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Ross Douthat on "The Reactionary Mind"
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Back in early April, I tweeted:

Reaction is less of a political philosophy than an art form, one conducive to creating the best satire.

Now, from Ross Douthat in the NYT:

The Reactionary Mind
Ross Douthat APRIL 23, 2016

… Is there a way to make room for the reactionary mind in our intellectual life, though, without making room for racialist obsessions and fantasies of enlightened despotism? So far the evidence from neoreaction is not exactly encouraging.

Okay, but at the risk of going off on a tangent, doesn’t the term “racialist obsessions” describe rather aptly much of the content of the New York Times under editor Dean Baquet?

Yet its strange viral appeal is also evidence that ideas can’t be permanently repressed when something in them still seems true.

Maybe one answer is to avoid systemization, to welcome a reactionary style that’s artistic, aphoristic and religious, while rejecting the idea of a reactionary blueprint for our politics. From Eliot and Waugh and Kipling to Michel Houellebecq, there’s a reactionary canon waiting to be celebrated as such, rather than just read through a lens of grudging aesthetic respect but ideological disapproval.

A phrase from the right-wing Colombian philosopher Nicolás Gómez Dávila could serve as such a movement’s mission statement. His goal, he wrote, was not a comprehensive political schema but a “reactionary patchwork.” Which might be the best way for reaction to become something genuinely new: to offer itself, not as ideological rival to liberalism and conservatism, but as a vision as strange and motley as reality itself.

Personally, I’m a realist reformer in the tradition of Benjamin Franklin. But Franklin, while amusing, wasn’t as enduringly comic as, say, the reactionary Swift.

 
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  1. That’s the big problem isn’t it? The left makes everything about race while the right pretends that the left isn’t making everything about race.

    Also, I’ve never read this Moldburg guy or ever seen him quoted by anyone on any alt right site I’ve ever been on yet he is always quoted in the press as being behind the whole thing.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Yep

    I tried reading him. I"m sure there's useful ideas in there, but he's a terrible writer.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @antipater_1

    , @Justpassingby
    @Yep


    That’s the big problem isn’t it? The left makes everything about race while the right pretends that the left isn’t making everything about race.
     
    Bingo! Wins the thread. And the very first post, too.

    Also, I’ve never read this Moldburg guy or ever seen him quoted by anyone on any alt right site I’ve ever been on yet he is always quoted in the press as being behind the whole thing.
     
    Don't know about "alt right" but "Moldburg" is a johnny-come-lately to the soi dissant reactionary movement.
  2. Reaction is for losers.

    What I mean by this is that, in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    Culture is a different matter, there, reaction is the source of lots of great literature. All you have to do is look for authors — particularly in literature, philosophy, belles lettres — who are pessimistic, conservative, have given up on pleasing the multitude, or repeating the desired shibboleths, and so on. Such authors, under the surface, are elitist; not because they are snobs, but because they are writing for an audience of individuals who are trying to find their way, rather than trying to curry favor with the confederacy of dunces.

    I could include in this list not only Swift, but also Voltaire, probably Hume, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Chesterton, and many others. And, not surprisingly, much of what they wrote was satirical and still very funny: the fact that the list would include earnest Christians ranging from Erasmus and More to Chesterton tells you something about the fortunes of authentic religious belief.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @SPMoore8

    . . .in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    The reactionary is doomed because he recognizes threats to his society so much earlier than anyone else that he can't motivate others to help stop them.

    Auster's Formulation:


    A traditionalist (or a reactionary) recognizes a threat to his society the moment it appears.

    A conservative recognizes the threat when it has half-destroyed the society.

    A liberal only recognizes the threat after it has completely destroyed the society, or, alternatively, he never recognizes it at all.
     
    Douthat is at best a conservative.

    Replies: @RamonaQ, @neon2

  3. Speaking of artistic reactionaries: Derbyshire’s been holding out on us! Here he is in Bristol UK earlier this year, workin’ the board. The intro track is dope.

    • Replies: @gruff
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Jesus...Underworld are decades old now....Ageing Slippy...

    , @Blobby5
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Damn that Limey is multi talented, what a great pull.

  4. Racialism and “enlightened” despotism for me, not for thee.

  5. Douthat is essentially describing what I’ve been advocating for the Alt-Right for years, i.e., the primacy of the artistic approach.

    It’s working.

    • Replies: @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    , @Carl
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    You mean the autistic reproach, surely.

  6. but a “reactionary patchwork.”

    translation: neutered

    still interesting though

    this Moldburg guy

    early spotter of what was happening like Larry Auster and Fjordman who tried to steer it in a safe direction – not bad guys overall, dual loyalty is better than none

  7. @Yep
    That's the big problem isn't it? The left makes everything about race while the right pretends that the left isn't making everything about race.

    Also, I've never read this Moldburg guy or ever seen him quoted by anyone on any alt right site I've ever been on yet he is always quoted in the press as being behind the whole thing.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Justpassingby

    I tried reading him. I”m sure there’s useful ideas in there, but he’s a terrible writer.

    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    He's hamstrung because if he gave a more honest assessment of the "Neo-Reaction" or "Alt-Right", he would be quickly out of a job.

    The reader commentators think Douthat is talking about Ted Cruz and National Review.

    , @antipater_1
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    Yes indeed! Moldbug - why say something in 100 words if you can say it in 10,000 words?

    Replies: @Gutenberg

  8. @SPMoore8
    Reaction is for losers.

    What I mean by this is that, in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    Culture is a different matter, there, reaction is the source of lots of great literature. All you have to do is look for authors -- particularly in literature, philosophy, belles lettres -- who are pessimistic, conservative, have given up on pleasing the multitude, or repeating the desired shibboleths, and so on. Such authors, under the surface, are elitist; not because they are snobs, but because they are writing for an audience of individuals who are trying to find their way, rather than trying to curry favor with the confederacy of dunces.

    I could include in this list not only Swift, but also Voltaire, probably Hume, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Chesterton, and many others. And, not surprisingly, much of what they wrote was satirical and still very funny: the fact that the list would include earnest Christians ranging from Erasmus and More to Chesterton tells you something about the fortunes of authentic religious belief.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    . . .in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    The reactionary is doomed because he recognizes threats to his society so much earlier than anyone else that he can’t motivate others to help stop them.

    Auster’s Formulation:

    A traditionalist (or a reactionary) recognizes a threat to his society the moment it appears.

    A conservative recognizes the threat when it has half-destroyed the society.

    A liberal only recognizes the threat after it has completely destroyed the society, or, alternatively, he never recognizes it at all.

    Douthat is at best a conservative.

    • Replies: @RamonaQ
    @Harry Baldwin

    What a great quote, and so true - in particular, about Auster himself. He wrote The Path to National Suicide in 1989 when immigration wasn't a blip on anyone's radar.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @guest

    , @neon2
    @Harry Baldwin

    Auster was magnificent, and nobody is more missed.

    But I think those of you happily agreeing with one another that political reaction is for losers are forgetting that the Congress of Vienna was Reaction's great moment, and ushered in the glorious 19th Century (1815-1914) when monarchy, tradition and religion set the tone. All sorts of unexpected people from every walk of life were men (and women) of the Right; it was indeed so natural that it never came up in any public sort of way, and is usually only discoverable from diaries and private letters. My favorite example is Gottlob Frege: it is deliciously enjoyable to read the scandalised reactions of his modern day admirers once they discover his "fascism").
    1848 was a worry, but victory went again to reaction, and the Right kept on winning right up until the madness of 1914.
    "The Holy Alliance" - who does not thrill at the very name? It is no small part of the tragedy of the First World War that the act which triggered it, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, killed the very man who, more than any other of his time, realised the importance of re-vitalising that alliance in the face of the twin dangers of democracy and nationalism.
    Ichabod! Ichabod! For the glory is indeed departed.

  9. Once again, I’ll remind everyone that this clown joked about Trump being killed.

    • Replies: @RamonaQ
    @Cracker

    I get the sense that Douthat and Michael B Dougherty came dangerously close to being accused of Trumpsplaining so they had to make a hasty anti Trump turn so as to avoid being thrown out of polite society. The joke about killing Trump probably bought Douthat enough street cred to get away with writing this column.

    It's nice that he wrote about it but I found the timid and roundabout style kind of annoying.

  10. @Harry Baldwin
    @SPMoore8

    . . .in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    The reactionary is doomed because he recognizes threats to his society so much earlier than anyone else that he can't motivate others to help stop them.

    Auster's Formulation:


    A traditionalist (or a reactionary) recognizes a threat to his society the moment it appears.

    A conservative recognizes the threat when it has half-destroyed the society.

    A liberal only recognizes the threat after it has completely destroyed the society, or, alternatively, he never recognizes it at all.
     
    Douthat is at best a conservative.

    Replies: @RamonaQ, @neon2

    What a great quote, and so true – in particular, about Auster himself. He wrote The Path to National Suicide in 1989 when immigration wasn’t a blip on anyone’s radar.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @RamonaQ

    Yes, Peter Brimelow has said that Auster's "The Path to National Suicide" influenced his own thinking greatly.

    Replies: @antipater_1

    , @guest
    @RamonaQ

    Immigration wasn't a blip on anyone's radar in 1989? Are you nuts?

    Replies: @ben tillman

  11. Neoreaction is not the alt-right even though the alt-right and neoraction have uncommon beliefs in common, such as HBD.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymousa

    A moving target made of smoke is pretty useful right now.

  12. @Laguna Beach Fogey
    Douthat is essentially describing what I've been advocating for the Alt-Right for years, i.e., the primacy of the artistic approach.

    It's working.

    Replies: @JB, @Carl

    Where’s the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @JB

    Many say Houellebecq.

    Replies: @anon, @guest

    , @Clifford Brown
    @JB

    Dude, do you even listen to vaporwave?

    Kidding. As for traditional art forms, my favorite film of the past decade Drive by Nicholas Refn is pretty Alt-Right. The hero is even an autiste. Can't get more Alt-Right than that.

    Replies: @dsgntd_plyr

    , @Cagey Beast
    @JB

    There's stuff from France, like Les Filles Au Moyen Age but in the English-speaking world the reactionaries have to settle for reading hidden meanings into Batman movies and Japanese cartoons.

    , @the cruncher
    @JB

    'When My Brothers Wake Up": Murdoch Murdoch -- hard working troupe

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rg8innCuN4

    Walt Bismarck - 'The 14 Words' -- very talented, he's got a million high-quality parodies

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f5ojDWMpV8

    Seventh Son, makes cover songs: 'Fashy Lullabies'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kV9KVosHxi8

    Nationalist Public Radio:

    https://radio.therightstuff.biz/2016/04/24/nationalist-public-radio-episode-5/

    Join us.

    Replies: @Carl

    , @anon
    @JB

    What form would red server art take?

    I see it everywhere.

    , @Gutenberg
    @JB

    Million Dollar Extreme:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Hkov3QcCpQ

    Seems like everything cutting-edge and exciting right now is "alt-right". The fact that it's amorphous and unideological, a general disgust with late-stage liberalism, gives it its power. It can dwell within the quantum state of current anti-culture and co-opt the detached philistinism of Millennials, at least those who aren't true believers.

    , @dsgntd_plyr
    @JB

    "The Dark Knight" trilogy. Liberal reviews noticed it was almost fascist. Conservative reviews thought it was promoting Randian free market ideology.

  13. @Cracker
    Once again, I'll remind everyone that this clown joked about Trump being killed.

    Replies: @RamonaQ

    I get the sense that Douthat and Michael B Dougherty came dangerously close to being accused of Trumpsplaining so they had to make a hasty anti Trump turn so as to avoid being thrown out of polite society. The joke about killing Trump probably bought Douthat enough street cred to get away with writing this column.

    It’s nice that he wrote about it but I found the timid and roundabout style kind of annoying.

  14. Douchehat seems to be advocating reaction as long as it is limited to LARPing, and has no discernable effect.

    Of course his characterization of reaction as being a rigid and all-encompassing philosophy, rather than an appreciation of reality as it is, is already a straw-man portrayal of it.

  15. In other words, how can we appease those with right-wing instincts while ensuring that white dispossession continues uninterrupted.

  16. @RamonaQ
    @Harry Baldwin

    What a great quote, and so true - in particular, about Auster himself. He wrote The Path to National Suicide in 1989 when immigration wasn't a blip on anyone's radar.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @guest

    Yes, Peter Brimelow has said that Auster’s “The Path to National Suicide” influenced his own thinking greatly.

    • Replies: @antipater_1
    @Harry Baldwin

    So did Pat Buchanan and so did Steve Sailer.

  17. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

    “without making room for racialist obsessions and fantasies of enlightened despotism”

    Funny coming from someone who writes for NYT that indulges in racial obsessions of Zionism & Black Lives Matter and practices the enlightened despotism of Political Correctness, homo supremacism, gentrification, stop-and-frisk, and locking up record numbers of Negroes under Clinton.

    I don’t need no stinking neo-reaction.
    Not when I’m the only true race-ist.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Priss Factor

    Polly Perkins? Didn’t you go to one of those horsey girls' schools… Garrison Forest, or something?

  18. “Is there a way to make room for the reactionary mind in our intellectual life, though, without making room for racialist obsessions and fantasies of enlightened despotism?”

    Is not the avoidance even of any consideration that race may have some tangible consequences in human affairs a kind of obsession? And it seems that the Republican Party endorsed neo-conservative policy of military intervention around the world could be characterized – at best – as “enlightened despotism”

  19. @Anonymousa
    Neoreaction is not the alt-right even though the alt-right and neoraction have uncommon beliefs in common, such as HBD.

    Replies: @anon

    A moving target made of smoke is pretty useful right now.

  20. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    Many say Houellebecq.

    • Replies: @anon
    @fnn

    Houellebecq's book is stealth Lord Haw Haw imo: "stop struggling while we drown you in the bath little one, you can't win, just give up."

    Replies: @fnn

    , @guest
    @fnn

    I don't believe him. I think it's a put-on. Either that, or he's hedging his bets. Either of which lead ultimately to confusing books.

  21. @fnn
    @JB

    Many say Houellebecq.

    Replies: @anon, @guest

    Houellebecq’s book is stealth Lord Haw Haw imo: “stop struggling while we drown you in the bath little one, you can’t win, just give up.”

    • Replies: @fnn
    @anon

    Not too much similarity between Houellebecq's works and Twilight Over England.

  22. From the perspective of the mainstream left, much reactionary thought should be taboo; from the perspective of the sensible center, the absence of far-right equivalents of Michel Foucault or Slavoj Zizek probably seems like no great loss.

    MMM, Douthat must have missed the Liberal revival of Carl Schmitt. I can’t tell you how many hardcore radical Leftist academics these days are making their way through his corpus….

    Personally, I’m a realist reformer in the tradition of Benjamin Franklin. But Franklin, while amusing, wasn’t as enduringly funny as, say, the reactionary Swift.

    Which probably has something to do with Franklin’s fundamental optimism.Reactionary humor carries with it the smack of despair. Its witticisms are sharp and cutting. We laugh as we bleed.

  23. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Speaking of artistic reactionaries: Derbyshire’s been holding out on us! Here he is in Bristol UK earlier this year, workin’ the board. The intro track is dope.

    Replies: @gruff, @Blobby5

    Jesus…Underworld are decades old now….Ageing Slippy…

  24. Steve,

    Have you tried Square Cash? It makes those other systems look byzantine.

    cash.me

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Almost Missouri

    Weird, I thought I put this on the fundraising post. Now it is here.

  25. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Before the scales fell from my eyes and I came here (thanks CNN–was it?–for those bleached photos of Trayvon’s face) I commented extensively in the leftist blogosphere. My opinion, for what it’s worth, is that conservatives in general, and e.g. Sailer, Derbyshire here in particular, have a much better sense of humor than leftoids.

    Leftists don’t laugh much. They’re too busy tsk tsking and shaking their heads. Conservatives write with (at the very least) a sense of amused, grim irony–though that may come from their being embattled underdogs.

    Douthat’s so-called “Reactionaries” are just better all-round intellectuals. They know and can do Math, plus, they speak the unspeakable and that’s always fun.

    I just can’t shake the feeling that Liberalism is a Religion and in so far as it functions through a political party it actually violates the constitutional ban on a State imposed religion but cleverly avoids censure because it subscribes to no particular set of accepted, orthodox dogma. Yet it does practice excommunication, worships certain alleged truths which it holds sacrosanct and beyond challenge, prohibits certain thoughts and speech as anathema and so forth. The crowning irony is that most Liberals, who either ignore or mock organized churches, are fundamentalist in outlook and behavior–intolerant of intolerance I believe they call it.

    • Replies: @Stirner
    @Anon

    Anon,

    Moldbug wrote extensively on the religious underpinnings of the modern progressive "mind".

    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2009/01/gentle-introduction-to-unqualified.html

    If you can deal with the baroque and self-indulgent writing style, it's a thought provoking analysis.

    Replies: @guest, @WowJustWow

  26. Ed says:

    I have to admit that this is one post here I didn’t understand much, but Steve Sailer has Swift and Franklin nailed.

    I recently read parts of “Poor Richard’s Almanac” and OK, its amusing, sort of like a better-than-average issue of the Onion. Swift’s stuff, though, is hilarious, more like Monty Python when they were focused.

    The Python troupe partially refutes the thesis, which SPMoore8 ably supports, that humor has to be reactionary. They were all leftists in a left-wing era. The most right-wing members of the group were Cleese, a liberal, and Palin, a mainstream Labour supporter. The rest were well to the left of that.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Ed

    John Cleese on London:


    The comic was asked what he thought about British culture and the recent London riots during an interview on 7.30, a television show in Australia, where he is currently on a stand-up tour.
    He replied: 'I'm not sure what's going on in Britain. Or, let me say this – I don't know what's going on in London, because London is no longer an English city.
    'That's how we got the Olympics.
    'They said we were the most cosmopolitan city on Earth. But it doesn't feel English.
    'I had a Californian friend come over two months ago, walk down the King's Road and say, "Where are all the English people?"
    'I mean, I love having different cultures around. But when the parent culture kind of dissipates, you're left thinking, "Well, what's going on?
     
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2032956/John-Cleese-London-longer-English-city-thats-got-2012-Olympics.html
    , @syonredux
    @Ed

    Monty Python's send-ups of Leftist politics were pretty funny


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WboggjN_G-4

  27. Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn’t something we embrace. It’s something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    • Replies: @Warner
    @Tiny Duck

    Cool narrative, bro!

    , @anon
    @Tiny Duck

    a perfect example of the Frankfurt school in action

    so perfect it could be fake I guess

    , @5371
    @Tiny Duck

    And to think they say liberals are smug and ignorant.

    , @unpc downunder
    @Tiny Duck

    Right-wing liberalism is the opposite of tribalism. Left-wing liberalism is the division of society into self-identifying cliches, with technocrats like Hillary moulding them into an alliance against the majority.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Tiny Duck


    Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.
     
    Yes - a spectrum - with Peter Singer buggering a happy calf, and you, buggering Peter Singer!

    Replies: @SPMoore8

  28. RE: Reactionary humor,

    Been wending my way though the Library of America volume of Ambrose Bierce’s stuff. “Bitter” Bierce, “Voltaire with stomach ulcers.” Shockingly cold for the late 19th-early 20th century. The Civil War stories (“Chickamauga,” “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” “Parker Addison, Philosopher,” etc) are as biting and cynical as anything from the Great War. And the horror stories (“The Damned Thing,” “The Death of Halpin Frayser,” “An Inhabitant of Carcosa,”etc)….far more terrifying than the sentimental slop that was coming out of England.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @syonredux

    Some Hungarian made a movie about "George Thurston" in the Civil War stories, translates as "American Postcard"; basically has some Hungarian 48ers on the Union side in the Civil War. Very weird film based on an equally weird story. "Horseman in the Sky" is also a favorite.

    Unfortunately the book you have -- I have it too -- only includes the Devil's Dictionary (which is very funny in its own mordant way) as a demonstration of his humor, it doesn't include all the little short pieces that show off his sarcasm and sardonic wit. The Clifton Fadiman edited volume from the '50's is what I broke my teeth on, it has a lot of those tales. However, all of Bierce is easily available for free on multiple internet platforms.

    But, yeah, he makes the list.

    Replies: @syonredux

  29. Moldbug was/is a clown…besides being practically unreadable, his writing has a sub-sophomoric understanding of history and politics. I suspect he is held up as important by the mainstream media precisely to belittle conservative intellectuals, since he is neither.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @MQ

    His piece explaining how blacks are our new aristocracy is brilliant.

    , @NOTA
    @MQ

    How would the mainstream media recognize a real intellectual vs a fake one?

  30. @Tiny Duck
    Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn't something we embrace. It's something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    Replies: @Warner, @anon, @5371, @unpc downunder, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Cool narrative, bro!

  31. @Ed
    I have to admit that this is one post here I didn't understand much, but Steve Sailer has Swift and Franklin nailed.

    I recently read parts of "Poor Richard's Almanac" and OK, its amusing, sort of like a better-than-average issue of the Onion. Swift's stuff, though, is hilarious, more like Monty Python when they were focused.

    The Python troupe partially refutes the thesis, which SPMoore8 ably supports, that humor has to be reactionary. They were all leftists in a left-wing era. The most right-wing members of the group were Cleese, a liberal, and Palin, a mainstream Labour supporter. The rest were well to the left of that.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux

    John Cleese on London:

    The comic was asked what he thought about British culture and the recent London riots during an interview on 7.30, a television show in Australia, where he is currently on a stand-up tour.
    He replied: ‘I’m not sure what’s going on in Britain. Or, let me say this – I don’t know what’s going on in London, because London is no longer an English city.
    ‘That’s how we got the Olympics.
    ‘They said we were the most cosmopolitan city on Earth. But it doesn’t feel English.
    ‘I had a Californian friend come over two months ago, walk down the King’s Road and say, “Where are all the English people?”
    ‘I mean, I love having different cultures around. But when the parent culture kind of dissipates, you’re left thinking, “Well, what’s going on?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2032956/John-Cleese-London-longer-English-city-thats-got-2012-Olympics.html

  32. @anon
    @fnn

    Houellebecq's book is stealth Lord Haw Haw imo: "stop struggling while we drown you in the bath little one, you can't win, just give up."

    Replies: @fnn

    Not too much similarity between Houellebecq’s works and Twilight Over England.

  33. @Anon
    Before the scales fell from my eyes and I came here (thanks CNN--was it?--for those bleached photos of Trayvon's face) I commented extensively in the leftist blogosphere. My opinion, for what it's worth, is that conservatives in general, and e.g. Sailer, Derbyshire here in particular, have a much better sense of humor than leftoids.

    Leftists don't laugh much. They're too busy tsk tsking and shaking their heads. Conservatives write with (at the very least) a sense of amused, grim irony--though that may come from their being embattled underdogs.

    Douthat's so-called "Reactionaries" are just better all-round intellectuals. They know and can do Math, plus, they speak the unspeakable and that's always fun.

    I just can't shake the feeling that Liberalism is a Religion and in so far as it functions through a political party it actually violates the constitutional ban on a State imposed religion but cleverly avoids censure because it subscribes to no particular set of accepted, orthodox dogma. Yet it does practice excommunication, worships certain alleged truths which it holds sacrosanct and beyond challenge, prohibits certain thoughts and speech as anathema and so forth. The crowning irony is that most Liberals, who either ignore or mock organized churches, are fundamentalist in outlook and behavior--intolerant of intolerance I believe they call it.

    Replies: @Stirner

    Anon,

    Moldbug wrote extensively on the religious underpinnings of the modern progressive “mind”.

    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2009/01/gentle-introduction-to-unqualified.html

    If you can deal with the baroque and self-indulgent writing style, it’s a thought provoking analysis.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Stirner

    "the baroque and self-indulgent writing style"

    That's the main objection. Another is that he's a convert from the progressive side who, despite what he says, I think hasn't completely let go. That's what gives his writings an air of perpetual irony. Unlike, say, the baroque and self-indulgent Carlyle (one of Moldbug's chief inspirations), I don't think he completely believes what he's saying. Plus, his solutions, as opposed to his analysis, are flat-out crazy. But that may be necessary, because a Jacobite restoration is unimaginable.

    But he did give me countless tidbits of genius, and we share an admiration for Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn, Bertrand de Jouvenel, Austrian economics, the Americanist Library, and so forth.

    , @WowJustWow
    @Stirner

    Some of his most valuable content is about explaining the progressive mind, because he has one. All of his stuff is very specifically written for those who were raised as good-thinking atheist Brahminate progressives who fully absorbed their received value system.

    This quote comes not from his blog, but one of his random comment-thread-bombings elsewhere on the web. I think it elucidates the appeal of his writing to the right sort of reader:


    As for “K. Marx and F. Engels,” our perspectives differ in one critical regard. Because I was born in 1973 and graduated from Brown in 1992, I am completely marinated in your perspective. No intelligent person can pretend to be unaware of progressive doctrine, still less one whose zip code is 94114! You, however, appear to have only the sketchiest and most distorted knowledge of any perspective to the right of yours. If you lack the inclination to change this, I cannot make you drink.

    My misfortune, I suppose, is that I took all the horseshit that was jammed up my young ass seriously. That is: I was told I was supposed to be tolerant, keep an open mind, and above all never hate anyone. Being foolish enough to take these principles seriously, I could not remain on the reservation. I still feel they are good principles, in theory. It is certainly never too late to apply them.
     
    So UR is very different from what you might read from writers who converged on similar ideas through different life trajectories. Somebody who, say, went to the same elite institutions but was a member of their college Republican group wouldn't have cut it for me; my ideological immune system would have set off antibodies at seeing particular buzzwords, shibboleths, or just subtle stylistic flourishes that give off the wrong vibe. For instance, Ross Douthat. If you develop your traditionalist thinking within progressive institutions, you'll acquire a noticeable Outer Party patina, which makes you easier to dismiss, even by people who like to think of themselves as open-minded.

    Part of what makes UR such fascinating reading is the "OMG get out of my younger self's head" moments -- touching on a lot of things you remember from your school years that you always noticed were a little bit... off, little circles you couldn't square. But you didn't have time to figure it all out, so it was best to just write it off as "hey, the world is complicated" for the time being. As an adult, what really keeps me eager to explore outside the Overton window is filling in some of those missing pieces while being reminded of how I felt when I first noticed them, like teasing out the root of some trauma in a therapy session. There are dots that are hard to connect unless you see how somebody else followed a similar path. That's what makes it worth slogging through some of his book-length blog posts.
  34. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    Dude, do you even listen to vaporwave?

    Kidding. As for traditional art forms, my favorite film of the past decade Drive by Nicholas Refn is pretty Alt-Right. The hero is even an autiste. Can’t get more Alt-Right than that.

    • Replies: @dsgntd_plyr
    @Clifford Brown

    Search "vaporware the simpsons." You're welcome.

  35. @Almost Missouri
    Steve,

    Have you tried Square Cash? It makes those other systems look byzantine.

    cash.me

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Weird, I thought I put this on the fundraising post. Now it is here.

  36. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    There’s stuff from France, like Les Filles Au Moyen Age but in the English-speaking world the reactionaries have to settle for reading hidden meanings into Batman movies and Japanese cartoons.

  37. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Yep

    I tried reading him. I"m sure there's useful ideas in there, but he's a terrible writer.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @antipater_1

    He’s hamstrung because if he gave a more honest assessment of the “Neo-Reaction” or “Alt-Right”, he would be quickly out of a job.

    The reader commentators think Douthat is talking about Ted Cruz and National Review.

  38. Personally, I’m a realist reformer in the tradition of Benjamin Franklin. But Franklin, while amusing, wasn’t as enduringly comic as, say, the reactionary Swift.

    Franklin was some sort of liberal proto-technocrat, no? Are you sure you’re in that mold?

  39. This article sounds like a lot of whistling past the graveyard.

  40. Its a mistake to conflate nationalism with reaction. Those two political movements are usually opposed and are now.

    The USA is at the dawn of a reactionary age. The fortunes that have been made in the past 30 years in finance, tech, and media IP will be passed down to more mediocre heirs who will still feel entitled to a central place in society. Political correctness/smug liberalism is the construction of the class of people connected to those realms, people who will act to set rules and mores (the more irrational the better) that will benefit themselves (and their masters) at the expense of the rest of us.

    The best part of this blog is the puncturing of the conceits of this reactionary moment. People who affect 19th century aristocratic ideals online are pretty much irrelevant

  41. @Yep
    That's the big problem isn't it? The left makes everything about race while the right pretends that the left isn't making everything about race.

    Also, I've never read this Moldburg guy or ever seen him quoted by anyone on any alt right site I've ever been on yet he is always quoted in the press as being behind the whole thing.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Justpassingby

    That’s the big problem isn’t it? The left makes everything about race while the right pretends that the left isn’t making everything about race.

    Bingo! Wins the thread. And the very first post, too.

    Also, I’ve never read this Moldburg guy or ever seen him quoted by anyone on any alt right site I’ve ever been on yet he is always quoted in the press as being behind the whole thing.

    Don’t know about “alt right” but “Moldburg” is a johnny-come-lately to the soi dissant reactionary movement.

  42. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Speaking of artistic reactionaries: Derbyshire’s been holding out on us! Here he is in Bristol UK earlier this year, workin’ the board. The intro track is dope.

    Replies: @gruff, @Blobby5

    Damn that Limey is multi talented, what a great pull.

  43. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Yep

    I tried reading him. I"m sure there's useful ideas in there, but he's a terrible writer.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @antipater_1

    Yes indeed! Moldbug – why say something in 100 words if you can say it in 10,000 words?

    • Replies: @Gutenberg
    @antipater_1

    For plausible deniability - so he could have a life and career after having a far-right blog. It's important to imply things without saying them and to defy neat summing-up.

    I for one, am immensely grateful to Moldbug. He gave me a true historical vision, which I think is the defining characteristic of a reactionary, which is judging the present by the best from all times. All great culture is reactionary, because it's not ideological, it's trying to portray reality and humans as truthfully as possible.

    the critique of democracy, Thomas Carlyle, the caste analysis of American politics, the ultra-Calvinist as liberalism hypothesis, "the Cathedral"... he brought all of these into currency in the alt-right

    Moldbug's verbosity is inseparable from the reactionary worldview itself, that nothing is ever reducible to an ideology or formula. It's the judgment of a well-developed character, at the end of the day, that counts.

  44. @Tiny Duck
    Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn't something we embrace. It's something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    Replies: @Warner, @anon, @5371, @unpc downunder, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    a perfect example of the Frankfurt school in action

    so perfect it could be fake I guess

  45. @Priss Factor
    "without making room for racialist obsessions and fantasies of enlightened despotism"

    Funny coming from someone who writes for NYT that indulges in racial obsessions of Zionism & Black Lives Matter and practices the enlightened despotism of Political Correctness, homo supremacism, gentrification, stop-and-frisk, and locking up record numbers of Negroes under Clinton.

    I don't need no stinking neo-reaction.
    Not when I'm the only true race-ist.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Polly Perkins? Didn’t you go to one of those horsey girls’ schools… Garrison Forest, or something?

  46. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

    The Douther is a tiresome bore.

    The fool thinks courage is about shouting at Edward Cullen to let Bella go. Never mind it was Bella who pursued Ed who kept his distance. The fool also panned DAMSELS IN DISTRESS, a real gem.

    I mean just get a load of this crap:

    “First, a group of prominent social psychologists released a paper quantifying and criticizing their field’s overwhelming left-wing tilt.”

    Why do we keep hearing about this ‘left-wing tilt’? Leftism is dead, and I mean real leftism. How many communists are there on campuses? Even Marx is mostly passe. No one reads Lenin or Trotsky. Maoism? Who dat?

    Globalist capitalism won

    [MORE]

    , and the main impetus of so-called ‘progressives’ is to spread Americanism and homo agenda around the world. Both are tied to Wall Street, Hollywood, Las Vegas, Pentagon, and etc.
    So-called ‘leftists’ opposed the Iraq War ONLY because it was by Bush. But keep in mind that the so-called ‘Liberal Media’ mostly gave Bush a free hand and served as the propaganda wing. And when Obama and Hillary got aggressive all over, the ‘leftist’ community was shhhhhhh, ever so quiet. So much for the ‘left’.

    What goes by ‘leftism’ is mostly hedonism, sexualism, homo decadence(tied to capitalist vanity and consumerism), slut feminism, precious ‘virtue-signaling’, and etc. These are all the products of capitalism. They are about elitism and decadence. They are about privilege and vanity.
    We have ‘leftists’ like Paul Krugman praising Hillary and attacking Bernie Sanders. But even the majority of Sanders supporters are upper-middle class types who just like the mere IDEA and IMAGE of being ‘progressive’. Their privilege depends on capitalism, and they are all for globalism.

    If America has true leftism, the movement wouldn’t have turned into celebration of vain homos funded by Wall Street and the national debate being ‘can a man in a dress use a woman’s washroom’?
    True, the academia is no go zone for true rightists, but its ‘leftists’ are a silly lot into the decadence of navel-gazing. They have no connection to the people or any kind of reality. They are ivory tower cocktail sippers who yap about ‘white privilege’ to keep their own white privilege. They practice gentrification, and their ambition is to stick close to rich urban globalists who provide the funds.

    “For its opportunistic fans, neoreaction just offers a pretentious justification for white male chauvinism and Trump worship.”

    Well, well, get a load of this cuck. I wonder if he would characterize NYT as offering pretentious justification for Jewish chauvinism and Zionist imperialism. Or for black thuggery and criminality. Didn’t NYT fan anti-white flames in Ferguson and Baltimore?
    Oh no, cucky Douthat only reserves harsh dismissive words for white interests. So, if white males are pissed at how PC dumps on them, they are wallowing in ‘white male chauvinism’. And Trump supporters are into ‘Trump worship’.
    In fact, support for Trump among Alt Right types is actually far more cynical than the kind of mindless worship you see among Sanders and Hillary supporters. Alt Right doesn’t trust Trump. They figure he’s just another shark. But they like what he’s doing as wrecker of the phony GOP.

    “Our intelligentsia obviously does have a conservative wing, mostly clustered in think tanks rather than on campuses.”

    No, they are cuckservative puppets of Neocon donors. They might as well be called Shrink Tanks. We remember what happened to Jason Richwine at the behest of Jennifer Rubin. In fact, lots of Neocons voted for Obama, but they still get to call the shots in the GOP. Anne Appelbaum has been a war-monger, and McCain was the ultimate neocon warmonger. But she went with Obama but still has the gall of posing as a ‘conservative’.

    “Such deep critiques of our society abound in academia; they’re just almost all on the left.”

    ‘Deep’ critiques of society on the ‘left’? So, yapping endlessly about ‘racism’, ‘sexism’, ‘white male privilege’, ‘homophobia’, and ‘evil Russia’ constitutes ‘deep critique’? Really?
    Deep leftist critique once did exist, but name one ‘deep’ thinker on the ‘left’ today?
    Even the New York Review of Books that once had some interesting think pieces mostly dishes out Soros-ian crap nowadays.
    Film criticism about THE SEARCHERS ends with ‘Wayne was racist’.
    What is this Douther clown talking about?

    Now, there are first-rate historians still working in the media. A lot of Liberal historians know their material and write interesting books. But as theorists and intellectuals, what original insight have they offered about humanity in the past 30 yrs? Give me one deep ‘leftist’ insight?
    And what of social scientists who just dish out the same old same old?
    Chetty and Assmugly don’t cut it.

    “Which is, in a sense, entirely understandable: Those politics were frequently racist and anti-Semitic, the reactionary style gave aid and comfort not only to fascism but to Hitler, and in the American context the closest thing to a reactionary order was the slave-owning aristocracy of the South.”

    Oh, what ‘deep’ thinking!!
    An idea is wrong cuz it’s ‘racist’. But what does that mean today? And ‘anti-semitic’? So what if some people see Jews as a negative influence? It’s perfectly okay for Jews to declare entire peoples — Russians, Wasps, Germans, French, Hungarians, Poles, Iranians, Chinese, etc — as their enemy. So, by what crazy law must we all love Jews?
    If Jews love us, we should love them. If they hate us, we should hate them back.

    And oh, some gave comfort to Hitler. Well, many more on the left gave comfort to Stalin and Mao. But that never stopped the leftist takeover of the academia(that eventually turned into a silly joke once communism fell and the new ‘leftism’ turned into silly inane stuff like freaking out over Halloween costumes and banning even Vagina Monologue as a women’s college… cuz it might offend trannies. That is ‘leftism’? I have too much respect for real leftism to deign such as leftism.)
    Oh, the ‘slave-owning aristocracy of the South’. Never mind that Southern slavery was facilitated by the capitalist enterprise of the North. Never mind the Eastern Brahmins were, in their own, way conservative and reactionary as well as reformist. Eastern Brahmins had very austere cultural standards at odds with rapid changes in NY and LA.

    And if ‘reaction’ must be associated with southern slavery, shouldn’t northern ‘progressivism’ be tied to ‘genocide’ of Indians, expansion of American imperialism to Cuba and Philippines?
    And what about Nakba facilitated by Democrat Truman and pushed by ‘liberal’ Zionists and even by communist Jews who obviously didn’t care about the fate of Palestinians who got it as bad or worse than Indians under Andrew Jackson?
    And when Stalin turned all those Ukrainians into slaves, who were cheering in America? the Left or the right? But cucky boy Douther better not mention such stuff cuz he’ll be booted by both Neocons and NYT. What courage!

    “But while reactionary thought is prone to real wickedness, it also contains real insights.”

    Yabba dabba. We don’t need to no stinking reaction. Reaction is for crusty old folks.
    It’s about people with no vision, no will to act. They just watch others do stuff and then sigh and complain. Or, it is for people who prefer style over substance. I don’t need no stinking style.

    There is only the Truth. Truth is neither left nor right, progressive or reactionary. It just is. For example, an anus is NOT a sex organ. That is the truth. A man who puts on a dress is NOT a woman. Black Lives Matter is based on lies. Jewish cult of ‘white privilege’ is to mask and hide Jewish privilege. US has been the aggressor in Ukraine because Jews control US foreign policy. All these truths are buried by NYT, but cuck boy Douther would rather bitch about Hitler!!!

    What Douther fails to understand is that the biggest closet-rightists are actually Jews. Jews use Liberalism as a tool to serve Jewish identity, power, history, and territory.
    For Jews, Liberalism is a tool, a weapon, not a principle. It’s like the Jewish Jonathan Haidt pretending that it’s more taboo to badmouth Muslims than Jews. Is he kidding? Sure, there are some segments of the academia where it’s fair game to attack Israel, but it’s never ever okay to criticize Jews as Jews. One must make sure that one loves Jews and is only critical of Israel’s West Bank policy. But it’s fair game in much of America to bash Muslims as a group. Besides, how many so-called ‘leftists’ vocally objected to Hillary and Obama’s policies that brought so much death and destruction to the Middle East? Can anyone imagine US foreign policy doing to Israel what it has done to Iran(economic ruin), Libya(hellh0le), and Syria(a total mess).
    Notice that everything that Jews push on EU and white America are never stuff they would push on Israel. Notice that Jews yammer endlessly about ‘white privilege’ but throw fits if someone mentions Jewish privilege.

    Idea such as reaction and neoreaction are all bogus.
    There is only the Core Formula. And Jews mastered this formula better than others.

    Consider the Moses story in TEN COMMANDMENTS. Moses is a Jew kid born to a Jewish mother but he’s raised by an Egyptian ‘mother’. He thinks he’s an Egyptian kid. He can have all the privilege in the world. He can have good times as an Egyptian. But upon discovering that his mother is really Jewish, he has a change of heart. He can choose Egyptianness and privilege or Jewishness and slavery. He opts for the latter because he realizes his real mother is Jewish and her blood runs in his veins.
    So, he chooses identity over materiality. For him, it’s better to be Jewish slave than a rich Egyptian cuz blood and identity come first. To reject his Jewishness for Egyptian privilege would be a betrayal of his mother and ancestors.
    Jews have had such mindset for 1000s of yrs, even in exile. So, they survived as a race and culture. Jews are Jews not only by faith but by blood. It is about blood identity.
    It is not a matter of faith that makes Moses change his mind. It is a matter of blood. His parents are Jewish. That’s what matters. (Those who honor and respect Jewish people cannot overlook this fact of Jewishness. It has been a blood identity.)

    In contrast, look at all the lowlife white cuck traitors. They will give up whiteness, identity, heritage, tribe, lineage, and etc just to gain privilege as globalists. They choose materiality over identity. They will sell their mothers and fathers down the river just to have the good life as deracinated globalist cucks. Douther is of this ilk as he spits on white identitarians as ‘racists’ and ‘trump worshipers’. Edward Cullen ought to bite his ass, but why bother? Douther is a bloodless race traitor cuck who sold out to globalists. He is too ‘intellectual’, ‘sophisticated’, and ‘cosmopolitan’ to OBSESS about tangible stuff like race, blood, and territory. That is for mouth-breathing ‘racist’ white ‘male chauvinists’.
    Never mind that the Liberal Jews who work at the NYT believe in the Jewish race, Jewish memory, and Jewish territory. They not only believe in the sanctity of Israel but do everything in their power to turn entire city blocks into Jewtopias of power and privilege. Jews survived with such mind-set for 1000s of yrs, and we are supposed to honor them for it. But it’s somehow wrong for non-Jews to have a similar mindset?

    Jews didn’t only have the Power of Identity, as in the case of Moses who chose his true identity even in slavery than privilege in freedom and riches. (At least in the movie which is more fun.)
    Jews also have the power of spirituality but in the form of Covenant. Christian spirituality is eventually deracinating and generic because Jesus was about all people worshiping in Him and going to Heaven. Jesus also divorced spirituality from the flesh. By sacrificing His flesh, He offered mankind a way to abandon the power of tribe and blood and reach Heaven by spiritual faith alone. So, it didn’t matter who your ancestors were. If you just believed in Jesus, you were cleansed and could be with God.

    In contrast, Jews believed in a special Covenant between God and themselves. Jews needed such a Covenant to maintain their unique identity. If Jews believed in one and only true God whose plan was same for all peoples, there would be nothing spiritually special about being Jewish. But through the Covenant through Abraham, Jewish identity became special. Sure, there is only one God for all mankind, but God has a special Covenant with the Jews.
    And the Jewish Covenant fused flesh and spirituality. God blessed the Jewish pud to produce Jewish kids whose puds would be sliced and blessed to produce more Jewish little ones. So the Jewish race survived. To be born Jewish was spiritual in and of itself through the Covenant. Being Jewish preceded believing Jewish.

    So, if gentiles wanna learn something from Jews, they need to reject or revise Christianity and have their own Covenant with God. If it’s good enough for Jews, why not for other peoples? If Jews can have a special Covenant with God, other peoples can have it too. All they need is for someone to come forth as prophet and talk with God and return with the divine truth for their people. It’s like there’s only one Sun but each nation has its own relation with the Sun. So, each people need a special Covenant with God or some cosmic power.

    Third, Jews developed an idea of a sacred homeland. Not just a piece of real estate, but the Holy Land given to them by God, the land where their ancient folks once lived and where their bones are buried. This is why even secular Jews demanded that the Jewish homeland be founded in the Holy Land and not in some nice quiet empty territory with far less political trouble. In order for a people to cling and fight and die for their land, they must believe that their land is holy to them. It’s like the Exodus song where Andy Williams says ‘God gave this land to me’. All peoples must formulate a Holy-Landism for their own nation. Otherwise, it will just become another piece of globalist real estate. So, if Jews say ‘your land should be open to all’, just sing the Exodus song and say ‘we have a special covenant with God and God gave this land to us like God gave you guys Israel’.

    Fourth, Jewishness isn’t possible without history. Old Testament reads like a history book. And it offers a vision of the world through Judeo-centric eyes.
    So, every people must have a history controlled by themselves. Imagine how Jews would think of themselves if they relied on ‘ant-semites’ to tell them about the meaning of their history. If Jews relied on people like Kevin MacDonald to explain the history of Jews, they would be filled with guilt, shame, and loss of confidence.
    Sadly, white gentiles rely on Jewish Macdonadowiczs who’ve reduced white history into a narrative of ‘historical sins’ that can only be redeemed by whites cucking out to other races.

    This is the source of Jewish power. It is the Core Formula. And it is something shared by both Neocons and Liberal Zionists.
    So, all such labels as ‘liberalism’, ‘conservatism’, ‘progressivism’, ‘libertarianism’, and ‘reaction’ are for the suckers, the birds.

    There is only the Truth and there is only the Formula. Jews came up with a powerful formula. All peoples who seek to survive must follow this formula.

    Abraham: Covenant between God and our tribe. Unity of flesh and spirituality.

    Moses: Identity over Materiality.

    The Jewish Kings: defense of homeland.

    The Rabbis: preservation of memory and history from Jewish perspective.

    All else is gravy.

  47. Okay, but at the risk of going off on a tangent, doesn’t the term “racialist obsessions” describe rather aptly much of the content of the New York Times under editor Dean Baquet?

    This is exactly why Douthat really gets me steamed sometimes. Since when has he ever mentioned the blatant racialism on display in his circles? He ignores it while he disparages and excoriates white Christians who demonstrate a mere fraction of that hostility. He might as well be a Swedish Social Democrat for this hypocrisy by omission.

    It’s a genuine sin and a moral error, and as a Catholic Douthat should think about the evil he tacitly endorses before accusing others of the same.

  48. Douthat, like his colleague David Brooks, is a former National Review man, and as such is a pseudo-conservative cuckolded by the Left. His Wikipedia page says “born in San Francisco and grew up in New Haven.” Graduated from Hah-vahd and works at the New York Times.

    Yeah, real conservative, buddy. Real conservative, fer sure.

    • Replies: @Thursday
    @Dr. X

    No, he has never really been one of the NR crowd. He used to be an open supporter of our host here. But now he's at the NYT, so he's walking a real tightrope. Look at the Razib Khan situation.

    That means Douthat has to throw up some bullshit to cover himself if he wants to say anything positive about reactionaries.

  49. Douthat writes:

    Maybe one answer is to avoid systemization, to welcome a reactionary style that’s artistic, aphoristic and religious, while rejecting the idea of a reactionary blueprint for our politics.

    In the next paragraph he mentions Nicolás Gómez Dávila. Here’s a stylish, artistic aphorism from that writer:

    The cause of democracy’s stupidities is confidence in the anonymous citizen; and the cause of its crimes is the anonymous citizen’s confidence in himself.

    But because it deals with politics (i.e., the vote, and who gets to), Douthat can ignore it, and go on his happy way.

  50. Aristocratic rule is rule by the rich for the rich. See the Koch’s for instance. We basically have a version of that as it is.

    In order to have a non-suicidal democracy we need basic voter competency tests, limits on contributions, including to to “PAC’s,” and women must not be allowed to vote. Women’s nurturing instinct propels them to vote to let the hungry masses in. When invading armies conquered foreign peoples, it wasn’t the women who were killed, it was the men (women were taken and raped). Is there any wonder why men are naturally more opposed to immigration?

  51. @Harry Baldwin
    @RamonaQ

    Yes, Peter Brimelow has said that Auster's "The Path to National Suicide" influenced his own thinking greatly.

    Replies: @antipater_1

    So did Pat Buchanan and so did Steve Sailer.

  52. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.”

    Most conservatives today aren’t old enough to recall the good old days and can’t miss them. But they can see around them obviously suicidally stupid “liberal” behavior, both at a personal level and societal level. Liberalism has become the bad old days.

  53. Here are another two of Davila’s politically tinged aphorisms that what-a-good-boy-am-I Douthat can ignore:

    Natural inequalities would make the democrat’s life bitter, if slander did not exist.

    Nothing is more dangerous than to solve ephemeral problems with permanent solutions.

    The second succinctly describes the current, Douthat-approved, SOP “political blueprint”.

  54. Reaction is like setting up a chair on the footpath outside one’s house to drink beer in the afternoon sun.

    You’ll get abuse from hooligans in their V8s, stares from liberals in their Golf diesels, toots from like minded. Some passers by say hello and want a chat, others remark on what a disgrace one is making of the street. People will ask the mrs is her old man ok, mentally? Others think him eccentric, yet others think him feigning eccentricity in order to garner attention.

    The fact is: it’s a sunny day, public holiday for some bizarre antiquated ceremony that no one understands but everyone argues over ownership of the true meaning (ANZAC), it’s Autumnal cold on the deck and one really couldn’t give a rat’s arse what anyone thinks; reality says sit in the sun, which, due to the season change, is now only on the footpath and enjoy yourself as we all go to hell together.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Maybe if instead of drinking beer I threw a High Tea party for one on the footpath instead that would be considered neo-reactionary?

  55. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    ‘When My Brothers Wake Up”: Murdoch Murdoch — hard working troupe

    Walt Bismarck – ‘The 14 Words’ — very talented, he’s got a million high-quality parodies

    Seventh Son, makes cover songs: ‘Fashy Lullabies’

    Nationalist Public Radio:

    https://radio.therightstuff.biz/2016/04/24/nationalist-public-radio-episode-5/

    Join us.

    • Replies: @Carl
    @the cruncher

    He's looking for something aimed at adults, not 15 year old boys.

    Replies: @anon

  56. @Ed
    I have to admit that this is one post here I didn't understand much, but Steve Sailer has Swift and Franklin nailed.

    I recently read parts of "Poor Richard's Almanac" and OK, its amusing, sort of like a better-than-average issue of the Onion. Swift's stuff, though, is hilarious, more like Monty Python when they were focused.

    The Python troupe partially refutes the thesis, which SPMoore8 ably supports, that humor has to be reactionary. They were all leftists in a left-wing era. The most right-wing members of the group were Cleese, a liberal, and Palin, a mainstream Labour supporter. The rest were well to the left of that.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux

    Monty Python’s send-ups of Leftist politics were pretty funny

  57. According to Keith Richards, being reactionary is to accept a knighthood:

    By accepting the knighthood, Keith believed Mick had sold out to the forces of reaction that once busted and hounded them in England.

    What exactly is a reactionary?

  58. @MQ
    Moldbug was/is a clown...besides being practically unreadable, his writing has a sub-sophomoric understanding of history and politics. I suspect he is held up as important by the mainstream media precisely to belittle conservative intellectuals, since he is neither.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @NOTA

    His piece explaining how blacks are our new aristocracy is brilliant.

  59. @Pat Hannagan
    Reaction is like setting up a chair on the footpath outside one's house to drink beer in the afternoon sun.

    You'll get abuse from hooligans in their V8s, stares from liberals in their Golf diesels, toots from like minded. Some passers by say hello and want a chat, others remark on what a disgrace one is making of the street. People will ask the mrs is her old man ok, mentally? Others think him eccentric, yet others think him feigning eccentricity in order to garner attention.

    The fact is: it's a sunny day, public holiday for some bizarre antiquated ceremony that no one understands but everyone argues over ownership of the true meaning (ANZAC), it's Autumnal cold on the deck and one really couldn't give a rat's arse what anyone thinks; reality says sit in the sun, which, due to the season change, is now only on the footpath and enjoy yourself as we all go to hell together.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Maybe if instead of drinking beer I threw a High Tea party for one on the footpath instead that would be considered neo-reactionary?

  60. @syonredux
    RE: Reactionary humor,

    Been wending my way though the Library of America volume of Ambrose Bierce's stuff. "Bitter" Bierce, "Voltaire with stomach ulcers." Shockingly cold for the late 19th-early 20th century. The Civil War stories ("Chickamauga," "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," "Parker Addison, Philosopher," etc) are as biting and cynical as anything from the Great War. And the horror stories ("The Damned Thing," "The Death of Halpin Frayser," "An Inhabitant of Carcosa,"etc)....far more terrifying than the sentimental slop that was coming out of England.

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    Some Hungarian made a movie about “George Thurston” in the Civil War stories, translates as “American Postcard”; basically has some Hungarian 48ers on the Union side in the Civil War. Very weird film based on an equally weird story. “Horseman in the Sky” is also a favorite.

    Unfortunately the book you have — I have it too — only includes the Devil’s Dictionary (which is very funny in its own mordant way) as a demonstration of his humor, it doesn’t include all the little short pieces that show off his sarcasm and sardonic wit. The Clifton Fadiman edited volume from the ’50’s is what I broke my teeth on, it has a lot of those tales. However, all of Bierce is easily available for free on multiple internet platforms.

    But, yeah, he makes the list.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @SPMoore8


    Unfortunately the book you have — I have it too — only includes the Devil’s Dictionary (which is very funny in its own mordant way) as a demonstration of his humor, it doesn’t include all the little short pieces that show off his sarcasm and sardonic wit.
     
    Yeah, it's a tad light on humor. On the other hand, it does have a good selection of his autobiographical writing ("What I saw of Shiloh," "Working for an Empress," Across the Plains," etc).

    Interesting to note that the Library of America Bierce book was edited by ST Joshi, who is (probably) the leading Lovecraft scholar.
  61. It would be an enormous help if the Right drop the anger, stop the jeering, realize that we’re all in this together, start stressing what it is for, rather than against, and push for those Surveys Of Western Civ. undergrad requirements to come back into higher ed.
    The Western Heritage is both rich and enriching but the memory will die with the older generations if not transmitted- don’t blame the Millennials if they sound like illiterate barbarians; God knows I was clueless concerning my cultural inheritance until I “had” to undergo instruction in it.
    If a Black slave lady will now grace our $20 bill, surely a Republican Congress can force a Western Civ. survey requirement on institutions participating in the Student Loan Program.
    And if the Republican Congress can’t do that, what are they good for ?

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Oldeguy

    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system. Even private school teachers are super leftist these days, in all the ways that matter, at least. Teachers in religious schools may still defend Christianity, but they spend all of their history lessons talking about the Civil Rights movement and condemning imperialism, colonialism, etc. We also ought to support historical programs about European history (even if they are silly and soapy) like the Tudors, Vikings, Outlander, etc. You must realize this is the only brush with Western Civilization many millennials get.

    There are lots of (very bright) high schoolers and college students who have no idea who people like Elizabeth I, Charlemagne, Otto Von Bismarck, Joan of Arc, Napoleon, Constantine, Lenin etc are. You might as well be talking about Javanese philosophers. The only history young Americans know is the American Revolution, slavery & the Civil War, World War II, the Holocaust, the Civil Rights movement. They probably know some vague details about the suppression of Native Americans. Maybe the curious ones know a little bit about Ancient Rome and Greece. That's it. Western Civilization is foreign to them. If people have no history, they are very malleable.

    Replies: @guest, @anon

  62. @Tiny Duck
    Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn't something we embrace. It's something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    Replies: @Warner, @anon, @5371, @unpc downunder, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    And to think they say liberals are smug and ignorant.

  63. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    What form would red server art take?

    I see it everywhere.

  64. It is excessively odd that people are focusing so much on Moldbug. I can understand the technocrats at Vox latching onto that sort of thing, but Douthat should know better.

    I’d say our very own Steve Sailer is a much better candidate for the centre of a truly alternative right than Moldbug. People rally around things like ancestry and religion, not technical critiques of democracy.

  65. Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    I’m sure unicorns come from somewhere, and are the opposite of something, too.

  66. @Dr. X
    Douthat, like his colleague David Brooks, is a former National Review man, and as such is a pseudo-conservative cuckolded by the Left. His Wikipedia page says "born in San Francisco and grew up in New Haven." Graduated from Hah-vahd and works at the New York Times.

    Yeah, real conservative, buddy. Real conservative, fer sure.

    Replies: @Thursday

    No, he has never really been one of the NR crowd. He used to be an open supporter of our host here. But now he’s at the NYT, so he’s walking a real tightrope. Look at the Razib Khan situation.

    That means Douthat has to throw up some bullshit to cover himself if he wants to say anything positive about reactionaries.

  67. @Tiny Duck
    Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn't something we embrace. It's something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    Replies: @Warner, @anon, @5371, @unpc downunder, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Right-wing liberalism is the opposite of tribalism. Left-wing liberalism is the division of society into self-identifying cliches, with technocrats like Hillary moulding them into an alliance against the majority.

  68. @Tiny Duck
    Liberal thinking emerges from enlightenment. It’s the realization that we’re all in the same boat, regardless of gender or skin color or sexual identity. It’s the opposite of tribalism.

    Everyone deserves a decent life. Ultra capitalists were cast out by unions, the old were granted security and women wrested their right to vote from a male-dominated society. The self-evident superiority of one race over another was shown to be based on ignorance. Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Nothing lasts forever. For the last twenty years there has been a backlash against liberalism from a bitter contingent of conservatives who miss the good old days.

    Conservatism isn't something we embrace. It's something we recover from. Let the healing begin.

    Replies: @Warner, @anon, @5371, @unpc downunder, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.

    Yes – a spectrum – with Peter Singer buggering a happy calf, and you, buggering Peter Singer!

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Yes – a spectrum – with Peter Singer buggering a happy calf, and you, buggering Peter Singer!

    Isn't that called "The Circle of Life"?

  69. I once had respect for Michael B Dougherty in the same way I respected Daniel Larison. In their younger days both were vicious in their contempt for political elites and defense of traditional America. Around 2008 however both got into nasty spats with Jaime Kirchick and the rest of the neocon crowd and although they claimed to have “won” this battle the damage was done. Ultimately the allure of respectable opinion (and the money therein) proved too much.

    I casually mentioned this on Twitter once and discovered Larison had blocked me, despite me not mentioning him by name. Asshole.

  70. “Neoreactionary”
    That’s something you don’t hear much, at least not anymore.

  71. @Laguna Beach Fogey
    Douthat is essentially describing what I've been advocating for the Alt-Right for years, i.e., the primacy of the artistic approach.

    It's working.

    Replies: @JB, @Carl

    You mean the autistic reproach, surely.

  72. @the cruncher
    @JB

    'When My Brothers Wake Up": Murdoch Murdoch -- hard working troupe

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rg8innCuN4

    Walt Bismarck - 'The 14 Words' -- very talented, he's got a million high-quality parodies

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f5ojDWMpV8

    Seventh Son, makes cover songs: 'Fashy Lullabies'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kV9KVosHxi8

    Nationalist Public Radio:

    https://radio.therightstuff.biz/2016/04/24/nationalist-public-radio-episode-5/

    Join us.

    Replies: @Carl

    He’s looking for something aimed at adults, not 15 year old boys.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Carl

    The media's/academia's anti-white cultural poison isn't aimed at adults either.

  73. @Oldeguy
    It would be an enormous help if the Right drop the anger, stop the jeering, realize that we're all in this together, start stressing what it is for, rather than against, and push for those Surveys Of Western Civ. undergrad requirements to come back into higher ed.
    The Western Heritage is both rich and enriching but the memory will die with the older generations if not transmitted- don't blame the Millennials if they sound like illiterate barbarians; God knows I was clueless concerning my cultural inheritance until I "had" to undergo instruction in it.
    If a Black slave lady will now grace our $20 bill, surely a Republican Congress can force a Western Civ. survey requirement on institutions participating in the Student Loan Program.
    And if the Republican Congress can't do that, what are they good for ?

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system. Even private school teachers are super leftist these days, in all the ways that matter, at least. Teachers in religious schools may still defend Christianity, but they spend all of their history lessons talking about the Civil Rights movement and condemning imperialism, colonialism, etc. We also ought to support historical programs about European history (even if they are silly and soapy) like the Tudors, Vikings, Outlander, etc. You must realize this is the only brush with Western Civilization many millennials get.

    There are lots of (very bright) high schoolers and college students who have no idea who people like Elizabeth I, Charlemagne, Otto Von Bismarck, Joan of Arc, Napoleon, Constantine, Lenin etc are. You might as well be talking about Javanese philosophers. The only history young Americans know is the American Revolution, slavery & the Civil War, World War II, the Holocaust, the Civil Rights movement. They probably know some vague details about the suppression of Native Americans. Maybe the curious ones know a little bit about Ancient Rome and Greece. That’s it. Western Civilization is foreign to them. If people have no history, they are very malleable.

    • Replies: @guest
    @S. Anonyia

    This is the basic upshot of Moldbuggery, which is for the right to set up an alternative to what he calls the Cathedral, which is the system of unofficial intellectual institutions that truly govern our country. From the universities and NGOs on down to the press and your local schoolhouse, they're disturbingly leftist. That's why conservatism can't win, because everyone's default mental political state is progressive.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @anon
    @S. Anonyia


    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system.
     
    Your main point is correct but it's too late for that. The education system and media were targeted specifically because that's how the poison could be injected directly into the young and poisoning the young is how they won the culture war.

    However guerrilla education, yes - very much so.

  74. @SPMoore8
    @syonredux

    Some Hungarian made a movie about "George Thurston" in the Civil War stories, translates as "American Postcard"; basically has some Hungarian 48ers on the Union side in the Civil War. Very weird film based on an equally weird story. "Horseman in the Sky" is also a favorite.

    Unfortunately the book you have -- I have it too -- only includes the Devil's Dictionary (which is very funny in its own mordant way) as a demonstration of his humor, it doesn't include all the little short pieces that show off his sarcasm and sardonic wit. The Clifton Fadiman edited volume from the '50's is what I broke my teeth on, it has a lot of those tales. However, all of Bierce is easily available for free on multiple internet platforms.

    But, yeah, he makes the list.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Unfortunately the book you have — I have it too — only includes the Devil’s Dictionary (which is very funny in its own mordant way) as a demonstration of his humor, it doesn’t include all the little short pieces that show off his sarcasm and sardonic wit.

    Yeah, it’s a tad light on humor. On the other hand, it does have a good selection of his autobiographical writing (“What I saw of Shiloh,” “Working for an Empress,” Across the Plains,” etc).

    Interesting to note that the Library of America Bierce book was edited by ST Joshi, who is (probably) the leading Lovecraft scholar.

  75. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Tiny Duck


    Sexuality was found to be a natural part of biology that existed along a spectrum.
     
    Yes - a spectrum - with Peter Singer buggering a happy calf, and you, buggering Peter Singer!

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    Yes – a spectrum – with Peter Singer buggering a happy calf, and you, buggering Peter Singer!

    Isn’t that called “The Circle of Life”?

  76. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    Million Dollar Extreme:

    Seems like everything cutting-edge and exciting right now is “alt-right”. The fact that it’s amorphous and unideological, a general disgust with late-stage liberalism, gives it its power. It can dwell within the quantum state of current anti-culture and co-opt the detached philistinism of Millennials, at least those who aren’t true believers.

  77. Ross Douthat is the worst kind of pundit. He’s the one who is smart enough to get it all, and knows the alt-right is correct, and yet he continues his pose as a “reasonable reform Republican” for his NYTimes cocktail party elitist crowd, because he is far too cowardly to take heat for truth. The absolute worst.

    I’d rather he get fired and the Times just foregoes any pretense of conservative commentary because guys like Douthat do far more harm than good. But that’s the point, and he’s just cowardly enough to be used a tool.

  78. @antipater_1
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    Yes indeed! Moldbug - why say something in 100 words if you can say it in 10,000 words?

    Replies: @Gutenberg

    For plausible deniability – so he could have a life and career after having a far-right blog. It’s important to imply things without saying them and to defy neat summing-up.

    I for one, am immensely grateful to Moldbug. He gave me a true historical vision, which I think is the defining characteristic of a reactionary, which is judging the present by the best from all times. All great culture is reactionary, because it’s not ideological, it’s trying to portray reality and humans as truthfully as possible.

    the critique of democracy, Thomas Carlyle, the caste analysis of American politics, the ultra-Calvinist as liberalism hypothesis, “the Cathedral”… he brought all of these into currency in the alt-right

    Moldbug’s verbosity is inseparable from the reactionary worldview itself, that nothing is ever reducible to an ideology or formula. It’s the judgment of a well-developed character, at the end of the day, that counts.

  79. Is there a way to make room for the progressive mind in our intellectual life without making room for (nonwhite) racialist obsessions and fantasies of enlightened despotism?

    See, progressivism doesn’t sound as crazy to me as, say, fascism does to most people. But it should, because it is. We’re just used to it.

  80. @RamonaQ
    @Harry Baldwin

    What a great quote, and so true - in particular, about Auster himself. He wrote The Path to National Suicide in 1989 when immigration wasn't a blip on anyone's radar.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @guest

    Immigration wasn’t a blip on anyone’s radar in 1989? Are you nuts?

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @guest


    Immigration wasn’t a blip on anyone’s radar in 1989? Are you nuts?
     
    He's egomorphizing. It wasn't a blip on my radar at that time, either. Surely, there were others, presumably including you, for whom it was different.
  81. @Stirner
    @Anon

    Anon,

    Moldbug wrote extensively on the religious underpinnings of the modern progressive "mind".

    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2009/01/gentle-introduction-to-unqualified.html

    If you can deal with the baroque and self-indulgent writing style, it's a thought provoking analysis.

    Replies: @guest, @WowJustWow

    “the baroque and self-indulgent writing style”

    That’s the main objection. Another is that he’s a convert from the progressive side who, despite what he says, I think hasn’t completely let go. That’s what gives his writings an air of perpetual irony. Unlike, say, the baroque and self-indulgent Carlyle (one of Moldbug’s chief inspirations), I don’t think he completely believes what he’s saying. Plus, his solutions, as opposed to his analysis, are flat-out crazy. But that may be necessary, because a Jacobite restoration is unimaginable.

    But he did give me countless tidbits of genius, and we share an admiration for Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn, Bertrand de Jouvenel, Austrian economics, the Americanist Library, and so forth.

  82. @fnn
    @JB

    Many say Houellebecq.

    Replies: @anon, @guest

    I don’t believe him. I think it’s a put-on. Either that, or he’s hedging his bets. Either of which lead ultimately to confusing books.

  83. @S. Anonyia
    @Oldeguy

    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system. Even private school teachers are super leftist these days, in all the ways that matter, at least. Teachers in religious schools may still defend Christianity, but they spend all of their history lessons talking about the Civil Rights movement and condemning imperialism, colonialism, etc. We also ought to support historical programs about European history (even if they are silly and soapy) like the Tudors, Vikings, Outlander, etc. You must realize this is the only brush with Western Civilization many millennials get.

    There are lots of (very bright) high schoolers and college students who have no idea who people like Elizabeth I, Charlemagne, Otto Von Bismarck, Joan of Arc, Napoleon, Constantine, Lenin etc are. You might as well be talking about Javanese philosophers. The only history young Americans know is the American Revolution, slavery & the Civil War, World War II, the Holocaust, the Civil Rights movement. They probably know some vague details about the suppression of Native Americans. Maybe the curious ones know a little bit about Ancient Rome and Greece. That's it. Western Civilization is foreign to them. If people have no history, they are very malleable.

    Replies: @guest, @anon

    This is the basic upshot of Moldbuggery, which is for the right to set up an alternative to what he calls the Cathedral, which is the system of unofficial intellectual institutions that truly govern our country. From the universities and NGOs on down to the press and your local schoolhouse, they’re disturbingly leftist. That’s why conservatism can’t win, because everyone’s default mental political state is progressive.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @guest


    This is the basic upshot of Moldbuggery, which is for the right to set up an alternative to what he calls the Cathedral, which is the system of unofficial intellectual institutions that truly govern our country. From the universities and NGOs on down to the press and your local schoolhouse, they’re disturbingly leftist. That’s why conservatism can’t win, because everyone’s default mental political state is progressive.
     
    Conservatism can't win because conservatism can't do what you and Yarvin propose. Or, we already set up such institutions, they were subverted, and, if we do it again, the subversion will happen again.

    Critical institutions will be dominated by cohesive groups.

    There's no reason it should be any different for people than for insects: E.O. Wilson tells us that "social insects control the center of the land environment, while solitary insects predominate in the margins." The institutions you speak of are essentially the center of our environment.

    For thousands of years the center of the land environment was the area where Africa, Asia, and Europe came together. Theory tells us we should expect cohesive (ethnocentric) groups to come from this region, and this is in fact the case. The same qualities that allowed such people to control the center of the land environment equip them to control the central institutions of our societies.

  84. @MQ
    Moldbug was/is a clown...besides being practically unreadable, his writing has a sub-sophomoric understanding of history and politics. I suspect he is held up as important by the mainstream media precisely to belittle conservative intellectuals, since he is neither.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @NOTA

    How would the mainstream media recognize a real intellectual vs a fake one?

  85. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @S. Anonyia
    @Oldeguy

    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system. Even private school teachers are super leftist these days, in all the ways that matter, at least. Teachers in religious schools may still defend Christianity, but they spend all of their history lessons talking about the Civil Rights movement and condemning imperialism, colonialism, etc. We also ought to support historical programs about European history (even if they are silly and soapy) like the Tudors, Vikings, Outlander, etc. You must realize this is the only brush with Western Civilization many millennials get.

    There are lots of (very bright) high schoolers and college students who have no idea who people like Elizabeth I, Charlemagne, Otto Von Bismarck, Joan of Arc, Napoleon, Constantine, Lenin etc are. You might as well be talking about Javanese philosophers. The only history young Americans know is the American Revolution, slavery & the Civil War, World War II, the Holocaust, the Civil Rights movement. They probably know some vague details about the suppression of Native Americans. Maybe the curious ones know a little bit about Ancient Rome and Greece. That's it. Western Civilization is foreign to them. If people have no history, they are very malleable.

    Replies: @guest, @anon

    People on the alt-right need to infiltrate the education system.

    Your main point is correct but it’s too late for that. The education system and media were targeted specifically because that’s how the poison could be injected directly into the young and poisoning the young is how they won the culture war.

    However guerrilla education, yes – very much so.

  86. @Carl
    @the cruncher

    He's looking for something aimed at adults, not 15 year old boys.

    Replies: @anon

    The media’s/academia’s anti-white cultural poison isn’t aimed at adults either.

  87. @Clifford Brown
    @JB

    Dude, do you even listen to vaporwave?

    Kidding. As for traditional art forms, my favorite film of the past decade Drive by Nicholas Refn is pretty Alt-Right. The hero is even an autiste. Can't get more Alt-Right than that.

    Replies: @dsgntd_plyr

    Search “vaporware the simpsons.” You’re welcome.

  88. @JB
    @Laguna Beach Fogey

    Where's the reactionary movie/novel/poem of the past ten years? All I see are essays.

    Replies: @fnn, @Clifford Brown, @Cagey Beast, @the cruncher, @anon, @Gutenberg, @dsgntd_plyr

    “The Dark Knight” trilogy. Liberal reviews noticed it was almost fascist. Conservative reviews thought it was promoting Randian free market ideology.

  89. @Harry Baldwin
    @SPMoore8

    . . .in a political sense, once one becomes a reactionary you have already lost.

    The reactionary is doomed because he recognizes threats to his society so much earlier than anyone else that he can't motivate others to help stop them.

    Auster's Formulation:


    A traditionalist (or a reactionary) recognizes a threat to his society the moment it appears.

    A conservative recognizes the threat when it has half-destroyed the society.

    A liberal only recognizes the threat after it has completely destroyed the society, or, alternatively, he never recognizes it at all.
     
    Douthat is at best a conservative.

    Replies: @RamonaQ, @neon2

    Auster was magnificent, and nobody is more missed.

    But I think those of you happily agreeing with one another that political reaction is for losers are forgetting that the Congress of Vienna was Reaction’s great moment, and ushered in the glorious 19th Century (1815-1914) when monarchy, tradition and religion set the tone. All sorts of unexpected people from every walk of life were men (and women) of the Right; it was indeed so natural that it never came up in any public sort of way, and is usually only discoverable from diaries and private letters. My favorite example is Gottlob Frege: it is deliciously enjoyable to read the scandalised reactions of his modern day admirers once they discover his “fascism”).
    1848 was a worry, but victory went again to reaction, and the Right kept on winning right up until the madness of 1914.
    “The Holy Alliance” – who does not thrill at the very name? It is no small part of the tragedy of the First World War that the act which triggered it, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, killed the very man who, more than any other of his time, realised the importance of re-vitalising that alliance in the face of the twin dangers of democracy and nationalism.
    Ichabod! Ichabod! For the glory is indeed departed.

  90. @Stirner
    @Anon

    Anon,

    Moldbug wrote extensively on the religious underpinnings of the modern progressive "mind".

    http://unqualified-reservations.blogspot.com/2009/01/gentle-introduction-to-unqualified.html

    If you can deal with the baroque and self-indulgent writing style, it's a thought provoking analysis.

    Replies: @guest, @WowJustWow

    Some of his most valuable content is about explaining the progressive mind, because he has one. All of his stuff is very specifically written for those who were raised as good-thinking atheist Brahminate progressives who fully absorbed their received value system.

    This quote comes not from his blog, but one of his random comment-thread-bombings elsewhere on the web. I think it elucidates the appeal of his writing to the right sort of reader:

    As for “K. Marx and F. Engels,” our perspectives differ in one critical regard. Because I was born in 1973 and graduated from Brown in 1992, I am completely marinated in your perspective. No intelligent person can pretend to be unaware of progressive doctrine, still less one whose zip code is 94114! You, however, appear to have only the sketchiest and most distorted knowledge of any perspective to the right of yours. If you lack the inclination to change this, I cannot make you drink.

    My misfortune, I suppose, is that I took all the horseshit that was jammed up my young ass seriously. That is: I was told I was supposed to be tolerant, keep an open mind, and above all never hate anyone. Being foolish enough to take these principles seriously, I could not remain on the reservation. I still feel they are good principles, in theory. It is certainly never too late to apply them.

    So UR is very different from what you might read from writers who converged on similar ideas through different life trajectories. Somebody who, say, went to the same elite institutions but was a member of their college Republican group wouldn’t have cut it for me; my ideological immune system would have set off antibodies at seeing particular buzzwords, shibboleths, or just subtle stylistic flourishes that give off the wrong vibe. For instance, Ross Douthat. If you develop your traditionalist thinking within progressive institutions, you’ll acquire a noticeable Outer Party patina, which makes you easier to dismiss, even by people who like to think of themselves as open-minded.

    Part of what makes UR such fascinating reading is the “OMG get out of my younger self’s head” moments — touching on a lot of things you remember from your school years that you always noticed were a little bit… off, little circles you couldn’t square. But you didn’t have time to figure it all out, so it was best to just write it off as “hey, the world is complicated” for the time being. As an adult, what really keeps me eager to explore outside the Overton window is filling in some of those missing pieces while being reminded of how I felt when I first noticed them, like teasing out the root of some trauma in a therapy session. There are dots that are hard to connect unless you see how somebody else followed a similar path. That’s what makes it worth slogging through some of his book-length blog posts.

  91. @guest
    @RamonaQ

    Immigration wasn't a blip on anyone's radar in 1989? Are you nuts?

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Immigration wasn’t a blip on anyone’s radar in 1989? Are you nuts?

    He’s egomorphizing. It wasn’t a blip on my radar at that time, either. Surely, there were others, presumably including you, for whom it was different.

  92. @guest
    @S. Anonyia

    This is the basic upshot of Moldbuggery, which is for the right to set up an alternative to what he calls the Cathedral, which is the system of unofficial intellectual institutions that truly govern our country. From the universities and NGOs on down to the press and your local schoolhouse, they're disturbingly leftist. That's why conservatism can't win, because everyone's default mental political state is progressive.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    This is the basic upshot of Moldbuggery, which is for the right to set up an alternative to what he calls the Cathedral, which is the system of unofficial intellectual institutions that truly govern our country. From the universities and NGOs on down to the press and your local schoolhouse, they’re disturbingly leftist. That’s why conservatism can’t win, because everyone’s default mental political state is progressive.

    Conservatism can’t win because conservatism can’t do what you and Yarvin propose. Or, we already set up such institutions, they were subverted, and, if we do it again, the subversion will happen again.

    Critical institutions will be dominated by cohesive groups.

    There’s no reason it should be any different for people than for insects: E.O. Wilson tells us that “social insects control the center of the land environment, while solitary insects predominate in the margins.” The institutions you speak of are essentially the center of our environment.

    For thousands of years the center of the land environment was the area where Africa, Asia, and Europe came together. Theory tells us we should expect cohesive (ethnocentric) groups to come from this region, and this is in fact the case. The same qualities that allowed such people to control the center of the land environment equip them to control the central institutions of our societies.

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