The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Rock Star Has Good Idea, Follows Through
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Here’s a nice story: Jeff Ament, the bass player for 90s grunge rock band Pearl Jam, has built skate parks for teens in 27 small towns and Indian reservations in his home state of Montana. I can imagine if you are a bored, moody 13-year-old out on the prairie, having a first class skate park to hang out at could make your life considerably better.

Back in the 1970s, skateboarders started exploiting empty swimming pools and flood control basins, then eventually got around to custom designing skate parks. It’s rather like how golf started out on sheep pastures on sand dunes, then during the 19th Century, golfers got the idea of altering the landscape for their game rather than just looking for the best holes on pre-existing land forms.

Here’s producer Rick Beato’s analysis of Pearl Jam’s hit “Jeremy:”

Beato’s Youtube videos enthusiastically explaining the music theory and production intricacies of 1970s-1990s electric guitar rock songs are some of the better things available on the Internet. Most rock critics are old English majors, so they devote a lot of time to analyzing the lyrics, but Beato mostly ignores the words and sticks to the music.

 
Hide 288 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Anon[208] • Disclaimer says:

    I saw a report on the guys who designed the climbing walls for the Tokyo Olympics climbing competition. It’s quite a process, and took a year or so. Getting the Goldilocks level of difficulty for a particular class of climbers is very tricky.

    I wonder if there is a similar level of creativity in the insurance industry about this stuff. Is the Pearl Jam guy on the hook as a co-defendent/deep pockets for the first kid who ends up being Christopher Reeved in one of his courses?

    I saw a report on television the other day, following up online, about federal regulation via the ADA of any children’s playground constructed since 2012 that is “publicly accessible,” a test that seems to be impossible to avoid unless the playground is completely encased in a solid concrete Schrödinger box. Such playgrounds must be constructed according to ridiculous standards that include making swing set seats look like child car seats, with solid plastic three-point roller-coaster-esque restraints.

    In addition, the swing sets need to be wheelchair accessible, so the surface has to be asphalt or concrete, not sand … I guess it’s a good thing you cannot fall out of the swings. I have this vision of a completely paralyzed kid being rolled up the swing set and strapped in and pushed. And in order to obtain this result, the 99 percent of heathy kids have to contend with all this safety crap. Except it all so expensive that nobody builds kids parks anymore, so maybe kids don’t have to contend with it after all.

    This whole thing of everyone has to do everything together so nobody feels different goes too far. They could build a few of these ortho-parks for kids that need them, and even let normal kids in, but also have normal parks. The same principle could apply to schools: retarded black kids could have their own classes, and white kids of progressive parents would have the option of also being in the retard class, leaving other kids the right to track into classes at their level of academics and violence.

  2. Skateboarding is weird because it still attracts the “rebellious” type of suburban youth despite it being a decades-old thing.

    I think its because you have to be young (i.e. young joints and cartilage, easier-healing bones, teen guys desire to risk injury to do crazy-looking stunts) to be good at it–much like with breakdancing, although the latter’s appeal is more limited because it’s tied to a specific type of music and requires more athleticism and therefore winnows more young guys out.

    With skateboarding, you can be a normal, not-super-athletic teen dude and still learn enough tricks to impress people.

    • Replies: @Curle
  3. Most rock critics are old English majors, so they devote a lot of time to analyzing the lyrics, but Beato mostly ignores the words and sticks to the music.

    Talk about a waste of time. Most rock (and rap) lyrics are far less deep than you think as a teen when you first get into them. If it ain’t a straightforward song, 80% of the time the “cryptic” lyrics about sex, drugs, or falling in love, and not really that cleverly written. The rest are rather random lyrics that worked in the song to give it mystery and “depth”. Bowie used to just take random phrases he liked, write them on pieces of paper, toss them into a hat and then pull them out at random to make a song.

  4. Anon[295] • Disclaimer says:

    It seems like skateboarding has become pretty mainstream and socially acceptable among teenagers now. When I was growing up in the Midwest and on the East coast during the 90s, skateboarding was considered “gay” and for “fags”. The normal and cool kids would do sports, and a minority of outcasts and kids who sucked at sports tended to be into skateboarding. The only acceptable and “cool” kind of skateboarding was stuff like racing down incline roads on skateboards and launching off ramps. The sort of real skateboarding where you do tricks and stuff was not considered cool at all and being into it would mark you as a social outcast.

    From what I understand, it was different in California and on the West Coast where skateboarding started and had a longer history. If I’m not mistaken, skateboarding was acceptable and cool and something that even the cool/sports kids were into.

    I noticed that by the 2000s, skateboarding had become more acceptable and cool even in the Midwest and East Coast. The popularity of the Tony Hawk video game may have played a role.

  5. Juggler says:

    I could never stand Pearl Jam for some reason, other than the song “Black.” Good on that bassist, Jeff Ament, for making the lives of thousands of young boys a little more pleasant.

    No one cares much for little boys these days (other than those who want to bugger them, that is).

    Of course, for his efforts he may get labeled a racist twice over, given Montana’s demographics and that whites are disproportionately represented among skate boarders.

  6. It’s rather like how golf started out on sheep pastures on sand dunes, then during the 19th Century, golfers got the idea of altering the landscape for their game rather than just looking for the best holes on pre-existing land forms.

    meeting.

    The 22nd century will open with S. E. Sailer IV analyzing skate park architecture in whatever medium constitutes a blog in eighty years.

    How would this work out on a space station, the Moon, or Mars?

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  7. Eddie Vetter sings like Gomer Pyle.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  8. Most skateboarders are in their 40s. Real mature.

    • Troll: Hangnail Hans
  9. As long as those skateboarders wear masks and plastic shields.

  10. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:

    I well remember when the first, initial, skateboarding craze hit the UK in 1976/7, London’s newly opened South Bank National Theatre/Culture Bunker center – designed according to the zeitgeist in a thoroughly brutalist fashion, with seemingly made-for-job concrete ramps, banks and slide ways – was transformed into an impromptu skate park by the trendy youth of the neighborhood.

  11. bjdubbs says:

    Pat Finnerty has some funny videos on “What makes this song stink” and takes some shots at Beato for talking over the heads of 99% of his audience.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/hududhsskso

    • Replies: @Stan
  12. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    beato is the same guy who claimed keith moon was NOT the greatest rock drummer.

    totally discredited.

    …golfers looking for the best holes…

  13. I do enjoy beato’s videos. He’s a late boomer/early x’er, and clearly has fun getting into the music, all while trying to educate the millennial and zoomer kids on why their music mostly sucks.

    He is too much a booster for the grunge bands, however, who managed to suck the fun out of rock and cleared the table for the horrible world of rap/sampled/synthetic dominance that is music today.

  14. anon[652] • Disclaimer says:

    Rick Beato is neat, but he’s a youtube sperg/autist trying to make some money, and that’s possibly a cul-de-sac for aspiring musicians.
    The guys who wrote Jeremy weren’t thinking any music theory.
    That’s what makes the song great.

  15. Off topic but there’s an article by Freddy Gray about American ‘Hate Hoaxes’ in the British Spectator. I can’t link to it because it’s behind a paywall. It doesn’t mention Steve by name, although I can’t think of another public figure who uses the term ‘hate hoax’. It’s a good article anyway though.

    • Replies: @guest007
  16. AndrewR says:

    Anyway, speaking of Pearl Jam, no number of good deeds can make up for their disgusting anti-whiteness.

    In June of last year they posted this

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PearlJam/status/1268317718924726273?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1268317718924726273%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fd-3511549132605779534.ampproject.net%2F2109102127000%2Fframe.html

    “Democrats are the real racists” is a line that gets mocked a lot in our circles, but it’s certainly true. The clear implication of this tweet is that blacks all think the same way and have the same “narrative.” I imagine the loved ones of, say, David Dorn might have a very different narrative than the BLM black supremacists do. And no constructive change in society can happen if one loud, violent and implacable group (like BLM) gets to dominate the conversation. Of course SJWs and their pets don’t actually want constructive change. They want to act out their infantile psychodramas forever, with law abiding, productive members of society playing the role of the hated mother.

    I also distinctly recall Pearl Jam tweeting that white people have no place telling blacks to protest peacefully, but I can’t find it. Certainly we all have heard prominent shitlibs express such sentiments. Of course when it comes to people upset that an election was stolen or that an experimental, largely ineffective “vaccine” is being mandated on the world, said shitlibs expect complete compliance and pacifism.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Feryl
  17. Welshman says:

    When I was teenager, the appearance of such a skatepark as this would have been a dream come true.

  18. @Anon

    “The normal and cool kids would do sports, and a minority of outcasts and kids who sucked at sports tended to be into skateboarding.”

    That’s what the bass player says — in high school, he was a star linebacker, so small town life in Montana for him was sweet.

    Skateboarding was an offshoot of surfing, so it was always cool in Southern California.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  19. @R.G. Camara

    Elvis Costello used to write down phrases he heard ladies using on the bus.

    On average, rock lyrics are notably lousier than 1920-1960 lyrics.

  20. Beato’s YouTube videos enthusiastically explaining the music theory and production intricacies of 1970s-1990s electric guitar rock songs are some of the better things available on the Internet.

    Steve, I was ready to snark, but I gotta say thanks for the recommendation.

    At 25 minutes in, Beato takes on the second solo to “Comfortably Numb” (‘tis worth watching the whole video):

    Hamish Wallace 2 months ago

    Playing air guitar while holding a guitar. This man is working on levels we dare dream of…

    Listen to Lisa 2 months ago

    The faces that Rick makes (ie 14:48-ish) are what makes his videos so endearing. It’s like a friend looking you in the face with true wonder and excitement. I must have replayed that 4 or 5 times just chuckling and smiling with him.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Richard B
  21. @Reg Cæsar

    Maestro Steve can’t stop bringing golf into it. So no change there.
    He would have a lot more stories about Sleepy Joe if Biden were a golfer. He’s not, even if he spends a lot of time in the bunker.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  22. Edmund says:

    Some people never learn.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  23. @obwandiyag

    Eddie Vetter sings like Gomer Pyle.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing. Gomer Pyle (Jim Nabors) had a pretty good voice.

    • Agree: I, Libertine
    • Replies: @flyingtiger
  24. @anon

    Moon was obviously Not the greatest rock drummer. I don’t know who was, but it sure as hell wasn’t some flailing spaz that didn’t even have a set of hats on his kit.

    That said, Neil Peart’s Neil Peart was Keith Moon, so there must have been something he saw in Moon that I don’t. My tastes run to either sophisticated technical fireworks or tasteful groove playing, and Moon doesn’t fit with either of those.

  25. @John Milton’s Ghost

    I recently discovered Professor of Rock, who is much better.

    • Agree: flyingtiger
    • Replies: @Finspapa
  26. “Kung Fu, that was one of my good ones/ what’s a few broken bones when it’s all good clean fun/ Skateboards, I almost made them acceptable/ cause if I can’t get to you I’ll go through your son” – Joe Jackson

  27. Thanks for the Rick Beato stuff!

    Here is some Old White Man virtuosity for you:

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
    • Replies: @frankie p
  28. @Anon

    ‘…The same principle could apply to schools: retarded black kids could have their own classes, and white kids of progressive parents would have the option of also being in the retard class, leaving other kids the right to track into classes at their level of academics and violence.’

    Were white parents ever barred from enrolling their children in black schools?

  29. @anon

    Nah, Beato anticipates this criticism at 5:50 of his analysis of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit”.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  30. AndrewR says:
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    As a 37 year old “millennial kid” who has no desire to sit through hours of Beato’s videos to be boomersplained to, I would say that, contrary to the gripes of lame people, it’s not that difficult to find good new music. Granted, the record executives tend to push music aimed at the low IQ crowd more than they did 50 years ago (Cardi B being one of the more prominent examples), but even a lot of popular music has a lot of musical complexity and lyrical depth.

    I have noticed that most people seem to tend to glorify the music they liked as teenagers, and they have a psychological block against liking newer music. Today I barely ever listen to the music I liked as a teenager. I have a high need for novelty and I lack the aforementioned psychological disorder, so I listen to and enjoy a lot of new music.

    As for grunge, Nirvana and Pearl Jam have aged extremely poorly, but Alice in Chains has aged like a fine wine. Perhaps because they are more metal than grunge, or at least more metal than their grunge contemporaries.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  31. @Steve Sailer

    I rode a skateboard on the sidewalks of Huntington Beach in the mid-1960s. I was just a kid, so I didn’t appreciate how cool it was. (Back then, the wheels and axles really did appear to have come from roller skates! Mine were all metal, and pretty damned simple. It was the early days of skateboards.)

    Then, fortunately, we moved far away to places with no sidewalks, and I’ve never looked back. I still don’t have any sidewalks where I live.

    Having skateboarding as an event at the Olympic Games this year was the height of silliness. What will they add next time? Beer pong?

    But yes, it’s fun. Anything to help adolescents who need help is a good thing. I totally agree with the skateparks and with Steve’s analogy to golf courses.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  32. @anon

    Moon the Loon, the best? You are in a minority there. Bonzo and Peart. Beato is correct on this one.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  33. I’m a big fan of Beato and the youtube music scene generally. Re the music criticism and history it’s really great to hear from people who actually know what they are talking about, having worked at the highest level as musicians and producers etc. Beato did some work with Cameron Crowe who directed Almost Famous, which I didn’t realize was highly autobiographical until I saw Beato’s video:

  34. Rick Beato is really good at what he does.

    Beato’s style and attitude are very likable, and he studied at Ithaca College, which is one of the best places to get a formal education in music. He’s intelligent, too. It’s easy to see why he has so many subscribers on YouTube.

    YouTube also has numerous black people doing reaction videos to classic rock music, and all of the ones I’ve seen come across are really dull and stilted. Many of them do have numerous followers, so I wonder what the deal is.

    Maybe people like watching black people react stereotypically to white guy music.

    There are a couple of young, college age white guys in Florida, Andy and Alex, who play in a band, and are exploring classic rock—putting up reaction videos on YouTube as they do so.

    While not as strong on music theory as Rick Beato, they’re generally insightful, and have a decent sense of what makes a performance work. Like many Gen-Z ers, they’ve grown up with a multiplicity of sources for music online, and, seem mostly unacquainted with the FM radio classic rock canon of twenty or thirty years ago that older generations know well.

    To an older guy like me, it’s often entertaining to watch them react to a piece of 1960s or early 1970s music they’ve just
    discovered.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @RichardTaylor
  35. Thoughts says:

    My niece and nephew live near one of these in the middle of nowhere skate parks and are OBSESSED

    I don’t know what I think. It’s better than the computer, but their behavior has gone to shit even more than the last time.

    The male kid just flops on the couch watching skating videos on instagram while ignoring me trying to talk to him.

    I dunnos….skating has never struck me as a Winning Hobby

    But yes, better than the video game addiction (which they still have but less so)

    You have to talk to your kids, and anything that isn’t under the guise of ‘getting parents to discuss things with their children’ is rather worthless in my book

    The skate park is just a way for the idiot divorced mother to drop the kids off and f** her bf (true story)

  36. @anon

    Rick Beato is pushing sixty, and has a family and kids, and seems to have had a long career in music production with some degree of success. So, he’s hardly your usual YouTube sperg, I’d say. Compared to many others, he has a lot of subscribers, about 2.5 million, which is pretty respectable. I don’t get the impression that the guy is barely scraping by. More that the videos are enjoyable for him to make, and a nice sideline.

    I could be wrong, of course.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  37. Feryl says:
    @AndrewR

    Pearl Jam and Nirvana (mainly Cobain) were even further to the Left than is the norm for musicians (caveat: early 80’s punkers could actually be rather Right-Wing e.g. Fear mocking gays and Minor Threat’s Guilty of Being White). Cobain was incredibly Woke for his era, professing his disdain for “rednecks” and various ‘phobes and ‘ists long before it became socially mandatory. Naturally the most Leftist of the bunch turned out to be a manic-depressive drug addict who eventually offed himself.

    One of the reasons the 90’s sucked was because so many rock groups became very Leftist/explicitly political (in interviews if not in lyrics). Bor-ing! And this hasn’t really changed since then. Furthermore, instead of having the decency to be anti-establishment (as rock groups often were in the 60’s-80’s), post-1990 they often promote staid and stale people and policies of the mainstream Left. Part of this trend might be due to the West Coast and Northeast coast (where the entertainment industry is centered) becoming so boringly and predictably Leftist since Clinton won in 1992. Unchallenged dominance leads to intellectual stagnation.

  38. Feryl says:
    @PiltdownMan

    A couple of the black reactors are fairly intelligent and have a decent grasp of musical composition. But as a general rule, it’s the excitable reactors who get most of the views because let’s face it, it’s not like that many normies YouTube viewers want something beyond shallow entertainment.

  39. @anon

    Bonzo was rocks greatest drummer. FACT

  40. Ralph L says:

    Having watched too much FailArmy on TBD, my second reaction was that yes, it’s a good idea to have teen boys (and older) rack themselves and crash where there’s adult supervision and easier access for EMS.

  41. joe862 says:

    Pearl Jam – if you took some pearls and made jam out of them what would it look like? sperm. Also, Pearl Jan is the most unlistenable band in history, bar none. Rick Beato is the Pearl Jam of youtubers. I speculate that grunge was pushed by big music because it appealed to spoiled rich kids with lots of money to spend on ticket mastered concerts.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    , @Steve Sailer
  42. @Steve Sailer

    Well E.C. was [early on anyway] one of the best lyricists ever. Occasional trouble with trying too hard, but that still generally beats not trying at all. Even Dylan wasn’t perfect.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Curle
  43. Here’s a unique thing about serious skateboarding, as compared to other sports. For some of the tricks, even the best of them can only do them right about every 5th or 10th time. I’ve watched thwse guy sroll the board in the air, maybe off a metal railing or something. It’s takes luck each time for the board to come around right there at the right angle to allow the kid to land right on it.

    You really have to have quick reactions to roll your ankles right and land your feet SOMEWHERE solid, not the edge of a step, or at an angle in which you’re likely to sprain one.

    I can rollerblade just fine (except not up and down those skateboard park walls), but I can’t even move on a skateboard. BTW, I thought they’d catch on by now, but have any of you seen those “rip sticks”? These have just one wheel in front and one in back, but the big difference is that there is a pivot joint for roll motion at the middle. One uses that to move it and to steer. They were big in China about 10 years ago. 8 y/o kids were pretty good with them.

  44. Mike Tre says:

    Pearl Jam, like Beato, is overrated. Back when I was playing drums in a metal band in the early 90’s LA scene, I was fortunate enough to listen in on the discussions of some fairly proficient musicians and studio techs who would of course discuss the current crop of breakthrough acts, like STP, PJ, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, etc. All pretty much agreed that the two guitar players in Pearl Jam were poor representatives of their craft: lazy chops, poor timing, sloppy licks, limited proficiency, etc. The best musician in early Pearl Jam was their drummer, Dave Abbruzzese, who was fired from the band after the 2nd or 3rd album. Pretty much everything Pearl Jam has done since the Ten album has been forgettable, with the insufferable Vetter soaking the band’s image in his personal crusade of dimwitted neo-hippie activism.

    Beato’s shtick tires fast. His “What Makes This Song Great” series on youtube is a self serving display of Beato’s own sense of musical genius. The problem is his analysis is irrelevant, because all of the songs he chooses to review are hits. Bands have hit songs, and bands have great songs, and they certainly aren’t always mutually inclusive. The song Jeremy (which I do like, BTW) is a hit, but is it great? “Whip It” was a hit song, but I wouldn’t call it great, even if I was under the influence of LSD.

    Beato does analysis of two Rush songs: Closer to the Heart and Limelight. Now anyone who is familiar with Rush knows right away that up to the Moving Pictures album, these songs were 2 of the closest things to mainstream pop rock that Rush had come up with to that point. And anyone who is more than a casual fan of Rush knows that these two songs are at the bottom of the list when it comes to discussing GREAT Rush songs. Two other radio friendly songs by Rush up to that point – The Spirit of Radio and Freewill – from a technical standpoint are much much greater songs than the two former songs Beato discusses, by every technical measure as well as the measure of Rush’s unique style. As far as great Rush songs, most committed fans would probably agree that songs like La Villa Strangiato, Xanadu, Jacob’s Ladder, the Cygnus X-1 Books, the complete 2112 epic fit that description much better. You’ll hardly ever hear any of them on the radio, unless it’s at 2am during a deep deep cut segment.

    So, to answer Beato’s eternal question of what makes any song “great”: It’s catchy and gets played on the radio a lot. So here’s a 10 minute video all about it!

    • Thanks: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  45. I think that one nice upbeat piece like this every week would be good.

    This comment from Kunstlers place for example, made me smile.

    “First they came for the trannies
    then for NAMBLA
    then for the wetbacks.

    Then I looked around and saw how much better the world is.

    • LOL: AnotherDad
  46. Beato was a college music professor specializing in jazz before he quit that gig at the request of others to become a rock guitarist. Absolutely the best channel on YouTube for rock fans, IMHO. His obvious disdain for the inanity of most rock lyrics is refreshing.

    He’s gets a lot of grief from copyright lawyers employed by the rapacious music industry, but he soldiers on, sorta like Steve Sailer versus the world.

  47. megabar says:

    Beato has nary a trace of cynicism, which is why he’s so refreshing. I much prefer a society filled with Beatos than one filled with, say, Howard Sterns, even if Stern is obviously an intelligent and funny man. The older US culture was Beatic, while the current one is Sternal.

    As someone who enjoys sarcastic humor as much as anyone, I’ve come to realize that there’s a distinction between it and more fundamental and complete cynicism. You can have the former without the latter.

    • Agree: Patrick in SC
  48. The one in my city looks like a blast but I gave my skateboard away to a neighbor boy twenty years ago after I had not used it for ten years. Beato has some great takes and I appreciate how he a lot of times picks the 3rd or 4th best track on an album you totally forgot about. The only CD I have bought at his recommendation though is a Joe Pass.

  49. frankie p says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    David Gilmour has always been among my favorite rock guitarists, an unbelievably emotional soloist who really joined with Roger Waters to make Pink Floyd much larger than the sum of its parts. That said, it must really suck to have to play the EXACT SAME SOLO in every show. Please note that David Gilmour was a guitar solo builder, a soloist who ran tape and improvised, choosing neat little phrases and parts that he liked and putting them end after end, creating the final product and then learning the solo.

    After I started listening to jazz players, and not just guitarists, but pianists like Bill Evans, I realized what bullshit rock music is for a musician. You create a hit and a bunch of idiots want to hear it over and over, for decades, exactly the way it appeared on the album. What a great way to arrest your development as a musician.

  50. Are skate parks worth it? The sport strikes me as fine for what is probably a small minority of youth, and the parks take up a lot of space. I don’t know if they’re expensive to build or not. And I don’t know if skating on them is as dangerous as it looks. But if I were king I’d suggest PingPong, which can be played amazingly well by some amazing athletes but also can be played satisfyingly by the relatively ungifted.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  51. nebulafox says:

    Back in the PNW, I worked for a while as a house painter with a former Pearl Jam (and before that, Alice in Chains) roadie. He had some interesting stories of pre-Amazonified Seattle.

    • Replies: @eded
  52. @anon

    Interesting that the early version of the “Jeremy” video pretty clearly showed the alienated sprat slaughtering his classmates, apparently with a pump shotgun (actual weapon was not depicted). Even the amoral MTV eventually realized that broadcasting a more-or-less sympathetic depiction of such an act might lead to trouble for them if some kid were to follow Jeremy’s path and then claim inspiration from the video.

    • Replies: @Jokah Macpherson
  53. @Anon

    When I was growing up in the Midwest and on the East coast during the 90s, skateboarding was considered “gay” and for “fags”.

    Snowboarding was like this, though now it has evolved into flabby, suburbanite 50-something, “grays on trays.”

    One of the best things about Europe is that their ski culture is much stronger and their surfing culture much weaker relative to the US.

    Thus, snowboarding never really caught on there.

    Skiing in the Alps is a joy, as are purist hills like Alta, UT and Mad River Glen, VT.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    , @JMcG
  54. @PiltdownMan

    Maybe people like watching black people react stereotypically to white guy music.

    My guess is most Black reactors figured out they can make money by flattering White baby boomers. They go gaga over 60s/70s rock music they don’t actually care about.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  55. @John Milton’s Ghost

    He is too much a booster for the grunge bands, however, who managed to suck the fun out of rock and cleared the table for the horrible world of rap/sampled/synthetic dominance that is music today.

    Certainly, the grunge groups were not the happiest bunch.

    However, for the music industry, the real problem with the grunge scene was that it came up from the grassroots of the Pacific NW, and we simply can’t have any genuine, organic musical movements in the corporate state.

    I can remember watching the Spice Girls come on MTV2 around 1 AM when I was in undergrad and thinking they were the spear tip of the corporate reaction to grunge, nu-metal, and alt-rock.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  56. @Feryl

    Cobain was incredibly Woke for his era, professing his disdain for “rednecks” and various ‘phobes and ‘ists long before it became socially mandatory. Naturally the most Leftist of the bunch turned out to be a manic-depressive drug addict who eventually offed himself.

    Cobain was known to enjoy wearing dresses. Heck, Nirvana made half the video for, “In Bloom, ” with the band in dresses:

  57. @Anon

    “Is the Pearl Jam guy on the hook as a co-defendant/deep pockets for the first kid who ends up being Christopher Reeved in one of his courses?”

    Well, yes, unless he has set up a corporation or multiple corporations to take the hits (in New York City, an old dodge of the cab companies was that each vehicle would have its own individual corporate owner and dinky insurance policy, as an attempt to limit recovery by injured people). Even if he did, the injured kid’s attorneys would attempt to bore through the layers of protection until they reach the money. My guess is that he has some sort of corporate protective shield, and insurance policies for each location. I can’t even imagine the premiums. Of course, the existence of a policy will further attract attorneys, but not much else he can do to protect himself.
    Or, perhaps there is some protection in his state’s laws, a real “assumption of risk” shield or something like that, which will protect him?

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    , @Muggles
  58. nebulafox says:
    @Feryl

    “I want a tie-dyed shirt made with the blood of Jerry Garcia.”

    I don’t disagree, but anybody who says something like that deserves a bit of deeper investigation into what they actually believe. Nobody with a naive, standard issue liberal Baby Boomer positive view of the 1960s would sing the intro to “Territorial Pissings”. This is a guy who drew pictures of Charles Manson and aborted fetuses. It doesn’t sound terribly different from what you’d expect the white male school shooter of SJW demonology to draw.

    My main takeaway is that Cobain was always straining to be part of the “in crowd”, and had a strong self-loathing streak to him. That’s not terribly abnormal for someone with his kind of adolescence, of course. But it is notable that it was after dropping his first girlfriend and getting involved with the riot grrrl types that the leftist platitudes began to become more frequency and more extreme. I suspect his general craving for acceptance and feelings of inferiority were activated around the Olympia and Portland punk scenes, outside of Seattle. Cobain couldn’t hide the fact that he was from (sneer) some backwater logging town outside Seattle to the college educated crowd he was now running with. Naturally, then, his impulses melded with politics.

    The sheer degree of cringe worthiness came with him lying about mundane stuff in his past. He claimed to spray stuff like “God is gay” rather than the more mundane graffiti he actually did write: and in one case, something cancellable about recently arrived Vietnamese boat people. He played down the influences of classic cock rock and heavy metal (which, then as now, was the preferred music of economically downscale young white men), which had views on women and an unapologetic aggressive masculinity that was barely more politically correct than rap music. Etc, etc. He’d have done better to not try and impress anybody and be who he was, without apologies. It’s what blew him up in the first place.

    So, yeah: Cobain was a proto-SJW. No two ways about it. But his music betrays itself as longing for something other than what the 1960s left to him. And before heroin overtook him, he seemed to be achieving just that: married to a kindred soul, if nothing else, wealthy, and the father of a new daughter.

    • Thanks: Abe, bomag
  59. Anon[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    My favorite lyricist from the rock era, “dr. Frank” Portman, writes Tim pan alley inspired lyrics with punk rock/power pop arrangements. Try their album “revenge is sweet and so are you” to see what I’m talking about, though the production is much more sophisticated on their next album, alcatraz. Here’s a Tin Pan Alley type novelty song from dr. Frank’s solo album:

    • Thanks: Steve Sailer
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Reg Cæsar
  60. Anon[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Oh yeah, band I was talking about is The Mr. T Experience

  61. Meanwhile back in the mean streets of the real world.
    Here’s somebody noticing something ala Sailer.

    https://neonnettle.com/news/16862-twice-as-many-killed-with-knives-than-rifles-shotguns-combined-fbi-report-shows

  62. @Feryl

    Is there any doubt Kurt Cobain would’ve eventually declared himself trans?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  63. eded says:
    @nebulafox

    Interesting. Can you elaborate on those stories? I read Kevin Michael Grace tweet where mentions that he remembers the old Seattle when it was just a rough port city.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
  64. Trinity says:

    Skateboards are now more commonly used as weapons to bludgeon people by (((Antifa))) and “urban yufes” than there original purpose. I remember skateboarding being a brief fad in the mid 1970s before being resurrected later. It was a stoner’s activity for sure. I liked the roller skating fad of the 1970s. I can still remember skating as a carefree 12 year old to Crocodile Rock by Elton John or D’yer Mak’er by Led Zeppelin in Nineteen Seventy-Tree.

    Used to watch Roller Derby back in the day as well. It was pro rasslin’ on skates. Baltimore-Washington Cats aka Tiger Cats? haha. Not the best team name in history by any stretch. Just recently watched that drive in classic, “The Kansas City Bomber” with Raquel Welch from this same time period. The movie was so bad that it was watchable. It had that weird broad, Jackie Burdette, who played as Raquel’s rival and nemesis. Burdette was the weird chick that Jack Nicholson picked up in the movie, “Five Easy Pieces” and was in the “hold the chicken scene” of that movie. I have yet to see the movie with James Caan titled “Rollerball” which came out a few years after “The Kansas City Bomber.”

    How about Skateboard Derby, a skateboard version of Roller Derby? hehe.

  65. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    British duo, ‘Godley & Creme’ ex of 10cc used to come up with some seriously good lyrics, for example this one from the opus ‘Englishman in New York’ , (no, not the Sting snoozefest).

    “Just one of the extras with blood on their faces, from Snow White and the seven basket cases,
    I’m feeling Happy and Dopey and dirty in places”.

  66. @R.G. Camara

    I seem to be on the lower end of the distribution of even paying attention to lyrics at all. As long as it’s a good tune with a catchy melody I don’t care, and often times I’ve been in groups where one of the more uptight folks present will say, “This song is horrible! How can you play this?” and I have to admit I had never noticed.

    “Jeremy” lyrics are supposedly based on some news article Vedder read about a teen killing himself in front of his classroom, which is pretty banal and not full of deeper meaning, but as the video shows it’s still a classic.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  67. Anonymous[415] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve & Co. should be interested:

    Rick Beato has a lot of videos that show the inheritance of musical ability. His young son Dylan can name chords and notes by sound. Showing that most musical ability is a genetic gift.

  68. @Anon

    Skateboarders were considered pretty cool in my HS in Alabama in the 90’s. Several of them actually called me a ‘fag’ so I find it hard to buy in to the narrative of them as intelligent, misunderstood outcasts.

  69. J.Ross says:

    Supposedly the lives of the First Nations people in Nunavut, Canada, which had the levels of suicide and alcoholism you would expect, got better since getting internet access.

  70. @additionalMike

    He actually killed himself (don’t recommend that either) but the edited video cut out the part where he puts the gun in his mouth, leading to the misunderstanding.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  71. @Buzz Mohawk

    I rode a skateboard on the sidewalks of Huntington Beach in the mid-1960s.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Steve Sailer
  72. J.Ross says:

    TikTok star Gabriel Salazar attempted to smuggle cartel slaves into the US, but don’t worry, because per the laws of Mexican driving, he rolled his car and everyone was killed. Alejandro Mayorkas is inconsolable.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10045559/TikTok-star-Gabriel-Salazar-19-three-die-fiery-car-crash-police-chase.html

  73. J.Ross says:
    @Jokah Macpherson

    And left reaction shots of “frozen” kids spattered with blood and holding out their hands to stop something, thus everyone misremembering it as a school shooting instead of a suicide.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
  74. Erik L says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Rock lyrics are almost universally stupid. Rap (at least the limited subset of rap I am familiar with e.g. Eminem) is much better for lyrics. Country music much better.

  75. @The Wild Geese Howard

    I quit skiing decades ago when moguls suddenly seemed to become all the rage and every black diamond and blue square trail seemed to have a bunch of them to screw up your speed downhill and hurt your legs as you bumped between them.

    I really never understood why people seemed to like moguls. They really killed long fun glides downhill and the bouncing back and forth between them was only something a few could master.

    Between that and the psychos who needed to get up at 4am to ski all day, I really don’t miss it.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  76. guest007 says:
    @Trinity

    Steve would be one of the people who knows that Rollerball was the first time that a team from Houston won a world championship in anything.

    However, Rollerball (1975) was one of the many dis-utopian moves from that time period.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  77. JMcG says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Skiing Alta after the ice of the Northeast was sublime. For the first time, I understood why people loved skiing so much.

  78. anon[594] • Disclaimer says:

    How dare any one claim Eddie Vedder was a virtue signaller? https://www.facebook.com/PearlJam/videos/pearl-jam-pro-choice/664321957371921/

  79. @R.G. Camara

    There is the famous story of when John Lennon got pissed off at scholars and critics over analyzing his lyrics.

    So he wrote a song with the stupidest lyrics imaginable to see what would happen. He even told everyone what he was doing. And still, the lyrics were over analyzed.

    For us old folks, the song was “I am the Walrus “.

  80. @Anon

    Pacific N.W in the early 90s; skateboarding was always considered cool. Some of the guys I knew in H.S. were skaters and snowboarders. Girls dug these guys. Went to college in the East Coast, the skaters who could pull off tricks were considered cool, and who not coincidentally also happened to be surfers.

  81. @Anonymous

    It goes for everything. Everyone in my family is horrible at music – as am I – but we’re all good visual artists. From a young age I had a seemingly innate ability to draw and sculpt. It’s great to see that my young sons inherited this gift, even if it hasn’t helped me much in life. What my sons really need to inherit is their mother’s IQ. It’s hard to understand how any parent can deny HBD. Kids come out different, and with different pieces of their parents. Denying obvious realities like this is a good sign you’re in a cult.

  82. @nebulafox

    He’d have done better to not try and impress anybody and be who he was, without apologies. It’s what blew him up in the first place.

    What you did there.

    I see it.

  83. @Trinity

    Skateboards are now more commonly used as weapons to bludgeon people by (((Antifa))) and “urban yufes” than there original purpose.

    Didn’t they try that on Kyle Rittenhouse?

    How’d that work out for them?

    • Replies: @Yngvar
  84. @Erik L

    Well, *classic* country and the more traditionally-minded or alternative stuff often has good lyrics. The “bro-country” that still gets the most radio airplay has abominably bad lyrics.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Erik L
  85. Trinity says:
    @guest007

    Houston used to have one of the coolest names in sports before becoming the Houston Astros. The Houston Colt 45s is right up there with the Baltimore Bullets for cool sports names, and the Wizards and Astros are two of the lamest names in sports. I loved the Houston Oilers uniforms back in the day as well. Lived next door to some of Roy Gerela’s relatives. Gerela is best known as a Steeler but he played briefly with the Houston Oilers and I remember my neighbors had a Houston Oiler helmet gifted to them by Gerela. Don’t watch football and haven’t watched it for 3 years and counting but I did HAVE to watch the YT video of Baltimore Ravens Justin Tucker breaking the record with a 66 yard field goal. Tucker also kicked a 61 yard field goal to beat those same Detroit Lions in 2013. Tucker has to be the GOAT as a place kicker. He is the Tom Brady of kickers. haha. Gerela wasn’t that bad either.

    How about Stripper Roller Derby?

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  86. @anon

    “beato is the same guy who claimed keith moon was NOT the greatest rock drummer”

    This is all subjective. Moon was flamboyant and choked to death on his own vomit. So he was perfect for The Who. His propulsive style layered well with John Entwistle’s bass. I’m rather fond of drummers who match power with precision, like Danny Carey of Tool and the late great Neil Peart. Those two guys with their massive and complex kits are basically one-man bands whilst sharing the stage with other master musicians who happen to be their band mates.

  87. “Most rock critics are old English majors, so they devote a lot of time to analyzing the lyrics, but Beato mostly ignores the words and sticks to the music.”

    And that’s a major error, since about 99.9% of all rock songs are comprised of both music and words, (e.g. unless he was just analyzing the Allman Brother’s instrumental ‘Jessica’), words have to be taken into account.

    As most grunge songs’ lyrics basically suck, its understandable why one would want to look at something else in an attempt to find something of redeeming value regarding that musical genre. Of course Eddie Vetter always sings as if he’s totally constipated for three consecutive days.

    Wonder what Beato would have to say regarding the music of Shanai Twain, a musical artist of around the same time as Perl Jam?

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  88. @Anonymous

    “Showing that most musical ability is a genetic gift.”

    True, but I would broaden it out to encompass other forms of art. Plus, consider the environmental factor: a lad or lass growing up watching a parental unit practice their craft will spark the innate gift.

  89. @frankie p

    After I started listening to jazz players…I realized what bullshit rock music is for a musician.

    A guitarist friend who played in a rock band told me essentially the same thing. (He also told me one of the Neville Brothers borrowed one of his guitars and never gave it back. LOL) As far as I am concerned, what matters is what the listener enjoys, so rock is great when it’s good. So is jazz.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  90. Neuday says:
    @anon

    If you think Keith Moon was a great drummer you must really enjoy sixteenth-note fills and hate accents, grace notes, feel, or subtlety. Sesame Street’s Animal was based on Keith Moon for a reason. Moon played like a kid who learned how to play one cool thing, never listened to what the song was doing other than looking for spots to play his One Cool Thing. One of the worst drummers in a successful band.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @J.Ross
    , @Curle
  91. Barnard says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Didn’t Letterman have a bit in the late 80s where he would have someone read the stupid lyrics from Guns and Roses and popular hair bands in a monotonous tone?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  92. Beato plays so many instruments remarkably well. I was beginning to think, “Is there nothing this guy CAN’T do?” and then I heard him try to sing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  93. @Erik L

    Zappa/Mothers “Trouble Every Day” (original studio version) has very good, smarter-than-the-average-bear lyrics. Sonic Youth’s “Tom Violence” and “Sister” sort of qualify as a kind of species of avant-garde poetry. But lyrics (of any genre) are not literary poetry, they generally have no life of their own on paper, they are supposed to be married to the music to gain their power. Consider early Lennon:

    “Is there anybody going to listen to my story,
    All about the girl who came to stay?”

    Not exactly Yeats when you just read it and don’t hear it, but when you marry it to the music, it’s quite moving, and fairly literate. Of course, great poets like Yeats create their own music right on the page, but that’s what makes it different.

    Rap lyrics are generally too gushing, undisciplined and verbose to really qualify as “lyrics”, they’re more like endless, rambling talk-therapy sessions that rhyme. Some early rap songs like Schooly D’s “Smoke Some Kill” or Public Enemy’s “Night of the Living Baseheads” have the wit, economy and precision to qualify as lyrics, but it’s rare. Compare the wit, economy and precision of Chuck Berry’s “Maybelline” to the non-stop blather of a contemporary rap track and you’ll notice the difference at once.

    Here’s Schooly:

    “So, I
    Cracked another 40,
    Smoked some kill,
    Thought to myself,
    My moms got ill.
    Heh.
    Wait til she gets _my_ bill.”

    That is mean, tight, and hilarious. Rappers don’t make ’em like that any more.

  94. @Paleo Liberal

    Sometimes people create art, and sometimes people are art. Lennon set out to generate nonsense but the nonsense is still a function of his person and state at the time of creation. Intent is not a prerequisite for meaning. I admit it is easy to go too far with analysis, especially when there is no intent on the part of the creator, but that does not mean there’s nothing to be analyzed.

  95. @J.Ross

    Disagree…I do not “misremember”, because there was no clear indication in the video that he killed himself.
    Maybe a “misinterpretation” of a confusing video, but still doesn’t do either the Jam or MTV for exposing children to this stuff.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  96. Stan says:
    @bjdubbs

    What has the pandemic wrought?

  97. This all is overrated. Any popular music is fine when you’re a teen or adolescent or anything similar.

    But, as St. Paul had said:

    When I was a child,
    I spoke as a child,
    I understood as a child,
    I thought as a child;
    but when I became a man,
    I put away childish things.

    • Agree: Yngvar
  98. @John Milton’s Ghost

    “He is too much a booster for the grunge bands … who managed to suck the fun out of rock”

    Grunge was a reaction to the hair-metal crap coming out of LA. The flagship bands of grunge — Nirvana and Pearl Jam — did not live up to the hype. Nirvana was destined to flame out given Cobain’s fragility. And meat and potatoes Pearl Jam was bound to recede into the classic rock playlist. You have to go deeper into the grunge milieu to strike the real gold: Soundgarden and Alice in Chains. Both bands crafted doomy, beautiful music. If I want fun I’ll put on The Police or Van Halen.

  99. As far as I am concerned, what matters is what the listener enjoys, so rock is great when it’s good.

    We all have guilty pleasures. When you are a teenager you get to advertise it. Mr. Sailer has surely destroyed all photographs of himself in a Grateful Dead t shirt. (or what ever)

    Does it feel the same
    When she calls your name?

  100. @frankie p

    That said, it must really suck to have to play the EXACT SAME SOLO in every show.

    Not when you’re making that much money for every show. You or I would gladly perform the same trick over and over for that kind of money. In some sense, we in fact do it every day for far less.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  101. @additionalMike

    Most states recognize the “assumption of the risk” doctrine, either by common law or statute. So, as a general rule, as long as the recreational facility is as safe as it appears to be, i.e. it has no hidden danger-enhancing defects, the owners/proprietors have no liability. Of course, some states go a little further, some not quite as far. Here’s Montana’s law.

  102. Anonymous[585] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Much of rock is lazy, sure, but it doesn’t have to be. This is a world-famous death metal band from Buffalo. You don’t need to love their sound to appreciate the effort and ability. No vocal track so this is a family friendly video (if you don’t read the title).

    There is actually a small sub-sub-genre of internet videos of people attempting to play this song.
    I’m sure there’s also some Beatles tune that is difficult on guitar, but it’s not coming to me right now.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Known Fact
  103. @Erik L

    I wouldn’t say rap lyrics are any better than rock lyrics, if anything the opposite., going beyond merely stupid or banal to outright offensive. However, I’m told that in its original form, rap was indeed rather poetic and also spoke of and to actual life “on the streets” — the “authenticity” critics love. I guess everyone figured out that either lyrics don’t matter or else the sleazier the better for sales. (Also authenticity came to mean “gangsta life” rather than that of normal people, as it still is in country music).

    There is likely a dialectic btw words and music: the more important the music, the less the words matter. Thus rock’s “it’s got a good beat and you can dance to it”. Even if the music is “serious” the lyrics still don’t matter: opera libretti are famously stupid, after all.

    According to Alexander Jacob, whose book on Wagner I reviewed at Counter-Currents, last month, the nature of tragedy is communicated by lyrics, not music; this was the case with Greek tragedy (speeches accompanied by simple monochords) and Renaissance opera (where the arias are comments on the speeches delivered to a simple recitative style of accompaniment. Audiences demanded catchy tunes and singing, and thus the modern opera.

    Boomers don’t understand that the 60s was an anomaly; basically Dylan took acid and became a future Nobel laureate, and then John Lennon decided he needed to compete in the “poetry” department. Drugs aided both writing “lyrics” and the idea of sitting around stoned and “interpreting” them. This was not a sustainable “evolution” of music: pop music before and after is junk for teenagers. Some speculate that this was a deliberate attempt by Them to brainwash Boomers; makes as much sense as any other theory.

    • Replies: @Erik L
  104. CCZ says:

    Some buried (??) “red pill” charity news from 2017 from the pre-Islamic Minnesota AG:

    [2017] Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson is taking aim at Kars4Kids, a New Jersey charity that spent less than 1 percent of the \$3 million it raised from Minnesota donors on programs in the state.

    The charity, one of the largest vehicle donation charities in the country and perhaps best known for its radio jingle, solicits vehicles from donors and raises money by selling and scrapping them.

    Kars4Kids, which operates in all 50 states, defended its practices and said it made sense to spend most of its money on the East Coast.

    Kars4Kids reports spending 63 percent of its proceeds on its mission, which according to its website includes summer camps and mentorships for children, and school and family programs.

    According to Swanson, however, only about 44 percent of the \$88 million it raised nationally from 160,000 donated vehicles between 2012 and 2014 went to good works.

    Most of that money, amounting to \$40 million, was given to an affiliated nonprofit called Oorah, which promotes Orthodox Judaism among children mostly in New Jersey and New York.

    Kars4Kids and Oorah share offices in Lakewood, N.J., and many of their employees serve both organizations. Oorah receives the “majority of its budget in the form of grants from Kars4Kids,” according to documents obtained by the attorney general’s office, and most of its programs are held at boys’ and girls’ camps in upstate New York.

    According to the report, Kars4Kids and Oorah lost \$9.2 million in failed real estate projects controlled by a second cousin of the charity’s president, Rabbi Eliyohu Mintz. Kars4Kids also invested in what turned out to be a Ponzi scheme, according to Swanson’s report.

    https://www.loriswanson.com/minnesota-attorney-general-finds-less-1-percent-donations-kars4kids-charity-goes-minnesota-kids

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Ragno
  105. @Buzz Mohawk

    “In some sense, we in fact do it every day for far less.”

    True that, it’s called “having to work a job for a living” and it sucks.

    Marx in his utopian mood claimed that once communism “solved” the problem of exploitation etc., the former workers would lead the lives of wealthy, bohemian artist types. Was there ever a bigger or more tragic gap between promise and performance?

    They dropped the more “romantic” version of the dream but all along the Left, especially in America, thought, as Tom Wolfe put it somewhere, that in the future Dad would come home from the factory, put on a suit, and take the family out to the free workers’ theater for an evening of opera.

    That was when the Left was still tied in with High German Kultur, and the complaint was the rich were monopolizing it. Now, of course, it’s all about destroying Dead White Straight Male culture and replacing it with whatever floats your boat, we’re all equal, maaaaaaaaaaaan.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  106. @Paleo Liberal

    Yours is a great comment, because what you describe happens not only with music but with everything else. Even here, people come up with hypotheses about nefarious intentions on a global or national scale when mostly events are just the same stupid crap humans have always done while pursuing their own interests, either as groups or individuals.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Thea
  107. @Erik L

    You don’t know what “better” means.

    • Replies: @Erik L
  108. @eded

    https://archive.org/details/Century21964

    The MST3k version is a great compendium of “Boy, things were weird and white before we got woke” tropes.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
  109. I remember stuck eating in a bar and grill that was having a karaoke.

    You could see the lyrics on the TV.

    Somebody did Guns and Roses and somebody did Metallica.

    Not only didn’t either of these group’s lyrics rhyme–no that’s the tip of the iceberg–they weren’t even complete sentences. Their lyrics were all just a bunch of incoherent, disjointed phrases.

    There is stupid and then there is stupid.

    The lyrics written by the professional songwriters of the US in the 1930s, 1940s, and to a certain extent the 1950s and early 1960s were infinitely, infinitely superior. If you don’t know that, you do not understand language or poetry or music or culture or aesthetics, and should not even try to type.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
  110. @Trinity

    “Jackie Burdette” of course is the character’s name; the actress is Helena Kallianiotes. By weird you seem to mean “Greek”. I think of her as “discount Angelica Huston.”

    According to IMDB, she was born March 24, 1938 in Megalopolis, Greece; great name for a city, and hurrah for still apparently being around. In addition to being in Five Easy Pieces, IMDB says she was ‘uncredited” in Easy Rider, presumably one of the hoors in New Orleans.

    IMDB also says Jodi Foster is in KCB somewhere.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  111. @Barnard

    That’s an old shtick. Steve Allen did it on the original Tonight Show in the 1950s:

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  112. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    now here’s a surprise!

    it would be nice if it were subjective. but then there’s I Can See for Miles. moon’s ability was SUPERHUMAN.

    in this house we believe:

    moon was the greatest.

    daltrey and morrison are tied.

    the holocaust happened.

    psychology is a pseudoscience.

    all the cool people play frisbee golf.

    people with political yard sings are morons.

    etc…

    recall that The Who can only be fully appreciated at ear bleed volume. you can hear moon’s genius.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
  113. Muggles says:
    @additionalMike

    As to the liability risk, several points:

    First, there are many such parks already operating in various places so rules and liability issues/protection have been developed to avoid major problems.

    These measures may include requiring helmets, knee and elbow pads, etc. as well as perhaps even formal signing of liability waivers. I suspect there are also “safe design” criteria recognized.

    The NYT article says that these parks were built via a foundation that was created for this purpose, presumably a non profit. That will provide another layer of protection.

    These parks probably are either on Indian reservation land or local municipal parks (not clear from the article where the non Indian skate parks are located.) To the degree they are run on such government owned property, and operated (if any are w/ employees) then that is pretty effective liability protection.

    His foundation may have umbrella liability insurance as well. If these parks are donated to other entities then any liability (other than for original design) would be transferred to the owners.

    I’m sure there is already a lot of liability discussion regarding skate parks in legal journals, etc. Of course far more skateboarding happens on public or even private streets, stairs, sidewalks, etc. where it is pretty obvious that participants assume risks.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    , @CCZ
  114. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @Neuday

    well daltrey did say that The Who was the worst rock band of all time.

    but at least it wasn’t a gay disco band for neckbeards like Led Zeppelin and canadian Rush.

    for those who have ears to hear…

  115. Janus says:
    @Feryl

    Guilty of Being White is a strange anomaly for Ian Mackaye, which I’m sure he wishes he had never written. I think he was 19 at the time. Fugazi was extremely PC/woke for its era. There were some right wing factions to the early punk scene, but for the most part punk/hardcore has always tended to be very much on the left.

    • Replies: @Curle
    , @Feryl
  116. Janus says:
    @Feryl

    Guilty of Being White is a strange anomaly for Ian MacKaye, which I’m sure he wishes he had never written. I think he was 19 at the time. I can’t think of any other Minor Threat songs which could be considered right wing. His later band Fugazi was extremely PC/woke for its era. There were some right wing factions to the early punk scene, but for the most part punk/hardcore has always tended to be very much aligned with the left.

  117. Danindc says:
    @Edmund

    What are we watching here?

    • Replies: @Edmund
  118. J.Ross says:
    @additionalMike

    We essentially agree, the way they edited it managed, intentionally or not, to convey a very different message.

  119. @Verymuchalive

    Is there room in Deleware for an 18-hole course? Or just mini-golf? They do go with duckpins for bowling.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  120. @anon

    Rich Marotta, Jim Keltner, Bernard Purdy, Ralph Humphrey, Vinnie Colauita, David Garibaldi…I could go on and on listing his contemporary drummers, but Moon would not be in the top 100. He was a great personality, but not a great drummer.

  121. J.Ross says:
    @CCZ

    Oh come on, this is the first time you’ve talked about this; how often are you going to bring this up? This is the Emmett Till of Unzites. What were Minnesotans going to spend that money on anyway? Deschutes Beer?

  122. J.Ross says:
    @Neuday

    But hey, he had a career as a valet waiting any time he got tired of the sticks. The man could park a car. He would park it wherever he wanted and the thing would generally stay where he put it.

  123. How long before Koncerned Karens fill them in with sand … because COVID.

  124. @Mike Tre

    Pretty much everything Pearl Jam has done since the Ten album has been forgettable,

    Pearl Jam has aged into a slightly edgier version of Phish crossed with a generic ’70s rock band.

    Quite sad, really.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  125. @Buzz Mohawk

    And then there’s Peter Sellers doing “It’s Been A Hard Day’s Night” as Richard III.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  126. Off topic, but Steve mentioned it in March of this year. The murder of Sarah Everard, after her disappearance on Clapham Common in south London and the discovery of her raped and burned corpse in the neighbouring county of Kent, has now resulted in prosecution, trial and sentencing to life with no hope of release. It was worse than anybody thought. A (white) police officer arrested her on a technicality relating to Covid lockdown, immobilised her with police handcuffs. .. and the rest you know.

  127. Right_On says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Elvis Costello used to write down phrases he heard ladies using on the bus.

    In 1962, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, I was living in Berlin and my dad came home chuckling. On a tram, he’d overheard a middle-aged German man say to his wife, “Well, if there is going to be a war, at least they won’t be able to blame us this time.”

    Top comment.
    Dunno if Elvis Costello could have worked it into a song lyric, though.

  128. Thea says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Wichita Lineman was written as a bet that a good songwriter could write a song about absolutely anything. Jimmy Webb promised to write a song about the next thing he saw and it was a utility worker along a highway near the OK/KS border.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  129. @Hypnotoad666

    You have to clarify if you are talking about Nabors speaking voice or singing voice.
    BTW, Nabors sang Back Home in Indiana over thirty times before the Indy 500. I always wondered if he was blackmailed to do this or did he blackmailed them for the gig. One year he was ill. The song was played as an instrumental. They were afraid to replace him.

  130. Right_On says:

    During the sixties, rock music was seen as the soundtrack to a broader counterculture movement: Revolution, leftism, psychedelics, occultism, Vietnam, the underground press, ‘free love’, eastern religions, anti-psychiatry, . . .
    (The seventies’ punk spirit tried to revive that wider cultural resonance.)

    Today’s youth strike me as so conformist that modern music is reduced to being either a pastiche of earlier periods or degrading rap crap.

    The counterculture today is found on the dissident right.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  131. frankie p says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Apples and oranges!

    “You or I would” is true, because you and I are not independently wealthy to the degree of a David Gilmour.

    Gilmour should play Comfortably Numb in his next concert with a completely different solo.

    It’s NOT all about the listener.

    Listen to some of this interview with Bill Evans, done by the famous Marian McPartland, herself a famous jazz pianist as well as journalist/reporter.

    “As far as the jazz playing goes, I think the rhythmic construction of the thing has evolved quite a bit. I don’t know how obvious that would be to the listener, but the displacement of phrases, and the way phrases follow one another, and their placement against the meter is something I’ve worked on rather hard, and it’s something that I believe in, it has little to do with trends, it has more to do with my feeling about my basic conception of jazz structure and jazz melodies and the way the rhythmic things follow one another. And so I keep trying to get deeper into that, and as the years go by, I seem to make some progress in that direction, and do some things which please myself, and I know what’s happening… We must look at it as an art; I mean, otherwise we get so confused because there are a million things that you can do, so you just have to perfect your own art, and hopefully there will be room for it, and I’m very thankful for the position I have and the freedom I have, and I just keep my focus and I play what pleases me.”

    Here is a lesson on how advanced Bill Evans’ playing and conception of jazz (and all) music was. Although Marian McPartland was a famous jazz pianist, she had NO IDEA of what he was talking about when he talked about jazz soloing and “displacement of the phrases”. She asks him to demonstrate on the tune that he opened with “Waltz for Debby”, his most famous song. He refused, as that song is for solo piano, and suggested “All of You”, another Evans original. They did this interview in a piano shop, and they jammed together on many tunes. Evans demonstrated what he meant.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  132. Ragno says:
    @CCZ

    This is at least the third or fourth “expose” of the kosher kon, Kars4Kids, I’ve encountered – yet no matter how many AGs and DAs bring the hammer down on them, they somehow only grow stronger…..their hideous, sing-song ads play constantly, redefining “ubiquitous”. You’d think law enforcement would at least force them to drop the “kids” from the sales pitch, as the “kids” part of the scam represents the elusive red card on this virtual three-card monte table; yet Oorah and Rabbi Mintz mysteriously outlive and outlast one investigative journalist and Attorney General after another. Perhaps generous checks are showing up, unbidden of course, in campaign slush funds for both parties, since anyone with a working radio can verify that the ads (whose copy has remained unchanged for 30 years) run two to three hundred times a day, every day without fail, on a dozen different stations, minimum. Perhaps this is only my latent anti-Semitism showing through, but the idea of “charities” running thousands of paid ads a month, and tens of thousands each year, over three decades – all the while brushing aside the concerns of law enforcement’s bunco divisions like so many sand-flies – is perhaps one reason why clearly-untrue urban legends like “Hymietown” proliferate.

    By the way, don’t you dare to toy with the idea of financing your own lavish lifestyle/retirement/extended family by running a similar operation. There is an art to running a blue-state bogus charity, you see; it’s a very select club – rest assured you ain’t in it.

  133. @Ron Mexico

    Well, it’s hard to watch Moby Dick live and imagine anyone else doing Bonzo’s bit. But then so too for YYZ and Peart or Moon banging on an aquarium..

    One might wonder why all the best ones are dead.

    https://m.vk.com/video89981764_170865739

    RIP

  134. @joe862

    But at least Detriot responded to the horrors of grunge with Marshall Mathers, Robert Ritchie, and Jack White.

    Gen-X Detriot has been trying to get the message out.

    Nobody listened when Joseph Bruce and Joseph Utsler cried out in pain in immediate opposition to the dread grunge. MC5 they are not.

    Pain is what brings us creative genius. Seattle “pain” is not quite like Detriot pain.

    • Replies: @Curle
  135. @Erik L

    Yeah, I’ve always thought country music had the best lyrics out of all pop music, if only because musically 90% of country doesn’t deviate from the Nashville sound/”3 chords and the truth.”

    The best rap is more about playing with words as sounds rather than the meaning of the words. The best country is about pushing a lot of meaning into the words you hear.

  136. @Harry Baldwin

    Wonderful.

    A bit of trivia — the producer for the Flanders and Swan records was allowed to set up his own label, called Parlophone. That same producer signed Peter Sellers to the Parlophone label not long afterwards.

    A few years later, the producer, George Martin, signed the Beatles. Not that he likes their music, but because he likes their sense of humor.

    There are a number of clips of Peter Sellers doing spoofs of his fellow Parlophone artists the Beatles.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Reg Cæsar
  137. @Trinity

    I did HAVE to watch the YT video of Baltimore Ravens Justin Tucker breaking the record with a 66 yard field goal.

    Meh! Morten Andersen pegged a 63 yarder at MSU in the 80’s..

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morten_Andersen

  138. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Wonder what Beato would have to say regarding the music of Shanai Twain, a musical artist of around the same time as Perl Jam?

    That she was the super hot depository for Mutt Lange’s “efforts” at the time?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_John_%22Mutt%22_Lange

    Nah, Beato won’t say it, but I will. I am in awe of Mutt. He was hitting that hard.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  139. @Muggles

    where it is pretty obvious that participants assume risks.

    Not really. I know of one case resulting in quadriplegia where reckless alcoholic stupidity atop a hole filled with water resulted in a multi-million \$ settlement. The owners of the hole, being in this case commercial real estate investors, must factor the cost of stupid into the residential rental property market.

    Nobody ever owns their failure. Everyone is a victim. And nothing is more antithetical to human advancement.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  140. Finspapa says:
    @Redneck farmer

    The Professor is great, but he is different from Beato.
    I stumbled upon both of them within the last year. I really enjoy both guys. Beato for the music (which is way over my head) and the Professor for the history.
    The pure joy both of them have is wonderful.

  141. @Paleo Liberal

    A bit of trivia — the producer for the Flanders and Swan[n] records…

    For Yanks unfamiliar with them:

    And the original:

    [MORE]

  142. @Anon

    In addition, the swing sets need to be wheelchair accessible, so the surface has to be asphalt or concrete, not sand … I guess it’s a good thing you cannot fall out of the swings. I have this vision of a completely paralyzed kid being rolled up the swing set and strapped in and pushed. And in order to obtain this result, the 99 percent of heathy kids have to contend with this safety crap. Except it all so expensive that nobody builds kids parks anymore, so maybe kids don’t have to contend with it after all

    I don’t mean to invade Another Dad’s turf, but this is just another manifestation of Minoritarianism.

  143. @Reg Cæsar

    Delaware has a surprising number of public golf courses. Given, Biden’s French ancestry, this seems most appropriate.
    https://www.bestpublicgolfcourses.com/course/frog_hollow_golf_club_middletown

  144. @Paleo Liberal

    T.I.L. that Donald Swann’s father descended from an English merchant in the Muscovy Company, and his mother was from Ashgabat, today the most expensive city in the world. Pyongyang, Jr.

    Did you know that the USSR’s last capital wasn’t Moscow, but another city? It started and ended with A, then started and ended with A again.

  145. Old Prude says:

    Pretty sneaky, Sailer. Title the post so we think you are going to discuss energy-drink marketing, or boomer music, then after we bite, slip in golf course architecture.

    I suspect you know if you had been honest and titled the post “Let’s discuss how Skateboard Parks are similar to Golf Courses” you would have gotten five comments, two of which would have been pithy anagrams.

  146. Old Prude says:
    @frankie p

    Every time I have heard a singer perform their “big hit” you can feel the energy drain out of them. Rosanne Cash and “Seven Year Ache” was exceptionally rote.

    Speaking of playing the same stuff over and over, what must it be like playing in a wedding band? Not only having to play the same lame music, but watch the same drunken antics every Saturday night.

  147. Old Prude says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Drummers. Bah. My mother-in-law was watching her Frank Sinatra concert video for the umpteenth time. Buddy Rich comes on the screen, and she rolls her eyes “This guy is just going to make a racket for five minutes.” You tell um, Ma.

    • Agree: JMcG
  148. @Reg Cæsar

    1960s skateboards had metal wheels, like old-time roller skates, so they were painful to ride on streets and sidewalks (rather than wooden roller rinks). Polyurethane wheels were invented in the 1970s, leading to the revival of skateboarding and Venice Beach street rollerskating.

    Material science majors always won their arguments at Rice U. about what their major did for humanity.

  149. @The Only Catholic Unionist

    He can reproduce both the notes and the aural texture of famous guitar parts, the latter using his sound engineer skills.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  150. @AndrewR

    I was listening to the local college radio station play new stuff yesterday, and it was all quite good by my 1979 standards. Here’s a band that’s been around for awhile but I’m too old to have heard of them, Parquet Courts: This catchy new single by them is like a heavier New Order:

  151. @PiltdownMan

    I think Beato mostly produces country these days. He lives in Atlanta, although he’s obviously a Northeasterner. He wrote a #1 hit on the country charts in 2013. I imagine country these days sounds, instrumentally, a lot like rock in 1970s-1990s (which sounded a lot like country), so having an expert on late 20th Century guitar rock produce country works.

  152. @Tono Bungay

    I had a ping-pong table as a kid and it was a lot of fun. We took to playing with a Nerf ball using tennis rules, such as overhand serves. The ping-pong table was right next to a plate glass window and, looking back, I’m surprised we never crashed through it.

    Badminton with a nerf ball was fun too. We played over a chain link fence. You could put more spin on a nerf ball than a ping pong ball or shuttlecock, but the maximum velocity was low.

  153. @The Wild Geese Howard

    The two Simons behind American Idol arrived in America convinced that what Americans, like the Brits, wanted were synthetic pop idols like the Spice Girls. But the first year’s winner was Kelly Clarkson, a rather sturdy girl who stood in one place and just sang. But she sang really well. Eventually, Simon Cowell and Simon Fuller, being smart guys, figured out that American Southerners, black and white, sing a lot in church and they appreciate good singing.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  154. @joe862

    Pearl Jam famously rebelled against Paul Allen’s extortionate Ticketmaster monopoly but found out they could only be booked into county fairs and the like:

    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/pearl-jam-taking-on-ticketmaster-67440/

    • Replies: @joe862
  155. @Hangnail Hans

    Elvis Costello was, quite intentionally, the James Joyce of rock lyricists: “to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race.”

    Costello’s lyrics are made up of phrases he overheard people on the bus saying.

    Rock lyrics are much more fragmented than Great American Songbook lyrics. From the mid-1960s onward, you hear a lot of brilliant lines embedded in an incoherent poem. From Elvis’s “Pump It Up:”

    I’ve been on tenderhooks, ending in dirty looks
    Listening to the Muzak, thinking ’bout this ‘n’ that
    She said, “That’s that, I don’t wanna chitter-chat”
    Turn it down a little bit or turn it down flat

    Or Bowie:

    Is there life on Mars?
    It’s on America’s tortured brow
    That Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow
    Now the workers have struck for fame
    ‘Cause Lennon’s on sale again
    See the mice in their million hordes
    From Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads
    Rule Britannia is out of bounds
    To my mother, my dog, and clowns
    But the film is a saddening bore
    ‘Cause I wrote it ten times or more
    It’s about to be writ again
    As I ask you to focus on
    Sailors fighting in the dance hall
    Oh man, look at those cavemen go
    It’s the freakiest show
    Take a look at the lawman
    Beating up the wrong guy
    Oh man, wonder if he’ll ever know
    He’s in the best selling show
    Is there life on Mars?

    or from “Smells Like Teen Spirit:”

    With the lights out, it’s less dangerous
    Here we are now, entertain us
    I feel stupid and contagious
    Here we are now, entertain us
    A mulatto, an albino, a mosquito, my libido
    Yeah, hey

    Maybe it was the drugs, maybe it was the electric guitars being so loud that nobody could hear the lyrics. Maybe it was Dylan setting the example that the singer-songwriter couldn’t be told that he should stick to one or two skills and not try to do everything.

    Early rock n roll had old-fashioned lyrics that told a story:

    It was a teenage wedding
    And the old folks wished them well
    You could see that Pierre did truly love the mademoiselle
    And now the young monsieur and madame
    Have rung the chapel bell
    “C’est la vie”, say the old folks
    It goes to show you never can tell

    They furnished off an apartment with
    A two room Roebuck sale
    The coolerator was crammed with TV dinners and ginger ale
    But when Pierre found work, the little money comin’ worked out well
    “C’est la vie”, say the old folks
    It goes to show you never can tell

    They had a hi-fi phono, boy, did they let it blast
    Seven hundred little records
    All rock, rhythm and jazz
    But when the sun went down
    The rapid tempo of the music fell
    “C’est la vie”, say the old folks
    It goes to show you never can tell

    Or:

    Another Saturday night and I ain’t got nobody
    I got some money ’cause I just got paid
    How I wish I had someone to talk to
    I’m in an awful way

    The second line of Sam Cooke’s song resists the temptation to over-egg the pudding about how tragic is his situation.

    Rod Stewart was one of the few classic rock lyricists that wrote coherent lyrics:

    Wake up, Maggie
    I think I got something to say to you
    It’s late September and
    I really should be back at school

    I know I keep you amused
    But I feel I’m being used
    Oh, Maggie, I couldn’t have tried anymore

    You led me away from home
    Just to save you from being alone
    You stole my heart and that’s what really hurts

    The morning sun, when it’s in your face
    Really shows your age

    A transitional lyric:

    You know, those were different times
    All the poets they studied rules of verse …

    Some people they like to go out dancing
    And other people, they have to work, just watch me now
    And there’s even some evil mothers
    Well they’re gonna tell you that everything is just dirt

    You know that women never really faint
    And that villains always blink their eyes
    You know children are the only ones who blush
    And that life is just to die

    But, anyone who ever had a heart
    Oh, they wouldn’t turn around and break it
    And anyone who ever played a part
    They wouldn’t turn around and hate it

  156. @nebulafox

    Here’s my book review of the first Kurt Cobain biography, which I finished in the wee hours of September 11, 2001, so I didn’t get published until five weeks later:

    https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2001/10/16/Book-Review-Cobain-The-Last-Rock-Legend/82891003255268/

    ODD NEWS OCT. 16, 2001 / 2:01 PM
    Book Review: Cobain – The Last Rock Legend
    BySTEVE SAILER, UPI National Correspondent

    UPI NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT, Calif., Oct. 16 (UPI) — With comic results, fans routinely misunderstand the lyrics of hit songs. A recent compendium was entitled “‘Scuse Me While I Kiss this Guy and Other Misheard Lyrics” in tribute to a common mangling of Jimi Hendrix’s line “‘Scuse me while I kiss the sky” from “Purple Haze.”

    The book includes such delightful absurdities as Bob Dylan’s “The ants are my friends / They’re blowin’ in the wind.”

    Yet, one of its fouled-up lyrics was an improvement over the original. Kurt Cobain’s actual chorus for Nirvana’s landmark 1991 hit “Smells Like Teen Spirit” reads “A mulatto, an albino/A mosquito, my libido.” One insightful listener, however, thought he heard something that sums up Cobain far better:

    “I’m blotto and bravado / I’m a scarecrow and a Beatle.”

    Cobain, who blew his brains out in 1994, was indeed a blotto scarecrow. A junkie who suffered chronic stomach pain, the always scrawny rocker would waste away to as little as 105 pounds during his many futile attempts to kick heroin. He was literally dyspeptic: his stomach problems twisted his view of the world.

    Yet, just as the six-shooter was the “equalizer” of the Wild West, allowing small men to defeat big men, Cobain, in the grand tradition of petite electric guitar bravos like Pete Townshend of The Who, wielded his six-string as a sonic equalizer in his fight against his family and class insecurities.

    Finally, Cobain bears comparison to the Beatles. He was almost as charismatic as John Lennon, and even more self-destructive. More importantly, despite his constant assertion of his punk rocker purity, nobody since Paul McCartney has had a more fertile or original brain for composing catchy pop hooks.

    Yet, Seattle rock journalist Charles R. Cross seldom mentions Cobain’s melodic gifts in his otherwise excellent new biography “Heavier than Heaven” (Hyperion, 381 pages, \$24.95).

    The crucial reason Kurt continues to fascinate is the melodiousness of his music. Cross does, however, make clear that Cobain was influenced not just by the Sex Pistols, but also by the less hip mainstream styles he heard growing up in a Washington lumber town, notably the Beatles’ pop and Led Zeppelin’s slower, heavier arena rock.

    Cobain’s brief life was not without incident. A delightful little boy much doted upon by his family, 9-year-old Kurt was permanently wounded by his parents’ virulent divorce. Unable to accept his parents’ remarriages, which showed he was no longer their highest priority, he tormented ten foster families and spoke frequently of suicide.

    From age 17 onward, he was often homeless. Two weeks before the release of Nirvana’s second album, “Nevermind,” which sold ten million units, the 24-year-old was sleeping in the backseat of his Plymouth Valiant.

    Having conducted 400 interviews and persuaded Cobain’s widow, singer/actress Courtney Love, to let him see Kurt’s voluminous private journals and art works, Cross is quite helpful at explaining Nirvana’s lyrics.

    For example, the baffling phrase “Smell Like Teen Spirit” actually referred to the Teen Spirit brand deodorant worn by his girlfriend Tobi Vail. She dumped him, and that inspired some of the rage that resounded through “Nevermind,” which topped most white male rock critics’ lists of the best albums of the last decade.

    Although Cobain was largely a Northwest version of the classic bohemian artist starving in a Parisian garret, he was quite monogamous for an artist, much less a rock star. By Cross’ count, he slept with about six women in his 27 years. He seemed to feel that the sexual revolution had destroyed his childhood and didn’t want to perpetuate it.

    Cross doesn’t theorize much about why Cobain was both so talented and so doomed. Still, he provides plenty of raw materials for speculating about what it was like inside Cobain’s head.

    Evolutionary psychologists such as Geoffrey Miller of the U. of New Mexico often argue that geniuses don’t generally have better thoughts than you or me; they just have far more thoughts, and then choose the best of them. Cobain’s career gives credence to that. During the three years he was financially supported by his first girlfriend, Boeing cafeteria worker Tracy Marander, he devoted his days to expressing himself in music, art, and words.

    Just as so many British rock stars like Townshend and David Bowie were art school refugees, Cobain had an impressive knack for drawing and making morbid collages. He also wrote countless lyrics and letters in the powerful but disturbing stream-of-consciousness style made famous in “Teen Spirit.”

    Yet, being blessed with highly inventive musical, visual, and verbal imaginations may ultimately have been a curse to him. With little logical ability – he was awful at math, for example – to ride herd on his imagination, he artistically obsessed on the emotional and physical pain he felt.

    In his search for a nirvana where his teeming mind never again would perturb him, he turned to drugs and ultimately a shotgun.

  157. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Generally, the straight guys who declare themselves trans are the highly logical ones. Kurt Cobain could never be accused of being logical.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  158. @Steve Sailer

    Recent sunny SoCal pop—not quite college radio, but here’s a tight 2017 track (stealth Tesla ad?) from former members of No Doubt and the singer from AFI:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  159. @frankie p

    David Gilmour isn’t particularly an improvisational musician. He composed the two solos in “Comfortably Numb” from many of his recordings, taking the best moments from here or there.

    Classical musicians are happy to be paid to perform pieces they didn’t write over and over. Placido Domingo has performed the lead in Verdi’s “Otello” at least 225 times, and he didn’t even compose it. Why shouldn’t Gilmour get paid to perform his composition of “Comfortably Numb”?

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @frankie p
  160. @Steve Sailer

    “Cross doesn’t theorize much about why Cobain was both so talented and so doomed.”

    Well at least as far as the “doomed” part goes, two words: Courtney Love.

    As far as talented and doomed goes, I prefer Syd Barrett;

    “I’ve got a bike!
    You can ride it if you like!
    It’s got a basket,
    A bell that rings,
    And lots of needless things
    To make it look good.
    I’d give it to you if I could,
    But I borrowed it.

    You’re the kind of girl
    Who fits in with my world.
    I’ll give you anything,
    Everything, if you want things.”

    Beat that, Seattle.

    Oh and also, Syd’s guitar on “Astronomy Domine” (get it?) cuts David Gilmour.

  161. Ralph L says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The wheels we had in ’67-8 weren’t metal but some kind of ceramic or hard plastic, almost as bad. They didn’t get much use after my 9 y.o. brother had to get stitches in his chin.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  162. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Gwen Stefani’s No Doubt in the later 1990s was doing the new wave of The Motels and The Waitresses and the ska of English Beat and Madness of 1981.

    Of course the 1979-1982 ska bands were imitating the early 1960s ska bands that were mainstream enough that Annette Funicello sang in a 1964 beach party money:

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  163. @Stan d Mute

    I saw Shania Twain at a Parents’ Back to School Night. She was amazing.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Clyde
  164. @R.G. Camara

    3 chords and the truth is a great song:

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  165. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Phish was pretty great the one time I saw them on Saturday Night Live.

    In general, famous musicians are really good at music.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  166. @R.G. Camara

    “The best country is about pushing a lot of meaning into the words you hear.”

    Proof that (genuine, old-school) country lyrics are best lyrics….

    Best bitter, broken-hearted lyric of all time:

    “If the phone don’t ring, it’s me.”

  167. AceDeuce says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    I think that Moon died in the same London apartment that Mama Cass checked out in a few years before.

  168. Mike Tre says:
    @anon

    Here is a cover of Danny Carey’s drumming on the Tool song Invincible. I use the cover because I cannot find a decent video of Carey playing it where you can actually see what he’s doing, but in this one you can clearly see just how impossibly good Carey is. He plays a polyrhythm almost throughout the entire 12 minute song and also uses a drum machine to play a solo piece that sounds like a synthesizer. I’m not taking anything away from Moon, but his approach to drumming was 100% energy 100% of the time, which in rock is an awesome thing. But Carey really is on another level. He can go off for minutes in song using obscure time signatures, and most of their music on the last three albums is not in 4/4 time.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  169. @SunBakedSuburb

    In rock and roll, it’s usually pretty hard to rate “best” or “greatest” in any category. It sort of depends on what you’re drawn to.

    Whatever you think of his chops, Keith Moon was a great stylist, as was Ringo Starr. Their sounds are unmistakable. Which to some of us is what matters. You can hear brilliant technical drummers like Neil Peart or Ginger Baker, and yes, they are impressive, but there are… fifty more just like them. There is only one Keith Moon, only one Ringo Starr.

    I like to piss off people by claiming that John Lennon was the best-ever pop/rock singer — better than Elvis, better than Marvin Gaye or Sam Cooke, better than Robert Plant…. because, despite being a clearly inferior singer and an even more inferior voice, he always sounded like John Lennon, not like somebody blowing his lungs out, trying to be a star.

    Marvin Gaye, despite his far superior voice and technical skills, always sounded like he was singing some sort of impersonal anthem: his pain was “I Am a Black Man’s Pain” whereas Lennon’s pain was “I am John Lennon’s Pain”. Same thing with the difference between say Aretha Franklin and Janis Joplin, or Bono and Kurt Cobain.

    But like I say, depends what you’re drawn to.

    • Replies: @Edmund
    , @Curle
  170. @Steve Sailer

    LOL, that’s great. (Back in a jif, I’m skippying to the beat.)

  171. @Steve Sailer

    Material science majors always won their arguments at Rice U. about what their major did for humanity.

    I only took one materials science course as a technical elective in my undergrad days at a big time STEM school but I remember it being quite fascinating.

    Modern automobiles are a tour de force that demonstrate how far materials science has progressed.

  172. Thirdtwin says:

    “Beato mostly ignores the words and sticks to the music.”

    That’s why I like his stuff. Words in rock are merely rhythmic sounds, meaning nothing. When spoken without music they sound banal and trite, for the most part. Sussudio, if you will.

    And I’m not too sure that constructing Never-never Lands and Pleasure Islands in the middle of nowhere is actually helping boys grow up. Sounds more like the pipe dream of a wealthy musician who thinks bestowing his childhood diversions on today’s boys is “doing something”.

    The people who play golf pay for their goof courses, and they appreciate what they pay for. Will these boys who are handed skateparks do the same?

  173. @Steve Sailer

    Eventually, Simon Cowell and Simon Fuller, being smart guys, figured out that American Southerners, black and white, sing a lot in church and they appreciate good singing.

    I have to wonder if that led to the horrific oversinging trend that began in the early ’00s with pop acts like Chistina Aguilera and persisted for several years thereafter.

  174. Bitfu says:
    @R.G. Camara

    So where would one go to find ‘deep lyrics’? [Whatever that means…]

    I love the lyrics of country music. Haven’t a clue if they’re deep or not–but the simplicity hits home.

    May not be as good as I once was.
    But I’m as good once as I ever was.

    Every middle aged dude can relate. Is it deep? Of course not. But really, who cares? It works. I don’t need depth for resonance. I am pretty shallow, though. So, there’s that.

    Anyways…where to go for deep lyrics?

    Your problem may just be that you don’t like lyrics. Nothing wrong with that, of course. You’re just too smart for stupid rock and roll.

    For your soul yearns for a fecund of profundity in the still of the night. Ir cries out in the wilderness with the lament that‘We are all, like you know, dust in the wind.’

  175. @Steve Sailer

    Interesting set of songs, though that’s definitely not one of E.C.’s more profound lyrics. That’s a song that doesn’t even need lyrics.

    Perhaps try “Chemistry Class” or “Motel Matches” or even “Two Little Hitlers” for brilliant wordplay.

    More: “You Tripped At Every Step” “Wave a White Flag” “Oliver’s Army” “Watching the Detectives” etc etc

  176. @Steve Sailer

    In general, famous musicians are really good at music.

    Certainly.

    I was attempting to fault PJ for growing comfortable and workmanlike over the years.

  177. CCZ says:
    @Muggles

    I wonder if his liability insurance covers death or injury caused by black males and black male gunfire????

  178. JMcG says:
    @Thea

    Thanks, that’s good to know. It comes up all the time in my line of work.

  179. Erik L says:
    @Hereward the Woke

    yes, that’s what I meant. Obviously most examples of every genre are crap but the best (old) country had great lyrics that worked with the music and told coherent stories in an economical manner. The best rock songs tend to have mysterious lyrics that are only coherent one sentence at a time. When you go back and learn the story of the writing of these songs you tend to learn that phrases got throw in because the singer thought they sounded cool and beyond that make no sense.

    • Replies: @Curle
  180. And when skateboarders aren’t using it, that looks like a great place to stage Waiting for Godot or film a low-budget sci-fi flick

  181. Erik L says:
    @James J O'Meara

    My comments are about the best examples of each genre. I listen to some rap while I work out these days which is 90% women bragging about their pussies. I respect this as a hilarious reaction to the men bragging about their dicks but it’s still pretty stupid. OTOH the rap I remember from my youth was much better. The music and the words worked together and the words made sense more than one sentence at a time. They gave you a real feeling of what the performer was trying to convey.

    I don’t need pretentious lyrics. I don’t even need pretentious poetry. I love Stairway to Heaven but even Robert Plant doesn’t know WTF it means. He can’t even remember most of the lyrics probably because they are incoherent…just a collection of cool sounding phrases.

  182. @Anonymous

    Metal is sometimes said (by metalheads, at least) to be the most complex form of rock and the closest to classical in structure.

  183. F. Galton says:
    @Steve Sailer

    During the 1920s-60s, song writing was done by professionals, who typically handed off their songs to singers/performers.

    After that time, the boys in the band were writing their own songs, and if they wanted that 50% of the royalty for the lyrics, they wrote those too. These lads (Richards/Jagger, Townsend/Daltry, Page/Plant, etc.) didn’t have English Lit degrees, so you got what you got on the lyrics side. It appears the fans don’t care that rock lyrics don’t hold up to Keats & Yates.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  184. @Steve Sailer

    That’s cool. Word around here is that Keith Richards and his wife Patti Hansen used to show up at parent-teacher conference nights.

  185. @frankie p

    There is more than one way to look at this.

    Jazz is jazz partly because it is improvisational, especially during solos. That is cool.

    Would you expect an orchestra to change up (jazz up) its performances of, say, Beethoven’s 5th Symphony?

    Joe Walsh (one of my favorites) recounted how he and Don Felder created their guitar duet for Hotel California: He said they started out improvising, but then Don Henley urged them to stick to the structure of Felder’s original demo tape which had started the whole project.

    Walsh said that then he and Felder worked together for three days until they could precisely play what became one of the greatest guitar segments of any song. From then on, they played it the same at every performance, because it is part of the song.

  186. Yngvar says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Here is the skateboarder, overwhelmed over meeting Kyle.

    This is like a Robert Capa. A glowing moment, fixed for eternity.

    • LOL: Muggles
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  187. Trinity says:
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Tanks for the correction on her name. Nah, that chick played a weird character in KCB and in Five Easy Pieces. She could be the total opposite in real life as Jerry Lewis, the comedian and not Jerry Lee Lewis the singer, was an asshole in real life but was the funny guy while acting. Yeah, I didn’t recall seeing Jodie Foster at all in KCB, must have been a very small role. Never watched the entire movie, “Easy Rider” because it was just another form of leftist trash that was more comical than anything else. Only thing good about Easy Rider was the theme song, “Born To Be Wild.” Peter Fonda was a total douchebag in real life and reel life. I sort of liked “Dirty Mary & Crazy Larry” because a young Susan George reminded me of my old high school girlfriend. hehe. Of course Susie lost cool points for her role in the miscegenation and the muh slavery (((Hollywood))) fairy tale, “Mandingo.” Remember former rassler and bodybuilder Earl Maynard and of course the late Ken Norton played in this very forgettable movie. Soon afterward every other Black dude was proclaiming to be part Mandingo warrior back in the day, dudes like Mr. T. LMAO. Ali condemned Norton for parading around showing his “naked ass” on films. teehee.

  188. Yngvar says:
    @Erik L

    Some songs can can speak to you sometimes, but the music business is a business.

    The English artist The The was always very socially conscious and critical of trends private and public, but events in the video for his tune Kingdom of Rain was set in New York City. Great tune, great lyrics, but he was trying to break it in the US market. Sell out? Just business.

  189. @Jokah Macpherson

    Aside from old-school 80s stuff I honestly cannot even make out the lyrics to much of the metal I enjoy. It’s all about the music or at least soothing white noise, unlike the prog-rock days of Procol Harum, Steely Dan, Dio or the vapid but magnificently performed lyrics of Renaissance. When Amon Amarth’s singer urges the crowd to sing along he adds, “And if you don’t know the words, who cares — it’s metal!”

    Arch Enemy does write some intelligent songs but a lot gets lost in translation

  190. Clyde says:

    Skateboarder definitely has that antifa look. Do you think the other one was shot or is taking photos? The antifa had hand guns too IIRC.

  191. Clyde says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I saw Shania Twain at a Parents’ Back to School Night. She was amazing.

    She made one of the sexiest videos. Funny too. “OK so you think you are Brad Pitt”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  192. Clyde says:
    @F. Galton

    Townsend/Daltry

    Pete Townsend wrote most of the Who tunes, so is much wealthier than Roger. Though Roger seems the happier man. Keith Moon was the perfect Who drummer. In three interviews, I have only seen Pete Townsend praise Moon. Back in the late 60s I saw the Who, Stones, Led Zepplin. The were all boring because they sounded very thin. With the Who being absolutely pathetic at recreating Tommy on stage. Led Zep was really thin with Plant leaping about like a madman to make up for this. Musta been the drugs. Friend claimed that in the back of a club he saw Page and Plant shooting up H. I have not seen him in years, otherwise I would ask him about this story.
    Rolling Stones were better. At least they brought 4 instrumentalists. And possibly a piano player.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @anon
    , @JMcG
  193. @Thea

    And that is a great song.

    There was something long ago, the idea that everything in nature is a masterpiece. When you see a man working up on a telephone pole, the highway stretched out before and after him, he and the highway too are part of the bigger nature, and you see a masterpiece of life and perspective.

    You can look down at the ground and see the rocks God made, and you see that even the edges and shapes, the masses themselves, were sculpted by a master.

    Well, I don’t know if you see this, but I do, and I used to tell people about it. The girlfriend who came up with this idea with me — that everything is a masterpiece — went on to RISD. I say these things no more, because I live a life of steady habits now, not as a songwriter.

    Speaking of rock:


    Ansel Adams

    • Thanks: Thea
  194. @Bitfu

    “Anyways…where to go for deep lyrics?”

    Well, to Don Van Vliet, alias Captain Beefheart, bien sur.

    Two examples….

    “Why doesn’t ol’ Odd-Jobs come round any more?
    He used ta ride on his form-a-heap bike,
    An’ his basket was a whole candy store.
    He used ta make X’s from door ta door. [1]
    All of the women,
    And the young gals round here
    Wonder why ol’ Jobs don’t come around no more.
    Why ole Odd-Jobs don’t come on home.
    And the gate without its pants on danced, [2]
    N creaked n moaned.”

    And this is possibly the angriest, saddest thing in the world:

    “I cry,
    But I can’t buy your
    Veteran’s Day poppy.
    It don’t make me high,
    It can only make me cry,
    It
    Can never grow
    Another son
    Like the one
    Who warmed me,
    My days after,
    Sweet and calmed my breast,
    My life’s blood
    Screaming empty!
    She cries,
    It don’t get me high,
    It can only make me cry….
    Your Veteran’s Day poppy.”

    [1] Hobos traditionally mark small X’s on houses where it’s known that people are generous and will maybe give them a meal in exchange for doing odd jobs.

    [2] Meaning that someone usually hangs laundry across this gate to dry, but it isn’t there any more.

  195. Edmund says:
    @Danindc

    You’re watching Jeff Ament getting mugged in Atlanta.

    Now, there is a slim possibility that these muggers were white or Hispanic, but with the type of crime, the way it happened and the city it happened in, they were likely black.

    And I said some people don’t learn because now, Pearl Jam has gone all in on the notion that you can never question those holy black people, if their social media is anything to go by.

  196. Curle says:
    @R.G. Camara

    “ Skateboarding is weird because it still attracts the “rebellious” type of suburban youth despite it being a decades-old thing.”

    Could be it is just more fun than other things. I’ve never really done it, but have the impression that it is more thrilling than other recreational activities available to teens. Kind of like surfing. Maybe the rebels are the one’s in sufficiently thrilled by organized sports.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  197. Curle says:
    @Hangnail Hans

    I know I still want to hear girls talk.

  198. Edmund says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I heartily agree with you on this. Not just for the examples but for the fact that some bands like Rush and Tool have the greatest musicians who cannot for the life of them make listenable songs.

    And besides Lennon and Cobain being annoying whiners (not as singers but as people), they were great writers of simple songs. And they definitely had distinctive voices.

    Songwriting is the most important aspect of making great music. Musicianship is icing on the cake.

  199. @Curle

    Skateboarding is indeed like surfing. The motions are similar, and it was a hit in SoCal way back when among boys who were not yet old enough to drive down to the beach with surfboards. My opinion is that it continues as a sort of vestige of youth. It is not something adults would normally do, but now it is an Olympic event because our culture has become neotenous.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  200. Mr Mox says:
    @obwandiyag

    The lyrics written by the professional songwriters of the US in the 1930s, 1940s, and to a certain extent the 1950s and early 1960s were infinitely, infinitely superior. If you don’t know that, you do not understand language or poetry or music or culture or aesthetics, and should not even try to type.

    Is professionel songwriters even a thing anymore? I can’t recall anyone but Bernie Taupin, who did most of Elton John’s stuff.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Dave Pinsen
  201. Curle says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ by claiming that John Lennon was the best-ever pop/rock singer”

    Seems a perfectly reasonable claim. Lennon made his voice an instrument suitable to the emotional state he was trying to create with his songs. Seems to me his success rate was high. Maybe the best ever.

  202. @Clyde

    I saw the Stones in 1981, and they made up for it all by just being LOUD. I was smart and wanted to protect my hearing, so I wore earplugs. (I had been a chainsaw operator in the Forest Service previously, so this was normal for me.)

    The fact is, a lot of bands cannot reproduce their studio, engineered, multi-tracked songs in concert. At least the Beatles understood this and just stopped touring.

    I seriously think the real reason so many recording artists go on giving concerts is for the money. Evidently it is a money fountain for them, whereas recording sales are somewhat problematic due to record company shysters.

    BTW, just as an aside, this is relevant to the other topic of guitar solos and whether or not they should be consistent or jazzed up. The fact is, when you have mastered something difficult, then it is your prerogative to perform your final product, as created by you, for your audiences. What you have made is part of the song, and deserves respect and deserves to be performed with the same perfection and respect as any other piece of music.

  203. anon[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr Mox

    Robert Hunter wrote lyrics for a lot of Grateful Dead songs but wasn’t in the band. According to wiki, he even got into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the Dead for doing so.

  204. @Steve Sailer

    “Here’s my book review of the first Kurt Cobain biography, which I finished in the wee hours of September 11, 2001, so I didn’t get published until five weeks later”

    Unfortunate timing preceding what was at the time the most oppressively stupid event in modern history – now utterly eclipsed by the worldwide CoronaHoax. Imagine if after 9/11 everyone was forced to remove their shoes and subject their effects to search and seizure before entering any building anywhere – forever. Yeah, that’s how retarded is the facediapering and infinite PrickPass regime of today. And Americans love it.

  205. @Clyde

    My wife is a fan.

    So, I know this song well, and I have absorbed its lessons. The part about cars stings me particularly hard.

  206. AceDeuce says:

    Helena Kallianiotes was a very good friend of Jack Nicholson, Dennis Hopper, Bob Rafelson, and that crowd from the time that they were nobodies. She was also in the 1960s Monkees film Head that Nicholson helped produce/direct, that starred everybody from Annette Funicello to Frank Zappa.

    She is far more noteworthy for her later career as a club impresario in Los Angeles in the 80s/early 90s–she had a club–named Helena’s–that had everyone from Prince to Nicholson to Madonna to Marlon Brando as regulars.

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lifestyle/style/hollywood-nightlife-queen-helena-kallianiotes-finally-tells-all-1165363/

  207. Curle says:
    @Stan d Mute

    “ Seattle “pain” is not quite like Detroit pain.”

    For what it is worth I don’t think many of those “Seattle” artists were from Seattle.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  208. Curle says:
    @Neuday

    Doesn’t the careening nature of his drumming add to the feel of the songs or at least some of them?

    • Replies: @Neuday
  209. @James J O'Meara

    Yes, I remember a political science professor from my first year of college telling us all that Marx said “we could all do our jobs in the daytime and be critical critics and artists at night,” and other shit. Your idea exactly, only this professor gave no indication that he didn’t think it was possible.

    We all became communists in our freshman year as a result.

    That was 40 years ago, and it has only gotten worse.

    Oh, and we had one classmate who had emigrated from the Soviet Union. (This was 1981.) That student ardently and repeatedly argued with our professor that communism was bullshit. Our professor’s consistent response was that the Soviet Union didn’t have “real communism.”

    I remember when another member of our class challenged our professor to prove that the professor himself had ever done “proletarian” work. Our professor answered at some length that he had a job in college painting lines on tennis courts!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  210. Curle says:
    @Erik L

    “ The best rock songs tend to have mysterious lyrics that are only coherent one sentence at a time.”

    I dunno, I figured out California Girls without much work.

  211. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’ve been on tenderhooks, ending in dirty looks

    The lyric source spelled that wrong – it’s *tenterhooks*.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenterhook

    Tenterhooks or tenter hooks are hooked nails in a device called a tenter. Tenters were wooden frames which were used as far back as the 14th century in the process of making woollen cloth.

    The phrase “on tenterhooks” has become a metaphor for nervous anticipation.

    […]
    Metaphor
    By the mid-18th century, the phrase on tenterhooks came to mean being in a state of tension, uneasiness, anxiety, or suspense, i.e., figuratively stretched like the cloth on the tenter.[4]

    [MORE]

    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Discography
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/This_Year%27s_Model
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Pump_It_Up

    I’ve been on tenterhooks
    Ending in dirty looks
    List’ning to the Muzak
    Thinking ’bout this ‘n’ that
    She said that’s that
    I don’t wanna chitter-chat
    Turn it down a little bit
    Or turn it down flat.

    Pump it up when you don’t really need it
    Pump it up until you can feel it

    Down in the pleasure centre
    Hell bent or heaven sent
    Listen to the propaganda
    Listen to the latest slander
    There’s nothing underhand
    That she wouldn’t understand

    Pump it up until you can feel it
    Pump it up when you don’t really need it

    She’s been a bad girl
    She’s like a chemical
    Though you try to stop it
    She’s like a narcotic
    You wanna torture her
    You wanna talk to her
    All the things you bought for her
    Putting up your temp’rature

    Pump it up until you can feel it
    Pump it up when you don’t really need it

    Out in the fashion show
    Down in the bargain bin
    You put your passion out
    Under the pressure pin
    Fall into submission
    Hit-and-run transmission
    No use wishing now for any other sin

    Pump it up until you can feel it
    Pump it up when you don’t really need it

    Pump it up until you can feel it
    Pump it up when you don’t really need it

    Pump it up until you can feel it
    Pump it up when you don’t really need it
    Don’t really need it
    Don’t really need it
    Don’t really need it

  212. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clyde

    yeah. i have no idea what’s a comme il faut drummer.

    i just know of all rock bands, moon is the only drummer who i thought…”wow! who is that guy?!”…i mean from the sound.

    of course there was that yuge solo on In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, but seriously…

    you can hear it!

    dude sounds like a gorilla with greyhound muscle fibers.

    sometimes doing everything wrong is doing everything perfectly.

  213. Curle says:
    @Janus

    The right wingers were cancelled: FEAR being one.

  214. @Buzz Mohawk

    Rick Beato, in his analysis of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” praised Cobain’s solo for just playing the melody (it’s a great melody): “When in doubt, play the melody.”.

  215. @Buzz Mohawk

    “The fact is, a lot of bands cannot reproduce their studio, engineered, multi-tracked songs in concert. At least the Beatles understood this and just stopped touring.”

    I went through a period where I (or we, really) understood this problem and tried to find ways to work around it.

    Example:

    I have a friend who is a low-to-mid-range solo singer-songwriter (i.e. not as famous as say Fiona Apple [1], but still, she gets respect).

    Anyway, I was talking to her one night, and she told me she was looking for new material. I said to her, This isn’t exactly new, but it’s a way to make it new, it’s sort of like performance art. Here’s what I want you to play:

    1. Sit down at the piano. Look down at the keyboard, and only at the keyboard, and do NOT ever look at the audience, at all.

    2. Sit and wait in silence for an uncomfortably long time, without doing anything or looking at anyone. Then….

    3. With your left hand, play in bass the original intro guitar part of “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”. Play it very very slowly, with only a bit of right hand partial chords in a very high register for cover.

    4. Now sing the song, very slowly and almost a cappella, with just a hint of left hand playing the original bass line. Most importantly….

    5. CUT OUT THE CHORUSES ENTIRELY! Sing only the stanzas, one after the other, as if you are telling a story (which you are). Do not have any variation at all in dynamics, it’s all very flat and affectless and quiet.

    6. When you get to the last line “suddenly some one is there at the turnstile…..” when you finish, take a quiet pause, and then finish left hand with the famous bass coda. That’s it. Then, and only then, look up at the audience.

    So, I bumped into her again about two weeks later and asked, Did you do what I told you? –Yes. –Well how did it go?

    She said, I’m not entirely sure, when I finally looked up at the end the way you told me to, about half the people in the crowd were crying.

    I’ll take it as a win.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  216. @Mr Mox

    Of course it’s still a thing. Look at the songwriting credits of any pop or country song.

  217. Trinity says:

    Best Songs When It Comes To Lyrics IMO

    Numero uno : Amazing Grace * you don’t even have to be a believer. Beautifully written song.

    I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry by the one and only Hank Williams

    First Cut Is The Deepest * done by various artists but my favorite is Rod Stewart

    Me And Bobby McGee by Janis although Pink does a helluva version as well

    The Rose * done by Bette Midler in the movie The Rose

    Turn The Page by Bob Seger

    Maggie May another gem by Hot Rod

    Bridge Over Troubled Water * best version is the cover by Elvis Presley

    If Loving You Is Wrong * yet another done by numerous artist, best version IMO is Leann Rimes

    Help * original by The Beatles but Tina Turner OWNS this one.

    Let It Be by The Beatles * only Beatles tune I like.

    Purple Rain by Prince

    November Rain by Guns & Roses * yes, G&R had a song with great lyrics

    Take Me Home, Country Roads * beautiful song about West Virginia done by John Denver

    Follow You Follow Me by Genesis

    Tuesday’s Gone and Simple Kind Of Man by Lynyrd Skynyrd

    Enuff for now.

  218. Muggles says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    because our culture has become neotenous.

    Okay, we know Buzz is smarter than we are. (And had more girlfriends…)

    Now this?

    He must enjoy making us normies reach for the dictionary. I keep mine under my revolver.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  219. Trinity says:
    @Curle

    I picture Detroit as gray and gloomy and I picture Seattle as rainy, gray and gloomy. Seattle has the edge on serial killers though. That and Grunge makes Seattle a nominee for most fucked up cities in America to reside in. Of course, with all the “teens” in Detroit, I would have take Seattle, with all their white traitor trash, Starbucks sipping pukes, and weirdo serial killers over Detroit IF you put a gun to my head and told me I had to live in either Detoilet and Skeetattle.

    • Replies: @Curle
  220. @Steve Sailer

    An alternate take would be that the lyrics went from story-telling to being more like poetry…

  221. Muggles says:
    @Bitfu

    So where would one go to find ‘deep lyrics’? [Whatever that means…]

    Just go shopping at Kroger or similar.

    When pop music became ubiquitous in supermarkets some time ago I had to stop and laugh the first time I heard Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4” gently playing while I was on the cereal aisle.

    The song (so I’m convinced) is about being on an acid trip in the deepest part of the night. If you’ve done that, you ask yourself the same question (“should I try to do some more…?”)

    Nope, definitely not. Just a waste.

    Of course that was decades back for me. Do people even do that these days? Do these mama-sans even know what these lyrics are about? No, probably not.

    “Let’s try the Captn’ Crunch tomorrow.”

    Of course given certain other modern song lyrics (especially rap), those Chicago lyrics are practically Christmas carols.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Sam Malone
  222. Muggles says:
    @Stan d Mute

    Nobody ever owns their failure. Everyone is a victim. And nothing is more antithetical to human advancement.

    You may be right about “owning” failure, but you and I are no exception either.

    We want to blame others for our own (often) mistakes.

    As for human advancement, you are dead wrong. Sure no one likes parasitical lawsuits over nothing, but that isn’t all that common. Try living in a place where there are no trial lawyers…

    Most if not all modern safety advances come from damage/tort lawsuits or concerns over that.

    You still want to drive in those 50s cars w/o seatbelts. Yes, we’ll all “be thrown free from the accident” like we used to think. Free and neck broken.

    Too much childish (or dare I write it, “womanly”?) concern over remote safety concerns is a brake on progress. COVID paranoia has brought out the worst of that.

    But life is dangerous enough without hazards being placed in front of us, or lied about, ignored, etc.

    The real problem now is that generally, we can’t sue governments for the damages they create for the rest of us. “Sovereign immunity” it is called.

    Who was Ashley Bobbit?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  223. joe862 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, I remember that and have long considered it a great irony.

  224. Skateparks–having guys get outside doing something–is better than video games. But skateboarding has a sulky misfit vibe.

    Much better would be getting boys out camping and hunting. Actual take responsibility for yourself, teaching patience and discipline and some useful skills while grounding young men in realities of life.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  225. @Muggles

    The song (so I’m convinced) is about being on an acid trip in the deepest part of the night.

    Worse than that, it’s self-referential. Songs about songs are bad enough, but songs about writing the very song you’re singing take the coke cake. The official story is that that was the time in the clock during a late-night rehearsal. It’s boring enough to be true.

    Just go shopping at Kroger or similar… I had to stop and laugh the first time I heard Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4” gently playing while I was on the cereal aisle.

    I pay attention to Musak, too. One night Supervalu played “Jet Airliner”, so I looked up the song, learned the amazing story of Paul Pena, and mentioned it in a comment or two. A year or two later, Steve does a post on Pena and his throat singing. I like to think I planted the seed in his mind, but he was probably reading about Mongolia.

  226. @Yngvar

    A glowing moment, fixed for eternity.

    Note how young Kyle is already totally dialed in on fake surrender guy before skateboard guy even hits the ground.

    What great cool and instinct in pure chaos.

  227. @Muggles

    You still want to drive in those 50s cars w/o seatbelts. Yes, we’ll all “be thrown free from the accident” like we used to think. Free and neck broken.

    It’s a statistical game. We are close to a case in which five rural teens were driving to school. The brakes failed just as they approached a highway, and they were slammed by a truck. Four of them were shaken up, but walked away without serious injury. The fifth was put into a vegetative state which lasted for decades.

    She was the only one wearing a belt.

    No, that’s not the way to bet, but sometimes it happens that way. We don’t know if the belt contributed in any way to her fate.

  228. @Buzz Mohawk

    Jazz is jazz partly because it is improvisational, especially during solos. That is cool.

    Well, one way that rock bands can add value to their live performances is improvisation.

    As an Xer, my favored example is (the underrated) Daniel Johns, the lead singer and guitarist for Silverchair.

    Note the unorthodox guitar tone, mini-solo, and extended solo, none of which are in the album version of, “The Door.”

    The band Clutch are another great example of artists who go above and beyond improvising and spicing it up rather than just banging out album tracks in concert.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
  229. @Buzz Mohawk

    The fact is, a lot of bands cannot reproduce their studio, engineered, multi-tracked songs in concert.

    I feel lucky to have seen bands that are very, very tight live, like the aformentioned Silverchair and Clutch.

    Social Distortion and the Black Crowes are two more of this Xer’s faves who are both very, very good in concert.

  230. @Muggles

    [Buzz] must enjoy making us normies reach for the dictionary. I keep mine under my revolver.

  231. Brutusale says:
    @Ralph L

    The clay skateboard wheels had to have been developed by an orthopedic surgeon. If you hit the tiniest pebble you were going ass over teakettle!

  232. @AnotherDad

    A nice thought, Dad, and I am all for it, but you would need to get those boys far outside the urban and suburban hells in which they reside.

    Now, if you are going to try to spend taxpayer’s money to do so, I will, um, I guess, fight against you, because, you see, I am jaded as to the benefits of any and all government efforts, however local, to “help” people.

    I am sorry, but nothing substitutes for PARENTS doing whatever God gave them the INSTINCTIVE DRIVE to do for their offspring.

    (PS: Those who seem to be running our country now, and most of the rest of the world, did, for the most part, not at all grow up in anything remotely resembling nature or the “realities of life.” They are, almost to a man, a woman, and a pretend man or woman, urban creatures.)

    Yet they now lord over you and me.

  233. JMcG says:
    @Clyde

    I’ll be that guy again. Pete Townshend was caught with loads of child pornography and skated because he is rich and famous. The little kids in that material suffered unspeakable horror for his perversion and that of those like him.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  234. @Steve Sailer

    Now I know where Elvis Costello got the idea for “Watch Your Step”.

    • LOL: JMcG
  235. @Buzz Mohawk

    Your idea exactly, only this professor gave no indication that he didn’t think it was possible.

    Sure he did– his very presence there!

  236. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Note how young Kyle is already totally dialed in on fake surrender guy

    Good ol’ biceps blowchunks! Whatta great night in our national drama.

  237. Neuday says:
    @Curle

    No. It makes me wonder what The Who would’ve sounded like with a skilled drummer who knew how to play to the song.

  238. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The performance you describe sounds wonderful. I wish I could see and hear it. Bravo.

  239. Anon55uu says:

    1. There is no obvious fellow feeling between skateboarders and the bureaucratic Left. Filling skate parks with sand was a bizarre early corona insanity.

    https://www.foxla.com/news/los-angeles-fills-venice-skate-park-with-sand-to-discourage-prohibited-gatherings

    Hopefully Montana stays non blue long enough to avoid this madness.

    2. Given the bravery involved it is a very tough sport. Most kids who start cannot move much beyond the most basic moves performed by professionals. Professionals make it look very easy despite the risk.

    3. There is one unfortunate comparison with surfing. Women professional surfers frequently look very hot (a number compete in thong bikinis plus vest). Women skateboarders, however, struggle to look good. Part of it is baggy clothing, but as in a few womens sports it seems professionalism has arrived too quickly for elite athletic bodies to be competing at the top level.

  240. frankie p says:
    @Steve Sailer

    David Gilmour absolutely IS an improvisational musician and guitarist, as what you describe points that out. He takes the rhythm tracks of the song and then IMPROVISES guitar leads over it, rinse and repeat, rinse and repeat, developing ideas, rinse and repeat. You say he “composed” the two solos, but what he actually did was, again as you said, take the best pieces from many, many IMPROVISED solos.

    I think it’s fine that Dave makes big bucks playing the same solo again and again.

    I just wonder if he might enjoy it more if he stretched out a bit and got back to improvising.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  241. When it comes to lyrics, rock is often much like opera, which is better in Italian or Russian so you don’t have to deal with all the details. A talented singer (or growler) will communicate the general mood and sense

  242. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    The serial killer moment seems to have passed.

  243. Trinity says:
    @Curle

    Atlanta is just as gloomy and rainy as Seattle. Good gawd, I got to get back to Florida, but with all those invading snowbirds ( as if Florida didn’t have enough of those already) and turd world invaders, I don’t know if I could even go back to the Sunshine State which at one time was GREAT.

    Hell, Atlanta even receives more rain per year than Seattle, has more crime, has some of the worst drivers in the world, and is the Black version of San FranSissy, not San FranSHITco, not yet at least, but there are probably more gay Black dudes in Atlanta than any other major metro in America.

    I ain’t looking California or feeling Minnesota but maybe I can try some Southwestern desert state full of Messcans. I have tried the beach, the mountains, and big old Northeastern cities, give desert living a chance. Strap on the cowboy boots and hat and try to ride a horse without crushing my ball sack when that thing starts to gallop.

  244. @Buzz Mohawk

    If there’s one thing I have learned in life, it is that “the Girl with Kaleidoscope Eyes” does not independently exist in the natural habitat: she only exists when you take the trouble to give her very good cause to have real Kaleidoscope Eyes, whether subjectively or objectively, n’importe quoi.

    But once you make the effort, then she’s yours. And she still has the Kaleidoscope Eyes. Cheerio!

  245. Mike Tre says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “ The fact is, a lot of bands cannot reproduce their studio, engineered, multi-tracked songs in concert. At least the Beatles understood this and just stopped touring.”

    There is a Led Zeppelin tribute band called Get the Led Out that does just that, by employing up to 8 on stage musicians to achieve the LZ studio sound. They tour nationally and are outstanding. They even play a theremin during Whole Lotta Love.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  246. @Curle

    The serial killer grooming budget has been reallocated to grooming terrorists.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  247. Feryl says:
    @Janus

    Right wing sentiment is essentially non existent in punk/alternative since the early 90’s. I agree with you that punk, like all of the arts/entertainment industry, has always been dominated by the Left. But since 1992 it’s gotten even worse (let’s not forget that anti-communist themes were quite common in 80’s movies).

  248. @Buzz Mohawk

    The fact is, a lot of bands cannot reproduce their studio, engineered, multi-tracked songs in concert. At least the Beatles understood this and just stopped touring.

    Lame excuse. The poster child for this is “Good Vibrations”. Not only did the Beach Boys do this on stage, so did the Cowsills, who started as a cover band. These versions were just as good, if not better, than the studio tracks.

    It’s similar to the claim that false rhymes are necessary, because restricting oneself to true rhymes would interfere with the meaning. Funny, that didn’t get in the way of Johnny Mercer, Cole Porter, et al.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  249. @frankie p

    I just wonder if he might enjoy it more if he stretched out a bit and got back to improvising.

    You have to realize that “Comfortably Numb” (and most of Pink Floyd’s oeuvre) isn’t about some hep cat jazz soloist noodling on the keys or bebop scatting or whatever. It’s an intricately composed piece for an entire, rather talented band to play. It’s literally a concerted effort.

    • Replies: @frankie p
  250. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah KCRW has been playing that catchy song quite regularly.

    But have you heard Wet Leg? Their first single has over 2 million hits of Spotify, and you can’t get that song out of your head:

  251. Clyde says:
    @JMcG

    I’ll be that guy again. Pete Townshend was caught with loads of child pornography and skated because he is rich and famous. The little kids in that material suffered unspeakable horror for his perversion and that of those like him.

    You are probably right about the why/how he got off. I did go to a site that explained Pete Townsend’s innocence. So the explanations are out there. I am pretty sure I read how Townsend admitted having some gay encounters. Here it is>>>

    9 Male Celebs Who Swing Both Ways – Page 6 of 9 – Fame Focus
    https://www.famefocus.com/love/9-male-celebs-who-swing-both-ways/6
    The Who’s lead guitarist admits that he has had a few homosexual encounters throughout his life and at one point would have identified as bisexual. Townshend also joked about being sexually

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  252. Clyde says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lame excuse. The poster child for this is “Good Vibrations”. Not only did the Beach Boys do this on stage, so did the Cowsills, who started as a cover band. These versions were just as good, if not better, than the studio tracks. Here is a good 1979 live version. The Beach Boys have a total of ten people up on stage. For fun look when they show Dennis Wilson drumming

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  253. @R.G. Camara

    I really never understood why people seemed to like moguls. They really killed long fun glides downhill and the bouncing back and forth between them was only something a few could master.

    Heh, I’ve come to much the same conclusion myself.

    One really does need to be mentally and physically dialed in to comfortably ski anything larger than the tiniest bumps at speed.

    Even if one does manage to achieve that flow state the practice of skiing the larger bumps is tremendously physically jarring to the body and exposes one to injury risks that simply don’t exist for people gliding or carving arcs are moderate speeds.

  254. frankie p says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Jennifer,

    Thanks. I DO realize what Comfortably Numb is about. I was probably 17 when the album The Wall was released, and I know that song inside out. I can play it, I can sing it, and I have listened to it countless times.

    This is not about some “hep cat jazz soloist” noodling. The song is for a band to play, and it has a rigid structure. We are not talking about changing the concerted effort. We are talking about the possibility of a different solo in the two solo sections, the first one eight measures long, the second one running on and on, probably 40 measures or more live, and guess what? I just listened to Live in Pompeii 2016 and Gilmour most definitely improvises during the second solo section, though he also plays the parts on the record in the early part of the solo.

    The best of both worlds.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  255. Richard B says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Beato’s Youtube videos enthusiastically explaining the music theory and production intricacies of 1970s-1990s electric guitar rock songs are some of the better things available on the Internet. Most rock critics are old English majors, so they devote a lot of time to analyzing the lyrics, but Beato mostly ignores the words and sticks to the music.

    I do have to say that, though I like his channel, there are tons of Rick Beatos out there. So, there should be more of them on yt. But that would work against the current Wokegeist. Though there is a handful of smaller channels as well.

    And he’s definitely at his best when he sticks to the music. Which, fortunately, he mostly does.

    He’s at his worst, however, when he waxes philosophic or talks too much about himself.

  256. @Clyde

    Townshead “excuse” was that he was “doing research”.

    Which is the excuse 90% of child porn viewers use when caught.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  257. @frankie p

    I just listened to Live in Pompeii 2016 and Gilmour most definitely improvises during the second solo section …

    That might be why you got so much flak for your comment—you replied to Buzz’s posting of that exact solo, and wrote:

    it must really suck to have to play the EXACT SAME SOLO in every show

    … we assumed, reasonably, that you expected far more variance in his playing in Pompeii. Of course, any Floydhead is able to tell the difference between that version and the ones on Delicate Sound of Thunder, Pulse, etc. He and the band(s) sound recognizable, yet different, in each rendition. And yet the song remains the same, as it should.

    Also, this hot take was silly:

    After I started listening to jazz players, and not just guitarists, but pianists like Bill Evans, I realized what bullshit rock music is for a musician.

    And this was silly:

    What a great way to arrest your development as a musician.

    Gilmour, with later Pink Floyd and also solo, has done great new work. Faithfully playing older classics never stunted him musically. He maybe never reached the thematic grandeur of ’70s PF, but there are gems in his later works. And to his credit, he never turned away from his older stuff, and was wise to keep control of “Pink Floyd” the commercial entity.

    But ultimately I think we agree on the important stuff: Pink Floyd, and Gilmour, are great. (Not exactly an obscure opinion, I know 🙂 )

    [MORE]

    Jennifer,

    LOL, you’re not the first to misread my handle.

    It’s “Generic American” (after Peter Brimelow’s “Generic American Party”)

  258. @Steve Sailer

    I really enjoyed when he reconstructed the background to the solo in Stairway to Heaven (no multitrack, sadly).

    Then he ‘aped’ Frampton and did a really impressive solo; then he had a friend ‘ape’ Eddie van Halen for a different version of the same solo; then had Eric Johnson ‘ape’ himself.

    Thanks for the pointer to his channel: I’ve wasted several hours there now.

    For those who want to see a grown-ass man’s eyes light up,see his reaction to chord progressions in “Never Gonna Let You Go” (A song I’ve never liked)

    Now I want him to do some stuff on the polyrhythms in Aenima.

  259. @Kratoklastes

    “see his reaction to chord progressions in “Never Gonna Let You Go” (A song I’ve never liked)”

    Submitted just for laffs….

    At the time that “Never Gonna” was popular, I wasn’t paying very much attention to pop music or to pop culture at all, really. I used to hear the song on the radio say at a diner or something, but to me it was just background white noise — as was everything else.

    But in one of those classic mis-hearings of pop songs (like the notorious fake Hendrix “scuse me while I kiss this guy”), I thought the dude was singing something far nastier than what he really said, and I couldn’t believe it was on the radio. Here is what I thought he said:

    “Then I’m gonna give you up.
    Then I’m gonna let you down.
    Then I’m gonna run around,
    And desert you.
    Then I’m gonna make you cry.
    Then I’m gonna say goodbye.
    Then I’m gonna tell a lie,
    And then I’m gonna hurt you.”

    I was like, WHAAAT? How could something this cruel and horrible be a hit on the radio?!?

    But then rap happened, and I guess you can get away with pretty much anything now.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  260. Feryl says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    The serial killing peaks of the 1970’s-mid 1980’s coincide with Boomers making the population both more young and more naive/reckless, thereby creating more criminals and more vulnerable victims. Many serial killers conned their victims to lure them to a more vulnerable position. Hitch-hiking peaked in the 70’s, then gradually faded as the 80’s and 90’s went on.

    Whites were much younger back then and had a greater tolerance of deviancy and crime in general, and more distrust of the police (police looking for white rapists and serial killers back in the 70’s say that offenders were frequently seen by the public but not necessarily reported, even in middle class suburban areas e.g. the Original Night Stalker). The shift to zero tolerance began in the late 80’s and then really escalated in the mid-late 90’s, as Boomers aged out of being soft in crime (arrests for curfew violations by minors for example went way up in the late 90’s.

    • Replies: @Curle
  261. @Mike Tre

    I’ve wondered if that sort of thing is possible, with enough people and instruments on stage as you describe. Now I know it is. Thanks!

    Ya know, if symphony orchestras can employ scores of musicians to recreate works created by past masters, I see no reason there can’t be rock orchestras in the future that will do the same thing with the best compositions from our time.

    Interesting thought…

  262. @R.G. Camara

    Yeah, but still, why is it that “viewers” get slammed and prosecuted into the slammer, where they will have to live years in fear of the REAL CRIMINALS who inhabit such places?

    Investigate, arrest and prosecute the people who ACTUALLY create the things our legal system decides are wrong — but leave end users (just like everyone who uses a computer, end users, you see?) alone.

    The only reason somebody like Townsend or your local garbage man ever get prosecuted for “possessing kiddie porn” is because they are the low-hanging fruit. They do nothing to further this garbage, but they do the most time for it.

    This is all because, as always, government employees, including prosecutors and their staff, are the bottom-of-the-barrel dregs that got hired for government jobs.

    If you are going to do this (which you are) then you will have to arrest and put in ass-fucking prison everybody who buys alcoholic beverages and behaves badly as a result. This is complete nonsense, but the kind that actually hurts innocent people.

  263. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Note how young Kyle is already totally dialed in on fake surrender guy

    That “back off a bit…then charge him” number Mr. Fake Surrender Guy tried to pull was a damned dirty trick.

    And yet, every American mainstream media story I saw portrayed him as the victim, rather than the poor sap who was trying to get up off the ground.

    Sickening.

  264. @Clyde

    Sure. It’s crap.

    Imagine the Beatles trying to do the same thing on stage with “A Day in the Life.” Or even “Tomorrow Never Knows.” Not gonna happen. This is nothing more than a pathetic attempt at imitating a work of art.

    Imagine trying to watch Vincent van Gogh paint his Sunflowers in front of you in five minutes. Same damn thing, and equally ridiculous.

    The very first to shun requirements for live performances, The Beatles and George Martin in their studio on Abbey Road, told the whole world that what they were doing was using the studio as an instrument. They were making audio paintings, permanent works of art.

    That is a concept obviously some people still cannot comprehend.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  265. Curle says:
    @Feryl

    Neither Bundy nor the Green River killer were children of Boomers. They did, however, come of age in a time when police procedures and access to information was primitive and the habit of seat-of-pants thinking by cops was consistent with the culture’s other seat-if-the-pants processes (think baseball recruiting). Further, women and men were more naive.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  266. Clyde says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Imagine the Beatles trying to do the same thing on stage with “A Day in the Life.” Or even “Tomorrow Never Knows.” Not gonna happen. This is nothing more than a pathetic attempt at imitating a work of art.

    The 4 Beatles could do a good version (recreation) of these with 6 additional musicians on stage and the year would have to be 1981 onwards. I say 1981 due to the technological advances to put on a good rock show.
    Rolling Stones once were 5 guys up on stage. They are on tour right now. If you went to a show you would see 12 or so up on stage.
    See how many musicians David Gilmore has on stage with him when he recreates Pink Floyd songs. About 12 or so. And this includes 4 background singers.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  267. Feryl says:
    @Curle

    Huh? I said that Boomers themselves were killing and dying a lot in the 70’s and 80’s. Millennials, mostly the children of Boomers, caused a huge decline in crime because they grew up entirely in the tough on crime/zero tolerance/can’t go to the parking lot during high school lunch breaks era. Tolerance (among adult authorities) of risk taking and anti-social deviancy plummeted in the 90’s.

    Police tactics wise, things were even more primitive in the 1940’s and 50’s, yet serial killers were quite rare back then. It was the sheer amount of “signature” linked bodies with the motive being obscure that caused the public and the police to become aware of serial killers in the 70’s. Before the youthquake of the 1960’s-1980’s, the population wasn’t dominated enough by young people to create a massive crime wave (of which serial killing was a scandalous element).

    I don’t think people do the math enough when it comes to the rise of “rock and roll” culture in the 60’s, and it’s subsequent death in the 90’s. It’s all based on demographics, population structure. It’s got nothing to do with the CIA, the Beatles, or whatever. Risky behavior, and tolerance thereof, is most common among people under the age of about 27 (Jordan Peterson cited 27 as the age at which people become more concerned about the effects of violence). 1991 is when the last cohort of Boomers turned 27. The oldest Boomer cohort by then was 45, and leading fights against smoking, drunk driving, abortions, and porn. Since few people were born in the 1970’s, that meant no Youthquake in the 1990’s. Older people began to dominate.

  268. Curle says:

    “ Police tactics wise, things were even more primitive in the 1940’s and 50’s, yet serial killers were quite rare back then.”

    We don’t know whether they were rare or not do we? Nobody was looking for them or trying to connect the dots.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Feryl
  269. JMcG says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Different song – That’s Never Going to Give You Up, by the ageless Rick Astley.

  270. JMcG says:
    @Curle

    There’s an interesting book called The Man From the Train by Bill James and his daughter, that examines a series of really brutal axe murders from the turn of the last century. I think I heard about it here. It would have been impossibly hard to realize a serial killer was at work at that time. Trains provided national mobility, but there was no national police force or any nationwide news organization.

  271. @Clyde

    Point well-taken. I see that I am overstating my argument and admit I’m wrong. Another commenter mentioned a Led Zeppelin band he saw that was excellent with the big songs too.

    Thanks.

    Too bad the Beatles never got the chance to do what you suggest. That would have been interesting. As for the Stones, I’ve never felt their live performances capture the quality and sound of their best music from their classic period, but maybe that’s just me.

  272. Feryl says:
    @Curle

    The number of body “dumpings” rapidly increased in the 1970’s, touching off the fire wave of awareness that violent predators were lurking about*. Police did not look for serial killers before circa 1970 because they mostly did not exist. All kinds of crime and deviancy rapidly grew in the 60’s and 70’s. Serial killing was a part of that.

    *Also by the late 70’s there was a growing concern over child abuse because….. It had become more common. Not because it existed unnoticed for decades and people suddenly became aware of it. Note also that the surge in child abuse reports of the late 1970’s also coincides with large numbers of Boomers becoming parents (to be fair, pro-social Boomers were horrified by this), and abuse of kids didn’t really decline until the late 90’s when Gen X started forming the majority of parents of young kids.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  273. MEH 0910 says:
    @Feryl

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @Feryl
  274. Feryl says:
    @MEH 0910

    Looks nothing like the police sketches, even taking minor aging into account (though I always thought the sketches made him look younger than what most of the witnesses reported his estimated age to be, which was mid-late 30’s. That being said, police sketches can be quite off-base. Witness reports and police sketches of the Original Night Stalker made him out to be in his early-mid 20’s, but he was actually in his 30’s by 1975, and I don’t think any of the police sketches came that close to capturing his features (the fact that he was seen in poor lighting, often wearing a knit hat, and those who saw him up close were usually terrified out of their wits made it tough to get an accurate description).

  275. @nebulafox

    I remember hearing online once a couple minutes of audio that someone in the audience of a live Nirvana show must have recorded, probably around 1992. The clip takes place presumably in between songs, and Cobain is taking a moment to rant about Axl Rose of Guns N’ Roses, who he had really antagonistic feelings toward despite Axl loving ‘Nevermind’ and wanting them to open for him (legend is that the two also clashed at the September 1992 MTV awards and almost came to blows).

    As well as complaining that Guns N’ Roses had got too far away from their hard rock roots (for example, making fun of how Axle now had huge choirs and grand pianos onstage so he could perform his newer and more complex and sedate songs like November Rain), Cobain was also explicitly political in his anger, essentially ranting that Axl was too right wing in his worldview.

    Cobain said, after naming some things (I don’t remember what specifically) that Axl allegedly believed or had stated, “He shouldn’t say that stuff…he can’t say those things..” and then continuing to finally say “he has no right to say that.” The emphasis on the last bit is mine – because I remember right after saying that, Cobain backtracks and restates it, saying “He has the right to say that…but he shouldn’t.” In other words, his impulse was to go all the way toward outlawing the insufficiently progressive outlook and cancelling the person, but then realized either that he was wrong in going that far or sensed that his public wouldn’t go that far with him.

    It’s a very small thing, but I remember it clearly and thinking there was some meaning in it all. What is it that makes someone backtrack like that, and what if they all stop backtracking and realize they have strength in (social media) numbers and keep going for the jugular to eliminate what they hate? That’s where we are now, but where we weren’t in 1992, despite a nascent desire for it building up.

  276. @James J O'Meara

    In defense of comedians Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett: I’ve watched a lot of the MST3K stuff they did back in the 1990s when that show was on Comedy Central (and when the woke/liberal/progressive zeitgeist was at a lower intensity than now), as well as a great deal of their privately produced and user-subsidized RiffTrax content made since 2006 (as the zeitgeist has continued to reach an ever-shriller pitch).

    Bits where they gratuitously sneer at America’s whiteness in the recent past occur a good deal in their old MST3K show, yet very rarely occur in their newer RiffTrax material over which they have total control (and they also often make edgy, non-progressive digs they never would have on Comedy Central). I can only suspect that those bits in their MST3K show were artificial efforts to cater to the perceived tastes of specific executive(s) at the Comedy Central network, upon which they were dependent to be renewed each season.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  277. @Muggles

    Speaking of background music played in supermarkets, I’ve actually heard – TWICE – in my local Krogers the loud heavy Guns N’ Roses song “Welcome to the Jungle” being blared throughout the store. It’s kind of strange hearing Axl Rose screeching at the top of his lungs about wanting to see a teenage girl “BLEED!” while you’re in the fresh fruit section surrounded by other ordinary/boring looking middle-aged middle-class people shopping for the most mundane items.

    I mean I love that song, it’s one of their best and a really kick-ass hard fast rock number, but it just doesn’t fit in that context. I can’t imagine what someone was thinking programming it into the store’s playlist unless as a (pretty good) joke. Both times, I almost couldn’t believe what I was hearing, and came very close to actually speaking to a fellow shopper to say “Do you hear that? Isn’t that weird?”

    I’ve also heard a number of other (mellower) songs at my Krogers which I can remember actually first coming out in the 1990s, and realizing they’ve been around long enough to apparently be reduced to bland supermarket Muzak status makes you feel a little old.

  278. Feryl says:
    @Sam Malone

    Mike is conservative (or at least publicly stated that to be the case in the 2000’s), he also I believe is a devout Christian. Kevin is more liberal. I don’t get the sense that Trace, Frank, Bill, or Joel ever really cared that much about politics. Back in the 90’s MST3K had some writers who were not recurring cast members, perhaps they were liberal? Nowadays with Rifftrax the “actors” write their own material.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
$
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Commenting Disabled While in Translation Mode
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The Hidden Information in Our Government Archives