

    If that happens, you can at least take comfort in knowing that you're getting exactly what you deserve.

    Replies: @Thelma Ringbaum

  179. Anyone who says they are for the breakup of the United States has already lost the game. You can’t go run and hide in Wyoming or Idaho or West Virginia because the people who are persecuting you now will eventually track you down and get you there.

    You either win the war for the United States or you lose the war for the United States. This is no middle strategy in which you retreat and regroup inside a hyper-federalist structure. You won’t protect the borders of Idaho any better than you did those of the United States. In fact, you will be inundated by outsiders in that state far more quickly than the country was.

    Ethnic solidarity, by itself, is also a losing strategy. There are many millions of whites who want you to lose – and, no, they are not all Jews and LBGTers. Some of the whitest, most goy states in the union are in the New England and they show little to no inclination to side with your politics.

    I’ma confused by all the pessimism. I’m no fan of Donald Trump, but his political instincts are solid on most policies (border, trade, wars) compared to the GOP establishment and he won an historic election in 2016. He would’ve won again in 2020 if not for COVID. And the Democrats’ popularity is in the tank. A populist-leaning GOP could sweep the table in 2022 and 2024 with the best proposals on immigration and trade for this country in the last seventy years.

    You have a chance for real victory in this country. Why waste it trying to win an independent Iowa?

    • Disagree: Father Coughlin
  180. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    That war was an unjust war of aggression; it’s laughable for anyone criticize Vladimir Putin for trying to preserve his ‘Union’ when Abraham Lincoln did much worse killing 750,000+ Americans in a bloody war of aggression to force a peacefully-seceded Dixie to remain in his ‘Union’ against their will. Many of the same U.S neocons (like Mark Levin on Fox News) kvetching loudest about Putin celebrate Lincoln as the “the greatest president in history.” That would be Lincoln the despot who suspended basic rights to free expression and habeas corpus, arrested dissident journalists, ordered 4-year bloodbath to forcibly annex a neighboring country that had seceded according to the same principles upon which the United States had seceded from British rule in 1776.

    All the 1861-1865 war settled was that the right of secession is contingent upon having superior firepower to enforce that self-proclaimed right. Had USA and CSA been allowed to go separate ways in 1861, that may have been a successful ‘national divorce’. However too much has changed since then; U.S. political and cultural divides no longer fall along neat sectional geographic lines as they did in 1865 or even 1965. Attempting a geographic-political ‘national divorce’ today would be a catastrophic epic fail for practical reasons.

    Despite what some Western media figures (mostly on “the right”) say, Putin did not call the collapse of the U.S.S.R. ‘the greatest geopolitical disaster of the 20th century’ because he is secretly still a KGB Communist Party loyalist who misses Marxism-Leninism. Since the 1991 breakup, Russia has never recovered from massive overall decline in power, prestige, social and economic standing that the Soviet Union superpower had commanded. Some might also consider allowing Warsaw Pact puppet states to go free in 1989-1990 as a sort of ‘national divorce’ that weakened the Soviet Union itself, which in turn encouraged secession of 14 Soviet republics that left behind a vastly weakened Russian Federation.

  181. @White refugee in usa
    ethnonationalism will break the USA apart eventually. Only problem is that blacks are totally dependent on white Americans for any meager civilization that they possess right now. Whites could go their own way but blacks will resist with everything they have.

    Blacks without white people= Jamaica

    Hispanics without white people= central Mexico

    White people without minorities= Denmark

    Ethnonationalism= Destiny of USA

    Replies: @Joe Walker, @Charon, @Recently Based, @Slugsmagee

    I think Steve’s point is that Denmark was occupied by the Nazis. An it was not overrun by the Soviets only because of US military backing.

  182. HA says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    Thread at bottom of Americans and others who considered extending NATO to Russian borders to be a very bad idea likely to lead to conflict. Useful when you get accused of being a Russian troll or Putin's accomplice.

    George Kennan in 1998

    Henry Kissinger in 2014

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/henry-kissinger-to-settle-the-ukraine-crisis-start-at-the-end/2014/03/05/46dad868-a496-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html

    US Ambassador to SU Jack F. Matlock Jr in 1997

    "the most profound strategic blunder, [encouraging] a chain of events that could produce the most serious security threat [...] since the Soviet Union collapsed"

    Clinton Defence Secretary William Perry, "explaining in his memoir that to him NATO enlargement is the cause of "the rupture in relations with Russia" and that in 1996 he was so opposed to it that "in the strength of my conviction, I considered resigning"."

    UN Deputy Sec-Gen Pino Arlacchi ("NATO is the root cause of the Russian crisis")

    CIA Director Bill Burns in 2008 - "Ukrainian entry into NATO is the brightest of all redlines for [Russia]" and "I have yet to find anyone who views Ukraine in NATO as anything other than a direct challenge to Russian interests"

    Aussie PMs Fraser "the move east [by NATO is] provocative, unwise and a very clear signal to Russia". He adds that this leads to a "difficult and extraordinarily dangerous problem."

    and Keating

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/03/ukraine-theres-no-way-out-unless-the-west-understands-its-past-mistakes


    US Defence Sec Robert Gates

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C2WBtXlUQAAdo9x.jpg

    Sir Roderic Lyne, former British ambassador to Russia, warned a year ago that "[pushing] Ukraine into NATO [...] is stupid on every level." He adds "if you want to start a war with Russia, that's the best way of doing it."

    Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, John Mearsheimer, Stephen Cohen, economist Jeffrey Sachs (""NATO enlargement is utterly misguided and risky. True friends of Ukraine, and of global peace, should be calling for a US and NATO compromise with Russia.""), as well as people like Chomsky.

    https://twitter.com/RnaudBertrand/status/1498491107902062592

    Replies: @HA, @Anonymous

    “Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, John Mearsheimer, Stephen Cohen, economist Jeffrey Sachs…”

    Aww, so nice to see Jeffrey Sachs finally get some love on iSteve. That’s a new one. As for NATO membership for Ukraine, it never had much traction at all internally.

    According to a poll conducted by Solomon, Center for Strategic and International Studies] A Ukrainian public opinion poll of May 6 [1997] showed in favor of joining NATO with 28% opposed and 34% undecided.

    I recall seeing a timeline at one point of similar polls during previous years that indicated that was kind of the longstanding consensus — i.e. considerably less than half Ukrainians were in support. But the story doesn’t end there, does it? Op. cit.:

    Relations between Ukraine and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) started in 1992.[1] Ukraine applied to begin a NATO Membership Action Plan (MAP) in 2008.[2][3] Plans for NATO membership were shelved by Ukraine following the 2010 presidential election in which Viktor Yanukovych, who preferred to keep the country non-aligned, was elected President.[4][5] Amid the Euromaidan unrest, Yanukovych fled Ukraine in February 2014.[6] The interim Yatseniuk Government which came to power initially said, with reference to the country’s non-aligned status, that it had no plans to join NATO.[7] However, following the Russian military invasion in Ukraine and parliamentary elections in October 2014, the new government made joining NATO a priority.

    What’s that? Even Yatsenuk, Victoria Nuland’s pet candidate, expressed no interest in having Ukraine join NATO? It’s weird how Russia’s swiping off a chunk of Ukraine, after previously having agreed in writing to respect Ukraine’s borders in exchange for Ukraine giving up nuke materials, boosted the Ukrainians’ previously lukewarm interest in actually signing up. It was my understanding from reading the Putin experts on Unz-dot-com that Victoria Nuland’s magic pastries was what caused that turnaround.

    Now, even Finland and Sweden want closer ties with NATO. Are the same “experts” and peace advocates (none of whom seem to have any interest in what the Ukrainians themselves might have to say on this topic, as bizarre as that may seem) going to pretend that it’s NATO’s manifest destiny in pushing eastward that is primarily to blame for that? It doesn’t mean Nuland isn’t scum — I never claimed she wasn’t. But so far, she seems to be the real winner here, which makes me think Putin, no matter how this debacle turns out for him, isn’t nearly as on the ball as he thinks he is. Too bad his yes-men will never allow him to see that.

  183. @Anon7
    As recently as the 1960's (my childhood), Americans could joyfully sing that "This land is my land...", and since little kids don't know anything about Woody Guthrie's Communist leanings, we just sang it and meant it.

    No more.

    Now, this land is their land, a vast empty canvas upon which the world's financiers can draw all their fantasies of big industrial parks full of busy, cheap foreign labor, making them rich.


    "If you travel 20 miles east of Columbus, Ohio, you’ll find 1,000 empty acres of land. It won’t look like much, but if you stop and look closely, you’ll see a “Field of Dreams,” the ground on which America’s future will be built. This is where Intel, the American company that helped build Silicon Valley, is going to build its $20 billion semiconductor “mega site.” Up to eight state-of-the-art factories in one place. 10,000 new good-paying jobs."

    Joe Biden, President, SOTU address 2022
     

    Also Joe Biden and the Democrats:

    The draft “America COMPETES Act of 2022” would allow foreigners to win an uncapped number of green cards by studying to become ordinary chemists, doctors, engineers, and statisticians — or accountants, tax experts, computer security experts, statisticians, ecologists, and many other types of professionals.
     
    So, by all means, let's keep America as one big, beautiful office park for the world's global financial interests, from sea to shining sea. After all, it could be worse; it could look like Beirut and now, Ukraine.

    Replies: @epebble

    “The business of America is business!” – President Calvin Coolidge (Republican) – January 1925

    “This Land Is Your Land” – Woody Guthrie (Socialist) – February 1940

  184. HA says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But, as Putin is finding in Ukraine, it’s not so easy to put Humpty Dumpty together again."

    But this time, he needs Humpty Dumpty to buffer Moscow from the possibility of a NATO backed Ukraine with nuclear warheads pointed straight at them. This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia's historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction. At first glance, Putin appears willing to go to the mat over Ukraine. Perhaps the US does not. after all, what does the US have to gain?

    2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US? Unfortunately, then the US would definitely have skin in the game and something to fight for; their very existence. Same thing more or less and the comparison holds.

    "Hence, American enthusiasts of going down the ex-Soviet path should think twice."

    Except that there is historical precedent for it. The original government of the US was the Articles of Confederation, a loosely held together nation of semi-sovereign states, much like modern Canada has in fact. Perhaps the US could return to that form of government, albeit with a few modern modifications.

    And after all, this isn't the ex-USSR, this is the United States of America. Different country, different borders, different people with different historical traditions of self-governance.

    Replies: @HA

    “2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US?”

    Last I heard, Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead, and Cuba is still Cuba. Even Guantanamo remains on a “lease”, in the same way that Crimea was before Russia took it over.

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.

    “This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia’s historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction.”

    Oh, see how these Putin lackeys wail copious tears, not for Kiev buildings and citizens being blown apart, no — but rather, for Russia not having enough in the way of “defensive buffers”. They wail like a husky with separation anxiety. Did having enough defensive buffers get slipped into some UN charter while I wasn’t looking? You know, maybe if Russia hadn’t expanded to the size of an entire continent, it wouldn’t need so much in the way of buffer states, has anyone ever considered that? Little Lichtenstein isn’t exactly clamoring for buffer states. Maybe Andorra? There’s the answer to Russia’s “existential crisis”. If you don’t balloon in size the way gluttons do, you wouldn’t have as much waistline or other “border issues” you need to worry about.

    What, you’re telling me that not only does Russia get to keep its current borders (unlike, say, Ukraine), but on top of that, it also needs buffer states to ensure that it remains “protected”? I dunno, I would have thought with all that acquisition, it’s rather Russias neighbors who might need protection. As of last week, I’m even more convinced of that. You Putin lackeys really need to step out of the echo chamber.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @HA

    As a "Putin lackey" I'm proud to stand alongside George Kennan, Henry Kissinger, two US Ambassadors to Russia, two Aussie Prime Ministers, the Defence Secretaries to Clinton, Bush and Obama, a CIA chief, and various other luminaries (Mearsheimer ring a bell?) in saying that the expansion of NATO is the ultimate, underlying cause of this conflict.

    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted "if you want to start a war with Russia, that's the best way of doing it". The fact that the US went ahead with something that's "stupid on every level" (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.

    So the links between Germany and Russia are severed, in a triumph for US policy. Pity about Ukraine.

    I see Rheinmetall shares (guns and tanks) are flying today, and that Germany suspended the closure of coal (dirty lignite) and nuclear powered electricity generation.

    European gas prices up 40% today. Brent crude $111. Wheat up again.

    Interesting times. China must be loving it.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @ben tillman

    , @JimDandy
    @HA

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.


    Sorry, I'm a bit slow on this one. Spell it out for me, please. How would the US react if Russia put nukes in Cuba tomorrow--C'est la vie? Que sera, sera?

    Would that make Cuba relevant again?

  185. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    The central part of the United States has one of the busiest ports in the world New Orleans . Plus the Mississippi Missouri River route to the Great Lakes the st Laurence Seaway and the N Atlantic ports of Canada, Halifax etc. plus there’s Biloxi and Galveston.

  186. @Huwhite Man
    The overwhelming majority of competent members of the U.S. military identify with Red States. So if (more likely when) Balkanization occurs, I suspect the Red State areas will be just fine in terms of deterring and repelling foreign militaries.

    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Brutusale

    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.

    Or for the Red States to just take them back, and exile all the Blue State inhabitants.

    • Replies: @Huwhite Man
    @William Badwhite

    I wouldn't want to deprive them of the opportunity to live under truly diverse and inclusive rulers.

  187. @anonymous
    OT but funny - Retired German Chancellor Angela Merkel, age 67, has been robbed whilst shopping in Berlin at a delicatessen grocery, no word on whether the thief might have been one of the 'Merkel's million migrants' she invited into Germany

    Merkel's bodyguard from the German Federal Criminal Police was unable to prevent the theft ... Her stolen wallet contained Merkel’s ID card, debit card, driver’s license, and cash ... Merkel went down to the police station to report the theft herself

    Quite a trophy for some ruffian in Germany to have Merkel's personal ID card framed on his wall

    https://rmx.news/article/merkel-robbed-while-shopping-in-berlin/

    https://i.4pcdn.org/pol/1646141573263.jpg

    Replies: @theMann, @Anonymous, @Alden

    That is sooo cool. Imagine anyone trying to rob Obama Bush Trump Clinton. They’d be swarmed by 10 secret service men if they got within 15 feet.

    Ha ha ha ha ha. She’s just another old woman now, prey for the immigrant Muslim criminals she loved so much.

  188. HA says:
    @Art Deco
    @PSR

    we happily bombed Serbia in the 1990s to appease Mohammedan separatists.

    The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point. They were also in danger of an ethnic cleansing extravaganza.

    Replies: @HA

    “The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point.”

    A dozen years, you say? As I recall, during one of my attempts to dig through Putin-lackey historical bunk, it turns out the plans to exterminate the Kosovar Albanians, go back way further than that. R

    Then again, that’s kind of like Russian attempts to root out Ukrainian language and culture. Those, too, have been around for centuries. Remember that the next time someone wants to know why there haven’t been any great novels written in Ukrainian.

    I’ll say this again (not to you specifically, since I’m agreeing with you, but to the wider audience here), in case someone who knows”Hillbilly Elegy” guy J. D. Vance or other redneck supporters of Putin come across this. Any hillbilly or alt-righter or other so-called redneck who sides with Putin against the Ukrainians DESERVES to have the culture and way of life of his people trashed and belittled and sneered at. Because that’s exactly how the Russian elite-and-powerful like Putin have been treating Ukrainian culture for centuries. It’s eerily similar. Any of you alt-righters who think Putin is the enemy-of-my-enemy who’s going to help you push back against your own sneering elites might one day get a wake-up call from Pastor Niemöller instead, but at that point, it may well be too late.

    If that happens, you can at least take comfort in knowing that you’re getting exactly what you deserve.

    • Disagree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Thelma Ringbaum
    @HA

    A bit of propaganda is what you are saying. There was rather , forced Ukrainization ( "Nativization" ) in Soviet times, and Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture (as part of their divide et emper agenda) along with many others. Cf. the UK, where Welsh and Scottish nationalisms are alive, to get an idea.

    In any Republic though, like US or USSR, simple economic life will work for assimilation , though. You want to talk to your customers in their dominant language. You want to join elites talking in the dominant language. So you assimilate. The Soviets tried hard to preserve any non-russian nationalizm, and to combat russhian chauvenism, but were failing at that.

    However, it is true that mr. Putin may not be a real ally for "white nationalists", conservatives, etc. His dallying with them is at best situational. I think, the official line is now that Russian army combats "nationalists".

    Things are complicated..

    Replies: @HA

  189. @JimDandy
    When I was a little boy, my concept of apocalypse was clearly defined and absolute--My Parents Getting Divorced. I lived in perpetual prayer that it would never happen. But it did. And whattya know--my quality of life improved, dramatically. Citing current events in Ukraine is reductive. Think Czech and Slovakia.

    Replies: @Anon, @Thelma Ringbaum

    Chezch and Slovaks were not forming completely separate states , but joining the EU. Thats why their separation was peaceful.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Thelma Ringbaum

    They joined the EU 11 years after separating. The EU wasn't the reason they were not at each other's throats.

    , @West reanimator
    @Thelma Ringbaum

    EU doesn't even have a military dumbass.

  190. @OilcanFloyd
    Ok Steve, how about Califirnia and other blue states take back all of the immigrants and transplants that they have flooded my state with. There should also be a real move to take power away from Washington, and we both know none of that will happen.

    I assume that most people understand that a break-up would have problems like resource wars, long-running feuds, regional domination, foreign meddling....but we already have all of that as a nation. Americans just haven't started killing each other yet. Considering our undeclared one-sided race war that the Establishment accepts and pushes, and the fact that the blue side is committed to replacing the rest of us with immigrants it's pretty obvious that we are already in an undeclared war. Why not break up? Some sort of new order seems to be in the making whether anyone likes it or not.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    how about Califirnia and other blue states take back all of the immigrants and transplants that they have flooded my state with.

    What would be even less sucky is if those inflow states refused to provide tax-funded freebies to the newcomers; then they can get around to separating natives from the tax teat.

    I’m following Idaho school bond referenda. There’s a bunch coming up this month (though with relatively small, face-value amounts). The typical, district pleading is “.. but our population is growing like gangbusters!” Also, the DEMs there (like DEMs everywhere) are working to tie school funding to enrollment rather than to the # of warm bodies that actually show up. The teachers union demands a credentialed babysitter in every, empty classroom.

  191. @HA
    @Art Deco

    "The separatists accounted for 90% of the population in the territory in question and had been subject to abuse by the central government for a dozen years at that point."

    A dozen years, you say? As I recall, during one of my attempts to dig through Putin-lackey historical bunk, it turns out the plans to exterminate the Kosovar Albanians, go back way further than that. R

    Then again, that's kind of like Russian attempts to root out Ukrainian language and culture. Those, too, have been around for centuries. Remember that the next time someone wants to know why there haven't been any great novels written in Ukrainian.

    I'll say this again (not to you specifically, since I'm agreeing with you, but to the wider audience here), in case someone who knows"Hillbilly Elegy" guy J. D. Vance or other redneck supporters of Putin come across this. Any hillbilly or alt-righter or other so-called redneck who sides with Putin against the Ukrainians DESERVES to have the culture and way of life of his people trashed and belittled and sneered at. Because that's exactly how the Russian elite-and-powerful like Putin have been treating Ukrainian culture for centuries. It's eerily similar. Any of you alt-righters who think Putin is the enemy-of-my-enemy who's going to help you push back against your own sneering elites might one day get a wake-up call from Pastor Niemöller instead, but at that point, it may well be too late.

    If that happens, you can at least take comfort in knowing that you're getting exactly what you deserve.

    Replies: @Thelma Ringbaum

    A bit of propaganda is what you are saying. There was rather , forced Ukrainization ( “Nativization” ) in Soviet times, and Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture (as part of their divide et emper agenda) along with many others. Cf. the UK, where Welsh and Scottish nationalisms are alive, to get an idea.

    In any Republic though, like US or USSR, simple economic life will work for assimilation , though. You want to talk to your customers in their dominant language. You want to join elites talking in the dominant language. So you assimilate. The Soviets tried hard to preserve any non-russian nationalizm, and to combat russhian chauvenism, but were failing at that.

    However, it is true that mr. Putin may not be a real ally for “white nationalists”, conservatives, etc. His dallying with them is at best situational. I think, the official line is now that Russian army combats “nationalists”.

    Things are complicated..

    • Replies: @HA
    @Thelma Ringbaum

    "Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture...

    I suspect any developments that they made occurred when they were trying to wrest Ukraine away from Poland. Those don't count. Because afterwards, once the Czarists actually absorbed Ukraine, things got uglier (which I suspect, is why more recent appeals for a warm embrace with mother Russia are being rebuffed, but hey, let's ignore all that and focus on Nuland's pastries).

    In other words, I'm going to say the instances of "development" Ukrainian culture are the few paltry exceptions that prove the rule: Again, here's some examples from the link I cited above:


    ...the use of Ukrainian language within the Russian empire was initially restricted by official government decrees such as the Valuev Circular (18 July 1863) and later banned by the Ems ukaz (18 May 1876) from any use in print (with the exception of reprinting of old documents). Popularly the anti-Ukrainian sentiment was promulgated by such organizations as the "Black Hundreds", which were vehemently opposed to Ukrainian self-determination...In 1720 Peter the Great issued an edict prohibiting printing books in the Ukrainian language... In 1763 Catherine the Great issued an edict prohibiting lectures in the Ukrainian language at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. In 1769 the Most Holy Synod prohibited printing and using the Ukrainian alphabet book... In 1847 the Russian government persecuted all members of the Brotherhood of Saints Cyril and Methodius and prohibited the works of Taras Shevchenko... and others... In 1863 the Russian Minister of Interior Valuev decided that the Little Russian language (Ukrainian language) had never existed and could not ever exist. [Weird how so much effort is involved in eradicating something that "had never existed and could not exist.]... In 1879 the Russian Minister of Education Dmitry Tolstoy (later the Russian Minister of Interior) officially and openly stated that all people of the Russian Empire should be Russified. In the 1880s several edicts were issued prohibiting education in the Ukrainian language at private schools, theatric performances in Ukrainian, any use of Ukrainian in official institutions, and christening Ukrainian names... In 1914 the Russian government officially prohibited celebrations of the 100th Anniversary of Shevchenko's birthday and posted gendarmes at the Chernecha Hill. The same year Nicholas II of Russia issued an edict prohibiting the Ukrainian press...Under Soviet rule in Ukraine, a policy of korenization.. initially supported Ukrainian cultural self-awareness. This policy was phased out in 1928 and terminated entirely in 1932 in favor of general Russification.
     
    If anyone wants to counter that with some list of allegations that the current Ukrainian government (led by native Russian speaker Zelensky, I might add) is doing anything comparable towards Russian speakers, make sure the source you provide isn't something from RT or some similarly craven sellout to Putin. Then we can compare both lists and get some added perspective.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

  192. OT
    Steve, does Judge Jackson have a higher IQ than Michelle Obama? Aren’t smart ppl supposed to look smart?

    https://www.npr.org/2022/02/14/1078086453/ketanji-brown-jackson-supreme-court-biden

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Meretricious

    Mere, what do you think when you look in the mirror?

  193. @William Badwhite
    @Huwhite Man


    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.
     
    Or for the Red States to just take them back, and exile all the Blue State inhabitants.

    Replies: @Huwhite Man

    I wouldn’t want to deprive them of the opportunity to live under truly diverse and inclusive rulers.

  194. @Ryan Andrews
    The argument here is entirely premised on the idea that preserving the union is necessary in order that "we" are powerful enough to guard against adversaries meddling in our affairs. The problem is our adversaries are not outside our borders; they are here, and they do not simply meddle in our affairs, but have almost total control of them. This is like the Tibetans worrying that if they escaped the Chinese yolk they might fall prey to the Americans.

    Conservative and right-wing Whites need to purge from their mind the thought that they have any say in the United States whatsoever. The GOP can win 90 seats in the senate and 400 in the house every cycle for the next twenty years, and the culture and every institution that matters still will be further to left and more anti-White than they are now. Every one of us knows this in our bones.

    The only way out of this grim arrangement, is to get out. As long as we are yolked to the United States, our country will never represent us. It is as simple as that.

    Replies: @Alden

    Absolutely true. The hard left has been in control for a long time.

  195. For those appalled by the news from Ukraine.
    Be of good cheer!
    It’s all bullshit.
    https://newspunch.com/propaganda-mainstream-medias-top-trending-ukraine-stories-turned-out-to-be-completely-fake/

    But you knew that anyway, didn’t you?

  196. More delusions from a Californian boomer. Steve, you don’t even understand COVID, what makes you think you understand the United States?

  197. @Ben tillman
    @Jack D

    Buy low; sell high.

    Replies: @res

    The interesting question is: where are all of the “Buy low; sell high” people on the buy side?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @res

    "where are all of the “Buy low; sell high” people on the buy side?"

    We know that the banks can't be allowed to fail, so they can be as reckless as they like and the Fed or BoE will rescue them.

    But little people wanting to buy the dip in say Polymetal, a London-quoted Russian gold miner down about 66% last time I looked, are likely to find themselves expropriated by one side or the other. Caveat emptor.

  198. @Thea
    @Zero Philosopher

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    Replies: @Barnard, @AndrewR, @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack P

    The Spaniards that first colonised the Americas were overwhelmingly from the hottest and poorest Spanish regions like Extremadura (the name tells you everything) and Andalucia. Not that many from the rainier, greener, milder climates of Galicia/Asturias/Basque Country (inside the Hajnal Line). They could perhaps stand the climate better.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/atlantic-how-should-we-talk-about-migration-policy/#comment-2320025

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Extremadura sounds like the best place to be _from_.

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @YetAnotherAnon

    It did help the Spaniards that in Central and South America there were lots of highland valleys and plateaus for them to settle in, which made the latitudes much more bearable. Most of the largest cities in Latin America are of high altitude, such as Mexico City and Bogota to name a few. A few others are tempered by their coastal location. Lima in particular gets winds from the cold Humboldt current, giving it a coastal California-like feel.

  199. @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called ’em “States”, and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov’t.
     
    Thanks Achmed.

    I had an unwritten comment, with a similar thrust--in my head in reaction to Steve's "World Cup" post. The Brits indeed had evolved--over time and with some big mistakes--at least a semi-reasonable of handling the natural "diversity" within their kingdom.

    And our founders--no idiots--were both well aware of that, but also of the tyranny that the central state could dish out. The founders knew that any peaceful and voluntary association in a large nation--especially with the variation among the various Anglo-Saxon and Germanic peoples that were the polity, and with our large regional variations--required federalism. People would locally govern themselves in their own states according to their own norms, values and circumstances. And the federal state would handle the common stuff--mostly defense, keeping the foreigners out.

    There's absolutely no reason the good folks in Pigsknuckle, Arkansas, must have the same norms and the same laws as in Baghdad By the Bay. Each could--in theory--live according their community norms. But this is simply an anathema--hate!--to minoritarians, and they absolute love central state power to make ordinary Americans--whom they have contempt for- behave as they wish.

    Our "cosmopolitan globalist" elite are not only the most parochial "cosmopolitans, and not only have the most stupid and toxic ideology in minoritarianism, but they also have the most deformed and toxic personalities--incredibly obnoxious and aggressive imposing minoritarianism upon everyone else. In a word--*assholes*.

    That's our problem. That's what motivates secession.

    Replies: @res

    The best part of that is how much of it is done under the flag of “tolerance.”

  200. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    @BluEidDvl

    Why do you think the dollar is collapsing? Why can't gross national debt to GDP reach 300% like in Japan? Japan hasn't collapsed yet either. It's been unhealthy for 30 years and will be for the long term future but no collapse is on the horizon.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Who cares about silly minor things like birthrates?

  201. @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.
     
    Jack, the ruble was already worth less than 2 cents in 2015.

    Russia had hyper-inflation back in the '90s.

    It's percentage changes that matter. The current crash in the ruble is reversible if Putin pulls this off.

    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now. (Warning: currency speculation is financially dangerous!)

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Bill Jones

    If the sanctions destroy the oligarch class, average Russians won’t care. There’s a lot of smart stuff being written about the boomerang effect. Look: it’s going to hurt Russia. No doubt. But when you’re in an existential battle, you fight. The cost of giving in is worse than the cost of fighting.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Paperback Writer

    Who do you think employs the average Russian citizen? The Oligarchs! So if they begin to suffer, so do the Russian people. And, no, it’s not an existential fight. It’s Putin’s War. The cost is the economy and dignity of Russia. And for what?

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  202. This guy better watch his back. Ukraine is full of real Nazis. Not the Richard Spencer types.

  203. @res
    @Ben tillman

    The interesting question is: where are all of the "Buy low; sell high" people on the buy side?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “where are all of the “Buy low; sell high” people on the buy side?”

    We know that the banks can’t be allowed to fail, so they can be as reckless as they like and the Fed or BoE will rescue them.

    But little people wanting to buy the dip in say Polymetal, a London-quoted Russian gold miner down about 66% last time I looked, are likely to find themselves expropriated by one side or the other. Caveat emptor.

  204. @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    A lot of old stock Anglo Americans consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Truth

    And an old stock Anglo-American considered an ADOS marriage material. Weird that Steve hasn’t talked about the new Supreme Court pick. Maybe because he can’t say anything bad about her?

  205. Anonymous[583] • Disclaimer says:
    @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    No,we’re not a family. You sound like woman!😉
    A break up seems unlikely now,even with such a fractitious population. But if we dont stop the African surge,what kind of nation will we be?
    As Dear Leader says,predictions are hard,especially about the future

  206. @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Thank you, GToD. Lionel Shriver is a GREAT writer. This prepper novel was written with a women's perspective (Lionel changed her name from Margaret or something as a teenager, but no funny stuff).

    If you want a man's perspective on how we will have to deal with the collapse in the future, regarding materiel, power, security, etc., this book doesn't cut it. However, when it comes to how it may very well go down economically, she does an excellent job - she even understands precious metals!

    I thank John Derbyshire for recommending The Mandibles, and I would like to spam the readers again with 6 links, as I got so into this book, that the review took that long:

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4
    Part 5
    Part 6

    Replies: @SFG

    She also defended freedom of speech against the wokies.

  207. @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    A lot of old stock Anglo Americans consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Truth

    You mean a lot of old Stock “white nationalists” consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Truth

    I mean many white men, the desire for a low drama relationship transcends politicial ideology.

    That said, "white nationalist with Asian girlfriend" is becoming a cultural touchstone just like "anti racist activist lives in lily white suburb." It's what happens when you know, deep down, that a big part of your ideology is basically spurious.

  208. @Barnard
    @Thea

    I commented when visiting Florida in the heat of summer was "how did the original settlers handle this?" For the Spanish maybe it was not as bad, but it amazes me that English and Scots adapted well enough to stay in Florida long term.

    Replies: @Thea, @S. Anonyia

    The original Florida Crackers were a hard boiled bunch. I’m in awe of them but wouldn’t want to be them.

    The book Strawberry Girl is about a young girl early settler. Not a bad read.

  209. @AndrewR
    @Thea

    Halloween through mid April is a decent time to be in South Florida, no A/C needed, but keep a fan or two around. Hurricane likelihood: low.

    Coincidentally, mid spring through mid fall is a nice time to be in the midwest or northeast. Northern Michigan in particular is heavenly in the summer.

    Replies: @Thea

    I lived in Palm Beach County and can count only a few days that life without AC was comfortable over all my years there. If you can do it, then hats off. You are stronger than I ever was.

  210. @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US?"

    Last I heard, Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead, and Cuba is still Cuba. Even Guantanamo remains on a "lease", in the same way that Crimea was before Russia took it over.

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.

    "This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia’s historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction."

    Oh, see how these Putin lackeys wail copious tears, not for Kiev buildings and citizens being blown apart, no -- but rather, for Russia not having enough in the way of "defensive buffers". They wail like a husky with separation anxiety. Did having enough defensive buffers get slipped into some UN charter while I wasn't looking? You know, maybe if Russia hadn't expanded to the size of an entire continent, it wouldn't need so much in the way of buffer states, has anyone ever considered that? Little Lichtenstein isn't exactly clamoring for buffer states. Maybe Andorra? There's the answer to Russia's "existential crisis". If you don't balloon in size the way gluttons do, you wouldn't have as much waistline or other "border issues" you need to worry about.

    What, you're telling me that not only does Russia get to keep its current borders (unlike, say, Ukraine), but on top of that, it also needs buffer states to ensure that it remains "protected"? I dunno, I would have thought with all that acquisition, it's rather Russias neighbors who might need protection. As of last week, I'm even more convinced of that. You Putin lackeys really need to step out of the echo chamber.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @JimDandy

    As a “Putin lackey” I’m proud to stand alongside George Kennan, Henry Kissinger, two US Ambassadors to Russia, two Aussie Prime Ministers, the Defence Secretaries to Clinton, Bush and Obama, a CIA chief, and various other luminaries (Mearsheimer ring a bell?) in saying that the expansion of NATO is the ultimate, underlying cause of this conflict.

    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted “if you want to start a war with Russia, that’s the best way of doing it“. The fact that the US went ahead with something that’s “stupid on every level” (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.

    So the links between Germany and Russia are severed, in a triumph for US policy. Pity about Ukraine.

    I see Rheinmetall shares (guns and tanks) are flying today, and that Germany suspended the closure of coal (dirty lignite) and nuclear powered electricity generation.

    European gas prices up 40% today. Brent crude \$111. Wheat up again.

    Interesting times. China must be loving it.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Ha ha ha doesn't see it, he's a globalist lackey that suddenly five days ago, Ukraine was all important, the bees knees, when about six months ago he so much cared for our loyal Afghanistan allies, them precious incoming refugees. Doesn't everyone realize that Afghanistan is the future economic power of tomorrow? And that it's a democracy in the making? After all, 20 yrs spent there must've have made some results to show for it.

    All to preserve the US Empire. What happens when it collapses due to the weight of its own hubris?

    China's the smart ones. They might as well quite delaying and take Taiwan already. And that'll be the next tear-gushing from Ha ha ha, all for our loyal Taiwanese allies.

    Replies: @HA

    , @ben tillman
    @YetAnotherAnon


    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted “if you want to start a war with Russia, that’s the best way of doing it“. The fact that the US went ahead with something that’s “stupid on every level” (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.
     
    And they knew what the response would be; i.e., they wanted Russia to invade Ukraine.
  211. @fish
    @Anonymous

    Notorious sock Tiny's Duck would have been too obvious so Tiny's employed a new sub-sock for his usual retardery.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    I think he should have used the pseudonym Johnson White to stay in theme with penis related names. He started as Tiny Du(i)ck, presumably to mock the un-manliness of SJWs, switched to Ebony Obelisk to make fun of their cuckold lust for Black sexuality, Johnson would provide better continuity.

  212. As a dedicated southern nationalist in the same camp of the southern “fireeaters”, I want our southern lands to be vacated by the US government occupiers.

    They can take all their welfare kings and queens with them.

  213. @Achmed E. Newman
    I haven't read the column yet but just did a quick ctrl-f (in the iPad sense) for the word "Federalism". Nada. How 'bout in the comments here? Nada.

    There WERE many ALMOST separate countries in this land until not that awful long ago! They called 'em "States", and they still do, even now, when they are behaving and being treated like nothing but districts or provinces by the Feral Gov't.

    The Founders of this country were smarter than most. Even though this country was run entirely by White Men, a big majority of British extraction, with real Federalism again, this ultra-diverse Tower of Babel might be able to hang together. The Founders created the Federal Gov't for the main purpose of a common defense. That's all it SHOULD be for!

    There is far too much diversity at this point for this place to stay together as it is. I would not want to be part of the Totalitarian Police State, a Yugoslavia on steroids, that it's going to take to keep it together. (That's what it's been becoming for a long while, accelerated by the problems of the immigration invasion and "civil rights".)

    I want no part in BEING together with many of these people period. It's not just the policies but the fact that my labor is being stolen for the use of those with opinions and lifestyles anathema to me that makes me want out. Simple solution: Devolve the power back to the State and people where it belongs, per Amendment X.

    One of the silver linings to have come out of the Covid PanicFest was the visibility of, and a modicum of respect for, Federalism again. Go Gators! Go DeSantis!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad, @Dmon

    What do you guys think of the Convention of States initiative?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dmon

    I like the spirit of those guys, Dmon. However, with the make-up of this country now - 50 million or more newcomers who aren't likely Ron Paul readers, I don't know how it'd really go down. Their plan hinges on this:


    Our convention would only allow the states to discuss amendments that, “limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, impose fiscal restraints, and place term limits on federal officials.”
     
    Will that hold?
    , @Known Fact
    @Dmon

    It would probably get hijacked by provocateurs from the left and from the government (but wait, I repeat myself)

  214. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?

    Yeah, insisting we stop secession … turned out to be such a great idea last time.

  215. @Huwhite Man
    The overwhelming majority of competent members of the U.S. military identify with Red States. So if (more likely when) Balkanization occurs, I suspect the Red State areas will be just fine in terms of deterring and repelling foreign militaries.

    The Blue State areas, on the other hand, will be open game for Latin American Cartel expansion, and entrepreneurial Asian generals.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Brutusale

    I have two acquaintances up here in the People’s Commonwealth of Massachusetts with daughters attending military schools. Both have recently expressed concern that events over the past two years have made them nervous about the potential use of the military during an extended period of civil unrest, fearing that their daughters would be ordered to commit violence on their fellow Americans.

    Pollyanna that I am, I remind them where most of the enlisted men hail from and the shelf life of Lt. Muffy ordering her soldiers to open fire on civilians.

  216. “But by this Californian’s lights, the final results of French’s Calexit scenario don’t sound so bad. New England creates its own democratic nation. Millions of Americans relocate to places better aligned with their politics. And Californians seem happier.

    Or more likely, New England (except for some of us holdouts) would join San California in a Union of American Socialist States. The only problem might be building a land bridge to join them, but maybe we could have an airlift to link them, like in Berlin sixty years ago. Are you happy now, California?

  217. @Mark G.
    Most potential problems that might happen in the future were foreseen by the founders of this country. They already had two thousand years of history to look back on and were well versed in the Greek and Roman classics. They attempted to build safeguards into the Constitution to prevent these potential problems, including dissolution of the union. I am a direct descendant of Isabella Pendleton. She was the sister of Edmund Pendleton, one of three Virginia delegates to the first Continental Congress alongside Patrick Henry and George Washington. Edmund Pendleton wrote the following in 1801:

    "Union is certainly the basis of our political prosperity, and this can only be preserved by confining, with precision, the federal government to the exercise of powers clearly required by the general interest or respecting foreign nations and the state governments to objects of a local nature; because the states exhibit such varieties of character and interests that a consolidated general government would be in perpetual conflict with state interests, from its want of local knowledge or from a prevalence of local prejudice or interest, so as certainly to produce civil war and disunion."

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    “Union is certainly the basis of our political prosperity, and this can only be preserved by confining, with precision, the federal government to the exercise of powers clearly required by the general interest or respecting foreign nations and the state governments to objects of a local nature; because the states exhibit such varieties of character and interests that a consolidated general government would be in perpetual conflict with state interests, from its want of local knowledge or from a prevalence of local prejudice or interest, so as certainly to produce civil war and disunion.”

    Terrific quote MarkG–thanks. Suggest your Grand**n Uncle Edmond was a wise on-the-ball fellow.

    You don’t see such wisdom from the plethora of babbling elite “experts” who feast on America today.

  218. @Mr. Anon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada “meddling” in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada’s western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.
     
    The danger is that the newly formed Republic of Woke (i.e. the seceded states of California, Oregon, and Washington), would turn to China for protection, ultimately concluding a military alliance with them. That would given China a military presence on the North American mainland.

    I know - it sounds farfetched.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to certain British Chieftans who invited German mercenaries to their islands to help them fight their wars, that their country would soon come to be ruled by them, speak their language, and that virtually every place name in "England" (Land of the Angles) would end up being germanic instead of celtic.

    I'm sure it seemed farfetched to the Greek city states that invited the Romans into the Peloponnese to adjudicate their disputes that they would end up as provinces ruled by Rome for the next six hundred years or so.

    Despite what Francis Fukuyama said, history doesn't end.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Fun To Do Bad Things, @epebble

    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_(independence_movement)

    But the two/three States + Province do work together for some public policy issues:

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/MOU-Final%20Draft%20for%20Distribution.pdf

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/british-columbia-california-oregon-washington-join-forces-combat-climate-change

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @epebble


    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.
     
    I'm not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I'm talking about web developers in Seattle.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  219. Yes, a breakup of the US of A would put America in danger of becoming the federated republic of 1789-1861. How could you maintain hegemony and send troops all over the world, or demand that one half of the population support the other half in perpetuity? Etc etc etc.

  220. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Thea

    The Spaniards that first colonised the Americas were overwhelmingly from the hottest and poorest Spanish regions like Extremadura (the name tells you everything) and Andalucia. Not that many from the rainier, greener, milder climates of Galicia/Asturias/Basque Country (inside the Hajnal Line). They could perhaps stand the climate better.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/atlantic-how-should-we-talk-about-migration-policy/#comment-2320025

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hapalong Cassidy

    Extremadura sounds like the best place to be _from_.

  221. @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Here is the nicest place I have found to show the ruble behavior since the mid-2000s.

    Click on "All" to see it back to 2006.

    Playing around with the interface shows that, during that time, the ruble has never been worth much more than 4 cents. (Note that the vertical axis does NOT start at zero!)

    And it has been under 2 cents most of the time since 2015.

    For the last couple years it has been generally running under 1 1/2 cents.

    Yeah, it has fallen recently, but the news media saying that it is now under 1 cent gives people the impression that it has recently fallen from a "reasonable" value, say a dollar or so, to below a cent.

    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.

    Replies: @res, @Paperback Writer

    As far as Ivan and Masha are concerned, the oligarchs can f#ck the f*ck off.

    And they are:

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium.HIGHLIGHT-u-s-losing-patience-as-israel-backs-ukraine-but-pulls-punches-on-russia-1.10646758

    Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, generally considered the most pro-Israel senator in Washington, condemned Israel on Monday, accusing it of declining to sell Stinger missiles to Ukraine following a plea by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to Bennett.

  222. @Barnard
    @New Dealer

    You have a good point, but in the event of a national breakup, there is no reason to think state borders would hold. The people of Eastern Washington, to use your example, would see themselves as having much more in common with the people of Idaho than with those in the Seattle metro area. I am somewhat surprised the Greater Idaho movement hasn't spread beyond Oregon into the Eastern part of Washington already.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    For a long time, there’s been considerable support among both New Yorkers and NYCers to separate from each other. The only real problem seems to be that neither one wants Albany.

  223. @Paperback Writer
    @PhysicistDave

    If the sanctions destroy the oligarch class, average Russians won't care. There's a lot of smart stuff being written about the boomerang effect. Look: it's going to hurt Russia. No doubt. But when you're in an existential battle, you fight. The cost of giving in is worse than the cost of fighting.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Who do you think employs the average Russian citizen? The Oligarchs! So if they begin to suffer, so do the Russian people. And, no, it’s not an existential fight. It’s Putin’s War. The cost is the economy and dignity of Russia. And for what?

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Corvinus


    Who do you think employs the average Russian citizen? The Oligarchs! So if they begin to suffer, so do the Russian people.
     
    So the Russian government will sell their assets to others. Bullshit artist: our oligarchs get richer and richer, and average Americans suffer.

    The cost is the economy and dignity of Russia. And for what?

     

    For the same reason we'd invade if Mexico were to become a Russian satellite.

    China wins.
  224. Completely OT, nothing to do with the topic or politics….

    Maz Jobrani is right. When you enter your 30s, everything about the body begins to …meh …

  225. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    Look at the voting results. Even in the reddest large cities such as Lubbock Texas, Biden still received about 33% of the vote. And in the bluest districts, San Francisco, Trump received 12% of the vote. The idea that there is an all red county or city that would love to be in a different country is laughable.

    Look at a map of the 2020 election results by county. Almost any state of size has blue countries and usually those blue counties are the largest counties by population.

  226. @Mr. Anon

    Let’s Not Break Up the USA
     
    That is of course a wise sentiment.

    However................a lot of people (like me) look at Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, Kamal Harris, Eric Swalwell, etc., and think: "I don't want to be governed by that. And I don't want to be governed by anybody who would vote for that. It's not an unreasonable sentiment.

    When your government spends most of its time vilifying you, blaming you for everything, making vague noises about extracting reparations from you, silencing your opinions, outlawing your political views and your ability to politically organize in your own defense - when it craps on your beliefs, and promotes the most appalling degeneracy (for example, appointing dudes in dresses and deviant transvestites with dog-f**king fetishes to responsible government offices and encouraging young people to mutilate and chemically castrate themselves), then national divorce begins to look like your best option.


    Whether you blame poor Ukraine’s current agony most on Russia’s obvious aggressions or NATO’s subtle machinations is a matter of opinion, but the lesson is clear: If you can avoid it, don’t be Ukraine.
     
    What if the alternative to being Ukraine in 2022 is being Cambodia in 1976?

    Replies: @Glaivester, @Charon, @guest007

    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy. If one does not want to be ruled by those listed, then run candidates who can win with ideas and policies that appeal to the majority. That is the point of a democracy. Not claiming to be silenced politically because one’s favored fringe candidate did not win.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @guest007


    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy.
     
    If 51% of the population hates me and wants me dead then - yes - I hate democracy. Why shouldn't I?

    Actually it doesn't even have to be that lopsided. The way our system works is that some fraction of the 1/3 of the population in the middle which barely even understands how our system of government functions, throw the election to one half of the other 2/3 of the population, based on how effective, or ineffective their propaganda is.

    The system doesn't work anymore. If you think it does, you're living in a fantasy World, dreaming about a country that's already dead.

    Democracy is just the latest sham used by the Oligarchy to buy our assent for their system. I'm beginning to wonder if it hasn't always been that way.

    I'm not suggesting solutions. I don't know that there are any.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Drapetomaniac

  227. @Thelma Ringbaum
    @JimDandy

    Chezch and Slovaks were not forming completely separate states , but joining the EU. Thats why their separation was peaceful.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @West reanimator

    They joined the EU 11 years after separating. The EU wasn’t the reason they were not at each other’s throats.

  228. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    Said it before, in my role as the “separate nations!” guy:

    If you want to keep America intact, then you better start talking about secession.

    It’s the same reason, if you want law+order you better be willing to dole out punishment.

    For the past 60 the minoritarians have been gathering strength, running roughshod over us and trashing the nation. But … it’s a fundamentally parasitic ideology. And at root an alliance of parasitic forces who want to tax, rent-seek and loot the America–the prosperity–built up by our ancestors.

    The bottom line is “they need us, we don’t need them”. So if there’s any hope of reining them in, it’s telling them that what they are doing is unacceptable and we are prepared to leave if it does not stop.

    • Replies: @Drapetomaniac
    @AnotherDad

    The foragers need something to forage on - either nature or technological civilization.

  229. @anonymous
    https://i.imgur.com/Zw2oJXv.png

    My idea for breaking up the US.

    I think it starts with a MAGA country that wishes to be mostly rural, whiter, live according to socially conservative values, and free from election cheating. The last part will be the trigger for secession. It will include Texas because a sovereign country needs ocean access (or else surrounding countries can block the borders if MAGA decides to ban abortion, etc.) Texas has cities and racial diversity but at least the big cities are more conservative than other big US cities and the diversity is mostly better-assimilated Latinos.

    Greater California takes shape because MAGA split the USA apart.

    The State of Deseret because the Mormons want to be both socially conservative and racially inclusive.

    The remainder of the US will be huge because I think the biggest inconvenience problem to deal with after deciding on the split is the management of the nuclear forces. Two weeks ago this wasn't a big concern but now it will preoccupy minds. The remaining part of the US has to be big enough to maintain the deterrence and even operate the missile fields in MAGA as foreign bases.

    This map is made to get the conversation started on what a breakup could sensibly look like and most importantly what goals the MAGA country sets to secure. Create your own map.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Thea

    Texas has almost ¾ of the population in your orange bloc. That’s more than Russia in the USSR, and like England in the UK.

  230. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Thea

    The Spaniards that first colonised the Americas were overwhelmingly from the hottest and poorest Spanish regions like Extremadura (the name tells you everything) and Andalucia. Not that many from the rainier, greener, milder climates of Galicia/Asturias/Basque Country (inside the Hajnal Line). They could perhaps stand the climate better.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/atlantic-how-should-we-talk-about-migration-policy/#comment-2320025

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hapalong Cassidy

    It did help the Spaniards that in Central and South America there were lots of highland valleys and plateaus for them to settle in, which made the latitudes much more bearable. Most of the largest cities in Latin America are of high altitude, such as Mexico City and Bogota to name a few. A few others are tempered by their coastal location. Lima in particular gets winds from the cold Humboldt current, giving it a coastal California-like feel.

  231. @Exile
    @res

    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because "I still believe in limited government" shows why we can't have a united America.

    One side doesn't believe in limited government, they believe in clubbing guys to death with it.

    This poor sap doesn't know how to take his own side even when he has the votes to make policies that protect his kids.

    The neocon conservative-libertarian fusion we've seen from Reagan to the Tea Parties amounts to unilateral White political disarmament.

    Whites won't dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don't be shocked to see more McMicheals cases, more Chauvins, more BLM and antifa until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    Moreover, the bill itself would limit what the government can do. He’s a dumbass.

  232. HA says:
    @Thelma Ringbaum
    @HA

    A bit of propaganda is what you are saying. There was rather , forced Ukrainization ( "Nativization" ) in Soviet times, and Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture (as part of their divide et emper agenda) along with many others. Cf. the UK, where Welsh and Scottish nationalisms are alive, to get an idea.

    In any Republic though, like US or USSR, simple economic life will work for assimilation , though. You want to talk to your customers in their dominant language. You want to join elites talking in the dominant language. So you assimilate. The Soviets tried hard to preserve any non-russian nationalizm, and to combat russhian chauvenism, but were failing at that.

    However, it is true that mr. Putin may not be a real ally for "white nationalists", conservatives, etc. His dallying with them is at best situational. I think, the official line is now that Russian army combats "nationalists".

    Things are complicated..

    Replies: @HA

    “Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture…

    I suspect any developments that they made occurred when they were trying to wrest Ukraine away from Poland. Those don’t count. Because afterwards, once the Czarists actually absorbed Ukraine, things got uglier (which I suspect, is why more recent appeals for a warm embrace with mother Russia are being rebuffed, but hey, let’s ignore all that and focus on Nuland’s pastries).

    In other words, I’m going to say the instances of “development” Ukrainian culture are the few paltry exceptions that prove the rule: Again, here’s some examples from the link I cited above:

    …the use of Ukrainian language within the Russian empire was initially restricted by official government decrees such as the Valuev Circular (18 July 1863) and later banned by the Ems ukaz (18 May 1876) from any use in print (with the exception of reprinting of old documents). Popularly the anti-Ukrainian sentiment was promulgated by such organizations as the “Black Hundreds”, which were vehemently opposed to Ukrainian self-determination…In 1720 Peter the Great issued an edict prohibiting printing books in the Ukrainian language… In 1763 Catherine the Great issued an edict prohibiting lectures in the Ukrainian language at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. In 1769 the Most Holy Synod prohibited printing and using the Ukrainian alphabet book… In 1847 the Russian government persecuted all members of the Brotherhood of Saints Cyril and Methodius and prohibited the works of Taras Shevchenko… and others… In 1863 the Russian Minister of Interior Valuev decided that the Little Russian language (Ukrainian language) had never existed and could not ever exist. [Weird how so much effort is involved in eradicating something that “had never existed and could not exist.]… In 1879 the Russian Minister of Education Dmitry Tolstoy (later the Russian Minister of Interior) officially and openly stated that all people of the Russian Empire should be Russified. In the 1880s several edicts were issued prohibiting education in the Ukrainian language at private schools, theatric performances in Ukrainian, any use of Ukrainian in official institutions, and christening Ukrainian names… In 1914 the Russian government officially prohibited celebrations of the 100th Anniversary of Shevchenko’s birthday and posted gendarmes at the Chernecha Hill. The same year Nicholas II of Russia issued an edict prohibiting the Ukrainian press…Under Soviet rule in Ukraine, a policy of korenization.. initially supported Ukrainian cultural self-awareness. This policy was phased out in 1928 and terminated entirely in 1932 in favor of general Russification.

    If anyone wants to counter that with some list of allegations that the current Ukrainian government (led by native Russian speaker Zelensky, I might add) is doing anything comparable towards Russian speakers, make sure the source you provide isn’t something from RT or some similarly craven sellout to Putin. Then we can compare both lists and get some added perspective.

    • Thanks: Alden
    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @HA

    Is that long passage from a link to The Pretend Encyclopedia?

  233. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon, and American culture no longer has a lot of gravity. Oh sure, Team Brown will take the video games, the Dodge Chargers, the twerking, the R&B/gospel National Anfum. But they have no interest in Team White's Adam Smith, Locke's Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays. Actually they do have an interest in them: they want them tossed into history's trash can.

    You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus, @PhysicistDave

    “There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.”

    And strong non-Jewish influence as well.

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    “But they have no interest in Team White’s Adam Smith, Locke’s Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays”

    Neither does Team White on average.

    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @res
    @Corvinus


    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.
     
    Up to the usual Corvinus standard for intelligent comments.
    https://www.tpr.org/news/2020-05-29/alamo-cenotaph-monument-hit-with-graffiti-denouncing-white-supremacy-and-the-alamo
    https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2021/01/15/man-indicted-on-graffiti-charges-accused-of-defacing-the-alamo-cenotaph/

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Corvinus

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    Out-marriage among Jews? That runs about 50%.

  234. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @Truth
    @Anonymous

    You mean a lot of old Stock "white nationalists" consider Chinese women more marriagable than White American women.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I mean many white men, the desire for a low drama relationship transcends politicial ideology.

    That said, “white nationalist with Asian girlfriend” is becoming a cultural touchstone just like “anti racist activist lives in lily white suburb.” It’s what happens when you know, deep down, that a big part of your ideology is basically spurious.

  235. @anonymous
    https://i.imgur.com/Zw2oJXv.png

    My idea for breaking up the US.

    I think it starts with a MAGA country that wishes to be mostly rural, whiter, live according to socially conservative values, and free from election cheating. The last part will be the trigger for secession. It will include Texas because a sovereign country needs ocean access (or else surrounding countries can block the borders if MAGA decides to ban abortion, etc.) Texas has cities and racial diversity but at least the big cities are more conservative than other big US cities and the diversity is mostly better-assimilated Latinos.

    Greater California takes shape because MAGA split the USA apart.

    The State of Deseret because the Mormons want to be both socially conservative and racially inclusive.

    The remainder of the US will be huge because I think the biggest inconvenience problem to deal with after deciding on the split is the management of the nuclear forces. Two weeks ago this wasn't a big concern but now it will preoccupy minds. The remaining part of the US has to be big enough to maintain the deterrence and even operate the missile fields in MAGA as foreign bases.

    This map is made to get the conversation started on what a breakup could sensibly look like and most importantly what goals the MAGA country sets to secure. Create your own map.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Thea

    While you mess around in fantasyland Antifa is teaching recruits street fighting and propaganda techniques. This is why we lose.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Thea

    It sounds like fantasy land now but what do you think happens in 2024 if there is widespread election fraud?

    Replies: @Thea

  236. HA says:

    “As a ‘Putin lackey’ I’m proud to stand alongside George Kennan, Henry Kissinger,… in saying that the expansion of NATO is the ultimate, underlying cause of this conflict”.

    So great to see the alt-right being proud to stand alongside and approvingly quote Henry Kissinger and Jeffrey Sachs. I can’t see the sense of it myself, but I will admit that is indeed a new one. (In other words, you Putin lackeys need to actually read some of the stuff you post before you post it — you’ll embarrass yourselves less.)

    And no one is disputing that the expansion of NATO is the gravamen here. It’s the notion that America or Nuland is the primary driver of that expansion that needs to be dispelled, as opposed to the Ukrainians themselves. NATO didn’t roll a single tank into Kiev, and didn’t swipe Crimea. It didn’t buy up a puppet politician who then tried to compromise Ukraine’s courts, hobble their press, stuff enemies in prison with little in the way of judicial process, etc. Putin did. And that’s why the Ukrainians decided to change from their lukewarm policy of saying “meh” to NATO.

  237. @Rex Little
    @PhysicistDave


    My best friend in high school was half-Japanese: mom from Japan, dad was Caucasian, and my friend was born in Western Pennsylvania.

    He was culturally and politically as “American” as the rest of us.

    America has historically had an enormous power of acculturation.

    It’s true of course that those who immigrate as adults cannot themselves fully acculturate. But their kids and especially their grandkids tend to.
     
    I know a Chinese couple who came here in their 20s and had two sons. The kids were raised in mostly white communities, went to mostly white schools, had mostly white friends, eventually married white women. Now in their 40s, they (the kids) are as American as anyone whose ancestors came over on the Mayflower. It's been awhile since I've been in touch with them, but I'll bet they voted for Trump.

    I know a blonde, blue-eyed California girl (my ex-wife) whose grandparents all came from other countries (Sweden, Germany, Mexico).

    And no doubt it is possible to overwhelm the process if the numbers get too large.
     
    What happens when the numbers get large is that enclaves form. The children born into and raised in these enclaves don't assimilate into the larger American culture.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    What happens when the numbers get large is that enclaves form. The children born into and raised in these enclaves don’t assimilate into the larger American culture.

    Enclaves form, but they are subsequently broken up. Infrastructure degrades and becomes outdated. Property values decay and a different class of people slowly take over. Eventually things are either abandoned or “renewed”, depending on their location.

  238. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Here's your handbook for the next few decades....


    https://www.amazon.com/Mandibles-Family-2029-2047-Lionel-Shriver/dp/006232828X

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Bill Jones

    I read it. It seemed to me to get so many things dead right.
    Especially the financial aspects.

  239. @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    The ruble has crashed and is now worth less than a penny.
     
    Jack, the ruble was already worth less than 2 cents in 2015.

    Russia had hyper-inflation back in the '90s.

    It's percentage changes that matter. The current crash in the ruble is reversible if Putin pulls this off.

    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now. (Warning: currency speculation is financially dangerous!)

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Bill Jones

    Anyone who wants to bet on a decisive Russian victory could consider buying rubles now.

    Or Lukoil ADR’s.

  240. @anonymous
    @BluEidDvl

    Why do you think the dollar is collapsing? Why can't gross national debt to GDP reach 300% like in Japan? Japan hasn't collapsed yet either. It's been unhealthy for 30 years and will be for the long term future but no collapse is on the horizon.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I’m literally embarrassed for you. Twin deficit countries running the Japan playbook don’t become Japan; they become Argentina.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    If you know so much you should explain more clearly or don't leave a comment like this. What do you mean by a twin deficit country using the Japan playbook? And why does the combination result in collapse of the dollar? What does collapse of the dollar more precisely mean?

    Replies: @J.Ross

  241. Secession makes sense, because it’ll stop OUR oligarchs from owning everything and everybody.

    In the 19th century, the European peoples were creating Big Nations out of petty states for a good reason: Economics of scale. China is doing that now.

    But the great powers that united and thrived in those years (Germany, Italy, the USA etc) are seeing the backside of it now: Economic consolidation is making large swaths of the population both powerless and pauperized.

    Best bet: Split is all up now or watch it break up like the Hapsburg Empire did a century ago. Keep in mind the Hapsburg States were all European and the breakup was STILL bloody. What mess, what catastrophe waits for the US if it keeps on as it is now?

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Franz

    Big Nations out of petty states for a good reason: Economics of scale.

    'Economy of scale' can only work its magic, i.e. lower production costs, in the private sector. In the public sector, cost savings resulting from bigger size, if any, are retained by the bureaucracies involved and used for self- expansion and enrichment.

    Those huge, public high schools are just as inefficient (and crappy) as their smaller counterparts. It's also noteworthy that all schools in a state, large and small, receive the same amount of per- warm body funding, per type of student (e.g. the rate for special ed is 2-3X the "standard" rate).

    Replies: @Franz

  242. @YetAnotherAnon
    @HA

    As a "Putin lackey" I'm proud to stand alongside George Kennan, Henry Kissinger, two US Ambassadors to Russia, two Aussie Prime Ministers, the Defence Secretaries to Clinton, Bush and Obama, a CIA chief, and various other luminaries (Mearsheimer ring a bell?) in saying that the expansion of NATO is the ultimate, underlying cause of this conflict.

    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted "if you want to start a war with Russia, that's the best way of doing it". The fact that the US went ahead with something that's "stupid on every level" (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.

    So the links between Germany and Russia are severed, in a triumph for US policy. Pity about Ukraine.

    I see Rheinmetall shares (guns and tanks) are flying today, and that Germany suspended the closure of coal (dirty lignite) and nuclear powered electricity generation.

    European gas prices up 40% today. Brent crude $111. Wheat up again.

    Interesting times. China must be loving it.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @ben tillman

    Ha ha ha doesn’t see it, he’s a globalist lackey that suddenly five days ago, Ukraine was all important, the bees knees, when about six months ago he so much cared for our loyal Afghanistan allies, them precious incoming refugees. Doesn’t everyone realize that Afghanistan is the future economic power of tomorrow? And that it’s a democracy in the making? After all, 20 yrs spent there must’ve have made some results to show for it.

    All to preserve the US Empire. What happens when it collapses due to the weight of its own hubris?

    China’s the smart ones. They might as well quite delaying and take Taiwan already. And that’ll be the next tear-gushing from Ha ha ha, all for our loyal Taiwanese allies.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Ha ha ha doesn’t see it, he’s a globalist lackey..."

    Let the record note that Yojimbo calls me a globalist lackey while responding to a comment by a self-professed Putin lackey who states that he is "proud" to stand alongside Henry Kissinger.

    And I'm the globalist lackey, you say?

    Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it. Ha ha ha indeed.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  243. A lot of problems could be solved by giving California back to Mexico
    Libtards, illegal Mexicans and Chinese kleptocrats gone in one swoop.

  244. if ‘white culture’ (and the people that go with it) is to survive anywhere at all, the USA has got to go.

    It’s easy for me to say that because I’m not American… but I prefer to think that helps me think clearer about the matter.
    I’m sure the white Americans coming of age in 30 years time- with no more feelings of living connection to the glory days of the boomers – will have no obstacle to understanding that as well.

    better have a 1/4 of the land (and that’s still a heckuva lot of land) but be able to actually use it constructively for ‘your people’ (whatever that even means in america anymore), than none of it (which is how much whites actually ‘own’ and have any kind of cultural control over right now, and will continue to have until the genocide is complete – unless some of them are able to declare independence from it. History repeating itself??).

  245. @AndrewR
    @Nathan

    Everyone knows the US has the best real estate on earth. Two oceans on either side, weak neighbors to the north and south (which might as well be annexed), plus the Great Lakes and the mighty Mississippi, among other geographical blessings.

    But barring a revolution in DC, or major devolution of power to the states, of course we would be better off in a "divorced" nation. We cannot live with Democrats.

    Replies: @Nathan

    Mexico is not as weak as most people think. It has a fairly large conventional army and the technical ability to acquire nuclear weapons if it wanted to.

    If you think you can’t live with Democrats, wait until you have to live with the PRI. Better learn enough Spanish to pay a bribe and hope you hold a currency that you can pay bribes with.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Nathan

    Last I checked, Mexico spends about 0.6% of its domestic product on its military. I think that's about 1/2 what's typical in today's world.

  246. @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous[273] wrote to me:


    I certainly don’t want America to fracture, but what I find most fascinating is the idea held by many that partition would be at the state level: it most certainly would not. Most of California would remain under American control, including more coastal areas than one may think.
     
    Well, the state lines are already drawn, so it is easier to break things up that way. That is of course basically what happened with the Soviet Union, and the result is less than perfect, as the world is now learning.

    There is an entertaining series of novels by conservative author Kurt Schlichter about the country breaking up due to the Left choosing to secede: he predicts bitter fighting within states that are divided by the Split.

    Initially, the novels were intended to be over-the-top satires of the Left. Unfortunately, in 2022 they no longer seem so over-the-top.

    Schlichter started out as a non-Trumper who got red-pilled. He is ex-military (served in Desert Storm and Kosovo), so the fighting scenes ring true (except, of course, our hero always survives!).

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    I think what he means is that it can be by state and county.

    If California seceded, most of inland California would not wish to go the way of coastal-elite California, and that’s a lot of California. You could exclude too northern Cali, Shasta county, which is hard-core Trump country.

    And no reason to stop there – geographically the majority of Oregon is red-state including most of the coast, just two highly dense blue spots tilt it the other way when measured whole. Washington state is mostly the same story.

    Certainly it’s anyone’s guess if it’s going to come to that, enough so I wouldn’t put hard bets either way, but if there was a split the whole western coastal corridor would break down by county, no way you’d hold those together.

  247. res says:
    @Enzo the Baker
    General question about comments. Is it too hard to set up comments so that replies appear immediately below the respective comment they are replying to?

    Replies: @res

    Think about how that would work for multiple replies (and replies to replies, etc.).

    The ability to hover over the reply hyperlinks and see the reply comment text is IMHO a better way of accomplishing what you are looking for. If you disagree, maybe give some more detail on what you desire?

  248. HA says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Ha ha ha doesn't see it, he's a globalist lackey that suddenly five days ago, Ukraine was all important, the bees knees, when about six months ago he so much cared for our loyal Afghanistan allies, them precious incoming refugees. Doesn't everyone realize that Afghanistan is the future economic power of tomorrow? And that it's a democracy in the making? After all, 20 yrs spent there must've have made some results to show for it.

    All to preserve the US Empire. What happens when it collapses due to the weight of its own hubris?

    China's the smart ones. They might as well quite delaying and take Taiwan already. And that'll be the next tear-gushing from Ha ha ha, all for our loyal Taiwanese allies.

    Replies: @HA

    “Ha ha ha doesn’t see it, he’s a globalist lackey…”

    Let the record note that Yojimbo calls me a globalist lackey while responding to a comment by a self-professed Putin lackey who states that he is “proud” to stand alongside Henry Kissinger.

    And I’m the globalist lackey, you say?

    Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it. Ha ha ha indeed.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @HA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2f_q634ZKs

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HA

    "And I’m the globalist lackey, you say?"

    Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO's Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is).

    "Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it.:

    Was keyed in the larger context. Putinista, oh really now? But 'tis better than to be a globalist that sells out US citizens at every turn. Putin knows what's best for Russia. He believes that his backyard, or sphere of influence is being threatened.

    AGAIN. This is the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. If Russia were to place nuclear weapons in Cuba or in a South or Central American nation, how would the US respond?

    "Ha ha ha indeed."

    No, it's no so funny indeed. War, armed conflicts are unfortunate and regrettable. To have the good sense to avoid them for as long as possible, those people tend to live in the ideal world. But this is the real world, and for now, this is the most recent conflict of the current new year. This is not our fight, not our backyard, not our monkeys or our circus. Therefore, the US should stay out of it.

    Replies: @HA

  249. @Franz
    Secession makes sense, because it'll stop OUR oligarchs from owning everything and everybody.

    In the 19th century, the European peoples were creating Big Nations out of petty states for a good reason: Economics of scale. China is doing that now.

    But the great powers that united and thrived in those years (Germany, Italy, the USA etc) are seeing the backside of it now: Economic consolidation is making large swaths of the population both powerless and pauperized.

    Best bet: Split is all up now or watch it break up like the Hapsburg Empire did a century ago. Keep in mind the Hapsburg States were all European and the breakup was STILL bloody. What mess, what catastrophe waits for the US if it keeps on as it is now?

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Big Nations out of petty states for a good reason: Economics of scale.

    ‘Economy of scale’ can only work its magic, i.e. lower production costs, in the private sector. In the public sector, cost savings resulting from bigger size, if any, are retained by the bureaucracies involved and used for self- expansion and enrichment.

    Those huge, public high schools are just as inefficient (and crappy) as their smaller counterparts. It’s also noteworthy that all schools in a state, large and small, receive the same amount of per- warm body funding, per type of student (e.g. the rate for special ed is 2-3X the “standard” rate).

    • Replies: @Franz
    @Abolish_public_education


    ‘Economy of scale’ can only work its magic, i.e. lower production costs, in the private sector. In the public sector, cost savings resulting from bigger size, if any, are retained by the bureaucracies involved and used for self- expansion and enrichment.
     
    The demon in the firebox is that the private sector, once it deletes "transaction costs" can easily imitate the public sector. Big Tech started doing so in the 1990s. Actually earlier --

    Reagan's cost saving measures of having private contractors do what the military did by itself since Lysander of Sparta had the magical effect of militarizing parts of the private sector and civilianizing the military. Both got fatter and less useful to the nation as a whole.

    Cut the whole up, the problem disappears.
  250. @Bardon Kaldian
    It is not a question of intent, but of historical inevitability.

    Of course there is no "scientific" explanation, but I'll use analogies.

    From the beginning to the assassination of JFK, the US was basically a nation. It was founded by Anglo-Protestants with some other NW Europeans thrown in, and later with other Europeans added (which caused friction), but they've more or less assimilated. Blacks were not Americans, but they were an American national minority.

    When Churchill and Roosevelt met to sign the Atlantic charter in 1941, they clearly indicated that Americans and British share the essential common heritage.

    In the past 60 or so years the US has been transformed beyond recognition. This is not a nation; there is not an American people anymore; various other visibly different groups (Muslims, Chinese, Indians, ...) are not supposedly new Americans.

    When newly arrived non-European immigrants arrive, they may pledge the allegiance, but they are not the new "we" who will consider Washington, Franklin, Lincoln, .... as their historical heritage & identity. I know it's a bit funny when Italian-Americans say "we" and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.

    New, multicultural "Americans" are a hollow entity. What is "American" about them is basically a combination of baseball, English (when they adopt it) and segments of trivial popular culture. Even the most cultured or "advanced" among them don't see Franklin, Whitman or Twain being "them", or having an affinity with those defining American historical figures.

    In other words, multicultural Americans don't have much in common with historical Americans- and this is a definite divide no one can bridge.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Anonymous, @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    I know it’s a bit funny when Italian-Americans say “we” and mean George Washington, but for Africans or Muslims it is impossible. It is not funny, but completely absurd.

    IIRC it was about 5 million Italians who migrated to the US from 1880-1920, so it’s generations down the line now that’s many tens-of-millions in descent – if you’re going with the Soprano / NJ stereotypes it’s pretty far off from the reality of the millions. Italian immigrants have been very successful on a multi-generational basis.

    And, it wasn’t Washington, but it’s worth noting since you raise the point that long before Grant was a glimmer in Lincoln’s eye, Lincoln reached out to Giuseppe Garibaldi and asked him to lead the union army against the rebellion. Garibaldi, who had once lived on Staten Island, had distinguished himself multiple times including in the Uruguayan Civil War, among other conflicts and seemed to have a knack for an American form of war and was popular in the states – a contemporary unit of the US Army was named for him: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/39th_New_York_Infantry_Regiment.

    He refused the commission that was offered to him as the union still had slave-holding states in its number. He ended up back in Italy, took a key role in expelling the Austrians and forming the unified Italian nation state … which: promptly – fell into chaos.

    Facing that chaos many Italians gave up – not so much on Italy as on the nascent nation-state, and spent the next 40 years migrating here. It’s a misnomer to think of them as coming from the Italian nation state, they came from the Italian peninsula which hadn’t been unified for well over 1000 years.

  251. res says:
    @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.”

    And strong non-Jewish influence as well.

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    “But they have no interest in Team White’s Adam Smith, Locke’s Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays”

    Neither does Team White on average.

    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.

    Replies: @res, @Nicholas Stix

    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.

    Up to the usual Corvinus standard for intelligent comments.
    https://www.tpr.org/news/2020-05-29/alamo-cenotaph-monument-hit-with-graffiti-denouncing-white-supremacy-and-the-alamo
    https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2021/01/15/man-indicted-on-graffiti-charges-accused-of-defacing-the-alamo-cenotaph/

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @res

    If you're feeding that dumb troll I hope it's for the foie gras.

  252. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.

    This is completely inapt. Are you seriously worried about Mexico or Canada "meddling" in the resulting American statelets? The more likely result is perfectly logical mergers with Canada's western and eastern provinces and the US southwest merging into Mexico and Miami being the center of a new Caribbean union.

    Russia could take over Mongolia, but it doesn't. So could China, but it doesn't. The US could take over the Caribbean and Central America, but it doesn't. The South American ABC powers could carve up the place among themselves, but they don't.

    The only two other countries that matter, Russia and China, find Americans as baffling and alien as we find them. And they have no interest in inheriting hordes of negros and latinos.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dennis Dale

    I don’t find them baffling at all.

    But I find us as baffling as they find us.

  253. @Meretricious
    OT
    Steve, does Judge Jackson have a higher IQ than Michelle Obama? Aren't smart ppl supposed to look smart?

    https://www.npr.org/2022/02/14/1078086453/ketanji-brown-jackson-supreme-court-biden

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Mere, what do you think when you look in the mirror?

  254. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    Everything from Marxism to critical theory to transgenderism are Western inventions.

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon, and American culture no longer has a lot of gravity. Oh sure, Team Brown will take the video games, the Dodge Chargers, the twerking, the R&B/gospel National Anfum. But they have no interest in Team White's Adam Smith, Locke's Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays. Actually they do have an interest in them: they want them tossed into history's trash can.

    You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Corvinus, @PhysicistDave

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:

    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.

    That’s true, but there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in political movements in general — including libertarianism and conservatism.

    And of course there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in physics, medicine, etc.

    I think it can be explained simply by the fact that all of these fields tend to attract people with higher IQs, and (Ashkenazi) Jews do have, on average, higher IQs.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @PhysicistDave

    No, it cannot be explained by that.

  255. The real problem I suspect–in addition to the looting that China and others will indulge, no need for war or anything really, just a solid diaspora presence and good lobby–is that the more powerful entity, which will be globalist, will simply not abide the presence of a near alternative competing worldview. What happens if and when outmigration becomes a problem?
    Giving us separate states means they can just explicitly wage war on us, with superior weapons.

    But the prospect of staying captive in a society and polity controlled by your enemies (and laughably “democratic”) is slavery and penury. We’re well on our way. It’s the age-old human choice between warlike freedom and peaceful slavery.

    I don’t have the answer, but to assent to union feels very much like surrender.

    Here’s an unattributed quote:
    “When a people who amount to a hundred million souls tolerate the yoke of common slavery in order to prevent the territory belonging to their State from being broken up and divided, that is worse than if such a State and such a people were dismembered while one fragment still retained its complete independence”

    I agree and argue that all separation has to do to be superior to union is produce a nation for a fragment of old white America, that might continue the European-American line–as opposed to union, which guarantees and end to that line. It’s a core value.

    With all due respect, I’m not ready to Lay Back and Think of Ukraine.

  256. @res
    @Corvinus


    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.
     
    Up to the usual Corvinus standard for intelligent comments.
    https://www.tpr.org/news/2020-05-29/alamo-cenotaph-monument-hit-with-graffiti-denouncing-white-supremacy-and-the-alamo
    https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2021/01/15/man-indicted-on-graffiti-charges-accused-of-defacing-the-alamo-cenotaph/

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    If you’re feeding that dumb troll I hope it’s for the foie gras.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  257. @guest007
    @Mr. Anon

    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy. If one does not want to be ruled by those listed, then run candidates who can win with ideas and policies that appeal to the majority. That is the point of a democracy. Not claiming to be silenced politically because one's favored fringe candidate did not win.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy.

    If 51% of the population hates me and wants me dead then – yes – I hate democracy. Why shouldn’t I?

    Actually it doesn’t even have to be that lopsided. The way our system works is that some fraction of the 1/3 of the population in the middle which barely even understands how our system of government functions, throw the election to one half of the other 2/3 of the population, based on how effective, or ineffective their propaganda is.

    The system doesn’t work anymore. If you think it does, you’re living in a fantasy World, dreaming about a country that’s already dead.

    Democracy is just the latest sham used by the Oligarchy to buy our assent for their system. I’m beginning to wonder if it hasn’t always been that way.

    I’m not suggesting solutions. I don’t know that there are any.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Mr. Anon

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn't scale beyond that. We have the same number of Congressmen that we did almost a century and 190 million people ago. How can that possibly reflect "representative democracy?" Hence, Congress becomes purely a vehicle for personal grift.

    A nice way to lower the temperature in Presidential elections would just be to have the governors vote every 4 years on one of their number to head the Executive branch. The notion that the Presidency can turn on a handful of votes within the statistical margin of error in a single precinct is appalling.

    Nursing home residents can vote; non-citizens can vote in some jurisdictions; net tax consumers can vote. Mail-in ballots and ballot harvesting is allowed. The results are no more morally legitimate than a coin toss. LOL--Iowa caucuses can literally be decided by a coin toss; here's a classic:

    https://youtu.be/eaWstSk2ZFk

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Drapetomaniac
    @Mr. Anon

    In high school US Government class (1963/64?) I suggested replacing elected government with direct democracy. It was sane and simple and favored the individual over groups. A no vote would exempt you from any forced participation in whatever bill/referendum that was being proposed. Crimes were basically relegated to someone aggressing against person or property with ostracism, arbitration, insurance, and payback being a bitch, among others, as possible solutions.

    A NO vote exempted the voter completely - no paying for anything you don't want, no fighting wars for the government (you don't fight wars for the public), no drug wars, no forced death vaccines, no gun control, no welfare, etc. The individual for all practical purposes was sovereign.

    As a child I'd see signs proclaiming "Trespassers will be shot" on farmer's fields, not "You can shop!ift $900 and not be prosecuted" at stores.

    A sane and civilizing world.


    SKYNET FOR PRESIDENT 2024

    If it's okay to kill some of the people why not kill them all?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  258. @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_(independence_movement)

    But the two/three States + Province do work together for some public policy issues:

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/MOU-Final%20Draft%20for%20Distribution.pdf

    https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/british-columbia-california-oregon-washington-join-forces-combat-climate-change

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.

    I’m not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I’m talking about web developers in Seattle.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Anon


    I’m not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I’m talking about web developers in Seattle.
     
    Let's hope they're not driving Mazdas tuned to NPR:


    https://youtu.be/F0YW43JYUwE

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  259. @Barnard
    @Thea

    I commented when visiting Florida in the heat of summer was "how did the original settlers handle this?" For the Spanish maybe it was not as bad, but it amazes me that English and Scots adapted well enough to stay in Florida long term.

    Replies: @Thea, @S. Anonyia

    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @S. Anonyia


    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

     

    Or the British astronomer who visited the state in 1888 to view some astral phenomenon. New York Times headline from September 13 that year:

    RICHARD A. PROCTOR DEAD; QUARANTINED AS A YELLOW FEVER PATIENT. HE ARRIVED IN THIS CITY FROM FLORIDA ON MONDAY AND DIED LAST NIGHT--NO DANGER APPREHENDED.


    https://devonandexeterinstitution.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/1-768x1308.jpg



    https://www.wisefamousquotes.com/images/richard-a-proctor-quotes-1126640.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

  260. @Bardon Kaldian
    @PhysicistDave

    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans; also, if this society is not under great stress of poverty or some other crisis.

    One must take into account historical culture & various classes.

    You may say whatever you want, but the general culture of a real country is multilayered & there has to be some core group, if this country is to be treated as something real, and not as de Gaulle thought of Americans- a bunch of rootless individuals or segments of tribes bent on economic exploitation and nothing more.

    The US is an extension of, first, Britain & later, Europe. And then- stop. Teddy Roosevelt was right when he halted Asian immigration in the US. This is as far as one can go.

    First- race. Blacks, with very few exceptions, cannot- even if they wanted to - feel to have anything in common with historical America, let alone with roots of that country, from Aristotle to Caesar and Britain. It is the same in a more colored country like Brazil. Blacks there don't give a hoot about the history of that country, as a meaningful entity. Putting sensitive IQ question aside, there is no black intelligentsia, or middle class anywhere, that would possess any emo connection with anything Western (Greek heritage, Christianity & scientific rational spirit). What you are writing about is not a reality of Jamestown Americans, nor of Ellis Island Americans.

    You write about the likes of Maz Jobrani, Iranian-American comedian (whom I like, although I disagree with him on many points- which doesn't matter, because he's a comedian). The guy is married to an Indian, is your typical urban newer American, but has nothing in common with "deep roots" of American identity.

    Let's take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You'll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews. You won't find blacks interested in French literature; you won't find Muslims interested in Catholic philosophy; you won't find Hindu Indians writing encyclopedic works on Western musicology.

    And without the field one could call the humanities & the way of life -there is no nation. No nation can remain founded mostly on STEM or, at the lower level, popular culture.

    Ricardo Duchesne was right in his critique of Nial Ferguson's neo-con liberal delusions: for a culture to flourish & continue, you have to have a combination of race and culture, which, in the case of the West- and the US in particular- is not replaceable, nor universal, and not as superficial as many seem to think.

    https://reviews.history.ac.uk/review/1225

    Civilization: The Six Ways the West Beat the Rest

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Bardon Kaldian wrote to me:

    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.

    For how long? Were you born here and did you grow up here?

    I did, and, as I have related, I married into an immigrant family, and my best friend in high school was half-Japanese.

    I suspect I have a more detailed perspective on this country than you do.

    BK also wrote:

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans…

    Y’know, the case you make would argue that the US could not survive the Irish/German/Italian immigrants of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

    In fact, my ancestors on the English side of my family did argue that, especially concerning Catholics, and, most especially, Irish Catholics.

    But we did assimilate them, as shown by the other side of my own family — German and Irish.

    BK also wrote:

    Let’s take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You’ll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews.

    Indeed, but the people who are trying to destroy Western Civilization come from exactly those same groups.

    Socialism, progressivism, environmentalism, critical theory, transgendersim — all of these are evil products of Western Civilization and of the ethnic groups you mention — Europeans and Euro-Americans.. None of these evils are due to Blacks or Hispanics or any Third-World immigrants.

    The culture war is a civil war within the West.

    The enemy is within the gates.

    Yes, massive, overwhelming immigration is not a great idea for any society. But that is not our central problem. Our central problem is our corrupt, decadent, bizarrely incompetent — and overwhelmingly White — ruling elite.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    The only reason that immigration wave worked out in the end, though, was that the country got a break after 1924 to digest everybody for a couple of generations. It was no pre-ordained thing. It goes to reason that, since we've now added the equivalent of France in terms of population from a wider array of peoples, many more culturally distant, the break would need to be longer. It's something I think America can pull off... if given the space to do so.

    Alas, our leaders don't think in terms of "limits": their emotions and petty whims define physical, empirical reality. You know what the definition of something without limits is? A deity. And the universe has a funny way of really, really screwing over people who think themselves above all restraints toward the end, as much as it did 3000 years ago: what Homer would have called "contending with the gods". You'll lose against physical reality, the gods, nature itself in the end: call it what you will. Hubris knows every man's number.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  261. @Glaivester
    @IHTG

    The problem is that it is becoming increasingly obvious that t he Left will not allow political devolution. When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex "marriage" maybe that will be a solution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex “marriage” maybe that will be a solution.

    No state is, but many statelets are. Apparently, some Americans still have [*ahem*] reservations:


    Legend here: Map of same-sex marriage in the United States

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Indians, with their tribal sovereignty, are uniquely positioned for the implosion of the US. Tribal citizenship would be nice to have right now.

  262. @Thea
    @IHTG

    Alienation hits both left and right. Antifa and such are the left’s response. Daydreaming about separate nations is apparently the right’s way to cope. Something more productive and unifying would be nice from both sides.

    The tragedy is that occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party never realized they were on the same side.

    Replies: @Joe Walker

    Diversity is the enemy of unity.

  263. @PhysicistDave
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:


    There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.
     
    That's true, but there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in political movements in general -- including libertarianism and conservatism.

    And of course there is a disproportionate Jewish presence in physics, medicine, etc.

    I think it can be explained simply by the fact that all of these fields tend to attract people with higher IQs, and (Ashkenazi) Jews do have, on average, higher IQs.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    No, it cannot be explained by that.

  264. @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Ha ha ha doesn’t see it, he’s a globalist lackey..."

    Let the record note that Yojimbo calls me a globalist lackey while responding to a comment by a self-professed Putin lackey who states that he is "proud" to stand alongside Henry Kissinger.

    And I'm the globalist lackey, you say?

    Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it. Ha ha ha indeed.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  265. @YetAnotherAnon
    @HA

    As a "Putin lackey" I'm proud to stand alongside George Kennan, Henry Kissinger, two US Ambassadors to Russia, two Aussie Prime Ministers, the Defence Secretaries to Clinton, Bush and Obama, a CIA chief, and various other luminaries (Mearsheimer ring a bell?) in saying that the expansion of NATO is the ultimate, underlying cause of this conflict.

    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted "if you want to start a war with Russia, that's the best way of doing it". The fact that the US went ahead with something that's "stupid on every level" (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.

    So the links between Germany and Russia are severed, in a triumph for US policy. Pity about Ukraine.

    I see Rheinmetall shares (guns and tanks) are flying today, and that Germany suspended the closure of coal (dirty lignite) and nuclear powered electricity generation.

    European gas prices up 40% today. Brent crude $111. Wheat up again.

    Interesting times. China must be loving it.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @ben tillman

    As Brit Ambassador Roderic Lyne noted “if you want to start a war with Russia, that’s the best way of doing it“. The fact that the US went ahead with something that’s “stupid on every level” (Lyne again) implies that they knew what they were doing.

    And they knew what the response would be; i.e., they wanted Russia to invade Ukraine.

  266. OT, on Varsity Blues.

    I said last year:

    … the admissions office as an institution knew about unqualified athletes. … My contention is that this tacit sanction from the admissions office as an institution, blows up the federal case pertaining to that university.

    Now Sports Illustrated says,

    So why didn’t Varsity Blues implicate more high-ranking officials at the schools? “Prosecutors go where the evidence takes them,” Rosen says. “If it were a school policy to accept fake athletes in exchange for money, it probably would not be a crime. But admissions thought these were legitimate athletes recruited to play on their teams. And they weren’t.”

    But it remains an open question: What did admissions, and other administrators, know at each of the eight Varsity Blues schools?

    https://www.si.com/college/2022/01/20/varsity-blues-real-scandal-texas-tennis-coach-daily-cover

    Told ya!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @dvorak

    I should write a teen comedy screenplay about a bunch of rich kids who meet at test prep camp the summer before their senior year in high school, but they don't get any better on their practice tests. But then 15 months later they all run into each other at USC, where they are now the second string football placekicker or soccer goalie or tennis team member.

  267. @Reg Cæsar
    @Glaivester


    When states are allowed not to recognize same-sex “marriage” maybe that will be a solution.
     
    No state is, but many statelets are. Apparently, some Americans still have [*ahem*] reservations:


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States.svg/800px-Same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States.svg.png

    Legend here: Map of same-sex marriage in the United States

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    The Indians, with their tribal sovereignty, are uniquely positioned for the implosion of the US. Tribal citizenship would be nice to have right now.

  268. Good column and funny video.

    > Putin then appointed an extroverted local, Ramzan Kadyrov,
    > to serve as, in effect, his client King of the Chechens

    To be precise, Putin appointed Ramzan’s dad Akhmat as head of the administration of the Chechen Republic in 2000. It’s only after his dad was assassinated, in 2004, that Ramzan came to power, first as deputy prime minister, then as acting prime minister in 2005, then as Prime Minister in 2006.

  269. @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "2022 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which is very relevant to the current crisis in Ukraine. How exactly would the US respond if Russia decided to place nuclear warheads in Cuba aimed directly at the US?"

    Last I heard, Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead, and Cuba is still Cuba. Even Guantanamo remains on a "lease", in the same way that Crimea was before Russia took it over.

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.

    "This is more than an existential crisis, it goes to the heart of Russia’s historical existence as a nation with many defensive buffers to protect it from total destruction."

    Oh, see how these Putin lackeys wail copious tears, not for Kiev buildings and citizens being blown apart, no -- but rather, for Russia not having enough in the way of "defensive buffers". They wail like a husky with separation anxiety. Did having enough defensive buffers get slipped into some UN charter while I wasn't looking? You know, maybe if Russia hadn't expanded to the size of an entire continent, it wouldn't need so much in the way of buffer states, has anyone ever considered that? Little Lichtenstein isn't exactly clamoring for buffer states. Maybe Andorra? There's the answer to Russia's "existential crisis". If you don't balloon in size the way gluttons do, you wouldn't have as much waistline or other "border issues" you need to worry about.

    What, you're telling me that not only does Russia get to keep its current borders (unlike, say, Ukraine), but on top of that, it also needs buffer states to ensure that it remains "protected"? I dunno, I would have thought with all that acquisition, it's rather Russias neighbors who might need protection. As of last week, I'm even more convinced of that. You Putin lackeys really need to step out of the echo chamber.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @JimDandy

    In other words, as analogies goes, Cuba just stopped being relevant as of about a week ago (and really, after Russia decided it needed more than just a lease). The Putin lackeys need to put that one to bed.

    Sorry, I’m a bit slow on this one. Spell it out for me, please. How would the US react if Russia put nukes in Cuba tomorrow–C’est la vie? Que sera, sera?

    Would that make Cuba relevant again?

  270. @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Ha ha ha doesn’t see it, he’s a globalist lackey..."

    Let the record note that Yojimbo calls me a globalist lackey while responding to a comment by a self-professed Putin lackey who states that he is "proud" to stand alongside Henry Kissinger.

    And I'm the globalist lackey, you say?

    Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it. Ha ha ha indeed.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “And I’m the globalist lackey, you say?”

    Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO’s Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is).

    “Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it.:

    Was keyed in the larger context. Putinista, oh really now? But ’tis better than to be a globalist that sells out US citizens at every turn. Putin knows what’s best for Russia. He believes that his backyard, or sphere of influence is being threatened.

    AGAIN. This is the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. If Russia were to place nuclear weapons in Cuba or in a South or Central American nation, how would the US respond?

    “Ha ha ha indeed.”

    No, it’s no so funny indeed. War, armed conflicts are unfortunate and regrettable. To have the good sense to avoid them for as long as possible, those people tend to live in the ideal world. But this is the real world, and for now, this is the most recent conflict of the current new year. This is not our fight, not our backyard, not our monkeys or our circus. Therefore, the US should stay out of it.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO’s Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is)."

    And before he invaded, Putin had a buffer state composed of people whose net preference for NATO was roughly zip, demographically speaking. Percentage support for joining NATO was in the low 30's, pretty much a match for the "say no to NATO" camp. Not even Nuland's pastries were enough to shift the balance, and even her favored candidate Yatseniuk, nixed the idea of joining NATO.

    Strangely enough, when Putin confiscated those Russian-heavy areas that were the counterbalance and the buffering he needed, the vote shifted.

    Sorry, it isn't NATO's insatiable lust for land that caused that. It was Putin's. Shaking your angry little fist at me or trying to hide under Kissinger's and Brzezinski's skirts won't change what happened.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  271. @Exile
    @res

    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because "I still believe in limited government" shows why we can't have a united America.

    One side doesn't believe in limited government, they believe in clubbing guys to death with it.

    This poor sap doesn't know how to take his own side even when he has the votes to make policies that protect his kids.

    The neocon conservative-libertarian fusion we've seen from Reagan to the Tea Parties amounts to unilateral White political disarmament.

    Whites won't dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don't be shocked to see more McMicheals cases, more Chauvins, more BLM and antifa until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    Gee, freedom of association is a bitch, isn’t it? Let’s not even mention the anarchistic Bill of Rights, dubbed by a Brit of the day as “a conspiracy against government”.

    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because “I still believe in limited government” shows why we can’t have a united America…

    …until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.

    A bill refusing funds to a rogue department of a state university sounds awfully libertarian to me.

    Whites won’t dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don’t be shocked to see more McMicheals cases

    Again, the right to carry a weapon in public for self-defence is the libertarian position, “constitutional carry” even more so. You want to go back to the old-time Southern gun control, when concealment was a crime?

    Competent races don’t need affirmative action or other government “programs” to thrive.

    You come across as yet another SPLC troll who detects a fault line among the otherwise unified commenters here– in this case, weak vs strong government action– then mocks one side while paying lip service to the other. Divide and conquer.

    • Replies: @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    The SPLC loves libertarians. You are the most articulate advocates for unilateral White political disarmament and most of you don't even understand how damaging (and eventually self-defeating) your ideas are.

    Libertarianism is a Fellow White-promulgated ideology targeted at higher-IQ White men.

    If I was an SPLC troll, I would agree with and amplify everything you, onebornfree and Corvinus say here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  272. @White refugee in usa
    ethnonationalism will break the USA apart eventually. Only problem is that blacks are totally dependent on white Americans for any meager civilization that they possess right now. Whites could go their own way but blacks will resist with everything they have.

    Blacks without white people= Jamaica

    Hispanics without white people= central Mexico

    White people without minorities= Denmark

    Ethnonationalism= Destiny of USA

    Replies: @Joe Walker, @Charon, @Recently Based, @Slugsmagee

    Valid point. Obviously, blacks have been gifted vast political and institutional power over the last twenty years. They aren’t letting us crackers go anywhere. Steve in particular has detailed, rather exhaustively, just how emboldened they feel. We need to be kept around as a permanent source of reparations. Or else it all falls apart.

  273. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:

    Have you read Ron Unz’s latest? He states that when the full culpability of the U.S. government’s involvement in the unleashing and handling of Covid is fully known, the government and its weak dollar will likely and rightly disintegrate in a Soviet style way. That is exactly what you are pleading against.

    What is the stolen election, subversion of politicians to foreign oligarchs, 9/11, MK Ultra, deliberate opioid crisis, and the Covid and mrna vax bioweapons compared to the Stamp Act? To take your current position you must also declare the entire American Revolution total folly. And if it was, then what are you clinging to?

  274. anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thea
    @anonymous

    While you mess around in fantasyland Antifa is teaching recruits street fighting and propaganda techniques. This is why we lose.

    Replies: @anonymous

    It sounds like fantasy land now but what do you think happens in 2024 if there is widespread election fraud?

    • Replies: @Thea
    @anonymous

    The republicans have done nothing to help white Americans. They are the main supports of invite the world, invade the world policies that destroy America.


    Who cares if the GOP get conned out of another election. They need to grow a pair and support the American people.

  275. anonymous[404] • Disclaimer says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @anonymous

    I'm literally embarrassed for you. Twin deficit countries running the Japan playbook don't become Japan; they become Argentina.

    Replies: @anonymous

    If you know so much you should explain more clearly or don’t leave a comment like this. What do you mean by a twin deficit country using the Japan playbook? And why does the combination result in collapse of the dollar? What does collapse of the dollar more precisely mean?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    The Japanese are a very unique people and practices which they take for granted are simply impossible for many other peoples.

    Replies: @anonymous

  276. @dvorak
    OT, on Varsity Blues.

    I said last year:

    ... the admissions office as an institution knew about unqualified athletes. ... My contention is that this tacit sanction from the admissions office as an institution, blows up the federal case pertaining to that university.
     
    Now Sports Illustrated says,

    So why didn’t Varsity Blues implicate more high-ranking officials at the schools? “Prosecutors go where the evidence takes them,” Rosen says. “If it were a school policy to accept fake athletes in exchange for money, it probably would not be a crime. But admissions thought these were legitimate athletes recruited to play on their teams. And they weren’t.”

    But it remains an open question: What did admissions, and other administrators, know at each of the eight Varsity Blues schools?
     
    https://www.si.com/college/2022/01/20/varsity-blues-real-scandal-texas-tennis-coach-daily-cover


    Told ya!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I should write a teen comedy screenplay about a bunch of rich kids who meet at test prep camp the summer before their senior year in high school, but they don’t get any better on their practice tests. But then 15 months later they all run into each other at USC, where they are now the second string football placekicker or soccer goalie or tennis team member.

  277. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers. However, for the US, secession would only be a sound idea were it permitted sub-nationally. Neighborhoods should be allowed to join and then secede from their current counties to form a new county. Counties should be allowed to join and then secede from their current states and form a new state. This would accelerate The Big Sort, and create localities sufficiently homogenous in political preferences that national representation in Congress and state representation in legislatures would truly be representative.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Cato

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers.

    The African boundaries are often suboptimal because they bisect certain tribes. However, nearly all African states would be polyglot even if the boundaries were set optimally. The more salient problem was when they put quite incompatible sets of people in one territory (as they did in Chad, the Sudan, and, to a lesser degree, Uganda) or assembled behemoths (Nigeria, the Congo, the Sudan). Some problems couldn't be helped by modified political geography (Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Burundi).

    Disagree with you in re 'west and south Asia'. The boundaries in North Africa map to vernacular dialects and to Ottoman-era political units, albeit imperfectly. Those on the Arabian peninsula map to the zones of influence of local political grandees in the late Ottoman period. It's only in the Fertile Crescent that you see artifacts of western powers. In South Asia, you see an attempt to build a political order across a whole world civilization. The Muslim areas were bracketed out at the behest of Muslim politicians, with one half later divorcing the other. The provincial boundaries in (Hindu) India were drawn after the British Raj and drawn according to language.

    Replies: @Cato

  278. @anonymous
    @Thea

    It sounds like fantasy land now but what do you think happens in 2024 if there is widespread election fraud?

    Replies: @Thea

    The republicans have done nothing to help white Americans. They are the main supports of invite the world, invade the world policies that destroy America.

    Who cares if the GOP get conned out of another election. They need to grow a pair and support the American people.

  279. anon[232] • Disclaimer says:

    A lot of the disbelief that secession is a realistic goal apparent in this comment thread neglect to consider what happens when hot skirmishes start breaking out across Post-America: A Great Sorting.

    When civil society begins to recede, many of those who find themselves behind enemy lines — either racial or ideological — will skedaddle quickly to freindlier locales. The need for allies will force all these “mixed up” Americans to sort themselves into geographic blocs of like-minded people. Once that process is underway, the conerns about “fault lines running through every neighborhood” will evaporate, easing the way forward to region-wide separations.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @anon

    If Trump is elected in 2024 it will be the end of democracy in the minds of many people. So it becomes necessary to end democracy to save it. If there is a lot of election fraud in 2024 then non-violent secession is the only viable outlet for the energy that has no ballot box to go to.

    Don't just look at the downside. Think about how a beautiful MAGA country can be created that will save the America that we remember.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anon

    A Conversation with Bill Bishop, author of THE BIG SORT


    https://s.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BA-AN069_book2_20080725200015.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

  280. @prime noticer
    Steve would advise the colonists to not break away from the Crown. even if they're successful (obviously they won't be, they'll be defeated and hanged, and i'll go back to making a profit trading goods or publishing the town newspaper because i'm smart and revolutionaries are stupid morons with muskets), as soon as the colonies become independent, they'll immediately be invaded and taken over by the French or the Spanish or indians or somebody else. breaking away from Great Britain is the stupidest, dumbest course of action possible. only a total idiot would think that's a good idea.

    supposedly that's the smart money talking, the adults in the room, the conventional wisdom that i have to hear every day from absolute losers like GOP leadership barnacles who are superglue ensconced in their positions.

    Steve thinks that trying to escape the subjugation of the DC regime, which is controlled by hostile aliens, and seeks to CRUSH me and my people, would be one of the biggest mistakes possible. he prefers you vote moar harder, that should work.

    Replies: @bee steve is stupid, @AKAHorace

    That’s because Steve is a college educated idiot.

  281. anonymous[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    A lot of the disbelief that secession is a realistic goal apparent in this comment thread neglect to consider what happens when hot skirmishes start breaking out across Post-America: A Great Sorting.

    When civil society begins to recede, many of those who find themselves behind enemy lines -- either racial or ideological -- will skedaddle quickly to freindlier locales. The need for allies will force all these "mixed up" Americans to sort themselves into geographic blocs of like-minded people. Once that process is underway, the conerns about "fault lines running through every neighborhood" will evaporate, easing the way forward to region-wide separations.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    If Trump is elected in 2024 it will be the end of democracy in the minds of many people. So it becomes necessary to end democracy to save it. If there is a lot of election fraud in 2024 then non-violent secession is the only viable outlet for the energy that has no ballot box to go to.

    Don’t just look at the downside. Think about how a beautiful MAGA country can be created that will save the America that we remember.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @anonymous

    "If Trump is elected in 2024 it will be the end of democracy in the minds of many people. So it becomes necessary to end democracy to save it."

    Oh, don't you worry, bud. Trump will not be elected in 2024 even if every single person in ZFUSA voted for him. There will never be an honest presidential election in this country, ever again. Toothpaste don't go back in the tube and so on.

  282. @Mr. Anon
    @epebble


    Northwesterners turning to China is absurd even as a thought experiment. However, there is a somewhat low energy movement to create an autonomous region called Cascadia.
     
    I'm not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I'm talking about web developers in Seattle.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’m not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I’m talking about web developers in Seattle.

    Let’s hope they’re not driving Mazdas tuned to NPR:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Eternal NPR purgatory". Thanks, Reg.

  283. @S. Anonyia
    @Barnard

    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

    Or the British astronomer who visited the state in 1888 to view some astral phenomenon. New York Times headline from September 13 that year:

    RICHARD A. PROCTOR DEAD; QUARANTINED AS A YELLOW FEVER PATIENT. HE ARRIVED IN THIS CITY FROM FLORIDA ON MONDAY AND DIED LAST NIGHT–NO DANGER APPREHENDED.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    So progressive, they let black folk enlarge the photographs.

  284. @anon
    A lot of the disbelief that secession is a realistic goal apparent in this comment thread neglect to consider what happens when hot skirmishes start breaking out across Post-America: A Great Sorting.

    When civil society begins to recede, many of those who find themselves behind enemy lines -- either racial or ideological -- will skedaddle quickly to freindlier locales. The need for allies will force all these "mixed up" Americans to sort themselves into geographic blocs of like-minded people. Once that process is underway, the conerns about "fault lines running through every neighborhood" will evaporate, easing the way forward to region-wide separations.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Does he mention immivasion? It's obviously the clearest illustration of what he's arguing. Overnight instant neighborhood of materialist climbing South Asians, who all believe NPR, and all vote Democrat, and who feel traditional Indian antipathy to outsiders like the native population.

  285. @Abolish_public_education
    @Franz

    Big Nations out of petty states for a good reason: Economics of scale.

    'Economy of scale' can only work its magic, i.e. lower production costs, in the private sector. In the public sector, cost savings resulting from bigger size, if any, are retained by the bureaucracies involved and used for self- expansion and enrichment.

    Those huge, public high schools are just as inefficient (and crappy) as their smaller counterparts. It's also noteworthy that all schools in a state, large and small, receive the same amount of per- warm body funding, per type of student (e.g. the rate for special ed is 2-3X the "standard" rate).

    Replies: @Franz

    ‘Economy of scale’ can only work its magic, i.e. lower production costs, in the private sector. In the public sector, cost savings resulting from bigger size, if any, are retained by the bureaucracies involved and used for self- expansion and enrichment.

    The demon in the firebox is that the private sector, once it deletes “transaction costs” can easily imitate the public sector. Big Tech started doing so in the 1990s. Actually earlier —

    Reagan’s cost saving measures of having private contractors do what the military did by itself since Lysander of Sparta had the magical effect of militarizing parts of the private sector and civilianizing the military. Both got fatter and less useful to the nation as a whole.

    Cut the whole up, the problem disappears.

  286. @Reg Cæsar
    @anon

    A Conversation with Bill Bishop, author of THE BIG SORT


    https://s.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BA-AN069_book2_20080725200015.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Does he mention immivasion? It’s obviously the clearest illustration of what he’s arguing. Overnight instant neighborhood of materialist climbing South Asians, who all believe NPR, and all vote Democrat, and who feel traditional Indian antipathy to outsiders like the native population.

  287. @Reg Cæsar
    @S. Anonyia


    Some of my ancestors were Danes and Norwegians who settled Florida circa 1875. Talk about a sudden shift in climate.

     

    Or the British astronomer who visited the state in 1888 to view some astral phenomenon. New York Times headline from September 13 that year:

    RICHARD A. PROCTOR DEAD; QUARANTINED AS A YELLOW FEVER PATIENT. HE ARRIVED IN THIS CITY FROM FLORIDA ON MONDAY AND DIED LAST NIGHT--NO DANGER APPREHENDED.


    https://devonandexeterinstitution.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/1-768x1308.jpg



    https://www.wisefamousquotes.com/images/richard-a-proctor-quotes-1126640.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross

    So progressive, they let black folk enlarge the photographs.

  288. @anonymous
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    If you know so much you should explain more clearly or don't leave a comment like this. What do you mean by a twin deficit country using the Japan playbook? And why does the combination result in collapse of the dollar? What does collapse of the dollar more precisely mean?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The Japanese are a very unique people and practices which they take for granted are simply impossible for many other peoples.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @J.Ross

    That's not a good explanation. We are talking about the national debt and the economy, not aspects of society. No one is able to explain why the US can't go down the Japanese path: 300% gross national debt to GDP and remain solvent.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  289. @Dmon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    What do you guys think of the Convention of States initiative?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Known Fact

    I like the spirit of those guys, Dmon. However, with the make-up of this country now – 50 million or more newcomers who aren’t likely Ron Paul readers, I don’t know how it’d really go down. Their plan hinges on this:

    Our convention would only allow the states to discuss amendments that, “limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, impose fiscal restraints, and place term limits on federal officials.”

    Will that hold?

  290. @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Anon


    I’m not talking about lumberjacks in Wenatchee. I’m talking about web developers in Seattle.
     
    Let's hope they're not driving Mazdas tuned to NPR:


    https://youtu.be/F0YW43JYUwE

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    “Eternal NPR purgatory”. Thanks, Reg.

  291. anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    The Japanese are a very unique people and practices which they take for granted are simply impossible for many other peoples.

    Replies: @anonymous

    That’s not a good explanation. We are talking about the national debt and the economy, not aspects of society. No one is able to explain why the US can’t go down the Japanese path: 300% gross national debt to GDP and remain solvent.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @anonymous

    Japan's debt is denominated in Yen and owned by Japan's citizens, who have vast private savings. Don't try that anywhere else.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anonymous

  292. @anonymous
    @anon

    If Trump is elected in 2024 it will be the end of democracy in the minds of many people. So it becomes necessary to end democracy to save it. If there is a lot of election fraud in 2024 then non-violent secession is the only viable outlet for the energy that has no ballot box to go to.

    Don't just look at the downside. Think about how a beautiful MAGA country can be created that will save the America that we remember.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “If Trump is elected in 2024 it will be the end of democracy in the minds of many people. So it becomes necessary to end democracy to save it.”

    Oh, don’t you worry, bud. Trump will not be elected in 2024 even if every single person in ZFUSA voted for him. There will never be an honest presidential election in this country, ever again. Toothpaste don’t go back in the tube and so on.

    • Agree: Kylie
  293. @SunBakedSuburb
    After reading this article, and his output on Ukraine, I just don't think Steve's a big picture guy. He's a sports guy, a sports statistics guy, a pop culture guy, a badminton guy, a hair guy, a black crime guy, a golf course landscape architecture guy, an architecture guy, a gay guy, an IQ guy. Big picture? No.

    Replies: @njguy73

    So what is the big picture?

  294. @Nathan
    @AndrewR

    Mexico is not as weak as most people think. It has a fairly large conventional army and the technical ability to acquire nuclear weapons if it wanted to.

    If you think you can't live with Democrats, wait until you have to live with the PRI. Better learn enough Spanish to pay a bribe and hope you hold a currency that you can pay bribes with.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Last I checked, Mexico spends about 0.6% of its domestic product on its military. I think that’s about 1/2 what’s typical in today’s world.

  295. @Cato
    @Nathan

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers. However, for the US, secession would only be a sound idea were it permitted sub-nationally. Neighborhoods should be allowed to join and then secede from their current counties to form a new county. Counties should be allowed to join and then secede from their current states and form a new state. This would accelerate The Big Sort, and create localities sufficiently homogenous in political preferences that national representation in Congress and state representation in legislatures would truly be representative.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers.

    The African boundaries are often suboptimal because they bisect certain tribes. However, nearly all African states would be polyglot even if the boundaries were set optimally. The more salient problem was when they put quite incompatible sets of people in one territory (as they did in Chad, the Sudan, and, to a lesser degree, Uganda) or assembled behemoths (Nigeria, the Congo, the Sudan). Some problems couldn’t be helped by modified political geography (Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Burundi).

    Disagree with you in re ‘west and south Asia’. The boundaries in North Africa map to vernacular dialects and to Ottoman-era political units, albeit imperfectly. Those on the Arabian peninsula map to the zones of influence of local political grandees in the late Ottoman period. It’s only in the Fertile Crescent that you see artifacts of western powers. In South Asia, you see an attempt to build a political order across a whole world civilization. The Muslim areas were bracketed out at the behest of Muslim politicians, with one half later divorcing the other. The provincial boundaries in (Hindu) India were drawn after the British Raj and drawn according to language.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Art Deco

    A knowledgeable comment. The problem faced by the Hutu and Tutsi --intermingling too much for separation into sovereign states-- is also a problem in all of the mega-cities of Africa, a problem growing worse with each passing year. And I admit the selfish regret that Afrikaners and other whites failed to declare a sovereign state in the Western Cape.

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries. For South Asia, my impression has always been it could as well be called a "continent", like Europe, rather than a "sub-continent". It would probably be a better place were it 40 countries, rather than six.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  296. @anonymous
    @J.Ross

    That's not a good explanation. We are talking about the national debt and the economy, not aspects of society. No one is able to explain why the US can't go down the Japanese path: 300% gross national debt to GDP and remain solvent.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Japan’s debt is denominated in Yen and owned by Japan’s citizens, who have vast private savings. Don’t try that anywhere else.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Art Deco

    Also, Japan's debt was incurred for things which improved Japan and the Japanese, so, ROI.

    We borrowed $20 trillion and spent it on negroes, fake Americans, illegal fake Americans, and Israel. it's like we borrowed $20 trillion and then just shoveled it into a bottomless pit. Cui bono?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @anonymous
    @Art Deco


    vast private savings
     
    Japan was well known for a high savings rate. But it is no longer the case because of aging population and stagnant salaries. "The country’s savings rate, long one of the highest in the world, is now below zero. In short, Japan’s citizens are spending more than they earn. By comparison, the rate in the United States, where consumers have a reputation for living beyond their means, is on the rise, hitting 5.5 percent in January." https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/20/business/international/japans-recovery-is-complicated-by-a-decline-in-household-savings.html

    Japan’s debt is denominated in Yen
     
    US federal debt is denominated in its own currency. For this analysis is there a difference?

    owned by Japan’s citizens
     
    About $7 trillion of the $30 trillion gross US federal debt is held by foreigners. The percentage is a lot lower in Japan. How crucial is this?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  297. @Old Prude
    @neutral

    I don't mind living around "good whites". Sure they have unsound opinions, but hey. I don't even much mind by being bossed around by good whites. What I do mind is living around blacks, latinos, orientals, hindus and moslems.

    If America fractures, it may not be a dissolution of the Union, but rather the races building their own enclaves within the "country". I won't say "nation", because it will just be a bunch of squabbling races and ethnicities who can't stand each other.

    The problem is those blasted good whites will keep inviting diversity, and the non-whites will keep wanting whatever nice things the whites have going.

    I don't want a separate country, I just want to be left alone to live with my people.

    Replies: @Nick Granite

    You have a group who actively work on nationalizing housing so they can pinpoint pockets of whiteness and darken the doorsteps by any means necessary. They will never leave us alone.

  298. @Art Deco
    @anonymous

    Japan's debt is denominated in Yen and owned by Japan's citizens, who have vast private savings. Don't try that anywhere else.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anonymous

    Also, Japan’s debt was incurred for things which improved Japan and the Japanese, so, ROI.

    We borrowed \$20 trillion and spent it on negroes, fake Americans, illegal fake Americans, and Israel. it’s like we borrowed \$20 trillion and then just shoveled it into a bottomless pit. Cui bono?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    We borrowed $20 trillion and spent it on negroes, fake Americans, illegal fake Americans, and Israel. i

    Arithmetic isn't your strong suit, and neither is public finance. General obligation treasury issues are not attributable to specific line items in the budget. That aside.

    1. Aid to Israel amounts to about $3 bn a year on average, in the form of credits to buy military equipment.

    2. No clue what you fancy you mean by 'spending on negroes'. Spending on support staff, or regulatory authorities, or public goods would not be attributable to population subsets. Welfare spending could. Some programs have a disproportionately black clientele. The problem for your thesis is that two of the three expensive programs have a disproportionately non-black clientele because the programs (Social Security retirement and Medicare) are for the old and blacks have lower life expectancies. Per capita spending on blacks for SSI, unemployment compensation, housing subsidies, SNAP, and TANF, and Medicaid is higher than it is for others. If you calculate the overhang and then offset the reduced expenditure on Social Security and Medicare, the sum amounts to something like $85 bn.

    3. No clue who is a 'fake American'. I know what an illegal alien is. Heretofore they'fe accounted for about 3 or 4% of the population.

    Note, $88 bn is about 1.3% of all public expenditure, so I don't think that's what's running up your debt.

  299. @Dmon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    What do you guys think of the Convention of States initiative?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Known Fact

    It would probably get hijacked by provocateurs from the left and from the government (but wait, I repeat myself)

  300. @Corvinus
    @Paperback Writer

    Who do you think employs the average Russian citizen? The Oligarchs! So if they begin to suffer, so do the Russian people. And, no, it’s not an existential fight. It’s Putin’s War. The cost is the economy and dignity of Russia. And for what?

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Who do you think employs the average Russian citizen? The Oligarchs! So if they begin to suffer, so do the Russian people.

    So the Russian government will sell their assets to others. Bullshit artist: our oligarchs get richer and richer, and average Americans suffer.

    The cost is the economy and dignity of Russia. And for what?

    For the same reason we’d invade if Mexico were to become a Russian satellite.

    China wins.

    • LOL: Corvinus
  301. @Thelma Ringbaum
    @JimDandy

    Chezch and Slovaks were not forming completely separate states , but joining the EU. Thats why their separation was peaceful.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @West reanimator

    EU doesn’t even have a military dumbass.

  302. @res
    @PhysicistDave


    That is not the case: it is the hyper-inflation of the 1990s that really killed the ruble.
     
    Right.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_ruble

    The ruble's exchange rate versus the U.S. dollar depreciated significantly from $1 = 125 RUR in January 1992 to approximately $1 = 6,000 RUR when the currency was redenominated in 1998.
     
    BTW, that's what it looks like when an economy breaks (or is destroyed/looted?). Hope it never happens here.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    One of the key factors in South Vietnam’s ultimate collapse was the hyperinflation that wrecked the country in 1973-1974. “Looting” was an appropriate word for what happened there, too. The bigwigs fled Saigon with bars of gold smuggled away. WWII-era China underwent hyperinflation, too, and that broke the KMT for good more than anything: a lot of the notorious corruption was rooted in that, when combined with Chiang’s pre-existing limited ability to control subordinates. It took a fresh restart in Taiwan plus pressure from Communist land reform for that to change.

    So, hyperinflation is, to put on an intellectual level appropriate for our bien-pensants: a *really* bad thing. As for commentators here, the point I’m trying to make is strong, stable polities are defined by their ability to weather such crises, and that not everybody has that margin of error. Looks can be deceiving: the US was a lot more durable than the USSR was in the 1970s and 1980s.

    But what about now? Can’t say that the PRC is in a similar position of only having the military as its saving grace to justify itself to its own citizens, unlike the USSR.

    Yugoslavia was able to avoid South Vietnam’s fate with the oil shocks in the 1970s, but that was entirely dependent on NATO loans, as the 1980s showed. I can’t avoid feeling a similar vibe with what the Fed is doing.

  303. @PhysicistDave
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon Kaldian wrote to me:


    I did live in the US & saw that the dominant current narrative was all- fake.
     
    For how long? Were you born here and did you grow up here?

    I did, and, as I have related, I married into an immigrant family, and my best friend in high school was half-Japanese.

    I suspect I have a more detailed perspective on this country than you do.

    BK also wrote:

    What you write about is a description of a wealthy society which can function only if one group remains dominant, in this case Euro-Americans...
     
    Y'know, the case you make would argue that the US could not survive the Irish/German/Italian immigrants of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

    In fact, my ancestors on the English side of my family did argue that, especially concerning Catholics, and, most especially, Irish Catholics.

    But we did assimilate them, as shown by the other side of my own family -- German and Irish.

    BK also wrote:

    Let’s take a quick look- who are the high priests of American historical identity? Who are all those professors of history, languages, arts, literature etc. etc. ? You’ll generally find people of broadly European extraction (mostly NW European) plus a sizable portion of assimilated Jews.
     
    Indeed, but the people who are trying to destroy Western Civilization come from exactly those same groups.

    Socialism, progressivism, environmentalism, critical theory, transgendersim -- all of these are evil products of Western Civilization and of the ethnic groups you mention -- Europeans and Euro-Americans.. None of these evils are due to Blacks or Hispanics or any Third-World immigrants.

    The culture war is a civil war within the West.

    The enemy is within the gates.

    Yes, massive, overwhelming immigration is not a great idea for any society. But that is not our central problem. Our central problem is our corrupt, decadent, bizarrely incompetent -- and overwhelmingly White -- ruling elite.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    The only reason that immigration wave worked out in the end, though, was that the country got a break after 1924 to digest everybody for a couple of generations. It was no pre-ordained thing. It goes to reason that, since we’ve now added the equivalent of France in terms of population from a wider array of peoples, many more culturally distant, the break would need to be longer. It’s something I think America can pull off… if given the space to do so.

    Alas, our leaders don’t think in terms of “limits”: their emotions and petty whims define physical, empirical reality. You know what the definition of something without limits is? A deity. And the universe has a funny way of really, really screwing over people who think themselves above all restraints toward the end, as much as it did 3000 years ago: what Homer would have called “contending with the gods”. You’ll lose against physical reality, the gods, nature itself in the end: call it what you will. Hubris knows every man’s number.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @nebulafox

    The Progressives (both Republican and Democrat) lack any limiting principle. Progress is good, right? Tolerance is good, right? Charity is good, right? We're a Nation of Immigrants, right? And so off we go into this holiness spiral until all the history books are rewritten and the statues pulled down and modern cities become run for the benefit of pathological underclasses, not net-productive taxpayers.

    In essence, we're ruled by religious fanatics.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  304. @prime noticer
    Steve would advise the colonists to not break away from the Crown. even if they're successful (obviously they won't be, they'll be defeated and hanged, and i'll go back to making a profit trading goods or publishing the town newspaper because i'm smart and revolutionaries are stupid morons with muskets), as soon as the colonies become independent, they'll immediately be invaded and taken over by the French or the Spanish or indians or somebody else. breaking away from Great Britain is the stupidest, dumbest course of action possible. only a total idiot would think that's a good idea.

    supposedly that's the smart money talking, the adults in the room, the conventional wisdom that i have to hear every day from absolute losers like GOP leadership barnacles who are superglue ensconced in their positions.

    Steve thinks that trying to escape the subjugation of the DC regime, which is controlled by hostile aliens, and seeks to CRUSH me and my people, would be one of the biggest mistakes possible. he prefers you vote moar harder, that should work.

    Replies: @bee steve is stupid, @AKAHorace

    Steve would advise the colonists to not break away from the Crown. even if they’re successful (obviously they won’t be, they’ll be defeated and hanged, and i’ll go back to making a profit trading goods or publishing the town newspaper because i’m smart and revolutionaries are stupid morons with muskets),

    Are you sure that they would not have been better off with the British ? Australia and Canada are pretty good places to live by US standards. It is difficult to say.

  305. @Anon
    @JimDandy

    This matricuck actually believes divorce can improve a child's quality of life, against all statistical evidence.


    Proof again that all of this separatist bullcrap is motivated by feminism and the hatred of male authority.

    All I want to know is: what went wrong? What made everybody so afraid of the Father?

    Replies: @Alden

    Jim Dandy wrote about his personal experience. You are just repeating. the screeds of the never married childless nerds who hate women in general.

  306. @nebulafox
    @PhysicistDave

    The only reason that immigration wave worked out in the end, though, was that the country got a break after 1924 to digest everybody for a couple of generations. It was no pre-ordained thing. It goes to reason that, since we've now added the equivalent of France in terms of population from a wider array of peoples, many more culturally distant, the break would need to be longer. It's something I think America can pull off... if given the space to do so.

    Alas, our leaders don't think in terms of "limits": their emotions and petty whims define physical, empirical reality. You know what the definition of something without limits is? A deity. And the universe has a funny way of really, really screwing over people who think themselves above all restraints toward the end, as much as it did 3000 years ago: what Homer would have called "contending with the gods". You'll lose against physical reality, the gods, nature itself in the end: call it what you will. Hubris knows every man's number.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Progressives (both Republican and Democrat) lack any limiting principle. Progress is good, right? Tolerance is good, right? Charity is good, right? We’re a Nation of Immigrants, right? And so off we go into this holiness spiral until all the history books are rewritten and the statues pulled down and modern cities become run for the benefit of pathological underclasses, not net-productive taxpayers.

    In essence, we’re ruled by religious fanatics.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    >In essence, we’re ruled by religious fanatics.

    But don't say so in front of them. ;)

    They'll get very testy because they are Rational, Non-Superstitious 21st Century People. After all, they are SECULAR. Can't possibly put them in the same category as The Children. Especially the Bad Children at home. How can you possibly put them on the same level?

    On second thought: by all means, say so in front of them. With the added emphasis that their religious beliefs are... shall we say, far inferior? Since this has a big class component underneath it all, trust me, drives them nutty!

    Replies: @nebulafox

  307. @Mr. Anon
    @guest007


    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy.
     
    If 51% of the population hates me and wants me dead then - yes - I hate democracy. Why shouldn't I?

    Actually it doesn't even have to be that lopsided. The way our system works is that some fraction of the 1/3 of the population in the middle which barely even understands how our system of government functions, throw the election to one half of the other 2/3 of the population, based on how effective, or ineffective their propaganda is.

    The system doesn't work anymore. If you think it does, you're living in a fantasy World, dreaming about a country that's already dead.

    Democracy is just the latest sham used by the Oligarchy to buy our assent for their system. I'm beginning to wonder if it hasn't always been that way.

    I'm not suggesting solutions. I don't know that there are any.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Drapetomaniac

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn’t scale beyond that. We have the same number of Congressmen that we did almost a century and 190 million people ago. How can that possibly reflect “representative democracy?” Hence, Congress becomes purely a vehicle for personal grift.

    A nice way to lower the temperature in Presidential elections would just be to have the governors vote every 4 years on one of their number to head the Executive branch. The notion that the Presidency can turn on a handful of votes within the statistical margin of error in a single precinct is appalling.

    Nursing home residents can vote; non-citizens can vote in some jurisdictions; net tax consumers can vote. Mail-in ballots and ballot harvesting is allowed. The results are no more morally legitimate than a coin toss. LOL–Iowa caucuses can literally be decided by a coin toss; here’s a classic:

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn’t scale beyond that.

    Thanks for the ex cathedra. Always an education.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  308. anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @anonymous

    Japan's debt is denominated in Yen and owned by Japan's citizens, who have vast private savings. Don't try that anywhere else.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anonymous

    vast private savings

    Japan was well known for a high savings rate. But it is no longer the case because of aging population and stagnant salaries. “The country’s savings rate, long one of the highest in the world, is now below zero. In short, Japan’s citizens are spending more than they earn. By comparison, the rate in the United States, where consumers have a reputation for living beyond their means, is on the rise, hitting 5.5 percent in January.” https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/20/business/international/japans-recovery-is-complicated-by-a-decline-in-household-savings.html

    Japan’s debt is denominated in Yen

    US federal debt is denominated in its own currency. For this analysis is there a difference?

    owned by Japan’s citizens

    About \$7 trillion of the \$30 trillion gross US federal debt is held by foreigners. The percentage is a lot lower in Japan. How crucial is this?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @anonymous

    I generally agree with your comments, but this quote you cite is both dated and misleading:


    “The country’s savings rate, long one of the highest in the world, is now below zero. In short, Japan’s citizens are spending more than they earn.
     
    First, you need to differentiate between types of savings. There is "household savings" and then there are "national savings." The latter category is a far more comprehensive category. It includes savings made by governments, private businesses, and private citizens, etc.

    Japan's household savings is indeed quite low, especially when compared to other East Asian countries and to Japan's own savings rates decades ago. But the household savings rate in Japan is not below zero. It dipped very low around the time the NYT was reporting on it, but as you can see here ( https://www.gfmag.com/global-data/economic-data/916lqg-household-saving-rates ), it has risen again to above 7% in 2020. That's still low, but a great deal higher than it was seven to eight years ago.

    Japan's national savings rate is also low. It's around 5% of GDP. See here ( https://data.oecd.org/natincome/saving-rate.htm ) That is still more than double the U.S. saving rate.

    Please look at other countries on the table. A low household saving rate is not indicative of a low national saving rate. Denmark, for example, has a low household savings rate, but a very high national savings rate.

    About $7 trillion of the $30 trillion gross US federal debt is held by foreigners. The percentage is a lot lower in Japan. How crucial is this?
     
    It's not crucial at all.
  309. @Bill Jones
    This is by far the best analysis of the Russia/Ukraine debacle I have seen.

    Well worth the listen.

    https://tomwoods.com/ep-2074-russia-ukraine-and-nato/

    Replies: @Exile

    As libertarians go, Tom Woods in one of the best. Woods, Mercer and Hoppe (the paleo/realist vein) are the ones who make the most sense of the lot. Not enough sense, but way ahead of others.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Exile

    Actually, Woods is a weird crank who fancies national income accounting is invalid.

  310. @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile

    Gee, freedom of association is a bitch, isn't it? Let's not even mention the anarchistic Bill of Rights, dubbed by a Brit of the day as "a conspiracy against government".


    The guy objecting to the funding cuts because “I still believe in limited government” shows why we can’t have a united America...

    ...until they get this libertarian claptrap clubbed out of their heads.
     

    A bill refusing funds to a rogue department of a state university sounds awfully libertarian to me.

    Whites won’t dirty their hands using government to protect themselves so don’t be shocked to see more McMicheals cases
     
    Again, the right to carry a weapon in public for self-defence is the libertarian position, "constitutional carry" even more so. You want to go back to the old-time Southern gun control, when concealment was a crime?

    Competent races don't need affirmative action or other government "programs" to thrive.

    You come across as yet another SPLC troll who detects a fault line among the otherwise unified commenters here-- in this case, weak vs strong government action-- then mocks one side while paying lip service to the other. Divide and conquer.

    Replies: @Exile

    The SPLC loves libertarians. You are the most articulate advocates for unilateral White political disarmament and most of you don’t even understand how damaging (and eventually self-defeating) your ideas are.

    Libertarianism is a Fellow White-promulgated ideology targeted at higher-IQ White men.

    If I was an SPLC troll, I would agree with and amplify everything you, onebornfree and Corvinus say here.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile

    Okay, Mr Bigmouth, what is your solution? You are deliberately inspecific. Typical troll behavior.


    It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear.

    Why are you opposed to concealed carry? It took decades of libertarian argument-- self-defense is a right, not a privilege-- to achieve that.

    If you have pro-government, "pro-White" (shouldn't that be spelled "pro-WHITE", or even "pro-WHITE"?) ideas, why don't you spell them out for us? E.g., what are the specifics of your plan to remove the blacks to Africa? No politician has even suggested that since Theodore Bilbo. How do we even begin? What is Step 1?

    Replies: @Exile, @Anonymous

  311. @AnotherDad
    @Nathan

    Said it before, in my role as the "separate nations!" guy:

    If you want to keep America intact, then you better start talking about secession.

    It's the same reason, if you want law+order you better be willing to dole out punishment.

    For the past 60 the minoritarians have been gathering strength, running roughshod over us and trashing the nation. But ... it's a fundamentally parasitic ideology. And at root an alliance of parasitic forces who want to tax, rent-seek and loot the America--the prosperity--built up by our ancestors.

    The bottom line is "they need us, we don't need them". So if there's any hope of reining them in, it's telling them that what they are doing is unacceptable and we are prepared to leave if it does not stop.

    Replies: @Drapetomaniac

    The foragers need something to forage on – either nature or technological civilization.

  312. @Mr. Anon
    @guest007


    Many would jump on this as a sign that Repubicans/conservatives hate democracy.
     
    If 51% of the population hates me and wants me dead then - yes - I hate democracy. Why shouldn't I?

    Actually it doesn't even have to be that lopsided. The way our system works is that some fraction of the 1/3 of the population in the middle which barely even understands how our system of government functions, throw the election to one half of the other 2/3 of the population, based on how effective, or ineffective their propaganda is.

    The system doesn't work anymore. If you think it does, you're living in a fantasy World, dreaming about a country that's already dead.

    Democracy is just the latest sham used by the Oligarchy to buy our assent for their system. I'm beginning to wonder if it hasn't always been that way.

    I'm not suggesting solutions. I don't know that there are any.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Drapetomaniac

    In high school US Government class (1963/64?) I suggested replacing elected government with direct democracy. It was sane and simple and favored the individual over groups. A no vote would exempt you from any forced participation in whatever bill/referendum that was being proposed. Crimes were basically relegated to someone aggressing against person or property with ostracism, arbitration, insurance, and payback being a bitch, among others, as possible solutions.

    A NO vote exempted the voter completely – no paying for anything you don’t want, no fighting wars for the government (you don’t fight wars for the public), no drug wars, no forced death vaccines, no gun control, no welfare, etc. The individual for all practical purposes was sovereign.

    As a child I’d see signs proclaiming “Trespassers will be shot” on farmer’s fields, not “You can shop!ift \$900 and not be prosecuted” at stores.

    A sane and civilizing world.

    SKYNET FOR PRESIDENT 2024

    If it’s okay to kill some of the people why not kill them all?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Drapetomaniac

    I can think of two ways besides the universal franchise to make government more accountable to the taxpayers:

    1) all taxation is voluntary.

    2) all unencumbered fee simple titles are converted to allodial title.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  313. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @nebulafox

    The Progressives (both Republican and Democrat) lack any limiting principle. Progress is good, right? Tolerance is good, right? Charity is good, right? We're a Nation of Immigrants, right? And so off we go into this holiness spiral until all the history books are rewritten and the statues pulled down and modern cities become run for the benefit of pathological underclasses, not net-productive taxpayers.

    In essence, we're ruled by religious fanatics.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >In essence, we’re ruled by religious fanatics.

    But don’t say so in front of them. 😉

    They’ll get very testy because they are Rational, Non-Superstitious 21st Century People. After all, they are SECULAR. Can’t possibly put them in the same category as The Children. Especially the Bad Children at home. How can you possibly put them on the same level?

    On second thought: by all means, say so in front of them. With the added emphasis that their religious beliefs are… shall we say, far inferior? Since this has a big class component underneath it all, trust me, drives them nutty!

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @nebulafox

    It's OK to base your whole ideology around your emotions for the Right Person. But admitting to the fact that you are human and you feel passions, that you base the world around you off intuition which is usually, though not always right? That, that there is Plebian.

    No, passive-aggressive denial is the way to go. And since our elites don't actually view themselves as such, they aren't really responsible for the masses adopting that behavior and the social consequences that come with it on a society-wide scale, eh?

  314. @nebulafox
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    >In essence, we’re ruled by religious fanatics.

    But don't say so in front of them. ;)

    They'll get very testy because they are Rational, Non-Superstitious 21st Century People. After all, they are SECULAR. Can't possibly put them in the same category as The Children. Especially the Bad Children at home. How can you possibly put them on the same level?

    On second thought: by all means, say so in front of them. With the added emphasis that their religious beliefs are... shall we say, far inferior? Since this has a big class component underneath it all, trust me, drives them nutty!

    Replies: @nebulafox

    It’s OK to base your whole ideology around your emotions for the Right Person. But admitting to the fact that you are human and you feel passions, that you base the world around you off intuition which is usually, though not always right? That, that there is Plebian.

    No, passive-aggressive denial is the way to go. And since our elites don’t actually view themselves as such, they aren’t really responsible for the masses adopting that behavior and the social consequences that come with it on a society-wide scale, eh?

  315. HA says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HA

    "And I’m the globalist lackey, you say?"

    Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO's Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is).

    "Again, the Putinistas need to start reading what they type before posting it.:

    Was keyed in the larger context. Putinista, oh really now? But 'tis better than to be a globalist that sells out US citizens at every turn. Putin knows what's best for Russia. He believes that his backyard, or sphere of influence is being threatened.

    AGAIN. This is the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. If Russia were to place nuclear weapons in Cuba or in a South or Central American nation, how would the US respond?

    "Ha ha ha indeed."

    No, it's no so funny indeed. War, armed conflicts are unfortunate and regrettable. To have the good sense to avoid them for as long as possible, those people tend to live in the ideal world. But this is the real world, and for now, this is the most recent conflict of the current new year. This is not our fight, not our backyard, not our monkeys or our circus. Therefore, the US should stay out of it.

    Replies: @HA

    “Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO’s Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is).”

    And before he invaded, Putin had a buffer state composed of people whose net preference for NATO was roughly zip, demographically speaking. Percentage support for joining NATO was in the low 30’s, pretty much a match for the “say no to NATO” camp. Not even Nuland’s pastries were enough to shift the balance, and even her favored candidate Yatseniuk, nixed the idea of joining NATO.

    Strangely enough, when Putin confiscated those Russian-heavy areas that were the counterbalance and the buffering he needed, the vote shifted.

    Sorry, it isn’t NATO’s insatiable lust for land that caused that. It was Putin’s. Shaking your angry little fist at me or trying to hide under Kissinger’s and Brzezinski’s skirts won’t change what happened.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HA

    "Sorry, it isn’t NATO’s insatiable lust for land that caused that."

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.


    "It was Putin’s. "

    Nope. Its called sphere of influence, its own backyard. US wouldn't want Russia or China to start putting nukes and/or building military bases in Canada, Mexico, Cuba, or in a South/Central American nation, because that would violate our backyard, spheres of influence.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

  316. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    I’m glad that you’ve pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is.

    What’s the point of talking about breaking up the United States when it’s already disintegrating right before our eyes? And in the one place no one’s looking or talking about, our social institutions – all of them.

    Orwell once wrote about the power of facing unpleasant facts. From this perspective the point of talking about the break up of the United States would be to keep from facing the unpleasant fact that it’s disintegrating right before our eyes.

  317. @Alfa158
    @Wilkey

    I think you are right about there being more of a collapse than a breakup. A problem with a formal breakup is that there aren’t enough viable geographical areas where the cleave lines would occur. People can talk about a Red state like Texas seceding, but what would do you do with Austin, Houston and the southernmost areas that are effectively areas of Mexico that happen to be under US administration?
    The hypothetical maps showing a northwestern White, conservative new country are already obsolete. Washington, Oregon and soon Idaho are Blue states with dissident rural Red areas.
    You can look at many areas of the US similarly and see there are almost no equivalents of modern Mason-Dixon lines along which you could divide it up.
    As the country becomes more racially, politically and economically fragmented and the central economic power of being able to print Monopoly money declines we will see more chaos. Independence of a sort will manifest itself as small areas continuing to work inside a common economy, but ignoring the overreaches of a Federal system that won’t be able to afford forcing them to comply. A state or local government will ban transgender education in schools, a Federal judge blocks the ban and the Supreme Court agrees. The locals tells the kritarchy to go boil their heads, we’re doing it anyway , and what are you going to do about it.

    Replies: @Thea

    This makes more sense thank a break up. We will become kind of like Latin America where people ignore the corrupt government and do basically as they like. This will create a really low trust society but better than living in Pakistan or somewhere like that

  318. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Art Deco

    Also, Japan's debt was incurred for things which improved Japan and the Japanese, so, ROI.

    We borrowed $20 trillion and spent it on negroes, fake Americans, illegal fake Americans, and Israel. it's like we borrowed $20 trillion and then just shoveled it into a bottomless pit. Cui bono?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    We borrowed \$20 trillion and spent it on negroes, fake Americans, illegal fake Americans, and Israel. i

    Arithmetic isn’t your strong suit, and neither is public finance. General obligation treasury issues are not attributable to specific line items in the budget. That aside.

    1. Aid to Israel amounts to about \$3 bn a year on average, in the form of credits to buy military equipment.

    2. No clue what you fancy you mean by ‘spending on negroes’. Spending on support staff, or regulatory authorities, or public goods would not be attributable to population subsets. Welfare spending could. Some programs have a disproportionately black clientele. The problem for your thesis is that two of the three expensive programs have a disproportionately non-black clientele because the programs (Social Security retirement and Medicare) are for the old and blacks have lower life expectancies. Per capita spending on blacks for SSI, unemployment compensation, housing subsidies, SNAP, and TANF, and Medicaid is higher than it is for others. If you calculate the overhang and then offset the reduced expenditure on Social Security and Medicare, the sum amounts to something like \$85 bn.

    3. No clue who is a ‘fake American’. I know what an illegal alien is. Heretofore they’fe accounted for about 3 or 4% of the population.

    Note, \$88 bn is about 1.3% of all public expenditure, so I don’t think that’s what’s running up your debt.

  319. @Exile
    @Bill Jones

    As libertarians go, Tom Woods in one of the best. Woods, Mercer and Hoppe (the paleo/realist vein) are the ones who make the most sense of the lot. Not enough sense, but way ahead of others.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Actually, Woods is a weird crank who fancies national income accounting is invalid.

  320. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Mr. Anon

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn't scale beyond that. We have the same number of Congressmen that we did almost a century and 190 million people ago. How can that possibly reflect "representative democracy?" Hence, Congress becomes purely a vehicle for personal grift.

    A nice way to lower the temperature in Presidential elections would just be to have the governors vote every 4 years on one of their number to head the Executive branch. The notion that the Presidency can turn on a handful of votes within the statistical margin of error in a single precinct is appalling.

    Nursing home residents can vote; non-citizens can vote in some jurisdictions; net tax consumers can vote. Mail-in ballots and ballot harvesting is allowed. The results are no more morally legitimate than a coin toss. LOL--Iowa caucuses can literally be decided by a coin toss; here's a classic:

    https://youtu.be/eaWstSk2ZFk

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn’t scale beyond that.

    Thanks for the ex cathedra. Always an education.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Art Deco

    LOL. There are tons of issues with democracy beyond the town level. History hasn't ended.

  321. @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    The SPLC loves libertarians. You are the most articulate advocates for unilateral White political disarmament and most of you don't even understand how damaging (and eventually self-defeating) your ideas are.

    Libertarianism is a Fellow White-promulgated ideology targeted at higher-IQ White men.

    If I was an SPLC troll, I would agree with and amplify everything you, onebornfree and Corvinus say here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Okay, Mr Bigmouth, what is your solution? You are deliberately inspecific. Typical troll behavior.

    It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear.

    Why are you opposed to concealed carry? It took decades of libertarian argument– self-defense is a right, not a privilege– to achieve that.

    If you have pro-government, “pro-White” (shouldn’t that be spelled “pro-WHITE”, or even “pro-WHITE“?) ideas, why don’t you spell them out for us? E.g., what are the specifics of your plan to remove the blacks to Africa? No politician has even suggested that since Theodore Bilbo. How do we even begin? What is Step 1?

    • Replies: @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I'm against concealed carry into the conversation. Readers can check what I said here (and in my entire post history, for that matter).

    You are trying to get away with the shell game that "libertarians are for concealed carry and you said bad thing about libertarians so you are against concealed carry."

    You're also trying to shell-game your weird assumptions as my actual opinions re: abortion. FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it. Being pro-life because states rights is a minority position among libertarians.

    Then you segue into what my position on removing Blacks is - again, nothing to do with Wyoming or the bone-headed limited government argument against limiting this funding.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.

    You have made a devastating case against the points I was never making. I assume the fantasy person I've never been is sorely embarrassed. Ask him sometime - the rest of us can't see or hear him.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    "It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear."

    The total figure for aborted fetuses is 40 million so the white figure must be significantly less. And what's this "not conceived due to fear" business? Were women afraid to get pregnant because planned parenthood would corner them on the street and forcibly abort their kid?

    Just say it. You want to ban abortion because of religion even if it makes America a dumber , more criminal country.

  322. @Art Deco
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Democracy is a town referendum on a new water tower; it really doesn’t scale beyond that.

    Thanks for the ex cathedra. Always an education.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    LOL. There are tons of issues with democracy beyond the town level. History hasn’t ended.

  323. @Drapetomaniac
    @Mr. Anon

    In high school US Government class (1963/64?) I suggested replacing elected government with direct democracy. It was sane and simple and favored the individual over groups. A no vote would exempt you from any forced participation in whatever bill/referendum that was being proposed. Crimes were basically relegated to someone aggressing against person or property with ostracism, arbitration, insurance, and payback being a bitch, among others, as possible solutions.

    A NO vote exempted the voter completely - no paying for anything you don't want, no fighting wars for the government (you don't fight wars for the public), no drug wars, no forced death vaccines, no gun control, no welfare, etc. The individual for all practical purposes was sovereign.

    As a child I'd see signs proclaiming "Trespassers will be shot" on farmer's fields, not "You can shop!ift $900 and not be prosecuted" at stores.

    A sane and civilizing world.


    SKYNET FOR PRESIDENT 2024

    If it's okay to kill some of the people why not kill them all?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    I can think of two ways besides the universal franchise to make government more accountable to the taxpayers:

    1) all taxation is voluntary.

    2) all unencumbered fee simple titles are converted to allodial title.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Apple and Amazon already pay approximately zero taxes so I guess we're seeing that voluntary taxation now...

  324. @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Oh, yes, definitely, and actually so say all of us. Kissinger, Brzezinski, George Kennan, etc have all stated that NATO’s Eastern expansion borders on insanity (from a realpolitik, containment point of view, that is)."

    And before he invaded, Putin had a buffer state composed of people whose net preference for NATO was roughly zip, demographically speaking. Percentage support for joining NATO was in the low 30's, pretty much a match for the "say no to NATO" camp. Not even Nuland's pastries were enough to shift the balance, and even her favored candidate Yatseniuk, nixed the idea of joining NATO.

    Strangely enough, when Putin confiscated those Russian-heavy areas that were the counterbalance and the buffering he needed, the vote shifted.

    Sorry, it isn't NATO's insatiable lust for land that caused that. It was Putin's. Shaking your angry little fist at me or trying to hide under Kissinger's and Brzezinski's skirts won't change what happened.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Sorry, it isn’t NATO’s insatiable lust for land that caused that.”

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.

    “It was Putin’s. ”

    Nope. Its called sphere of influence, its own backyard. US wouldn’t want Russia or China to start putting nukes and/or building military bases in Canada, Mexico, Cuba, or in a South/Central American nation, because that would violate our backyard, spheres of influence.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO."

    I already answered that, but clearly, you have trouble in the way of deductive reasoning, so let me spell it out for you: "Would welcome" is one thing. It implies that any such assurance is contingent on public support, etc. It doesn't involve threats, and it doesn't involve ripping off a chunk of another country and then getting upset when the portion of the country he was relying on to block any NATO accession vote is no longer permitted to participate in Ukraine's affairs.

    That's quite a different scenario than the one Putin chose. Trying to morally equate the two isn't going to work, for anyone paying attention, and hanging "we welcome you" banners from the turret of an invading tank reminds me of that old antisemitic quip -- something about "he cries out Ouch! while striking you".

    Now, if Putin wanted to out-maneuver, or out-deal any wecomes that NATO was offering -- at this point, I would have settled for secretly bribing/blackmailing/extorting or whatever he did in the case of Trump and those Russian stooges in Czechia -- I would have even been OK with that. I suspect I'm not alone. He had an immense head start on that front, being ex-KGB, knowing the language, and having the vast resources that come from Ukraine being, in significant part, a Russian-speaking entity to this day (ask their Russian-speaking president about that). THAT is how you build a sphere of influence. He chose to squander those advantages and go for a military option, and that I have a problem with, given that the US signed on to the Budapest Memorandum too in an effort to get the Ukrainians to foolishly believe their territorial integrity would be respected by Russia. "Whippings will continue until morale improves" doesn't get you too far in building consensus. And now, he also wants some agreement from NATO agreeing on a freeze, even though he himself has clearly shown that his signature on an agreement means nothing. That's not statecraft. That's just being a thug. I'm not saying he won't win, but don't expect me to rationalize what he's doing or placate the traitors in his cheering section.

    If he wants to retreat Russia's population to about 20 miles within Russia's borders (that'd give him roughly the width of the English Channel at its narrowest point) and fill the no-man's land with alligators and crocodiles, that's about as much "buffer state" as the Brits get, even though their empire was vast, too (though, admittedly, it didn't help all that much during the Blitz). See? Problem solved, and no tanks were required.

    , @Art Deco
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.

    They applied, after which nothing was done.

  325. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @PhysicistDave

    "the current division in the US is really cities vs. countryside"

    Sorta, but more accurate would be Americans (viz. Whites) vs. looters (negroes, Jews, Asians, Muslims, Hispanics, etc).

    "My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession?"

    My history might be a little off, but wasn't there a war between Germany and France, Britain and Russia circa 1914-1918? Therefore it was a settled question, and no further wars were possible, nor did they happen.

    "the United States of America, history’s mightiest country,"

    Well, it was mighty before diversity became our strength. Think how much mightier we are now!

    Bottom line: if you don't get secession, then what you will get with the status quo is gradual but rapidly accelerating extermination of Whites from all North America. It's just math at this point.

    Replies: @Alrenous, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @AndrewR, @guest007, @Travis

    The white population is in steep decline, the white demographic death spiral has begun. The white population has fallen from 197 million to 189 million over the past decade. But more significant is the decline in the number of fertile whites, falling from 75 million in 1990 to just 50 million today. To maintain the white population at the current 189 million we would need white fertility to double to 3.2. The math indicates that the white population will decline from the current 189 million to 175 million over the next 20 years, as the non-white population increases to 180 million. Whites will be a minority of Americans around the year 2043.

    Very few whites would choose to form a white nation. Even if a white nation was somehow created, not even 1% of US whites would choose to move to a separate white nation in North America. Maybe 50,000 white Americans would re-locate to a white state if the state was given autonomy. We already have a White state called Maine , yet few whites relocate to the whitest state in the nation to escape all the non-whites. Currently there is nothing stopping any of the white nationalists from moving to Maine to establish a white ethnic state within the US. Maine would be the ideal state, since it is already 95% white and only shares a border with 92% New Hampshire and Canada. Yet nobody talking about forming a separate white nation is even willing to relocate to Maine. Fewer would be willing to wage a war to form their own nation state. Maybe 1,000 whites in the entire United States would take up arms to form a separate white nation. 90% of whites are content to live among non-whites and have non-white grandchildren (just being thankful to have any grandchildren at this point)

  326. HA says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HA

    "Sorry, it isn’t NATO’s insatiable lust for land that caused that."

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.


    "It was Putin’s. "

    Nope. Its called sphere of influence, its own backyard. US wouldn't want Russia or China to start putting nukes and/or building military bases in Canada, Mexico, Cuba, or in a South/Central American nation, because that would violate our backyard, spheres of influence.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

    “Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.”

    I already answered that, but clearly, you have trouble in the way of deductive reasoning, so let me spell it out for you: “Would welcome” is one thing. It implies that any such assurance is contingent on public support, etc. It doesn’t involve threats, and it doesn’t involve ripping off a chunk of another country and then getting upset when the portion of the country he was relying on to block any NATO accession vote is no longer permitted to participate in Ukraine’s affairs.

    That’s quite a different scenario than the one Putin chose. Trying to morally equate the two isn’t going to work, for anyone paying attention, and hanging “we welcome you” banners from the turret of an invading tank reminds me of that old antisemitic quip — something about “he cries out Ouch! while striking you”.

    Now, if Putin wanted to out-maneuver, or out-deal any wecomes that NATO was offering — at this point, I would have settled for secretly bribing/blackmailing/extorting or whatever he did in the case of Trump and those Russian stooges in Czechia — I would have even been OK with that. I suspect I’m not alone. He had an immense head start on that front, being ex-KGB, knowing the language, and having the vast resources that come from Ukraine being, in significant part, a Russian-speaking entity to this day (ask their Russian-speaking president about that). THAT is how you build a sphere of influence. He chose to squander those advantages and go for a military option, and that I have a problem with, given that the US signed on to the Budapest Memorandum too in an effort to get the Ukrainians to foolishly believe their territorial integrity would be respected by Russia. “Whippings will continue until morale improves” doesn’t get you too far in building consensus. And now, he also wants some agreement from NATO agreeing on a freeze, even though he himself has clearly shown that his signature on an agreement means nothing. That’s not statecraft. That’s just being a thug. I’m not saying he won’t win, but don’t expect me to rationalize what he’s doing or placate the traitors in his cheering section.

    If he wants to retreat Russia’s population to about 20 miles within Russia’s borders (that’d give him roughly the width of the English Channel at its narrowest point) and fill the no-man’s land with alligators and crocodiles, that’s about as much “buffer state” as the Brits get, even though their empire was vast, too (though, admittedly, it didn’t help all that much during the Blitz). See? Problem solved, and no tanks were required.

    • Troll: Drapetomaniac
  327. @anonymous
    @Art Deco


    vast private savings
     
    Japan was well known for a high savings rate. But it is no longer the case because of aging population and stagnant salaries. "The country’s savings rate, long one of the highest in the world, is now below zero. In short, Japan’s citizens are spending more than they earn. By comparison, the rate in the United States, where consumers have a reputation for living beyond their means, is on the rise, hitting 5.5 percent in January." https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/20/business/international/japans-recovery-is-complicated-by-a-decline-in-household-savings.html

    Japan’s debt is denominated in Yen
     
    US federal debt is denominated in its own currency. For this analysis is there a difference?

    owned by Japan’s citizens
     
    About $7 trillion of the $30 trillion gross US federal debt is held by foreigners. The percentage is a lot lower in Japan. How crucial is this?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I generally agree with your comments, but this quote you cite is both dated and misleading:

    “The country’s savings rate, long one of the highest in the world, is now below zero. In short, Japan’s citizens are spending more than they earn.

    First, you need to differentiate between types of savings. There is “household savings” and then there are “national savings.” The latter category is a far more comprehensive category. It includes savings made by governments, private businesses, and private citizens, etc.

    Japan’s household savings is indeed quite low, especially when compared to other East Asian countries and to Japan’s own savings rates decades ago. But the household savings rate in Japan is not below zero. It dipped very low around the time the NYT was reporting on it, but as you can see here ( https://www.gfmag.com/global-data/economic-data/916lqg-household-saving-rates ), it has risen again to above 7% in 2020. That’s still low, but a great deal higher than it was seven to eight years ago.

    Japan’s national savings rate is also low. It’s around 5% of GDP. See here ( https://data.oecd.org/natincome/saving-rate.htm ) That is still more than double the U.S. saving rate.

    Please look at other countries on the table. A low household saving rate is not indicative of a low national saving rate. Denmark, for example, has a low household savings rate, but a very high national savings rate.

    About \$7 trillion of the \$30 trillion gross US federal debt is held by foreigners. The percentage is a lot lower in Japan. How crucial is this?

    It’s not crucial at all.

  328. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HA

    "Sorry, it isn’t NATO’s insatiable lust for land that caused that."

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.


    "It was Putin’s. "

    Nope. Its called sphere of influence, its own backyard. US wouldn't want Russia or China to start putting nukes and/or building military bases in Canada, Mexico, Cuba, or in a South/Central American nation, because that would violate our backyard, spheres of influence.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

    Yes it is. And fully documented too. Starting in 2008, when NATO officially stated that it would welcome Georgia and Ukraine into NATO.

    They applied, after which nothing was done.

  329. @PaceLaw
    The USA breaking up? That is a completely and totally crazy and insane idea. I know that commentators on the left and the right have been pushing this viewpoint for a while, but it is complete insanity. My history might be a little off, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession? No state or territory is going anywhere.

    The United States it’s like a large and fractious family that might have a tranny cousin and/or a sibling married to a person of another race, but who still somehow gets along during the holidays.

    Replies: @Kylie, @BluEidDvl, @R.G. Camara, @Catdog, @J1234, @Juvenalis, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Drapetomaniac

    “, but didn’t United States already have a war regarding the issue of secession”

    No. It was about control as is everything about government.

  330. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Drapetomaniac

    I can think of two ways besides the universal franchise to make government more accountable to the taxpayers:

    1) all taxation is voluntary.

    2) all unencumbered fee simple titles are converted to allodial title.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Apple and Amazon already pay approximately zero taxes so I guess we’re seeing that voluntary taxation now…

  331. @Art Deco
    @Cato

    Secession into sovereign states would be a sound idea for much of Africa or West and South Asia, where national boundaries were imposed by colonial powers.

    The African boundaries are often suboptimal because they bisect certain tribes. However, nearly all African states would be polyglot even if the boundaries were set optimally. The more salient problem was when they put quite incompatible sets of people in one territory (as they did in Chad, the Sudan, and, to a lesser degree, Uganda) or assembled behemoths (Nigeria, the Congo, the Sudan). Some problems couldn't be helped by modified political geography (Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Burundi).

    Disagree with you in re 'west and south Asia'. The boundaries in North Africa map to vernacular dialects and to Ottoman-era political units, albeit imperfectly. Those on the Arabian peninsula map to the zones of influence of local political grandees in the late Ottoman period. It's only in the Fertile Crescent that you see artifacts of western powers. In South Asia, you see an attempt to build a political order across a whole world civilization. The Muslim areas were bracketed out at the behest of Muslim politicians, with one half later divorcing the other. The provincial boundaries in (Hindu) India were drawn after the British Raj and drawn according to language.

    Replies: @Cato

    A knowledgeable comment. The problem faced by the Hutu and Tutsi –intermingling too much for separation into sovereign states– is also a problem in all of the mega-cities of Africa, a problem growing worse with each passing year. And I admit the selfish regret that Afrikaners and other whites failed to declare a sovereign state in the Western Cape.

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries. For South Asia, my impression has always been it could as well be called a “continent”, like Europe, rather than a “sub-continent”. It would probably be a better place were it 40 countries, rather than six.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Cato

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries.

    True, but most of them live in Iran or Turkey. I think Iran's boundaries were about the same then as now and Turkey has what it managed to hold on to during the war and just after.

    Replies: @Cato

  332. @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile

    Okay, Mr Bigmouth, what is your solution? You are deliberately inspecific. Typical troll behavior.


    It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear.

    Why are you opposed to concealed carry? It took decades of libertarian argument-- self-defense is a right, not a privilege-- to achieve that.

    If you have pro-government, "pro-White" (shouldn't that be spelled "pro-WHITE", or even "pro-WHITE"?) ideas, why don't you spell them out for us? E.g., what are the specifics of your plan to remove the blacks to Africa? No politician has even suggested that since Theodore Bilbo. How do we even begin? What is Step 1?

    Replies: @Exile, @Anonymous

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I’m against concealed carry into the conversation. Readers can check what I said here (and in my entire post history, for that matter).

    You are trying to get away with the shell game that “libertarians are for concealed carry and you said bad thing about libertarians so you are against concealed carry.”

    You’re also trying to shell-game your weird assumptions as my actual opinions re: abortion. FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it. Being pro-life because states rights is a minority position among libertarians.

    Then you segue into what my position on removing Blacks is – again, nothing to do with Wyoming or the bone-headed limited government argument against limiting this funding.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.

    You have made a devastating case against the points I was never making. I assume the fantasy person I’ve never been is sorely embarrassed. Ask him sometime – the rest of us can’t see or hear him.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile


    FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it.
     
    Not by much. It's consistently been about ⅓ seeing it as a right and ⅓ seeing it as a crime. Those in the middle oppose changing the status quo mostly by default.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.
     
    Because you haven't given any explicit proposals to counter. How are we to tell whether your activist government is dangerous or not until you do?

    Ask him sometime – the rest of us can’t see or hear him.
     
    Nor you. We have to go by what you imply.

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I’m against concealed carry...

     

    How do you propose to restrict it to whites? What with the 14th Amendment and all?

    Replies: @Exile

  333. @Cato
    @Art Deco

    A knowledgeable comment. The problem faced by the Hutu and Tutsi --intermingling too much for separation into sovereign states-- is also a problem in all of the mega-cities of Africa, a problem growing worse with each passing year. And I admit the selfish regret that Afrikaners and other whites failed to declare a sovereign state in the Western Cape.

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries. For South Asia, my impression has always been it could as well be called a "continent", like Europe, rather than a "sub-continent". It would probably be a better place were it 40 countries, rather than six.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries.

    True, but most of them live in Iran or Turkey. I think Iran’s boundaries were about the same then as now and Turkey has what it managed to hold on to during the war and just after.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Art Deco

    Kurds are an unusual ethny in that they speak about seven languages, a few of which are not mutually intelligible (Zaza is the big outlier). A tribal people, much more attached to clan than to a semi-artificial nation, Kurds were not a big concern when the Treaty of Sèvres was drawn up. Atatürk promised Kurds their own country, but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise. The many well-educated Turks that I know today (known from university circles), mostly agree that Turkey would have been a better country had the Kurds been cut loose. And I think the Kurds would have done well with their own country. I wish we had partitioned Iraq when we had the chance.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  334. @Art Deco
    @Cato

    For West Asia, I offer the example of the Kurds, who have been cheated out of a state by post-WWI colonial boundaries.

    True, but most of them live in Iran or Turkey. I think Iran's boundaries were about the same then as now and Turkey has what it managed to hold on to during the war and just after.

    Replies: @Cato

    Kurds are an unusual ethny in that they speak about seven languages, a few of which are not mutually intelligible (Zaza is the big outlier). A tribal people, much more attached to clan than to a semi-artificial nation, Kurds were not a big concern when the Treaty of Sèvres was drawn up. Atatürk promised Kurds their own country, but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise. The many well-educated Turks that I know today (known from university circles), mostly agree that Turkey would have been a better country had the Kurds been cut loose. And I think the Kurds would have done well with their own country. I wish we had partitioned Iraq when we had the chance.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Cato

    but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise.

    What, did a British General win it in a card game with marked cards?

    The area around Kirkuk had a Kurdish majority in 1925 and is well south of the border between the Republic of Turkey and the old League of Nations Mandate of Iraq. I'm not seeing how the Kurdish population of the former Ottoman territory gets a state courtesy Kemal Attaturk but the area around Kirkuk remains his absent constituting it as some sort of exclave or turning a whole mess of Arabic-speaking territory over to Attaturk.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  335. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile

    Okay, Mr Bigmouth, what is your solution? You are deliberately inspecific. Typical troll behavior.


    It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear.

    Why are you opposed to concealed carry? It took decades of libertarian argument-- self-defense is a right, not a privilege-- to achieve that.

    If you have pro-government, "pro-White" (shouldn't that be spelled "pro-WHITE", or even "pro-WHITE"?) ideas, why don't you spell them out for us? E.g., what are the specifics of your plan to remove the blacks to Africa? No politician has even suggested that since Theodore Bilbo. How do we even begin? What is Step 1?

    Replies: @Exile, @Anonymous

    “It took almost 50 years for a vigorous and persevering movement to get the Supreme Court even to consider allowing states to restrict abortion, a scourge that has cost nearly 40 million white lives, not counting white children never conceived due to fear.”

    The total figure for aborted fetuses is 40 million so the white figure must be significantly less. And what’s this “not conceived due to fear” business? Were women afraid to get pregnant because planned parenthood would corner them on the street and forcibly abort their kid?

    Just say it. You want to ban abortion because of religion even if it makes America a dumber , more criminal country.

  336. The dollar has been about to collapse since like the 1970s. Predicting that it will collapse is macroeconomics, and thus comically easy. Predicting when it will collapse is micoreconomics and thus comically hard.

    But no, debt ratios are not relevant. Germany went through hyperinflation and the deutschemark still didn’t collapse. Hey, what are Zimbabwe dollars denominated in these days?

    America’s reserve status hinges primarily on military superiority. Do you think Europe adopted the reserve dollar by choice? I believe this particular tyranny is called Bretton Woods. (For me all the bureaucratic faux-names kind of run together.) Do you think Europeans wouldn’t jump ship to BTC in an instant if they thought they could get away with it?

    Recently America had to bully the Swiss into locking down its banks another notch, due to the BTC threat.

    I’m trying to think of a second major factor, but I’m not coming up with anything but colour revolutions; threat thereof.

  337. @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I'm against concealed carry into the conversation. Readers can check what I said here (and in my entire post history, for that matter).

    You are trying to get away with the shell game that "libertarians are for concealed carry and you said bad thing about libertarians so you are against concealed carry."

    You're also trying to shell-game your weird assumptions as my actual opinions re: abortion. FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it. Being pro-life because states rights is a minority position among libertarians.

    Then you segue into what my position on removing Blacks is - again, nothing to do with Wyoming or the bone-headed limited government argument against limiting this funding.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.

    You have made a devastating case against the points I was never making. I assume the fantasy person I've never been is sorely embarrassed. Ask him sometime - the rest of us can't see or hear him.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it.

    Not by much. It’s consistently been about ⅓ seeing it as a right and ⅓ seeing it as a crime. Those in the middle oppose changing the status quo mostly by default.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.

    Because you haven’t given any explicit proposals to counter. How are we to tell whether your activist government is dangerous or not until you do?

    Ask him sometime – the rest of us can’t see or hear him.

    Nor you. We have to go by what you imply.

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I’m against concealed carry…

    How do you propose to restrict it to whites? What with the 14th Amendment and all?

    • Replies: @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    As usual in libertarian debate, you want to expand the scope of the discussion to something so off-topic and meta that it would take a comment five times longer than Sailer's Taki piece to even summarize.

    America has obviously followed the trajectory Lee Kuan Yew predicted for every multiracial democracy - race-based interest groups fighting over spoils. The present system can't overcome that from within - it will take extra-constitutional reform (aka revolution).

    Until that happens, Whites have to work the existing system the same way the other blocs do. Libertarianism's gut-level aversion to collective action is a recipe for voluntary White disenfranchisement.

    As your comments show, you are deeply concerned with rules and permission when everyone else playing the game of American politics is concerned with flexing power.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  338. @Nathan
    Thank you Steve. Your writings are influential, so I'm glad that you've pointed out what a terrible idea dividing the United States is. A lot of conservative types imagine that they'll be better off under "national divorce" circumstances, but nothing could be further from the truth. A North American nation without port access to both the Atlantic and Pacific will quickly fall under the dominion of either Mexico or Canada. Nobody understands this, but it's true.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ben tillman, @SaneClownPosse, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @Cato, @Richard B, @Moses

    My Democrat neighbor hates me more than any Russian or Chinese ever will.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Moses

    And we they.

    I deliberately steer away from political topics in most conversations precisely because I generally like people and I don't want to spoil that impression.

    Replies: @Moses

  339. @HA
    @Thelma Ringbaum

    "Czarists did develop Ukrainian language and culture...

    I suspect any developments that they made occurred when they were trying to wrest Ukraine away from Poland. Those don't count. Because afterwards, once the Czarists actually absorbed Ukraine, things got uglier (which I suspect, is why more recent appeals for a warm embrace with mother Russia are being rebuffed, but hey, let's ignore all that and focus on Nuland's pastries).

    In other words, I'm going to say the instances of "development" Ukrainian culture are the few paltry exceptions that prove the rule: Again, here's some examples from the link I cited above:


    ...the use of Ukrainian language within the Russian empire was initially restricted by official government decrees such as the Valuev Circular (18 July 1863) and later banned by the Ems ukaz (18 May 1876) from any use in print (with the exception of reprinting of old documents). Popularly the anti-Ukrainian sentiment was promulgated by such organizations as the "Black Hundreds", which were vehemently opposed to Ukrainian self-determination...In 1720 Peter the Great issued an edict prohibiting printing books in the Ukrainian language... In 1763 Catherine the Great issued an edict prohibiting lectures in the Ukrainian language at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. In 1769 the Most Holy Synod prohibited printing and using the Ukrainian alphabet book... In 1847 the Russian government persecuted all members of the Brotherhood of Saints Cyril and Methodius and prohibited the works of Taras Shevchenko... and others... In 1863 the Russian Minister of Interior Valuev decided that the Little Russian language (Ukrainian language) had never existed and could not ever exist. [Weird how so much effort is involved in eradicating something that "had never existed and could not exist.]... In 1879 the Russian Minister of Education Dmitry Tolstoy (later the Russian Minister of Interior) officially and openly stated that all people of the Russian Empire should be Russified. In the 1880s several edicts were issued prohibiting education in the Ukrainian language at private schools, theatric performances in Ukrainian, any use of Ukrainian in official institutions, and christening Ukrainian names... In 1914 the Russian government officially prohibited celebrations of the 100th Anniversary of Shevchenko's birthday and posted gendarmes at the Chernecha Hill. The same year Nicholas II of Russia issued an edict prohibiting the Ukrainian press...Under Soviet rule in Ukraine, a policy of korenization.. initially supported Ukrainian cultural self-awareness. This policy was phased out in 1928 and terminated entirely in 1932 in favor of general Russification.
     
    If anyone wants to counter that with some list of allegations that the current Ukrainian government (led by native Russian speaker Zelensky, I might add) is doing anything comparable towards Russian speakers, make sure the source you provide isn't something from RT or some similarly craven sellout to Putin. Then we can compare both lists and get some added perspective.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Is that long passage from a link to The Pretend Encyclopedia?

  340. @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile


    FWIW, libertarians have more often supported abortion than opposed it.
     
    Not by much. It's consistently been about ⅓ seeing it as a right and ⅓ seeing it as a crime. Those in the middle oppose changing the status quo mostly by default.

    As usual, you are debating a fantasy opponent with imaginary low-hanging bad arguments for you to tilt at.
     
    Because you haven't given any explicit proposals to counter. How are we to tell whether your activist government is dangerous or not until you do?

    Ask him sometime – the rest of us can’t see or hear him.
     
    Nor you. We have to go by what you imply.

    You are ham-fistedly trying to smuggle the idea that I’m against concealed carry...

     

    How do you propose to restrict it to whites? What with the 14th Amendment and all?

    Replies: @Exile

    As usual in libertarian debate, you want to expand the scope of the discussion to something so off-topic and meta that it would take a comment five times longer than Sailer’s Taki piece to even summarize.

    America has obviously followed the trajectory Lee Kuan Yew predicted for every multiracial democracy – race-based interest groups fighting over spoils. The present system can’t overcome that from within – it will take extra-constitutional reform (aka revolution).

    Until that happens, Whites have to work the existing system the same way the other blocs do. Libertarianism’s gut-level aversion to collective action is a recipe for voluntary White disenfranchisement.

    As your comments show, you are deeply concerned with rules and permission when everyone else playing the game of American politics is concerned with flexing power.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Exile


    Whites have to work the existing system
     
    Anglo-Saxons have to work within another existing system-- their own genetic constraints. "Collective action" is forcible action. That's fine for Germans and Koreans. Lockstep is to Anglo-Saxons what nuclear physics is to sub-Saharans.

    ...it would take a comment five times longer than Sailer’s Taki piece to even summarize.
     
    And you wonder why I suspect you're just another one of Corvinus's sockpuppets.

    "Five times longer" is bad English, by the way.
  341. That ship has sailed, Steve. Back in 1990, when patriots and Republicans started talking publicly about “political correctness” (which petit bourgeois communists had been talking about privately for years), you could still talk about possible survival, but the GOP stabbed the White race in the back, with extreme prejudice. In a few years, Whites will be a minority in their own country. The discrimination, rape, maiming, and murder will get worse and worse.

    Whites will either secede, or be annihilated. And the thing is, blacks couldn’t do it on their own, but tens of millions of genocidal Whites are leading the purge.

    https://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com/2012/05/possibilities-for-how-american.html

    • Replies: @Exile
    @Nicholas Stix

    Genocidal Fellow Whites and Whites, but yeah that's pretty much it.

    As Israel likes to say about the Palestinians, "you can't negotiate with people dedicated to your destruction."

    Why shouldn't that apply to White Americans vs. Coloreds of Person?

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

  342. @Cato
    @Art Deco

    Kurds are an unusual ethny in that they speak about seven languages, a few of which are not mutually intelligible (Zaza is the big outlier). A tribal people, much more attached to clan than to a semi-artificial nation, Kurds were not a big concern when the Treaty of Sèvres was drawn up. Atatürk promised Kurds their own country, but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise. The many well-educated Turks that I know today (known from university circles), mostly agree that Turkey would have been a better country had the Kurds been cut loose. And I think the Kurds would have done well with their own country. I wish we had partitioned Iraq when we had the chance.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise.

    What, did a British General win it in a card game with marked cards?

    The area around Kirkuk had a Kurdish majority in 1925 and is well south of the border between the Republic of Turkey and the old League of Nations Mandate of Iraq. I’m not seeing how the Kurdish population of the former Ottoman territory gets a state courtesy Kemal Attaturk but the area around Kirkuk remains his absent constituting it as some sort of exclave or turning a whole mess of Arabic-speaking territory over to Attaturk.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco

    Greeks and Armenians:


    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ER89L0sU4AAQ-p5.png

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/d7a4beed0f2687b1829e6ed38d68b725/03f1880b8f0a818c-e3/s1280x1920/6bc8126e0ddb19f04d23e82b047a7cb9da689e0c.jpg

    Replies: @Art Deco

  343. @Nicholas Stix
    That ship has sailed, Steve. Back in 1990, when patriots and Republicans started talking publicly about “political correctness” (which petit bourgeois communists had been talking about privately for years), you could still talk about possible survival, but the GOP stabbed the White race in the back, with extreme prejudice. In a few years, Whites will be a minority in their own country. The discrimination, rape, maiming, and murder will get worse and worse.

    Whites will either secede, or be annihilated. And the thing is, blacks couldn’t do it on their own, but tens of millions of genocidal Whites are leading the purge.

    https://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com/2012/05/possibilities-for-how-american.html

    Replies: @Exile

    Genocidal Fellow Whites and Whites, but yeah that’s pretty much it.

    As Israel likes to say about the Palestinians, “you can’t negotiate with people dedicated to your destruction.”

    Why shouldn’t that apply to White Americans vs. Coloreds of Person?

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Exile

    I wasn't just talking about Whites vs. coloreds.

  344. @Moses
    @Nathan

    My Democrat neighbor hates me more than any Russian or Chinese ever will.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    And we they.

    I deliberately steer away from political topics in most conversations precisely because I generally like people and I don’t want to spoil that impression.

    • Replies: @Moses
    @Pincher Martin

    I dunno. I certainly don't care for the wokies, but I don't hate them with the spittle-flecked crazy-eyed passion with which the left hates me.

    https://www.educationviews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/liberal-mad-women.jpg

  345. Anonymous[479] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    Thread at bottom of Americans and others who considered extending NATO to Russian borders to be a very bad idea likely to lead to conflict. Useful when you get accused of being a Russian troll or Putin's accomplice.

    George Kennan in 1998

    Henry Kissinger in 2014

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/henry-kissinger-to-settle-the-ukraine-crisis-start-at-the-end/2014/03/05/46dad868-a496-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html

    US Ambassador to SU Jack F. Matlock Jr in 1997

    "the most profound strategic blunder, [encouraging] a chain of events that could produce the most serious security threat [...] since the Soviet Union collapsed"

    Clinton Defence Secretary William Perry, "explaining in his memoir that to him NATO enlargement is the cause of "the rupture in relations with Russia" and that in 1996 he was so opposed to it that "in the strength of my conviction, I considered resigning"."

    UN Deputy Sec-Gen Pino Arlacchi ("NATO is the root cause of the Russian crisis")

    CIA Director Bill Burns in 2008 - "Ukrainian entry into NATO is the brightest of all redlines for [Russia]" and "I have yet to find anyone who views Ukraine in NATO as anything other than a direct challenge to Russian interests"

    Aussie PMs Fraser "the move east [by NATO is] provocative, unwise and a very clear signal to Russia". He adds that this leads to a "difficult and extraordinarily dangerous problem."

    and Keating

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/03/ukraine-theres-no-way-out-unless-the-west-understands-its-past-mistakes


    US Defence Sec Robert Gates

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C2WBtXlUQAAdo9x.jpg

    Sir Roderic Lyne, former British ambassador to Russia, warned a year ago that "[pushing] Ukraine into NATO [...] is stupid on every level." He adds "if you want to start a war with Russia, that's the best way of doing it."

    Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, John Mearsheimer, Stephen Cohen, economist Jeffrey Sachs (""NATO enlargement is utterly misguided and risky. True friends of Ukraine, and of global peace, should be calling for a US and NATO compromise with Russia.""), as well as people like Chomsky.

    https://twitter.com/RnaudBertrand/status/1498491107902062592

    Replies: @HA, @Anonymous

    You could compile a similar collection of quotes from notable people in the 1990s who opposed invading Iraq and overthrowing Saddam.

  346. @Exile
    @Reg Cæsar

    As usual in libertarian debate, you want to expand the scope of the discussion to something so off-topic and meta that it would take a comment five times longer than Sailer's Taki piece to even summarize.

    America has obviously followed the trajectory Lee Kuan Yew predicted for every multiracial democracy - race-based interest groups fighting over spoils. The present system can't overcome that from within - it will take extra-constitutional reform (aka revolution).

    Until that happens, Whites have to work the existing system the same way the other blocs do. Libertarianism's gut-level aversion to collective action is a recipe for voluntary White disenfranchisement.

    As your comments show, you are deeply concerned with rules and permission when everyone else playing the game of American politics is concerned with flexing power.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Whites have to work the existing system

    Anglo-Saxons have to work within another existing system– their own genetic constraints. “Collective action” is forcible action. That’s fine for Germans and Koreans. Lockstep is to Anglo-Saxons what nuclear physics is to sub-Saharans.

    …it would take a comment five times longer than Sailer’s Taki piece to even summarize.

    And you wonder why I suspect you’re just another one of Corvinus’s sockpuppets.

    “Five times longer” is bad English, by the way.

  347. @Thea
    @Zero Philosopher

    I grew up in South Florida. The weather is miserable pretty much every single day without relief. Without air conditioning it is uninhabitable.

    I developed a theory as a teen that people of European descent do not belong in the tropics but few people agree with me.

    Replies: @Barnard, @AndrewR, @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack P

    You’re probably right, but why are there blacks in Minnesota and Wisconsin? Is the welfare really worth it?

    • Replies: @Alrenous
    @Jack P

    Warming up is cheaper and easier than cooling down.

  348. @Art Deco
    @Cato

    but when the British cheated Turkey out of Kirkuk, he reneged on the promise.

    What, did a British General win it in a card game with marked cards?

    The area around Kirkuk had a Kurdish majority in 1925 and is well south of the border between the Republic of Turkey and the old League of Nations Mandate of Iraq. I'm not seeing how the Kurdish population of the former Ottoman territory gets a state courtesy Kemal Attaturk but the area around Kirkuk remains his absent constituting it as some sort of exclave or turning a whole mess of Arabic-speaking territory over to Attaturk.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Greeks and Armenians:

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Reg Cæsar

    They don't give you a key to the map for a reason.

  349. @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco

    Greeks and Armenians:


    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ER89L0sU4AAQ-p5.png

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/d7a4beed0f2687b1829e6ed38d68b725/03f1880b8f0a818c-e3/s1280x1920/6bc8126e0ddb19f04d23e82b047a7cb9da689e0c.jpg

    Replies: @Art Deco

    They don’t give you a key to the map for a reason.

  350. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest.
     
    Ruled by China or Russia? How would we handle such freedom?

    Anyway, I'd say it's on those indifferent Americans in the MidWest and other areas to figure out if they have any loyalty to the rest of us. Otherwise, it's getting so hard to keep this thing together. Being tired can be a force too.

    Replies: @David Davenport

    Breaking up the USA into smaller states would open the door for massive meddling in the new minor countries by both overseas powers and local neighbors, as the chronicles of the ex–Soviet Union suggest

    The new nation of Heartland America must avoid the mistake Ukraine make, and keep plenty of nukes and nu-klur delivery systems.

    Local neighbors? Are we supposed to fear Mexifornia or the Canuckistan military machine? Heartland America conventional forces could easily defeat those local neighbors.

  351. @Pincher Martin
    @Moses

    And we they.

    I deliberately steer away from political topics in most conversations precisely because I generally like people and I don't want to spoil that impression.

    Replies: @Moses

    I dunno. I certainly don’t care for the wokies, but I don’t hate them with the spittle-flecked crazy-eyed passion with which the left hates me.

    • LOL: Pincher Martin
  352. @Jack P
    @Thea

    You're probably right, but why are there blacks in Minnesota and Wisconsin? Is the welfare really worth it?

    Replies: @Alrenous

    Warming up is cheaper and easier than cooling down.

  353. @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “There is a strong Jewish vanguard in every one of those movements; they are well-placed in media, education and law.”

    And strong non-Jewish influence as well.

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    “But they have no interest in Team White’s Adam Smith, Locke’s Treatises, Columbus statues, personal values of restraint and decorum, and the old national holidays”

    Neither does Team White on average.

    “You and I will probably live to see the day the Alamo no longer gets monument funding and is covered in triumphalist Team Brown graffiti.”

    I’ll bet you a virtual sawbuck it won’t happen.

    Replies: @res, @Nicholas Stix

    “Assimilation is out-marriage, which remains a marginal phenomenon”

    Out-marriage among Jews? That runs about 50%.

  354. @Exile
    @Nicholas Stix

    Genocidal Fellow Whites and Whites, but yeah that's pretty much it.

    As Israel likes to say about the Palestinians, "you can't negotiate with people dedicated to your destruction."

    Why shouldn't that apply to White Americans vs. Coloreds of Person?

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    I wasn’t just talking about Whites vs. coloreds.

  355. If wishes could be…

    Look, Steve, there are concessions to reality that must be made. One of them is that unless the centralization of social policy is reversed, everyone is required, as a matter of self-defense, to get into everyone else’s face in a most uncivil manner.

    The concession to reality here is to recognize that we’ve been here before with The Thirty Years War, and that this time around it will be vastly more destructive. Admonishing people to behave themselves won’t cut it — especially if directed at those who are suffering under the yoke of this meta-supremacist regime. If you don’t offer them an alternative to killing off their neighbors without giving up their values, that’s what they’ll end up doing.

    I suggest you offer a superior, and equally concise alternative to The Minimalist Rules For Sortocracy because right now, that’s the fallback position as an improvement on The Treaty of Westphalia which ended The Thirty Years War.

    If you want to _prevent_ that war, and are willing to recognize the necessities of what must be some sort of forceful overthrow of the current elites, despite their well-funded project to diffuse “diversity” into every isolated hamlet, you’ll have to refer to John Robb’s ideas and come up with a “Plausible Promise” as the focal point of an “Open Source Insurgency”. In that event, beat this “Plausible Promise” for which men — and I do men men — will fight and, if necessary, die:

    Replace government with an equal militia dividend paid to every male of military age — no exceptions — with a 2.5%/year protection fee placed on liquidation value of net assets.

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The Hidden History of the 1930s and 1940s
Becker update V1.3.2
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement