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Sailer in Taki's Mag: Is the Age of Conquest Still Over?
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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

An End to Conquering
Steve Sailer

September 14, 2022

The success of Ukraine’s surprise northeastern offensive suggests a fundamental problem for the invaders: When it comes to seizing and holding land in Ukraine, the average Russian soldier’s heart just isn’t in it.

But why should it be? After all, unlike Patrick Swayze’s guerrilla in Red Dawn, the poor Russian doesn’t live there.

That the modern male is less interested in conquest than his progenitors were seems like a general pattern. Men will still fight bravely for their homelands or for what they see as a good cause, but less so to raise their flag over their neighbor’s fields.

I’ve been arguing for most of this century that the age of wars of conquest is drawing to a close. Why? In recent generations, the payoff from militarily subjugating foreign lands has been typically less than the cost.

Therefore, I had assumed that Vladimir Putin’s cold-blooded rationality would cause him to stop short of starting a major war. So, I felt pretty stupid back on Feb. 24, 2022.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. AKAHorace says:

    You end the article with

    Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    And that, more than anything else, may explain the decline in our hunger for conquest: We’re not hungry enough anymore.

    Literally.

    Give this time. Agricultural yield may not be stable. Much of the best agricultural land is being built on and soil degradation gets less attention now that environmentalists are preoccupied with climate change. As well as this food distribution depends on world trade.

  2. Daniel H says:

    Oh Steve, you silly, silly white man. Red blooded, and red in tooth and claw, national conquest will always animate man (and the women folk that admire them.) Just look around, one by one, white nations are falling to conquest.

  3. Daniel H says:

    Oh Steve, you silly, silly scribbling white man. Red blooded, and red in tooth and claw, national conquest will always animate man (and the women folk that admire them.) Just look around, one by one, white nations are falling to conquest.

  4. Yeesh! Glanced at the headline and thought it said “Age of Consent” — about which:


    Another Nice White Lady, and a teacher, yet. Pedophilia and Bestiality now, with incest on the next step—it’s featured in some Netflix show.

    Sorry to go OT early in the thread but it’s always worth documenting why so many of us believe in Burn It All Down.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  5. D. K. says:

    “When it comes to seizing and holding land in Ukraine, the average Russian soldier’s heart just isn’t in it.”

    Have you used your professional training and experience in grocery-store marketing to quantify just how into “seizing and holding land in Ukraine . . . the average Russian soldier’s heart” is or isn’t, or do you just close your eyes, in your walk-in closet in L.A., and imagine what it must be like to be one of those average Russian soldiers in Ukraine, these days?

    Are American soldiers’ hearts into illegally occupying Syria and stealing its oil?

  6. Really, Steve. Are we sure our host isn’t taking a well-earned break while Jack D phones it in?

    “militarily subjugating foreign lands”

    Aka protecting the Russians in Donbass/Luhansk at the same time as stopping the installation of US missiles on the border closest to Moscow, maybe?

  7. @YetAnotherAnon

    You didn’t hear about Russia’s plans for holding referenda in the occupied territory on Russia annexing them? They had to push the elections back from September to November because of the turn of events outside Kharkov.

    https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20220905-moscow-pauses-annexation-vote-in-ukraine-amid-fightback

  8. And that, more than anything else, may explain the decline in our hunger for conquest: We’re not hungry enough anymore.

    Literally

    Yep. Nice survey Steve.

    — Land used to be the assert. Slaves were 2nd banana. Now land is of much lesser importance. Industrial and technological processes generate more of the production people consume.

    — The demographic transition–fertility collapse–means there is not the direct “how to feed and house all these people” issue.

    — The post-War American system of free world trade allows you to get whatever you need … you just have to be able to produce and pay.

    — People–at least in the West–are not going to do the sort of bathed in blood kind of stuff necessary for land acquisition to actually be acquisition.

    — War is expensive. It not only disrupts and destroys productive asserts (in a way that old fighting over territory did not) but it is very expensive. Harry Baldwin pointed out on a prior thread that a Taliban crashing a Blackhawk was actually cheaper in Taliban-deaths/dollar than the war. (Ridiculous as that sounds, it’s probably true.) The US does war particularly expensively, but modern war is pricey. To make Afghanistan pay it would have to have been a very old style deal where our boys ended up with … Afghanistan. (See previous point.)

    Overall … just not a great idea.

    What works is nationalism that is fair minded and respects other peoples’ nationalism. We just need to get everyone on board.

  9. Steve Sailer:
    The success of Ukraine’s surprise northeastern offensive suggests a fundamental problem for the invaders: When it comes to seizing and holding land in Ukraine, the average Russian soldier’s heart just isn’t in it.

    But why should it be? After all, unlike Patrick Swayze’s guerrilla in Red Dawn, the poor Russian doesn’t live there.

    Mr Steve is no military analyst or historian. About 25 % of Ukraine’s population are ethnic Russians. They are overwhelmingly concentrated in the Donbas and the south of Ukraine. As a result of persecution and harassment by the Ukrainian Government, the ethnic Russians of Crimea ( more than 80% of the province ) expelled the Ukrainian military garrison without a single death and voted in a referendum to rejoin Russia. At the same time – 2014 – in the Donbas, ethnic Russian militias formed to protect themselves, and have been at war with the Ukraine Central Government ever since.

    Russian soldiers would feel much at home in the Donbas and South Ukraine precisely because it is so Russian. Also, in the Donbas itself, the vast majority of the infantry fighting is being conducted by soldiers of the Donbas militias. The Russia military provides artillery and other support. Apart from Mariupol, actual infantry warfare by the Russian military has been slight. Yes, Steve, these militiamen certainly live there and know their own country.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Art Deco
  10. @AKAHorace

    “his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer”

    Accurate information about Ukraine seems to be hard to find, but the “black earth” of Ukraine and (Russian) Kuban is pretty important, as we’ve seen from the cries to allow grain exports (which Russia agreed to) has shown. They thought the Green Revolution killed Malthus, but he won’t lie down!

    https://www.npr.org/2022/05/18/1099733752/famine-africa-ukraine-invasion-drought

    And as I understand it, foreign ownership of land is forbidden in Ukraine. However the laws were changed after 2014 to allow corporate ownership of land (by Ukrainian companies), and US companies are buying shares in those Ukrainian companies. What could possibly go wrong, in a country as uncorrupt as Ukraine?

    https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2022/09/13/fact-check-ukraines-president-did-not-sell-farmland-us-companies/7942775001/

    U.S. investment funds have large stakes in the largest landowners in Ukraine. Investors include funds like BlackRock and Vanguard, as well as American and European pension funds, banks and foundations.

    Although the companies mentioned in the post can’t buy land directly, in 2014 Cargill did buy a 5% share in UkrLandFarming, one of the largest landholders in Ukraine with 475,000 hectares of land as of 2020, Mousseau said.

    Despite the moratorium on private land transfers, more than two million hectares — or about 7,700 square miles — of land have ended up being controlled by foreign companies through leases, Mousseau said. The largest investors are companies from Cyprus, the U.S. and the Netherlands.

    NCH Capital, a U.S. investment fund, also controls more than 330,000 hectares of land in Ukraine through leases, Mousseau said.

    “There is no doubt that Cargill, Dupont and Monsanto have major business interests in Ukraine – and see major profit opportunities there – but it is not through their direct control of the land,” he said.

    One other point – the Haber-Bosch process is very energy intensive. Who has the energy which allows fertiliser production?

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-08/high-gas-prices-force-uk-fertilizer-plant-to-close-for-good

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-13/fertilizer-group-warns-europe-plant-shutdowns-may-turn-permanent

    https://www.reuters.com/business/environment/yara-cuts-cast-doubt-europes-fertiliser-production-2022-08-25/

    https://www.gasworld.com/basf-becomes-latest-to-curtail-fertiliser-production/2021817.article

  11. AKAHorace says:

    I am reposting as my first version is difficult to follow because of where the italics went.

    You end the article with

    Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    And that, more than anything else, may explain the decline in our hunger for conquest: We’re not hungry enough anymore.

    Literally.

    Give this time. Agricultural yield may not be stable. Much of the best agricultural land is being built on and soil degradation gets less attention now that environmentalists are preoccupied with climate change. As well as this food distribution depends on world trade.

  12. @D. K.

    In Reclaimed Towns, Ukrainians Recount a Frantic Russian Retreat

    By Andrew E. Kramer and Jeffrey Gettleman
    Sept. 13, 2022

    BALAKLIYA, Ukraine — The signs of desperation were everywhere. Abandoned military vehicles. Cans of food and dishes left on tables. Mail scattered on office floors. Clothes left hanging on lines.

    This is how the Russian army left the town of Balakliya in northeastern Ukraine, in a sign of a frantic, chaotic withdrawal as the Ukrainian Army closed in during a fast-moving counteroffensive over the last few days. The lightning assaults allowed Ukraine’s military to recapture hundreds of square miles of territory, strategic towns and abandoned weapons.

    One resident, Oleksandr Kryvosheya, said that he had overheard Russian soldiers yelling at their commanders on a radio in an armored personnel carrier parked in the courtyard of his apartment block. “You left us behind, you got out,” the soldiers protested, Mr. Kryvosheya said.

    “If they came to fight, if they came to build this new Russia, why didn’t they stay and fight in Balakliya?” he said in an interview on Tuesday.

    As the Russian defenses around the town collapsed, residents said, soldiers ran for whatever transport they could, leaving behind ammunition and weapons along with personal items in apartments where they had quartered.

    “Trucks drove through the city honking, and they climbed on and left,” said Igor Levchenko, a retiree, describing the Russian Army’s withdrawal after more than six months of occupation. “They didn’t have a fighting spirit. They were afraid.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/13/world/europe/ukraine-russia-retreat-morale.html

  13. @Steve Sailer

    “You didn’t hear about Russia’s plans for holding referenda in the occupied territory on Russia annexing them? “

    After what’s happened (the transformation into US/NATO vs Russia) I’m not at all surprised. They are shooting civilians in the recently regained area of Kupyansk. I won’t show the pictures but I’m sure John Johnson will.

    Why are you surprised? Russia knows “the West” i.e. US can’t be trusted – is “agreement incapable”, in their words. Otherwise Minsk II would have been implemented and we’d all be at peace and warm.

    Incidentally I see there’s been border shooting between two more ex-Soviet republics, on the Kyrgyz-Tajik border. That’s after the Armenia – Azeri border clashes.

    PS – how come the NYT is now an unbiased source of accurate news?

    • Thanks: Renard
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  14. Here is a very interesting recent paper using sophisticated statistical methods to analyze the influence of pro-Ukrainian and pro-Russian bots on online discussions.

    The bottom line, for anyone not willing to dig into the technical details:

    Pro-Russian non-bot accounts are most influential overall, with information flows to a variety of other account groups. No significant outward flows exist from pro-Ukrainian non-bot accounts, with significant flows from pro-Ukrainian bot accounts into pro-Ukrainian non-bot accounts.

    I.e., in simple English, Ukrainian bots work for influencing the online discussion; Russian humans are more effective than Russian bots.

    Tells you something, I think.

    It also raises the question of how to analyze the Kievan hasbara efforts online.

    I assume everyone has figured out by now that my pal HA is an agent of the Kievan regime: thanks to the nice software Ron Unz has created, you can easily see that HA only had posted a total of 4 comments prior to 2014.

    But this ramped up very dramatically after the 2014 putsch engineered by the US Deep State to install a puppet regime in Kiev: 391 comments in 2014 and then 602 in 2015. He then slacked off a bit as things quieted down in Ukraine, but of course, he just exploded this year after Russia intervened to try to end the murders by Kiev in the Donbass: over 1000 posts already this year!

    It’s interesting that even someone as sophisticated about data as Sailer seems not to have “noticed” this obvious evidence that HA is a Kievan operative.

    Of course, a bit of content analysis also shows that HA is not an American — too many slips, despite the fact that his English is pretty good.

    I am actually curious as to why HA does not just lie and claim he is an American: I suppose he is bright enough to know it would be pretty easy to show that he was lying (not that being caught out in lying seems to inhibit HA in general).

    Anyway, as people come to realize how they have been manipulated and deceived on the Ukriane crisis by bots, hasbara, etc., I suspect this sort of analysis will become more common in the future.

    At least, we can hope so.

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Pixo
    , @Anonymous
  15. A lot of mind-reading and acceptance of the Narrative in this piece. Everyone in the Lying Media keeps telling us what Russians are doing, as if they know. But what the Lying Media tells us doesn’t agree with what Russians say. So who knows. Russia has never referred to this as a ‘war of conquest’ or anything like it. That was our Lying Media’s spin.

    When it comes to seizing and holding land in Ukraine, the average Russian soldier’s heart just isn’t in it.

    That may or may not be true, but you’d have no idea (more mind-reading). And, they don’t claim that is their goal. That’s the Lying Media’s spin.

    What we all suspect is that Russians don’t want their nation destabilized. And so, they may be up for what they consider a defensive move. The Usual Suspects will rant-and-rave that “invading ain’t defensive” but everyone else gets how it could be, from the perspective of a country that feels itself threatened. This has been explained by Stephen F. Cohen, John Mearsheimer and Henry Kissinger. None of those boys are lightweights.

    Maybe their wrong (I doubt it), but why not dig a little deeper and think for yourself? You’re not channelling Jack D, you’re starting to channel Rachel Maddow. We can all get Yahoo News commentary easy enough.

  16. BB753 says:

    On the contrary, in the Dombass, it’s local militias who are doing most of the fighting on their own turf against the Ukrainian army. Russian regulars occupy most of Kherson area, where the Ukrainian military did not make any inroads.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  17. @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    You cited the Gray Lady.

    The same outlet that lied for years about Russian Collusion.

    The National Enquirer now has higher credibility.

  18. AndrewR says:
    @Daniel H

    What’s happening in “white nations” is a type of conquest, but the conquerors are being changed at least as much as they’re changing their new lands.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    , @Corvinus
  19. @YetAnotherAnon

    Aka protecting the Russians in Donbass/Luhansk at the same time as stopping the installation of US missiles on the border closest to Moscow, maybe?

    YAA, really please stop with the missile nonsense.

    The Russians probably have a sub in the Atlantic right now that is closer to DC than you can get to Moscow from any point in the Ukraine. And Ukraine isn’t materially closer to Moscow than Latvia. And for that matter in terms of flying missiles it isn’t materially closer than the Baltic or Black Seas which have been there for decades.

    And then there’s the awkward fact that the US had no plans, still has no plans to slap a bunch of missiles in Ukraine.

    This stuff is just ridiculous. The US and Russia can blow each up very handily and have been able to my entire life. This “Ukraine imminent threat” nonsense … not a good look.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Thanks: Jack D
    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @PhysicistDave
    , @Pixo
  20. @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad wrote:

    — War is expensive. It not only disrupts and destroys productive asserts (in a way that old fighting over territory did not) but it is very expensive.

    Although, bizarrely, Russia seems to be doing great economically out of this war, much to my surprise, I admit.

    The ruble is up well above its pre-war level; Russia is making money hand over fist thanks to the Western sanctions. And everything I have seen is that Russian consumers are doing fine — Western consumers, not so fine, of course.

    Perhaps the gods merely smile on those who are on the side of truth, justice, and freedom for the human race from the Hegemon?

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    , @JimB
  21. D. K. says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “’Trucks drove through the city honking, and they climbed on and left,’ said Igor Levchenko, a retiree, describing the Russian Army’s withdrawal after more than six months of occupation. ‘They didn’t have a fighting spirit. They were afraid.’”

    If you can’t trust Igor Levchenko and “The New York Times” for an unbiased assessment of what was in the heart of the average Russian soldier in the town of Balakliya, who the fuck can you trust?!?

    ***

    Update for Russian military operations in Ukraine for September 12, 2022

    – Ukraine has committed what is left of its best troops and equipment to multiple and expensive offensives – both around Kherson and in Kharkov, and rumors of offensives being prepared elsewhere;

    – The Kherson offensive has failed, costing Ukraine multiple brigades’ worth of men and equipment with little territorial gain;

    – The Kharkov offensive has cost Ukraine a large amount of men and equipment with significant territorial gains but failed to eliminate the Russian forces holding the region;

    – Russia’s decision to withdraw from Kharkov conserves men and equipment for fighting later on and to be determined on Russian terms;

    – There will be a significant strategic cost for Ukraine’s tactical gains – some of which are already being paid along the line of contact where Ukrainian lines have been weakened as Kiev cobbled together these offensive forces;

    – There are significant parallels between this Ukrainian push and Germany’s Ardennes Offensive in 1944;

    – Russia is targeting Ukrainian infrastructure including communication towers and power plants for the first time amid its military operations, signalling a possible escalation;

    References:

    Washington Post – Wounded Ukrainian soldiers reveal steep toll of Kherson offensive:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/09/07/ukraine-kherson-offensive-casualties-ammunition/

    Atlantic Council – The Ukrainian military must reorganize to defeat Russia:
    https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/the-ukrainian-military-must-reorganize-to-defeat-russia/

    British Army Documentaries (YouTube) – The Ardennes Offensive Part 1 – A Calculated Risk:

    British Army Documentaries (YouTube) – The Ardennes Offensive Part 2 – Hold at All Cost:

    British Army Documentaries (YouTube) – The Ardennes Offensive Part 3 – Forget Bastogne, head for the Meuse:

    ***

    https://rumble.com/v1jszku-ukraines-offensives-tactical-victories-can-contribute-to-strategic-defeat.html?mref=15jk98&mrefc=2

    N.B.: Let it be duly noted that, for the second time this week, you have chosen not to answer any questions about our own country’s ongoing war crimes in Syria.

    • Thanks: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @HA
  22. Altai says:

    In the past under kingdoms, kings would conquer new lands and gladly rule over alien peoples and farm them for taxes and surplus production under feudalism like a cattle farmer farms cows.

    The people, the peasants were the prize and the inability to grow wealth from any kind of innovation meant you had to simply expand the realm. If they had nice things in the new land you might also loot it, see how Rome fell apart at the end when there was no more to conquer.

    Today the alien peoples are the problem and desire for land stems from irredentism from incomplete unification of peoples or from colonial deposition or alien people preventing the unification.

    There is also a value to certain geography, China, for instance, conquered Tibet after it declared independence again with the fall of the previous state because it valued holding the strategic territory and mountain passes to guard against a future threat from India. India, by comparison, achieved the same thing by just having nice relations with Nepal with nobody ever thinking about annexing it. The Chinese realised the lack of value in holding militarily strategic land with ethnic aliens who aren’t loyal and have had an aggressive policy of ethnic Han and some Chinese Muslim transmigration (Similar to the currently topical Soviet policy of ethnic transmigration of ‘good Soviet’ ethnic Russians to Latvia and Estonia among other places, a lot of the ethnic Russians in the Donbas don’t have very long roots there either) and suppression of the Tibetan language and culture, as time goes on more and more places are banning the use of Tibetan as a medium of instruction in schools, replacing it with Mandarin.

    The other abstract value to geography comes from access to resources, Turkey is currently threatening to take land off Greece in their conflict over their exploitation of hydrocarbon resources in the seas around Turkish occupied Cyprus and other areas that are clearly legally part of the Greek EEZ. Rare Earth Metals are one resource that literally exists everywhere (Though obviously in varying densities) but which the extraction of which results in an environmental apocalypse which is why China dominates the market with it’s tolerance for such things in pursuit of industrial power. There is much talk about conflicts over the huge amounts found in Afghanistan.

    The current situation in Ukraine is driven by the ethnic conflict between Ukrainians and Russians (With Russian speaking Ukrainians having interesting roles and impacts on the conflict, notably in terms of the status of the Russian language. They are often erroneously lumped in with ethnic Russians as ‘Russian speakers’ as if ethnicity is language) that has been intensified to a civil war in the East by the US state department and the desire of the same people to make Ukraine into a giant NATO base and use the civil war in the East to goad Russia into responding and eroding it’s military so it will be less able to respond to the new attacks on Syria. Currently outside Crimea there isn’t anything of direct value in the land of Donbas that Russia would fight over, not even the ethnic Russians in the Donbas. (Which is 50/50 Ukrainian/Russian)

    It’s more that the Russians have nothing left to deter the neocons in the US state department, they rattled their sabre for 10 years and now they had no choice but to use it, the insane ‘Russiagate’ rhetoric turbo-charging everything. You can see the lack of attacks under now on civilian infrastructure and a lack of declaration of full war and the likelihood of them wanting to negotiate the two ‘republics’ as independent or federated as buffer states between Russia and a hostile Ukraine that conquest was not the war aim but removing Ukraine as a military threat and asserting some line against constant geopolitical aggression. Russia may end up with the Donbas at the end of the war but Plan A was to leave it as a buffer state or even a federated part of Ukraine between it and Ukraine proper, that is almost certainly what the peace plan that the Ukrainians almost signed on in April and that Boris Johnson was sent to scupper had in mind. Most of what Russia wanted out of the war was achieved by going to war itself and proving they were prepared to go to war over Ukrainian neutrality and the West wasn’t, happy to let Russia fight a proxy war no matter how badly Ukraine came out.

    There are also examples of Nazi style drives to take land that was never ones own and remove the people who’ve always lived there, see Israel and currently Turkey and Azerbaijan who are quite public in there current rhetoric of genocide against Greeks and Armenians and whose national identity is bound with the idea of being genocidal conquerors, chiefly against the aforementioned Greeks and Armenians. Turkey has been making noise of about taking islands it never held and which never held any Turks save as colonial presences.

    The Azeri war against Armenia will be important to watch since it could turn into a second proxy war against Russia, the Azeris are crazy and really do see it as some kind of mission to wipe out the Armenians, any space for aggression they feel they can get from Russian reoccupation with Ukraine they will take. The last NK war ended badly for Armenia with 100k Armenians ethnically displaced from land that was actually the ancient homeland for Armenians but which had over time during Ottoman times become full of Azeris (A large number of whom the Armenians ethnically cleansed during the war in the 90s) and Azeri destruction of Armenian historical and archeological sites. The Azeris didn’t take all the territory they wanted (Land that was under the Azeri Soviet Republic and which represents the accepted international border today) with Russia mediating a ‘line of control’ with several hundred peacekeepers. But the Azeris are shelling even with the Russian soldiers present, they see a chance to complete their object and take the rest of the land legally regarded as Azerbaijan and who knows what else. If the Russians intervene as they are obligated to, no doubt Turkey and NATO will fund the Azeris even harder than they did the first time. The Turks dream of a land border and land bridge with Azerbaijan to the Caspian sea. (Perhaps Iran should also worry about Iranian Azerbaijan, the Azeris would no doubt wage a proxy war to complete the unification of the Azeri people with US funding.)

    As always, borders matter and messing with them and ethnic compositions causes war in the modern world not ‘nationalism’. (Okay, some peoples have psychotic conquering nationalism like the Azeris, Israelis and Turks but almost all don’t)

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon, ic1000
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  23. Daniel H says:
    @AndrewR

    What’s happening in “white nations” is a type of conquest, but the conquerors are being changed at least as much as they’re changing their new lands.

    Does that make it any less awful?

  24. Ah Steve, you are a naïve Westerner. This military operation that you speak of as a “war of conquest” is neither a war nor an act of conquest. The Ukraine is Russia, period, the oldest part of Russia. And the people there, the Little Russians, are about 70-90% in favor of rejoining the Russian Federation, despite all the propaganda against it.

    The Russian special military operation has gone far better than EVERYONE predicted it would go, including all levels of Russian government predicted it would go. Russia’s military, government, politicians, academics, Putin, etc. all believed that it would take 2 years before The Ukraine rejoined the Russian Federation. Now we are on pace for The Ukraine to be part of Russia before December comes.

    The Ukrainian “army” and “military” will lose soldiers even more rapidly now that they’ve fallen into the Russian armies amazing trap of allowing them to retake a small piece of Kharkov oblast undefended, an intentional strategic withdrawal so Ukrainian forces will be more exposed to artillery, aircraft, etc. Kharkov city will now fall within 2 weeks, Kiev within a month, and the rest of the country before December.

    The Ukrainian army is full of “men” who like to play dressup in skirts as women and has proven itself to be extremely effeminate and stupid. Ukrainians and NATO will never be able to win a conflict against Russia as they are all run by gays, trans, lesbians, mulattos, and women. The people of The Ukraine are overwhelmingly for Russia and against Western Europe and America, basically the only people who really are for the West in The Ukraine are in the Pride Parade Ukranian Army or are being forced to die against their will. There are many real patriotic Ukranians fighting in the Russian Army and the LPR and DPR armies though.

    • Troll: hhsiii
    • Replies: @ValeryKarpin
  25. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Of course, that’s the point: Putin won’t call his invasion a war of conquest or even a war: instead, it’s a Special Military Operation. Did Shakespeare have Henry V referring to his invasion of France as a special military operation?

  26. @Daniel H

    Didn’t Sun Tzu say the best conquest is to win without fighting? Conquest, and even genocide, can move forward without any violence.

    Which is worse, a population being bombed out of existence or being deliberately “replaced” over a period of time? Should a nation risk bloodshed defending itself or allow a bloodless replacement of its people by “peaceful” means?

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  27. @Steve Sailer

    You didn’t hear about Russia’s plans for holding referenda in the occupied territory on Russia annexing them? They had to push the elections back from September to November because of the turn of events outside Kharkov.

    Count me as someone who thinks an honest referendum would be goodness.

    Having pondered the mess in Northern Ireland, I came to the conclusion that a referendum, and sorting people according to the results beats the heck out of continued conflict.

    But a referendum where
    — the vote counting was fair and transparent (not fortified)
    — included refugees who had left

    And one that treats individual areas individually. In other words, I’m unmoved by some referendum where Donetesk (the city) votes for joining Russia and somehow is allowed to drag along all the Ukrainian farmers–the people actually on the land, who need their land–in the oblast sticks. Nope if we’re doing self-determination everyone gets self-determination. (My guess is most Ukrainians even in these provinces are in stay-in-Ukraine territory that is contiguous to other majority stay-in-Ukraine territory right on through to Kiev.)

    But honest referenda are goodness.

    And since the Russians seem to love the idea, then after this one … why not Chechnya?

    Then I’d like to move on to the USA and get things sorted out here. I’m frankly tired of living around these Rainbow people.

    • Agree: michael droy
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  28. D. K. says:
    @AnotherDad

    How do you plan to commemorate the sixtieth anniversary, next month, of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when President John Kennedy brought us to the brink of nuclear annihilation, in order to keep Soviet nuclear missiles from becoming operational, a mere ninety miles from Florida (where some of us kids from that 1962 America now live in retirement)?

  29. Maciano says:

    I love how Steve just keeps writing these Ukraine-sympathetic articles, while his russophile fans keep telling him how wrong he is.

    A lot of rightwingers seem totally deluded, they rly think Russia is some sort of trad right-wing role model, while it is just a rusty has-been power. Russia is not even worth mocking at this point.

    I can only hope as many Russians as possible migrate to the West, while their political class fantasizes abt a glorious future based on oil, grain, Orc army of colonial subjects and the 70plus great strategist & Parkinson patient Vladimir Putin!

    LoL

  30. @D. K.

    Ahistorical comment.

    American imperialism has failed & it is evident to everyone. US plutocrats do not have some huge profits from Iraq and Syria oil or anything similar- actually, they and the US have lost in any sense. Financially, demographically, culturally, ….. And the US ended with a bunch of Iraqis and Afghans in the US, which is a suicidal policy & a way of thinking.

    The age of imperialist colonization is over, at least when it comes to relatively normal powers.

    What remains are local conflicts and/or wars for territory which both or more sides claim it is their or sacred. This is about some sacralized Lebensraum. This is the case with conflict between two peoples in Northern Ireland, with 3 peoples in Syria and Iraq, with two peoples in Israel and Palestine, with three peoples- not physical conflict yet-in the protectorate of Bosnia and Herzegovina..

    The US did not occupy Iraq, ethnically cleanse Sunni and Shia Muslims & settled American white colonizers (or, to make things even sillier, blacks or Mestizos). 

    Russia, on the other hand, tried to cleanse, assimilate, …actually destroy Ukrainian national identity (which, in their lunatic heads, doesn’t even exist)

  31. Mike Tre says:

    Shockingly out of touch article.

    Driving around Chicago every tenth car has a massive Mexican flag draped over it in some fashion. If that isn’t conquest, I don’t know what is.

    • Replies: @Alden
  32. another reason why young men were eager to go to war 100 years ago or more was that back then the laws often bound young whites to live on the farm until 21 years of age, unless they went into the military. Back then 70% of americans (and europeans) lived in rural areas. On the farm. And the laws were rigged to force them into working for the parents until 21 (“free, white and 21,” etc). The young men yearned to see the world. So they went to war.

    Nowadays we can see the world on youtube. And there is no farm or laws to hold them to the farm.

  33. @AnotherDad

    Ethnic referendums have never occurred in history. The only one I know of is in 1920. in parts of Austria with significant Slovene population, which failed because Slovenes preferred living in a Catholic German state than to join a religiously mixed South Slavic country.

    Later they regretted- they became a negligible minority & assimilated- but it was too late.

    Other than that, no ethnic referendum happened in modern history.

    • Thanks: Alden
    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    , @Anne Lid
  34. OT but I’d have thought Steve might opine, after all “the knee is nearer than the shin” and Washington closer than Kiev.

    https://www.unz.com/proberts/for-all-americans-who-think-they-still-have-a-country-here-is-bad-news/

    The (Rasmussen) poll tested the US population on its response to President Biden’s assertion that

    Donald Trump and the MAGA Republicans represent an extremism that threatens the very foundations of our republic.

    The poll results are:

    48% of likely U.S. voters agree with Biden including 36% who Strongly Agree. Forty-seven percent (47%) disagree with Biden including 39% who Strongly Disagree.

    Hmm. Still, keep worrying about men with snow on their boots.

  35. JackOH says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    My foreign policy understanding is weak. But, even I could see the foolhardiness and arrogance of America pushing NATO expansion eastward into the swamp of ancient intra-Slavic enmities. I don’t like bear-baiting policies—they’re a dishonest means to justify your own aggressive intentions. Still, Russia opened up. Damned mess.

  36. @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad wrote to YetAnotherAnon

    The Russians probably have a sub in the Atlantic right now that is closer to DC than you can get to Moscow from any point in the Ukraine.

    Possibly — though friends of mine who had the security clearances to know back during the Cold War told me that Russian subs were so noisy that we knew where they all were and would immediately take them all out if war broke out.

    In any case, as I am sure you know, nukes don’t matter.

    Not when both sides have nukes: Mutual Assured Destruction works.

    But conventional forces do matter: would you be thrilled if Russian tanks, infantry, conventional missiles, etc. were to be deployed right across the Mexican and Canadian borders?

    Because if they were, they could cross the border whenever they felt like it.

    And that is what the US Deep State did to Russia: the US poured billions into Ukraine before the Russians moved in early this year.

    Ukraine has been de facto a NATO member for several years now, just without Article 5 guarantees.

    You don’t believe a Great Power would ever hit another once they had a massive weapons build-up on the other guy’s border?

    Read some history.

    Also, if Russia had accepted Ukraine being one more US satellite, Russia would also be allowing the US to build up a launching pad for taking over Belarus, Kazakhstan, etc.

    Which might not matter if we actually had a liberal/free-trade order in the world.

    But we don’t.

    The US Deep State tries to control the world trade and financial system to serve its geopolitical goals: we have seen that during this war with, for example, cutting Russian banks off from the SWIFT system. Taking control of the countries in Russia’s “near abroad” has been an important part of that strategy now for three decades.

    If it does not matter in the slightest who controls Ukraine, why did the US Deep State foment the putsch in 2014? Why did the US pour in billions to arm Ukraine militarily prior to 2022? Who cares?

    Because it does matter: for almost thirty years now, the US Deep State has very clearly been trying to encircle Russia — economically, politically, and, yes, militarily.

    Because the people who make up the US Deep State are truly and completely insane with the lust for Power. Power over the entire world.

    And they do not care how many people have to die so that they can attain it.

    And the Kremlin has decided that if the Western Ruling Class is determined to push the point on Ukraine, the historical heartland of Russia itself (Kievan Rus), then this will be where the issue will be decided.

    Do you honestly think any Great Power would have behaved differently when backed into that corner?

  37. @D. K.

    There…. were…… ACTUAL….. MISSILES…. in Cuba.

  38. @PhysicistDave

    All the above is correct.

    So now some current home truths.
    Anyone who read the incredible run of Kiev victories reported out of Ukraine which led them to their position in August will not be surprised that:

    The 2 weeks of Ukraine success has been a complete disaster for … …Ukraine (or at least for Kiev).
    3 k died in Kherson with zero gain. A few more in Zaporizhzhia (where everyone now knows that Ukraine shelled the Nuclear plant repeatedly even if no one dared say it on TV).
    3k dies outside Kharkov. Multiply deaths by 3 to get wounded. The land was lightly defended and quickly evacuated, few Russian casualties (though civilian “collaborators” will be found and punished).

    Kiev lost 6% of its forces to regain 6% of the land Russia controlled!!

    Worse – all that training in Nato countries and the insertion of NCOs and officers by “mercenaries” has been shown, there will be no further surprises.
    And instead of firing HIMARS from across the Dnieper Ukraine’s forces are where Russia wants them – en mass and within firing range.

  39. @Altai

    Altai wrote:

    Today the alien peoples are the problem and desire for land stems from irredentism from incomplete unification of peoples or from colonial deposition or alien people preventing the unification.

    Yeah, in all the case you discuss.

    But there is one major exception you did not discuss: the ruling class in the United States of America.

    They really do think that they should rule the entire planet, not because of irredentism or co-ethnics abroad, but just on general principles.

    And a very large number of Americans, including, I am afraid, our host, have trouble seeing anything odd in this at all.

    The Serbs have a beef with Muslims in Kosovo? Well, we Americans will decide how it will turn out.

    The Chinese all agree that Taiwan is part of China but disagree as to how to bring that about? We American get to decide.

    And so on in Somalia and Syria and Libya and Sudan and on and on and on.

    And of course in all of the former Soviet Union.

    It is sort of as if the strongest guy in the neighborhood were to decide that he is entitled to sleep with all the other guys’ wives, whether the wives like it or not, and he is truly and deeply puzzled that anyone objects to it!

    The people who rule America, and a significant fraction of its citizens, are clinically insane.

  40. Corvinus says:
    @AndrewR

    “What’s happening in “white nations” is a type of conquest, but the conquerors are being changed at least as much as they’re changing their new lands“

    If we go by that metric, the Inited States changed hands from the preferred native white stock (WASPs) to an undesired white stock (Eastern and Southern European). The land and values changed dramatically.

    They have to go back.

    But human history has shown this immutable truth. And unless you are willing to try to physically stop it, your lamenting is futile.

    New people move to a place.
    The people who were there blend in due time.
    Other people move in.
    The previous people blend in due time.

    Now, you will say non-whites like the darkies and Asians haven’t sufficiently mixed in the U.S., and normies would generally say they have, you just have an outlying perspective.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @bomag
    , @anon
  41. With or without conquest war is what humans do. When they are no longer human people might cease to make war. Conquest of course does not require war. Witness the Great Replacement.

    The WEF invisions the replacement of humanity by a limited number of God like super humans. God like super humans would have no need of war or conquest. But they might do either or both just for fun.

    Glad I could help.

    The current proxy war in Ukraine between “The West” and Russia/China is of course a war of conquest with Russia/China playing defence. For now at least the “Age of Conquest” continues.

  42. Esso says:

    Before you presume and comment: Google “Georgia” “South Ossetia” and “NATO” on this blog.

    I don’t agree with it but I can see a pretty consistent anti-war bias here.

  43. G. Poulin says:

    Yeah, invading Ukraine doesn’t really accomplish much. It would have been better if Vlad had gone right to the source of the problem and just nuked D.C. with the biggest Tsar-bomba he’s got. Most of America would be eternally grateful.

  44. Corvinus says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    And here lies in the problem with a good number of the Unz commentariat—the belief that the media lies all or most of the time. It’s an excuse not to engage in critical thinking. The end result? Intellectual sterility.

    Mr. Sailer and Mr. Unz link to media stories they use as evidence in support of their worldview. Are they promoting “lies” by extension?

    Fox News has stories about what os wrong about America. Are they “lying” as well?

  45. Gordo says:

    I’m going to come out of the closet here Mister Sailer.

    I want Russia to win big style, but I’m not actually a fan of Russia.

    Mister Putin arrests people with my pro-White beliefs, and is almost certainly personally corrupt.

    Why I want Russia to win is to see the unelected depraved globalists goblins who rule over us take a massive loss.

    I want to see their paid talking heads cry and gibber live on television, I want to see the hint of panic on their smug shit-eating faces.

    Yes I have real sympathy for ethnic Russians abused in Ukraine, and real antipath to the ultra-corrupt Ukie regime, but those are not my drivers.

  46. Corvinus says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    There’s a number of stories in that publication, as well as other outlets, that have facts and figures and dates and quotations which demonstrate a clear unbiased approach. You’ve just been conditioned to think Unequivocally that the MSM always and repeatedly lies. You’re simply a slave to confirmation bias. Again why did the authors and bloggers of this fine opinion webzine use articles from the media to support their positions? Are they also Contributing to fake news?

  47. @D. K.

    How many American colonists are there in Syria, you know, building farms and businesses and otherwise creating a mini-America there? How does that compare to the number of Syrians living in say, Dearborn MI and building futures there. Completely assimilated of course, they vote straight Democratic ticket every election.

  48. Ralph L says:

    property rights in England were largely respected,

    Tell it to Henry Bolingbroke, John of Gaunt’s dispossessed heir.

    • Replies: @Alden
  49. @Corvinus

    And here lies in the problem with a good number of the Unz commentariat—the belief that the media lies all or most of the time.

    Only 36% of the public trust the media according to Gallup (2021).

    – 36% in U.S. have a “great deal” or “fair amount” of trust in mass media
    – 68% of Democrats, 31% of independents and 11% of Republicans trust media

    Most Americans agree with us!

    To be clear, we’re really talking about the political media or any media pushing a political agenda. This makes sense because this affects power and there will always be a push to use information, media and propaganda to gain power. Always.

    It’s an excuse not to engage in critical thinking. The end result? Intellectual sterility.

    Quite the opposite. Intellectual sterility would be mindlessly repeating what Yahoo News tells you. It’s the very act of critical thinking that shows us how they shade things.

    (By the way, people in technical fields tell me the media gets things right in their area about half the time. That’s when it isn’t even political. They’re just sloppy.)

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  50. Gimeiyo says:

    In the comparatively recent past, the rationale for fighting to the death to hold foreign territory was to block an attack on your own territory, e.g. by pushing out to defensible borders, holding a critical pass, etc. We have the example of Japanese soldiers who died facing fearful odds in tiny islands in the Pacific, just to delay the Americans from building airfields from which to attack “the ashes of their fathers / and the temples of their gods,” as the poem goes.

    But now, whether the Ukraine exists as a buffer state for Russia or not probably doesn’t make much strategic difference, in the age of ICBMs. The Americans can obliterate Moscow either way. I suppose it’s possible to game out a US-instigated salami-slice invasion of Russia that doesn’t somehow trigger nuclear war (à la the Kargil War between Pakistan and India, or various Sino-Indian border conflicts), but NATO just doesn’t have enough serviceable ground forces for me to think the average Russian would consider this a serious risk. We weren’t willing to risk Seoul to prevent North Korea from developing nuclear weapons — would we risk London and Paris to invade a country that already has nuclear weapons? And does the average Russian care that much about impoverished border regions near the even more impoverished Ukraine? St. Petersberg and the Konigsberg / Kaliningrad enclave, sure, but that’s far, far away from the current fighting.

    But I’m not Russian so I don’t really know how they think about this. It just seems a lot fuzzier and more abstract than “hold this island today and maybe the American bombers won’t burn your family alive this week.”

  51. Anonymous[259] • Disclaimer says:

    Bad closing line, Steve.

    The western part of Ukraine – the hotbed of Ukrainian nationalism – was the region of Stepan Bandera and his followers, who were basically more Nazi than the Nazis and lent material and military support to the German invaders.
    Bandera is still revered by the contemporary Ukrainian nationalists.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Troll: Ian Smith
  52. Anonymous[259] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    I’m deeply sceptical of this much bandied about premise that the oh-so-clever human race with its artificial fertilizers and free trade, bulk carriers etc has ‘proven Malthus wrong’.

    There are more malnourished people alive today than there ever have been in the whole of history. Just in India alone.
    And third world populations are still climbing. Not to mention Steve’s graph.

    It’s only that the *manifestation* of Malthus has taken a more nuanced view. Perhaps a typical European no longer encounters his countrymen literally starving to death – but he certainly does encounter six billion paupers doing their utmost to barge into his home and – literally – take the food from his mouth.
    And The Economist encourages it.

  53. Graham says:
    @AKAHorace

    “Much of the best agricultural land is being built on” – true, but some of the buildings contain farms, particularly in the Netherlands. In 100 years time most food in the developed world will be grown indoors, leaving (ideally) the rest of the land for housing and re-wilding. We may be able to get the best of both worlds: plenty of food, plenty of housing, and a beautiful landscape full of life. It’s worth a try.

  54. Art Deco says:

    Latin America has had one interstate war of note since 1885, when Bolivia and Paraguay spent three years (1932-35) fighting over a piece of territory that currently has about 500,000 inhabitants (from among the 18 million who live in Bolivia and Paraguay). The tropical African states have been very circumspect about tampering with the borders drawn by European powers; today’s borders differ little from what they were in 1917. Russia’s designs in re the Ukraine and China’s in re Taiwan are quite atypical in today’s world.

    • Agree: guest007
    • Replies: @Redman
  55. Coemgen says:

    What’s with the pettifogging on the words “conquest / conquer?”

    What exactly does the Russian government want to conquer?

    What other motivations does the Russian government have for their “special military operation?”

    In degree of importance, how do the reasons for these other motivations stack against the conquest of some territory?

    That is, one hundred years from now, what will be the downstream effects of the other triggers for the war in comparison to the effects of the conquering of some small amount of land.

    Did you put your “I stand with Ukraine” banner over your “End all war” banner?

  56. MLK says:
    @Steve Sailer

    A word to the wise, beware of bias confirmation in this raging information war.

    It’s similar to during the 2016 election. Whatever else you might say about her, Hilary was indisputably the most unlucky candidate ever. That made me wary every time the media, especially that of the prestige variety, announced her latest royal straight flush.

    The war will continue but Ukraine has lost. Yet, with the midterm elections weeks away, the illegitimate Biden regime has conjured a glorious victory and renewed hope just in time.

    Believe me, no one has more respect for your incisive thoughts than I do. But “I read it in the New York Times” should have led you to find a better occasion to reprise them on wars of conquest.

  57. @PhysicistDave

    Let’s revisit this post in 6 months. Seems to me, sitting in Europe, that you are spouting utter nonsense, but I suppose by March we should know who was right.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  58. Mr. Sailer should wear an N-95 mask superimposed with Ukrainian colors for his next fund drive. There’s probably one available through Raytheon.

    All this back-and-forth bickering is Avalon Hill copium, as pointless as the adolescent sportsball blogs it evokes. Don’t confuse the end with the means — the Establishment will be winning this war as long as it can be kept waging.

    • Replies: @SFG
  59. guest007 says:
    @D. K.

    Syria does not have oil to steal. And no matter how much excuse making some American reactionaries do, Putin is still a despicable human being and a lousy leader.

    • Troll: Jim Christian
  60. J.Ross says:

    So Steve knows no recent history. And he wants to die on a hill among people who would spit on him if they met him. Wierd.
    Anglin’s “our leaders think it’s the 70s” theory just got another verification as Joe Biden celebrates the Dow tanking with James Taylor because Leo Sayer wasn’t available.

  61. @Graham

    EU Parliament. Don’t know who she’s addressing, but his reaction (first laughing at her, then walking out without answer) reminds me of the Germans laughing at Trump.

    • Thanks: Dumbo
  62. Steve Sailer

    Why the hatred towards Slavic Russians?

    What’s your favorite Zelensky Video? The Penis Piano Man Video?…Or the the gay dance video?

    • Replies: @Pixo
  63. J.Ross says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    This is what’s happening. Ukraine is interesting as a target to destroy Russia not only because it borders Russia, and because it controls sea access, but most of all because of the integration of military industry. Military production in the Soviet Union was distributed like NASA is for us. So over years a clique in DC has cultivated an anti-Russian clique in Ukraine. Ukraine was intimately involved with the Russia hoax, often standing in for Russia, providing deniability and laundering, as well as supplying the material of the hoax itself through Ukrainian information services companies. The Biden and Kerry families are deeply involved in the most corrupt country in Europe. Nuland’s War accomplishes many self-explanatory goals for the invade-the-world, invite-the-world people, and is easily a classic example of the fundamental itwitw action. This is what Steve is defending. This represents a repudiation.
    The anti-Russian clique has been very honest about what they think about Ukrainians, especially those Eastern Ukrainians who did not want to anger and attack the huge country next to them. They have spoken in the unambiguous language of racism and extermination, with one former leader wishing out loud she could nuke them, and more recent leaders gloating about a campaign of economic discrimination. You don’t know and I don’t want you to learn the real quotes, I want you to be as in the dark as your kind was in expecting a Hillary landslide. And why did you go back to that side? Because the New York Times and the Washington Post, enormously dishonest propaganda outlets you have made a career of deconstructing, are now unquestionable for some reason.
    Which raises questions about your previous work. It does resemble Russian disinformation. It encourages racial dicision and leads the reader to doubt trusted experts.
    Warmongering so close has activated Turkey’s vice of conspiracy, so they have pushed their Azeri allies to restart the war with Armenia. Good thing Russia held its military back in Ukraine: it might be necessary soon in the Caucasus. And if the Ukrainian conflict becomes a world war, at least the boomer scum will have one more way to kill younger generations.

  64. Bill P says:

    On the contrary, I propose that a new age of conquest is dawning, driven not by the need for land and commodities, but for productive labor and human capital.

    The demographic decline of productive populations will set off a scramble to seize those that remain so as to capture the proceeds of their labor.

    It is no surprise that this started in Eastern Europe, as this is the first place in the developed world to see a decline in working age population, but it will soon spread to the West and East Asia. I wouldn’t be surprised to see efforts to reestablish serfdom in some form to keep people from fleeing rapacious élites and public sector institutions.

    • Thanks: Rob
  65. Thoughts says:

    The fundamental premise of this article is incorrect. Ukraine used to be Russia.

    It was the USA that did the War of Conquest. And besides, this has nothing to do with ethnic Ukraine. Nothing.

    Whole chunks of Syria are gone…soon to be followed by chunks of Egypt and Lebanon and Iraq and Iran. Seriously? Wars of Conquest are Just Getting Started

    Syria only exists because Russia and China stand behind it.

    Russian soldiers better get their asses in gear or else the whole world is going to burst into flames.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Reg Cæsar
  66. @Graham

    This is the dream. But I assume this would require the perpetuation of the white race, so we’d have to kick the anti-white psychopaths out of power first.

  67. guest007 says:
    @Bill P

    The world is too flat for this to work. Short of rebuilding the iron curtain, how is a country going to keep people in while having any form of tourism/international businesses. This idea needs much more thought and analysis.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  68. Arclight says:

    I have been solemnly informed by an in-law that climate change will kick off an orgy of wars of conquest this century to secure resources and food supplies. No word on where or who will fund these conflicts, they say ‘experts’ have forecasted this so buckle up. You can imagine what family gatherings can be like.

  69. @YetAnotherAnon

    Thanks. And countries such as Brazil apparently lack even a single large fertilizer factory which is why the Brazilian leader flew to Moscow at the start of the conflict to confer with Putin and secure fertilizer shipments for his distant country.

    • Replies: @anon
  70. SFG says:
    @Corvinus

    You can apply critical thinking to both ends of the spectrum. Some of the conspiracy theories on this site are over the top.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  71. @YetAnotherAnon

    São Paulo PhD candidate explains Brazil’s reliance on RU fertilizer , but the article declines to explain why Brazil that can make Embrarer aircraft lacks the ability to perform what seems so much simpler i.e. make fertilizer

    https://cris.unu.edu/brazil’s-reliance-russian-fertilisers-vulnerability-turned-geopolitical

    https://www.reuters.com/world/ships-carrying-russian-fertilizers-find-way-brazil-despite-sanctions-2022-04-18/

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  72. Well, whites are being conquered around the world via immigration and propaganda so I’d say, no, the age of conquest isn’t over.

    Just done in a different way. Actually, migration of peoples who take over the territory of other peoples is as old as time, so, perhaps, we’re just going back to an older form of conquest.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @anonymouseperson
  73. @Steve Sailer

    The bulk of the infantry fighters on the “Russian” side are residents and citizens of the Donetsk People’s Republic (DPR) and Luhansk People’s Republic (LPR). These ethnic Russians have been fighting for their freedom from Ukranian oppression for eight years exactly like the Red Dawn Wolverines. If they lose, they will be massacred like the Russian sympathizers at Bucha.

    You are pushing the propaganda line that this war was a sudden, unprovoked, illegal attack by Pootin, to conquer the freedom loving Ukrainians for profit. (Except that he’s too stupid to figure out that he will lose money on the deal). But if that’s true, why have the Russians offered peace if only Ukraine would stay out of NATO and the DPR and LPR Russians would be respected? (These offers were both pre-war in December and in April in Istanbul but were rejected by the West).

    Rightly or wrongly, this war is waged for national security, not profit and conquest. The US wanted to threaten and dominate Russia with a militarized puppet state, and to have an excuse to crash the Russian economy with sanctions. So far it’s the US and EU which have miscalculated. If they were “coldly rational” they would have chosen peaceful coexistence. But they have other agendas. There is a whole worldwide security and trade realignment at issue. That’s what’s going on. It’s not some cartoonish scheme to steal land.

    Finally, this Ukrainian “victory,” is a PR victory only. The Russians retreated in good order from a relatively useless part of the front. They are keeping their reserves available to crush the next Ukranian offensive (probably starting tomorrow in the Donetsk area), like they did at Kherson a couple weeks ago.

    So your article is basically wrong about everything. The facts, the motives, the consequences. Everything.

    P.S., Believing anything you read in the MSM is the surest way to be misinformed about the Ukraine war.

    • Agree: Forbes, YetAnotherAnon
    • Troll: guest007
  74. OT (again), but I note that the crowds gathering in London to see Queen Elizabeth’s lying in state are predominantly(though not overwhelmingly) female. It was the same in Edinburgh too.

    There’s no end to the ways in which men and women are different.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @SafeNow
  75. @AnotherDad

    Thanks for the cite. I realize it’s silly to expect credit for anything you post in a comments thread, like those plaintive “Steve–don’t you remember I made this same point in a thread three weeks ago?” comments, but it is nice to be acknowledged.

  76. @Corvinus

    Mr. Sailer and Mr. Unz link to media stories they use as evidence in support of their worldview. Are they promoting “lies” by extension?

    Yes.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  77. Zelo says:

    Ukrainian bots, probably run out of Washington DC, are infecting every comment section on the internet. They’re demanding billions more.

    This is an obvious coordinated propaganda campaign. I suspect people are getting sick of it. Ukrainians are actually coming across as really annoying people. It may not be fair but they’re like aggressive panhandlers. It’s amazing they could blow all the goodwill people had toward them in the past. Maybe it’s not their fault, probably it’s the creeps out of Washington DC.

    • Agree: Lurker
  78. @AnotherDad

    What works is nationalism that is fair minded and respects other peoples’ nationalism.

    The good thing about nationalism, is that unlike Communism, imperialism, and other globalist notions, it doesn’t export very well no matter how popular it is at home. So its ambitions to oppress others abroad are necessarily limited.

    Napoléon belatedly discovered that there were a limited number of Bavarians or Poles willing to die for the glory of the French national emperor. (But he did get most of them killed along with a lot of others on that journey to discovery.) Hitler missed the memo and had to relearn the discovery.

  79. @Graham

    You write:
    In 100 years time most food in the developed world will be grown indoors, leaving (ideally) the rest of the land for housing and re-wilding.

    What planet are you from ? Certainly not the one to which the the Most Important Graph In The World pertains.

    • Agree: Renard
  80. Redman says:
    @Art Deco

    Except that Ukraine didn’t exist as a state until 1991. It’s current borders with Russia, therefore, didn’t exist until the 1990s.

    Ukraine has never been a real country until the post-cold war era. It’s own “nationalism” has never been terribly uniform either. Among Ukrainians there is also a lot overlap with Russian culture and language. Zelensky’s mother tongue is in fact Russian.

    It’s odd that such a young state, with so little history, has Europe’s third largest and (now) third best equipped military. The US has of course played the dominant role in that buildup.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Art Deco
  81. Jack D says:
    @BB753

    Dumbass is a good name for the leadership of the Donbas. Most of the “locals” who were fighting in Kharkiv (who were not local to Kharkiv at all) were shanghaied off the streets of the Donetsk/Luhansk “Peoples Republics”/Russian puppet mafia kleptocracies. They showed their fighting spirit by running away/surrendering at the earliest opportunity.

    Now that the Russian offensive in Ukraine has crashed and burned, the level of copium among the Rushists here has reached unprecedented levels. Pay no attention to every single Western media source – only RT tells you the pravda!

  82. simple21 says:

    There was a traditional reward for the men of conquering armies that is now denied to them by their own rulers.

  83. Maybe it’s just the case that in post-Cold War Pax Americana Wars of Conquest attract the attention of the American Empire as Global Policeman? Any gains are probably offset by sanctions and diminished trading prospects, before accounting for the likelihood of the U.S. supplying your opposition with updated military whizbangs for prolonged attrition or even risking direct U.S. involvement. In a multipolar world I imagine things may revert back to the pro-conquest norms of history.

    Further, Wars of Conquest may just have a more plausible cover story than before – if China takes Taiwan, it will be on the casus belli of liberating and unifying the Han Chinese peoples and fighting colonialism rather than “we really just want this land and its resources and human capital and we don’t like foreign-aligned states this close to the Chinese mainland.”

    In the matter of the Ukraine invasion, Putin may have taken his own casus belli about Ukraine historically being one with Russia too seriously and thereby went too far West with a force that couldn’t swallow that much of Ukraine. Annexing the Eastern regions on the justification of pro-Russian plebiscite results would perhaps have been a better idea for creating a buffer between Russia proper and NATO.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  84. Jack D says:
    @Graham

    It’s possible to economically grow high value crops like lettuce and herbs indoors under lights in high rise type greenhouses that could be located in cities. But for grain crops which (directly or indirectly) provide most of the calories that we consume, this is completely impractical and will never be practical.

  85. @Steve Sailer

    Putin won’t call his invasion a war of conquest or even a war

    And we don’t call our takeover of Ukraine colonialism. But a rose is a rose.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  86. Dumbo says:

    “Only the dead have seen the end of war.”

    Sometimes I don’t know if Sailer is naive, or just pretends to be…. Wars of conquest are over, LOL. Well, I guess some nations are easier to conquer via massive immigration, without a war, so there’s that.

    This is not Russia vs Ukrainian peasants. It is Russia vs. US/NATO by proxy. I mean, how many TENS OF BILLIONS have been sent from the U.S. taxpayer to the Ukrainian cesspool?

    And is it really a coincidence that just now, another conflict in Armenia and Azerbaijan pops out, as well as new troubles in Kosovo, applying more pressure on Russia? Who’s doing all that, some other CIA terrorist splinter group?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  87. Jack D says:
    @D. K.

    The copium is strong in this one.

    No amount of spin is going to turn this “tactical victory” into a “strategic defeat”. Cut and paste from Rushist sites all you want. Whatever the Ukrainian losses were, Russian losses were much greater and now they have left behind a great deal of equipment which the Ukrainians can use for themselves.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  88. @Bill P

    I wouldn’t be surprised to see efforts to reestablish serfdom in some form to keep people from fleeing rapacious élites and public sector institutions.

    Already happening: IRS ahead of most other tax authorities deems that it has worldwide jurisdiction; the last few decades have given us the spectacle of the FBI investigating crimes in the US Federal jurisdictions of … Europe, the Middle East, and Asia; and while it is extraordinarily easy to get into First World countries, it is increasingly difficult to get out: the covid lockdowns have been a perfect pretext for the government to assert authority over your comings and goings, even the rare adjudicated forced removals of aliens end up getting stymied and blocked by government-funded NGOs [oxymoron, I know].

    • Replies: @Dmon
  89. @Steve Sailer

    Good point. Remember how the Mongols held popular referenda in the lands they conquered and then made their subjects full citizens with a right to vote? Its a sure sign of exploitation.

    • Replies: @HA
  90. bomag says:
    @Corvinus

    New people move to a place.
    The people who were there blend in due time.
    Other people move in.
    The previous people blend in due time.

    But not everyone is created equal.
    Some blends are better.
    Some blends are worse.
    It makes a difference.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  91. @Jack D

    Now that the Russian offensive in Ukraine has crashed and burned, the level of copium among the Rushists here has reached unprecedented levels. Pay no attention to every single Western media source – only RT tells you the pravda!

    I think putting every single Western media source on par with RT is apt.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  92. @Peter Akuleyev

    No need to wait that long. The EU already has plans for energy rationing.
    https://fortune.com/2022/09/12/eu-energy-rationing-mandatory-power-demand-cut/

    Before the War, the Euro bought 86 Roubles. Now, it’s 60 – a depreciation of over 30%.

    Germany, the EU’s largest economy, is facing looming deindustrialisation as a result of the sanctions on Russia. Even the Economist, of all sources, agrees on this.
    https://www.economist.com/business/2022/09/11/germany-faces-a-looming-threat-of-deindustrialisation
    https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Energy-Prices-Trigger-Deindustrialization-In-Germany.html

    By contrast, there are no energy shortages or surging energy prices in Russia. Prices are actually falling, unlike the West, where some EU states have inflation rates of over 20%. The shops are full and very few shortages exist. Russia recorded a record trade surpus for the first 6 months of the year – \$ 138 bn.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-07-11/russian-current-account-hits-record-on-surging-energy-exports

    By March, EU economies will have collapsed or be collapsing. The effect on Russia will be very limited. EU and other Western citizens will experience financial hardship and declining living standards for many years to come. Even the Belgian PM admitted that the next 5 to 10 winters would be “difficult.” This is a serious underestimate at the very least.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-22/europe-faces-up-to-10-difficult-winters-belgian-premier-warns

    Your view that things may be better in 6 months’ time is complete fantasy

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  93. Quite right. These days, invasion Does Not Pay.

    But the politicians and the activists are the last to kmow. Because “there is no politics without an enemy.”

  94. Dumbo says:

    I think the only thing this Ukraine war proves is this: there is a Hidden Power, let’s call it Jewish Power for lack of a better name (LOL), who decides things at a global or almost global level.

    How else to interpret sending billions of the U.S. taxpayer and modern weapons to “defend democracy” in the Ukraine?

    Does anyone really believe that is the reason? And does anyone really believe that the semi-senile Biden himself is the one who comes up with any of these ideas?

    And what to make of Germany and other European countries shooting themselves on the foot for no reason, and punishing their own population, for no logical reason, because of a border issue between Russia and Ukraine?

    If the Ukraine was so important, why no one cared about it until now, since it’s been going on since at least 2014, already with U.S. involvement?

    Also, I guess it’s kinda funny that the borders of the Ukraine are sacred, but there’s no will to control the U.S. Southern border. And there’s no problem in giving thousands of guns to Ukrainians, but God forbid that white Americans are allowed to keep their legally purchased guns.

    • Agree: Renard
    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  95. Coemgen says:

    If we consider this concept: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Crichton#GellMannAmnesiaEffect

    Then consider this concept: https://www.simplypsychology.org/sapir-whorf-hypothesis.html

    Then “Next Page” through a few months of postings here: https://freerepublic.com/tag/globalistpropaganda/index

    Do we gain any insight?

  96. Paul Rise says:

    A thoughtful piece of analysis as is typical from Mr. Sailer.

    As a Ukraine-skeptic I am not sure I disagree but do note these items –

    I think the desire for ag lands was incidental to the Nazis goals. They were nationalistic anarchists who wanted to destroy the existing nation States of Europe to create an environment Germans could flourish.

    I find it interesting that so many Russian officials and analysts are going on state run media to admit the success of Ukraines recent offensive. Is Putin an iron hand dictator or not?

    The new war in Armenia changes a lot of this analysis and makes the current times seem even more like the early days of WW3.

    Biden and the neocon cabal continue to be ruthless yet incompetent psychopaths. The best way to analyze their behavior in the current situation is that they think a huge war will help the economy and restore some sense of cohesion in America that they will be credited for. And Biden and others of his age are probably fulfilling childhood fantasies of defeating the Reds and advancing the Church of Rome across Eastern lands.

  97. Today because of welfare states, and the emphasis on the state of “the economy” above all, foreign conquests are not always desirable.

    For example, the United States could easily add Puerto Rico as another state, but most citizens of the 50 would probably see it as an economic burden. This was not however the case when West Germany merged with impoverished East Germany and nationalist sentiments overwhelmed the economic disadvantages.

    Up to this point in time, the United States have been sufficiently stable, or to put it another way, the individual states are sufficiently emasculated that states have not tried to invade each other, although I suppose there’s some possibility that in the future anti-abortion States might try to take over parts of pro-abortion states, or pro marijuana states might try to take over parts of anti marijuana states so as to try to liberate the citizens of adjacent States.

    But on the whole states would probably perceive issues of invasion in terms of how it would affect the taxpayers and the economy.

    Physical invasions occasionally take place as a way of replacing hostile governments with friendly governments, or else as a way of restoring stability in a foreign country to protection National economic interests.

    For example the US has invaded Haiti, has supported guerrilla movements in Nicaragua, engineered coups in Chile and Genada, and would definitely like to invade Cuba and Venezuela, but on the whole the US can exploit other countries within its hemisphere to the South by its banks and mega corporations providing infrastructure at high rates of profit, thus weakening the other country without having to bother to occupy it with troops.

    Foreign wars keep the troops busy, make lots of money for defense corporations and arms dealers, and can win votes at home if they are presented to the public as preemptively protecting the homeland, but this is a risky strategy, and the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq have lost support over time as the bodies start to be brought home.

    In these times, any military action that prevents a population from accessing cell phones and Facebook, Tiktok, and Whatsapp will quickly bring that population to its knees, especially the children and women folk.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @Art Deco
  98. Anonymous[433] • Disclaimer says:

    Where are the Astroturf protesters we got against other wars? We used to have street demonstrations whenever the US gave aid to allies or offered intelligence help.

    The Rolling Stones wrote protest songs against our involvement in South American politics. U2 blasted us for support of military in central America. Tom Morello would never shut up about how evil the imperialist USA was. Michael more would produce documentaries condemning America.

    But now those voices go silent. Not a peep. And now the peaceniks are towing the party line that we have to stop the Russian bear and support Ukraine with a bloody war!

  99. Mike Tre says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    It’s pretty clear this is an emotional issue for Steve, just like kovid was. His powers of insight and observation go out the window at that point.

    • Replies: @keypusher
  100. @Jonathan Mason

    Exactly. A nation (especially a democracy) can’t take over a foreign land and plunder it for profit anymore. Public/international opinion won’t allow such economic exploitation.

    However, nothing prevents US-style retard colonialism, in which you take over a country with the specific plan of wasting your own resources, trashing the country, and then leaving. There is no conceivable profit in that, so it’s okay.

  101. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:

    Cheap fertilizer has only created higher yields so that the 3rd World can overpopulate itself again, causing 3rd Worlders to flood into the 1st World trying to find jobs.

  102. TWS says:
    @Steve Sailer

    You’re quoting the people who still have Durante’s award in their trophy case? FFS didn’t you get enough of being wrong at the beginning of this fiasco?

    If Russia wins or loses the people doing the most fighting do live there. Ethnic Russian or Ukraine they both live there. So while Putin’s guys might live in Russia, the guys fighting the no-shit Nazis do live there.

  103. @Hypnotoad666

    Trashing the country is feature not bug.

    The idea is to show any ME country that unless they are aligned with the GAE (Global American Empire) they’ll end up like Gaddaffi, who was actually pretty good and did a fair bit for his people and for Europe (OK, his family got rich and he maintained a harem, but is that so different to the Bidens?).

    So Saudis can pretty much do what they like, knocking off a dissident no problem, so can Egyptians after the 2013 coup, who killed a lot of people who supported the overthrown government. Syria, Yemen and Iran on the other hand…

    • Agree: Hypnotoad666
  104. @YetAnotherAnon

    Thanks.

    They thought the Green Revolution killed Malthus, but he won’t lie down!

    Agree.

    One other point – the Haber-Bosch process is very energy intensive. Who has the energy which allows fertiliser production?

    Yes, by unfortunate coincidence, many of the countries who are at or above their Malthusian Limit are also short on the energy needed to goose themselves above that Limit using Haber-Bosch. As I’ve said before, having the ability to swap one scarce resource for another scarce resource is not actually very helpful: everything is still scarce.

    A particularly unfortunate historical example of this was Germany. Steve said:

    Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    Not fast enough. The mass famine of the Turnip Winter was post-Haber-Bosch.

    Haber-Bosch allows you to swap fuel for food, but if you’re short on both, what good is it? I suppose it allows you to choose between starving to death and freezing to death, so there’s that.

    And that, more than anything else, may explain the decline in our hunger for conquest: We’re not hungry enough anymore.

    Literally.

    Germany in the 1930s was hungry, literally. Strict food rationing was widespread, and everyone was keenly aware from painful personal experience that the whole region was only a few meals from starvation in good times, and dipped all too easily into mass famine in not so good times.

    Our current elites’ latest wheeze is to make food and fuel dear again. Hey, what can go wrong?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @Rob
  105. fish says:
    @PhysicistDave

    The National Enquirer now has higher credibility.

    It’s my understand that after being sued into near oblivion they actually verify sources and vet the stories before publication.

    The Old Fey Lady isn’t hamstrung by these impediments!

  106. @D. K.

    I will do it by reminding people that was in response to the US putting Jupiter missles in Turkey. But that was okay ’cause we the good guys. They even wrote it up in the Atlantic years ago.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/01/the-real-cuban-missile-crisis/309190/

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief, Adam Smith
  107. @Almost Missouri

    The turnips of the “Turnip Winter” are Swedish turnips or “Swedes”, which Brits eat with potatoes and haggis on Burns Night. Scots call them ‘neeps’.

    Great with butter and pepper, but as an accompaniment. I wouldn’t want to live on them.

    I see from your Wiki link that politicians are the same in Germany as in US/UK.

    When there was a naval revolt over the inedible food for ratings, the post-war German Government put a Socialist who publicised their complaints on trial for sedition, accusing him of trying to replicate the Bolshevik Revolution in Germany.

  108. Art Deco says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Where is ‘Genada’? And who do you fancy is planning an invasion of Cuba or Venezuela?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  109. Pixo says:
    @AnotherDad

    “ The Russians probably have a sub in the Atlantic right now that is closer to DC”

    Probably not. Too complicated and expensive. They officially have 12 boomers, and typically the Russian Navy is 20% or less operating and seaworthy.

  110. Mr. Anon says:

    For example, England’s 15th-century War of the Roses, the basis for the Game of Thrones and House of the Dragon television series, was quite lethal to nobility but less so to commoners.

    That statement gives a completely false impression. The Wars of the Roses were comparatively lethal to the nobility – compared to previous wars. Commoners still paid the lions share of the cost in blood. They always do.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Alden
  111. Pixo says:
    @PhysicistDave

    “ I assume everyone has figured out by now that my pal HA is an agent of the Kievan regime:”

    You are so pathetically dumb.

    What I have figured out is you spam false Russia propaganda.

    You admitted why already: you hate America and wish you were Chinese.

    Here are false claims Russian claims you spammed here:

    “The Russians are in the process of taking Kharkov.”

    “Russian marines have now landed in Odessa.”

    “Russia seems to have stopped the bombardment around Kiev, now that they have taken out local military assets and command and control capabilities, and are saying that they have no desire to attack civilian populations.
    I assume they will soon be seizing radio and television broadcast facilities.“

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  112. Mr. Anon says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    However, nothing prevents US-style retard colonialism, in which you take over a country with the specific plan of wasting your own resources, trashing the country, and then leaving. There is no conceivable profit in that, so it’s okay.

    For several years after the US invasion of Iraq, Israel was getting 3/4 of it’s oil from Kurdistan. US “Defence” contractors were making solid bank on the forever war too, even moving into new areas like surveillance and the “homeland security market”.

    Modern war is still profitable, in the same sense that war has always been profitable – it’s been profitable for some people.

    • Agree: Hypnotoad666
  113. A more cautious view from Reuters, quoting an unnamed “Western official”, presumably a UK one as it’s datelined London.

    If a Russian official said this, the cries of “copium!” from Jack would be deafening.

    https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/western-official-too-early-say-ukrainian-gains-are-turning-point-2022-09-13/

    “There’s an ongoing debate about the nature of the Russian drawdown, however it’s likely that in strict military terms, this was a withdrawal, ordered and sanctioned by the general staff, rather than an outright collapse.”

    “Obviously, it looks really dramatic. It’s a vast area of land. But we have to factor in the Russians have made some good decisions in terms of shortening their lines and making them more defensible, and sacrificing territory in order to do so,” the official said, adding he did not expect Russia to immediately seek to regain lost territory.

    • Replies: @Paul Rise
  114. @Steve Sailer

    I’ve never seen the iSteve commentariat give you this much hostile blowback so suddenly, and I’ve been reading the iSteve comment section for – what? – fifteen, twenty years?

    Why have you struck such a nerve?

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    , @New Dealer
  115. @Corvinus

    Sources? Citations needed. Lots and lots and lots of citations.

    • LOL: bomag
  116. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    There’s a number of stories in that publication, as well as other outlets, that have facts and figures and dates and quotations which demonstrate a clear unbiased approach.

    RT has facts and figures and dates and quotations too. Are they unbiased?

    You believe everything that NPR programs you to believe. You are a stupid tool.

  117. What’s happening in “white nations” is a type of conquest, but the conquerors are being changed at least as much as they’re changing their new lands.

    Not changed, corrupted. The kids are doing things here they never would be allowed to at home. Heck, Hell, just look at the “reproductive” and other family-law policies of “Catholic” Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi, Andrew Cuomo, Kirsten Gillibrand, Patrick Leahy, Susan Collins, and, believe it or not, both senators Wasington has sent to Washington. Would their immigrant ancestors recognize them, let alone embrace them?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_affiliation_in_the_United_States_Senate#Catholics_(25)

    Downward assimilation helps no one but the devil.

  118. @AKAHorace

    Some research points to Hitler not actually wanting eastward expansion for agriculture. He was interested in expanding markets and industry. I think that’s from Rainer Zitelmann’s book, but I can’t remember.

    Anyway, the “Haber-Bosch solved Malthusianism” perspective is probably wrong. There’s more to soil than what’s in fertilizer. We’ll see how things go in the future.

    • Replies: @Wency
  119. Art Deco says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    By my count, the crowd is about 2:1 female. I would wager that’s more integrated than most past times.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  120. Art Deco says:
    @Redman

    I’m afraid the locals don’t see the logic of your position. But you be you.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  121. Two things:

    1. Don’t be taken in by neo-Trot propaganda. Ukraine’s much-ballyhoo offensives are much less successful than we’re told. Russia is still grinding their forces to dust.

    2. Isn’t it interesting that synthetic nitrogen fertilizer, which helped destroy the Malthusian trap, is now under attack, as in Holland and Sri Lanka? It’s a one-two punch: attack industrial production by targeting CO2, and food production by targeting fertilizer. It will be interesting to see if our own rulers adopt this new tactic to starve us here in the U.S.

  122. @Bill P

    Lol, you’re off by, oh, 180°. The main theme of our age is unproductive populations moving to where they can freeload off the accumulated production (including cities and their infrastructure) of those declining but still-productive populations.

    • Agree: Old Prude, bomag
  123. The “Ukraine” is the US. How can you write an article about the “Ukraine” that doesn’t admit this? As if the “Ukraine” has any will or power or control of its own. Without the US, the Ukraine does not exist. Russia would not have to fight. They would walk in with a casual strolling gate.

  124. Au contraire, Steve. We’re well into an age of conquest not seen in Europe since the Bronze Age. The only thing that makes it a bit unobvious is that this time the victims aren’t even putting up a fight.

  125. Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    You do realize that the Haber-Bosch process uses methane, a.k.a. natural gas, a.k.a. what this war is all albout, don’t you/

  126. @PhysicistDave

    would you be thrilled if Russian tanks, infantry, conventional missiles, etc. were to be deployed right across the Mexican and Canadian borders?

    I might actually welcome that, if I got to choose where their incursions took place.
    Canadian border: they can occupy Detroit, Seattle and Burlington, VT.
    Mexican border: just come in about fifty miles and hold continuous live fire exercises; that’ll stop the people smugglers good.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  127. @Steve Sailer

    Steve,
    You’re getting caught up in the sportsball cheering, and it’s breaking your brain. The forces in that region were outnumbered by the Ukrainians. When you’re outnumbered, you retreat. If they get the drop on you, maybe you have to leave quick. (And maybe, just maybe, there’s some propaganda in that article, too.) However, if the decisive factor were that Russian soldiers simply don’t have the will to fight, what happened to the Ukrainian offensive around Kherson?

    Or, do you have a explanation for why the Kharkov troops lacked the will to fight but the Kherson troops didn’t? What’s that rattling sound? Are you searching for a butterknife?

  128. @AnotherDad

    — War is expensive.

    Interesting, while war has gotten expensive and generates negative returns …

    Nothing is more cost effective–gives you more bang for the buck–than enforcing a border, keeping the barbarians out.

    (See previous thread on Sweden.)

    • Agree: Old Prude
  129. Paul Rise says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Good piece, seems like actual journalism.

    To those who are so rapturous about the news the Oligarch controlled woke media complex is reporting- when at any point in this war have they been correct?

    From – Putin will not invade

    To

    Ghost of Kiev

    To

    Russian army is 10 days from collapse (variants if this are pushed about once a month)

    To

    Etc

    Any excessively exuberant coverage has been wrong.

    I dont know what is happening- I doubt very few people do. None of them are talking to the media.

    Finally – again why does the tyrant Putin allow so much Russian media criticism in this, his darkest hour?

    Are the Ukrainians on the road to victory or the briar patch? Have they landed a decisive blow against a tar baby?

  130. @Daniel H

    “Oh Steve …”

    I used my last free visit to Taki’s without disabling my ad-block (never!) for this article and I’m glad I did. Excellent work by our favorite Steve.

    “Red blooded, and red in tooth and claw, national conquest will always animate man …”

    Have you been reading Robert E. Howard’s correspondence to H.P. Lovecraft?

    “Just look around, one by one, white nations are falling to conquest.”

    Agreed. And the enemy of the white man is an elite white man and woman. It’s an open conspiracy made acceptable to the average sucker by a river of lies. This is where Steve’s usually astute analysis falters: his rationalist, materialist ideology acts as a kind of ad-block to the big picture. His training prohibits him from recognizing that all major wars in the white man’s lands going back to medieval times are initiated by elite avarice or delusion that they’ve been summoned by god to change the world. Steve has taken a small picture lens which better fits warfare between tribes or clans to epic warfare between opposing religious systems or nation states. I also think the Shimmery, the Disney Dog, is clouding Steve’s mind.

  131. Twinkie says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Commoners still paid the lions share of the cost in blood. They always do.

    In the British Army in World War I, the officers – the sons of aristocrats and university graduates – had a higher death/casualty rate than did the conscripts. It’s not for nothing that it is said, “A whole generation of the British gentry was extinguished on the fields of Passchendaele.”

    And all that despite the fact that the ascendant Whigs were waging a political and economic war on the aristocracy back home, literally depriving the latter of its estates with crippling taxation.

    There was a time when Anglo-American elites believed in noblesse oblige and fought at the front, pistols in hand – “Men, follow me!” – going over the trenches first. Well, that’s when the Anglo-American world HAD Anglo-American elites… as opposed to be the current virtue-signaling (and Jewish-inflected) elites whose motto seems to be “Your sons and daughters first.”

    I await with horror the prospect of our future Indian-inflected elites.

  132. JimB says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Although, bizarrely, Russia seems to be doing great economically out of this war, much to my surprise, I admit.

    Yes, I don’t know what to think about this war, except that in the long run Russia and China will prevail over the West. It could be that the Russians are withdrawing in order to get the US to overplay its hand and send its military proxies into Russia. I think Russia has an important shock and awe card they haven’t played yet: a high altitude thermonuclear explosion to knock out all the US high tech combat gear and the electricity grids across the entire Western Ukraine.

  133. SafeNow says:


    I’ve seen a war that was the embodiment of “hearts of the troops were not in it.” That didn’t matter to the politicians and generals. They were oblivious to this, even to the extent of “MacNamara’s folly” (the profound lowering of troop qualifications ). Can this obliviousness be extrapolated?

  134. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Very good point. Conquests can take many forms, some more subtle then others.

  135. @Twinkie

    WW1 was the last time this was true.

  136. Old Prude says:
    @AnotherDad

    War isn’t just expensive: It is wasteful. Nothing comes from all the destruction, massive consumption of munitions and material, not to mention the death and maiming. Waste, waste, waste.

    And yet here we are, with dire public finances, crumbling infrastructure and intractable social conflict, running around, putting our dicks in dark holes we know nothing about [ -to use Buzz Mohawk’s pithy apothegm-]: Syria, Libya, Niger, Ukraine, Somalia, North Korea, Taiwan…

    Nothing was or will be gained for Americans from any of the meddling since the Cold War ended…**

    Putin and Ukraine will harvest nothing but waste, regardless of how the debacle turns out.

    Our dopey spoiled elite will reap the same harvest: Wasted time, money and resources. Any deal they cut with Putin would have been better than what has already happened, but they were/are too arrogant to negotiate.

    * I will allow the MIC is lovin’ it. They are evil parasites and enemies of humanity…

  137. @Steve Sailer

    The New York Times is an unreliable source, especially now and especially on this topic. As far as I can tell the same is true of the other prestige media outlets.

    The rest of us need to learn to live with not being able to trust what the media and our officials say. We have to live with the current state of Russian forces in Ukraine as a “known unknown”. We are told things about this but the people telling us are proven liars who admit they’re engaging in an “information war”.

    If the local newspaper had a decades long track record of deliberately lying about local events and inaccurately printing the flyers from local stores, wouldn’t we be fools to build a shopping trip around the news that prime rib is on sale at store X for five cents a pound?

    “Trust but verify” doesn’t even apply here. We should not trust and not put too much time or effort into verfiying the verifiable.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  138. @Cagey Beast

    * put too much time or effort into verifying the unverifiable.

  139. Twinkie says:
    @AnotherDad

    Land used to be the assert. Slaves were 2nd banana.

    I don’t think it’s just the issue of land why wars of conquest and conquerors are so deeply unattractive in the public perception of the post-modern era.

    I think it’s more about the changed status of the conquerors vs. the conquered. In the post-modern era, being a “victim” has a far more cache than a dominant and brutal winner.

    There was a time (the last time probably being World War II) when the victors got to celebrate crushing their enemies into rubble and were seen as heroes back home by the adoring masses, all the while looting the defeated and lording over the conquered population and helping themselves to the hapless women of the vanquished (often willingly in exchange for food and trinkets, but also often enough not so willingly, see Berlin 1945).

    Those days are long gone in much of the world. Now TV cameras and mobile phones are everywhere. Everything that “the strong,” the ostensible victors, do is scrutinized and critiqued mercilessly in the public opinion and by one’s own “legal.” Transgressing even relatively minor civilian norms is quickly denounced as war crimes and vile brutality. These days, yesterday’s “heroes” are lucky not to be spat upon by a segment of their own population as war criminals.

    Forget looting and rape and strutting around as winners, drinking champagne at cafes, this is how would-be conquerors are perceived today, either as barbarous baby-killing monsters or ridiculous, emasculated young men being chased out by the elderly:

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  140. keypusher says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    You are pushing the propaganda line that this war was a sudden, unprovoked, illegal attack by Pootin, to conquer the freedom loving Ukrainians for profit. (Except that he’s too stupid to figure out that he will lose money on the deal). But if that’s true, why have the Russians offered peace if only Ukraine would stay out of NATO and the DPR and LPR Russians would be respected? (These offers were both pre-war in December and in April in Istanbul but were rejected by the West).

    You’re going to need new talking points. Putin’s envoy made a deal, but Putin preferred to invade.

    PARIS, Sept 14 (Reuters) – Vladimir Putin’s chief envoy on Ukraine told the Russian leader as the war began that he had struck a provisional deal with Kyiv that would satisfy Russia’s demand that Ukraine stay out of NATO, but Putin rejected it and pressed ahead with his military campaign, according to three people close to the Russian leadership.

    The Ukrainian-born envoy, Dmitry Kozak, told Putin that he believed the deal he had hammered out removed the need for Russia to pursue a large-scale occupation of Ukraine, according to these sources. Kozak’s recommendation to Putin to adopt the deal is being reported by Reuters for the first time.

    Putin had repeatedly asserted prior to the war that NATO and its military infrastructure were creeping closer to Russia’s borders by accepting new members from eastern Europe, and that the alliance was now preparing to bring Ukraine into its orbit too. Putin publicly said that represented an existential threat to Russia, forcing him to react.

    But, despite earlier backing the negotiations, Putin made it clear when presented with Kozak’s deal that the concessions negotiated by his aide did not go far enough and that he had expanded his objectives to include annexing swathes of Ukrainian territory, the sources said. The upshot: the deal was dropped.

    https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/exclusive-war-began-putin-rejected-ukraine-peace-deal-recommended-by-his-aide-2022-09-14/

    Of course, the greatest significance of this story doesn’t lie in whether or not it is true. It lies in the fact that the rats are beginning to turn on each other.

  141. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:

    “The first casualty in war is Truth.”

    Why believe either side’s version of events?

    Conveniently, Ukie supporters aren’t interested in the Ukronazis shelling the Russian speaking civilian population in Donbas since the cookie coup.

    The West shoots its own foot with sanctions on Russian energy to support the Ukies.

    Support for virtue signaling governments will go cold as room temps plunge. German industry is having issues with the lack of energy.

    Next up, USA is proposing sanctions on China because Taiwan. The multi-billionaire Walton family, with their numerous Chinese factories, might be a little nervous about their supply chain and their bottom line.

  142. Old Prude says:
    @PhysicistDave

    If there were Russian or Chinese tanks on the Mexican border, I would not be stirred. We are already being invaded by a third world peasant horde. The Chinese would at least do us the favor of sending all our politicians to labor camps…

    The Russians resent the humiliation of having NATO up against their homeland. We are such pussies and fags we feel no shame having our nation trashed by amnesty scammers and illegals. Instead we get upset about Ukraine. Pathetic.

  143. @Twinkie

    “In the British Army in World War I, the officers – the sons of aristocrats and university graduates – had a higher death/casualty rate than did the conscripts.”

    In September 1916, he (50s PM Harold MacMillan) was severely wounded, and lay for over twelve hours in a shell hole, sometimes feigning death when Germans passed, and reading the classical playwright Aeschylus in the original Greek. Prime Minister Asquith’s own son, Raymond Asquith, was a brother officer in Macmillan’s regiment, and was killed that month.

    One summer night in 1916, near Ploegsteert, (MacMillan’s predecessor as PM) Eden had to lead a small raid into an enemy trench to kill or capture enemy soldiers to identify the enemy units opposite. He and his men were pinned down in no man’s land under enemy fire, his sergeant seriously wounded in the leg. Eden sent one man back to British lines to fetch another man and a stretcher, and he and three others carried the wounded sergeant back with, as he later put it in his memoirs, a “chilly feeling down our spines”, unsure whether the Germans had not seen them in the dark or were chivalrously declining to fire.

    Different world then. A relative was a stretcher bearer/first aider in the RAMC in France for four years. The things he must have seen…

  144. keypusher says:
    @Mike Tre

    It’s pretty clear this is an emotional issue for Steve, just like kovid was. His powers of insight and observation go out the window at that point.

    The projection in this thread is hilarious. The worse things get for Russia, the angrier and stupider Putin’s Strurmtruppen get.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
  145. Pixo says:
    @War for Blair Mountain

    “ What’s your favorite Zelensky Video? The Penis Piano Man Video?…Or the the gay dance video?”

    ¿Por qué no los dos?

    A handsome and funny Jewish leader with a sexy tradwife and adorable children sure does make the incels seethe.

  146. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Actually, a better summary of this paper is this:
    “Pro-Ukrainian accounts are boring as hell, and as a result are only preaching to the chorus”.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  147. D. K. says:
    @Jack D

    “Whatever the Ukrainian losses were, Russian losses were much greater….”

    What is your evidence for that claim, counselor? Steve’s self-selected evidence from “The New York Times” [supra] does not even mention any supposed Russian casualties, at all; it merely says that the defenders– and, again, as others have mentioned, those defenders were mostly local militia, not Russian army units– retreated. As someone else quoted from a Western source:

    ***

    “There’s an ongoing debate about the nature of the Russian drawdown, however it’s likely that in strict military terms, this was a withdrawal, ordered and sanctioned by the general staff, rather than an outright collapse.”

    “Obviously, it looks really dramatic. It’s a vast area of land. But we have to factor in the Russians have made some good decisions in terms of shortening their lines and making them more defensible, and sacrificing territory in order to do so,” the official said, adding he did not expect Russia to immediately seek to regain lost territory.

    ***

    • Replies: @Jack D
  148. @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    I think the whole question is much more complicated. First of all, the kind of conquest wars Steve is talking about can not be undertaken so equally by all parties in modern times. In the past, maybe you just had to have lots of bodies, but today to defeat your neighbor who has tanks and planes, you need bigger and better tanks and planes. The primary populations who were in a position to develop those things (Europe and northeast Asia) have been living under the shame of WWII. Germans are never going to see farmland in France as a possible German asset because they can’t think of Germans and French in nationalistic terms.

    Second, in places where people have not been living under the shame of WWII, territorial conquest is a thing. In particular, there is one country that many people at Unz love to bring up that has been slowly taking Lebensraum from its neighbors and has been engaged in a very low-key, slow-moving de facto war with them.

    Third, wars of territorial conquest only really make sense when you need to secure a resource that you can’t get through politics. We never needed boots on the ground for Saudi oil. Now, we have boots on the ground in Syria. In a sense, NATO is a form of territorial conquest because it virtually assures US access to resources. Hence, neocons saying Russia is a gas station masquerading as a country. Sure, we’re not at war with Russia, but er… well, we haven’t invaded yet.

  149. @Pixo

    You forgot to mention the by now over 400 dead Slavic Russian Children…including infants….in Donbass…..did the Kharzar Zelensky Family find this to be hysterically funny? I think Comrade Larry Romanoff may be onto something about the Kharzars….

  150. Bill P says:
    @guest007

    All they have to do is raise the cost of leaving. Just taxing remittances could have a huge influence.

    Most people have neither the skills nor inclination to adapt to a foreign country. They need a shove to get them to move in the first place. For Mexicans NAFTA provided the shove. For Venezuelans the Communists are providing the shove.

    With demographic implosion nobody is going to want their people to leave. All the Chinese and Indian workers we have here, it’s all going to dry up soon. We’re already scraping the bottom of the barrel with the current influx.

  151. Twinkie says:
    @PhysicistDave

    You have to stop with this cope.

    Even Anatoly Karlin seems to admit that the Russians along the Kharkov front have crumbled and retreated in disarray.

    I am in neither camp on this one (though I very mildly favor Ukraine, only because I dislike adjusting national borders by force of arms).

    I’ve argued with Mr. Unz about the size of the Russian casualties (in my view, he underestimated them based on his “feelz” and distrust of what he perceived to be the information manipulated by Western intelligence agencies as well as too much trust of “dissident” Russian triumphalism). In retrospect, my casualty assessment based on Russian equipment losses reported by picture-takers seems to have been more on the mark than his skepticism. Based on that assessment, I opined weeks ago that the Russians have sustained serious losses that have degraded their force-generating capacity.

    I’ve also argued with the Ukrainian triumphalist rhetoric of the likes of Jack D, whom I would caution today even in light of this Ukrainian operational victory (and it IS a significant Ukrainian operational victory). Yes, Russia has been bloodied repeatedly by Ukraine and the war is becoming politically more perilous for the Russian leadership. Yes, as I have pointed out repeatedly to the likes of Karlin, training, morale, cohesion, courage, tactical and operational proficiency are vital in war, not just counting tanks and GDP (I often repeat John Boyd’s maxim, “People first, ideas second, hardware third), and this war has exposed Russian deficiencies in many of those areas. BUT, materiel is still a part of the force-generating calculus and, in the long run (to use the Soviet expression), the correlations of forces still favor the Russian side.

    Of course, much now depends on what each side will do. Will Ukraine be able to continue to receive modern Western equipment and be able to utilize them and sustain the momentum of the latest operational victory and continue to dislocate the Russians without burning up too much of its own personnel? Will Russia no longer see the conflict as a limited “special operations” and engage in a more intense mobilization of its population and economy for a wider war?

    The future is not certain. It never is. As I often say, only mad men and people selling something claim to know the future. And as I sometimes caution my fellow political dissidents, not everything reported by the mainstream media is fake, much as its credibility is highly suspect.

  152. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    Burlington, VT is very nice.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  153. @Houston 1992

    I was hoping they might explain WHY Brazil has no indigenous fertiliser production. They use more natural gas than they consume, so none to spare for fertiliser.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_in_Brazil#Natural_gas

  154. ic1000 says:

    The quality of iSteve comments deteriorates sharply, whenever Sailer pens something about the Russia-Ukraine War.

    In my opinion, Sailer is trying to make sense of events, and offering this space for others to do the same. He’s not the All Seeing Father. We could allow him to be Wrong On The Internet. Smart dissenters’ well-reasoned and well-sourced rebuttals are particularly valuable in showing his errors to other readers. Angry denunciations of pseudonymous enemies… not so much.

    Through tech (unz.com, Twitter, WaPo, RT, etc.), it feels like it’s 1913 or so, and I’ve been given a ringside seat to the runup of the Great War — one where fog (propaganda) obscures most of the relevant things that are happening.

    Some unanswered questions are:

    * Pro-Russians say that Ukrainian killed/wounded in the Kherson and Kharkov campaigns are heavy, an intolerable pace over the long term. True?

    * Pro-Ukrainians have been saying that the Kharkov offensive has bagged (will bag) thousands of Russian/Wagner/Donbass POWs. True?

    * Unless Putin decides otherwise, Ukraine will be largely blacked out and browned out, into the indefinite future. How will this affect Home Front morale and military capabilities?

    * This winter and next year, are Germany and the rest of Western Europe facing recession or depression? How will the citizenry respond to these mandatory sacrifices for a foreign cause?

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  155. Jack D says:
    @D. K.

    This was a withdrawal, ordered and sanctioned by the general staff,

    Hahaha. No wonder the “Western official” is afraid to put his name on this.

    The delighted Ukrainian soldier is saying “You and I get a tank,” “We all get a tank each.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/2022/09/13/russia-retreat-abandoned-weapons-izyum/

    This is a rout not an orderly withdrawal. You don’t leave hundreds of valuable pieces of armor behind as well as thousands of men in an “orderly withdrawal”.

    Russians have made some good decisions in terms of shortening their lines

    This is true. If they would shorten them all the way back to the 2014 border it would be an even better decision. Never mind that these shortened lines were lengthened only months ago at tremendous cost in Russian men and materiel. Those were sour grapes anyway.

  156. Alfa158 says:

    The age of conquest isn’t over but what has happened is that the methods of conquest will vary dependent on which is most effective for present and local conditions.
    Many parts of the West are being conquered and colonized today but the most effective way to do it now is to use the same technique used by Europeans to take huge chunks of the globe from the former inhabitants. From the 16th to 19th centuries, Europeans simply said to themselves, these look like pretty nice places to live but we don’t have to launch a blitzkrieg war for all these territories. We’ll just move in, and there pretty much isn’t anything the previous residents can effectively do about it.
    Perhaps in the course of history, and in different places military conquest will be an effective technique and it will be used. If the Russian plan does succeed, they will have chewed off the most valuable parts of Ukraine, wrecked the EU and expanded their national territory. Time will tell if this is ultimately a conquest that will work. In the meantime the fan-boys for each side can wear their jerseys, watch the war-porn and root for their favorite authoritarian government.

  157. ‘Therefore, I had assumed that Vladimir Putin’s cold-blooded rationality would cause him to stop short of starting a major war. So, I felt pretty stupid back on Feb. 24, 2022.’

    I think there are two points about that.

    First, I think Putin wildly miscalculated. He thought it would be like Czechoslovakia ’68 — or at worst, Hungary ’56. Send in the troops, and there’ll be at most some scattered resistance. The numbers he used were wildly inadequate to actually subduing a nation of forty million, however ineffectual its resistance. Compare and contrast, say, to the numbers the Pentagon recommended for Iraq relative to the population of the target.

    A need for actual conquest just wasn’t anticipated. This was supposed to be daddy putting his foot down. By the time it became clear that actual conquest was what would be required, the Russians were strung out all over the place, and trying to pick up the pieces. Remember those airborne landings? The column stuck outside Kiev? They were supposed to have rolled in before sunset on Day One. Things did not go as planned.

    Second, should Putin have waited? We were making noises that made it sound very much like he’d wake up one morning and the Ukraine would actually be in NATO. If that had happened and he’d then invaded the Ukraine, technically he would have been at war with Great Britain, Germany, Greece, Turkey, the United States, Poland…

    Putin drew a line in the sand — everyone had said for thirty years that the Ukraine joining NATO would be Russia’s line in the sand, and Putin confirmed that last December. We then proceeded to cross that line — or convinced Putin we were about to.

    So we got the war Biden needed. That was the plan. Putin blew it tactically — and we got what we wanted strategically. A nice little war to distract the hometown crowd.

    Of course, now we’re stuck with it — but one thing at a time. Biden, after all, had to get through the State of the Union Address. Some things are worth fighting and dying for.

    As to Russia, I’d say yes, Putin should have invaded. To argue otherwise is to imply Russia should retreat to the status of a minor power — a Turkey, or an India. It would have represented Russia returning to a condition she has not had to accept since the Seventeenth Century.

    But he should have prepared and planned for a serious war. Indeed, doing so might have made us backpedal on the invitations to the Ukraine to join NATO. Then no one would have had to die at all.

    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Pixo
    , @John Johnson
  158. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:

    The most successful wars of conquest are today masked as immigration. The victims don’t even realize they are being conquered.

    • Agree: bomag
  159. D. K. says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I realize that the Truman Administration (1945-1953) was before your time, as well as my own, Steve:

    https://www.justsecurity.org/63527/the-limited-war-powers-precedent-of-the-korean-police-action/

    Did the Reagan Administration refer to its invasion of Grenada as a war, Steve? That is not my own recollection….

    Did the Bush (I) Administration refer to its invasion of Panama as a war, Steve? That is not my own recollection….

    At least the Bush (II) Administration did call its invasions, and long-term occupations, of both Afghanistan and Iraq wars.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Art Deco
  160. Alden says:
    @Twinkie

    Reality check; the only victors of WW2 who benefited were the Russians. The American victors sent hundreds of billions to the enemies japan, Germany and Italy after the war, depriving the American tax payers of hundreds of billions of dollars either saved from taxation or tax money not spent in America.

    By 1950, Germans in West Germany were better fed than the people of their opponents in the war, the UK and France. Official rationing didn’t end in the UK till about 1955. France didn’t have official rationing after the war but a lot of families lived on potatoes pancakes cabbage and rabbits from their own hutches for years after the war.

    I believe, my opinion, is that the people who suffered most from the effects of WW2 are the American taxpayers who 80 years later are supporting bases in all but about 20 countries of the world and massive foreign aid. Aid that either stays in America and is just transferred from federal bank accounts to Bechtel, Brown Harriman etc bank accounts or is deposited in Caribbean and Swiss bank accounts by the blood soaked cannibals and cleptomaniacs of third world countries.

    It’s 77 years after the Russians conquered Berlin.

    • Replies: @FKA Max
    , @Peter Akuleyev
  161. @Twinkie

    ” […] not everything reported by the mainstream media is fake, much as its credibility is highly suspect.”

    Not everything is fake but they lie so often that no one should build an important working assumption on what they say. Even worse would be making an emotional investment in their narratives.

    When it comes to the war in Ukraine, we have to either invest a lot of time into independent research and OSINT (Open Source Intelligence) or we should simply learn to live with uncertainty. What we shouldn’t do is tell ourselves “I wish I lived in a West with a generally competent and reliable media and governing class, so I’ll just go ahead and pretend that’s the case”.

    • Troll: Corvinus
  162. I think those cheering the Ukraine’s victories should remember Russia usually begins her wars with spectacular displays of incompetence and unpreparedness. That was true against the Mongols, it was true against Charles XII, it was true in the Russo-Japanese War, and it was true in both the World Wars.

    She also usually wins in the end. For example, it was true in three of the five cases I just cited.

    I think Russia cannot accept losing in the Ukraine. Therefore, eventually, she will win.

    It may not be in the interests of either Zelensky’s masters or Biden’s to make peace now. However, it would be in our interest and that of the Ukrainians. Get a substantially independent if truncated Ukraine. Putin isn’t Hitler. He’s Ataturk. You can make a deal.

    Quit while you’re ahead. Let the Wookie win.

    If you don’t, he’ll tear your arms off.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  163. And Sailor Starts with a lie. If he expanded his sources beyond the Kagan family he would realize that “Conquering” Ukraine was not one of Putin’s goals in the Special Military Operation in support of the two breakaway Republics.
    Perhaps he needs a another booster shot.

  164. @Pixo

    Seethe? Of course. I am a white nationalist who does not favor mixing with Jews. What are you?

  165. D. K. says:
    @Jack D

    “Whatever the Ukrainian losses were, Russian losses were much greater….”

    I am still waiting for your evidence of “much greater” Russian casualties, Jackie.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  166. @Pixo

    I would just add that Zelenskyy is, outside of the US, not perceived as “Jewish”. True, he is of Jewish (partially? completely? I don’t know) ancestry, but Israeli newspapers have frequently, as far as I read them, pointed out that he is not “Jewish hero” simply because he’s not a Jew, in their eyes. His ancestry yes, identity- no.

    And the entire stuff about “Slavic” “race” is ridiculous. We, Slavophone speakers, do not consider ourselves to belong to some uniform, cultural-“racial”-historical group. This way of thinking was popular in the 1st half of the 19th C, during cultural clashes with Germans, but it soon disappeared.

  167. JimB says:
    @Jack D

    This is a rout not an orderly withdrawal. You don’t leave hundreds of valuable pieces of armor behind as well as thousands of men in an “orderly withdrawal”.

    As usual, the Ukronazis are murdering Russian speaking civilians whenever they take territory. Mostly, the people fleeing are civilians running for their lives, but the evil buttered-headed Ukes are claiming civilians are soldiers and torturing them publicly for propaganda purposes.

  168. HA says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “Remember how the Mongols held popular referenda in the lands they conquered and then made their subjects full citizens with a right to vote? Its a sure sign of exploitation.”

    Not sure about the Mongols, but the Soviets certainly held lots of popular referenda in the lands they conquered — in fact, in some places, NOT voting was a punishable crime — and wouldn’t you know it, the results tended to overwhelmingly favor their preferred candidate (sometimes exceeding 100% of votes cast).

    So much for your ideas regarding no exploitation whatsoever.

    I’m sure you’re also assuring all the Trump supporters who are still complaining about the election that the very fact that the mere fact that they were allowed to vote and retain their “full citizenship” is likewise a sure sign that there was no exploitation whatsoever.

  169. The West has highly competent political, diplomatic, academic and media classes and has for decades. They have not squandered the post-Cold War era but instead have made us wealthier, happier, more secure and less vulnerable to our foreign rivals. Bringing Russia and China closer than in the days of Stalin and Mao is just a minor hiccup, I assure you. Our folks know what they’re doing and, yes, they are indeed our folks.

  170. Alden says:
    @D. K.

    Correct you are.

    Last time an American president followed the law and constitution was December 8 or 9 1941, 81 years ago. When President Roosevelt went before congress to ask congress to declare war on Japan because of the Pearl Harbor attack. And congress agreed.

    Since then America has been in continuous wars and occupations all over the world.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Art Deco
  171. @PhysicistDave

    In any case, as I am sure you know, nukes don’t matter.

    Not when both sides have nukes: Mutual Assured Destruction works.

    But conventional forces do matter: would you be thrilled if Russian tanks, infantry, conventional missiles, etc. were to be deployed right across the Mexican and Canadian borders?

    Because if they were, they could cross the border whenever they felt like it.

    Ahh but Dave it profits a man nothing to gain the whole world if he should lose his soul brain … but for Wales to shill for Putin, Dave?

  172. @Jack D

    Those tanks are all part of a ruse.

    Everything is going to plan.

    First make it look like you tried to take Kiev and then fake a retreat.

  173. Art Deco says:
    @D. K.

    Did the Reagan Administration refer to its invasion of Grenada as a war, Steve? That is not my own recollection….

    It was over in a few days.

    Did the Bush (I) Administration refer to its invasion of Panama as a war, Steve? That is not my own recollection….

    Lasted about three weeks.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    , @D. K.
  174. @Pixo

    What is your favorite Putin video? The compilation of his shoe lifts?

    I don’t care for the penis piano routine and would have changed the channel.

    When Putin launches a shell at your neighborhood and blows your wife to bits you can’t opt out with a remote control.

    Zelensky has a term limit while Putin overruled the constitution to extended his and also ended direct elections under the justification of fighting terrorism. A total loser that can’t handle competition.

  175. Alden says:
    @Alden

    And a couple days later December 11 1941 when congress declared war on Germany after Germany declared war on us. The whole idea being that the president couldn’t declare war by himself. congress critter’s representing the citizens who elected them would have to agree.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  176. Mr Mox says:
    @Jack D

    The second video was filmed in Crimea. Perhaps Zelensky has already made good of his promises to retake it?

    “Stop sharing that video with the massive quantities of armoured vehicles, it’s from Crimea.”

  177. Jack D says:
    @D. K.

    Around 5,500 Russian troops have died in Ukraine since Aug. 29, according to Ukrainian officials. It’s possible the Ukrainians are overstating the death toll, but it’s worth noting that recent U.S. estimates of Russian losses have been only slightly lower than Ukrainian estimates.

    To put these numbers into perspective, Russian losses in Ukraine have swelled by a tenth in around 10 days—in a war that’s 200 days old. The rate of Russian casualties and vehicle write-offs doubled then tripled as the Ukrainians launched their counterattacks.

    Worse for the Russians, in their faltering defense of the south—and total rout in the east—they’ve failed to inflict heavy losses on the attacking Ukrainian brigades. Rough estimates have the Ukrainians losing one-tenth as many troops and vehicles since Aug. 30.

    Worse still, captures account for half the Russian vehicle losses. The Ukrainian army in just the last week and a half has seized enough Russian tanks, fighting vehicles and artillery to equip an entire brigade. In other words, the Ukrainian army actually has more vehicles now than it did before launching its counteroffensives.

    The Ukrainians meanwhile have taken so many Russian prisoners of war—potentially thousands—that they’re struggling to accommodate them. “We have nowhere to keep all the POWs,” Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, said Friday.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidaxe/2022/09/11/the-russian-army-is-losing-a-battalion-every-day-as-ukrainian-counterattacks-accelerate/?sh=49224bbb7628

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @James B. Shearer
  178. HA says:
    @D. K.

    “Russia’s decision to withdraw from Kharkov conserves men and equipment for fighting later on and to be determined on Russian terms;”

    Yeah, good advice, PhysicistDave. By that logic, Russia would do well to decide to withdraw even further, say, all the way back into Russia, at which point they’ll have even more conserved men and equipment for fighting later on, on whatever terms they so choose. You gotta think big.

    “Washington Post – Wounded Ukrainian soldiers reveal steep toll of Kherson offensive:”

    That was actually the most heartening story I’ve read in the last few months about Ukraine. See, unlike you, I can remember to stories of how things were for them during the Donbass offensive, before the HIMARS came on line. As many as 200/deaths a day. Back then, they were saying that there was no chance that the Ukrainians could ever take back territory. What a difference a few HIMARS can make! And we got 500 more that are already on their way to becoming obsolete.

    This time around, it seems that a fair number of the soldiers interviewed in that latest article could name only one person in their unit who had died. Awful? Yes, it is. But in comparison with earlier in the summer, a remarkable turnaround. And fair evidence that they could do with even more help, which may well have been the purpose of that article. Like I said, there’s nothing that those military/industrial-complex lobbyists love more than the words “we could win this if we only had more weapons”, and you can bet that WP article will be featured prominently in their promo packets.

    So you keep highlighting those stories for us, PhysicistDave. Like I said earlier, I’m starting to suspect some of these “it’s all proceeding according to plan for Putin, no need for his fanboys to be alarmed” stories are actually being supplied by US spooks eager to see Russia wriggle even further down the rabbit hole. Thanks so much for your help!

    • Replies: @HA
  179. AKAHorace says:
    @I, Libertine

    I’ve never seen the iSteve commentariat give you this much hostile blowback so suddenly, and I’ve been reading the iSteve comment section for – what? – fifteen, twenty years?

    Why have you struck such a nerve?

    My reaction as well. I think that for 15 to 20 years Steve covered immigration and racial differences which are two topics for which open, honest discussion is forbidden in the media (and if some SJWs get their way in private conversation). He wrote things that were unprintable in the mainstream media. So he attracted a lot of people who are against the conventional position.

    When Covid began and then the invasion of the Ukraine, Steve’s views differed from the conventional views but much more mildly. So he was pointed out that masks were a good idea (that was denied by the authorities at first) and that masking outdoors was unnecessary (once the authorities accepted masks they were fanatical about them). He said that vaccines were necessary but pointed out that much of the credit for them belongs to Trump. He did not want to “poke the bear” and start trouble in Ukraine, but once it started was against the Russian invasion.

    A lot of the commentators he attracted earlier feel betrayed by this. Many people unthinkingly agree with conventional views there are also a minority who unthinkingly reject them. Both groups tend not to handle disagreement well and assume that those who disagree with them have sinister hidden motives (Nazis/Hasbara posters).

    It is weird realizing that a lot of the people whose comments I have enjoyed over the years are such unbalanced fanatics.

  180. Lurker says:

    It may seem counter-intuitive but a rapid retreat, keeping units together, is a good sign. If they’d all stood and fought they would still have been overrun but more of them would have been dead or captured.

    As many people have now pointed out territory is the prize at the end. Destroying the opposition’s ability to fight is where it’s at. Whether by killing, capturing or demoralising them.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  181. HA says:
    @ic1000

    “This winter and next year, are Germany and the rest of Western Europe facing recession or depression?”

    Goldman no longer thinks that gas prices will be as big a dent to the economy as Putin hoped.

  182. D. K. says:
    @Jack D

    “‘. . . according to Ukrainian officials.’”

  183. mousey says:

    The interest waned when they began punishing soldiers for their raping and pillaging. Crusades are no longer profitable for the soldier.

  184. D. K. says:
    @Art Deco

    https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/The-Shortest-War-in-History/

    Your preternatural ability to miss the point, however, is hereby duly noted.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  185. A mass [pro-Ukraine edit] [history rewrite] seems to have broken out at Wikipedia.

    Most towns in Ukraine have at least two names and sometimes more. It makes following the conflict quite difficult, what with Cyrillic scripts as well.

    I read that the town of Krivoy Rog was flooded, so I thought I’d ask Wiki about it.

    Current version

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kryvyi_Rih

    Kryvyi Rih (Ukrainian: Криви́й Ріг [krɪˌwɪj ˈr⁽ʲ⁾iɦ], lit. ’Curved Cape’ or ‘Crooked Horn'[5]) is the largest city in central Ukraine, the 7th most populous city in the country;[6] and 2nd biggest area. The city’s population at the beginning of 2022 is estimated at 646,748.

    But they’ve not been too thorough. There are ten places where the Russian name still exists.

    “In 1939 12,745 Jews had lived in Krivoy Rog, comprising about 6 per cent of the total population.”

    I definitely recall that Orwell wrote 1984 as a warning, not an instruction manual.

    Older version

    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kryvyi_Rih&direction=prev&oldid=47498881

    Kryvyi Rih (Ukrainian: Кривий Ріг; Russian: Кривой Рог, Krivoy Rog) is a city in Ukraine, with population 632,100 (2004). It is situated in Dnipropetrovs’ka oblast’, to the southwest of Dnipropetrovsk, at the confluence of the Inhulets and Saksahan rivers.)

    Same seems to have happened to most towns. Just try to find “Kiev”, whereas the earliest revision says

    “Kiev, from Russian Киев, is the capital and largest city of Ukraine and has around 2.6 million inhabitants. It is increasingly called Kyiv in English-language publications, as Russian is not an official language of Ukraine and the Russian name can seem anachronistic or offensive.”

  186. How much the German public would have benefited from a puppet government in Ukraine remains a historical mystery. Probably Germans wouldn’t have benefited much from a quasi-independent Ukraine.

    If Ukraine had remained independent and didn’t become a Soviet state then Germany would have certainly benefited from having a capitalist trade partner.

    We know that in the 1980s USSR, the Russian Republic was subsidizing the Ukrainian Republic through underpriced oil and gas. Similarly, now prosperous Poland was then being economically propped up by the USSR to hold the Warsaw Pact together.

    Well all of the USSR was basically a gas station but Ukraine was still a major producer of grain and steel. It wasn’t as if Ukraine was dragging down Moscow through incompetence. The real problem was Communism and the refusal of Moscow to admit it was all a waste of time.

    Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    It never made sense to destroy Ukraine economically or hand it over to German farmers. There would have been far more economic benefit in leaving it alone and turning Ukrainians against the Soviets. The Soviets were indeed the enemy of the West but Ukraine was never given a choice on if they wanted to be part of the USSR. That is a major reason why Hitler was just plain full of s–t. He claimed to be anti-Communist but also planned on destroying Ukraine instead of liberating it. The siege of St. Petersburg showed his real intent.

    A side note here is that Hitler’s chief economist did not want the war against the USSR to happen as he believed the gains would not outweigh the costs. They were dependent on the USSR for oil which meant they had to rush in and secure the oil fields undamaged. But I suspect Hitler didn’t care about the risk and knew that the allies would eventually open a Western front. So he recklessly gambled for all of it while he could.

    But let’s say for argument’s sake that Germany ended up with a big chunk of Ukrainian farmland as part of some peace deal. They could in theory end up wealthier. Would the war have been worth the effort? Probably not but it is possible.

    The real problem is that modern war is dysgenic. You blow up your brave and smart men before they have a chance to reproduce. Really not worth it if the prize is farmland that some other nation was already managing and in fact trading for your own goods.

    Overall though this was a really interesting article that raises some good points.

    I would also add that conquering has long been tied to aristocracy without democracy. Much easier to risk the cost of war if your family is wealthy and protected. No need to explain the war if you don’t answer to anyone. If a king/ruler/tsar declares a war then it happens. I am critical of democracy but this is a major problem with autocratic governments. A dictator like Putin gets bored with peace or develops a disease and decides to go conquering. Nicholas II had plenty of land and still went off to expand the empire for the sake of it. Such reckless and needless use of aristocratic power in part motivated the revolution.

    • Agree: ic1000
  187. D. K. says:
    @Alden

    FDR also asked for, and received, declarations of war against Italy (on the same day as Germany, and for the same reason), Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania (the last three on June 5, 1942, because of their involvement with the Axis powers; those three had not declared war on the United States first, as Germany and Italy had). Regardless, FDR had done everything in his power to get the Japanese and Germans to attack America; he caught a break when Germany declared war on the United States, since the American public would not have looked kindly on his fighting Germany, otherwise, when we already had a shooting war underway in the Pacific!

    • Thanks: Alden
  188. Oh boy, another huge angsty thread about the on-the-ground situation in Ukraine. Embarrassing amounts of pink wojak cope going on. If only summa youse heeded my words back in April:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/putins-flawless-strategic-master-plan-is-working-out-perfectly/#comment-5287826 (#292)

    So many here (and on Twitter) have been getting mad at Steve for sardonically slagging Putin’s quizzical moves. Look, neither the Russians nor Ukrainians are geniuses. Too many in the West are rooting emotionally for one side or the other, mostly through the lens of globalist/anti-globalist domestic culture wars, and/or because of (ancestral) blood ties to the region. Relax, bitches.

    • Replies: @Pixo
  189. Muggles says:
    @D. K.

    Are American soldiers’ hearts into illegally occupying Syria and stealing its oil?

    While skepticism about what is in the “hearts and minds” of Russian soldiers in Ukraine is warranted, your comment about this is absurd.

    Fewer than 500 US “soldiers” are said to be in NE Syria, mopping up the Islamic State. They are evidently letting the Kurdish militia doing most of the work take some Syrian oil, which is minimal.

    The Kurds may be using it or selling it in Kurdish Iraq.

    The Syrian government can’t stop IS from doing the same (as they were) and now the Kurds. NE Syria is not governed by the Syrian State.

    The “legality” of all of this is of course murky. Why you are crying keyboard tears over this here is what is mysterious. Stupid and reeks of pathetic Russian propaganda efforts.

    You haven’t mentioned the “illegality” of the Russian invasion/occupation of Ukraine yet. That was a total violation of earlier signed treaties by Russia. How much Ukrainian owned “stuff” have the Russians thus-far stolen? What? Your tears quickly dried up…

    • Replies: @D. K.
  190. HA says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    “It also raises the question of how to analyze the Kievan hasbara efforts online.”

    So says the guy writing on Unz-dot-com, worried about KIEVAN hasbara. Yeah, they’re swarming like flies on Unz-dot-com! They’ve practically overrun the entire site. Seriously? You gotta learn to read what you post, PhysicistDave.

    “I am actually curious as to why HA does not just lie and claim he is an American…”

    Curious? You’re way more than curious about me PhysicistDave. Admit it. As to my being American, that’s obvious enough from my posting, but unfortunately for you, it is very much beside the point. And I’m not the one pining to skip off to Beijing like you, if only I could learn Mandarin a little better, or if only I could learn the ins and outs of Beijing university enrollment, or whatever other pathetically lame excuse you’ll cook up next time you want to rationalize your stubborn refusal to leave behind the West that you condemn. That being the case, you think you’re in position to question MY being sufficiently American? Projection, PhysicistDave — that’s all that is. And I’m not interested in indulging you — do it on your own time.

    But. hey, if the only way for you to feel better about how many times you’ve been made to look like a fool is cooking up conspiracy theories about how those who oppose you must be paid agents sent out by a foreign power, well, go ahead and keep trying to inflate my ego, but even that’s not going to work, given that it would require me to actually take you seriously, and that’s getting tougher by the day: “Zank you for ze help, Meester Blinken, but as much as we’d like more HIMARS, we need to prioritize, and what we REALLY need right now is to hire someone — anyone — to counteract the pro-Putin rhetoric of this ‘PhysicistDave’ person on Unz-dot-com. That is really priority #1 for us here in Kyiv, can you maybe help us out?”

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  191. @D. K.

    How do you plan to commemorate the sixtieth anniversary, next month, of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when President John Kennedy brought us to the brink of nuclear annihilation, in order to keep Soviet nuclear missiles from becoming operational, a mere ninety miles from Florida (where some of us kids from that 1962 America now live in retirement)?

    I don’t commemorate it at all. Kennedy and Khrushchev were both unnecessarily reckless and it took some wisdom on the part of at least one Russian naval officer to avoid some sort of limited tactical nuclear exchange.

    The actual deal–Soviet nuclear missiles out of Cuba, Jupiter missiles out of Turkey, we would not invade Cuba, could have been done with quiet diplomacy and much less big swinging dick confrontation.

    If you think it is particularly relevant to the “missiles in Ukraine!” nonsense, no. That was 1962. Since then–as I’ve pointed out–both side have submarine launched missiles. (And later ship launched cruise missiles.) Which actually allow the Russians have much shorter flights to US territory than vice versa.

    It’s actually a knock on being rash and having “I must show ’em I’m a big swinging dick” leaders … like Putin. More circumspect and careful guys–like say Eisenhower–are better.

  192. Not Raul says:

    OT; but important

    It’s time to leave LA County, Steve.

  193. Art Deco says:
    @Hunsdon

    The term ‘this war’ is first used at 0:57

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    , @D. K.
  194. Art Deco says:
    @D. K.

    Your preternatural ability to miss the point, however, is hereby duly noted.

    Thanks for the random insult. You should consult with Mr. Anon first, though, so as not to duplicate effort.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  195. Oh, I don’t know Steve.
    The muslim lads seem to be well on their way to taking over Sweden…
    Conquest is done by demographic creep these days!

  196. @AKAHorace

    A lot of the commentators he attracted earlier feel betrayed by this. Many people unthinkingly agree with conventional views there are also a minority who unthinkingly reject them. Both groups tend not to handle disagreement well and assume that those who disagree with them have sinister hidden motives (Nazis/Hasbara posters).

    What happened is that alt-right in general went nanners in response to the virus.

    Steve was expected to conform in all areas related to the virus or be called a Jew/troll/whatever.

    The anti-vaxx crowd couldn’t even get their message consistent (did the virus exist or not?) but both Ron and Steve were called traitors to some movement that no one has coherently explained for not conforming. Definitely not a healthy movement if you can’t agree on whether or not the virus is viewable in an electromicroscope and if thousands of researchers faked its rna sequence. Very bizarre reality denial.

    It was all very strange since the alt-right websites usually break taboos related to biology and yet merely stating that the virus *appears* to be killing people or that the vaccines *appear* to be working would get a tribal backlash with all kinds of accusations related to motive. Truly strange since diverse biological observations related to race are normally welcome and in fact encouraged.

    I have posted extensively about racial differences and yet I have been called a government operator for supporting the vaccines. Was the government also paying me to write about race and history? I was also critical of the mask mandates. Why wasn’t the government paying me to support masks and restaurant lockdowns? Doesn’t make any sense.

    I really don’t care if people get the vaccines at this point. It became a case of diminishing returns. The new variants aren’t as deadly and anyone vulnerable has gotten it by now.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Thomm
  197. @Thoughts

    The fundamental premise of this article is incorrect. Ukraine used to be Russia.

    It was once a Soviet state and wasn’t given a choice in the matter like the Baltic states and Hungary. The Communists never gave anyone a vote on if they wanted to be part of their loser empire.

    After the fall of the USSR it was Russia that recognized Ukraine as an independent nation and that included Crimea. Here is in fact the document they signed in 1994 which officially regonized their autonomy in exchange for their nuclear weapons:
    https://policymemos.hks.harvard.edu/files/policymemos/files/2-23-22_ukraine-the_budapest_memo.pdf?m=1645824948

    Of course that won’t be mentioned on PutinStateTV where even calling it a war will land you in jail.

    It’s a special military operation and they are now “regrouping” according to the defense minister.

    Not a war and that wasn’t a retreat. It’s a special military regrouping.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  198. Muggles says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Aka protecting the Russians in Donbass/Luhansk at the same time as stopping the installation of US missiles on the border closest to Moscow, maybe?

    “Protecting the Russians” like Hitler was “protecting the Germans” in Poland and Czechoslovakia before WWII.

    The “missiles on the border closest to Moscow” is another Russian troll tell. With intercontinental ballistic (and now guided cruise) missiles the “close borders” complaint sounds so WWI -ish.

    Really.

    Formerly we had a lot of Chinese paid trolls, but they seemed to be gone. Now it is Russian trolls or those who parrot those silly arguments.

    You don’t have to love Zelensky to get a good laugh about the pathetic pro Putin talking points.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @John Johnson
  199. HA says:
    @HA

    OUCH! My sincere apologies for confusing DK with PhysicistDave, who posted the same WP story a few days ago. In fairness, it’s hard to tell these Russia shills apart, sometimes, but nonetheless, my handlers in Kyiv will be outraged, and I will no doubt have to avoid standing near high-rise windows for the next few days, like poor Shoigu. They’ll probably curtail my Salo rations, too, oh, the ignominy!

  200. pyrrhus says:
    @D. K.

    Yes, that was a pretty silly statement by iSteve…the more so as that land was being held primarily by local militia, not Russian soldiers..Don’t bet the lunch money that the Ukraine is still holding it at the end of this mess….

  201. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:

    Mr. Putin’s war has not been especially successful for him. Like a certain European leader of the 20th century, he would be remembered more favorably if he’d stuck to tyranny within his own borders.

  202. TG says:
    @AKAHorace

    Ah, yes, the Haber-Bosch process. Most people don’t realize just how important that was. But it’s not an unlimited source of food, and even now many countries have hit the Malthusian limit.

    Just a few decades ago, food production in India was increasing very rapidly (thank you Haber-Bosch). If the Indian people had limited themselves to 1 or 2 or 3 children each, this would have lifted them out of poverty. Instead they had seven each, and all that massive increase in food production was rapidly cancelled out. 500 years of western scientific and economic progress, zeroed out.

    One notes that the presence or absence of a huge mass of chronically malnourished children had no bearing on the past massive increases in food production in India. Those increases were a done deal; they were brought about by adults using existing tools and resources. The teachings of Milton Friedman and Julian Simon etc. that Malthus was wrong, that people having the physical maximum number of children regardless of circumstance cannot possibly have any bad consequences, is a lie.

    Now the fertility rate in India has indeed dropped to about 2 children/women – but only because they just don’t have enough food to have any more! Remember, Malthus was explicit: when food limits population growth it is hardly ever due to outright famine, but rather “misery and vice” – chromic malnutrition makes it hard for women to get pregnant and bring a child to term, it increases the infant mortality rate, people sacrifice some children so that others may live, even regular birth control is of no benefit if people wait to stop having children at the point where it is physically impossible for them to support another child at any level of poverty.

    Remember also that you can’t go below subsistence: the fact that the Indian population is living right at the lowest levels of subsistence – about 150 kg woodgrain/person/year – is not an accomplishment, because you can’t do worse. Population growth is now tracking the availability of food to the population (which is currently about 140 million less than it would have been because the Indian government is exporting about 20 millions tones of rice a year, but that’s another issue).

    So yes: there are an awful lot of hungry people in the world, and more every year.

    Malthus was right.

  203. @ic1000

    The quality of iSteve comments deteriorates sharply, whenever Sailer pens something about the Russia-Ukraine War.

    Yep. It’s amazing how Putin’s War just turns brains off.

    PhysDave–not an idiot–told me “nukes don’t matter”. A level of stupid, that beggars belief.

    Through tech (unz.com, Twitter, WaPo, RT, etc.), it feels like it’s 1913 or so, and I’ve been given a ringside seat to the runup of the Great War — one where fog (propaganda) obscures most of the relevant things that are happening.

    1913? If you mean the noise in those places–ok. But in real life–no.

    Putin’s been playing Czar1914! But no other great power is interested–thankfully–in showing up. So this is going to end up more like Vietnam, where one great power beats up on some locals, but the other side just supplies its local proxies. (Note: I don’t mean the Ukrainians winning–that’s up to Putin and Russian political-military establishment. I just mean scale–no direct great power conflict.)

    * This winter and next year, are Germany and the rest of Western Europe facing recession or depression? How will the citizenry respond to these mandatory sacrifices for a foreign cause?

    There’s so much yapping and b.s. here. (Some of these guys really need to go fight in an actual to get a sense of how stupid and unpleasant war is.) But this one is an interesting question.

    There isn’t going to be depression–but a bad winter recession seems definitely possible. (Don’t have the background to really drill into it.) But European leaders have been ridiculously cavalier about their energy situation and allowing themselves to be dependent upon an unreliable, potentially unfriendly supplier–Russia. For instances Germany’s decision to shutdown its nukes. Just cutesy, girly, rainbows and happy trees nonsense.

    Of course, Europe’s energy stupidity is orders of magnitude less stupid and harmful than its immigration stupidity … so like most of this Ukraine stuff, in the big picture “who cares”.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  204. Hunsdon says:
    @Art Deco

    So you have a cite to the declaration of war declared by the United States Congress in accordance with our constitutional norms?

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Art Deco
  205. @Lurker

    There’s a quote from Solzhenitsyn in “August 1914” to the effect that while advances or outflanking manoeuvres have to be organised and men told exactly where to go, by contrast the word “retreat”, especially in the context of “encirclement”, is immediately understood by every soldier down to the lowliest private, and men will perform miracles of improvisation to implement it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_1914_(novel)

  206. SFG says:
    @Greta Handel

    Avalon Hill was sold to Hasbro in 1998, and their entire staff laid off.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
  207. SFG says:
    @Hunsdon

    Last official war we had was WW2.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  208. Anonymous[361] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    If it does not matter in the slightest who controls Ukraine, why did the US Deep State foment the putsch in 2014? Why did the US pour in billions to arm Ukraine militarily prior to 2022? Who cares?

    Because it does matter: for almost thirty years now, the US Deep State has very clearly been trying to encircle Russia — economically, politically, and, yes, militarily.

    Exactly. Instead of phoning it in and taking the NY Times’ word at face value, Steve should drive down to the Rand Institute in Santa Monica and talk to the guys there who get paid to come up with these plans for the US government:

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  209. @Steve Sailer

    Citing the least credible source imaginable to validate mind reading on a grand scale. Give me a break.

  210. @John Johnson

    ‘The fundamental premise of this article is incorrect. Ukraine used to be Russia.’

    ‘It was once a Soviet state and wasn’t given a choice in the matter like the Baltic states and Hungary. The Communists never gave anyone a vote on if they wanted to be part of their loser empire.’

    Your interlocutor is wrong, but you’re wronger. To see the Ukraine as entirely distinct from Russia is absurd.

  211. Wency says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Tooze’s recent book on the Nazi economy, which I thought was quite good, seemed to argue it was about both agriculture and industry.

    Hitler believed strongly in economies of scale and thought they were the reason US industry was poised to dominate the world. But also Tooze contends Germany’s agricultural productivity was pathetic relative to Britain and France, this was a significant drag on the larger economy, and the main factor was the inefficiently tiny size of the average German farm. The idea of increasing agricultural (labor) productivity by holding labor constant and increasing the size of farms by expropriating land from the Slavs and letting us starve was therefore more economically rational than it might seem.

    Also worth noting that in WW1, lack of food was a large part of the reason the Austro-German home fronts collapsed. Everyone who lived through the war had memories of hunger, and in Hitler’s view, Germany would always be subject to domination from the West unless it was food-independent.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  212. Corvinus says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    “Only 36% of the public trust the media according to Gallup (2021).“

    Wait, we are suppose to trust Gallup now? Anyways, NOTICE I was talking about how you and others believe the media lies all or most of the time, and not about trust.

    How are you absolutely certain of this trend? Isn’t that thought process extreme?

    So who exactly ought we believe is the source of news? What groups? Why?

    “Intellectual sterility would be mindlessly repeating what Yahoo News tells you. It’s the very act of critical thinking that shows us how they shade things.“

    So we shouldn’t believe it at all, no matter what! How is that even reasonable? How are you totally convinced everything or most everything Yahoo News is “shaded”?

    Certainly a person can be skeptical of what they hear, and thus the need to find other sources to confirm. But it’s more likely you go in with the mindset that if you don’t like something that was said or presented by the media, it automatically is labeled as a lie. That’s not how journalism operates. Again, even Mr. Unz uses mainstream media to support his position. Is he being hoodwinked?

    “To be clear, we’re really talking about the political media or any media pushing a political agenda. This makes sense because this affects power and there will always be a push to use information, media and propaganda to gain power. Always.“

    Including Fox News and NewsMax? How about Marginal Revolution or other Alt Right sites? By this metric, they all without fail hammer home a biased narrative to curry favor.

    So again who do you believe in for accurate and unbiased news? Why?

  213. FKA Max says: • Website
    @Alden

    “Overall, through its operations to 1990, Operation Paperclip imported 1,600 men as part of the intellectual reparations owed to the US and the UK, valued at \$10 billion in patents and industrial processes.[27][32]” – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Paperclip#Arrivals

    32. Naimark. 206 (Naimark cites Gimbel, John Science Technology and Reparations: Exploitation and Plunder in Postwar Germany) The \$10 billion compare to the 1948 US GDP \$258 billion, and to the total Marshall plan (1948–52) expenditure of \$13 billion, of which Germany received \$1.4 billion (partly as loans).

    Intellectual Spoils
    Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1990
    https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.248.4960.1241.a or https://archive.ph/Wm0Pp

  214. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve —

    You are as wrong on this as you were/are on Covid.

    1. The war is just a series of wars between the forces of the “New World Order” per Bush the Elder, or “Great Reset” per Klaus Schwab, and the leaders of the multi-polar world, Modi, Putin, Xi, and some others.

    2. The War furthermore is between dynastic neo feudal rule of the Finks, Bidens, Obamas, Clintons, Dimons, Bezos etc and the nationalist ambitions of those not content in the words of Z-Man to be “a gas station with serfs, a factory with serfs, and a call center with serfs.” Ambition in national leaders did not wither away, just because Klaus Schwab commands “eat the bugs.”

    3. Kosovo, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Georgia, Armenia/Azerbaijan, are all part of this war. Note that the US/NATO bombed and invaded Serbia/Yugoslavia on the notion that neither “were a real country” and neither had the right to keep other peoples from forming their own Muslim republic (to massacre the Orthodox). James Blunt avoided then WWIII by not following Wesley Clark’s order to fight the Russians at the Sarajevo airport.

    4. The “gallant Ukranians” are mostly dead. The forces occupying the region the Russians evacuated are mostly US and Polish forces, as Biden gave away the plan months earlier. Ukraine being a corrupt kleptocracy there are few to fight for Zelensky playing the piano with his penis while dancing around in women’s lingerie (one of his most notable skits). While Zelensky has lots and lots lots of luxury villas around the world: a \$20 million mansion in Miami, another in Venice, another in Switzerland, another in Israel. Meanwhile criticism of Putin is that he’s too considerate (of global South) world opinion, not national enough, and not protecting Russians in Ukraine enough. Russians who are Russian, speak Russian, are Orthodox, and write in Cyrillic. While Ukrainians write in the Latin Alphabet, are Catholic (if anything), and speak Ukrainian, and agree that they want to kill all the Russians for reasons historical and not.

    The Russians view themselves as fighting Nazis 2.0, while the Ukrainians mostly want to flee to the West and get consumer welfare. Absent the True Believer weirdos parading around as Nazis with sincerity of LARPers. [Azov did not fight to the last man but surrendered unlike fanatics.]

    5. The objective of this war is not to hold territory (neither the Russians nor the NATO forces have enough men, equipment, and supply to hold the ground near Kharkiv) but attrition. Attrition of the economies (so far Russia is winning that one big time as you can print money but not hydrocarbons) and attrition of men and equipment. Particularly men since they can no longer be replaced with demographic dearth. Russia is fighting a new, weird war where they carefully limit casualties (most of theirs have been the Donbass militias) and seek to bleed NATO white. The US military will crack when enough skilled White soldiers are dead and you have nothing but rear echelon YASS Qweens left. Putin and Xi both know this.

    This is the first real war of the Demographic Age. Where conserving the very limited amount of soldiers and airmen and sailors is key, and using the dependency of very limited hydrocarbons and green lunacy against the enemy. Germany has essentially de-industrialized, there is no replacement for what Credit Suisse Zoltan Posdar noted was \$20 billion of Russian Gas producing \$2 trillion of German GDP. Gas CAN be found, but not enough and not at the price to support German industry which is already going belly up with severe global financial consquences, as Mercedes, Bosch, BASF, BMW, all close for good in Germany.

    Essentially the Second World (Russia, China, India) have teamed up with the Global South to fight (in a cold way) World War Three. So far nukes have not been flying, there is no declaration of war, but its being fought. The US forces sure to be captured or killed in Ukraine will be no less prisoner or dead for no formal declaration. The people starving or freezing in the US or Europe will be no less dead for just a “Special Military Operation.”

    By all Third Party accounts, the “Ukranians” (really NATO) have about 30,000 men in and around Kharkiv. That’s not Paulus’s Third Army of 300,000. And I don’t see any grand encirclements, seiges, heroic manuevers, etc. Just the grind of new Attrition Warfare, with Russia aiming to grind down the US/Davos with economic warfare as much as anything else. Remember: we have very limited White men to fight with, and even less oil and gas. There is an absolute religious injunction against getting more oil and gas, so what we have is what we fight with.

  215. Art Deco says:
    @Hunsdon

    No, I can cite the appropriations bills passed every year to finance the war. I might be able to locate a concurrent or joint resolution of Congress.

  216. Art Deco says:
    @SFG

    Last formally declared war. Not sure you’re going to find a piece of case law which says that to wage war without a declaration is contrary to the Constitution.

  217. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    Since then America has been in continuous wars and occupations all over the world.

    It hasn’t.

    I’m sure you’d be less annoying to those around you if you had an internal editor which screened what came out of your mouth.

    • LOL: Renard
  218. Ralph L says:

    Have the Climate Crisis idiots realized that if they want to stop the African and Indian population explosions, they need to starve and cripple Europe first to deprive the 3rd world of food?

  219. mc23 says:

    Interesting twitter thread below on how the US or at least certain interests in the US will profit from Russo-Ukraine.

    Among other things- The US unloads lots of older weapons on the Ukraine under the guise of lend-lease. The US will order newer weapons, good for the military -industrial complex.
    The US LNG/ energy industry will move into the space in Europe formerly serviced by Russia.

    Not mentioned is a chance that a destitute Russia may be plundered again by Western financial interests and speculators. There’s also a lot graft in managing all the reperations that Russia will owe Ukraine.

    You can still make money on war just not on the battlefield

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  220. Mike Tre says:
    @keypusher

    Thanks for sharing your opinion. It matters.

    Project this: Stevie flushed my two sentence comment that I submitted this morning, in which I said his article was off base.

  221. Corvinus says:
    @bomag

    “Some blends are better.
    Some blends are worse.
    It makes a difference.“

    Like the mixing of the English and the Greeks? It’s

  222. Sailer trolls readers on the Ukraine war hoax whilst Ron trolls readers on the Covid hoax. I love it – echo chambers are boring. Well played, gents 👏👏👏

  223. OT:
    Poland passes reparations bill
    The request of \$1.3 trillion from Germany is based on flawed research, critics say

    https://www.rt.com/news/562809-poland-passes-reparations-bill/

  224. In recent generations, the payoff from militarily subjugating foreign lands has been typically less than the cost.

    Unless the country has oil.

  225. Rob says:

    Being able to grow enough food to feed a growing populatiom is especially easy, considering that Western populations are not growing (naturally)

    If you have several sons, losing one inna war is not the disaster that losing one’s only son is. People have much smaller families these days. Plus, when the population’s shrinking (like America’s) there’s not much need for lebensraum.

    Agriculture being limited only by people’s ingenuity: Fruit Trenches: Cultivating Subtropical Plants in Freezing Temperatures. If international trade (and Florida) did not exist, we’d be growing (more expensive) oranges.

    If Hitler really wanted Germany to be rich, he should have encouraged Hungarian Jews to immigrate and marry Germans.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Reg Cæsar
  226. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s amazing how NYT has become Steve’s go-to trusted source on all things Ukraine. Helluva thinking!

  227. Art Deco says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    There was no ‘engineered coup’ in Grenada. Mr. Reagan sent in the Marines to remove a crew run by one Hudson Austin, who had put the (illegitimate) prime minister in front of a firing squad. Outfits like the Institute for Policy Studies have contended for decades that the CIA organized the overthrow of Salvador Allende in Chile. They have never provided much more than assertions and innuendos to this effect.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  228. @Muggles

    “Protecting the Russians” like Hitler was “protecting the Germans” in Poland and Czechoslovakia before WWII.

    Claims to be protecting the Czech Germans and then proceeds to break the Munich agreement and take all of Czechoslovakia, destroying his credibility and also that of the British conservatives.

    Then he carpet bombs Warsaw. Any German-Poles in the city were just collateral damage I guess.

    Similar to Putin claiming to removing Nazis by sending cruise missiles at Kiev.

    Here come the liberation missiles!

    The “missiles on the border closest to Moscow” is another Russian troll tell. With intercontinental ballistic (and now guided cruise) missiles the “close borders” complaint sounds so WWI -ish.

    Well our Putin defense league seems to admit that Ukraine didn’t actually qualify for NATO nor did they have the votes which makes the “missiles on the border” argument even more ridiculous.

    There was never a plan to add missile silos to Ukraine as they aren’t needed in the first place. In a nuclear war everyone loses and it doesn’t matter if you launch from Germany or Ukraine. Even in a first strike you don’t gain anything. The missiles fly at mach 5.

  229. Thomm says:
    @John Johnson

    What happened is that alt-right in general went nanners in response to the virus.

    Steve was expected to conform in all areas related to the virus or be called a Jew/troll/whatever.

    er… what do you think is the true purpose of this website? Why is L Ron Unzzard all in on Covid conspiracy theories that only about six people in the world have been convinced by?

    This entire website’s purpose was to organize Neo-Nazis into one place where they could be corralled into being a demoralized controlled opposition that can be utilized as needed for Jewish benefit. The effect that Covid had on the ‘alt-right’ (as you call them) is entirely engineered and is consistent with Ron Unz’s actions.

    Why would Ron Unz be the only Jew that is in favor of a group that hates Jews? Particularly when Ron Unz also is staunchly in favor of unlimited immigration by Hispanics, even if illegal?

  230. @Rob

    Being able to grow enough food to feed a growing population is especially easy, considering that Western populations are not growing (naturally)

    It isn’t that simple in Europe. Some European countries are heavily urbanized and dependent on imports.

    If Hitler really wanted Germany to be rich, he should have encouraged Hungarian Jews to immigrate and marry Germans.

    Jews aren’t supposed to breed with non-Jews and I’m guessing Hitler would not have supported the idea.

    Germany would have been rich if Hitler stopped at the Munich agreement or grabbed a few African territories. Or went after the USSR from Prussia and Hungary. Heck the British would have happily given him India. But he couldn’t resist getting revenge over WW1. Now we have to live in the age of White guilt because of his greed.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  231. @Art Deco

    Can a “piece of case law” legitimately evade or alter the Constitution?

    The Establishment will do what it wants, the three hands — aka “branches” — washing themselves and using the Constitution as a towel to the extent necessary to maintain enough credulous voters.

  232. SafeNow says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Regarding the mourning crowd being mainly women, I ran this through the online “coin flip probability calculator.” I used Art Deco’s estimate of 2/3 women. I quickly counted the crowd and estimated 40 people. So, I told the calculator that the coin was flipped 40 times and 26 were heads. Result: A 2% chance. In conclusion it is overwhelmingly not due to mere chance, but rather, a difference exists between men and women. Nonetheless, a woke person would say men and women are the same…so it was just the luck of the draw in that crowd, it was the 2%. I went through this once in a different situation, and the woman told me that the coinflip calculator’s one in 4 million result was occurring; she simply would not admit that men and women are different.

    Fun coinflip calculator:

    https://www.omnicalculator.com/statistics/coin-flip-probability

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  233. @Twinkie

    Agree, I was poking a bit at this with my 4th point further down.

    But you’re right it is two aspects. Lack of willingness to undergo bloodshed for you. (Related also to the fertility point.) And lack of respect–even negative attitudes toward–the conquering hero vanquishing his victim.

  234. @SFG

    Okay.

    The remote reference was intentional.

    • Replies: @SFG
  235. @HammerJack

    Wow, Steve, sorry… 200 posts later, I guess you really didn’t like this one. (Still not approved 16 hrs later.) Back to your Ukraine squabbling. And royal family, and Hitler, and agricultural productivity analyses..

    Anyway her husband now claims she was taken out of context, so whatever.

  236. @Pixo

    They officially have 12 boomers

    Add 10 cruise missile-armed submarines, plus Belgorod with Poseidon nuclear torpedoes.

    typically the Russian Navy is 20% or less operating and seaworthy.

    They are perfectly capable of firing from the port.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
  237. Anonymous[309] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Liars are liars. After a few lies, standard practice in homo-sapiens is to treat them as enemies or at least threats: to avoid contact with them and to punish them where convenient. If actual damage has been done by the lie, legal remedies are to an extent available.

    The assumption of moral or other superiority (such as “You must believe me because everybody else is insane” or “because I’m Jewish and not believing me is antisemitism) by liars simply makes them repulsive as well as unsafe to listen to.

    I’d advise readers to consider the above and apply it. The present environment is not safe, as the current system cannot support its current population and is casting off members. You can no longer trust strangers even of your own ethnic group, and liars (even if you know them) with pretensions of superiority are best rejected and isolated.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  238. @Hypnotoad666

    Exactly. This is a Gladwell-esque take from Steve. Just like in David and Goliath when Gladwell refers to “the people of Northern Ireland” in their heroic struggle against British occupation, completely ignoring the existence of the protestant majority.

  239. Pixo says:
    @Colin Wright

    “ As to Russia, I’d say yes, Putin should have invaded. To argue otherwise is to imply Russia should retreat to the status of a minor power — a Turkey, or an India.”

    I agree your post up to there. Russia was already a second rate power, and the invasion made this plain to the whole world. They failed to take Kherson 25 miles from their border, and failed to achieve or maintain air superiority. They also showed their intelligence is third rate quality even over a poorer neighbor full of ethnic Russians.

    We all knew in Jan 2022 Russia was in a long decline, but the invasion was absolutely a shock at far fall it had fallen.

    The newest illustration of Russia’s third rate status is Azerbaijan attacking Russia’s ally, including areas near Russian military bases. Israel is also getting a bit bolder at bombing Syria.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @John Johnson
  240. Rob says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Haber-Bosch allows you to swap fuel for food, but if you’re short on both, what good is it?

    I’m pretty sure all you need is water, air, and heat as ingredients. You need a catalyst. To do it with water air and heat, you might need to do things like get nearly pure N2 or do electrolysis on the water to get hydrogen.

    That would not have helped Germany in the 1930s, but we have nuclear power. Given relief from the lawyer tax and diversity tax, we could build nuclear-powered H-B plants and never worry about the price of natural gas for fertilizer.

    Has Germany decided to re-open the closed nuclear plants, or is that just not realistic? If there are any still open, maybe they should keep them open?

    If we are really going to an electric vehicle future, don’t we need to build a lot of capacity? People will want to charge their cars at night. The sun is off at night, so all the solar capacity doesn’t help all that much. Wind I think blows fairly hard at night, but we burn a lot of gas.

    Going all-electric cars, it’ll be worse for the environment than keeping gas unless we replace all the coal plants that could provide electricity off-peak for low dollars but lots of CO2.

    There’s also the matter that going to a zero-carbon economy is not enough. We have to pull carbon out of the air. That’s probably going to be a very thermodynamically unfavorable process, requiring energy to do. I read a Gwern thing that this rock reacts with CO2 in the air. Crushing the rocks to powder and heating the dust seems too easy to stop global warming. But heating the mineral will take power.

    Oh, I found an interesting blog. http://www.bayesianinvestor.com/blog/ He’s rationalist-adjacent, so he probably believes hbd, but don’t go and be a dick about it.

  241. @AnotherDad

    But European leaders have been ridiculously cavalier about their energy situation and allowing themselves to be dependent upon an unreliable, potentially unfriendly supplier–Russia

    Russia has been reliable to a fault. Only after the sanction have been imposed did Russia reluctantly start reducing the flow of hydrocarbons to Europe. Even now, if SP2 suddenly becomes open, the gas will flow.

    If anyone was using energy as a weapon, that’s the West.

  242. D. K. says:
    @Art Deco

    The Truman Administration categorized its involvement in “the Korean conflict” as merely a “police action” pursuant to American treaty obligations, thus claiming that President Truman was “faithfully execut[ing]” the laws of the United States, and had no need to consult, let alone to rely upon, the Congress for his authority to invade the Korean peninsula and fight the Communists, for years on end.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  243. @Pixo

    The newest illustration of Russia’s third rate status is Azerbaijan attacking Russia’s ally, including areas near Russian military bases. Israel is also getting a bit bolder at bombing Syria.

    Chechnya may even join in on the party.

    If Ramzan Kadyrov gets spooked then he will leave. He can tell which way the wind is blowing.

    That is the Muslim mobster that Putin left in charge of Chechnya. The one that pretended to be taking part in the war.
    https://observers.france24.com/en/europe/20220401-was-this-photo-of-chechen-leader-kadyrov-praying-in-a-petrol-station-taken-in-ukraine

    • Replies: @Pixo
  244. Art Deco says:
    @D. K.

    That’s nice. Congress appropriated the money every year. It confirmed administration appointments to the flag ranks and to the civilian apparat of the Department of Defense every year.

    I must have missed the part about the South Korean military rolling the tanks over the 38th parallel on 25 June 1950

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @Steve Sailer
  245. Corvinus says:
    @Dumbo

    It’s Putin the oligarch and dictator who is forcing young Russian men to the front lines to remove the “neo Nazis” from Ukraine. Make no mistake about it.

  246. @Colin Wright

    Putin drew a line in the sand — everyone had said for thirty years that the Ukraine joining NATO would be Russia’s line in the sand, and Putin confirmed that last December.

    We just went over this. Ukraine doesn’t qualify for NATO nor were they in the process of applying. France and Germany have stated numerous times that they won’t vote for them. The NATO excuse was a line of BS that Putin has since abandoned.

    In fact it just came out that he rejected a peace deal that would have kept Ukraine out of NATO
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/putin-gave-up-a-major-win-in-ukraine-in-favor-of-waging-war-report/ar-AA11PFdT

    So that line of BS is even worse now.

    As to Russia, I’d say yes, Putin should have invaded. To argue otherwise is to imply Russia should retreat to the status of a minor power

    That doesn’t make any sense. Russia can only achieve greatness by invading a smaller neighbor?

    Putin is worth half a trillion dollars. Yes half a trillion. That’s 500 billion dollars.

    He is sitting around on a massive pot of gold and can only redeem the status of Russia by blowing up Ukrainians?

    Their GDP growth has been anemic because he doesn’t understand economics and he really doesn’t care about the people. Who spends 1.4 billion on a gaudy mansion?
    https://www.msn.com/en-US/lifestyle/homeandgarden/inside-the-enormous--billion-russian-mansion-dubbed-putins-palace/ss-AATrvvE

    1.4 billion spent on public parks would have done more for Russia than this stupid war. Before the war the Russian military could at least pretend to be first world. Well that illusion has been shattered. Russian military industry is in fact already losing sales. No one wants to buy their jack-in-the-box tanks. Their GDP is set to roll back 10 years at the least.

    Total fail.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  247. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Britain wouldn’t have happily given him India or anything else. Seizing portions of Africa would have required naval capacity and a willingness to fight Britain or France. I suppose he could have attempted to seize Portuguese or Belgian territory, but that might have landed him in the soup with the western powers anyway. There was no route into the Soviet Union except through Poland, Roumania, or the Baltic states. As for getting revenge over WWi, Germany had by the end of 1938 take nearly every piece of Germanophone territory it would have been practical to acquire and hold, abrogated the treaty limits on German armament, and successfully stiffed the allied powers of their reparations. They hadn’t reacquired Germany’s old overseas dependencies, but they’d acquired territory in Europe they’d not had before which was more productive. They also had opportunities to build congenial relationships throughout eastern Europe. They had their revenge, just not a revenge which incorporated a German boot stomping on a French face. They also did not have the lebensraum Hitler wanted.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  248. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Putin is worth half a trillion dollars. Yes half a trillion. That’s 500 billion dollars.

    Whoever your source is, I’d check his work.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  249. Dmon says:
    @Almost Missouri

    The US military staging a no-knock raid to arrest the president of Panama for drug dealing was definitely a New World Order milestone of some sort. Can’t Admiral Rachel Levine just lead a SWAT team over there and arrest Putin for discriminating against gays (in blatant violation of the Respect For Marriage diktat)?

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  250. @Graham

    In 100 years time most food in the developed world will be grown indoors, leaving (ideally) the rest of the land for housing and re-wilding.

    Is this your way of predicting wide spread cannibalism?

  251. D. K. says:
    @Muggles

    The United States has illegally invaded Syria and occupied its sovereign territory. The number of its own troops that the American Empire feels it needs to carry out its mission, overseeing its proxies, is irrelevant. The entire “Syrian Civil War” has been, and remains, an American proxy war to unseat the Assad regime. The rise of ISIS was America’s doing, as part of that proxy war, through its Saudi and Turkish allies. Your notion that the United States had the legal right to invade Syria, and then to steal its natural resources, because the former’s own proxies were in de facto control of parts of the latter’s own sovereign territory is, alas, without any basis in international law.

    As for Russia, it invaded Ukraine in defense of two break-away republics that Ukraine had waged war on for eight years, killing umpteen thousand people. The Ukrainian regime itself is a puppet government put in place by a \$5-billion American coup, overseen by Victoria Nuland.

    I have no need to shed any tears over the current war between Russia and Ukraine, because neither is my country. If I were the type to shed tears, however, I would shed them over the monstrosity that my own government has become, since the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and, then, the Soviet Union itself.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  252. @Art Deco

    By my count, the crowd is about 2:1 female.

    You can’t tell how they identify from a picture! For shame.

    • LOL: Alden
  253. D. K. says:
    @Art Deco

    Once again, your preternatural ability to miss the point is hereby duly noted. Steve Sailer is claiming that only Putin would dare to try to call an active military conflict between sovereign states anything other than a war. Steve Sailer is again mistaken: President Truman called his invasion of the Korean peninsula a “police action” pursuant to America’s treaty obligations. He waged war on that basis for the remainder of his presidential term, over two and a half years, without seeking a declaration of war from the Congress. I am not arguing whether American involvement in Korea, back before I was born, was good, bad or indifferent; I am arguing that it is unconstitutional for a president to wage such a military action without a declaration of war from the Congress.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Steve Sailer
  254. Alden says:
    @Ralph L

    Do you mean the Henry Bolingbroke who hired a London mob to overthrow his Cousin Richard 2 the King England and killed Richard by starving him to death? And thus acquired title to every acre of land in England not owned by the church? Whatever many have happened when Prince John died, Henry 4 Bolingbroke certainly came out ahead.

  255. Pixo says:
    @John Johnson

    Kadyrov had an outside chance of succeeding Putin, so for now I don’t think would try to break away.

    (I realized I said Kherson when I meant Kharkiv in my prior post. Seems like this was obvious to everyone.)

  256. @Art Deco

    Britain wouldn’t have happily given him India or anything else. Seizing portions of Africa would have required naval capacity and a willingness to fight Britain or France.

    The British were growing tired of India and in fact Churchhill hated the place. They would have happily handed it over to prevent a world war. India was a mess at the time and of questionable value to the British. The British were stretched too thin with their territories.

    Nothing was stopping Germany from taking African territories. The British nor the French would not have gone to war over Germany taking chunks of West Africa. The British never wanted war with Germany. That is how Chamberlain was a national hero until Hitler broke the Munich agreement. Chamberlain was viewed as saving the continent from war.

    There was no route into the Soviet Union except through Poland, Roumania, or the Baltic states.

    Wrong. Look at map of Europe 1939:
    He could have led two armies through Prussia and Czechoslovakia/Hungary. In fact his original plan was a massive army headed towards the Volga to starve Moscow and seize the oil fields. Only later did he get talked into the three army plan. Military historians debate whether or not he should have charged at the Volga or Moscow with a single army. Either could have been done with a two army attack through Belarus.

    Needing to go through Poland was a BS excuse that his post-war supporters came up with. Hitler and the Germans had long planned on destroying Poland. That was a key part of Hitler’s vision. It wasn’t strategic and needlessly risked world war. Then Hitler broke his own rule and opened two fronts. He flat out wrote that he wouldn’t make the mistake of two fronts. His greed and desire for revenge over WW1 led Germany into needless wars.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Almost Missouri
  257. Art Deco says:
    @D. K.

    The United States has illegally invaded Syria and occupied its sovereign territory.

    There are international conventions. There is no international law. (And there certainly hasn’t been much law in Syria). There are per press reports about 900 American troops in Syria, which might have sufficed to occupy a small city if they had ever been deployed as an occupying force.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  258. Art Deco says:
    @D. K.

    That’s not what he claimed, and your complaint is twee.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  259. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Wrong. Look at map of Europe 1939:

    The Munich accord provided for Germany to receive the Germanophone borderlands of Bohemia and Moravia, not the rest of Czechoslovakia.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  260. @Pixo

    And your source for this horseshit is who?

  261. @Art Deco

    Putin is worth half a trillion dollars. Yes half a trillion. That’s 500 billion dollars.

    Whoever your source is, I’d check his work.

    Putin’s wealth is difficult to estimate because there are no property rights.

    He can simply take the assets of any company at any time.

    So any oil company is de facto his property.

    Forbes put his gold reserves alone at 130 billion
    https://www.forbesafrica.com/billionaires/2022/02/03/how-can-putin-afford-war-in-ukraine-his-130-billion-gold-horde-helps/

    Plenty of money to invest in Russia. No need for this stupid war.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Hunsdon
  262. @Art Deco

    Wrong. Look at map of Europe 1939:

    The Munich accord provided for Germany to receive the Germanophone borderlands of Bohemia and Moravia, not the rest of Czechoslovakia.

    Yes and then Hitler broke the agreement and took the rest of it.

    That still didn’t set off a world war since the British were willing to let Hitler have Czechoslovakia. That humiliated the British conservatives and led to the rise of Churchhill.

    So the point is that he could have used that territory to attack the USSR.

  263. @Jack D

    This is a rout not an orderly withdrawal. ..”

    “Ordered” and “orderly” are not the same thing. The Russians may have made the best of a bad situation by ordering a withdrawal.

  264. D. K. says:
    @Art Deco

    Can you not comprehend Standard English, Professor? As I said, in the very comment to which you were replying: “The number of its own troops that the American Empire feels it needs to carry out its mission, overseeing its proxies, is irrelevant.”

    In the unlikely even that your campus contains a law school, walk over and ask one of its professors whether or not there is any such thing as “international law.”

  265. Alden says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Correct Read about some of the great battles like Teweksbury. 40K dead in 2 days here, 30K dead in 1 day there, several big battles a year for decades the deaths add up. It wasn’t just the nobility fighting. It was the tens of thousands of ordinary workers in each of their armies. Lady Margaret Beaufort probably had more than a million soldiers under her command in the 25 years she was fighting. Well, not fighting, ordering her armies to fight. She and her husbands weren’t killed. But their men were.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    , @Art Deco
  266. Anonymous[322] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Yes, out of arrogance or stupidity or whatever, the Russians are fighting this war with one hand behind their backs. They did this to themselves and can undo it as well. I think the problem is just Putin’s pride. He doesn’t want to admit he made a mistake.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @Colin Wright
  267. Alden says:
    @John Johnson

    I’m pretty sure Putin just got another face and neck lift. Maybe a chemical peel as well.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  268. D. K. says:
    @Art Deco

    “That’s not what he claimed, and your complaint is twee.”

    Here was Steve Sailer’s relevant comment, above, in full:

    ***

    Of course, that’s the point: Putin won’t call his invasion a war of conquest or even a war: instead, it’s a Special Military Operation. Did Shakespeare have Henry V referring to his invasion of France as a special military operation?

    ***

    Perhaps your being autistic keeps you from grasping the obvious, Artie. The LexisNexis machine to which you apparently have free access on campus is not going to help you in that regard.

  269. @Rob

    Plus, when the population’s shrinking (like America’s)

    Our population isn’t shrinking. Our native population may be.

    https://www.census.gov/popclock/

    333,089,179 as of yesterday.

    • Replies: @Rob
  270. @Jack D

    “..Rough estimates have the Ukrainians losing one-tenth as many troops and vehicles since Aug. 30.”

    The Russians have also claimed at times to be losing one-tenth as many troops as the Ukrainians. I don’t find a 10-1 ratio believable either way.

    • Agree: ic1000
  271. Alden says:
    @Rob

    Maybe we should all go back to horses mules and donkeys for transportation . Environmental friendly, natural, not so clean though, all that manure.

    I blame environmental lunacy on affirmative action. Deprive intelligent ambitious energetic young White men of careers and jobs; they’ll go out and invent a new way of making a living. If their new careers are destroying modern civilization, so be it.

  272. @Corvinus

    … which demonstrate a clear unbiased approach

    The dishonest Corvinus once again affirming the consequent. Corvinus, the antithesis of Solzhenitsyn, who said:

    Live not by lies.

    to which Corvinus replied

    I cannot but live by lies. My master demands it.

    • Agree: bomag
  273. @Jack D

    It’s possible to economically grow high-value crops like lettuce and herbs indoors under lights in high-rise type greenhouses that could be located in cities.

    As long as you do not mind eating lettuce and herbs which taste like cardboard.

    There is no substitute for growing lettuce and herbs in rich soil basking in the radiance of the unfiltered sun. Tomatoes are surely the ne plus ultra exemplar.

  274. @Alden

    I’m pretty sure Putin just got another face and neck lift. Maybe a chemical peel as well.

    Yea well maybe it will boost his confidence a point so he can get to -4999.

    Want to see a room full of men that look like they got their balls cut off?

    They are actually calling it a war on TV. I guess they forgot that is illegal.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  275. @Thoughts

    Ukraine used to be Russia.

    No, Russia used to be Ukraine.

  276. @I, Libertine

    I’m always relieved to discover that someone whom I agree with on a good number of things I don’t agree with on some smaller number of hings. It means that neither of us have views that are being formed by a common conformist prison of thought.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon, ic1000
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @HammerJack
  277. anon[687] • Disclaimer says:
    @Houston 1992

    Brazil needed Potash (potassium). You need natural deposits of the stuff; it’s not like nitrogen fertilizer which is made with natural gas in a factory.

    Check out production statistics. We don’t produce much of it here in the US, either.

  278. nebulafox says:
    @Anonymous

    I suspect Putin had a deep desire to prove that Russia had the ability to use conventional forces to enact political changes, a la the US. A combination of the success in the Crimea and increasing isolation made him underestimate Western backlash.

    Yes, if Putin really took all gloves short of nukes off, turned Kiev into Dresden, and threw all his forces toward the southwest, he’d “win”, at least against Ukraine alone. But that’s not what he wants. He wants to validate the claims his propaganda makes. And the degree of indigenous Ukrainian resistance, coupled with Russian military that all these decades later is still clearly stuck within sharper constraints than the US or the old Red Army (or at this point, China), is extremely bad for his regime’s image. I doubt that Putin ever believed that he had the Red Army’s ability to project power, but he underestimated just how big the gulf still was.

    He’s 70, and people only report to him what he’s wanted to hear for at least the last five years. It’s not that shocking in hindsight, I suppose.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  279. @Twinkie

    Twinkie wrote to me:

    You have to stop with this cope.

    Twinkie, old buddy, you usually make sense.

    But not this time.

    I merely pointed out that the NYT has become very unreliable — specifically with their lies about the Russian Collusion fraud.

    That is, after all, no longer in dispute.

    I didn’t say anything at all in the comment to which you linked about the recent fighting in the Donbass.

    Twinkie also wrote:

    I am in neither camp on this one (though I very mildly favor Ukraine, only because I dislike adjusting national borders by force of arms).

    Which is why I am opposed to the US Deep State engineering the secession of West Ukraine from the legal government of Ukraine.

    As an ardent secessionist myself, I of course support their right to have seceded: I just do not think the US Deep State should have been involved.

    Of course, far, far worse is the US encouraging the secessionist regime in Kiev to murder people in the Donbass who chose not to join the new regime.

    By any normal interpretation of international law, Russia was not only entitled but actually deserves praise for coming to the aid of the victims in the Donbass.

    Does that mean that Putin acted in the best interests of the Russian people by his heroic defense of the people of the Donbass? I have some real doubts — if I were a Russian citizen, I think I would oppose the aid to the Donbass simply because of the cost to Russia.

    But the US Deep State started this war. Putin will end it.

    Anyway, since you raised these issues, I am addressing them here. But look back at the comment by me that you linked to — that comment only addressed the corruption at the NYT.

  280. nebulafox says:
    @mc23

    I like his analysis, but I completely disagree with the notion that this is a 4D scheme to get us focus more on China. We can’t even keep Huawei out of the White House, making our bills on the topic self-parodying at best, and Intel still will go kicking and screaming despite massive bribes to not build chips in China. How does this stop Chinese investment in a sharply divided Europe?

    Also, it’s hard to overstate just how loathed the American political class is these days, and what that does for mainstream post-Cold War policies as they get ever more elderly. Much of the electorate has seen their lives materially destroyed over the last two years, and current policies coupled with inflation coming directly from this war make recovery impossible for many. Given how ironclad bipartisan consensus has become on Ukraine, that won’t stop the aid, but it will bring foreign interventionism as a whole into political question in the coming decade.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Pixo
    , @Greta Handel
  281. @HA

    HA wrote to Loyalty Over IQ Worship:

    You’re way more than curious about me PhysicistDave.

    Ummm…. HAsbara, little buddy, you were replying to Loyalty Over IQ Worship, not to me.

    HAsbara also wrote:

    “Zank you for ze help, Meester Blinken, but as much as we’d like more HIMARS, we need to prioritize, and what we REALLY need right now is to hire someone — anyone — to counteract the pro-Putin rhetoric of this ‘PhysicistDave’ person on Unz-dot-com. That is really priority #1 for us here in Kyiv, can you maybe help us out?”

    Is that how you Ukrainians really speak??? Not the Ukrainians I’ve known.

    HAsbara also wrote:

    As to my being American, that’s obvious enough from my posting, but unfortunately for you, it is very much beside the point.

    But you are still not actually overtly claiming to be an American, eh?

    If you do, I will post a comment giving an example of where you slipped up that shows you are not an American. Your English is not bad, but you do slip up a lot.

    • Replies: @HA
  282. @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Loyalty Over IQ Worship:

    Of course, that’s the point: Putin won’t call his invasion a war of conquest or even a war: instead, it’s a Special Military Operation. Did Shakespeare have Henry V referring to his invasion of France as a special military operation?

    Gee, Steve, you are stunned, stunned, that a government lies???

    Personally, I am always surprised when a government — any government — tells the truth.

    Of course
    the Russian defense of the victims in the Donbass is, in fact, a war.

    But the “SMO” designation seems aimed at conveying that the Rules of Engagement were more restricted than in true Total War, or at least they were until last weekend when Putin started taking out the infrastructure in regions occupied by the illegal regime in Kiev.

    My guess is that the gloves are off, now, and it is truly morphing into Total War.

    One faint cause for hope: Putin seems to have refrained from taking out the top leadership of the puppet regime in Kiev in the belief that he needs Zelensky and his cronies to sign the surrender.

    Hopefully, he has abandoned that fantasy and will now move to decapitate the puppet regime: he has a better chance of a reasonable negotiated peaces with the Kievan military than with the corrupt civilians, who are just pawns of the US Deep State.

    If the gods are just, Zelensky is not long for this world.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  283. @D. K.

    “Steve Sailer is claiming that only Putin would dare to try to call an active military conflict between sovereign states anything other than a war.”

    No, I’m saying that the concept of war fell in popularity after, roughly, the Great War, so now people are more likely to use euphemisms than in the past, when making war was seen as the chief pastime of kings.

  284. Ralph L says:
    @Alden

    I believe you’re referring to Margaret of Anjou, Henry VI’s wife. Her husband and only son (and her alleged boyfriend Somerset) were killed by the Yorks. M. Beaufort was future Henry VII’s mother at the age of 13. She sucked up at the York court to keep or get back her fortune.

    I imagine the pleb/noble killed ratio was much higher in the English defeats of the late Hundred Years War than the Wars of the Roses, when the stakes for landowners were much higher.

  285. @Art Deco

    I didn’t know until a few years ago that the U.S. was worried before June 1950 about South Korea starting a war with North Korea. The guy the US had put in charge of South Korea in 1945 was a hothead.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @bomag
  286. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:

    In recent generations, the payoff from militarily subjugating foreign lands has been typically less than the cost.

    What is the payoff from demographically subjugating foreign lands?

    Steve thinks he is oh so clever but the only difference between one conquest and another is whether the natives fight back.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  287. Art Deco says:
    @Verymuchalive

    About 25 % of Ukraine’s population are ethnic Russians.

    About 17% prior to the Crimea being nicked. Bit less afterward.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  288. @Rob

    “People will want to charge their cars at night.”

    I kind of think that to make electric cars really work, even in Southern California, you’ll need a battery that lets them recharge in an hour or two around noon when solar power is producing a lot of cheap electricity without too much demand yet for air conditioning. And then you’ll need to have chargers at workplace parking lots, which is a lot of new infrastructure. I gather they are working on that kind of a battery, but who knows if its feasible.

  289. @Steve Sailer

    And/or solar panels on the cars’ roofs, hoods, etc.

    No one can spend time in socal without noticing how many vehicles are stored under car covers, every day, to protect them from the sun. Even while people are at work—you see the covers on cars in office parking lots.

    That’s a lot of radiation going to waste. Which is (coincidentally enough) what I said during Madeleine Albright’s cancer treatments.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  290. Art Deco says:
    @Verymuchalive

    the ethnic Russians of Crimea ( more than 80% of the province ) expelled the Ukrainian military garrison without a single death and voted in a referendum to rejoin Russia.

    They did nothing of the kind. Putin sent troops out of uniform. He wasn’t confident that there would be sufficient enthusiasm for the idea among the ethnic Russians in the province (given that non-Russians were 40% of the total) that he stuffed the ballot boxes.

    Russian soldiers would feel much at home in the Donbas and South Ukraine precisely because it is so Russian.

    About 38% of the population of the Donetsk and Lukhansk oblasts identified themselves as Great Russians in survey research conducted prior to 2014. In the regions of Kherson and Mykolaiv, the share was 14%.

    Also, in the Donbas itself, the vast majority of the infantry fighting is being conducted by soldiers of the Donbas militias.

    Buy my bridge.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  291. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:

    Age of conquest bigger than ever.

    London is now 60% non-British, and Ireland will vanish.

    Say goodbye to France and much of the sterile modern world.

    No need to militarily conquer. Just cross the southern border in the US and be welcomed by the government. Or just fly to Europe or Japan and stay. Globalists rule and won’t take tough measures to send you back.

  292. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Synghman Rhee was in charge from 1948, not 1945. He had a long history in dissident politics in Korea. The man was, in 1948, 73 years old.

  293. LOL:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/14/us/desantis-florida-migrants-marthas-vineyard.html

    Florida Flies 2 Planeloads of Migrants to Martha’s Vineyard

    The moneyed summer resort became an unlikely arena in the fight over illegal immigration. Republican states have bused thousands of migrants to New York and Washington.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/14/nyregion/homeless-shelters-nyc-adams.html

    Adams Wants to Reassess a Shelter System ‘Nearing Its Breaking Point’

    New York City’s homeless system is built around the city’s unique right to shelter. On Wednesday, Mayor Eric Adams said the system should be reconsidered.

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    , @Mike Tre
  294. Rob says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The population of Americans is shrinking. The number of people with US citizenship keeps climbing.

    Immigration is caused by a lack of emigration, in a way. In a pre-1914 world, the clamor for American guidance would be various Mexican stationary bandits inviting Americans in to help them govern.

    There are tons of Mexicans who want to live with Americans making the big decisions. There’s no real reason Americans couldn’t colonize the country.

    Sometimes I wonder if the biggest problem in the third world is just that the local elites are terrible, small-minded, and not afraid of being swept away by better elites, so they never let up on draining the economic life out of their peons. “Invest in my country? America’s markets offer such fantastic returns!”

  295. @PhysicistDave

    I heard that the attacks on the infrastructure in Ukraine were due to Putin’s Parkinson s-cancer-induced roid rage. You might think the temperate way the war has been waged indicates against roid rage, but don’t let your lying eyes deceive you. This war committing Russia’s armed forces to attack the nation of Ukraine on all fronts is Putin’s last hurrah. He’ll dead and then deposed any day. The refusal to mobilize troops or declare war in re sponse to the Kharkiv offensive is just ruse disguising his desire to re-build the Soviet Union and the Russian Empire. The fact that he grabbed hold of a table in one meeting is proof–proof–of his Parkinsons-cancer-roid rage.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  296. I got a tip from an anonymous source in the Kremlin..

    Since the Russian troops weren’t willing to stand and fight, allowing the Ukrainians to take back Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, Putin is finally going to resort to the chemical weapons Biden warned us about. Expect the Russians to fire exactly 2 shells containing chlorine gas on a non-consequential target. This is the Russian-Syrian way of war!!

  297. Graham says:
    @Jack D

    Why can’t you grow grain indoors?

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    , @Jack D
  298. AKAHorace says:
    @Graham

    Why can’t you grow grain indoors?

    You can but not cheaply. Indoor agriculture works with high value crops such as vegetables.

  299. @Anonymous

    Steve thinks he is oh so clever but the only difference between one conquest and another is whether the natives fight back.

    Russia should have hired our MSM to saturate the Ukrainian airwaves with Diversity agitprop to the effect that Russian soldiers are not invading; they’re just migrating because They Want A Better Life and our job is to Welcome the Stranger.

    (They) can even claim that Jesus Christ would approve. And that anyone who dares object to his country being overrun is obviously a Racist Deplorable who doesn’t deserve to live.

    Why stop there? Ukraine is historically a Nation of Immigrants and all patriots must stand up and loudly proclaim that the invaders are better than the so-called natives. Loudly, because Ukraine Silence is Violence.

  300. @Corvinus

    My pal Benito Corvinus wrote to YetAnotherAnon:

    There’s a number of stories in [the NYT], as well as other outlets, that have facts and figures and dates and quotations which demonstrate a clear unbiased approach.

    Ummm. Benito, you do know that no one denies that sometimes the NYT prints the truth, right? Like when they claimed that Elizabeth II died?

    But the same was true of Pravda under the Soviets, the Völkischer Beobachter, the National Enquirer, etc.

    The question is whether the NYT is any more reliable than Pravda, the Völkischer Beobachter, the National Enquirer, etc.

    There is a simple test as to whether you are being honest on this: do you admit that the NYT lied about the Russian Collusion fraud?

    Take care, Benito!

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    , @Corvinus
  301. Jack D says:
    @HammerJack

    Not a big enough area. Even if solar panels were 100% efficient, which they never will be, a car does not have enough surface area to produce the power that it consumes.

    But you could canopy over large parking lots with solar panels and produce a meaningful amount of power as well as shading the cars which would reduce their ac requirements in sunny climates.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  302. @Corvinus

    My little buddy Benito Corvinus wrote to Loyalty Over IQ Worship:

    Mr. Sailer and Mr. Unz link to media stories they use as evidence in support of their worldview. Are they promoting “lies” by extension?

    The legal principle, Benito, is “testimony against interest”: when, say, Pravda admitted that the USSR had a bad grain harvest, that was probably true, because Pravda had a record of avoiding printing negative information about the USSR.

    By the same principle, when the NYT or other Ruling-Class media admit to facts that go against ruling-class interests and the narrative they are trying to support, they are probably telling the truth.

    Similarly, when racist commenters here concede that Tom Sowell or John MvWhorter or Clarence Thomas is a very intelligent, decent guy, that is evidence that these three African-Americans are indeed intelligent, decent guys.

  303. Pixo says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Electric cars despite over \$100 billion in subsidies still aren’t profitable or feasible for mass use. The most basic subsidy is that gas is heavily taxed, marked up by about 75% in California and even higher in Europe and Japan, while electricity is taxed more lightly.

    On top of this, there are tax credits for buying the electric car, for the car factory, for the charging station, and for the battery factory. And then there’s special parking spaces, free charging in some places, and carpool lane stickers for non carpool electric cars that would be worth thousands per year.

    All this and electric cars still aren’t competitive. And they aren’t particularly good for the environment either. Less urban air pollution is good, though tire wear pollution is still bad. But production and disposal of gigantic batteries is really nasty, and when they catch on fire (happens a lot), they toxic air pollution is far worse than hundreds of normal cars.

  304. Dumbo says:

    Zelensky was involved in a minor car accident in his return from Izum, and guess who was with him?

    Über-Jew Bernhard Henri-Levi!

    https://www.rt.com/russia/562815-zelensky-kiev-car-crash/

    Why is the Ukraine so important to Jews? Let’s face it, I’m not one who thinks Jews are behind “everything”, but in this war, this is true — it is all about Jews. Do you think the average European would care if the Donbass was Russian or Ukrainian, or even, say, Armenian? And what does it matter to the average American, who is thousands of miles away? It’s exclusively powerful Jews who are pushing for all this and elevating Zelensky into some sort of Churchill and the Ukrainians into “300 Spartans”.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  305. @Art Deco

    The only census in Ukraine held since independence was in 2001. No census has been held thereafter. The actual numbers of ethnic Russians has been a matter of dispute ever since, and it is claimed that the number is much higher than the official figures. I think this highly likely, as many post-Soviet states have falsified data to make it appear that the numbers of ethnic Russians in their states are considerably lower than they actually are . The most notable example of this is Kazakhstan, but even Belarus has done this. In the latter case, the actual percentage of ethnic Russians is widely regarded as being up to twice the official claim of 7.5%.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  306. Pixo says:
    @nebulafox

    “ Much of the electorate has seen their lives materially destroyed over the last two years,”

    Absurd, numerically and economically illiterate balderdash.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  307. @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous, ridiculing the ruling-class media reports on Putin wrote to me:

    I heard that the attacks on the infrastructure in Ukraine were due to Putin’s Parkinson s-cancer-induced roid rage.

    Yeah, one of the reasons we know that the US Deep State and its puppets in Kiev are in trouble is that they keep manufacturing silly narratives like this.

    The Russian MoD tends not to do this: the MoD reports are, no doubt, not always accurate (“fog of war,” confirmation bias, etc), but they do not seem addicted to patently false middle-school insult games.

    I myself predicted that Putin would be going after infrastructure as a matter of simple strategic logic just about the time that he was doing it (I was not aware that it was then in progress):

    One key point to keep in mind: modern infrastructure — especially electric power plants and water and sewage treatment plants, but also bridges — are very much “soft targets” given modern weaponry.

    Putin has not — yet — made a systematic effort to take that out across Ukraine.

    But he can.

    He can turn Kiev, Lvov, Odessa, etc. into bigger shitholes even than Jackson, Mississippi.

    The Kremlin still has a lot of cards to play that they have not yet laid on the table.

    I suspect that the MoD had been urging Putin to do this for some time.

    And now he has upped his game.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  308. @AKAHorace

    “It is weird realizing that a lot of the people whose comments I have enjoyed over the years are such unbalanced fanatics.”

    Yeah “the lion of the blogosphere” was so disturbed when he found out that many of his commenters were kind of nuts that he abandoned his blog.

  309. @John Johnson

    There’s a weird parallax thing going on where the same people who say dissent isn’t allowed in Russia love posting clips from Russian state TV where people criticize the government.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Pixo
  310. Jack D says:
    @Graham

    You can, just not in the quantity needed or at an economical cost. Some vast area of the surface of the earth is covered in grain crops. This far exceeds the building area. Maybe with cheap fusion energy you could build and light the vast structures needed but with present energy sources it would be completely impossible. Grain crops are a type of solar energy.

  311. @PhysicistDave

    There is a simple test as to whether you are being honest on this: do you admit that the NYT lied about the Russian Collusion fraud?

    The test is very simple – do you admit that Trump was colluding and that Barr buried the Mueller report? Anyone who tells you that a) “collusion was a hoax” or b) “Trump actually won the election” is either very stupid or mendacious.

    It is true that the left (the NYT less than most media) often mischaracterized Trump’s collusion as if he were an actual spy, and spread salacious rumors that were certainly not true. The truth is pretty banal – Trump has had close friendly contacts with Russian organized crime figures in NYC since the 1980s. Knowing Trump, it is not surprising he would turn to Russian crime figures for help winning an election, which he did. Say what you want, but the cooperation he asked for certainly rose to the level of “collusion.”

    The media did a horrible and irresponsible job reporting on Trump’s collusion because the media (and most consumers of media) find everyday corruption and illegality boring. They focus on nonsense like stories about women peeing on beds and Russian brainwashing. The media has been Trump’s lapdog for the past 6 years (really the past 40). He knows how to manipulate media figures into focusing on surface nonsense and ignoring substance and he does an excellent job.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @PhysicistDave
    , @Ralph L
  312. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco

    Thanks for the random insult. You should consult with Mr. Anon first, though, so as not to duplicate effort.

    My insults are never random. They are earned.

  313. Pixo says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I generally agree. However, the Russians got uppity by rejecting our beneficent hegemony and instead allied with anti-American regimes like Venezuela and Bolivia, and more generally became the primary source of anti-American propaganda in the third world. That won’t do.

    Every single article from “Pepe Escobar” and “The Saker” and all the other Putinist stooges about how awesome Russia’s silly new supersuper missile or jet fighter is, leaving American in the dust, and how the dollar was going to crash… they made me eager to see Putin’s mongoloid empire knocked down a few pegs.

    Russians also provide a safe haven for ransomware hackers and spammers, though so does Ukraine, a reason to dislike them both.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  314. @siberiancat

    “They are perfectly capable of firing from the port.”

    But they probably aren’t able to most of the time. The crew is off on leave or maintenance is being done and the missiles are inoperable. Also they are vulnerable to a first strike in port. Boomers are supposed to spend their time hiding out somewhere under the ocean.

  315. Mr. Anon says:

    Ooooooh, you have angered commenter Art Deco – aka, Conan the Librarian.

    Be afeared, mortal.

    • LOL: Hunsdon
  316. @Alden

    Reality check; the only victors of WW2 who benefited were the Russians.

    Debatable. On the one hand the USSR acquired satellite states with a lot of infrastructure and educated populations – Czechia, East Germany and Poland were nice assets. But the rest of the Empire was mostly poor and illiterate and had to be subsidized at the expense of Russians. Ordinary Russians also saw their quality of life drop dramatically due to rationing and shortages – life in 1940 was materially much better than in 1950 or even 1955 for anyone not in the Gulag. 27 million dead, mostly productive men, takes a huge toll on any society and the Germans disrupted the richest agricultural land in the USSR – Ukraine and Belarus. The war created huge economic dislocations, and of course Soviet industry was inefficient and clumsy and had a much harder time retooling for consumer production than in the West.

  317. @Art Deco

    Art Deco:
    He wasn’t confident that there would be sufficient enthusiasm for the idea among the ethnic Russians in the province (given that non-Russians were 40% of the total) that he stuffed the ballot boxes.

    Even the corrupt 2001 census claimed that ethnic Russians comprised 65% of the population, so the actual percentage would have been much higher. The fact of the matter is that the Ukrainian military garrison were expelled without loss of life – probably the first such instance in Europe since the Belgian Revolution of 1830. There has been no serious attempt by the Ukrainians to challenge this then or since, because the reunification obviously enjoys the support of the overwhelming majority of the Crimean population.

    Art Deco:
    About 38% of the population of the Donetsk and Lukhansk oblasts identified themselves as Great Russians in survey research conducted prior to 2014. In the regions of Kherson and Mykolaiv, the share was 14%.

    No references given, so very likely to be Ukrainian propaganda claims.

    Art Deco:
    Also, in the Donbas itself, the vast majority of the infantry fighting is being conducted by soldiers of the Donbas militias.
    Buy my bridge.

    Andrei Martyanov and other experienced military analysts put the number of regular Russian troops in The Ukraine at 80,000 . The majority of the Russian regulars are in Kherson and Zaporizhzhia Oblasts, not in the Donbas. Add on the Wagner Group and the Chechens and you’ve got maybe 90,000. The size of the Donbas Militias in February was 100,000 – regulars and reservists. Since then, the Militias have raised a 3rd Army Group of 30,000, which is coming into combat at the present time.

    Mr Martyanov is an experienced military analyst and his views are supported by other respected figures. It is noticeable that no Western Government organisation has made any claims about the numbers of Russian military in Ukraine, except for the British MOD and its ludicrous claim of half the Russian miltary ( 500,000 ) involved. Mr Martyanov is very much nearer the truth.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  318. Alden says:
    @Mike Tre

    Hispanics have replaced the blacks in Los Angeles, especially in government jobs. It’s so wonderful to deal with competent polite Hispanics than totally incompetent surly nasty blacks.

    They have really improved the city.

    So how about Chicago? Do White Chicagoans prefer Hispanics or blacks? I know it would be better if there were none of either. But realistically Hispanics are far preferable to blacks.

  319. Pixo says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    “ the same people who say dissent isn’t allowed in Russia”

    Oh those people who say such things!

    How about you, Dave Pinsen, what do you say? Is dissent allowed in Russia to a greater or lesser extent than the United States?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  320. @Anonymous

    Thank you. I wish more people posted pertinent information rather than just trash talk.

  321. Alden says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Are you a Rachel Maddow fan? Watch MSNBC read the NYTimes and Washington Post daily? Believe every falsehood and lie?

    Colluding, what exactly was colluded? How was the colluding colluded? How does a person collude?

    Like Biden didn’t collude with every black mayor city council critter and black staffed county election commission in the country to get elected. Most county election commissions in the big cities in the big states that have the majority of electors are affirmative action blacks mostly women. The county election commissions are the authorities that count and report the votes. And carefully don’t notice the precincts in which 120 percent of the registered voters voted.

    And here I thought you made knowledgeable comments.

  322. @ValeryKarpin

    Hey Steve, is there a reason you took well over 24 Hours, I think actually about 48 Hours, for you to approve my comment? I know you’re for the Ukranians and against the Russians, and annoyed that so many of your commenters rightfully support the Russians, but this is truly a new low. I also commented before about 300 others who you approved before mine despite the fact that I commented before them.

    I deserve to have a reason for why you approved literally hundreds of comments, over 300, before you approved mine, despite the fact that my comment was one of the very first 25 on this post and made before 300 others, yet you skipped it over 300 times before posting it. Is it because of my Russian name, Valery, or pro-Russian viewpoint? Presumably both?

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
  323. @Art Deco

    The courts tend to be shy about interfering with military affairs.

  324. @Peter Akuleyev

    Peter Akuleyev wrote to me:

    [Dave] There is a simple test as to whether you are being honest on this: do you admit that the NYT lied about the Russian Collusion fraud?

    [PA} The test is very simple – do you admit that Trump was colluding and that Barr buried the Mueller report? Anyone who tells you that a) “collusion was a hoax” or b) “Trump actually won the election” is either very stupid or mendacious.

    Well, Peter, thanks for taking my test.

    I think you can guess what grade I give you.

    I do not think that debating the issue with someone of your impressive level of intelligence is worthwhile.

    I will just let everyone form their own conclusions.

    But I hope you do not mind if I frequently link back to your comment to remind everyone here of your level of intellectual functioning.

    Did you say a while back that you were in high school?

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  325. @Pixo

    Pixo asked Dave Pinsen:

    [Dave] “ the same people who say dissent isn’t allowed in Russia”

    [Pixo] How about you, Dave Pinsen, what do you say? Is dissent allowed in Russia to a greater or lesser extent than the United States?

    The Fascist Bureau of Intimidation just seized Mike Lindell’s (the MyPillow guy’s) smart phone because… Lindell claims the 2020 election was a fraud.

    Which of course it was (whoops — now is the Fascist Bureau of Intimidation going to pay me a visit?).

    It is now a crime in the US, it seems, to tell the truth about an illegal* election.

    We live in a dictatorship.
    —————
    *Read Article II, Section 1.

  326. @ic1000

    “Pro-Russians say that Ukrainian killed/wounded in the Kherson and Kharkov campaigns are heavy, an intolerable pace over the long term. True?”

    That’s a big question. We get lousy coverage of Ukrainian losses by the Western press.

  327. @Verymuchalive

    Pepe Escobar has an interesting post up at the Saker’s blog discussing the recent actions near Kharkov.

    Let me make clear: I don’t think it is generally possible in the middle of a war to judge the importance of one particular skirmish.

    I do know that guys like Sailer who focus on the give-and-take of territory have zero understanding of military history: you win a war by causing enemy forces to be unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    And I also know that Escobar knows enormously more about that part of the world than Sailer or anyone commenting here, including me.

    Escobar’s key takeaway points:

    All hell broke loose – virtually – on why Kharkov happened. The people’s republics and Russia never had enough men to defend a 1,000 km-long frontline. NATO’s entire intel capabilities noticed – and profited from it.

    There were no Russian Armed Forces in those settlements: only Rosgvardia, and these are not trained to fight military forces. Kiev attacked with an advantage of around 5 to 1. The allied forces retreated to avoid encirclement. There are no Russian troop losses because there were no Russian troops in the region.

    Arguably this may have been a one-off. The NATO-run Kiev forces simply can’t do a replay anywhere in Donbass, or in Kherson, or in Mariupol. These are all protected by strong, regular Russian Army units.

    It’s practically a given that if the Ukrainians remain around Kharkov and Izyum they will be pulverized by massive Russian artillery. Military analyst Konstantin Sivkov maintains that, “most combat-ready formations of the Armed Forces of Ukraine are now being grounded (…) we managed to lure them into the open and are now systematically destroying them.”

    [MORE]
    His speculations on the future:

    Yet Kharkov may have forced Moscow’s hand to increase the pain dial. That came via a few well-placed Mr. Khinzals leaving the Black Sea and the Caspian to present their business cards to the largest thermal power plants in northeast and central Ukraine (most of the energy infrastructure is in the southeast).

    Half of Ukraine suddenly lost power and water. Trains came to a halt. If Moscow decides to take out all major Ukraine substations at once, all it takes is a few missiles to totally smash the Ukrainian energy grid – adding a new meaning to “decommunization”: de-energization.

    According to an expert analysis, “if transformers of 110-330 kV are damaged, then it will almost never be possible to put it into operation (…) And if this happens at least at 5 substations at the same time, then everything is kaput. Stone age forever.”

    Russian government official Marat Bashirov was way more colorful: “Ukraine is being plunged into the 19th century. If there is no energy system, there will be no Ukrainian army. The matter of fact is that General Volt came to the war, followed by General Moroz (“frost”).

    And that’s how we might be finally entering “real war” territory – as in Putin’s notorious quip that “we haven’t even started anything yet.”

    And the broader geopolitical context:

    This is an existential war. A do or die affair. The American geopolitical /geoeconomic goal, to put it bluntly, is to destroy Russian unity, impose regime change and plunder all those immense natural resources. Ukrainians are nothing but cannon fodder: in a sort of twisted History remake, the modern equivalents of the pyramid of skulls Timur cemented into 120 towers when he razed Baghdad in 1401.

  328. @Twinkie

    The Ukrainian offensive mostly serves as _proof of concept_ that the Ukrainians can successfully go on the offensive. Until last weekend, we didn’t have positive evidence that they even could.

  329. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Hey, the people of the Golan Heights voted or something for annexation by Israel, quickly approved by supremely neutral observers like the US.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  330. @Pixo

    Pixo wrote to Jenner Ickham Errican:

    However, the Russians got uppity by rejecting our beneficent hegemony and instead allied with anti-American regimes like Venezuela and Bolivia, and more generally became the primary source of anti-American propaganda in the third world. That won’t do.

    No, no, it won’t do at all.

    Because our “hegemony” is “beneficent” — even when we kill millions of innocent civilians from Iraq to Serbia to Sudan to Afghanistan… shout it out loud and long: Our hegemony is beneficent!

    Bow down before our “beneficent hegemony,” ye lesser breeds outside the Hegemon.

    Or else.

    “War is peace.

    “Freedom is slavery.

    “Ignorance is strength.”

  331. @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad wrote to ic1000:

    PhysDave–not an idiot–told me “nukes don’t matter”

    You are a pathological liar.

    What I wrote was:

    In any case, as I am sure you know, nukes don’t matter.

    Not when both sides have nukes: Mutual Assured Destruction works.

    The qualification “not when both sides have nukes” was clearly central to my point. If I have nukes and you don’t, yeah, nukes matter. But if both sides have nukes, then they deter each other (MAD), and it becomes a conventional conflict. In that event nukes don’t matter: that has at least been the situation for the last seven decades.

    You may disagree with that, though it is backed up by seven decades of experience, but leaving out the obvious qualification that was central to my point was dishonest.

    Leaving that out was the same as someone quoting you but leaving out the word “not” if you were to say, “I am not a Communist”: e.g., AnotherDad said, “I am… a Communist.”

    You are so wrapped up in defending the Deep State, that you are reduced to lying through your teeth.

  332. @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Twinkie:

    The Ukrainian offensive mostly serves as _proof of concept_ that the Ukrainians can successfully go on the offensive. Until last weekend, we didn’t have positive evidence that they even could.

    Wars are often lost by going “on the offensive.”

    It is not clear what the casualties were on either side: for all any of us know right now, this could have been the key disaster in the war for the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Or not. We just don’t know.

    Steve, you really need to learn some military history!

  333. @Anon

    As I’ve mentioned, the Trump-Kushner initiatives in favor of Israeli expansionism tended to break the embargo against other countries recognizing countries’ claims to have permanently grown larger by force. E.g., Morocco signed on to the Abraham Accords in return for the US recognizing its 1970s conquest of Western Sahara.

    That’s one of several reasons why Israel has been pretty quiet on the topic of the Russia-Ukraine war. If Russia annexes chunks of Ukraine, that helps validate Israel’s annexation of the Golan Heights and potential annexation of parts of the West Bank.

  334. @Twinkie

    Forget looting and rape and strutting around as winners, drinking champagne at cafes, this is how would-be conquerors are perceived today, either as barbarous baby-killing monsters or ridiculous, emasculated young men being chased out by the elderly:

    Not in Africa. And not of Africans in Europe or America. Unfortunately, old-fashioned mores of conquest still apply in some cases.

  335. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    “Which is worse, a population being bombed out of existence or being deliberately “replaced” over a period of time? Should a nation risk bloodshed defending itself or allow a bloodless replacement of its people by “peaceful” means?”

    This is a point I keep on about. With all the damage and innocent lives lost to Germany and Russia over the last 200 years, let alone the boundary going to and fro, Poland is still Polish. Similarly, when this is resolved (assuming Ukraine loses – see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacres_of_Poles_in_Volhynia_and_Eastern_Galicia
    for the fate of the Donbass Russians otherwise)

    there will still be Ukrainians in Ukraine.

    But Poland, for example, is well on the way to being conquered by GAE. When you think that (formerly) mighty Britain is pretty much defeated on all fronts, which is why a million immigrant visas were issued by Boris last year, what chance does Poland stand long term? Ireland, famously feisty, collapsed in no time at all.

  336. @Rob

    “I’m pretty sure all you need is water, air, and heat as ingredients. “

    Gas is best for Haber-Bosch. But there are new developments where there’s a surplus of power, like Iceland. Ironic that they and Norway will be the warmest this winter.

    https://www.icelandreview.com/news/giant-fertilizer-factory-proposed-south-iceland/

    https://atmonia.com/

    Based in Reykjavík, Iceland, Atmonia is at the forefront of electrochemistry for the sustainable reduction of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Our patented catalyst are currently being scaled up for industrial production of ammonia appropriate for use both directly in agriculture and as a new fuel source in global shipping.

  337. @nebulafox

    […] but it will bring foreign interventionism as a whole into political question in the coming decade.

    Not on the Exceptional! television sets, throttled social media, and birdcage newspapers most Americans will still comfortingly rely on.

    I hope that I’m wrong about that, but after several years it’s still apparent in my personal experience that TUR readers are here because we’re freaks. The 21st Century USA is and will remain for at least the next decade the most relentlessly, comprehensively, and effectively brainwashed society in human history.

    If you don’t support what your country’s become … well, quit supporting what it’s become. No Establishment institution — including Red+Blue politics — can be used against it. That’s why those institutions exist, to channel and harmlessly blow off dissent. No important “political question” is propounded — the topic of “foreign policy” was explicitly excluded from the 2020 Presidential “debates.”

    But the liars need our eyes and ears. So walk away from the channels of propaganda, and take every opportunity to constructively let friends, family, and acquaintances know that you’ve done so. Not “after the playoffs” — now. Abstain. Boycott. Withhold your time and dime.

    And refocus on the real people in your life. Some are already open to hearing us point out the lies when opportune in a non-confrontational way. But any change will be through passive attrition.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  338. @Steve Sailer

    Tesla has apparently done the legal and software steps to create a “distributed” utility company that buys and sells the energy stored in car and home batteries back to the grid. Thus making money by automatically “buying low and selling high” depending on fluctuating electricity rates. The strategic buying and selling to/from the collective energy storage of Tesla vehicles, powerwalls, and home solar would also tend to smooth out demands for energy generation. https://www.tesla.com/support/energy/tesla-software/autobidder

    • Replies: @David Davenport
  339. JackOH says:
    @Steve Sailer

    EV quick-recharge stations drain a great amount of energy.

    So I sleepily heard from a witness at an Ohio General Assembly committee hearing a few weeks ago. I was sort of half-asleep, didn’t think at all about it. It was in the context of the regulatory environment for existing power plants and new power plant construction in Ohio.

    I know little of the subject, but so far I’m just seeing a swapping-out of risk-reward/cost-benefit and all that economics stuff. Is Middle Eastern oil more or less politically reliable than lithium mined in or controlled by the People’s Republic of China? That sort of deal.

  340. Hunsdon says:
    @John Johnson

    Gold horde? I’d like to think that’s like a meta joke about the Tatarskoe igo, but it’s probably just illiteracy among the Forbes staff.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  341. Anon[184] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob

    There’s also the matter that going to a zero-carbon economy is not enough. We have to pull carbon out of the air.

    Or we could just reduce population growth in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. But nobody wants to talk about that. Not even Steve.

  342. anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    As I’ve mentioned, the Trump-Kushner initiatives in favor of Israeli expansionism tended to break the embargo against other countries recognizing countries’ claims to have permanently grown larger by force.

    The jews somehow receive a pass on all things. Theft of others’ land, mutilation of children’s genitals, ethnic nationalism, amalgamation of church and state, nuclear weapons, segregation, slave trading.

    If Russia annexes chunks of Ukraine, that helps validate Israel’s annexation of the Golan Heights and potential annexation of parts of the West Bank.

    Israel has already annexed the West Bank. All of it.

  343. Anon[426] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    But European leaders have been ridiculously cavalier about their energy situation and allowing themselves to be dependent upon an unreliable, potentially unfriendly supplier–Russia.

    Uhhh, Russia is in fact friendly and reliable. This is a self-inflicted wound by “European leaders.”

  344. @ValeryKarpin

    This will almost certainly go ignored.

    But take your Whimming as a compliment — upthread blueberry is the contrarian gold box.

  345. Ralph L says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I’ve yet to see a plausible explanation of what the Russian govt could have done for Trump’s election that he couldn’t do himself. Do they do better voter polling?

    • Replies: @Coemgen
  346. nebulafox says:
    @Steve Sailer

    You can see an even more important analogue with Taiwan, which unlike the others, is legally regarded by Beijing as a renegade province.

    (One relatively little noted factor compared to Iran or Israeli expansionism is the fact that Israeli domestic politics matters, too. They’ve got more Russian speakers than any country outside the former Soviet Union.)

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Sean
  347. Jack D says:
    @PhysicistDave

    The Ukrainians restored power within hours.

    Lashing out by destroying civilian infrastructure is not going to change the outcome of this battle or the greater war. It’s just going to make the fraternal people of Ukraine hate Russia even more, if that is even possible. Are they only going to black out the homes of Banderites and Nazis or are the innocent Russian speakers that Russia supposedly came to protect also going to sit in the dark?

    The Ukrainians in Izyum are not going to be “pulverized by artillery” except in fantasy. The Russian forces are not even in artillery range anymore. It’s going to be difficult for the Russians to bring up reserves (which they don’t even have anymore) now that their lines have been cut. If they swim them across the river in Kherson then they are just going to be left more vulnerable over there.

    It’s hilarious that “pulverizing by artillery” is the proposed Russian solution – it epitomizes the Russian approach to every problem.

    This is all just Russian copium to a battlefield loss – anger, denial, etc. – all the stages of grief. I think it’s been 72 hours now and no “bad thing” has happened because the Russians are starting to run out of options, even ineffectual lashing out in anger type options.

    Russia will continue to exist. It is however probably an existential war for Putin. Putin is not Russia. For regime supporters to worry about plundering of resources is laughable – Putin’s guys have been doing that for 20 years. All the vast Russian wealth that is now stashed in London, etc. is the product of plundering of Russian wealth by his guys.

  348. Art Deco says:
    @Verymuchalive

    I think this highly likely, as many post-Soviet states have falsified data to make it appear that the numbers of ethnic Russians in their states are considerably lower than they actually are

    You can make up other numbers if it helps you feel better. Just don’t bother other people with the issue of your imagination.

    The Ukraine has held a series of competitive elections since 2014. The results indicated that the Russophile parties lost over half of the electoral base they had in 2010. Survey research undertaken over the years indicates about 4% of the population favors annexation by Russia. Even if they were all located in Donetsk and Lukhansk, that would not add up to a majority of the population there. I don’t think the current misery in the Ukraine has improved the standing of the Russophile politicians and their program.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  349. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    Estimates of the population of England between 1300 and 1530 place it as varying between 2 million 6 million, with the nadir around 1400.

    https://localhistories.org/a-history-of-the-population-of-england/

    See Barbara Tuchman on what surviving documents like paymaster’s records indicate about the size of medieval militaries.

  350. Art Deco says:
    @nebulafox

    Israel relinquished territory in 1979-82, in 1993-2000, and in 2005. Beginning in 1978, it occupied portions of Lebanon at a time when Lebanon was a patchwork of gang territories; all such portions were relinquished in 1985. They’re kind of unclear on the concept of ‘expansionism’. Syria has never been willing to bargain over the Golan Heights and Israel has now held them for longer than the various Arab authorities did, so there isn’t much point in returning them. (The residual Arab population is largely Druze).

  351. Sean says:
    @nebulafox

    That cuts both ways.

    Helen Andrews Retweeted
    Dimitri Alexander Simes
    @DimitriASimes
    ·
    1h
    “The Chinese leadership still regards Russia as a critical partner,”
    @zx999
    said. “Partially this attitude is driven by a concern that if Russia is crushed, then China could find itself alone against the West.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  352. Jack D says:
    @Sean

    But not so critical that they will lift a finger to actually help them. At least so far.

    Unless you count buying oil at a steep discount. Even Putin mentioned what a hard bargain his Chinese “friends” have been driving.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @Sean
  353. @Rob

    I’m pretty sure all you need is water, air, and heat as ingredients.

    Heat, a lot of heat. The energy efficiency of Haber-Bosch (burning kWh to create calories) is very low, sub-1%.¹ Not all of that loss is Haber-Bosch’s fault. H-B gives you ammonia, which you still have to put on crops and grow them, which is also inefficient. Most of that ammonia nitrogen doesn’t actually make it into the crops.² It just washes off and poisons water supplies, creates algae blooms, dead zones, etc.

    Other fun Haber-Bosch facts:

    • Without Haber-Bosch, the world would need about four times more farmland.³

    • About half of the nitrogen in the human body today comes from Haber-Bosch.⁴

    Has Germany decided to re-open the closed nuclear plants, or is that just not realistic?

    It’s highly realistic. Unfortunately, Germans are idealists, not realists. So they’re reopening a few coal plants instead. It probably won’t be enough.

    If we are really going to an electric vehicle future, don’t we need to build a lot of capacity?

    Yes, trillions of dollars worth. And that is without changing the energy mix, which to this day is still overwhelmingly from fossil fuels.⁵ If you want “green” electricity for an all-electric future (which is what what people often mean without saying it) the price is will be much, much higher: basically rebuilding the entire global energy structure from scratch, which is only about one step removed from rebuilding all civilization from scratch. But a lot of green energy promoters probably consider that a good thing. I might too, actually, but for different reasons. It all depends how it’s rebuilt.

    There’s also the matter that going to a zero-carbon economy is not enough. We have to pull carbon out of the air.

    Religious debates are always touchy, but consider that carbon dioxide is only 3.6% of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, and man-made carbon dioxide is less than 0.1% of it.⁶ (Water vapor is 95% of greenhouse gas.⁷ Do we need a War on Water Vapor?)

    You could also consider that according to Greenland ice cores, in the history of civilization, where 0 is the coldest it’s ever been and 10 is the hottest, we’re currently somewhere between 2 and 6, depending whom you ask.⁸ (Warming periods have tended to coincide with rising civilization and cooling with collapses.)

    ———

    Sources:

    [MORE]

    ¹ 3000 cal/day/person × 365 day/year × 7,000,000,000 people = ~7×10¹⁵ calories/year (not all of which are H-B calories) ÷ H-B @ 2% of global energy = ~3200 TWh = ~3×10¹⁷ calories (https://ourworldindata.org/energy-production-consumption) = ~2% but most nitrogen never makes it into crops.

    ² https://doi.org/10.1016%2Fj.agee.2009.04.025

    ³ http://www.vaclavsmil.com/wp-content/uploads/docs/smil-article-worldagriculture.pdf

    https://cen.acs.org/articles/86/i33/Haber-Bosch-Reaction-Early-Chemical.html.html
    This could imply that half of everyone’s flesh is somehow artificial, which might mean something about global obesity.

    https://ourworldindata.org/energy-mix

    https://shiftfrequency.com/man-made-co2-3-of-3-of-0-1/

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2015/02/08/thanks-to-the-ipcc-the-public-doesnt-know-water-vapor-is-most-important-greenhouse-gas/
    There are convoluted, Occam’s Butterknife-ish “feedback” theories that the 0.1% is somehow driving up the 95%, but unfortunately for those theories, water vapor has been decreasing lately rather than increasing as those theories would require. (https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/03/06/nasa-satellite-data-shows-a-decline-in-water-vapor/)

    https://www.researchgate.net/figure/The-Central-Greenland-Temperature-Change-diagram-GISP2-Alley-2004_fig1_346657437
    https://blog.fathersforlife.org/2018/01/05/roman-warm-period-timeline/

  354. BB753 says:
    @Jack D

    I believe my comment above- which pointed out an obvious error in Steve Sailer’s piece- deserved something better than your russophobic knee-jerk answer.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  355. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    That the modern male is less interested in conquest than his progenitors were seems like a general pattern.

    One would have to be blind or stupid to make a statement like this, given the reality of mass immigration. We are experiencing in the present day the largest invasions, in magnitude and intensity, in world history.

    This is truly the age of conquest.

  356. @Jack D

    For regime supporters to worry about plundering of resources is laughable – Putin’s guys have been doing that for 20 years. All the vast Russian wealth that is now stashed in London, etc. is the product of plundering of Russian wealth by his guys.

    When they talk about plunder, they mean the big man did not get his outsized cut. In reality, foreign companies have been ripped off again and again, both before and during Putin’s reign. They certainly have the tens of billions in loss write-offs to show for. They keep risking large sums of money in Russia because the cognitive dissonance of a majority white country that’s structured like an African kleptocracy keeps tripping them up. Of course, it’s also possible the Russians give the CEO’s the benefit of a reacharound, i.e. they get a large commission on the back end.

  357. @PhysicistDave

    I don’t take Steve seriously as a military commentator, and neither does he. He says provocative things to generate traffic and they do. It generates income for him and I don’t begrudge him any of that.

    As regards Pepe Escobar , he is highly variable in quality. I would recommend The Duran, especially Alexander Mercouris instead. ( Videos on BitChute, YouTube etc ).
    Although, Mr Mercouris says he’s not a military man ( true ! ), he sifts his way through various Western and Russian journals, websites, and bloggers, civilian and military, as well as official Russian and Western diplomatic readouts. I find his understanding of military and economic matters to be superior and much more nuanced than Escobar’s.

    Here’s a video Mr Mercouris made yesterday. The first part deals with the military situation in Ukraine. The second part ( from 27:00 ) deals with the strategy behind the Russian Government’s conduct of the war. I’m sure you will find it very informative.



    Video Link

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  358. @Jack D

    But not so critical that they will lift a finger to actually help them. At least so far.

    Unless you count buying oil at a steep discount. Even Putin mentioned what a hard bargain his Chinese “friends” have been driving.

    Xi Jinping is helping Putin by relieving him of the responsibility of being the big player in Central Asia.

    https://eurasianet.org/china-warns-against-meddling-in-kazakhstan-ahead-of-putin-meeting

    What a guy, that Xi. Generous to a fault, he is.

  359. HA says:
    @PhysicistDave

    “But you are still not actually overtly claiming to be an American, eh? If you do, I will post a comment giving an example of where you slipped up that shows you are not an American. Your English is not bad, but you do slip up a lot.”

    Oh, all right, you got me. It’s time to come clean. No, I’m not an American — in fact, I’m not even from this planet. I’m from Zootron, many light years away, but I use that wormhole near Tallahassee to zip back and forth — it’s about a 10-minute commute.

    And I don’t even care about Ukraine. I was just sent here to mess with your head. That’s right — you, specifically. As for any errors, or reply switch-ups, or all those typos you see in my posts, those are actually added in later by my handlers. Without that, my otherwordly and superhuman rhetorical powers would be too much for your primitive reptilian brain.

    I probably shouldn’t be revealing all this, but whatever. You’re too dumb to believe me, and you’ll just assume I’m trying to put one over on you.

    • LOL: Jack D
  360. @John Johnson

    Either could have been done with a two army attack through Belarus.

    You realize that what your map calls “Belarus” was part of Poland, right? As the legend says about purple shading, “Annexed* by Soviet Union in September 1939”.

    The dark grey lines are the pre-war borders.

    ———

    * “Annexed” is apparently oxyi.org’s euphemism for “conquered, but we don’t mean to criticize”.

  361. @Almost Missouri

    Be fair. Large parts of Poland were German in 1939 – and pretty big chunks of the Baltic States were too.

    Delightful Anna on the Aldi till is from Stettin, previously part of German Pomerania in Prussia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Prussia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_State_of_Prussia

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  362. HA says:
    @PhysicistDave

    “It’s practically a given that if the Ukrainians remain around Kharkov and Izyum they will be pulverized by massive Russian artillery.”

    A significant section of the Russian-stooge blogosphere itself now admits that without discarding this pretense about “special military operation” and significantly boosting the Russian forces, Putin’s SMO is doomed to fail. I.e., they regard Strelkov/Girkin as having been vindicated inhis claims that only a full mobilization would save Donbass.

    They’ve since been quelled, to some extent, by those claiming “akshully, the losses weren’t that big a deal, and we more or less meant to withdraw, anyway, so everything’s still going according to plan”. (or as MoonOfAlabama puts it: “No Big Success – No Large Defeat” — i.e., ’tis but a scratch.) But those dissenters haven’t gone away and they’ll continue to snipe at the true believers from behind. And Putin needs a few of them around to bring home the point that after he gets deposed, the next guy will be even more militant, and hey, when you think about it, NATO needs an intact Russia to continue justifying its existence so they really don’t want us to totally get trounced and fall apart, or whatever, but they’ll be tougher to manage.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @PhysicistDave
  363. Anonymous[158] • Disclaimer says:

    Did PhysicistDave really say he wanted to live in China? He’s very naïve if he thinks that because the US permits Chinese people to rise to high ranks in society, that the Chinese will do likewise to expatriate Americans. On the contrary, the Chinese associate such a thing with colonialism – the bad old days when Brits and other foreigners were in China running the ‘Chinese’ railways, postal service, ports, etc. This is never going to be allowed to happen again.

  364. Anonymous[158] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Just cutesy, girly, rainbows and happy trees nonsense.

    Don’t underestimate the power of wishful thinking. It’s the basis of all religion and much political activism.

  365. @PhysicistDave

    Yeah, one of the reasons we know that the US Deep State and its puppets in Kiev are in trouble is that they keep manufacturing silly narratives like this.

    So politicians normally grip a table during an interview?
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/19660331/putin-grips-desk-amid-rumour-he-has-parkinsons/

    He has Parkinson’s.

    That is why this war happened. He is trying to go down as a conquering Tsar.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Hunsdon
  366. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Perhaps Parkinson’s or a more benign ‘essential tremor’. The positioning of his head is also peculiar.

  367. @Almost Missouri

    Either could have been done with a two army attack through Belarus.

    You realize that what your map calls “Belarus” was part of Poland, right? As the legend says about purple shading, “Annexed* by Soviet Union in September 1939”.

    The dark grey lines are the pre-war borders.

    You realize that Hitler and Stalin split Poland, right? The great anti-Communist split Christian Poland with the worst Communist in the world.

    Annexed by the Soviet Union in September 1939.

    Belarus was an involuntary state of the Soviet Union.

    Instead of splitting Poland and starting a world war Hitler could have attacked the USSR through Belarus.

    He never needed to invade Poland for an access point. That is a lousy excuse repeated by his defenders. In fact a real anti-Communist would have honored the Poles for defending Europe in the Polish-Soviet war.

    Furthermore if invading Poland was about strategic access to the USSR then he wouldn’t have carpet bombed Warsaw or enacted Intelligenzaktion. Hitler wanted to kill Poles just as much as he wanted to kill Communists.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  368. @Hunsdon

    Gold horde? I’d like to think that’s like a meta joke about the Tatarskoe igo, but it’s probably just illiteracy among the Forbes staff.

    Why is that hard to believe? Most countries have some type of precious metals reserve.

    When this war started it was Putin that bragged about having currency reserves.

    Not everything is some mainstream media conspiracy.

    Putin is ridiculously rich and can take any asset of Russia.

    Last year they exported nearly \$50 billion worth of crude
    https://www.rt.com/business/531517-russia-oil-exports-revenues-growth/

    They are an oil and gas rich country with negative population growth. This stupid war was never needed and he could have invested billions into the country instead of killing young Russians and Ukrainians.

    • Agree: Pixo
    • Replies: @Hunsdon
  369. Early in life I had noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper, but in Spain, for the first time, I saw newspaper reports which did not bear any relation to the facts, not even the relationship which is implied in an ordinary lie. I saw great battles reported where there had been no fighting, and complete silence where hundreds of men had been killed. I saw troops who had fought bravely denounced as cowards and traitors, and others who had never seen a shot fired hailed as the heroes of imaginary victories, and I saw newspapers in London retailing these lies and eager intellectuals building emotional superstructures over events that had never happened. I saw, in fact, history being written not in terms of what happened but of what ought to have happened according to various ‘party lines’.

    https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/looking-back-on-the-spanish-war/

  370. bro3886 says:

    Don’t count on it. Once the West goes all bets will be off. Any nation that wants to keep its sovereignty, particularly those around China and Russia, had better develop nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. I suspect that much of Africa will also be a free-for-all. Only the West believes in and enforces concepts like freedom and human rights, though they are dying even there.

  371. @Anonymous

    ‘Yes, out of arrogance or stupidity or whatever, the Russians are fighting this war with one hand behind their backs. They did this to themselves and can undo it as well. I think the problem is just Putin’s pride. He doesn’t want to admit he made a mistake.’

    There’s also the possibility that his ability to marshal what resources Russia can muster is limited.

    People tend to overestimate the power leaders have — even autocratic ones. If Putin’s like most, his power is more a matter of him balancing factions, making tacit deals for what he can get, etc than simply ruling by fiat. I suspect Putin couldn’t call up all able-bodied Russians between eighteen and thirty, etc. He’s got to win the war with what the system gives him.

    He may simply be stuck. He can’t back down, and he can’t assemble greater resources. Meantime, we pump money and resources into the Ukraine — essentially paying its leaders to be intransigent and continue the war.

    It’s all becoming a typical waste. Russia’s not going to lose and neither is the Ukraine. But for too many, peace is not in their interest.

    • Agree: Sam Malone
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  372. @John Johnson

    Germany would have been rich if Hitler stopped at the Munich agreement [1938] or grabbed a few African territories. Or went after the USSR from Prussia and Hungary.

    There was no route into the Soviet Union except through Poland, Roumania, or the Baltic states [in 1938].

    Wrong. … Either could have been done with a two army attack through Belarus.

    You realize that what your map calls “Belarus” was part of Poland [in 1938], right? As the legend says about purple shading, “Annexed by Soviet Union in September 1939”.

    You realize that Hitler and Stalin split Poland, right? … Annexed by the Soviet Union in September 1939. … Instead of splitting Poland and starting a world war Hitler could have attacked the USSR through Belarus.

    Hitler did attack the USSR through Belarus in 1941. He could not have done so at the time of the Munich agreement [1938] as you suggested because there was no route to the USSR then. There was in 1939, but Hitler was simultaneously at war with Britain and France who had declared war on him for invading Poland (but who had somehow forgotten to declare war on the USSR for the same thing). By 1941, France was defeated and Britain was at bay.

    He never needed to invade Poland for an access point. That is a lousy excuse repeated by his defenders. … Hitler wanted to kill Poles just as much as he wanted to kill Communists.

    I sorrow for the Poles as for all the war’s victims. It’s not a defense of Hitler to note that 1939 was after 1938, it’s just a defense of normal chronology.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  373. @Bardon Kaldian

    Other than that, no ethnic referendum happened in modern history.

    Slesvig 1920:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1920_Schleswig_plebiscites

    Silesia, 1920:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Silesia_plebiscite

    East Prussia, 1920:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1920_East_Prussian_plebiscite

    My family is from that part of Slesvig. Luckily, they were in the part that voted for a reunion with Denmark (Prussia and Austria invaded in 1864 to steal Slesvig and Holstein, then they fought each other in 1866 and Prussia got full control of both Slesvig and Holstein.)

    The problem is that the exact rules of the referendum matters. Whoever controls the rules more or less also controls the outcome.

    In the case of Slesvig, Danes who had fled the Prussian oppression could vote but only if they showed up in person, which is a bit hard if you fled to the Americas, which many of them did.
    Moreover, the German colonizers could also vote. That included people who briefly lived in Slesvig as children because their father worked there for the occupation force twenty-thirty-forty years earlier. And taking the train from Germany to vote was pretty easy… The way the borders of the voting zones are drawn is also a place where one can put a thumb on the scale. Gerrymandering is not just for elections…

    The Upper Silesian plebiscite had a majority voting for Germany, but there was a clear geographic divide. Most of Upper Silesia had a huge majority of votes for Germany and the South-Eastern tip had a huge majority for Poland — mostly because that part had been flooded with migrants from Poland proper in the decades leading up to the plebiscite. In this case, too, the migrants/colonizers won.

    East Prussia clearly voted for Germany (and the people there mostly had German as their first language and were Germanized, even if they originally were of Slavic stock).

    There was no plebiscite in West Prussia (except for a little bit that was included in the East Prussian plebiscite). Parts where allowed to remain in Germany and the rest was just transferred to Poland without a vote. It was clearly mostly German in 1910 (when there was a census) so it probably should have remained German.

    There was no plebiscite in Elsaß–Lothringen. The area was overwhelmingly German speaking and of German ethnicity but it may actually have preferred to be French.

    There was no plebiscite in the Sudetenland, because everybody knew they would have voted for being German.
    Before that, there was the short-lived Republic of German-Austria, which didn’t have a plebiscite but it did hold parliamentary elections once, in February 1919.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_German-Austria

    It seems to me the point of all this was to weaken Germany/Austria by giving the juicy bits away under the guise of “Ethnic Self-determination” and “democracy” (plebiscites) while largely denying that self-determination if it would have hindered the weakening goal. And then Germany got most of Slesvig as a consolation prize — and damn the self-determination of myancestors.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  374. @Almost Missouri

    Hitler did attack the USSR through Belarus in 1941.

    Yes and well after invading Poland and starting a world war. That was never needed.

    He could not have done so at the time of the Munich agreement [1938] as you suggested because there was no route to the USSR then.

    I already the posted the map of Germany 1939. Do I need to draw arrows on it for you? Germany included East Prussia at the time which bordered Belarus. The defense of needing to invade Poland is based on a modern map of Germany that doesn’t include Prussia. That was handed to (Soviet occupied) Poland at the end of the war.

    Germany could have invaded Belarus through Prussia and Czechoslovakia AFTER the Munich Agreement but BEFORE his needless invasion of Poland. Breaking the Munich agreement did not start the world war.

    Hitler’s original plan in fact called for one massive army to spearhead towards the Volga. That could have been achieved without invading Poland.

    Hitler chose to gamble that the British wouldn’t back Poland and he lost the bet. He still could have taken his forces back to the German border but instead allowed world war. Destroying Poland was a key part of his plan and he recklessly didn’t care if it meant fighting Britian and France over it.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  375. Pixo says:
    @ic1000

    “ Unless Putin decides otherwise, Ukraine will be largely blacked out and browned out, into the indefinite future.”

    Nope. And if he keeps it up, Belgorod and Rostov on Don infrastructure are close and can be hit by Ukraine. They already blew up gas storage facilities in Belgorod a few months ago. So can the multi-billion dollar bridge to Crimea.

    Russian sanctions are also still way less than possible. You think India will choose Russian over the US/EU if we actually make them choose? We are already tweaking them by upgrading the level of arms we sell Pakistan.

    “ feels like it’s 1913 ”

    WWI involved closely matched alliances. Unless you call willingness to buy Russian oil at a deep discount being “allied” with them, I don’t see the analogy.

    “ an intolerable pace over the long term”

    Even if the pace is “intolerable over the long term” perhaps you noticed Ukraine has has now expelled in 5 days more land than Russia took in the past 5 months? And that Russia has been driven out from more than half their newly occupied territory?

    It is Russia whose losses are unsustainable. They have basically no guided ground strike munitions left, so they switched to firing SAMs on ground targets. They have no modern tanks left, so they are taking ancient T62s out of warehouses.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  376. Anonymous[158] • Disclaimer says:

    Basically Hitler wanted other countries to focus on opposing Communism while he focused on avenging WWI. It worked until people realized what he was up to, and started to play the same game.

    Anglo-French in 1939 – “Hitler has betrayed the anti-Communist cause by attacking Poland in alliance with Russia!”

    Germany in 1943 – “The Anglo-Americans have betrayed the anti-Communist cause by attacking Germany in alliance with Russia!”

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  377. @Steve Sailer

    ‘I kind of think that to make electric cars really work, even in Southern California, you’ll need a battery that lets them recharge in an hour or two around noon when solar power is producing a lot of cheap electricity…‘ nuclear power.

    It makes me want to bang my head against the wall. You want to stop global warming, build nuclear power plants. If you don’t want to build nuclear power plants, you don’t want to stop global warming.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk, ic1000
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  378. Jack D says:
    @HA

    No Big Success – No Large Defeat

    Or in other words, not great, not terrible. Just like Chernobyl:

    This kind of denial is classic Russian cope. I understand what drives Putin to cope, but why would anyone in the West fall for this?

    • LOL: John Johnson
  379. @Pixo

    It is Russia whose losses are unsustainable. They have basically no guided ground strike munitions left, so they switched to firing SAMs on ground targets. They have no modern tanks left, so they are taking ancient T62s out of warehouses.

    Russians are currently scavenging the prisons for men:
    https://www.ibtimes.com/video-shows-putins-chef-recruiting-russian-prisoners-ukraine-war-offers-them-pardon-3612971

    Quite sad that the pro-Putin bloggers are depicting this humiliation as part of the plan.

    Yea just a flesh wound I’m sure. Tis a scratch!

    Unfortunately Putin is a weasel of a man and as such will not admit that he made a mistake. There is a story floating around where Putin lost an arm wrestling match to a very large man and freaked out over it. He demanded a re-match and everyone in the room just rolled their eyes.

    He is a petty little man that was spoiled as an only child. Spoiled children grow up to be spoiled adults that can’t face their limitations.

    Much of his image is myth. He was never head of the KGB or some secret agent. He was a paper pusher for the KGB and his former bosses described his work quality as average.

    There are some interesting bios written by former allies that describe him as a petty brat tyrant that can’t stand losing. A child.

  380. Jack D says:
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Maybe, but why would you put RT and random bloggers AHEAD of Western sources? People here won’t believe the NY Times but they believe “Moon over Alabama”.

  381. @Anonymous

    Basically Hitler wanted other countries to focus on opposing Communism while he focused on avenging WWI. It worked until people realized what he was up to, and started to play the same game.

    Yes when he was kidnapping Aryan looking kids of Polish-Soviet vets it should have been clear that anti-Communism was never a priority. He basically believed those kids were the offspring of Germans and Poles and didn’t want them growing up to be Polish leaders.

    They were drawing up a list of Polish intellectuals to be killed in 1937 and that included anti-Communists:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Prosecution_Book-Poland

    Which makes their fake negotiations with Poland an even bigger joke.

    Hitler was obsessed with Poland. He openly wrote about how Poles were the natural slaves of Germans. So he’ll save you from Communism and then enslave you and take your children if they are Aryan looking. But hey, at least you miserably died looking at the Nazi flag instead of the Soviet.

  382. Jack D says:
    @BB753

    There is no obvious error. LPR/DPR are phony Russian creations and the “local militias” are armed and paid by Russia. They are just cannon fodder taken from a different one of Putin’s pockets – a distinction without a difference. That they were not Russia’s finest is not Ukraine’s problem. Putin only has so many “elite” troops and they can’t be everywhere at all times, especially not since many of the best troops are now pushing up sunflowers.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @John Johnson
  383. BB753 says:
    @Jack D

    Top notch or not, those soldiers are locals and fighting for their land.
    As for cannon-fodder, sadly thousands of overgunned Ukrainian soldiers have to die every week so Zelensky and NATO can do some PR stuff to keep the grift and delay the inevitable defeat.

  384. Sean says:
    @Jack D

    But not so critical that they will lift a finger to actually help them.

    China must hold its ground against US on Russia, not because of any love for Russia but because China leaving Russia to its fate would in effect be China leaving itself without friends when the US used pressure on China at some point in the future. Also China is going through a tough time and that is a bad time to concede anything as it taken by the US as encouragement to press harder.

    Someone said that ‘Taiwan … is legally regarded by Beijing as a renegade province. The US recognizes Beijing as the government of China, but not Taiwan as a sovereign state. The US has no defence treaty with Taiwan; America gave that up when it established relations with China, which was the begining of the end for the USSR, the begining of falling living standards for the US working class.

    The US not putting a reduction of tariffs on the table in recent talks have the effect that, Taipei is being encouraged to think it could formalise its independence and Chinese public opinion (not just Xi’s) disgust at Pelosi’s Senate pleasing statements on and visit to Taiwan mean that the relations between China and America are in free fall. Beijing sees Taiwan as being used as a bulwark of US containment of mainland China along the first island chain in the Western Pacific

    In terms of productive capacity, Biden does not think that China is or could be a competitor, this is the guy from Wilmington, Delaware the corporate headquarters for American big business, so he is articulating the balance of opinion among them, whereby China is thought of as a place enormous profits can be made.

  385. @AKAHorace

    I think I handle disagreement pretty well, I just ignore obvious trolls and those with ancestral ethnic hatred of Russia. Oh, and people who talk of “Putin fanboys” or post videos of soldiers being killed.

    I just think Steve’s wrong on this, probably Gell-Mann amnesia. Just because you can describe something doesn’t make you invulnerable to it.

    I think it’s possible that both he and I were wrong about the mRNA jab, too, but it’s probably too early to tell. I was a big believer because the Israeli government, who care a great deal about their citizens, or at least most of them, were enthusiastic early adopters. It may be that the elevated death rates in the UK are indeed down to lockdown, face to face consultations cancelled, operations delayed etc etc.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-62648951

    The threat from Covid may have receded, but renewed concerns are being raised about the high number of total deaths being recorded.

    Data from the national statisticians for the UK suggests during the past 10 weeks the number has been 12% higher than would have been expected, based on the average for previous years.

    Covid-related deaths are – as they have been for much of the past year – pretty low, accounting for about 4% of deaths in July, making it the sixth-biggest cause of death. So what else could be causing this spike?

  386. Art Deco says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Be fair. Large parts of Poland were German in 1939 – and pretty big chunks of the Baltic States were too.

    By 1931, < 3% of Poland's population spoke German as their 1st language. A decade earlier, ethnic Germans were a majority only in a few islands of territory in the former West Prussia and the former Posnan. Germans were < 3% of the population in the Baltic states ca. 1923.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  387. Coemgen says:
    @Ralph L

    I’ve yet to see a plausible explanation of what the Russian govt could have done for Trump’s election that he couldn’t do himself. Do they do better voter polling?

    It’s all in the “Clapper Report”: https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/ICA_2017_01.pdf

    It’s funny, I live in one of the most “wired” places in the world, Massachusetts. Everybody is on Facebook, etc.

    Somehow, we didn’t get the message (i.e., vote Trump) as all eleven of Massachusetts’ electoral votes went to Hillary in 2016.

    Oh wait, you want a plausible explanation.

    Nevermind.

  388. @Art Deco

    Not sure you got my point, which was that big chunks of “what is now Poland and the Baltics” were both ethnically and de jure German in 1939.

    The Germans were ethnically cleansed at the end of WW2, those who hadn’t fled before the Red Army or been killed already.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_State_of_Prussia#Post-war_dismemberment

    After the Allied occupation of Germany in 1945, the provinces of Prussia were split up into the following territories/German states:

    Ceded to the Soviet Union
    The northern third of East Prussia. Today the Kaliningrad Oblast is a Russian exclave between Lithuania and Poland.

    Ceded to Poland
    Everything east of the Oder–Neisse line plus Stettin. This included most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the portion of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_and_expulsion_of_Germans_(1944%E2%80%931950)

    Between 1944 and 1948, millions of people, including ethnic Germans (Volksdeutsche) and German citizens (Reichsdeutsche), were permanently or temporarily moved from Central and Eastern Europe. By 1950, a total of approximately 12 million[5] Germans had fled or been expelled from east-central Europe into Allied-occupied Germany and Austria. The West German government put the total at 14.6 million,[6] including a million ethnic Germans who had settled in territories conquered by Nazi Germany during World War II, ethnic German migrants to Germany after 1950, and the children born to expelled parents. The largest numbers came from former eastern territories of Germany ceded to the People’s Republic of Poland and the Soviet Union (about seven million),[7][8] and from Czechoslovakia (about three million).

    The death toll attributable to the flight and expulsions is disputed, with estimates ranging from 500,000–600,000[13][14] and up to 2 to 2.5 million.

    Many German civilians were sent to internment and labour camps where they were used as forced labour as part of German reparations to countries in eastern Europe.[20] The major expulsions were complete in 1950.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  389. LoneStar says:

    In addition to being part of Imperial Russia for hundreds of years, including same religious leaders, Ukraine, the Bread Basket of Russia, was the birth place of Joe Stalin, who out maneuvered Lenin and Trotsky and out lasted FDR and Churchill.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Johnny Rico
  390. @Verymuchalive

    Just today the Russian Ministry of Finance announced there would be 10% budget cuts, government is not getting enough revenue. Worst deficit since 2009. No one in Russia believes the economy is doing well.

    https://www.vedomosti.ru/economics/articles/2022/09/15/940898-urezat-utverzhdennie-trati

  391. Sean says:

    Hitler never seemed to realize that his Malthusian worldview had been rendered obsolete by the invention just before WWI of the Haber-Bosch process for manufacturing cheap nitrogen fertilizer. Germans didn’t actually need vastly more land to support their growing population because agricultural productivity per acre was growing so fast.

    The German Foreign Policy elite before WW1 saw Russia (aided by military railways paid for by loans from French banks) as an unstoppable steamroller At the beginning of the century, Theobald von Bethmann Hollweg (chancellor of Germany before and during World War I) had told his son not to plant oak trees on the family estate because the Russians would be there before they had grown.

    Ukraine can feed the world – Atlantic Councilhttps://www.atlanticcouncil.org › blogs › ukrainealert
    4 Mar 2021 — Ukraine is already among the top three grain exporters and a world leader in areas such as soybeans and sunflower oil. Ukrainian agricultural …

    The US balance of payments being favourable is a due to oil and wheat, so the great thing about growing all the food you can use, and then some, is the surplus can be sold.

    We know that in the 1980s USSR, the Russian Republic was subsidizing the Ukrainian Republic through underpriced oil and gas. Similarly, now prosperous Poland was then being economically propped up by the USSR to hold the Warsaw Pact together.

    The Ukraine being overpopulated was a problem for Tsarist Russia, it is one of the reasons the comonisation of Siberia was encouraged. The analysis of 1930s German economists was Eastern Europe especial places on Poland now part of Ukraine, were suffering from rural overpopulation and a burgeoning and increasingly impoverished Jewish minority occupying trades and peddling that blocked the upward mobility of the rural population. The Ukrainian famine had been entirely deliberate and designed to kill off those who were eating up the surplus. Nazis saw the Soviet liquidation of useless eaters of the surplus in rural areas as the logical outcome of a correct economic analysis of the real problem holding back economic development in Eastern Europe

    Therefore, I had assumed that Vladimir Putin’s cold-blooded rationality would cause him to stop short of starting a major war.

    Putin does not give a monkeys. Like that time he kissed a little kid on the stomach in public whicile camera were on him; he wanted to do it so he did. And when FSB turncoat Litvinenko used the video of the incident to accuse Putin of being a paedo, Putin had Litvinenko poisoned within a few months.

    We’re not hungry enough anymore

    Bertrand Russel said that the road to happiness lay in the organized diminution of work, because the surplus produced by work beyond what was required to survive was always appropriated by the warrior elite. Jewish Ukrainian born Asher Ginsberg sad the wise men think very carefully on the advantages of any course of action’s drawbacks, and move nonly when they can see what the result of their action will be; but while they are deep in thought, the men with self-confidence ‘come and see and conquer.’ He was a pre-state Zionist thinkers and the founder of cultural Zionism. So what about Israel; wasn’t that territorial conquest?

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
  392. @Jack D

    There is no obvious error. LPR/DPR are phony Russian creations and the “local militias” are armed and paid by Russia. They are just cannon fodder taken from a different one of Putin’s pockets – a distinction without a difference.

    They come in and destroy the villages and use the local ethnic Russians as cannon fodder. Most of the LPR/DPR militiamen are now dead. They were viewed as expendable fools.

    The most Putin can achieve is to raise his “mission accomplished” banner over the ruins Donbass where all the young men are dead. When this happens the economy normally collapses and the women move away to find men. This has happened in the past in war where an area never recovers. The people all moved off to other areas.

    Putin can take his shirt off for a masculine picture while standing on graves and ruins. He can hold a big sword to look EXTRA MANLY and not at all compensating for anything. Maybe our remaining Putin defenders can go out there and get a picture as well.

    WHOOPY DOO!!!! MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!!!!

  393. @John Johnson

    Yes and well after invading Poland and starting a world war. That was never needed.

    Yeah, we already agree the war was unnecessary. The only point of disagreement is that prior to the war September 1939, there was no point where Germany touched the USSR.

    After September 1939, Germany and USSR touched in what was formerly Poland, but by then the war had begun so borders didn’t have quite the significance as before.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  394. @Peter Lund

    Anyway, it happened in the aftermath of WW1. Nowhere else & in no other time.

  395. @Almost Missouri

    Yeah, we already agree the war was unnecessary. The only point of disagreement is that prior to the war September 1939, there was no point where Germany touched the USSR.

    East Prussia touches Belarus. Look at the map again.

    Germany held East Prussia from WW1 and lost it after the war was over. The destruction of Königsberg was in fact a great tragedy of the war. The German population was expelled and the Communists put in a bunch of soulless buildings.

    The second corridor would have been Czechoslovakia.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  396. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    “Liars are liars. After a few lies, standard practice in homo-sapiens is to treat them as enemies or at least threats”

    The problem with this approach is it’s subjectivity. Anything you question or don’t agree with becomes “a lie”.

    “to avoid contact with them and to punish them where convenient.”

    What punishment?

    “If actual damage has been done by the lie, legal remedies are to an extent available.”

    Such as?

    “The assumption of moral or other superiority (such as “You must believe me because everybody else is insane” or “because I’m Jewish and not believing me is antisemitism) by liars simply makes them repulsive as well as unsafe to listen to.”

    Aren’t you here showing your own moral superiority?
    Shouldn’t you be rejected?

  397. @PhysicistDave

    I do know that guys like Sailer who focus on the give-and-take of territory have zero understanding of military history…

    What Steve has is an understanding of marketing. A bold military move that takes territory has propaganda value. It boosts morale and also enables arguments like the ones you see here in favor of the side that took the territory.

    It manipulates the minds of those members of the public who have zero understanding of military history, thus adding support for that side in the war.

    It kind of works the way you correctly explained how government inflation numbers move the stock market whether they are accurate or not.

    It’s a game of perception, and that is what Steve knows, and that is being played.

  398. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Greta Handel

    But the liars need our eyes and ears. So walk away from the channels of propaganda, and take every opportunity to constructively let friends, family, and acquaintances know that you’ve done so.

    What are some specific ways and specific things to say?

    And refocus on the real people in your life. Some are already open to hearing us point out the lies when opportune in a non-confrontational way.

    What specific comments should we make to them?

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Greta Handel
  399. Anne Lid says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Around the same time the beautiful town of Sopron – where the majority’s mother tongue was German – was given to Austria by the Trianon peace treaty. An armed rebellion took place with the silent support of the Hungarian government. In the end they were granted a referendum. 89.5 percent of those allowed to take part cast their votes. 72.8 % chose Hungary. The city was awarded the title Civitas Fidelissima, and they wear it with pride to this day.

  400. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    It’s all becoming a typical waste. Russia’s not going to lose and neither is the Ukraine. But for too many, peace is not in their interest.

    Indeed. Their interest is in exterminating the Russian and Ukrainian peoples.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  401. Anonymous[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    It makes me want to bang my head against the wall. You want to stop global warming, build nuclear power plants. If you don’t want to build nuclear power plants, you don’t want to stop global warming.

    If you don’t like nuclear power plants or global warming, start opening your mouth about getting the world population under control.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  402. Anne Lid says:
    @Sean

    Litvinenko was a shady guy. The likeliest scenario is that he tried to ferry the polonium to some shady buyer and managed to poison himself. The British presstitutes and their secret service handlers made it out to be a tragic fairy tale for adults. If the Russians had wanted him dead, he would have been dead, and not in a showy manner.

    I saw that belly blowing video. Putin was still a little green as to how to interact, how to behave before cameras. It was a clumsy attempt to be nice, not a pedo display. It’s a different culture.

    • Replies: @Sean
  403. Anne Lid says:
    @Jack D

    I’m a numpty nobody, but I put the loudmouth Gonzalo Lira and the RT way ahead of the spineless, soulless sources you mentioned.
    (Actually, I put them ahead of you, John Johnson and a couple others, too.)

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  404. @Anonymous

    “I quit voting years ago, and have never regretted it. Because I care twice as much about any of these Washington politicians as they do about me.”

    “They are not our leaders, they are our rulers. Where have they led you that was a better place than you could have found on your own?”

    Etc.

  405. @Anonymous

    ‘If you don’t like nuclear power plants or global warming, start opening your mouth about getting the world population under control.’

    …which, short of a totalitarian regime on a scale that would make Stalinist Russia look like laissez-faire, is not going to happen.

    Ergo, nuclear power.

  406. @Anonymous

    ‘…Indeed. Their interest is in exterminating the Russian and Ukrainian peoples.’

    I suspect that such an outcome doesn’t disturb them does enter into the reasoning of our Jewish masters — even if unconsciously. Lots of dead Russo-Ukrainian pogromists? Oh no…

  407. Art Deco says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Don’t think any territory in the Baltic states intersects with the former East Prussia. I’d be very skeptical that there were 12 million ethnic Germans in Eastern Europe.

  408. @John Johnson

    East Prussia touches Belarus.

    “Belarus” was part of Poland before the war.

  409. @LoneStar

    He was not born in Ukraine. Weirdly, he was actually born in Atlanta, Georgia.

    • LOL: Hunsdon
  410. @Buzz Mohawk

    I don’t know. I think you may be overthinking things. My opinion is Steve is a fairly intelligent guy who is a really decent writer at a couple of hundred or a thousand words. And a lot of people here including you and me and Intelligent Dasein would much rather read him then the others here at UNZ and almost everybody writing in the mainstream press. He makes mistakes, he has opinions people disagree with…good.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  411. @PhysicistDave

    The Chinese all agree that Taiwan is part of China

    This use to be true 2 years ago for PRC Han Chinese, not so much for PRC minorities.

    Not any more, since CCP having Zero-Covided its reputation.

    Taiwanese Han Chinese have always been split. The KMT Mandarin speakers are more for it. The Hokkien speakers are not, their dialect (to be precise sub-language of Chinese language family) was suppressed by both KMT and Japanese rulers.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  412. @Johnny Rico

    I left the door open to at least two interpretations:

    1) Steve understands that bold grabs of territory can aid the grabbing side simply by creating the appearance of winning, and he sees this grab as thus having real value in the war effort for the side he supports. This is the subtext at one level.

    2) Steve is applying that principle and using this particular bold grab to boost the side he supports, thus actually participating in the war in support of that side. This is a deeper possible subtext of the subtext.

    My view is that the marketing/persuasion aspects of a military move are things Steve would understand. I make no claim to be able to read his mind and know what his intentions are.

    It is possible that this is just another example like the one in physics where the observer effects the experiment. Steve is undeniably boosting the Ukranian side with his writing, and that is his right to do. As you say, it is good that he has opinions people disagree with.

    Yes, I am overthinking this. I can overthink putting my pants on. I often do. It is a problem.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  413. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Steve is undeniably boosting the Ukranian side with his writing

    Shorter Steve Sailer on the Russia-GAE conflict in the Ukraine: Might makes right.

  414. @HA

    My pal HA wrote to me:

    A significant section of the Russian-stooge blogosphere itself now admits that without discarding this pretense about “special military operation” and significantly boosting the Russian forces, Putin’s SMO is doomed to fail.

    Y’know what, little buddy, for once I actually think you are right.

    There have been a lot of people in Russia who have been pushing for relaxing the “Rules of Engagement” for some time — I would presume a lot within the MoD also.

    And it seems likely that they will now get their way.

    Which means more Ukrainians will die.

    Which is, I think, what the US Deep State actually wants: more Slavs killing Slavs. The US Deep State has publicly admitted to helping to plan the Kharkov operation: a partially successful operation but with a huge number of Ukrainian dead — yeah, that fits the modus operandi of the US Deep State.

    Which is why we need an immediate negotiated peaces. But Zelensky cannot do it: his US Deep State handlers clearly will not allow it.

    I’m afraid that Zelensky dead is the only thing that can lead to an end of the killing.

    A shame — no more Penis Piano Playing, eh?

    The killing must stop.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @HA
  415. @Verymuchalive

    Verymuchalive wrote to me:

    As regards Pepe Escobar , he is highly variable in quality.

    Well, I do not take Pepe as gospel, but he does have longer experience and deeper knowledge of that part of the world than Sailer or anyone commenting here, including me. I also suspect that Escobar has better knowledge of that region than Mercouris.

    That being said, let me emphasize what I and others have said before: no one really knows what is going on in a fluid war-time situation — almost certainly including the General Staffs on both sides. The fog of war and confirmation bias are only part of it — the big problem is that no one can see the ultimate consequences of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand or the Battle of Gettysburg or the attack on Pearl Harbor until the game has been played out.

    And “war gaming” (by professionals, not the silly games played by geeks online) is far from an exact science.

    Still, in the end, it was not hard to predict that America would ultimately defeat Japan (Yamamoto did foresee it), if America went all out, simply because of the enormous disparity in population, resources, and industrial capability.

    And, for the same reason, it is not hard to see that Russia will ultimately defeat Kiev, if Russia goes all out, simply because of a similar disparity of resources.

    The only hopes of the puppet regime in Kiev are that:

    A) Russia gets tired and says to hell with it, as America did in Vietnam or England did in our War of Independence.

    OR

    B) NATO gets directly involved.

    The people in the NATO countries have no stomach for option B: that will only happen if there is a massive miscalculation on both sides (then AnotherDad may turn out to be right that nukes do matter!).

    Option A could happen… but Ukraine to Russia is not like Vietnam was to the US. It would be more like the US just giving up on the Mexican War.

    I don’t see how any Russian leader can do that and survive politically.

    Anyway, my general point is that the long-term correlation of forces is much clearer and much easier to predict than the ups and downs of week-by-week/month-by-month fighting. No one — neither Sailer nor I nor the General Staffs on either side — is very good at short-term predictions. But the long-term results are often clearer.

    • Thanks: Mr Mox
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  416. @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:

    The Ukrainians restored power within hours.

    Lashing out by destroying civilian infrastructure is not going to change the outcome of this battle or the greater war.

    Amateurs think in terms of strategy; professionals think in terms of logistics.

    Destroy enough of the Kiev regime’s infrastructure and I think their logistics becomes a real problem. And, speaking as an engineer, I’ll tell you that truly wrecking Kiev’s infrastructure, for a very long time, is not that hard.

    We’ll see.

    Jack also wrote:

    It’s just going to make the fraternal people of Ukraine hate Russia even more, if that is even possible. Are they only going to black out the homes of Banderites and Nazis or are the innocent Russian speakers that Russia supposedly came to protect also going to sit in the dark?

    Unfortunately, I am afraid we are way beyond that.

    I think Putin did have a realistic hope that the puppet regime would come to its senses when regular Russian troops moved in and would work out a deal.

    I thought so, too, but I think Putin and I both underestimated the degree to which Zelensky is totally controlled by the US Deep State.

    Since this conflict started, various high-ranking US officials have let the cat out of the bag publicly: the US goal here is to wreck Russia.

    This is a reprise of what Zbig Brzezinski openly planned with Afghanistan, and that indeed succeeded.

    I ma quite sure that the Kremlin has this very clearly in mind.

    This is in fact WW III, it was intended to be such by the US Deep State from the start, and the Kremlin knows it.

    I do not think the Kremlin will make the same mistakes they made in dealing with Afghanistan.

    I think they intend to win WW III, and I think they can if they are determined to.

    Which means an awful lot of people are going to die.

  417. @PhysicistDave

    I’m afraid that Zelensky dead is the only thing that can lead to an end of the killing.

    Ukrainians don’t want to live under the boot of Putin. Why is that so hard to understand?

    Partisan warfare would never end with a Russian occupation. It doesn’t matter who is in charge or even if the Ukrainian military stands down. Ukrainians have Cossack blood and they aren’t going to roll over for a dictator like the Russian serfs. It was the Cossacks that gave Napolean hell and not the Russians.

    A shame — no more Penis Piano Playing, eh?

    Penis piano playing is crass but never took away anyone’s husband or son.

    The fact that you have to refer to that stupid act speaks volumes.

    Putin kills over 100k people on both sides and his defenders bring up some stupid comic act of Zelensky.

    The entire world admires Zelensky and thinks Putin is a mass murdering loser. If anyone has penis issues it is most likely Putin. Who else has the wealth of Russia in his hand and still invades his smaller neighbor? Someone with major insecurity issues.

    The killing must stop.

    Yes and Putin can end the war with a single command.

  418. @Corvinus

    Of course, FoxNews and NewsMax push agendas based on helping certain people get power. Who could doubt that? As far as blogs, well yes, that can happen too. And they can certainly be on a side.

    So again who do you believe in for accurate and unbiased news?

    The Weather Channel? Seriously, except on the most mundane level, who would trust any political news site not to have a bias? That’s why you want multiple outlets to check things against. Newspapers used to announce their allegiances upfront. People were more street smart back then.

    The idea of an “objective professional” press has always been a fairy tale. It gained currency after WWII and it was fake.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Corvinus
  419. @Jack D

    Jack D asked Alec Leamas (working from home):

    Maybe, but why would you put RT and random bloggers AHEAD of Western sources? People here won’t believe the NY Times but they believe “Moon over Alabama”.

    Jack, let’s answer your question with a question: are you able to admit that the NYT and other Ruling-Class media lied for three years about the Russian Collusion hoax?

    Or, if you want to go way back, that the NYT’s Moscow Bureau chief Walter Duranty lied about Stalin’s man-made famine in Ukraine (the Holodomor)?

    Those questions should answer your question: the NYT has been systematically lying on behalf of Leftist ruling classes since before any of us were born.

    No, they do not always lie. Even Hitler did not always lie.

    But the Gray Lady’s record of lying is so longstanding and so unapologetic that she can never, ever be trusted on contentious issues, except when, occasionally, she prints “testimony against interest.”

    You’re a lawyer: you do grasp that once a witness has been caught in a serious lie the jury is justified in disregarding that witness’s other testimony, don’t you?

    Why trust rt and MoA over the NYT? Simply because they do not have as egregious a record of lying.

    Should rt and MoA be treated as gospel? No, no one should.

    But they are not proven pathological liars like the NYT.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  420. @John Johnson

    My favorite Fed John Johnson wrote to me:

    [Dave]The killing must stop.

    [the Fed] Yes and Putin can end the war with a single command.

    Are you ever going to stop lying????

    This war started in 2014 when the US Deep State orchestrated the secession of West Ukraine from the legally elected government of Ukraine, the Donbass chose not to join in that secession, and the puppet regime in Kiev responded by murdering people in the Donbass.

    You know that, I know that, everyone knows that: we have the recording of US Deep State apparatchiks planning how to orchestrate the putsch.

    And they did this because the legally elected President of Ukraine made a decision to snub the US-Occupied countries of Western Europe, the EU, and align with the Russian Federation.

    And the US Empire will not allow that.

    Putin did not start this war.

    You know that; everyone knows it.

    The puppet regime started this war, at the behest of the US Imperium.

    And the war will not end unless and until the Free World defeats the US Deep State and its captive nations.

    You know that as well as I do.

    Stop lying.

    JJ also wrote:

    Partisan warfare would never end with a Russian occupation. It doesn’t matter who is in charge or even if the Ukrainian military stands down. Ukrainians have Cossack blood and they aren’t going to roll over for a dictator like the Russian serfs. It was the Cossacks that gave Napolean hell and not the Russians.

    Cossack blood seems to be pretty watery nowadays!

    You are treating Ukraine as a homogeneous country: it is not.

    Galicia is not the Donbass. Ukraine is no more ethnically one country than Yugoslavia was or Czechoslovakia or the old Soviet Union itself.

    West Ukraine will probably be allowed to survive as a neutered rump of a country.

    The East will be free of Kiev.

    In any case, we are beyond that now: this is now World War III, an existential fight between the American Empire and its captive nations vs. the Free World.

    And I do not think Russia believes it can accept anything short of victory in that existential conflict.

    The US Deep State chose to do this — now they will live with the consequences.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  421. @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote to me:

    What Steve has is an understanding of marketing. A bold military move that takes territory has propaganda value. It boosts morale and also enables arguments like the ones you see here in favor of the side that took the territory.

    It manipulates the minds of those members of the public who have zero understanding of military history, thus adding support for that side in the war.

    All true, and, in fact, what Sailer has proven to be best at is “coming trends” — most spectacularly foreseeing “World War T” when it was but a speck on the horizon.

    But I think it does go deeper than that.

    Steve seems to have invented the phrase “Invade the World/Invite the World” and seems to be the person who made the “Deep State” meme part of the current debate: even the Ruling Class now feels the need to try to debunk the “Deep State” meme (which of course only reinforces the meme!).

    So, Steve has often been as perceptive as anyone when seeing through the US Deep State.

    But when it comes to actual military conflict (and Ukraine is now a conflict between NATO and Russia — this is what we all feared for forty years, alas), I am afraid Steve’s childhood conditioning kicked in.

    Are you old enough to remember the air-raid drills for nuclear war, the Cuban missile crises, etc.?

    I am. My and Sailer’s generation were permeated with propaganda that the US was the leader of the Free World (not at all true) and that the Soviet Union was an evil empire (quite true, of course).

    And when actual military conflict breaks out, it is hard to break away from the childhood Pavlovian conditioning. No one wants to be a “disloyal American,” and we were taught that meant we had to cheer on the adventurism of the US government.

    Of course, now, it should be clear to any intelligent, thoughtful person that the disloyal Americans are those who apologize for the illegal, unconstitutional, and murderous actions of the US Deep State.

    But it is hard to break the childhood conditioning.

    Steve seems unwilling to address this, except to say that he is opposed to war in Europe. As are all of us who oppose the US Deep State.

    But the childhood conditioning prevents Steve from seeing that this war was started in 2014 at the instigation of the US Deep State, not in 2022 by Putin.

    I am of course speaking from personal experience here: it took me decades to break away from that childhood conditioning myself and see that, while the Soviet Union was most assuredly an evil empire, the US Deep State was also filled with people with a psychotic lust for power.

  422. @PhysicistDave

    The result of the Conflict for Ukraine’s borders is obvious even now. About 25% of the population of pre-2014 Ukraine were ethnic Russians, heavily concentrated in the East and South. The Russian aim is to incorporate as much of these areas into Russia as possible – hence the proposed referenda for November 4th.The longer the Ukrainians resist, the more they play into the Russians hands and the more land they will lose to Russia. The end result will be that Ukraine loses 20-25% of its pre-2014 land.

    The other results are much less obvious. Will the rump Ukraine remain or will it fracture into 2 or more states ? Will EU governments continue with a sanctions policy that only promises economic collapse for themselves, or will they be replaced by governments that want to negotiate with Russia? Will NATO ( hopefully ) dissolve itself?
    Only time will tell.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  423. Verymuchalive wrote to me:

    The result of the Conflict for Ukraine’s borders is obvious even now. About 25% of the population of pre-2014 Ukraine were ethnic Russians, heavily concentrated in the East and South. The Russian aim is to incorporate as much of these areas into Russia as possible – hence the proposed referenda for November 4th.

    My own feeling is that it would have been better for everyone to leave the Donbass as a buffer state between Russia and the Kievan regime.

    I think that was a feasible resolution prior to late February… if Zelensky had been allowed to work out a deal by his US Deep State handlers.

    Unfortunately, I agree that this is unlikely now.

    Verymuchalive also asked:

    The other results are much less obvious. Will the rump Ukraine remain or will it fracture into 2 or more states ? Will EU governments continue with a sanctions policy that only promises economic collapse for themselves, or will they be replaced by governments that want to negotiate with Russia? Will NATO ( hopefully ) dissolve itself?

    Of course, much of that depends on how much Europe suffers.

    Western Europeans really have been emasculated in the last seven decades: remember the mass sexual assaults in Cologne on New Year’s Eve 2015-16?

    The German men did nothing.

    I think that will go down as an iconic date in the collapse of the West.

    I’m not sure the Occupied Nations of Europe can free themselves from the US until the US itself collapses.

    Which bring up the one major consequence you do not mention: China.

    If Putin prevails, which does seem likely, how does Xi interpret this?

    I am afraid the answer is that the US is a paper tiger and that Beijing can now take Taiwan.

    Which will be very dangerous for us all.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
  424. @PhysicistDave

    I am afraid the answer is that the US is a paper tiger and that Beijing can now take Taiwan.

    Which will be very dangerous for us all.

    Only because the Establishment thinks that’s any of “our” business.

    German men may be more emasculated, but Americans are Exceptionally propagandized.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  425. @Art Deco

    Even Wikipedia has to admit this:
    The Party of Regions (Ukrainian: Партія регіонів, romanized: Partiia rehioniv, pronounced [ˈpɑrt⁽ʲ⁾ijɐ reɦiˈɔn⁽ʲ⁾iu̯]; Russian: Партия регионов, romanized: Partiya regionov) was a pro-Russian[18][19] political party in Ukraine formed in late 1997 that then grew to be the biggest party of Ukraine between 2006 and 2014.

    Since the February 2014 Ukrainian revolution, the party has not competed in elections and members have slowly dispersed; the last election the party participated in was the 2012 Ukrainian parliamentary election.[20][21] The best known former party members are former Prime Minister Mykola Azarov and former President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych;[22] both fled to Russia in February 2014 after Euromaidan.[23]

    In actual fact, after the secession of Crimea and the heavily populated part of the Donbas in 2014, the number of pro-Russian voters in Ukraine obviously suffered a sharp decline, since they were now outside of the country. The remaining party in Ukraine did not take part in elections after the Euromaidan Coup and the overthrow of the legitimate Yanukovych Government. They were then subject to a concerted campaign of harassment and persecution until the Party dissolved out of existence in 2016.

    You write:
    Survey research undertaken over the years indicates about 4% of the population favors annexation by Russia.

    Again, no reference. Given the anti-Russian hysteria of the present Ukrainian regime, it would take a brave or foolhardy voter to admit to this. The fear of having your name leaked to the regime would certainly be in the mind of any sensible person. Ukraine is by far the poorest and most corrupt State in Europe and violent crime is common.

    You write:
    I don’t think the current misery in the Ukraine has improved the standing of the Russophile politicians and their program.

    This question will soon be irrelevant. Very soon, the vast majority of ethnic Russians will soon be incorporated into Russia. What happens to the rump Ukraine ? That’s another question.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  426. Sean says:
    @Anne Lid

    Suggestive symptoms (total hair loss, peeling skin) as Alexander Litvinenko was to expire with in 2006 were experienced by Yuri Shchekochikhin in 2003 few days before his scheduled departure to the United States, where he planned to meet with FBI investigators. Also, a Chechen terrorist called Lecha Islamov after he had tea with FSB officers in a Moscow prison in April 2004 , he quickly died with the same symtoms. Isalamov was probably a test, but the identical death of Roman ‘Tsepov’, who knew much–some may have thought too much– about post Soviet Putin when he was in St Petersburg, was surely targeted

    In effect a defector to MI6, who began working for the once immensely powerful Berezovsky (apart from Yeltsin’s daughter and her husbands, the only person Yeltsin listened to and who selected Putin to keep to keep the Kievborn Yevgeny ‘Primakov’ from jailing them once daddy was out of pawer)) , showed a draft of the blog post calling Putin a paedo to Oleg Kalugin a former KGB general now living in the West; Kalugin warned him not publish such a personal allegation. Around this time the Upper House of the Russian parliament passed a law that authorises the Russian president to have enemies assassinated abroad. The dose used to kill him was of a substance only state actors have access to in such an astoundingly high dose, (Bismuth irradiated at Mayak reactor in the Urals then taken to the Avangard reacter in Sarov where it was made into polonium-210, and finally processes so it could be dissolved in tea.

    Ex KGB Lugovoi and Kovtun left a specific isotope radioactive trails that were as difficult to track as an elephant in six feet of snow after the incident in the Knightsbridge hotel where Litvinenko had a cup of tea (he was a teetotaler) with them. That and the fact Litenvenko started vomiting uncontrollably hours later suggests they used Polonium-210 to poison Litvinenko.
    Places and people visited Lugovoi and Kovtun on a previous trip to London and meeting with Litenvenko a fortnight earlier had also been contaminated by polonium-210. Lugovoi and Kovtun did it, on orders ultimately from Putin

    https://theconversation.com/life-hates-surprises-can-an-ambitious-theory-unify-biology-neuroscience-and-psychology-184052

    ‘Life hates surprises’: can an ambitious theory unify biology, neuroscience and psychology?
    Published: August 14, 2022 9.03pm BST

    But Friston … reasoned that the problem of drawing conclusions from limited information is a problem faced by all living things. This led him to the “free energy principle”: that every living thing, everywhere, minimises free energy.

    The free energy principle
    But what, exactly, is free energy? Why might all living things minimise it? Start with a simpler idea: every organism is trying to minimise how surprising its experiences are. By “surprising”, we mean experiences that have not been encountered previously by the organism or its ancestors.

    Minimising free energy means choosing to believe in the unobserved situation that makes your observations least surprising. Here’s an example: imagine you are picnicking in the park, watching two friends kick a football to and fro. Your view is occluded by a tree, so you don’t see the full trajectory of the kicked ball. Now, it is possible that there is a third person behind the tree, who catches the ball each time it passes them and then throws on a spare ball they have handy.
    However, there is no evidence for the existence of this third person, so their existence would be very surprising. So you can minimise your surprise by believing there is no secret third person behind the tree.

    Litvinenko had already authored aa book accusing Putin of the apartment bombings, but the child molester allegation on even less evidence was tasking the wrong man, and Putin had him liquidated. While that is not the only possible explanation it is the most likely explanation in the sense of being the least surprising one.

    I saw that belly blowing video. Putin was still a little green as to how to interact, how to behave before cameras. It was a clumsy attempt to be nice, not a pedo display.

    I am not sure that is better that what he is doing, because in the news is Russia is starting the school year with a timely new lesson: ‘There’s nothing to fear in dying for the motherland’.

    https://www.marxists.org/subject/science/essays/kropotkin.htm

    Malthus makes a far better prophet in a crowded, industrial country professing an ideal of open competition in free markets. Moreover, the point has often been made that both Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace independently developed the theory of natural selection after primary experience with natural history in the tropics. Both claimed inspiration from Malthus, again independently; but if fortune favors the prepared mind, then their tropical experience probably predisposed both men to read Malthus with resonance and approval. No other area on earth is so packed with species, and therefore so replete with competition of body against body. An Englishman who had learned the ways of nature in the tropics was almost bound to view evolution differently from a Russian nurtured on tales of the Siberian wasteland.

    For example, N. I. Danilevsky, an expert on fisheries and population dynamics, published a large, two-volume critique of Darwinism in 1885. He identified struggle for personal gain as the credo of a distinctly British “national type,” as contrasted with old Slavic values of collectivism. An English child, he writes, “boxes one on one, not in a group as we Russians like to spar.”

    “It’s a different culture”; yes, that twenty year old Ukrainian girl who was simultaneously ravished in all three of her orifices by rampant Russian invaders from the taiga must have thought that too.

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
    , @Chrisnonymous
  427. SFG says:
    @Greta Handel

    Ah. I used to play old D&D, so I have fond memories as well.

  428. Anne Lid says:
    @Sean

    Thank you. I don’t know the truth. I do know that the British propaganda can make up the most outlandish tales.
    It was not fair to bring up the poor girl’s case, obviously I wasn’t thinking about crimes but attitudes as to what is acceptable behaviour with children. I wouldn’t be surprised if the rape turned out to be true, even less surprised if it turned out to be manufactured.

  429. J.Ross says:
    @Twinkie

    Well, the season after fall looms, and that’s like their off-season, right?

  430. Hunsdon says:
    @John Johnson

    His lifts, John! You must mention his lifts! That’s like a Tiny Duck quote without a malapropism.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  431. Hunsdon says:
    @John Johnson

    Homonyms, John.

    A “hoard of gold” is what dragons covet. A vast store of stuff.

    A “horde” is like, oh, the Mongol horde—a vast mass of people.

  432. Jack D says:
    @Verymuchalive

    Strange that the “less obvious” results all seem to favor Putin. Here are some other “less obvious” results that may occur – Russia’s economy may collapse. Russia may fracture into more than one state, Russia will be forced to negotiate a settlement with Ukraine, etc. Unforeseen events are not just going to break in favor of Russia – chances are that some of them are going to break the other way too. So far, the unforeseen (by Putin) events have mostly been breaking AGAINST Russia, maybe because the people in his circle have been feeding him bad information for years now.

    BTW, who was it that said that something real bad was going to happen in 72 hrs? I think the 72 hrs is up and nothing real bad has happened unless you count bombing civilian infrastructure which Russia has been doing since the beginning of this war. This is why Russian threats are not credible – now we are REALLY going to attack Ukraine as if they haven’t been giving it their best for almost 7 months. I don’t think they are going to use nukes bc Putin doesn’t want to start WWIII and short of that there is not a lot left that he hasn’t tried already.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  433. @PhysicistDave

    Putin can end the war with a single command.

    Are you ever going to stop lying????

    Putin ordered the war on his own. You are saying that he couldn’t call it off?

    Cossack blood seems to be pretty watery nowadays!

    Military experts around the world gave Kiev one month at the most. The Ukrainians are pushing back the Russians. Cossacks are bad ass and are giving this half pint dictator a major headache just like they did to Napolean.

    You are treating Ukraine as a homogeneous country: it is not.

    Far more homogenous than Russia and their 193 ethnic groups.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_groups_in_Russia

    The Putin backing “muh new Hitler” deluded defenders like to imagine Russia as a White Orthodox state when they have more Muslims than any Western country. Oh and Putin is trying to lock in their Jews to prevent brain drain:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/07/putin-russia-jewish-agency-emigration-israel/670948/

    Oh dear. Quite a lot to take in for the Jew blamers. Anglin & Co must be having a hard time sleeping at night. They wanted Putin to be the new Hitler and he is selling Israel cheap oil while desperately trying to keep in his Jews.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  434. @Hunsdon

    His lifts, John! You must mention his lifts! That’s like a Tiny Duck quote without a malapropism.

    I just find it amusing that so many put their trust the world’s richest man who feels the need to wear shoe lifts and lock down the media. Unz is about free speech and yet we have posters here that not only defend the half pint dictator but actually think he can be trusted.

    I actually doubt his height is the driving cause of his horrible insecurities.

    My guess is something downstairs.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
  435. Hunsdon says:
    @John Johnson

    John writes: “Unz is about free speech and yet we have posters here that . . . ” disagree with John Johnson. Shocking!

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  436. @Jack D

    Maybe, but why would you put RT and random bloggers AHEAD of Western sources? People here won’t believe the NY Times but they believe “Moon over Alabama”.

    RT and random bloggers have to work harder to earn the trust and respect of their English language readers. The NYT, on the other hand is rewarded for being a good team player and for amplifying the narrative. There’s nothing in it for the prestige media to complicate the narrative with unhelpful facts or contradicting interpretations. Ironically it’s their own readership who most viciously turn on them when they detect any deviationism. The fans just want them to play the old hits. My guess is that it would take much more to get someone at the Council of Foreign Relations or the State Department to even informally ask someone at the NYT “what’s the story on that piece you did on Ukraine last week?”.

  437. HA says:
    @PhysicistDave

    “I’m afraid that Zelensky dead is the only thing that can lead to an end of the killing.”

    Your creepy death fetish for Zelensky is bizarre, given that the death of Putin, the man who actually initiated the killing, is a far more obvious way to end it. That being the case, I’m writing off as just more projection (not to mention yet another sign that you’re more than comfortable with being creepy.)

    Note that in the last few weeks PhysicistDave assured us that “The Western ruling class is cutting off the Kiev puppet regime… Just like they did with the puppet regime in Afghanistan…. the ruling elite and its Deep State apparatchiks are really getting ready to pull the plug on the little Pen!s-Piano-Playing despot and his corrupt little regime in Kiev.”

    Yeah sure, PhysicistDave, it is the despot in Kyiv who really has the Deep State apparatchiks in a tizzy. And how’s that projection looking right about now?

    I mean, I get it. It was a master PR stroke for the Ukrainians to spurn hardliner Poroshenko in the last presidential election for a Russian-speaking ethnically Jewish comedian, given that they were getting hammered with “neo-fascist” slurs by a regime that proudly employs and trumpets the achievements of the Wagner group (named after its founder’s “own call sign ‘Wagner’, reportedly after the German composer Richard Wagner, which he is said to have chosen due to his passion for the Third Reich (Wagner being Adolf Hitler’s favorite composer).” As absurd as those slurs were from the start, Zelensky’s overwhelming success and subsequent popularity is about as good a rebuttal as the Ukrainians are likely to find.

    The Russians are therefore now hoping that if they can at least get lucky enough to eliminate him, any hardliner likely to replace him will be easier to slur as a dangerous extremist. In fact, by having the Kremlin troll farms float the meme that the US Deep State is itself about to get rid of Zelensky, which stooges like PhysicistDave dutifully re-broadcast at their master’s whim, Zelensky’s mysterious death from, say, polonium or a wayward umbrella, could be conveniently blamed on the US.

    But after the last week or so, PhysicistDave, I think you’ll probably have to set aside your pipe dreams about how the Deep State is the one trying to shaft Zelensky right about now and I’m guessing they’re going to want him around for at least a little while longer. Being the TV actor that he is, he’s managed to put on quite a show as to how the US military industrial complex can be a game-changer for any country it favors, and that makes him worth his weight in gold to them.

    But hey, if you say your prayers and keep your fingers crossed like the true and faithful little believer that you are, I suppose one of those Chechen assassins might finally fire off a clean shot. Just don’t try to foist that off as anything but another act of desperation from the Kremlin that likely won’t amount to much. The Ukrainians, I wager, aren’t going to cave in the way you like, with or without Zelensky.

    • Replies: @Sean
  438. Anonymous[155] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    The Russians have the Ukrainians right where they want them. I’m not going to say more.

  439. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    The idea of an “objective professional” press has always been a fairy tale. It gained currency after WWII and it was fake.

    Well in journalism school they still teach that you are supposed to try and be objective when reporting an issue. Editorializing is supposed to be a different section.

    The problem is that no one is even trying and they know it. In the minds of conservative/liberal journalists they can’t be honest or else the other ebil side will win.

    In DC/NYC they really have to pick a side. It’s not like you can write for the Times or Wall St Journal and then partway through your career decide that you want to provide all points of view. I’m not making excuses for them, but I get that they have mortgages and families.

    They answer is to ignore all that BULLSHIT. Fox news is for retired conservatives that are still holding out for a Leave it to Bantu fantasy and CNN is for liberal housewives that want to feel smug from their couch. All garbage that should be ignored.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  440. @Hunsdon

    John writes: “Unz is about free speech and yet we have posters here that . . . ” disagree with John Johnson. Shocking!

    I think disagreement is great and the only way to real progress. Unz is a great place and might be the only place in fact that allows open political discussion. Free Republic ironically will ban you within minutes for taking the wrong position. Huffpo will go back and scrub any comments that makes liberalism look weak.

    A key problem I have with liberalism is that they don’t actually allow real debate while pretending that they do. Disagreement is viewed as dangerous dissent.

    Free market faggotry isn’t much better. Con Inc will call out something like liberal soft on crime policies but then will flip out if you ask why free market magic unicorns still haven’t fixed Detroit or why the free market didn’t fix health care before the government was even involved.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  441. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Con Inc will call out something like liberal soft on crime policies but then will flip out if you ask why free market magic unicorns still haven’t fixed Detroit or why the free market didn’t fix health care before the government was even involved.

    You’ve confused the conventional starboard with autistic libertarians. The free market hasn’t ‘fixed’ Detroit because Detroit suffers from problems that markets do not address. It did not ‘fix’ health care prior to 1940 because the deficiency you’re implicitly complaining about is a distributional issue. Except in your imagination, no one at Heritage or AEI is going to ‘flip out’ if you ask them those questions, and it’s doubtful that someone sitting in a legislature would.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  442. @Anonymous

    I was going to reply to Jack D (((emented))), but you answered much more quickly and pithily than me.
    Thank you. 155 you’re doing a good job !

  443. bomag says:
    @Steve Sailer

    … the U.S. was worried before June 1950 about South Korea starting a war with North Korea

    One result of this was denying SK artillery that could have stopped the North’s invasion.

  444. @Anonymous

    The Russians have the Ukrainians right where they want them. I’m not going to say more.

    You’re developing a capacity for embarrassment due to your past predictions having been refuted by current events. It’s not much, but it’s a kind of progress.

    • Disagree: PhysicistDave
  445. @Hypnotoad666

    Tesla has apparently done the legal and software steps to create a “distributed” utility company that buys and sells the energy stored in car and home batteries back to the grid.

    But the cars will have to take their electricity back out of the grid to recharge. -1 + 1 is not equal to 2.

  446. @John Johnson

    “Yes and Putin can end the war with a single command.”

    What command would that be? I am not convinced Putin is in control of events anymore.

  447. @Sean

    I think it’s strange that when Dugin’s daughter was killed, the Russians immediately had video footage of her killer but there has been a bunch of “suicides” of Russian oligarchs with no suspects. What’s your opinion of the oligarch suicides? Coming from Putin? Why? Coming from Russian opposition? Coming from the West?

    • Replies: @Sean
  448. @John Johnson

    Our little Fed John Johnson wrote to me:

    [JJ] Putin can end the war with a single command.

    [Dave] Are you ever going to stop lying????

    [JJ] Putin ordered the war on his own. You are saying that he couldn’t call it off?

    Your chutzpah in continuing to lie in public is certainly… impressive!

    As I keep pointing out, this war did not start in February 2022.

    The war started in 2014 when the US Deep State orchestrated the overthrow of the legal government of Ukraine, the Donbaas refused to go along with the putsch, and, as a result, the criminal regime in Kiev started killing people in the Donbass.

    Putin did not start this war: the US Deep State and their henchmen in Kiev started this war.

    But you just pretend to be surprised that I deny that Putin can stop a war at will that he did not start.

    Where did you acquire this ability to lie so brazenly on a matter on which everyone knows you are lying?

  449. @Art Deco

    Con Inc will call out something like liberal soft on crime policies but then will flip out if you ask why free market magic unicorns still haven’t fixed Detroit or why the free market didn’t fix health care before the government was even involved.

    You’ve confused the conventional starboard with autistic libertarians. The free market hasn’t ‘fixed’ Detroit because Detroit suffers from problems that markets do not address.

    I haven’t confused anything. Mainstream conservatism adopted libertarian beliefs long ago as an alternative to facing the reality of race. Con Inc blogs/Fox News/Wall ST Journal (The cabal) all maintain the belief that auto/gov unions and “big gubmint Democrats” ruined Detroit. I can dig up plenty articles if you would like. That is a core belief that was promoted heavily by Rush Limbaugh. Race doesn’t exist, all social conflicts are can be solved with minimal government and getting rid of unions. No explanation for why unions didn’t ruin neighboring Windsor or how those damn teacher’s unions just happen to create “bad skooz” in Black areas. Funny that.

    It did not ‘fix’ health care prior to 1940 because the deficiency you’re implicitly complaining about is a distributional issue.

    So the private market can’t be relied upon to distribute every resource or service to meet the needs of the public. Thanks champ, now go explain that to the Con Inc cabal.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @PhysicistDave
  450. @PhysicistDave

    But you just pretend to be surprised that I deny that Putin can stop a war at will that he did not start.

    Putin can withdraw his troops back to the border with a single command. Do you deny that?

    If this was about Donbass then why did he say it was about NATO and then attack Kiev?

    Why didn’t he issue an ultimatum over Donbass? If he is really trying to save lives then why wouldn’t he threaten an invasion if the Donbass isn’t handed over?

    Why were there no demands? Answer that simple question.

    A loser dictator with Parkinson’s is the best explanation. He thought he could just roll his tanks in there like Hungary 1956 and turn the whole place into a puppet state. Massively increase his population and GDP overnight. That was the plan and he didn’t have a backup.

    This isn’t 1956 or even 1996. This is the age of information and even more damning information will come out about Putin. This is not going to get easier for his defenders. People will spit on his grave when this is over.

    Have you not noticed that Tucker has slowly backed away from Putin? Even his last mainstream US defenders can smell a sinking ship of rats. Trump has stopped talking about him. That should be your cue to stop wasting your time on this half-pint dictator and his lies. Did you defend him when he said an invasion wouldn’t happen and that it was just US/UK propaganda?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  451. @Steve Sailer

    Electric cars are toys. Completely not feasible for most people without some unlikely yet miraculous new battery technology. (Graphene aluminium-ion batteries have potential but are not yet on the horizon.)

    [MORE]

    EV’s produce more pollution than ICE vehicles, take longer to refuel, have less range than advertised (especially if you use the air conditioner or the heater) making them less practical (especially in hot or cold climates), often self immolate, and need their expensive batteries replaced every 5-10 years depending on how gentle you treat your batteries. Oh, and there are not enough raw materials in the world to make all those expensive, dangerous battery packs. (And if there were you would still have to dig them out of the earth causing some serious pollution.)

    There is also a critical lack of infrastructure for any serious switch to electric cars.

    That said, if you did want to make them more feasible for urban travelers, you could start by making small, lighter, economy type electric cars instead of fancy electronic gizmos that can go from 0-60 in 3 seconds or less. You know, something like the Wuling Hongguang Mini EV…

    If they were really interested in saving the environment they would be promoting diesel electric hybrids…

    But electric cars have nothing to do with saving the environment or any other such nonsense. They are part of the WEF’s Great Reset. Electric cars are all about control of the peasantry. Ultimately they don’t want any commoner to have the ability to travel freely. They want the proles traveling on the “government” bus.

    As they say, you will own nothing and be happy! Or else…

  452. @PhysicistDave

    The war started in 2014 when the US Deep State orchestrated the overthrow of the legal government of Ukraine

    So if Biden ordered that Trump protestors be shot by snipers would you argue that he should be allowed to finish his term? Even if the majority wanted him out and he clearly broke the law?

    If Hispanics in SoCal decided that they wanted to be part of Mexico and the government sent in troops and militiamen to fight them would that be a war against Mexico?

    Oh and in case you weren’t aware of the protestor shootings:

    Security chiefs admit that Viktor Yanukovich ordered the shootings
    https://www.newsweek.com/ukraine-protesters-shot-under-direct-leadership-yanukovich-243771

    • Replies: @Sean
  453. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    Mainstream conservatism adopted libertarian beliefs long ago as an alternative to facing the reality of race.

    No, you’re deeply confused.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
  454. Wilkey says:
    @D. K.

    “When it comes to seizing and holding land in Ukraine, the average Russian soldier’s heart just isn’t in it.”

    Is there anyone in his right mind who believes that Russian soldiers who help conquer Ukraine are going to get to keep anything there that is worth keeping?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  455. @Art Deco

    “No, you’re deeply confused.”

    I think there is some truth there. Although not clear how much is actually believed by conservatives rather than just trying to use false liberal beliefs against them.

  456. @John Johnson

    John Johnson wrote to me:

    [Dave] But you just pretend to be surprised that I deny that Putin can stop a war at will that he did not start.

    [JJ] Putin can withdraw his troops back to the border with a single command. Do you deny that?

    That would not end the war.

    The Nazi regime in Kiev would continue the war against the Donbass, just as they were doing before Putin intervened.

    You keep insisting that Putin started this war and that he can easily end it.

    That is simply a lie, and you — and everyone reading this — knows it is a lie.

    Stop lying.

    JJ also asked:

    Why didn’t he issue an ultimatum over Donbass?

    Moscow spent years trying to negotiate a deal with the puppet regime in Kiev over the Donbass. And they had a deal — the Minsk accords. A deal which Kiev never abided by.

    So Putin — after years of trying! — finally gave up and hit Kiev.

    Were there better ways to deal with the matter? Perhaps. But if a guy is raping your wife, it is not your job to figure out whether the most delicate way to deal with the situation is to knife him or shoot him. It’s his fault that you have to stop him.

    And in the case of the Kiev puppet regime, it is their fault that they were committing mass murder.

    JJ also asked:

    If this was about Donbass then why did he say it was about NATO and then attack Kiev?

    Everyone knew that it was about both from the beginning;

    For example, only four days after Putin’s February incursion, I myself wrote on this website:

    All that Putin demanded was that Kiev honor the Minsk accords in terms of autonomy for the Donbass and that Kiev drop the insane nonsense about joining NATO.

    On that same day, I also wrote:

    The Donbass is going to be independent and Ukraine is never going to join NATIO.

    The two issues are, after all, tightly connected. NATO was giving the Kiev puppet regime weapons, financial support, and training over the last eight years that facilitated the mass murder carried out by the puppet regime in the Donbass.

    And indeed NATO’s support for the puppet regime’s crimes against humanity in the Donbass was a major part of NATO’s intentional provocation of Russia.

    The mass murders in the Donbass and the connection to NATO — both parts of a Brzezinski-like strategy to threaten and weaken Russia.

    The two issues cannot be separated and no informed person has ever pretended that they could be separated.

    JJ also asked:

    Have you not noticed that Tucker has slowly backed away from Putin?

    No, he hasn’t. Tucker has always said that he disapproves of Putin’s intervention, but Tucker wants to keep the US out of it. Consistent.

    JJ also wrote:

    This is not going to get easier for his defenders. People will spit on his grave when this is over.

    We’ll see.

    Leading figures in the US government have publicly stated that the real purpose of US policy is to wreck Russia — as I said, a Brzezinski-style gambit of the kind Brzezinski pursued, successfully, in Afghanistan.

    If Putin folds, I think he will be cursed by Russians for centuries to come.

    Putin knows that.

    Which is why I do not think he will fold.

    In any case, stop lying about Putin starting the war.

    He just did not.

    The US Deep State puppets in the Nazi regime in Kiev started the war in 2014.

    And the war will only end when that puppet regime is crushed… or the US Deep State tells the puppet regime to stop the killing.

    The killing must stop.

  457. @John Johnson

    John Johnson wrote to Art Deco:

    So the private market can’t be relied upon to distribute every resource or service to meet the needs of the public

    “Resources” are not owned by the state or the collective to be “distributed” as they choose.

    “Resources,” what in a free country are known as “private property,” are owned by individual people.

    Your true political colors are shining through, JJ. And they aren’t pretty.

    It would be diplomatic merely to describe you as a welfare-state liberal/democratic socialist.

    So I will refrain from pointing out the Continental ideology you really resemble.

  458. @Greta Handel

    Greta Handel wrote to me:

    [Dave] I am afraid the answer is that the US is a paper tiger and that Beijing can now take Taiwan.

    Which will be very dangerous for us all.

    [Greta] Only because the Establishment thinks that’s any of “our” business.

    True.

    Personally, I think Taiwan should be independent. For that matter, I think that Tibet, Xinjiang, and Manchuria should be independent. But I do not see why Americans should die for those causes.

    And I suspect that American politicians are not really all that concerned about the people of Taiwan, either: it’s all just the Great Game of geopolitics.

    Greta also wrote:

    German men may be more emasculated, but Americans are Exceptionally propagandized.

    Indeed.

    Take care.

  459. Corvinus says:
    @PhysicistDave

    “There is a simple test as to whether you are being honest on this: do you admit that the NYT lied about the Russian Collusion fraud?”

    Lol, that’s not a test, that’s your irrationality in action. So anyone who disagrees, regardless if you are given new information that lends clear support to Trump malfeasance or a cogent argument has been made, you automatically discount. See, you have to prove exactly how and why it was a fraud, rather than dismiss it entirely. That’s how discourse works, rather than take the hard headed approach that nearly everything and anything from the media is a lie.

  460. Corvinus says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Putin did start the war. Stop lying. The Ukrainian people have the liberty to make their own political decisions and determine their own allies.. Why do you despise liberty?

  461. Sean says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Kill one frighten a thousand, and Putin has done so brazenly because because his word is the law in Russia; what would be the point of making it look like an accident, suicide, or the work of the Ukrainians? Putin’s style is not bothering to cover up: ‘There is nothing you can do anyway, ha ha ha, ‘.

    Dugin and daughter were not any kind of opponents of Putin. Boris Berezovsky abolished his and others status of oligarchs by choosing Putin as Yelsin’s successor. Berezovsky then ended up kicking himself in sad exile because as a great scene in Game Of Thrones has it “Power is power”.

  462. Sean says:
    @John Johnson

    So if Biden ordered that Trump protestors be shot by snipers would you argue that he should be allowed to finish his term? Even if the majority wanted him out and he clearly broke the law?

    In fairness, Yanukovych was elected and prevented from taking office by the 2004 Orange revolution, in the re run he lost, but despite all the bad publicity against him not by all that much. Then in 2010 Yanukovych won a properly held election and became President. Trying to overthrow the government by demonstrations is a criminal undemocratic act. Those demonstrators were a minority in the country. And they came back out in 2019 to stop Zelensky enacting a modified version of Minsk 2, ; he was elected to on promises to end the war and restoring the territories.

    Putin started it; yes, but he did after he and Russian speakers in the East of the Country were repeatedly provoked by Ukrainian nationalist activists who respected democracy when it went their way, but if not triumphed over the people’s ballot box will by demonstrating in one Kiev square that held a tiny proportion of the population.

  463. @PhysicistDave

    The Nazi regime in Kiev would continue the war against the Donbass, just as they were doing before Putin intervened.”

    I believe by the border he meant from all territory claimed by Ukraine. Including Crimea. But I don’t think such an order would be obeyed.

  464. Art Deco says:
    @Verymuchalive

    Two successors to the Party of Regions have competed in every election since 2014. They don’t do well.

    This question will soon be irrelevant. Very soon, the vast majority of ethnic Russians will soon be incorporated into Russia. What happens to the rump Ukraine ? That’s another question.

    If it helps you fell better, you be you.

  465. Jack D says:
    @Wilkey

    Do washing machines count?

  466. Sean says:
    @HA

    I mean, I get it. It was a master PR stroke for the Ukrainians to spurn hardliner Poroshenko in the last presidential election for a Russian-speaking ethnically Jewish comedian, given that they were getting hammered with “neo-fascist” slurs

    Zelensky was elected in 2019 to make peace with Russian and get back the lost territories in the Donbass (there is no doubt that his campaign was promising an end to confrontation with Russia).

    Zelensky at first seemed to be doing just what he was elected to do, Ukraine approved a law on “special status” for Donbas in 2010 with increased autonomy to separatist-held areas in the Donbass. This was as specified by Minsk II,but with an important concession by Russia that the elections in Donbass would be held under Ukrainian jurisdiction. Then came demonstrations outside Zelensky Presidential offices that unnerved him and made him do a U turn and become a Poroshenko clone in relation to Russia. You could say those loud Ukrainian nationalist activists with tiny electoral support are the authentic voice of Ukraine, but why is Putin not the authentic voice of Russia ( and the separatists in the Donbass him to0)

    The Ukrainians, I wager, aren’t going to cave in the way you like, with or without Zelensky.

    Try and recall what Russian was prepared to settle for in 2019 and indeed up until a year ago. This is not a zero sum game in which is Russia loses, then Ukraine gains. America may gain if China was to be so short sighted to leave Russia to be humbled by the Ukraine-supplied-by-America assemblage, because China would then have the prospect of facing America alone in any future crisis, such as over Taiwan. So Russia will not have to come to terms in the foreseeable future. The country whose people suffers worst from the war will be Ukraine, it is understandable that they’ll not want to think about how all this could have been so easily avoided while maintaining Ukraine’s national integrity. But it could have been.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  467. Corvinus says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    So are you of the belief that the media lies all or most of the time? Why?

  468. @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer:

    “The Ukrainian offensive mostly serves as _proof of concept_ that the Ukrainians can successfully go on the offensive. Until last weekend, we didn’t have positive evidence that they even could.”

    Now we need a proof of c0ncepr that they can not all die instantly when Russia finally decides to go on the offensive. Because so far Vlad the Procrastinator is playing piddy-paddy with precision strikes to select military target and not shelling Ukranian cities and not bringing the Big Guns, because he is still trying to maintain that this is a Special Military Operation, and that the Ukranian people are not his enemy but rather Zhalensky’s regime.

    If you think Ukraine can win this war, you are bey9nd deluisional. Putin’s need to maintain a semblance of being reasonable and not a butcher, as well as his hesitation to bomb NATO suppliy lines in the fear of escalating the war with NATO, is what is allowing Ukraine to even stay in the fight.

    If you were actually intelligent, you’d realize that all that Russis would have to do to win w0uld be too bomb all the countries food supply, their power plants and all the roads that tthe Ukranians use to transport the supplies that they get from NATO, and then shell their cities to rubbles with their heavy artillary – Russia has the World’s most powerful long-ranged heavy artillary by far – and the war would be 0ver. This is obvious.

    Putin’s mistake is to insist that this is only an operation to disable Ukranian forces in the Donbass, and to try to spare Ukranian civilians and not more effectively cut off the NATO supply lines, which is the only thing that even keps Ukraine alive in this fight *despite* Russia holding back all it’s power trying to spare civilians. Putin should just declare war and go straight to the jugular: wipe all Ukranian citiees from off the face of the Earth, starve the remaining Ukranians to death and ruthlessly kill any U.S supply convoy or of it’s satellites to send a clear message that the U.S is not allowed to aid Ukraine in this war. And no, the U.S is not going to war with Russia if Russia bombs and kills a few dozen Americans who were aiding the Ukranians when it is made clear that they were aiding the Ukrainians. The U.S won’t do shit about it, and we know that it’s true.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  469. Corvinus says:
    @Zero Philosopher

    “If you were actually intelligent, you’d realize that all that Russis would have to do to win w0uld be too bomb all the countries food supply, their power plants and all the roads that tthe Ukranians use to transport the supplies that they get from NATO, and then shell their cities to rubbles with their heavy artillary”

    But Putin has war gamed this out, and he’s not going to be that foolish. Besides, holding on to that territory long after he is pushing up daisies is another consideration.

    Regardless, Ukraine is holding up quite well, and Russia is taking it on the chin.

  470. Corvinus says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    It was t colonialism. It was Ukraine exercising its sovereignty as a nation. You just simply don’t get it.

  471. @Twinkie

    Our future Indian-East Asian elites will probably be as corrupt & self-serving as Jews, but I really doubt that they’re planning any wars overseas. A realistic model would be the Indians of East Africa, or maybe the Chinese of Southeast Asia.

    Amy Chua has written about these “market-dominant” minorities.

    I do anticipate Jews will continue to start new wars.

  472. Anonymous[458] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    We can tell the global warming activists are full of BS when they advocate for the settlement of people from hot countries in cold countries – where (of course) they will run the home heating at max for 10 months of the year.

  473. @New Dealer

    Agreed fully, yet most people can’t seem to tolerate it. They prefer for everything to be wrapped up in tidy packages and for everyone they know to agree with everyone else they know.

    This, despite the fact of glaring internal contradictions in their (establishment-supplied) worldview and especially despite their endless caterwauling about diversity.

  474. Anonymous[103] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    He saw his forces effortlessly marching into Kiev the same way the Taliban did into Kabul, with the U.S.-backed local forces again just deserting or defecting without firing a shot. Huge, huge miscalculation.

    Though, it’s probably unwise to mock him too much for this. It wasn’t such an unrealistic expectation at the time. (Indeed it’s pretty much what happened in Crimea in 2014.)

    (The story of Damocles comes to mind. It’s good to be the king – until you have to make a decision like this, and it all goes wrong.)

  475. anon[221] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    corevagina:

    New people move to a place.
    The people who were there blend in due time.
    Other people move in.
    The previous people blend in due time.

    “new people move into a place” is a creepy euphemism for invasion and conquest.

    As for the rest of your anti-White screed, glad to see you’re finally outing yourself as a race exterminationist and genocide apologist. Every enemy of Truth and Beauty should be so candid.

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