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From Stallman.Org:

I am looking for a room in a shared house or apartment as an interim place where I could stay for at least two months. Ideally I would have the option of staying for up to six months, but I could do without that.

I’d like it to be located within 15 minutes walk of a subway line (not counting the Green Line beyond Kenmore), or a high frequency bus line such as #1 or #77, or #71, #73 or #66. The point is it should not be so hard to get to Cambridge or Downtown Boston that it dissuades me from going.

There should not be a cat (unless hypoallergenic), or a dog that jumps up excitedly on people (unless quite small), or a digital listening device such as Echo, Siri or “Hello Google”, or a card lock that records who opens the door. I will ask about cameras.

I’d like there to be a large supermarket in walking distance or close to a nearby subway station.

If you know of an opening, please email me at rms on the site gnu org with “Interim housing” as the subject.

 
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  1. If I owned real estate in the area I’d put him up. Hell, if I was really wealthy I’d buy a small house or a duplex and let him live there forever if he pays the utilities.

  2. A parrot would be a bridge too far, but I’d consider an owl if it was legal in that area.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Anonymous

    In the old days in the UK, France and USA, people like him who performed a major public service but were poor were given pensions.

    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.

    Replies: @res, @ScarletNumber

  3. Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Jim Given


    Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.
     
    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.

    Replies: @Joe Sweet, @Redneck farmer

  4. Reads like someone who would love
    the many great big brother aspects of AI.

    Work on it RS while you hide from
    recorders and prying eyes, ears.

    All AI researchers, CEOs
    should be subjected to 24/7 surveillance.

    And

    give blood daily.

    Maybe M. Minsky’s wife
    has an available room?

  5. If he’s broke there must be some tech company that would pay him to join their board. SJWs haven’t taken them all over yet.

    Edit: He’s crazier than I thought, and his website could be an issue. The top of his homepage has him attacking a bunch of big companies.

    Maybe the Jews have got to him. From his anti-AirBnB page:

    “Airbnb rents rooms in Israel’s colonies in Palestinian territory.

    Seizing land from the people of an occupied territory and settling people from the occupying power there violates the Geneva Conventions.”

    There’s also this, which is just idiotic:

    “Pay toilets are nasty, and ought to be illegal. Those of us who are not poor can afford the price, if we accept the practice; poor people can’t. To deny people access to a toilet when they need one is nasty and degrading.

    I have concluded that the least we can do, to eliminate pay toilets, is to avoid giving them money. Instead of paying them, I go to great lengths to find some other toilet.

    Please join me in rejecting pay toilets firmly.”

    Given that they are rare in the USA but common in poor countries, his talk about going to great lengths to avoid them means he hasn’t noticed that pay toilets are generally cheap (10-25 cents) and provide employment to marginal poor people who couldn’t find anything else.

    And this:

    “I see that cellular phones are very convenient. I would have got one, if not for certain reprehensible things about them.

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else’s cell phone, that doesn’t give Big Brother any information about me.“

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Lot


    Maybe the Jews have got to him.
     
    I know someone they got to...

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/09/29/05/19063112-0-image-a-51_1569729752023.jpg

    Wall Street mogul John R. Jakobson 'promised mistress that their love child Marina Squerciati would get a "big surprise" in his will - then left her NOTHING from $100M fortune


    Now see? Here's why it pays to mince words with the finest. Because technically he's in the clear-- besides being dead--he did deliver as promised: a "Big Surprise!"

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D, @Thea

    , @Pericles
    @Lot

    Stallman seems exquisitely virtuous, perhaps he can stay with the antifa or Mozilla.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @Cloudbuster
    @Lot

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else’s cell phone, that doesn’t give Big Brother any information about me.

    Does Stallman really believe that Big Brother doesn't know everything there is to know about him, of all people?

    If he asked me, I'd refuse "No, sorry, I don't want Big Brother to think I'm associating with any of the people with whom you associate."

  6. @Anonymous
    A parrot would be a bridge too far, but I'd consider an owl if it was legal in that area.

    Replies: @Lot

    In the old days in the UK, France and USA, people like him who performed a major public service but were poor were given pensions.

    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.

    • Replies: @res
    @Lot


    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.
     
    Do you have a good reference for this? It seems like an interesting topic. Who got the pensions, how much, what were the pro/anti arguments like, etc.

    Replies: @Lot

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Lot

    This is interesting to me, because up until fairly recently, presidents didn't even receive a pension. The Former Presidents Act wasn't passed until 1958, specifically to help Harry Truman. Herbert Hoover was also eligible, but didn't need the money. He took it anyway to avoid embarrassing Truman.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @FPD72

  7. Stallman always struck me as an eccentric and this post confirms how fringe he is. There has to be someone in the Boston area that can help this Brother out.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Clifford Brown

    Eccentric? He's flat out nuts, but he's also a genius, and isn't a danger to himself or anyone else. We need a few nuts like that. He's left the world a better place.

    , @Alice
    @Clifford Brown

    are you out of your mind? Who could stand to live with such a person? What legal hell would he drop a roommate or landlord into? what are the chances he'd find something wrong with your policies, your property, your financial arrangements? and then what would he unleash on you?

    do you not understand how many bridges at MIT he burned in the last few decades?

    We've created a set of societies that are too complex. We used to have simple ones where lunatics who were impossible to live with were taken care of in boarding houses or by unmarried family members or on monasteries.

    The problem is RMS can't live the way old school individualist lunatics could, off the grid, trapping dinner, chopping firewood, using water. He's utterly dependent on the interconnected social ans technological mechanisms that the modern globalist world has, even as he wishes to shun them. But he can't. he's helped invent them. we used to live with human trust. He didn't trust humans, so he killed that and replaced it with systems. But now he needs the society that thrives off such commie systems, and that's the system he built. gets what he deserves.

    Replies: @randomerican

  8. Poor bugger. I can’t imagine living in his skin. Good thing loneliness doesn’t seem to be a condition of such a temperament.

  9. @Lot
    @Anonymous

    In the old days in the UK, France and USA, people like him who performed a major public service but were poor were given pensions.

    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.

    Replies: @res, @ScarletNumber

    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.

    Do you have a good reference for this? It seems like an interesting topic. Who got the pensions, how much, what were the pro/anti arguments like, etc.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @res

    Wikipedia has a list of them as Private Acts of Congress, I have no idea if there’s a record of a debate, or if there was one.

    https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/United_States_Statutes_at_Large/Volume_6/1st_Congress

    A random example:

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,David Cook allowed a pension.

    That David Cook, a captain of artillery in the late war, and who, being shot through the body at the battle of Monmouth, is rendered incapable to obtain his livelihood by labor, shall be placed on the pension list of the United States, and shall be entitled to one-third of his monthly pay, as a captain of artillery: Provided, That he return into the treasury-office, a sum equivalent to two-thirds of his commutation of half pay, being the proportion of his pension to the amount of his commutation.

  10. Among the two dozen plus companies he has on his personal boycott lis Wendy’s, because it “has refused to sign an agreement with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.” Seems like an easy roomate to get along with.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Jon


    Among the two dozen plus companies [Richard Stallman] has on his personal boycott
     
    I see his master boycott list is at the top of his website, under "What's bad about: [..]."

    Some highlights from two others boycotts he has going :


    I absolutely refuse to take Amtrak trains because they check passengers' ID (not all the time, but it could happen at any time). Please join me in boycotting Amtrak until it stops requiring identification.

    It's not that I expect my personal rejection to make Amtrak change. Rather, as long as Amtrak does not change, I resent it so much I'd rather take a bus.
     


    I uphold the total boycott of Coca Cola Company, which is a response to the murder of union organizers in Colombia and Guatemala.
     
    (From Richard Stallman's lifestyle page.)
  11. Dear Richard,

    Can you say, “Israel has no right to exist”?

  12. @res
    @Lot


    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.
     
    Do you have a good reference for this? It seems like an interesting topic. Who got the pensions, how much, what were the pro/anti arguments like, etc.

    Replies: @Lot

    Wikipedia has a list of them as Private Acts of Congress, I have no idea if there’s a record of a debate, or if there was one.

    https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/United_States_Statutes_at_Large/Volume_6/1st_Congress

    A random example:

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,David Cook allowed a pension.

    That David Cook, a captain of artillery in the late war, and who, being shot through the body at the battle of Monmouth, is rendered incapable to obtain his livelihood by labor, shall be placed on the pension list of the United States, and shall be entitled to one-third of his monthly pay, as a captain of artillery: Provided, That he return into the treasury-office, a sum equivalent to two-thirds of his commutation of half pay, being the proportion of his pension to the amount of his commutation.

  13. What a world we live in, where one person with mental illness is demonized but another is deified.

    Both people deserve our help, not abuse or exploitation.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Laurence Whelk

    Now I can see the outline of a TV show.

    Replies: @BB753

    , @Steve in Greensboro
    @Laurence Whelk

    I've not had a chance to experience Mr. Stallman, at least not to the same extent as the grotesque Greta. Both certainly need psychiatric help and likely medication.

    But what about what the rest of humanity needs? To be clear, what the rest of us need is to not be exposed to Fraulein Thunberg in any form ever again.

    , @Olorin
    @Laurence Whelk

    Mommy's little crisis actor

  14. Stallman is a hardcore communist. A real one, old school. You have to admire though his creativity in figuring out how to use the tools of capitalism (property rights in software) to subvert capitalism.

  15. @Clifford Brown
    Stallman always struck me as an eccentric and this post confirms how fringe he is. There has to be someone in the Boston area that can help this Brother out.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alice

    Eccentric? He’s flat out nuts, but he’s also a genius, and isn’t a danger to himself or anyone else. We need a few nuts like that. He’s left the world a better place.

  16. He should join up with Greta and form an autism supergroup.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @kihowi

    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. The autism comes in with the pathological single mindedness in his work. He has the a bit of both, that is handy for true creativity and ensures he gets peace to think.


    https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201704/solitude-is-the-school-genius Asperger drew attention as a key feature of his autistics. As he put it: “Autistic children are able to produce original ideas. Indeed, they can only be original;” and a person cut off from the crowd is likely to be so too—at least to a greater extent than otherwise might be the case. Furthermore, when that person is already pre-disposed to independent thinking in a mechanistic mode thanks to an autistic cognitive configuration, quite remarkable originality is possible. Free of conformist constraints from critics, colleagues, or collaborators, such minds can function without the usual pressures that society places on innovative thinking. To use the symbolism I exploited in an earlier post: originality is not a feature of cloud cognition/group-think. On the contrary, as Edward Gibbon commented, “Conversation enriches the understanding, but solitude is the school of genius.”
     

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fran Macadam

  17. I guess even having this up on his personal website wasn’t enough to save him in the end:

    Better Genderless Pronouns in English

  18. Because I’m definitely not a progressive like Richard, I was purged earlier on. But the defecating stupidity of the Woke now has them devouring the most productive to all of us of their allies. I guess that’s a big part of why they do this, their malignant misanthropy. I’m doing all I can to defend RMS. Note – even though he apologized – he was still defenestrated. That is what they do – no forgiveness, no redemption – ever.

    • Agree: eah
    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    @Fran Macadam

    Woke has deteriorated to a flat assault on Western civilization coupled with an assault on idustrialization. The two are a pair, so the coupling was inevitable over the long run.
    In other words, Stalman and the Woke were never allies, although Stalman might have thought that they were. For that matter, Communism and the Woke are not really allies -- Communism is too Western, the Third Word has rejected both classical Maxist/Leninist C0mmunism and Eurocommunism. (e.g. the Caliphate, e.g. People's Republic of China).

    World's changed.

    Counterinsurgency

  19. No mention of a bath, I see.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @black sea

    https://youtu.be/eqHddcMUF9w?t=158

    , @International Jew
    @black sea

    Yes. If I were his roommate (even his housemate or his next-apartment-down-the-hallmate) his smell would get to me long before his personality did.

    Replies: @Lot

  20. Open source software always struck me as exactly the type of thing that academia was made for. Everyone is better off if the foundational data/information of a discipline is in the public domain, and academics are the natural group to do this. In the 19th century academics would publish steam tables and solubility charts and the like so that every engine maker or electroplater or whatever didn’t need to start from scratch. In the 20th century it made sense to have a high quality C compiler in the public domain. Things like the gcc, BSD Unix, the RISC-V project, etc. are academia at its best, in my opinion.

    RMS went way beyond, this, of course, not drawing a distinction between academia and the private sector. He avoided narrowly framing his crusade as an updated version of the role that academia has traditionally played. Personally I never found the more expansive arguments regarding open source to be that compelling, but nevertheless I am glad he was so zealous.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    The big problem with all the non-x86 architectures was getting the latest fab processes dedicated to them. x86-64 has outpaced the various RISC chips badly in terms of the available parts at any time point. That's what killed the workstationeers, commodity Lintel was faster.

    Going the opposite way-specialized baroque architectures like a 72 bit PDP-10 extension, or a LispM Ivory like tagged word processor or a Forth/PostScript customized processor might be a better tactic than yet another fungible short instruction set CPU. But thet's just a wild unscientific guess.

    The availability of good free Unix has pretty well killed OS development in new directions. Bell Labs' own Plan 9 and Inferno have died out, and now all that is left outside the IBM EBCDIC mainframe/midframe world is Windows and Unix.

    Technically, there are alternatives:

    https://www.haiku-os.org/about/
    https://www.morphos-team.net/intro
    https://www.riscosopen.org/content/

    http://www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
    https://9p.io/plan9/

    And last but not least, God's Own Operating System:
    https://templeos.org/

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency, @Jack D, @James N. Kennett

    , @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    It's the very definition of University. These scholars are paid to disseminate their research to the public and tutor students.

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @SimpleSong

    Most home use software was de facto open source early on. Bill Gates wrote a famous open letter in the 1970s arguing that hobbyists should pay for software.

    http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @bjondo

    , @Bill
    @SimpleSong

    Of course, modern universities are deeply concerned with protecting and monetizing the IP developed by their faculty.

  21. @Clifford Brown
    Stallman always struck me as an eccentric and this post confirms how fringe he is. There has to be someone in the Boston area that can help this Brother out.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alice

    are you out of your mind? Who could stand to live with such a person? What legal hell would he drop a roommate or landlord into? what are the chances he’d find something wrong with your policies, your property, your financial arrangements? and then what would he unleash on you?

    do you not understand how many bridges at MIT he burned in the last few decades?

    We’ve created a set of societies that are too complex. We used to have simple ones where lunatics who were impossible to live with were taken care of in boarding houses or by unmarried family members or on monasteries.

    The problem is RMS can’t live the way old school individualist lunatics could, off the grid, trapping dinner, chopping firewood, using water. He’s utterly dependent on the interconnected social ans technological mechanisms that the modern globalist world has, even as he wishes to shun them. But he can’t. he’s helped invent them. we used to live with human trust. He didn’t trust humans, so he killed that and replaced it with systems. But now he needs the society that thrives off such commie systems, and that’s the system he built. gets what he deserves.

    • Agree: jim jones, Kyle
    • Replies: @randomerican
    @Alice

    Not the person you're replying to but

    >do you not understand how many bridges at MIT he burned in the last few decades?

    Since I don't know him, I don't--care to share?

    I'm not sure what you mean by this:

    >What legal hell would he drop a roommate or landlord into? what are the chances he’d find something wrong with your policies, your property, your financial arrangements? and then what would he unleash on you?

    He doesn't seem very powerful, so what kind of thing do you expect he could do? Refuse to move out when you want him to? What else?

  22. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @SimpleSong
    Open source software always struck me as exactly the type of thing that academia was made for. Everyone is better off if the foundational data/information of a discipline is in the public domain, and academics are the natural group to do this. In the 19th century academics would publish steam tables and solubility charts and the like so that every engine maker or electroplater or whatever didn't need to start from scratch. In the 20th century it made sense to have a high quality C compiler in the public domain. Things like the gcc, BSD Unix, the RISC-V project, etc. are academia at its best, in my opinion.

    RMS went way beyond, this, of course, not drawing a distinction between academia and the private sector. He avoided narrowly framing his crusade as an updated version of the role that academia has traditionally played. Personally I never found the more expansive arguments regarding open source to be that compelling, but nevertheless I am glad he was so zealous.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Dave Pinsen, @Bill

    The big problem with all the non-x86 architectures was getting the latest fab processes dedicated to them. x86-64 has outpaced the various RISC chips badly in terms of the available parts at any time point. That’s what killed the workstationeers, commodity Lintel was faster.

    Going the opposite way-specialized baroque architectures like a 72 bit PDP-10 extension, or a LispM Ivory like tagged word processor or a Forth/PostScript customized processor might be a better tactic than yet another fungible short instruction set CPU. But thet’s just a wild unscientific guess.

    The availability of good free Unix has pretty well killed OS development in new directions. Bell Labs’ own Plan 9 and Inferno have died out, and now all that is left outside the IBM EBCDIC mainframe/midframe world is Windows and Unix.

    Technically, there are alternatives:

    https://www.haiku-os.org/about/
    https://www.morphos-team.net/intro
    https://www.riscosopen.org/content/

    http://www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
    https://9p.io/plan9/

    And last but not least, God’s Own Operating System:
    https://templeos.org/

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    @Anonymous

    Lanier has quite a bit to say that supports your post in _You are not a gadget_.

    Counterinsurgency

    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Sure, in a different world we could have had different dominant CPU, different OS's if we had started at a different point, but it's the nature of technology for people to settle on a standard and improve that standard until it is so far ahead of competitors by virtue of the millions of hours of R&D that have gone into it that no competing technology has a realistic chance of catching up.

    Even the Soviets mostly copied Western chips (Western technology in general) and didn't design their own. (Partly this is because it's easier to copy than to think of something new and partly because their leadership assumed that Western technology was better - sometimes they put so much effort into exactly copying Western technology that it would have been easier for them to start fresh).

    We saw this with the automobile where the reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, although conceptually a dumb idea (an engine powered by a bunch of explosions and which involves turning linear motion into rotary motion) came to be the dominant technology because so much effort was put into getting it to work. The highly refined dumb idea that was first to market works better than the unrefined clever one.

    BTW, in the PC world, ARM (which is a form of RISC) is coming up fast and may yet replace x86, especially at the low end of the market. Already by processor count they are ahead with over 100 billion chips produced, mostly in phones and embedded devices but they are also increasingly found in laptops, etc. And while Android is written on a Linux (Unix) base, there are competing OS's in the ARM world. Note that the reign of the IC engine is now being challenged by electrics - no technology remains dominant forever.

    , @James N. Kennett
    @Anonymous

    As an alternative to Windows and Unix, don't forget Fuchsia OS which is being developed by Google:

    https://fuchsia.dev/fuchsia-src
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fuchsia

  23. @Lot
    @Anonymous

    In the old days in the UK, France and USA, people like him who performed a major public service but were poor were given pensions.

    A fair share of the votes in the early US Congress was bestowing pensions on individuals.

    Replies: @res, @ScarletNumber

    This is interesting to me, because up until fairly recently, presidents didn’t even receive a pension. The Former Presidents Act wasn’t passed until 1958, specifically to help Harry Truman. Herbert Hoover was also eligible, but didn’t need the money. He took it anyway to avoid embarrassing Truman.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    Trump doesn't even accept salary.

    Replies: @South Texas Guy

    , @Chris Mallory
    @ScarletNumber

    No elected or appointed office should give a pension. Especially now with the multi million dollar book deals and tens of thousands of dollars speaking engagements.

    , @FPD72
    @ScarletNumber

    When Garfield was assassinated, Congress voted his widow a pension, the first presidential widow to be so supported. It was then noticed that Sarah Polk, widow of the 11th president, was still alive, some 32 years after her husband’s death soon after he left office. She was then given a pension of $5,000 a year.

    Dying of throat cancer, Grant spent his last days furiously writing his autobiography in order to provide for his soon-to-be-widowed wife. I guess he was personally innocent of the financial corruption that characterized his administration.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  24. @black sea
    No mention of a bath, I see.

    Replies: @Sean, @International Jew

  25. @Fran Macadam
    Because I'm definitely not a progressive like Richard, I was purged earlier on. But the defecating stupidity of the Woke now has them devouring the most productive to all of us of their allies. I guess that's a big part of why they do this, their malignant misanthropy. I'm doing all I can to defend RMS. Note - even though he apologized - he was still defenestrated. That is what they do - no forgiveness, no redemption - ever.

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    Woke has deteriorated to a flat assault on Western civilization coupled with an assault on idustrialization. The two are a pair, so the coupling was inevitable over the long run.
    In other words, Stalman and the Woke were never allies, although Stalman might have thought that they were. For that matter, Communism and the Woke are not really allies — Communism is too Western, the Third Word has rejected both classical Maxist/Leninist C0mmunism and Eurocommunism. (e.g. the Caliphate, e.g. People’s Republic of China).

    World’s changed.

    Counterinsurgency

  26. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    The big problem with all the non-x86 architectures was getting the latest fab processes dedicated to them. x86-64 has outpaced the various RISC chips badly in terms of the available parts at any time point. That's what killed the workstationeers, commodity Lintel was faster.

    Going the opposite way-specialized baroque architectures like a 72 bit PDP-10 extension, or a LispM Ivory like tagged word processor or a Forth/PostScript customized processor might be a better tactic than yet another fungible short instruction set CPU. But thet's just a wild unscientific guess.

    The availability of good free Unix has pretty well killed OS development in new directions. Bell Labs' own Plan 9 and Inferno have died out, and now all that is left outside the IBM EBCDIC mainframe/midframe world is Windows and Unix.

    Technically, there are alternatives:

    https://www.haiku-os.org/about/
    https://www.morphos-team.net/intro
    https://www.riscosopen.org/content/

    http://www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
    https://9p.io/plan9/

    And last but not least, God's Own Operating System:
    https://templeos.org/

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency, @Jack D, @James N. Kennett

    Lanier has quite a bit to say that supports your post in _You are not a gadget_.

    Counterinsurgency

  27. @kihowi
    He should join up with Greta and form an autism supergroup.

    Replies: @Sean

    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. The autism comes in with the pathological single mindedness in his work. He has the a bit of both, that is handy for true creativity and ensures he gets peace to think.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201704/solitude-is-the-school-genius Asperger drew attention as a key feature of his autistics. As he put it: “Autistic children are able to produce original ideas. Indeed, they can only be original;” and a person cut off from the crowd is likely to be so too—at least to a greater extent than otherwise might be the case. Furthermore, when that person is already pre-disposed to independent thinking in a mechanistic mode thanks to an autistic cognitive configuration, quite remarkable originality is possible. Free of conformist constraints from critics, colleagues, or collaborators, such minds can function without the usual pressures that society places on innovative thinking. To use the symbolism I exploited in an earlier post: originality is not a feature of cloud cognition/group-think. On the contrary, as Edward Gibbon commented, “Conversation enriches the understanding, but solitude is the school of genius.”

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Sean


    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum.

     

    It's somewhat unfortunate in this context that all of us actually are continually being spied upon these days.
    , @Fran Macadam
    @Sean

    "The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. "

    Except, everyone's communications are now spied on by "the intelligence community" for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President's.

    If you think there's no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Hail, @Sean, @PetrOldSack

  28. @Lot
    If he’s broke there must be some tech company that would pay him to join their board. SJWs haven’t taken them all over yet.

    Edit: He’s crazier than I thought, and his website could be an issue. The top of his homepage has him attacking a bunch of big companies.

    Maybe the Jews have got to him. From his anti-AirBnB page:

    “Airbnb rents rooms in Israel's colonies in Palestinian territory.

    Seizing land from the people of an occupied territory and settling people from the occupying power there violates the Geneva Conventions.”

    There’s also this, which is just idiotic:

    “Pay toilets are nasty, and ought to be illegal. Those of us who are not poor can afford the price, if we accept the practice; poor people can't. To deny people access to a toilet when they need one is nasty and degrading.

    I have concluded that the least we can do, to eliminate pay toilets, is to avoid giving them money. Instead of paying them, I go to great lengths to find some other toilet.

    Please join me in rejecting pay toilets firmly.”

    Given that they are rare in the USA but common in poor countries, his talk about going to great lengths to avoid them means he hasn’t noticed that pay toilets are generally cheap (10-25 cents) and provide employment to marginal poor people who couldn’t find anything else.

    And this:

    “I see that cellular phones are very convenient. I would have got one, if not for certain reprehensible things about them.

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else's cell phone, that doesn't give Big Brother any information about me.“

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Pericles, @Cloudbuster

    Maybe the Jews have got to him.

    I know someone they got to…

    Wall Street mogul John R. Jakobson ‘promised mistress that their love child Marina Squerciati would get a “big surprise” in his will – then left her NOTHING from $100M fortune

    Now see? Here’s why it pays to mince words with the finest. Because technically he’s in the clear– besides being dead–he did deliver as promised: a “Big Surprise!”

    • Replies: @anon
    @Mr McKenna

    That Jakobson fellow looks like a fine upstanding Scotts Irish man.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna

    This is a big BS story. Now that he's dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her - gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible - Jakobson is Jacob's son) - the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call - something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a "big surprise". And now the dead man speaks. C'mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small "go away" settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a "nice surprise" from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe, @Bill, @Mr McKenna, @Pericles

    , @Thea
    @Mr McKenna

    Removing the shame of illegitimate children has caused us much grief.

    She should take $500,000 and shut up. Some men leave everything to charity and none to even legitimate kids. That’s simply American inheritance laws.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

  29. Maybe one person could donate a small RV, and another could offer him a place to park it?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dave2

    I understand that Ted Kaczynski is no longer using his cabin but it's not on the Red Line to Cambridge.

    Replies: @Alden, @Dave2

  30. @SimpleSong
    Open source software always struck me as exactly the type of thing that academia was made for. Everyone is better off if the foundational data/information of a discipline is in the public domain, and academics are the natural group to do this. In the 19th century academics would publish steam tables and solubility charts and the like so that every engine maker or electroplater or whatever didn't need to start from scratch. In the 20th century it made sense to have a high quality C compiler in the public domain. Things like the gcc, BSD Unix, the RISC-V project, etc. are academia at its best, in my opinion.

    RMS went way beyond, this, of course, not drawing a distinction between academia and the private sector. He avoided narrowly framing his crusade as an updated version of the role that academia has traditionally played. Personally I never found the more expansive arguments regarding open source to be that compelling, but nevertheless I am glad he was so zealous.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Dave Pinsen, @Bill

    It’s the very definition of University. These scholars are paid to disseminate their research to the public and tutor students.

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @Anonymous

    True! However since around the time of the Bayh-Dole act universities sorta act like outsourced R&D departments, or as cozy places to nurture an idea before you take it to the venture capitalists. Not to say that this didn't always happen, but it has gotten quite extreme.

  31. @ScarletNumber
    @Lot

    This is interesting to me, because up until fairly recently, presidents didn't even receive a pension. The Former Presidents Act wasn't passed until 1958, specifically to help Harry Truman. Herbert Hoover was also eligible, but didn't need the money. He took it anyway to avoid embarrassing Truman.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @FPD72

    Trump doesn’t even accept salary.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    @Anonymous

    Actually, Trump said it's a quirk of federal law/regulations that he must accept the presidential salary. However, he donates it quarterly to various gov't funds or charities.

  32. @SimpleSong
    Open source software always struck me as exactly the type of thing that academia was made for. Everyone is better off if the foundational data/information of a discipline is in the public domain, and academics are the natural group to do this. In the 19th century academics would publish steam tables and solubility charts and the like so that every engine maker or electroplater or whatever didn't need to start from scratch. In the 20th century it made sense to have a high quality C compiler in the public domain. Things like the gcc, BSD Unix, the RISC-V project, etc. are academia at its best, in my opinion.

    RMS went way beyond, this, of course, not drawing a distinction between academia and the private sector. He avoided narrowly framing his crusade as an updated version of the role that academia has traditionally played. Personally I never found the more expansive arguments regarding open source to be that compelling, but nevertheless I am glad he was so zealous.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Dave Pinsen, @Bill

    Most home use software was de facto open source early on. Bill Gates wrote a famous open letter in the 1970s arguing that hobbyists should pay for software.

    http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    No, it was no source. They never released source, only executables. And bizarre copy protection schemes, few undefeatable but most a pain in the ass for legitimate users, were rife.

    Compilers and other programming tools were very expensive and not very good. I had a friend that decided he was going to start programming on the Mac and the Apple development suite he needed to even start was well into four figures. You had to buy into a bunch of crap. Plus a suitable Mac to start was something over two grand. He had taken a lot of classes but it was always on some minicomputer using terminals.

    The PC wasn’t much cheaper and you wound up with character based DOS programs only.By then it was obvious windowing environments would win.

    GNU free software was of no use to hobbyists until free Unix like systems came out.You needed a workstation or a mini to run it. There was SCO Unix for the PC but it was heinously expensive and not very good. I remember that there were people who figured out how to patch 68k Sun Unix to run on a Mac, but they never had video drivers, so you ran it off the serial port and used another micro running terminal emulation or an X Windows server.

    Linux became a usable environment about 1995, and all that went by the wayside. A lot of people were hopeful it would take over the desktop market. More were scared it would and that the commercial software business was done for. As a desktop it has been a total flop, but it has utterly dominated many back end and embedded spaces.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @bjondo
    @Dave Pinsen

    Speaking of Bill Gates, how high does
    an IQ need to be before one becomes
    a moron?

    https://www.iflscience.com/environment/bill-gatesbacked-controversial-geoengineering-test-moves-forward-with-new-committee/

  33. What is a hypoallergenic cat?

    • Replies: @Rex Little
    @Bill B.


    What is a hypoallergenic cat?
     
    One which produces fewer allergens than most. Certain breeds are known for this.
    , @anon
    @Bill B.

    A hypoallergenic cat is a special breed that has no fur.

  34. @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    Trump doesn't even accept salary.

    Replies: @South Texas Guy

    Actually, Trump said it’s a quirk of federal law/regulations that he must accept the presidential salary. However, he donates it quarterly to various gov’t funds or charities.

  35. @Mr McKenna
    @Lot


    Maybe the Jews have got to him.
     
    I know someone they got to...

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/09/29/05/19063112-0-image-a-51_1569729752023.jpg

    Wall Street mogul John R. Jakobson 'promised mistress that their love child Marina Squerciati would get a "big surprise" in his will - then left her NOTHING from $100M fortune


    Now see? Here's why it pays to mince words with the finest. Because technically he's in the clear-- besides being dead--he did deliver as promised: a "Big Surprise!"

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D, @Thea

    That Jakobson fellow looks like a fine upstanding Scotts Irish man.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @anon

    Long nose long face high cheekbones long pointed chin; Jacobson really does look Scots Irish.

  36. @Jon
    Among the two dozen plus companies he has on his personal boycott lis Wendy's, because it "has refused to sign an agreement with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers." Seems like an easy roomate to get along with.

    Replies: @Hail

    Among the two dozen plus companies [Richard Stallman] has on his personal boycott

    I see his master boycott list is at the top of his website, under “What’s bad about: [..].”

    Some highlights from two others boycotts he has going :

    I absolutely refuse to take Amtrak trains because they check passengers’ ID (not all the time, but it could happen at any time). Please join me in boycotting Amtrak until it stops requiring identification.

    It’s not that I expect my personal rejection to make Amtrak change. Rather, as long as Amtrak does not change, I resent it so much I’d rather take a bus.

    I uphold the total boycott of Coca Cola Company, which is a response to the murder of union organizers in Colombia and Guatemala.

    (From Richard Stallman’s lifestyle page.)

  37. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    @SimpleSong

    Most home use software was de facto open source early on. Bill Gates wrote a famous open letter in the 1970s arguing that hobbyists should pay for software.

    http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @bjondo

    No, it was no source. They never released source, only executables. And bizarre copy protection schemes, few undefeatable but most a pain in the ass for legitimate users, were rife.

    Compilers and other programming tools were very expensive and not very good. I had a friend that decided he was going to start programming on the Mac and the Apple development suite he needed to even start was well into four figures. You had to buy into a bunch of crap. Plus a suitable Mac to start was something over two grand. He had taken a lot of classes but it was always on some minicomputer using terminals.

    The PC wasn’t much cheaper and you wound up with character based DOS programs only.By then it was obvious windowing environments would win.

    GNU free software was of no use to hobbyists until free Unix like systems came out.You needed a workstation or a mini to run it. There was SCO Unix for the PC but it was heinously expensive and not very good. I remember that there were people who figured out how to patch 68k Sun Unix to run on a Mac, but they never had video drivers, so you ran it off the serial port and used another micro running terminal emulation or an X Windows server.

    Linux became a usable environment about 1995, and all that went by the wayside. A lot of people were hopeful it would take over the desktop market. More were scared it would and that the commercial software business was done for. As a desktop it has been a total flop, but it has utterly dominated many back end and embedded spaces.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Exactly - "free software" and "open source" are two different (but related) things. "Free" refers to the licensing but "open" means that you can see the source code. Naturally Gates wanted neither.

    Replies: @Lot

  38. @Lot
    If he’s broke there must be some tech company that would pay him to join their board. SJWs haven’t taken them all over yet.

    Edit: He’s crazier than I thought, and his website could be an issue. The top of his homepage has him attacking a bunch of big companies.

    Maybe the Jews have got to him. From his anti-AirBnB page:

    “Airbnb rents rooms in Israel's colonies in Palestinian territory.

    Seizing land from the people of an occupied territory and settling people from the occupying power there violates the Geneva Conventions.”

    There’s also this, which is just idiotic:

    “Pay toilets are nasty, and ought to be illegal. Those of us who are not poor can afford the price, if we accept the practice; poor people can't. To deny people access to a toilet when they need one is nasty and degrading.

    I have concluded that the least we can do, to eliminate pay toilets, is to avoid giving them money. Instead of paying them, I go to great lengths to find some other toilet.

    Please join me in rejecting pay toilets firmly.”

    Given that they are rare in the USA but common in poor countries, his talk about going to great lengths to avoid them means he hasn’t noticed that pay toilets are generally cheap (10-25 cents) and provide employment to marginal poor people who couldn’t find anything else.

    And this:

    “I see that cellular phones are very convenient. I would have got one, if not for certain reprehensible things about them.

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else's cell phone, that doesn't give Big Brother any information about me.“

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Pericles, @Cloudbuster

    Stallman seems exquisitely virtuous, perhaps he can stay with the antifa or Mozilla.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Pericles

    Red pill me on Mozilla — why are they to be distrusted? My browser is Firefox with the DuckDuckGo plug-in.

    What can I be doing better?

    Replies: @Pericles

  39. @Laurence Whelk
    What a world we live in, where one person with mental illness is demonized but another is deified.

    https://www.sott.net/image/s26/539367/full/angry_greta.jpg

    Both people deserve our help, not abuse or exploitation.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Steve in Greensboro, @Olorin

    Now I can see the outline of a TV show.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Pericles

    Stallman renting a room at the Thunberg's house? Endless squabbles between Greta and Stallman? Stallman metooing Greta's mother? Stallman killing and cooking the family dog? Yes, it's definitely sitcom material.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Anonymous

  40. @Sean
    @kihowi

    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. The autism comes in with the pathological single mindedness in his work. He has the a bit of both, that is handy for true creativity and ensures he gets peace to think.


    https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201704/solitude-is-the-school-genius Asperger drew attention as a key feature of his autistics. As he put it: “Autistic children are able to produce original ideas. Indeed, they can only be original;” and a person cut off from the crowd is likely to be so too—at least to a greater extent than otherwise might be the case. Furthermore, when that person is already pre-disposed to independent thinking in a mechanistic mode thanks to an autistic cognitive configuration, quite remarkable originality is possible. Free of conformist constraints from critics, colleagues, or collaborators, such minds can function without the usual pressures that society places on innovative thinking. To use the symbolism I exploited in an earlier post: originality is not a feature of cloud cognition/group-think. On the contrary, as Edward Gibbon commented, “Conversation enriches the understanding, but solitude is the school of genius.”
     

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fran Macadam

    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum.

    It’s somewhat unfortunate in this context that all of us actually are continually being spied upon these days.

  41. Computer science is both a branch of mathematics & a science per se (for classification, see Level I here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_Subject_Classification#First-level_areas ).

    I’ve always found somehow bizarre that mentally much more challenging areas like abstract algebra, topology, partial differential equations,.. (Jean-Pierre Serre, Michael Atiyah, Alexander Grothendieck, Simon Donaldson, Yakov Sinai..) tend to attract highly creative people who are adult, normal (with a few quirks), not susceptible to subculture idiocies etc.

    While computer science at any level, and especially programming- which is cognitively far below those areas, tend to attract/produce people who are immature, behave like spoiled children & are frequently form subcultures of one-dimensional wankers & Fachidiots (genus idiots, nerds, geeks,…)- Turing, Ken Thompson, Ritchie, perhaps this guy Stillman.

    Cognitively highest areas of mathematics produce, as a rule with few exceptions, mature & normal people; mentally lower levels like CS give as immature smelly geeks.

    • Replies: @European-American
    @Bardon Kaldian

    That sounds like a proud mathematician’s argument for his tribe. In my experience there are plenty of mathematician asocial childish weirdoes. And conversely plenty of normal, adult, creative computer people. Computer “science”, however, is a more practical kind of worldmaking. So there may be more of a temptation to “hack the world” or “engineer reality” than in more abstract fields.

  42. @Pericles
    @Laurence Whelk

    Now I can see the outline of a TV show.

    Replies: @BB753

    Stallman renting a room at the Thunberg’s house? Endless squabbles between Greta and Stallman? Stallman metooing Greta’s mother? Stallman killing and cooking the family dog? Yes, it’s definitely sitcom material.

    • LOL: Aft, Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @BB753

    It could be a great modern odd couple show. Greta buys a parrot. Stallman doesn't want to take a bath. Greta decides she's a boy. They mix up their SSRIs. The possibilities are endless.

    In season 2, Stallman has to get a new job every episode to pay the rent. More comedy!

    Replies: @Pericles, @BB753

    , @Anonymous
    @BB753

    Stallman=sitcom, but only for certain values of sitcom.

  43. @Sean
    @kihowi

    The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. The autism comes in with the pathological single mindedness in his work. He has the a bit of both, that is handy for true creativity and ensures he gets peace to think.


    https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201704/solitude-is-the-school-genius Asperger drew attention as a key feature of his autistics. As he put it: “Autistic children are able to produce original ideas. Indeed, they can only be original;” and a person cut off from the crowd is likely to be so too—at least to a greater extent than otherwise might be the case. Furthermore, when that person is already pre-disposed to independent thinking in a mechanistic mode thanks to an autistic cognitive configuration, quite remarkable originality is possible. Free of conformist constraints from critics, colleagues, or collaborators, such minds can function without the usual pressures that society places on innovative thinking. To use the symbolism I exploited in an earlier post: originality is not a feature of cloud cognition/group-think. On the contrary, as Edward Gibbon commented, “Conversation enriches the understanding, but solitude is the school of genius.”
     

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fran Macadam

    “The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. ”

    Except, everyone’s communications are now spied on by “the intelligence community” for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President’s.

    If you think there’s no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    • Agree: BB753, PetrOldSack
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Fran Macadam


    Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and
     
    ...
    yet Python, JavaScript, PostgreSQL/mySQL/SQLite, and PHP run the entire fucking internet.

    (I include Python for those who can see the future - where Python supplants PHP for back-end in web-facing apps).

    Add in R, QGIS, Octave, gnuPGP, Thunderbird, Firefox - and a load more that I've forgotten, since I'm half-pissed after watching the Wobblies lose to Wales (Suck shit. Straya).

    Oh - yeah... Lyx (and other LaTeX editors), SageMath, Semantic/Bootstrap/MaterialDesign, Gulp/Grunt/Rollup, npm, LESS and SASS compilers; Atom/Geany. Wordpress, FFS.


    And under it all - Linux, of course... the OS of choice if you want to run any of the world's Top500 supercomputers (except maybe 1 or 2).

    FOSS isn't just winning: it's absolutely clear that only dotards use anything else, unless they get their software for free anyhow.

    When's the last time anyone here paid retail for Office? My Office 2019 Pro Plus licence cost me $45 (which is $200 more than fair price: Microsludge should have to compensate me for the system risk I take on when I install their bloated insecure pre-alpha shitware).

    I do have a full license for MATLAB - but that's because it's paid for by someone else (and I make sure the cunt of a thing can't phone home - it's actually a piece of shit... its memory management is retarded and must have been written by the cheapest Sanjay in all of Bangalore).
    , @Hail
    @Fran Macadam


    everyone’s communications are now spied on by “the intelligence community”
     
    Give them a break -- They're referred to as a community, after all. Clearly they must be virtuous at heart.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Sean
    @Fran Macadam

    Stallman seems to be a very easy person to neutralize, one would think it could have been done long ago.


    “All I know [Giuffre] said about Minsky is that Epstein directed her to have sex with Minsky. That does not say whether Minsky knew that she was coerced.
    We know that Giuffre was being coerced into sex – by Epstein. She was being harmed. But the details do affect whether, and to what extent, Minsky was responsible for that.”

     

    What got Stallman into trouble was his first step of assuming the information he was given was true. The Emails were discussing Marvin Minsky, someone now deceased who was accused by Virginia Giuffre, who was not used by the prosecutors in the criminal case against Epstein. She was repeatedly caught out in a civil court case telling fibs: knocking two years off her age, saying she met Clinton and the Gore's on Epstein's Island ect ect. I don't see how anyone could make honest mistakes like that.

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/sep/17/mit-scientist-emails-epstein
    The computer scientist Richard Stallman has resigned from MIT and the Free Software Foundation (FSF), which he founded and led, after leaked emails appeared to show him downplaying another academic’s alleged participation in the purported sex trafficking of minors by Jeffrey Epstein.
     
    Stallman treated it like a problem of logic and took the human element (whether Guiffre's accusation was trustworthy ) right out of it at the begining Then using the information supplied by Giuffre for the scenario, Stallman tried to parse her yarn. What he did not do is simply say he does not believe Marvin Minsky was the sort of person to do what he has been alleged to have done.

    Free sourcer Stallman is happiest dealing with known facts and does not like uncertainty about matters like whether someone is being deceptive, or asking him to explain as a way of trying to trick him into saying things that can be used against him. This is the pathological literal mindedness and theory of mind deficit that makes him an altruistic computer engineer and such an easy mark.
    , @PetrOldSack
    @Fran Macadam

    The nexus Github and Microsoft, and greedy or stark blind coders.

  44. Whats wrong with Skid Row? It’s pretty cheap.
    https://www.thefix.com/struggle-clean-methadone-mile-camp-heroin-skid-row

    • Replies: @Alden
    @BB753

    Stallman wouldn’t get along with the neighbors.

  45. @Jim Given
    Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.

    Replies: @Realist

    Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.

    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.

    • Replies: @Joe Sweet
    @Realist


    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.
     
    They are.

    I once house sat for a couple with a parrot in a loft in Manhattan. He was a total bastard. The only endearing thing about it was how it would sing along with Charlie Parker every morning while I was tuned in to Phil Schaap's "Bird Flight" radio show on the Columbia U. radio station. Man, that bird dug the Bird! He had some serious chops too.
    , @Redneck farmer
    @Realist

    And if Stallman was an Australian woman....

    Replies: @Realist

  46. @Laurence Whelk
    What a world we live in, where one person with mental illness is demonized but another is deified.

    https://www.sott.net/image/s26/539367/full/angry_greta.jpg

    Both people deserve our help, not abuse or exploitation.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Steve in Greensboro, @Olorin

    I’ve not had a chance to experience Mr. Stallman, at least not to the same extent as the grotesque Greta. Both certainly need psychiatric help and likely medication.

    But what about what the rest of humanity needs? To be clear, what the rest of us need is to not be exposed to Fraulein Thunberg in any form ever again.

  47. @Bill B.
    What is a hypoallergenic cat?

    Replies: @Rex Little, @anon

    What is a hypoallergenic cat?

    One which produces fewer allergens than most. Certain breeds are known for this.

  48. @BB753
    @Pericles

    Stallman renting a room at the Thunberg's house? Endless squabbles between Greta and Stallman? Stallman metooing Greta's mother? Stallman killing and cooking the family dog? Yes, it's definitely sitcom material.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Anonymous

    It could be a great modern odd couple show. Greta buys a parrot. Stallman doesn’t want to take a bath. Greta decides she’s a boy. They mix up their SSRIs. The possibilities are endless.

    In season 2, Stallman has to get a new job every episode to pay the rent. More comedy!

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Pericles


    Greta buys a parrot.

     

    Wait, wait, wait. She rescues a parrot.
    , @BB753
    @Pericles

    In the last season, Greta finds out Stallman is his biological father! Meanwhile, her legal father is transitioning to a woman. There's enough material for 45 seasons at least!

    Replies: @Aft

  49. @Pericles
    @BB753

    It could be a great modern odd couple show. Greta buys a parrot. Stallman doesn't want to take a bath. Greta decides she's a boy. They mix up their SSRIs. The possibilities are endless.

    In season 2, Stallman has to get a new job every episode to pay the rent. More comedy!

    Replies: @Pericles, @BB753

    Greta buys a parrot.

    Wait, wait, wait. She rescues a parrot.

  50. This guy is a loser. He must have some sort of skill to provide society. If not and he’s unwilling to work that’s his own fault. He must have expected that eventually the zeitgeist would purge fat smelly autists from the institutions.

  51. @ScarletNumber
    @Lot

    This is interesting to me, because up until fairly recently, presidents didn't even receive a pension. The Former Presidents Act wasn't passed until 1958, specifically to help Harry Truman. Herbert Hoover was also eligible, but didn't need the money. He took it anyway to avoid embarrassing Truman.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @FPD72

    No elected or appointed office should give a pension. Especially now with the multi million dollar book deals and tens of thousands of dollars speaking engagements.

  52. @Pericles
    @Lot

    Stallman seems exquisitely virtuous, perhaps he can stay with the antifa or Mozilla.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    Red pill me on Mozilla — why are they to be distrusted? My browser is Firefox with the DuckDuckGo plug-in.

    What can I be doing better?

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @BenKenobi

    Mozilla's activist workers ousted Brendan Eich (invented Javascript) for once upon a time donating against gay marriage. They give money to anarchists in Seattle. I seem to recall there are a lot of gross people involved with Rust. It goes on. In short, they are a lot of degenerates who took over a project with money (though they are at least not entirely dedicated to giving the till away to their activist pals). Anyway, I've stayed away since Eich.

  53. Father of open-source begs cheap room & board.

    Dog bites man.

  54. @Fran Macadam
    @Sean

    "The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. "

    Except, everyone's communications are now spied on by "the intelligence community" for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President's.

    If you think there's no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Hail, @Sean, @PetrOldSack

    Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and


    yet Python, JavaScript, PostgreSQL/mySQL/SQLite, and PHP run the entire fucking internet.

    (I include Python for those who can see the future – where Python supplants PHP for back-end in web-facing apps).

    Add in R, QGIS, Octave, gnuPGP, Thunderbird, Firefox – and a load more that I’ve forgotten, since I’m half-pissed after watching the Wobblies lose to Wales (Suck shit. Straya).

    Oh – yeah… Lyx (and other LaTeX editors), SageMath, Semantic/Bootstrap/MaterialDesign, Gulp/Grunt/Rollup, npm, LESS and SASS compilers; Atom/Geany. WordPress, FFS.

    And under it all – Linux, of course… the OS of choice if you want to run any of the world’s Top500 supercomputers (except maybe 1 or 2).

    FOSS isn’t just winning: it’s absolutely clear that only dotards use anything else, unless they get their software for free anyhow.

    When’s the last time anyone here paid retail for Office? My Office 2019 Pro Plus licence cost me $45 (which is $200 more than fair price: Microsludge should have to compensate me for the system risk I take on when I install their bloated insecure pre-alpha shitware).

    I do have a full license for MATLAB – but that’s because it’s paid for by someone else (and I make sure the cunt of a thing can’t phone home – it’s actually a piece of shit… its memory management is retarded and must have been written by the cheapest Sanjay in all of Bangalore).

  55. @Lot
    If he’s broke there must be some tech company that would pay him to join their board. SJWs haven’t taken them all over yet.

    Edit: He’s crazier than I thought, and his website could be an issue. The top of his homepage has him attacking a bunch of big companies.

    Maybe the Jews have got to him. From his anti-AirBnB page:

    “Airbnb rents rooms in Israel's colonies in Palestinian territory.

    Seizing land from the people of an occupied territory and settling people from the occupying power there violates the Geneva Conventions.”

    There’s also this, which is just idiotic:

    “Pay toilets are nasty, and ought to be illegal. Those of us who are not poor can afford the price, if we accept the practice; poor people can't. To deny people access to a toilet when they need one is nasty and degrading.

    I have concluded that the least we can do, to eliminate pay toilets, is to avoid giving them money. Instead of paying them, I go to great lengths to find some other toilet.

    Please join me in rejecting pay toilets firmly.”

    Given that they are rare in the USA but common in poor countries, his talk about going to great lengths to avoid them means he hasn’t noticed that pay toilets are generally cheap (10-25 cents) and provide employment to marginal poor people who couldn’t find anything else.

    And this:

    “I see that cellular phones are very convenient. I would have got one, if not for certain reprehensible things about them.

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else's cell phone, that doesn't give Big Brother any information about me.“

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Pericles, @Cloudbuster

    When I need to call someone, I ask someone nearby to let me make a call. If I use someone else’s cell phone, that doesn’t give Big Brother any information about me.

    Does Stallman really believe that Big Brother doesn’t know everything there is to know about him, of all people?

    If he asked me, I’d refuse “No, sorry, I don’t want Big Brother to think I’m associating with any of the people with whom you associate.”

  56. I like how, despite all his privacy manias, he’s a Bernie Bro. Because the candidate that wants to establish a wealth registry is definitely going to respect Stallman’s privacy.

  57. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    The big problem with all the non-x86 architectures was getting the latest fab processes dedicated to them. x86-64 has outpaced the various RISC chips badly in terms of the available parts at any time point. That's what killed the workstationeers, commodity Lintel was faster.

    Going the opposite way-specialized baroque architectures like a 72 bit PDP-10 extension, or a LispM Ivory like tagged word processor or a Forth/PostScript customized processor might be a better tactic than yet another fungible short instruction set CPU. But thet's just a wild unscientific guess.

    The availability of good free Unix has pretty well killed OS development in new directions. Bell Labs' own Plan 9 and Inferno have died out, and now all that is left outside the IBM EBCDIC mainframe/midframe world is Windows and Unix.

    Technically, there are alternatives:

    https://www.haiku-os.org/about/
    https://www.morphos-team.net/intro
    https://www.riscosopen.org/content/

    http://www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
    https://9p.io/plan9/

    And last but not least, God's Own Operating System:
    https://templeos.org/

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency, @Jack D, @James N. Kennett

    Sure, in a different world we could have had different dominant CPU, different OS’s if we had started at a different point, but it’s the nature of technology for people to settle on a standard and improve that standard until it is so far ahead of competitors by virtue of the millions of hours of R&D that have gone into it that no competing technology has a realistic chance of catching up.

    Even the Soviets mostly copied Western chips (Western technology in general) and didn’t design their own. (Partly this is because it’s easier to copy than to think of something new and partly because their leadership assumed that Western technology was better – sometimes they put so much effort into exactly copying Western technology that it would have been easier for them to start fresh).

    We saw this with the automobile where the reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, although conceptually a dumb idea (an engine powered by a bunch of explosions and which involves turning linear motion into rotary motion) came to be the dominant technology because so much effort was put into getting it to work. The highly refined dumb idea that was first to market works better than the unrefined clever one.

    BTW, in the PC world, ARM (which is a form of RISC) is coming up fast and may yet replace x86, especially at the low end of the market. Already by processor count they are ahead with over 100 billion chips produced, mostly in phones and embedded devices but they are also increasingly found in laptops, etc. And while Android is written on a Linux (Unix) base, there are competing OS’s in the ARM world. Note that the reign of the IC engine is now being challenged by electrics – no technology remains dominant forever.

  58. @Mr McKenna
    @Lot


    Maybe the Jews have got to him.
     
    I know someone they got to...

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/09/29/05/19063112-0-image-a-51_1569729752023.jpg

    Wall Street mogul John R. Jakobson 'promised mistress that their love child Marina Squerciati would get a "big surprise" in his will - then left her NOTHING from $100M fortune


    Now see? Here's why it pays to mince words with the finest. Because technically he's in the clear-- besides being dead--he did deliver as promised: a "Big Surprise!"

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D, @Thea

    This is a big BS story. Now that he’s dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her – gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible – Jakobson is Jacob’s son) – the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call – something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a “big surprise”. And now the dead man speaks. C’mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small “go away” settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a “nice surprise” from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Jack D


    ...you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US.
     
    You are in South Dakota (and likely some other states; I doubt we're the only one).

    But this can be circumvented through a bequest of one (1) dollar. The adopted son (who used to rape my then-prepubescent wife) will be getting a single dollar when my father-in-law passes.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    , @Bill
    @Jack D


    During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?)
     
    "it"
    , @Mr McKenna
    @Jack D

    LOL....this spews forth from the guy who defends Jeffrey Epstein.

    Hmm...what on earth could the common thread be?

    , @Pericles
    @Jack D


    During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?)

     

    Well, seems straightforward enough to check whether they're related in our modern world.
  59. @Dave2
    Maybe one person could donate a small RV, and another could offer him a place to park it?

    Replies: @Jack D

    I understand that Ted Kaczynski is no longer using his cabin but it’s not on the Red Line to Cambridge.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    Best post of the month!!!!!

    , @Dave2
    @Jack D

    The Unabomber cabin is presently in a museum in Washington DC. It could be moved again.

  60. @black sea
    No mention of a bath, I see.

    Replies: @Sean, @International Jew

    Yes. If I were his roommate (even his housemate or his next-apartment-down-the-hallmate) his smell would get to me long before his personality did.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Lot
    @International Jew

    I wonder if he wrote his anti AirBnB page after being banned from the service due to hosts giving him bad reviews.

  61. Hollywood should produce a new version of “Big Bang” with rms replacing Sheldon. And in reality-show format.

    • Agree: Lot
  62. @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen

    No, it was no source. They never released source, only executables. And bizarre copy protection schemes, few undefeatable but most a pain in the ass for legitimate users, were rife.

    Compilers and other programming tools were very expensive and not very good. I had a friend that decided he was going to start programming on the Mac and the Apple development suite he needed to even start was well into four figures. You had to buy into a bunch of crap. Plus a suitable Mac to start was something over two grand. He had taken a lot of classes but it was always on some minicomputer using terminals.

    The PC wasn’t much cheaper and you wound up with character based DOS programs only.By then it was obvious windowing environments would win.

    GNU free software was of no use to hobbyists until free Unix like systems came out.You needed a workstation or a mini to run it. There was SCO Unix for the PC but it was heinously expensive and not very good. I remember that there were people who figured out how to patch 68k Sun Unix to run on a Mac, but they never had video drivers, so you ran it off the serial port and used another micro running terminal emulation or an X Windows server.

    Linux became a usable environment about 1995, and all that went by the wayside. A lot of people were hopeful it would take over the desktop market. More were scared it would and that the commercial software business was done for. As a desktop it has been a total flop, but it has utterly dominated many back end and embedded spaces.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Exactly – “free software” and “open source” are two different (but related) things. “Free” refers to the licensing but “open” means that you can see the source code. Naturally Gates wanted neither.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Jack D

    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Johann Ricke

  63. @Realist
    @Jim Given


    Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.
     
    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.

    Replies: @Joe Sweet, @Redneck farmer

    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.

    They are.

    I once house sat for a couple with a parrot in a loft in Manhattan. He was a total bastard. The only endearing thing about it was how it would sing along with Charlie Parker every morning while I was tuned in to Phil Schaap’s “Bird Flight” radio show on the Columbia U. radio station. Man, that bird dug the Bird! He had some serious chops too.

  64. @BB753
    Whats wrong with Skid Row? It's pretty cheap.
    https://www.thefix.com/struggle-clean-methadone-mile-camp-heroin-skid-row

    Replies: @Alden

    Stallman wouldn’t get along with the neighbors.

  65. @Jack D
    @Dave2

    I understand that Ted Kaczynski is no longer using his cabin but it's not on the Red Line to Cambridge.

    Replies: @Alden, @Dave2

    Best post of the month!!!!!

  66. @anon
    @Mr McKenna

    That Jakobson fellow looks like a fine upstanding Scotts Irish man.

    Replies: @Alden

    Long nose long face high cheekbones long pointed chin; Jacobson really does look Scots Irish.

  67. Anon[428] • Disclaimer says:

    This is an evergreen notice for him. I don’t think he’s had his own place for decades. He’s blocked the Wayback Machine so I can’t check, but every time I’ve looked at his site there’s been a variation of this autistic rock-band-tour-rider style “seeking lodgings” notice. It has nothing to do with his “cancellation.”

    • Replies: @European-American
    @Anon

    Thanks for pointing out that Steve’s “update” is nothing new.

    One of many negative consequences of being canceled is that it brings a new burst of the worst kind of fame, where everyone assumes they know everything about you after a few minutes of research, and feel entitled to judge you and sh*t on you. I imagine hardly anyone could withstand this kind of casually (and often unintentionally) injurious scrutiny.

  68. @Fran Macadam
    @Sean

    "The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. "

    Except, everyone's communications are now spied on by "the intelligence community" for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President's.

    If you think there's no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Hail, @Sean, @PetrOldSack

    everyone’s communications are now spied on by “the intelligence community”

    Give them a break — They’re referred to as a community, after all. Clearly they must be virtuous at heart.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hail


    Give them a break — They’re referred to as a community, after all. Clearly they must be virtuous at heart.
     
    As opposed to gun collecters, who are merely a "lobby".
  69. @Mr McKenna
    @Lot


    Maybe the Jews have got to him.
     
    I know someone they got to...

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/09/29/05/19063112-0-image-a-51_1569729752023.jpg

    Wall Street mogul John R. Jakobson 'promised mistress that their love child Marina Squerciati would get a "big surprise" in his will - then left her NOTHING from $100M fortune


    Now see? Here's why it pays to mince words with the finest. Because technically he's in the clear-- besides being dead--he did deliver as promised: a "Big Surprise!"

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D, @Thea

    Removing the shame of illegitimate children has caused us much grief.

    She should take $500,000 and shut up. Some men leave everything to charity and none to even legitimate kids. That’s simply American inheritance laws.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Thea


    She should take $500,000 and shut up.

     

    Pretty much agree; however ...

    Marina was offered a $50,000 settlement by the Jakobson lawyers.
     
    That won't even buy you a decent Mercedes nowadays.
  70. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna

    This is a big BS story. Now that he's dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her - gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible - Jakobson is Jacob's son) - the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call - something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a "big surprise". And now the dead man speaks. C'mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small "go away" settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a "nice surprise" from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe, @Bill, @Mr McKenna, @Pericles

    …you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US.

    You are in South Dakota (and likely some other states; I doubt we’re the only one).

    But this can be circumvented through a bequest of one (1) dollar. The adopted son (who used to rape my then-prepubescent wife) will be getting a single dollar when my father-in-law passes.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I'm not an expert in SD law but I doubt this is the law there. The reason you leave someone $1 is to foreclose any argument that you just forgot to mention them in your will and if you had remembered you would have given them their fair share. Maybe this made sense when people had 10 or 12 kids and you might not remember all their names.

    , @Anonymous
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Not a lawyer but AFAIK you can specifically state that a certain person gets nothing. Is usually upheld in court, the same as if you gave them $1 (but for some reason I'm told $20 is considered the default 'fuck you' bequest).

    I had a friend's dad that left his son in law and daughter all of his "yachts, aircraft, automobiles made before 1948 and considered CCCA Classics, golf equipment and Patek Phillippe or Rolex watches, and a US Gold Certificate for $10 serial number xxxxxx". He owned none of the above except the bill which had at the time zero numismatic value over face. They were pissed to say the least.

    John Lear, Bill Lear's idiot son who was on Fart Smell all the time with his crazy alien and moon hoax stories, was famously left $1 in his father's will.

  71. @Bardon Kaldian
    Computer science is both a branch of mathematics & a science per se (for classification, see Level I here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_Subject_Classification#First-level_areas ).

    I've always found somehow bizarre that mentally much more challenging areas like abstract algebra, topology, partial differential equations,.. (Jean-Pierre Serre, Michael Atiyah, Alexander Grothendieck, Simon Donaldson, Yakov Sinai..) tend to attract highly creative people who are adult, normal (with a few quirks), not susceptible to subculture idiocies etc.

    While computer science at any level, and especially programming- which is cognitively far below those areas, tend to attract/produce people who are immature, behave like spoiled children & are frequently form subcultures of one-dimensional wankers & Fachidiots (genus idiots, nerds, geeks,...)- Turing, Ken Thompson, Ritchie, perhaps this guy Stillman.

    Cognitively highest areas of mathematics produce, as a rule with few exceptions, mature & normal people; mentally lower levels like CS give as immature smelly geeks.

    Replies: @European-American

    That sounds like a proud mathematician’s argument for his tribe. In my experience there are plenty of mathematician asocial childish weirdoes. And conversely plenty of normal, adult, creative computer people. Computer “science”, however, is a more practical kind of worldmaking. So there may be more of a temptation to “hack the world” or “engineer reality” than in more abstract fields.

  72. I disagree with the labeling of Richard Stallman as mentally ill.

    He’s certainly a bit special. A natural dissident. Sometimes very difficult to deal with. But he’s no more mentally ill than Mark Zuckerberg. His work and his thinking have been controversial but of high quality.

    It’s just that when someone is down it’s easy to kick him and speak poorly and make fun of him.

  73. @Realist
    @Jim Given


    Also: Residence in the house of a parrot would be a huge plus.
     
    They are dirty, noisy birds that shit everywhere.

    Replies: @Joe Sweet, @Redneck farmer

    And if Stallman was an Australian woman….

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Redneck farmer


    And if Stallman was an Australian woman….
     
    He may be yet...he's weird enough to do the snip.
  74. @Dave Pinsen
    @SimpleSong

    Most home use software was de facto open source early on. Bill Gates wrote a famous open letter in the 1970s arguing that hobbyists should pay for software.

    http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html

    Replies: @Anonymous, @bjondo

    Speaking of Bill Gates, how high does
    an IQ need to be before one becomes
    a moron?

    https://www.iflscience.com/environment/bill-gatesbacked-controversial-geoengineering-test-moves-forward-with-new-committee/

  75. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Exactly - "free software" and "open source" are two different (but related) things. "Free" refers to the licensing but "open" means that you can see the source code. Naturally Gates wanted neither.

    Replies: @Lot

    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lot

    Not only that, each major PC vendor paid a different , secret price negotiated each year. Given the dismal margins in the commo PC business, if Dell paid $70 a box you can bet Ted Waitt at Gateway would have committed any act Gates wanted behind the halfway house for say $55, indeed maybe $60. Every dollar a box meant millions.

    So while Dell had some minimal support for Linux, the other players were rabidly anti-Linux until you got down to pure white box retailers who paid “wholesale retail” for Windows and if you didn’t want it, fine.

    Gates made it clear if any company sold or gave away any other OS this was going to be looked on with disfavor. Worst case scenario was that the company would be given the standard white box OEM price, maybe $100 back then, which just destroyed the profit margin on a budget PC. Or even a midline one.

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Lot


    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.
     
    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot, @Anonymous, @Pericles

  76. @International Jew
    @black sea

    Yes. If I were his roommate (even his housemate or his next-apartment-down-the-hallmate) his smell would get to me long before his personality did.

    Replies: @Lot

    I wonder if he wrote his anti AirBnB page after being banned from the service due to hosts giving him bad reviews.

  77. @BB753
    @Pericles

    Stallman renting a room at the Thunberg's house? Endless squabbles between Greta and Stallman? Stallman metooing Greta's mother? Stallman killing and cooking the family dog? Yes, it's definitely sitcom material.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Anonymous

    Stallman=sitcom, but only for certain values of sitcom.

  78. @SimpleSong
    Open source software always struck me as exactly the type of thing that academia was made for. Everyone is better off if the foundational data/information of a discipline is in the public domain, and academics are the natural group to do this. In the 19th century academics would publish steam tables and solubility charts and the like so that every engine maker or electroplater or whatever didn't need to start from scratch. In the 20th century it made sense to have a high quality C compiler in the public domain. Things like the gcc, BSD Unix, the RISC-V project, etc. are academia at its best, in my opinion.

    RMS went way beyond, this, of course, not drawing a distinction between academia and the private sector. He avoided narrowly framing his crusade as an updated version of the role that academia has traditionally played. Personally I never found the more expansive arguments regarding open source to be that compelling, but nevertheless I am glad he was so zealous.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Dave Pinsen, @Bill

    Of course, modern universities are deeply concerned with protecting and monetizing the IP developed by their faculty.

  79. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna

    This is a big BS story. Now that he's dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her - gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible - Jakobson is Jacob's son) - the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call - something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a "big surprise". And now the dead man speaks. C'mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small "go away" settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a "nice surprise" from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe, @Bill, @Mr McKenna, @Pericles

    During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?)

    “it”

  80. @Bill B.
    What is a hypoallergenic cat?

    Replies: @Rex Little, @anon

    A hypoallergenic cat is a special breed that has no fur.

  81. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    It's the very definition of University. These scholars are paid to disseminate their research to the public and tutor students.

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    True! However since around the time of the Bayh-Dole act universities sorta act like outsourced R&D departments, or as cozy places to nurture an idea before you take it to the venture capitalists. Not to say that this didn’t always happen, but it has gotten quite extreme.

  82. @Hail
    @Fran Macadam


    everyone’s communications are now spied on by “the intelligence community”
     
    Give them a break -- They're referred to as a community, after all. Clearly they must be virtuous at heart.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Give them a break — They’re referred to as a community, after all. Clearly they must be virtuous at heart.

    As opposed to gun collecters, who are merely a “lobby”.

  83. This one is close to Boston, but in a different NHL:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walden_Pond

  84. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    @Jack D

    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Not only that, each major PC vendor paid a different , secret price negotiated each year. Given the dismal margins in the commo PC business, if Dell paid $70 a box you can bet Ted Waitt at Gateway would have committed any act Gates wanted behind the halfway house for say $55, indeed maybe $60. Every dollar a box meant millions.

    So while Dell had some minimal support for Linux, the other players were rabidly anti-Linux until you got down to pure white box retailers who paid “wholesale retail” for Windows and if you didn’t want it, fine.

    Gates made it clear if any company sold or gave away any other OS this was going to be looked on with disfavor. Worst case scenario was that the company would be given the standard white box OEM price, maybe $100 back then, which just destroyed the profit margin on a budget PC. Or even a midline one.

  85. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    All of this seems a bit made up and melodramatic. Sure, Stallman is quite strange in many ways but all signs are that he can still function well enough in the real world; and no doubt the circumstances of his cancellation were ugly. Still, this is an older guy with a life-time appointment at the highest levels in academia. Those pay well enough to not ever run a risk of becoming a homeless.

    I don’t believe he has no savings, and I don’t believe he cannot afford a down payment on a flat or a house. Maybe someone close to Stallman can tell him about experiences of the many Americans who have lost their jobs, yet have not become “homeless” and never resorted to begging for handouts on Internet.

  86. @Fran Macadam
    @Sean

    "The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. "

    Except, everyone's communications are now spied on by "the intelligence community" for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President's.

    If you think there's no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Hail, @Sean, @PetrOldSack

    Stallman seems to be a very easy person to neutralize, one would think it could have been done long ago.

    “All I know [Giuffre] said about Minsky is that Epstein directed her to have sex with Minsky. That does not say whether Minsky knew that she was coerced.
    We know that Giuffre was being coerced into sex – by Epstein. She was being harmed. But the details do affect whether, and to what extent, Minsky was responsible for that.”

    What got Stallman into trouble was his first step of assuming the information he was given was true. The Emails were discussing Marvin Minsky, someone now deceased who was accused by Virginia Giuffre, who was not used by the prosecutors in the criminal case against Epstein. She was repeatedly caught out in a civil court case telling fibs: knocking two years off her age, saying she met Clinton and the Gore’s on Epstein’s Island ect ect. I don’t see how anyone could make honest mistakes like that.

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/sep/17/mit-scientist-emails-epstein
    The computer scientist Richard Stallman has resigned from MIT and the Free Software Foundation (FSF), which he founded and led, after leaked emails appeared to show him downplaying another academic’s alleged participation in the purported sex trafficking of minors by Jeffrey Epstein.

    Stallman treated it like a problem of logic and took the human element (whether Guiffre’s accusation was trustworthy ) right out of it at the begining Then using the information supplied by Giuffre for the scenario, Stallman tried to parse her yarn. What he did not do is simply say he does not believe Marvin Minsky was the sort of person to do what he has been alleged to have done.

    Free sourcer Stallman is happiest dealing with known facts and does not like uncertainty about matters like whether someone is being deceptive, or asking him to explain as a way of trying to trick him into saying things that can be used against him. This is the pathological literal mindedness and theory of mind deficit that makes him an altruistic computer engineer and such an easy mark.

  87. @Laurence Whelk
    What a world we live in, where one person with mental illness is demonized but another is deified.

    https://www.sott.net/image/s26/539367/full/angry_greta.jpg

    Both people deserve our help, not abuse or exploitation.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Steve in Greensboro, @Olorin

    Mommy’s little crisis actor

  88. I know of an available no-tech house adjacent to the Olympic Peninsula. But last I was there, physical mass transit to MIT/Beanburg was nonexistent. DSL an option but not in place. No dogs, no cats, but a good number of elk.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Olorin

    You've not said to where enquiries may be addressed.

  89. OT

    2017 — Open Letter to Grads from LTC(ret) Heffington

    (This was written by LTC (USA, ret.) Robert M. Heffington, as an open letter to graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. It has only been edited for format, and may differ in that respect from the original. My apologies to Lt. Colonel Heffington if this has been misrepresented in any way)

    …However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006–2009 and again from 2013–2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open.

    First and foremost, standards at West Point are nonexistent. They exist on paper, but nowhere else. The senior administration at West Point inexplicably refuses to enforce West Point’s publicly touted high standards on cadets, and, having picked up on this, cadets refuse to enforce standards on each other. The Superintendent refuses to enforce admissions standards or the cadet Honor Code, the Dean refuses to enforce academic standards, and the Commandant refuses to enforce standards of conduct and discipline. The end result is a sort of malaise that pervades the entire institution. Nothing matters anymore. Cadets know this, and it has given rise to a level of cadet arrogance and entitlement the likes of which West Point has never seen in its history.

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    It would be fun to have a league of colleges where the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body, so their teams are representative of their students.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @eah, @Olorin

    , @Aft
    @eah


    I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. …
     
    https://s1.r29static.com/bin/entry/84f/720x480,80/2189200/image.jpg
    , @Aft
    @eah


    Even the curriculum itself has suffered. The plebe American History course has been revamped to focus completely on race and on the narrative that America is founded solely on a history of racial oppression. Cadets derisively call it the “I Hate America Course.” Simultaneously, the plebe International History course now focuses on gender to the exclusion of many other important themes. On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).
     

    Replies: @eah

    , @res
    @eah

    Well, I think we know why he topped out at LTC. And I consider that praise rather than scorn.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  90. @Lot
    @Jack D

    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.

    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke


    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.
     
    That would be true for desktop applications in terms of user interface and 'friendliness" but not at all true for server side software.

    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    , @Lot
    @Johann Ricke

    “ China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. ”

    The obstacle to Linux adoption in China was the Chinese all pirated Windows.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke

    Open source wasn’t the real casualty, but other commercial software like BeOS, which literally could not get PC vendors to offer the software for free.

    NeXT would have faced the same issue but they had to pay licensors of code they licensed chunks of it from so much per OS license issued they didn’t even have that option. NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    , @Pericles
    @Johann Ricke


    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart.

     

    In particular, there was no Office on Unix, the second moat if you will. Nowadays this is not really an issue. Likewise, there were lots of windows-specific third party applications. Most of those are no longer exclusive, or have migrated to the cloud. A third problem was device drivers, which were often Windows-only too.

    By the way, Macos/OSX/... is a consumer Unix/BSD-derivative with a very competitive software environment, blinkenlights and all.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  91. @eah
    OT

    2017 -- Open Letter to Grads from LTC(ret) Heffington

    (This was written by LTC (USA, ret.) Robert M. Heffington, as an open letter to graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. It has only been edited for format, and may differ in that respect from the original. My apologies to Lt. Colonel Heffington if this has been misrepresented in any way)

    ...However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006–2009 and again from 2013–2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open.

    First and foremost, standards at West Point are nonexistent. They exist on paper, but nowhere else. The senior administration at West Point inexplicably refuses to enforce West Point’s publicly touted high standards on cadets, and, having picked up on this, cadets refuse to enforce standards on each other. The Superintendent refuses to enforce admissions standards or the cadet Honor Code, the Dean refuses to enforce academic standards, and the Commandant refuses to enforce standards of conduct and discipline. The end result is a sort of malaise that pervades the entire institution. Nothing matters anymore. Cadets know this, and it has given rise to a level of cadet arrogance and entitlement the likes of which West Point has never seen in its history.

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. ...
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Aft, @Aft, @res

    It would be fun to have a league of colleges where the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body, so their teams are representative of their students.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    So, in other words, sort of like... A nearly all-White league.

    We used to have them, and they /were/ kind of fun. So much fun, that Abbott and Costello used to make movies about it.

    , @eah
    @Steve Sailer

    the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body

    Perhaps moving down to Division II is also an option, one which on the surface seems more appropriate for West Point (and the other military academies), where undergrad enrollment, at just over 4k, is relatively small, ie probably significantly less than the Division I average -- no doubt this would have financial consequences.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Olorin
    @Steve Sailer

    The Ivy League used to be this.

  92. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    It would be fun to have a league of colleges where the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body, so their teams are representative of their students.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @eah, @Olorin

    So, in other words, sort of like… A nearly all-White league.

    We used to have them, and they /were/ kind of fun. So much fun, that Abbott and Costello used to make movies about it.

  93. Somebody needs to remake Being John Malkovich but call it Being Richard Stallman.

  94. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna

    This is a big BS story. Now that he's dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her - gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible - Jakobson is Jacob's son) - the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call - something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a "big surprise". And now the dead man speaks. C'mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small "go away" settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a "nice surprise" from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe, @Bill, @Mr McKenna, @Pericles

    LOL….this spews forth from the guy who defends Jeffrey Epstein.

    Hmm…what on earth could the common thread be?

  95. @Thea
    @Mr McKenna

    Removing the shame of illegitimate children has caused us much grief.

    She should take $500,000 and shut up. Some men leave everything to charity and none to even legitimate kids. That’s simply American inheritance laws.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    She should take $500,000 and shut up.

    Pretty much agree; however …

    Marina was offered a $50,000 settlement by the Jakobson lawyers.

    That won’t even buy you a decent Mercedes nowadays.

  96. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Johann Ricke
    @Lot


    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.
     
    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot, @Anonymous, @Pericles

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    That would be true for desktop applications in terms of user interface and ‘friendliness” but not at all true for server side software.

    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.
     
    The Macintosh was literally double the cost of the typical white box PC clone. It was never a contest. If the price difference were $70, the Apple Macintosh would be the dominant standard today, not Windows PC's.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  97. @Alice
    @Clifford Brown

    are you out of your mind? Who could stand to live with such a person? What legal hell would he drop a roommate or landlord into? what are the chances he'd find something wrong with your policies, your property, your financial arrangements? and then what would he unleash on you?

    do you not understand how many bridges at MIT he burned in the last few decades?

    We've created a set of societies that are too complex. We used to have simple ones where lunatics who were impossible to live with were taken care of in boarding houses or by unmarried family members or on monasteries.

    The problem is RMS can't live the way old school individualist lunatics could, off the grid, trapping dinner, chopping firewood, using water. He's utterly dependent on the interconnected social ans technological mechanisms that the modern globalist world has, even as he wishes to shun them. But he can't. he's helped invent them. we used to live with human trust. He didn't trust humans, so he killed that and replaced it with systems. But now he needs the society that thrives off such commie systems, and that's the system he built. gets what he deserves.

    Replies: @randomerican

    Not the person you’re replying to but

    >do you not understand how many bridges at MIT he burned in the last few decades?

    Since I don’t know him, I don’t–care to share?

    I’m not sure what you mean by this:

    >What legal hell would he drop a roommate or landlord into? what are the chances he’d find something wrong with your policies, your property, your financial arrangements? and then what would he unleash on you?

    He doesn’t seem very powerful, so what kind of thing do you expect he could do? Refuse to move out when you want him to? What else?

  98. Stallman can go to occupied Palestine
    occupy a home, pick a home, any home,
    easy job, taxi service.

    US taxpayer will foot the costs.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @bjondo

    US assistance comes to 1% of Israel's GDP.
    So it's amazing how far that assistance goes (in some people's minds): paying for the army, settling Jewish immigrants, populating the territories, buying the US Congress, and more. It's the modern loaves and fishes miracle!

    Replies: @bjondo

    , @bjondo
    @bjondo

    .

  99. Stallman spent his life expressing radical opinions, making enemies, and alienating people with his odd behavior. It sure is funny that he would be done in for some fairly mild remarks where he was sticking up for a dead friend who was unfairly accused.

    • Agree: International Jew
  100. @Anon
    This is an evergreen notice for him. I don't think he's had his own place for decades. He's blocked the Wayback Machine so I can't check, but every time I've looked at his site there's been a variation of this autistic rock-band-tour-rider style "seeking lodgings" notice. It has nothing to do with his "cancellation."

    Replies: @European-American

    Thanks for pointing out that Steve’s “update” is nothing new.

    One of many negative consequences of being canceled is that it brings a new burst of the worst kind of fame, where everyone assumes they know everything about you after a few minutes of research, and feel entitled to judge you and sh*t on you. I imagine hardly anyone could withstand this kind of casually (and often unintentionally) injurious scrutiny.

  101. Stallman’s Lefty bona-fides look pretty solid, but “per” white-(male-)ness, naturally, proves fatal.
    Check out “per” politics blog, it’s a laff riot.
    https://www.stallman.org/archives/2019-jul-oct.html

  102. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Jack D


    ...you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US.
     
    You are in South Dakota (and likely some other states; I doubt we're the only one).

    But this can be circumvented through a bequest of one (1) dollar. The adopted son (who used to rape my then-prepubescent wife) will be getting a single dollar when my father-in-law passes.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    I’m not an expert in SD law but I doubt this is the law there. The reason you leave someone $1 is to foreclose any argument that you just forgot to mention them in your will and if you had remembered you would have given them their fair share. Maybe this made sense when people had 10 or 12 kids and you might not remember all their names.

  103. @Johann Ricke
    @Lot


    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.
     
    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot, @Anonymous, @Pericles

    “ China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. ”

    The obstacle to Linux adoption in China was the Chinese all pirated Windows.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lot

    Microsoft actually preferred people pirate Windows than run Linux.

    Microsoft could effectively put the kibosh on Windows piracy but they chose not to do that. Just as Apple could stop Hackintoshing, but won't.

  104. @Lot
    @Johann Ricke

    “ China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. ”

    The obstacle to Linux adoption in China was the Chinese all pirated Windows.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Microsoft actually preferred people pirate Windows than run Linux.

    Microsoft could effectively put the kibosh on Windows piracy but they chose not to do that. Just as Apple could stop Hackintoshing, but won’t.

  105. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Jack D


    ...you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US.
     
    You are in South Dakota (and likely some other states; I doubt we're the only one).

    But this can be circumvented through a bequest of one (1) dollar. The adopted son (who used to rape my then-prepubescent wife) will be getting a single dollar when my father-in-law passes.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Not a lawyer but AFAIK you can specifically state that a certain person gets nothing. Is usually upheld in court, the same as if you gave them $1 (but for some reason I’m told $20 is considered the default ‘fuck you’ bequest).

    I had a friend’s dad that left his son in law and daughter all of his “yachts, aircraft, automobiles made before 1948 and considered CCCA Classics, golf equipment and Patek Phillippe or Rolex watches, and a US Gold Certificate for $10 serial number xxxxxx”. He owned none of the above except the bill which had at the time zero numismatic value over face. They were pissed to say the least.

    John Lear, Bill Lear’s idiot son who was on Fart Smell all the time with his crazy alien and moon hoax stories, was famously left $1 in his father’s will.

  106. @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke


    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.
     
    That would be true for desktop applications in terms of user interface and 'friendliness" but not at all true for server side software.

    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.

    The Macintosh was literally double the cost of the typical white box PC clone. It was never a contest. If the price difference were $70, the Apple Macintosh would be the dominant standard today, not Windows PC’s.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Johann Ricke

    Right, plus it was much easier to create, for instance, a cash register system using Windows boxes rather than Mac hardware. Gates didn't give a damn what you did with the OS after you bought it. Steve made sure you did it the Apple way, or not at all.

    Case in point, all the Redbox kiosks nati0n wide run Window.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  107. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    It would be fun to have a league of colleges where the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body, so their teams are representative of their students.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @eah, @Olorin

    the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body

    Perhaps moving down to Division II is also an option, one which on the surface seems more appropriate for West Point (and the other military academies), where undergrad enrollment, at just over 4k, is relatively small, ie probably significantly less than the Division I average — no doubt this would have financial consequences.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Ibound1, @Billy Shears, @Olorin

  108. @Redneck farmer
    @Realist

    And if Stallman was an Australian woman....

    Replies: @Realist

    And if Stallman was an Australian woman….

    He may be yet…he’s weird enough to do the snip.

  109. @ScarletNumber
    @Lot

    This is interesting to me, because up until fairly recently, presidents didn't even receive a pension. The Former Presidents Act wasn't passed until 1958, specifically to help Harry Truman. Herbert Hoover was also eligible, but didn't need the money. He took it anyway to avoid embarrassing Truman.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @FPD72

    When Garfield was assassinated, Congress voted his widow a pension, the first presidential widow to be so supported. It was then noticed that Sarah Polk, widow of the 11th president, was still alive, some 32 years after her husband’s death soon after he left office. She was then given a pension of $5,000 a year.

    Dying of throat cancer, Grant spent his last days furiously writing his autobiography in order to provide for his soon-to-be-widowed wife. I guess he was personally innocent of the financial corruption that characterized his administration.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @FPD72

    Grant's autobiography, written while dying, is a fine piece of prose.

  110. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Johann Ricke
    @Lot


    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.
     
    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot, @Anonymous, @Pericles

    Open source wasn’t the real casualty, but other commercial software like BeOS, which literally could not get PC vendors to offer the software for free.

    NeXT would have faced the same issue but they had to pay licensors of code they licensed chunks of it from so much per OS license issued they didn’t even have that option. NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.
     
    The tweaks to the physical design vs a bog standard PC that Jobs made was what made it so expensive. It's incredible that he finally compromised his vision when he joined Apple and folded NeXT into the Mac operating system, veered away from the costly NeXT box design *and* adopted the Intel chip as cost savings measures. That, no one saw coming.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

  111. @FPD72
    @ScarletNumber

    When Garfield was assassinated, Congress voted his widow a pension, the first presidential widow to be so supported. It was then noticed that Sarah Polk, widow of the 11th president, was still alive, some 32 years after her husband’s death soon after he left office. She was then given a pension of $5,000 a year.

    Dying of throat cancer, Grant spent his last days furiously writing his autobiography in order to provide for his soon-to-be-widowed wife. I guess he was personally innocent of the financial corruption that characterized his administration.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Grant’s autobiography, written while dying, is a fine piece of prose.

  112. @eah
    @Steve Sailer

    the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body

    Perhaps moving down to Division II is also an option, one which on the surface seems more appropriate for West Point (and the other military academies), where undergrad enrollment, at just over 4k, is relatively small, ie probably significantly less than the Division I average -- no doubt this would have financial consequences.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Steve Sailer

    You attended Rice twenty years too late. The Owls crushed Alabama in the 1954 Cotton Bowl behind a record setting performance by halfback Dicky Moegle. For the game, Moegle rushed for 265 yards on 11 carries for an average of 24.1 yards per attempt, including credit for a 95 yard touchdown run when Bama’s Tommy Lewis ran off the bench and tackled Moegle as he ran by the Crimson Tide bench.

    In the late 1950s the Owls had two future NFL quarterbacks on the same roster: King Hill and Dr. Frank Ryan. Tommy Kramer, who graduated in 1977, was also an effective NFL QB.

    , @Ibound1
    @Steve Sailer

    Call it the “Chip Hilton League”.

    That’s a test to see who remembers America.

    Replies: @FPD72

    , @Billy Shears
    @Steve Sailer

    BYU might qualify.

    , @Olorin
    @Steve Sailer


    The 3 military academies
     
    --West Point
    --Annapolis
    --CO Springs

    I presume you mean.

    What about:

    --New London (you're surely not leaving out Objee?)

    Quantico has no teams iirc, but Kings Point does.

  113. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Ibound1, @Billy Shears, @Olorin

    You attended Rice twenty years too late. The Owls crushed Alabama in the 1954 Cotton Bowl behind a record setting performance by halfback Dicky Moegle. For the game, Moegle rushed for 265 yards on 11 carries for an average of 24.1 yards per attempt, including credit for a 95 yard touchdown run when Bama’s Tommy Lewis ran off the bench and tackled Moegle as he ran by the Crimson Tide bench.

    In the late 1950s the Owls had two future NFL quarterbacks on the same roster: King Hill and Dr. Frank Ryan. Tommy Kramer, who graduated in 1977, was also an effective NFL QB.

  114. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    The big problem with all the non-x86 architectures was getting the latest fab processes dedicated to them. x86-64 has outpaced the various RISC chips badly in terms of the available parts at any time point. That's what killed the workstationeers, commodity Lintel was faster.

    Going the opposite way-specialized baroque architectures like a 72 bit PDP-10 extension, or a LispM Ivory like tagged word processor or a Forth/PostScript customized processor might be a better tactic than yet another fungible short instruction set CPU. But thet's just a wild unscientific guess.

    The availability of good free Unix has pretty well killed OS development in new directions. Bell Labs' own Plan 9 and Inferno have died out, and now all that is left outside the IBM EBCDIC mainframe/midframe world is Windows and Unix.

    Technically, there are alternatives:

    https://www.haiku-os.org/about/
    https://www.morphos-team.net/intro
    https://www.riscosopen.org/content/

    http://www.vitanuova.com/inferno/
    https://9p.io/plan9/

    And last but not least, God's Own Operating System:
    https://templeos.org/

    Replies: @Counterinsurgency, @Jack D, @James N. Kennett

    As an alternative to Windows and Unix, don’t forget Fuchsia OS which is being developed by Google:

    https://fuchsia.dev/fuchsia-src
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fuchsia

  115. RMS’s best non-technical work, the GNU Public License v2, permits companies such as IBM, Intel, and HP to cooperate on Linux kernel development.

    The alternative before this was software source code held in company stovepipes, and collaboration possible only with NDAs.

    The GPL v2 is a social invention that has conferred huge benefits, not only to individuals but to capitalist enterprises. This is not a bad achievement for someone who has communist leanings and is thought to be on the autistic spectrum.

    • Agree: Aft
  116. @Olorin
    I know of an available no-tech house adjacent to the Olympic Peninsula. But last I was there, physical mass transit to MIT/Beanburg was nonexistent. DSL an option but not in place. No dogs, no cats, but a good number of elk.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    You’ve not said to where enquiries may be addressed.

  117. @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke

    Open source wasn’t the real casualty, but other commercial software like BeOS, which literally could not get PC vendors to offer the software for free.

    NeXT would have faced the same issue but they had to pay licensors of code they licensed chunks of it from so much per OS license issued they didn’t even have that option. NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.

    The tweaks to the physical design vs a bog standard PC that Jobs made was what made it so expensive. It’s incredible that he finally compromised his vision when he joined Apple and folded NeXT into the Mac operating system, veered away from the costly NeXT box design *and* adopted the Intel chip as cost savings measures. That, no one saw coming.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke

    NeXT was originally a hardware entity which spent like drunken sailors building a state of the art electronic assembly plant and designing physically cool hardware. It was beautiful. They built a software environment by licensing all sorts of super cool stuff like Display PostScript. It was a truly WYSIWYG environment. (Of course PostScript guru Don Lancaster hated it, but he had a thickstun for Jobs stemming from some bullshit at the US Festival or something.)

    They were marketed as a workstation, not a personal computer. The problem was that they were on the Motorola 68040 for a good half decade after Sun, HP, SGI and DEC had all went to the short instruction set processors. At the end the cheapest low end Mac had the same CPU as a NeXT machine. They were wildly outclassed.

    So Jobs decided to junk his overpriced electronics operation and become software only. The software was for its day superb, in its user interface, it’s development suite, and in the body of apps developed for it and on it. What’s more, it ran on x86, Sun SPARC, PA-RISC and the old black 68k hardware.

    NeXTStep User was $999. Developer was $4999.

    For many businesses it was objectively (pun intended...) worth it but none were going to pay it. For home users it was out of the question unless as I did you paid $300 to a college student to get the academic bundle. But I was also the only person I ever even met that bought a brand new SPARCstation for home use either.

    Apple decided that Mac OS Classic was a museum piece, a coelacanth of Lycoming proportions, and decided they were going to buy an outside OS. They immediately and, at the time seemingly foolishly, limited the selection to NeXT and BeOS.

    The deciding factor apparently came down to Jean-Louis Gassee being an even bigger cunt than Jobs to the board.

    But in buying NeXT they had several issues. One was that to bend this new OS without paying ruinous license fees they had to heavily bowdlerize it, losing many of the key features that made it cool. Also, it had to run on yet another architecture, PowerPC. Apple did not again change Mac architectures for several more years.

    Apple bought NeXT around Christmas 1996 as I recall and NeXT went quiescent right after that. It was at least four more years before Mac OS X debuted and by then Microsoft had made huge strides in making something that resembled a real operating system

    As it turned out, iOS devices became Apple’s cash cow and the Mac is almost a footnote. Desktops have become a missing feature from many homes and even businesses.

    , @Anonymous
    @Johann Ricke

    NeXT hardware was completely bespoke with a completely unique architecture beyond the use of a 68k Motorola processor. it had nothing in common with Sun2/Sun3, Apollo, Mac, Atari or Amiga.

    It was expensive to build and way underpowered compared to a SSn5 or a hp 715, the contemporaries in its market.

  118. @BenKenobi
    @Pericles

    Red pill me on Mozilla — why are they to be distrusted? My browser is Firefox with the DuckDuckGo plug-in.

    What can I be doing better?

    Replies: @Pericles

    Mozilla’s activist workers ousted Brendan Eich (invented Javascript) for once upon a time donating against gay marriage. They give money to anarchists in Seattle. I seem to recall there are a lot of gross people involved with Rust. It goes on. In short, they are a lot of degenerates who took over a project with money (though they are at least not entirely dedicated to giving the till away to their activist pals). Anyway, I’ve stayed away since Eich.

  119. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna

    This is a big BS story. Now that he's dead, the mistress is free to put words in his mouth. During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?) but he did support her - gave them rent money, paid for her private education, etc. and now the daughter is a successful actress and full grown adult. This is an old story (so old that it is found in the Bible - Jakobson is Jacob's son) - the clever Jew who swindles the naive half sibling out of his inheritance. Marina and mom were not hayseeds. They could have gone to a lawyer, gotten something in writing, recorded a phone call - something, anything. They had decades to work on this. But they so loved and trusted Jakobson that they relied on his promise to give them a "big surprise". And now the dead man speaks. C'mon.

    Even if she was his child, you are not required to give any inheritance to your children in the US. The estate has offered them a small "go away" settlement but they are holding out for more. How much is a "nice surprise" from a man worth $100M? A $100,oo0? $1,000,000? $10M?

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe, @Bill, @Mr McKenna, @Pericles

    During his lifetime, he never publicly acknowledged the love child (who knows if it is even really his?)

    Well, seems straightforward enough to check whether they’re related in our modern world.

  120. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Ibound1, @Billy Shears, @Olorin

    Call it the “Chip Hilton League”.

    That’s a test to see who remembers America.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Ibound1

    I remember, and I grieve for what we have lost.

    My favorites were the Bronc Burnet books, a series of 27 football, baseball, and scouting novels for adolescent boys set in Sonora, New Mexico, written by Wilfred McCormick between 1948 and 1967. McCormick spoke at my school around 1964.

    Bee, McCormick, and Heinlein were my favorite authors during my late elementary and junior high years.

    Replies: @Ibound1

  121. @Johann Ricke
    @Lot


    Gates wisely but illegally made the PC makers license Windows on total PC sales, not total PC with Windows sales.

    So in 1998, Dell would have paid $70 to MS per PC it sold, with Windows or without. It was impossible for Dell to sell a PC with Linux instead of Windows and pass the savings to consumers.

    Eventually he was forced to stop this practice, but by then the Internet bubble of 1996-2001 had popped and the investor money that might had backed consumer Linux companies had dried up.
     
    I believe this was US only. Elsewhere, Dell passed the savings on. But there were few takers. China tried to get people to adopt Red Flag Unix. Nothing doing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Flag_Linux

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart. From the end user standpoint, installing Unix instead of Windows was like putting your arm in a sling, through the life of the computer, for a one-time $70 payment. It was a lousy trade.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Lot, @Anonymous, @Pericles

    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart.

    In particular, there was no Office on Unix, the second moat if you will. Nowadays this is not really an issue. Likewise, there were lots of windows-specific third party applications. Most of those are no longer exclusive, or have migrated to the cloud. A third problem was device drivers, which were often Windows-only too.

    By the way, Macos/OSX/… is a consumer Unix/BSD-derivative with a very competitive software environment, blinkenlights and all.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Pericles

    Gates famously said, “Develop for NeXT? I’ll piss on it”.

    Though you have to ask how many people really needed Office. Word had a lot of advanced features that were invaluable to legal or medical secretaries, but no one else used them.

    NeXT came with basic text, spreadsheet and email tools that met most people’s needs, and if I recall WordPerfect was available.

    Where I work now email is all through internal webmail (you are allowed to set up Thunderbird, no one does) and any word processing I do is on Wordpad. They won’t let us run emacs on the grounds everyone will start writing games in Lisp instead of working. Some of the people I work with probably would.

  122. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Ibound1, @Billy Shears, @Olorin

    BYU might qualify.

  123. @Pericles
    @BB753

    It could be a great modern odd couple show. Greta buys a parrot. Stallman doesn't want to take a bath. Greta decides she's a boy. They mix up their SSRIs. The possibilities are endless.

    In season 2, Stallman has to get a new job every episode to pay the rent. More comedy!

    Replies: @Pericles, @BB753

    In the last season, Greta finds out Stallman is his biological father! Meanwhile, her legal father is transitioning to a woman. There’s enough material for 45 seasons at least!

    • Replies: @Aft
    @BB753

    Gives

    "This is all wrong!" "You have stolen my childhood!"

    new meaning.

  124. @bjondo
    Stallman can go to occupied Palestine
    occupy a home, pick a home, any home,
    easy job, taxi service.

    US taxpayer will foot the costs.

    Replies: @International Jew, @bjondo

    US assistance comes to 1% of Israel’s GDP.
    So it’s amazing how far that assistance goes (in some people’s minds): paying for the army, settling Jewish immigrants, populating the territories, buying the US Congress, and more. It’s the modern loaves and fishes miracle!

    • Replies: @bjondo
    @International Jew

    US assistance comes to whatever Israel needs
    Jewry can steal, strongarm.
    Now, come up with real %.

    Replies: @International Jew

  125. @bjondo
    Stallman can go to occupied Palestine
    occupy a home, pick a home, any home,
    easy job, taxi service.

    US taxpayer will foot the costs.

    Replies: @International Jew, @bjondo

    .

  126. @International Jew
    @bjondo

    US assistance comes to 1% of Israel's GDP.
    So it's amazing how far that assistance goes (in some people's minds): paying for the army, settling Jewish immigrants, populating the territories, buying the US Congress, and more. It's the modern loaves and fishes miracle!

    Replies: @bjondo

    US assistance comes to whatever Israel needs
    Jewry can steal, strongarm.
    Now, come up with real %.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @bjondo

    Assistance in 2014 was $3.1 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel%E2%80%93United_States_relations

    Israel's GDP this year is estimated at $390 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel
    You can deflate that back to 2014 and you get to the 1% I stated (in fact a little less).

    So, you're surprised? You thought Israel was a basket case like Haiti where foreign assistance really does come to a big chunk of GDP?

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon's budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet's budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    And don't forget that Israel is obligated to spend 75% of that $3.1 in the US. So really, it's more a subsidy to Boeing, than to Israel.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

  127. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    It would be fun to have a league of colleges where the athletes have just as high test scores as the student body, so their teams are representative of their students.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @eah, @Olorin

    The Ivy League used to be this.

  128. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    When I was at Rice in the 1970s, it had about 2600 undergrads and was the smallest college to play big time college football (poorly). We routinely got crushed by teams with Heisman winners (e.g., Earl Campbell and Billy Sims).

    The military academies should form a conference with a few other colleges that have rules like average weight of football team no greater than 200 pounds and SAT score no lower than 1100. The 3 military academies, Stanford, Rice, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia Tech, etc.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Ibound1, @Billy Shears, @Olorin

    The 3 military academies

    –West Point
    –Annapolis
    –CO Springs

    I presume you mean.

    What about:

    –New London (you’re surely not leaving out Objee?)

    Quantico has no teams iirc, but Kings Point does.

  129. @eah
    OT

    2017 -- Open Letter to Grads from LTC(ret) Heffington

    (This was written by LTC (USA, ret.) Robert M. Heffington, as an open letter to graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. It has only been edited for format, and may differ in that respect from the original. My apologies to Lt. Colonel Heffington if this has been misrepresented in any way)

    ...However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006–2009 and again from 2013–2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open.

    First and foremost, standards at West Point are nonexistent. They exist on paper, but nowhere else. The senior administration at West Point inexplicably refuses to enforce West Point’s publicly touted high standards on cadets, and, having picked up on this, cadets refuse to enforce standards on each other. The Superintendent refuses to enforce admissions standards or the cadet Honor Code, the Dean refuses to enforce academic standards, and the Commandant refuses to enforce standards of conduct and discipline. The end result is a sort of malaise that pervades the entire institution. Nothing matters anymore. Cadets know this, and it has given rise to a level of cadet arrogance and entitlement the likes of which West Point has never seen in its history.

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. ...
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Aft, @Aft, @res

    I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. …

  130. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.
     
    The tweaks to the physical design vs a bog standard PC that Jobs made was what made it so expensive. It's incredible that he finally compromised his vision when he joined Apple and folded NeXT into the Mac operating system, veered away from the costly NeXT box design *and* adopted the Intel chip as cost savings measures. That, no one saw coming.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    NeXT was originally a hardware entity which spent like drunken sailors building a state of the art electronic assembly plant and designing physically cool hardware. It was beautiful. They built a software environment by licensing all sorts of super cool stuff like Display PostScript. It was a truly WYSIWYG environment. (Of course PostScript guru Don Lancaster hated it, but he had a thickstun for Jobs stemming from some bullshit at the US Festival or something.)

    They were marketed as a workstation, not a personal computer. The problem was that they were on the Motorola 68040 for a good half decade after Sun, HP, SGI and DEC had all went to the short instruction set processors. At the end the cheapest low end Mac had the same CPU as a NeXT machine. They were wildly outclassed.

    So Jobs decided to junk his overpriced electronics operation and become software only. The software was for its day superb, in its user interface, it’s development suite, and in the body of apps developed for it and on it. What’s more, it ran on x86, Sun SPARC, PA-RISC and the old black 68k hardware.

    NeXTStep User was $999. Developer was $4999.

    For many businesses it was objectively (pun intended…) worth it but none were going to pay it. For home users it was out of the question unless as I did you paid $300 to a college student to get the academic bundle. But I was also the only person I ever even met that bought a brand new SPARCstation for home use either.

    Apple decided that Mac OS Classic was a museum piece, a coelacanth of Lycoming proportions, and decided they were going to buy an outside OS. They immediately and, at the time seemingly foolishly, limited the selection to NeXT and BeOS.

    The deciding factor apparently came down to Jean-Louis Gassee being an even bigger cunt than Jobs to the board.

    But in buying NeXT they had several issues. One was that to bend this new OS without paying ruinous license fees they had to heavily bowdlerize it, losing many of the key features that made it cool. Also, it had to run on yet another architecture, PowerPC. Apple did not again change Mac architectures for several more years.

    Apple bought NeXT around Christmas 1996 as I recall and NeXT went quiescent right after that. It was at least four more years before Mac OS X debuted and by then Microsoft had made huge strides in making something that resembled a real operating system

    As it turned out, iOS devices became Apple’s cash cow and the Mac is almost a footnote. Desktops have become a missing feature from many homes and even businesses.

  131. @BB753
    @Pericles

    In the last season, Greta finds out Stallman is his biological father! Meanwhile, her legal father is transitioning to a woman. There's enough material for 45 seasons at least!

    Replies: @Aft

    Gives

    “This is all wrong!” “You have stolen my childhood!”

    new meaning.

    • LOL: BB753
  132. @eah
    OT

    2017 -- Open Letter to Grads from LTC(ret) Heffington

    (This was written by LTC (USA, ret.) Robert M. Heffington, as an open letter to graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. It has only been edited for format, and may differ in that respect from the original. My apologies to Lt. Colonel Heffington if this has been misrepresented in any way)

    ...However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006–2009 and again from 2013–2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open.

    First and foremost, standards at West Point are nonexistent. They exist on paper, but nowhere else. The senior administration at West Point inexplicably refuses to enforce West Point’s publicly touted high standards on cadets, and, having picked up on this, cadets refuse to enforce standards on each other. The Superintendent refuses to enforce admissions standards or the cadet Honor Code, the Dean refuses to enforce academic standards, and the Commandant refuses to enforce standards of conduct and discipline. The end result is a sort of malaise that pervades the entire institution. Nothing matters anymore. Cadets know this, and it has given rise to a level of cadet arrogance and entitlement the likes of which West Point has never seen in its history.

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. ...
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Aft, @Aft, @res

    Even the curriculum itself has suffered. The plebe American History course has been revamped to focus completely on race and on the narrative that America is founded solely on a history of racial oppression. Cadets derisively call it the “I Hate America Course.” Simultaneously, the plebe International History course now focuses on gender to the exclusion of many other important themes. On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).

    • Replies: @eah
    @Aft

    On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).

    I recently watched the George C Scott film 'Patton' again (link) -- in the dialogue, Patton shows great knowledge and interest in military history (I assume reflective of Patton himself) -- I further assume at least part of that is due to his time at West Point (he did come from a military family).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  133. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pericles
    @Johann Ricke


    The software available for Unix implementations was just not as good as its Windows counterpart.

     

    In particular, there was no Office on Unix, the second moat if you will. Nowadays this is not really an issue. Likewise, there were lots of windows-specific third party applications. Most of those are no longer exclusive, or have migrated to the cloud. A third problem was device drivers, which were often Windows-only too.

    By the way, Macos/OSX/... is a consumer Unix/BSD-derivative with a very competitive software environment, blinkenlights and all.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Gates famously said, “Develop for NeXT? I’ll piss on it”.

    Though you have to ask how many people really needed Office. Word had a lot of advanced features that were invaluable to legal or medical secretaries, but no one else used them.

    NeXT came with basic text, spreadsheet and email tools that met most people’s needs, and if I recall WordPerfect was available.

    Where I work now email is all through internal webmail (you are allowed to set up Thunderbird, no one does) and any word processing I do is on Wordpad. They won’t let us run emacs on the grounds everyone will start writing games in Lisp instead of working. Some of the people I work with probably would.

  134. @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    Then again, Mac Classic apps were genrally better than those for Win 3.1/95/98 and by not a small amount yet Macintosh never had great market share.
     
    The Macintosh was literally double the cost of the typical white box PC clone. It was never a contest. If the price difference were $70, the Apple Macintosh would be the dominant standard today, not Windows PC's.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Right, plus it was much easier to create, for instance, a cash register system using Windows boxes rather than Mac hardware. Gates didn’t give a damn what you did with the OS after you bought it. Steve made sure you did it the Apple way, or not at all.

    Case in point, all the Redbox kiosks nati0n wide run Window.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    The Apple II lent itself well to vertical markets, semi-embedded use, POS, test equipment controllers, et al. The Mac sucked at this. However, the Mac's NuBus architecture was ahead enough of ISA that it was used by Symbolics and TI as the host platform for their dedicated Lisp Machine hardware.

    Mac also failed utterly in the CAD/CAM world although the Rutans famously endorsed and used Ashlar Vellum, a CAD environment that competed with AutoCAD and Intergraph.

    Steve was not interested in these "boring and industrial " markets and did nothing to encourage people to in them to adopt Mac. Indeed, DOS was probably an ideal environment for single tasking apps that took over the whole machine because it was really just a monitor routine and program loader, not a real operating system that isolated user programs from the hardware.

    Steve did want the Mac to be in the video editing and composing space but it turned out that the lowly and, in many ways crude Commodore Amiga was more popular for that than the Mac. The killer app was made by a Topeka, Kansas company called Newtek. They were famous for having a hot but seemingly technically adept spokesmodel/ presenter named Kiki Stockhammer. (Actually Kiki was pretty smart and knowledgeable, but not a codehead herself. She was a huge company asset and well liked by all, even other females. )

    A great resource is http://basalgangster.macgui.com/RetroMacComputing/The_Long_View/The_Long_View.html

    And of course I can not resist:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLvTG5hwa1A

    I'm sure Jobs was pissed.

  135. @eah
    OT

    2017 -- Open Letter to Grads from LTC(ret) Heffington

    (This was written by LTC (USA, ret.) Robert M. Heffington, as an open letter to graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. It has only been edited for format, and may differ in that respect from the original. My apologies to Lt. Colonel Heffington if this has been misrepresented in any way)

    ...However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006–2009 and again from 2013–2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open.

    First and foremost, standards at West Point are nonexistent. They exist on paper, but nowhere else. The senior administration at West Point inexplicably refuses to enforce West Point’s publicly touted high standards on cadets, and, having picked up on this, cadets refuse to enforce standards on each other. The Superintendent refuses to enforce admissions standards or the cadet Honor Code, the Dean refuses to enforce academic standards, and the Commandant refuses to enforce standards of conduct and discipline. The end result is a sort of malaise that pervades the entire institution. Nothing matters anymore. Cadets know this, and it has given rise to a level of cadet arrogance and entitlement the likes of which West Point has never seen in its history.

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. ...
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Aft, @Aft, @res

    Well, I think we know why he topped out at LTC. And I consider that praise rather than scorn.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @res

    How many LTCs make full bird? And of those how many get a star?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  136. @Ibound1
    @Steve Sailer

    Call it the “Chip Hilton League”.

    That’s a test to see who remembers America.

    Replies: @FPD72

    I remember, and I grieve for what we have lost.

    My favorites were the Bronc Burnet books, a series of 27 football, baseball, and scouting novels for adolescent boys set in Sonora, New Mexico, written by Wilfred McCormick between 1948 and 1967. McCormick spoke at my school around 1964.

    Bee, McCormick, and Heinlein were my favorite authors during my late elementary and junior high years.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    @FPD72

    Bee (for me and my brothers) was supreme. We loved Chip. Although Bee definitely saw what was coming. Read Buzzer Basket, one of the later books. It’s practically not a kid’s book at all.

  137. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    NeXT had a commercial software suite that was of exceptionally good look and feel and UI and could have taken on Microsoft but for the exceptionally high price they had to charge. In 1996 you could have bought a computer with Windows and Office for the license fee for NeXT.
     
    The tweaks to the physical design vs a bog standard PC that Jobs made was what made it so expensive. It's incredible that he finally compromised his vision when he joined Apple and folded NeXT into the Mac operating system, veered away from the costly NeXT box design *and* adopted the Intel chip as cost savings measures. That, no one saw coming.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    NeXT hardware was completely bespoke with a completely unique architecture beyond the use of a 68k Motorola processor. it had nothing in common with Sun2/Sun3, Apollo, Mac, Atari or Amiga.

    It was expensive to build and way underpowered compared to a SSn5 or a hp 715, the contemporaries in its market.

  138. @bjondo
    @International Jew

    US assistance comes to whatever Israel needs
    Jewry can steal, strongarm.
    Now, come up with real %.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Assistance in 2014 was $3.1 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel%E2%80%93United_States_relations

    Israel’s GDP this year is estimated at $390 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel
    You can deflate that back to 2014 and you get to the 1% I stated (in fact a little less).

    So, you’re surprised? You thought Israel was a basket case like Haiti where foreign assistance really does come to a big chunk of GDP?

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon’s budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet’s budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    And don’t forget that Israel is obligated to spend 75% of that $3.1 in the US. So really, it’s more a subsidy to Boeing, than to Israel.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @International Jew

    Sorry, Seventh Fleet.

    , @Anonymous
    @International Jew

    But I don't want to subsidize Israel OR Boeing! They both are doing better than I am financially.

    , @Anonymous
    @International Jew


    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon’s budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet’s budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?
     
    So, we have established there are four subsidees that need cutting off from the federal tit: Israel, South Korea, Japan, and Boeing.

    Replies: @International Jew

  139. @International Jew
    @bjondo

    Assistance in 2014 was $3.1 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel%E2%80%93United_States_relations

    Israel's GDP this year is estimated at $390 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel
    You can deflate that back to 2014 and you get to the 1% I stated (in fact a little less).

    So, you're surprised? You thought Israel was a basket case like Haiti where foreign assistance really does come to a big chunk of GDP?

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon's budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet's budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    And don't forget that Israel is obligated to spend 75% of that $3.1 in the US. So really, it's more a subsidy to Boeing, than to Israel.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Sorry, Seventh Fleet.

  140. @International Jew
    @bjondo

    Assistance in 2014 was $3.1 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel%E2%80%93United_States_relations

    Israel's GDP this year is estimated at $390 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel
    You can deflate that back to 2014 and you get to the 1% I stated (in fact a little less).

    So, you're surprised? You thought Israel was a basket case like Haiti where foreign assistance really does come to a big chunk of GDP?

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon's budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet's budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    And don't forget that Israel is obligated to spend 75% of that $3.1 in the US. So really, it's more a subsidy to Boeing, than to Israel.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    But I don’t want to subsidize Israel OR Boeing! They both are doing better than I am financially.

  141. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    @bjondo

    Assistance in 2014 was $3.1 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel%E2%80%93United_States_relations

    Israel's GDP this year is estimated at $390 billion: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel
    You can deflate that back to 2014 and you get to the 1% I stated (in fact a little less).

    So, you're surprised? You thought Israel was a basket case like Haiti where foreign assistance really does come to a big chunk of GDP?

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon's budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet's budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    And don't forget that Israel is obligated to spend 75% of that $3.1 in the US. So really, it's more a subsidy to Boeing, than to Israel.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon’s budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet’s budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?

    So, we have established there are four subsidees that need cutting off from the federal tit: Israel, South Korea, Japan, and Boeing.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Anonymous

    And I'm inclined to agree with you. All I wanted to do in my comment was supply some factual grounding, and some perspective.

  142. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @Johann Ricke

    Right, plus it was much easier to create, for instance, a cash register system using Windows boxes rather than Mac hardware. Gates didn't give a damn what you did with the OS after you bought it. Steve made sure you did it the Apple way, or not at all.

    Case in point, all the Redbox kiosks nati0n wide run Window.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The Apple II lent itself well to vertical markets, semi-embedded use, POS, test equipment controllers, et al. The Mac sucked at this. However, the Mac’s NuBus architecture was ahead enough of ISA that it was used by Symbolics and TI as the host platform for their dedicated Lisp Machine hardware.

    Mac also failed utterly in the CAD/CAM world although the Rutans famously endorsed and used Ashlar Vellum, a CAD environment that competed with AutoCAD and Intergraph.

    Steve was not interested in these “boring and industrial ” markets and did nothing to encourage people to in them to adopt Mac. Indeed, DOS was probably an ideal environment for single tasking apps that took over the whole machine because it was really just a monitor routine and program loader, not a real operating system that isolated user programs from the hardware.

    Steve did want the Mac to be in the video editing and composing space but it turned out that the lowly and, in many ways crude Commodore Amiga was more popular for that than the Mac. The killer app was made by a Topeka, Kansas company called Newtek. They were famous for having a hot but seemingly technically adept spokesmodel/ presenter named Kiki Stockhammer. (Actually Kiki was pretty smart and knowledgeable, but not a codehead herself. She was a huge company asset and well liked by all, even other females. )

    A great resource is http://basalgangster.macgui.com/RetroMacComputing/The_Long_View/The_Long_View.html

    And of course I can not resist:

    I’m sure Jobs was pissed.

  143. @res
    @eah

    Well, I think we know why he topped out at LTC. And I consider that praise rather than scorn.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    How many LTCs make full bird? And of those how many get a star?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    Full bird colonel is where the slope of the promotion pyramid goes up quickly. Full colonels usually are given a command, and a combat command is best. If you keep your nose clean, you can probably do your 20 and retire as an LTC.

  144. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    An interesting tidbit I found:

    Remember Ted Waitt, the doofus founder of Gateway 2000?

    Waitt was romantically linked to Ghislaine Maxwell, after she ended her relationship with Jeffrey Epstein.[13]

    Ted Waitt

    Born January 18, 1963 (age 56)
    Sioux City, Iowa, U.S.
    Nationality American
    Known for Co-founder of Gateway, Inc.
    Net worth US$4.3 billion (1998)[1]
    Spouse(s) Joan Peschel (div.)
    Michele Merkin
    Children 4

    Theodore W. “Ted” Waitt (born January 18, 1963) is an American billionaire businessman and philanthropist. Waitt is a co-founder of Gateway, Inc..[2]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Waitt

    I mean, who’d of thunk??

  145. @Aft
    @eah


    Even the curriculum itself has suffered. The plebe American History course has been revamped to focus completely on race and on the narrative that America is founded solely on a history of racial oppression. Cadets derisively call it the “I Hate America Course.” Simultaneously, the plebe International History course now focuses on gender to the exclusion of many other important themes. On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).
     

    Replies: @eah

    On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).

    I recently watched the George C Scott film ‘Patton’ again (link) — in the dialogue, Patton shows great knowledge and interest in military history (I assume reflective of Patton himself) — I further assume at least part of that is due to his time at West Point (he did come from a military family).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    I presume Francis Ford Coppola, who wrote the "Patton" script, paid a lot of attention to military history.

    Replies: @FPD72

  146. @Anonymous
    @International Jew


    Israel is more in the category of South Korea or Japan. We subsidize them too, but because we actually have our own army stationed there to defend them, the cost comes out of the Pentagon’s budget. Our Navy too. I think we can fairly count, oh, 50% of the 2nd Fleet’s budget to a subsidy to Japan, S.Korea and Taiwan. How much you suppose that is?
     
    So, we have established there are four subsidees that need cutting off from the federal tit: Israel, South Korea, Japan, and Boeing.

    Replies: @International Jew

    And I’m inclined to agree with you. All I wanted to do in my comment was supply some factual grounding, and some perspective.

  147. @eah
    @Aft

    On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!).

    I recently watched the George C Scott film 'Patton' again (link) -- in the dialogue, Patton shows great knowledge and interest in military history (I assume reflective of Patton himself) -- I further assume at least part of that is due to his time at West Point (he did come from a military family).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I presume Francis Ford Coppola, who wrote the “Patton” script, paid a lot of attention to military history.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Steve Sailer

    Coppola’s and Ed North’s screenplay was based on the biography Patton: Ordeal and Triumph by Ladislas Farago and Omar Bradley's memoir A Soldier's Story.

  148. @Anonymous
    @res

    How many LTCs make full bird? And of those how many get a star?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Full bird colonel is where the slope of the promotion pyramid goes up quickly. Full colonels usually are given a command, and a combat command is best. If you keep your nose clean, you can probably do your 20 and retire as an LTC.

  149. @FPD72
    @Ibound1

    I remember, and I grieve for what we have lost.

    My favorites were the Bronc Burnet books, a series of 27 football, baseball, and scouting novels for adolescent boys set in Sonora, New Mexico, written by Wilfred McCormick between 1948 and 1967. McCormick spoke at my school around 1964.

    Bee, McCormick, and Heinlein were my favorite authors during my late elementary and junior high years.

    Replies: @Ibound1

    Bee (for me and my brothers) was supreme. We loved Chip. Although Bee definitely saw what was coming. Read Buzzer Basket, one of the later books. It’s practically not a kid’s book at all.

  150. @Steve Sailer
    @eah

    I presume Francis Ford Coppola, who wrote the "Patton" script, paid a lot of attention to military history.

    Replies: @FPD72

    Coppola’s and Ed North’s screenplay was based on the biography Patton: Ordeal and Triumph by Ladislas Farago and Omar Bradley’s memoir A Soldier’s Story.

  151. @Jack D
    @Dave2

    I understand that Ted Kaczynski is no longer using his cabin but it's not on the Red Line to Cambridge.

    Replies: @Alden, @Dave2

    The Unabomber cabin is presently in a museum in Washington DC. It could be moved again.

  152. @Fran Macadam
    @Sean

    "The delusions of being spied on are classic schizophrenia spectrum. "

    Except, everyone's communications are now spied on by "the intelligence community" for the purposes of Deep State control, even the President's.

    If you think there's no file on Stallman, you are nuts. Major corporations consider Free Software and Linux to be subversive and have in the past said so and taken actions against its distribution, while making enormous use of the code base themselves.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Hail, @Sean, @PetrOldSack

    The nexus Github and Microsoft, and greedy or stark blind coders.

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