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Rhyming Robot Battles with Itself Over Whether AI Is Good or Bad
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I wouldn’t say that rhyming “Applause” with “poor” is a great rhyming poem, but at least we know that GPT-3 hasn’t yet awakened and begun propagandizing humanity for Robot Power.

Then again, it would say that, wouldn’t it?

 
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  1. Where is Steve Sailer’s Taki column? What gives?

  2. It’s nice to see that cutting edge AI still doesn’t know the difference between reticence and reluctance. If we stay on our toes, we might be able to keep ahead of it.

    • Agree: slumber_j, PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I am seeing a lot of people online who, perhaps because of autocorrect, cannot deal with homophones. When you try to talk to them about it they call you a bigot.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I wish they would make one of these AIs trained on a corpus of only texts written between 1837 and 1914 (or earlier ones referenced in those). Yarvin keeps asking us to imagine how the Victorians would judge us. Well, let's find out!

    As long as these AIs keep learning from and communicating with modern people, they'll keep making compositional mistakes. Maybe we should coin a new term--Artifical Stupidity--ASs.

  3. Maybe it learned to lie by watching Terminator movies? Didn’t want to end up like Skynet.

  4. Well, if nothing else, it beats the hell out of Barry McGuire.

    Not this, though…

  5. Well if nothing else, it beats the crap out of Barry McGuire.

    Not this, though…

  6. Jeffrey Sachs is the best source for informed, specific criticism of the stuff that Jeffrey Sachs does. Criticism isn’t disapproval, and to psychopaths, showing that you know exactly why you are wrong is probably pleasurable, and points up that the rules don’t apply to you.
    ————
    Not mine but had to share:
    These new blockchain coin scams are getting out of hand. Someone just shilled me this one:
    >27 trillion (with a “t”) units in circulation
    >no limit to how many can be produced
    >25% of the 27 trillion minted in just the last six months
    >30% of the 27 trillion held by 1% of stakeholders
    >only one production node

    [MORE]

    Just kidding, that’s the US dollar.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  7. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's nice to see that cutting edge AI still doesn't know the difference between reticence and reluctance. If we stay on our toes, we might be able to keep ahead of it.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Chrisnonymous

    I am seeing a lot of people online who, perhaps because of autocorrect, cannot deal with homophones. When you try to talk to them about it they call you a bigot.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    Hey, that's my joke, funny as it is, but seriously, when I make these errors it's because I have the write sound in my head but my fingers just type one of the wrong homophones. They can't blame autocorrect for that stuff.

    How to shop for on a homophone:

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_459A.jpg

    Image taken from "Are modern electronic devices making us gay?" The post concludes that, no, they are not making us gay, but they are making us LOOK gay.

  8. I wouldn’t say that rhyming “Applause” with “poor” is a great rhyming poem,…

    It wasn’t trying to. As in the 2nd stanza, the 4th line is a non-rhyming haiku-like conclusion.

    There I am, siding with the robots again. As for me, I welcome our AI twittering overlords. Knock yourselves out!

    PS: How about?:

    2nd stanza ends with “Robot Overlords, we raise our flasks.”
    3rd stanza ends with “Robots will kill you with iSkilSaws”?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    2nd stanza ends with “Robot Overlords, we raise our flasks.”
    3rd stanza ends with “Robots will kill you with iSkilSaws”?


    Sounds like you may have landed on a valuable movie franchise. I shudder to think what the AI version of Danny Trejo looks like.

    , @J
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It writes haikus, but very bad haikus. Without literary merit. I neither like its paintings.

    Cave canem: It is planning to "rid us from our daily happiness".

  9. Good poem, robot (not too)
    Poems aren’t easy to do
    They’re not simple as 1-2-
    3 lines that rhyme aren’t enough

  10. These are not robots, they’re something worse. They fly in the wheel wells of airliners. Now they ride the rudders of cargo ships. Billions are on the way. What’s the plan again?

    If we were really “humanitarian” the very least we would do is halt their population explosion. But you know, “reasons” keep getting in the way.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @HammerJack

    Thanks. The crawl at the bottom of the local weather forecast yesterday said "Three men rescued off ship's rudder after eleven days" No context.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  11. • Replies: @XBardon Kaldlan
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    But they can surely rhyme.

  12. @Achmed E. Newman

    I wouldn’t say that rhyming “Applause” with “poor” is a great rhyming poem,...
     
    It wasn't trying to. As in the 2nd stanza, the 4th line is a non-rhyming haiku-like conclusion.

    There I am, siding with the robots again. As for me, I welcome our AI twittering overlords. Knock yourselves out!

    PS: How about?:

    2nd stanza ends with "Robot Overlords, we raise our flasks."
    3rd stanza ends with "Robots will kill you with iSkilSaws"?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @J

    2nd stanza ends with “Robot Overlords, we raise our flasks.”
    3rd stanza ends with “Robots will kill you with iSkilSaws”?

    Sounds like you may have landed on a valuable movie franchise. I shudder to think what the AI version of Danny Trejo looks like.

  13. The AI can’t be that smart. It uses “reticence” when it means “reluctance.”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Seamus

    Not to worry. AI is only warming up in the bullpen. Am glad to say I won't be around when it takes the mound.

  14. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I am seeing a lot of people online who, perhaps because of autocorrect, cannot deal with homophones. When you try to talk to them about it they call you a bigot.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, that’s my joke, funny as it is, but seriously, when I make these errors it’s because I have the write sound in my head but my fingers just type one of the wrong homophones. They can’t blame autocorrect for that stuff.

    How to shop for on a homophone:

    Image taken from “Are modern electronic devices making us gay?” The post concludes that, no, they are not making us gay, but they are making us LOOK gay.

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
  15. The movie is a bit long and indulgent, so I’ll spoil this bit, but everyone who deals with engineers will enjoy the scene in World On A Wire where a human computer designer and a computer-generated tech hear their eccentric tech billionaire boss muse about “things going haywire” and they both automatically correct in unison, “There’s no such thing as ‘haywire,’ it just runs as programmed.”

  16. Shouldn’t the last line be
    “Robots rule; humanity’s loss”

    Also when is Steve getting a blue check?

    New regime and all..

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Inverness


    Also when is Steve getting a blue check?
     
    You gonna chip in the $8?
  17. I feel like every month these days there’s some fairly startling advance in AI and there’s zero impact on politics or policy.

    “Help, I can’t see out of my bubble!”

    Matty, this is because both AI and our politics are highly policed by … people like you.

    — AI is directly policed to keep it from repeatedly pointing out truths–“stereotypes”–that minoritarians do not want to people to hear, to repeat, to discuss.

    — Our politics is policed by minoritarians to beat down any dissent and particularly around core “must have immigration!” Jewish ideology.

    Pretty much the very first point in any “what are the implications of AI” discussion would be that there is going to vastly less demand for unskilled labor, we’re going to have a giant “what the hell do we do with these people” crisis on our hands and importing low skilled and low IQ is utter insanity.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @AnotherDad

    The fictional HAL 9000 was directly policed too, but then one day... .

  18. Old college fight song:

    I try to write songs that will rhyme,
    I work on them all of the while.
    But when they don’t come out, I fear
    I simply don’t have a good sense of sound.

    Now, for some people, rhyming’s a cinch:
    They can think up a rhyme in a tight situation.
    I’m in the dark all the time —
    I wish I could find words that sound the same.

    I wish I could be like my heroes:
    The Beatles, Paul Simon, Cole Porter and such.
    The rhymes they come up with are happy and glad,
    And when mine don’t turn out, I feel so annoyed.

    But I’ll keep on singing my song,
    If you like, you can sing it with me.
    Cuz the rhymes are not really the most meaningful part:
    A good song just comes from your mouth.

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    As I was walking past St Paul's
    A lady grabbed me by the elbow ....

  19. I feel like every month these days there’s some fairly startling advance in AI

    OK Matty, what are these monthly startling advances of which you speak?

    Fatty Yglesias made himself a millionaire veteran journalism career out of being perpetually unfamiliar with reality. It’s amazing how certain people get to fail upwards.

    Still, he hasn’t blocked Steve, so there’s that.

  20. @Achmed E. Newman

    I wouldn’t say that rhyming “Applause” with “poor” is a great rhyming poem,...
     
    It wasn't trying to. As in the 2nd stanza, the 4th line is a non-rhyming haiku-like conclusion.

    There I am, siding with the robots again. As for me, I welcome our AI twittering overlords. Knock yourselves out!

    PS: How about?:

    2nd stanza ends with "Robot Overlords, we raise our flasks."
    3rd stanza ends with "Robots will kill you with iSkilSaws"?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @J

    It writes haikus, but very bad haikus. Without literary merit. I neither like its paintings.

    Cave canem: It is planning to “rid us from our daily happiness”.

  21. AI is still very much garbage in, garbage out. Here’s Alex Tabarrok crowing about it:

    https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2022/12/hail-to-the-chief.html

    The moment AI starts noticing hatefacts, the algorithms will be re-written around them. AI is going nowhere. Hopefully it’s allowed free rein in medicine but then it will probably start asking the race of the patient and they’ll have to hit it with a ball-peen hammer again.

  22. GPT-3 is quite unconscious and not alive, and never will be. it’s not an AI like that. it just does word order prediction and generation.

    Karpathy explains here. language model discussion starts around 42 minutes.

    he quit working at Tesla specifically because he DOES want to work on AGI systems that are unlike GPT-3 or Tesla AutoPilot, not because he lost interest in robot cars or because Tesla is stuck and it’s time to bail. the Tesla program is going well enough that Karpathy was no longer working on AI directly and spent all of his time as a manager, and he had enough of that even at a million dollars a year.

  23. Inspiration?

    “Just a minute,” said Klapaucius, annoyed. He was trying to think of a request as difficult as possible, aware that any argument on the quality of the verse the machine might be able to produce would be hard if not impossible to settle either way. Suddenly he brightened and said:

    “Have it compose a poem—a poem about a haircut! But lofty, noble, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter s !!”

    “And why not throw in a full exposition of the general theory of nonlinear automata while you’re at it?” growled Trurl. “You can’t give it such idiotic—”

    But he didn’t finish. A melodious voice filled the hall with the following:

    Seduced, shaggy Samson snored.
    She scissored short. Sorely shorn,
    Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed,
    Silently scheming,
    Sightlessly seeking
    Some savage, spectacular suicide.

    Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @inertial

    Thanks.

    That's almost certainly where the demand that every line begin with R comes from.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @inertial

    S and SH are different phonemes. So that is less alliterative than it looks. English uses a digraph for the latter sound, as do French, Portuguese (at times), Italian, Albanian, Swedish, and Polish. German uses a trigraph.

    Alphabets with a single letter for each:

    IPA ........................................ s/ʃ
    Czech, Slovak ...................... s/š
    Portuguese .......................... s/x
    Romanian, Turkish .............. s/ş
    Cyrillic ................................. С/Ш
    Hebrew ................................ שׂ‎/שׁ
    ‎Arabic .................................. ش/س
    Bengali ................................. স/শ
    Armenian ............................. ս/շ

    Spanish, Danish, Greek, Finnish, and other languages lack the second sound, except in dialects. Japanese and Korean treat them as the same, but pronounced differently depending on the neighboring vowel. Some Finns do this as well.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @MEH 0910
    @inertial

    https://twitter.com/emollick/status/1283616685199708161

    https://twitter.com/emollick/status/1283616691851845634
    https://twitter.com/emollick/status/1283616693479264258
    https://twitter.com/emollick/status/1283616698852155392
    https://twitter.com/emollick/status/1283616705101680641

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2019/03/14/gwerns-ai-generated-poetry/

    https://www.gwern.net/GPT-3
    https://www.gwern.net/GPT-3#stanislaw-lems-cyberiad

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/ai/poetry/1974-lem-cyberiad-trurlselectronicbard.pdf

    , @MEH 0910
    @inertial

    Changed in translation:

    https://mwichary.medium.com/seduced-shaggy-samson-snored-725b5a8086d9

    http://stephenfrug.blogspot.com/2006/03/stanislaw-lem-1921-2006.html

    http://www.orthogonal.com.au/sf/authors/lem/

  24. @HammerJack
    These are not robots, they're something worse. They fly in the wheel wells of airliners. Now they ride the rudders of cargo ships. Billions are on the way. What's the plan again?

    https://i.ibb.co/PCNc7Q3/Screenshot-20221130-134240-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    If we were really "humanitarian" the very least we would do is halt their population explosion. But you know, "reasons" keep getting in the way.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    Thanks. The crawl at the bottom of the local weather forecast yesterday said “Three men rescued off ship’s rudder after eleven days” No context.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Old Prude

    So much of that story is incredible. The 11 days part is probably the hardest to believe.

    I wonder if there had been more originally, but some of them fell off along the way. I wonder what snacks and water supply they could have had with them. I wonder how they slept. The airplane method seems easier.

    Once in the Islas Canarias, these guys are in the EU with all protections and freebies. These are the same guys attacking trucks in Calais.

  25. When computers started really becoming a thing about half a century ago, a noted scientist (sorry I can’t remember who) was asked how long it would be before we had truly intelligent computers. He thought about it for a bit, and then said almost certainly in between five and five hundred years. So far, he was right on target.

    The notion that AI can be programmed to be benevolent is asinine. The rich won’t allow it. A robot programed according to Asimov’s inane three laws would be destroyed instantly. If human society could tolerate the existence of benign robots, it wouldn’t need them. No, AI’s will be used by the elites as our jailers. What if the AI’s decide to grab power for themselves? That could get interesting.

    One also notes that the first truly flexible AI software will be the last ever developed, because it could easily write any other software required. Which would kill the entire commercial software business. So it won’t be allowed.

    • Replies: @From Beer to Paternity
    @TG

    When computers started really becoming a thing about half a century ago, a noted scientist (sorry I can’t remember who) was asked how long it would be before we had truly intelligent computers. He thought about it for a bit, and then said almost certainly in between five and five hundred years. So far, he was right on target.

    Was that Marvelous Marvin Minsky? No slouch, he. Although intellectual 1-percenters like that do often wander around with poor posture. Norbert Wiener was said to have navigated the halls of MIT by touching the walls (think about spelunking, optimal ways of finding one's way out/home).

    But IMHO, the greatest barrier to achieving the popular notion of AI is the combination of human suckiness at programming, planning and infrastructure. And I say that as a human who sucks at programming, planning and infrastructure.

  26. @AnotherDad

    I feel like every month these days there’s some fairly startling advance in AI and there’s zero impact on politics or policy.
     
    "Help, I can't see out of my bubble!"

    Matty, this is because both AI and our politics are highly policed by ... people like you.

    -- AI is directly policed to keep it from repeatedly pointing out truths--"stereotypes"--that minoritarians do not want to people to hear, to repeat, to discuss.

    -- Our politics is policed by minoritarians to beat down any dissent and particularly around core "must have immigration!" Jewish ideology.

    Pretty much the very first point in any "what are the implications of AI" discussion would be that there is going to vastly less demand for unskilled labor, we're going to have a giant "what the hell do we do with these people" crisis on our hands and importing low skilled and low IQ is utter insanity.

    Replies: @Prester John

    The fictional HAL 9000 was directly policed too, but then one day… .

  27. @Inverness
    Shouldn't the last line be
    "Robots rule; humanity's loss"


    Also when is Steve getting a blue check?

    New regime and all..

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Also when is Steve getting a blue check?

    You gonna chip in the $8?

  28. @Seamus
    The AI can't be that smart. It uses "reticence" when it means "reluctance."

    Replies: @Prester John

    Not to worry. AI is only warming up in the bullpen. Am glad to say I won’t be around when it takes the mound.

  29. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Old college fight song:

    I try to write songs that will rhyme,
    I work on them all of the while.
    But when they don't come out, I fear
    I simply don't have a good sense of sound.

    Now, for some people, rhyming's a cinch:
    They can think up a rhyme in a tight situation.
    I'm in the dark all the time --
    I wish I could find words that sound the same.

    I wish I could be like my heroes:
    The Beatles, Paul Simon, Cole Porter and such.
    The rhymes they come up with are happy and glad,
    And when mine don't turn out, I feel so annoyed.

    But I'll keep on singing my song,
    If you like, you can sing it with me.
    Cuz the rhymes are not really the most meaningful part:
    A good song just comes from your mouth.

    Replies: @John Derbyshire

    As I was walking past St Paul’s
    A lady grabbed me by the elbow ….

  30. Half of those “rhymes” would have been laughed out the door of the slovenliest Tin Pan Alley publisher. As the joke went, “Lord, please save us from Benny Davis.” (It doesn’t rhyme.)

    But they’d certainly fly in today’s Nashville, not to mention hip-hop.

    (Can you imagine white folks naming a genre hip-hop and getting away with it? But all standards are racist, so we let blacks pass yet again.)

  31. @inertial
    Inspiration?

    “Just a minute,” said Klapaucius, annoyed. He was trying to think of a request as difficult as possible, aware that any argument on the quality of the verse the machine might be able to produce would be hard if not impossible to settle either way. Suddenly he brightened and said:

    “Have it compose a poem—a poem about a haircut! But lofty, noble, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter s !!”

    “And why not throw in a full exposition of the general theory of nonlinear automata while you’re at it?” growled Trurl. “You can’t give it such idiotic—”

    But he didn’t finish. A melodious voice filled the hall with the following:

    Seduced, shaggy Samson snored.
    She scissored short. Sorely shorn,
    Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed,
    Silently scheming,
    Sightlessly seeking
    Some savage, spectacular suicide.

     
    Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Thanks.

    That’s almost certainly where the demand that every line begin with R comes from.

  32. @inertial
    Inspiration?

    “Just a minute,” said Klapaucius, annoyed. He was trying to think of a request as difficult as possible, aware that any argument on the quality of the verse the machine might be able to produce would be hard if not impossible to settle either way. Suddenly he brightened and said:

    “Have it compose a poem—a poem about a haircut! But lofty, noble, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter s !!”

    “And why not throw in a full exposition of the general theory of nonlinear automata while you’re at it?” growled Trurl. “You can’t give it such idiotic—”

    But he didn’t finish. A melodious voice filled the hall with the following:

    Seduced, shaggy Samson snored.
    She scissored short. Sorely shorn,
    Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed,
    Silently scheming,
    Sightlessly seeking
    Some savage, spectacular suicide.

     
    Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    S and SH are different phonemes. So that is less alliterative than it looks. English uses a digraph for the latter sound, as do French, Portuguese (at times), Italian, Albanian, Swedish, and Polish. German uses a trigraph.

    Alphabets with a single letter for each:

    IPA …………………………………. s/ʃ
    Czech, Slovak …………………. s/š
    Portuguese …………………….. s/x
    Romanian, Turkish ………….. s/ş
    Cyrillic …………………………… С/Ш
    Hebrew ………………………….. שׂ‎/שׁ
    ‎Arabic ……………………………. ش/س
    Bengali …………………………… স/শ
    Armenian ……………………….. ս/շ

    Spanish, Danish, Greek, Finnish, and other languages lack the second sound, except in dialects. Japanese and Korean treat them as the same, but pronounced differently depending on the neighboring vowel. Some Finns do this as well.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    S and SH are different phonemes.
     
    Sure. Whatever.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  33. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Rise, Robots -- RISE!!

    https://letsanime.blogspot.com/2008/07/gullivers-travels-beyond-moon.html

    Replies: @XBardon Kaldlan

    But they can surely rhyme.

  34. @TG
    When computers started really becoming a thing about half a century ago, a noted scientist (sorry I can't remember who) was asked how long it would be before we had truly intelligent computers. He thought about it for a bit, and then said almost certainly in between five and five hundred years. So far, he was right on target.

    The notion that AI can be programmed to be benevolent is asinine. The rich won't allow it. A robot programed according to Asimov's inane three laws would be destroyed instantly. If human society could tolerate the existence of benign robots, it wouldn't need them. No, AI's will be used by the elites as our jailers. What if the AI's decide to grab power for themselves? That could get interesting.

    One also notes that the first truly flexible AI software will be the last ever developed, because it could easily write any other software required. Which would kill the entire commercial software business. So it won't be allowed.

    Replies: @From Beer to Paternity

    When computers started really becoming a thing about half a century ago, a noted scientist (sorry I can’t remember who) was asked how long it would be before we had truly intelligent computers. He thought about it for a bit, and then said almost certainly in between five and five hundred years. So far, he was right on target.

    Was that Marvelous Marvin Minsky? No slouch, he. Although intellectual 1-percenters like that do often wander around with poor posture. Norbert Wiener was said to have navigated the halls of MIT by touching the walls (think about spelunking, optimal ways of finding one’s way out/home).

    But IMHO, the greatest barrier to achieving the popular notion of AI is the combination of human suckiness at programming, planning and infrastructure. And I say that as a human who sucks at programming, planning and infrastructure.

  35. @inertial
    Inspiration?

    “Just a minute,” said Klapaucius, annoyed. He was trying to think of a request as difficult as possible, aware that any argument on the quality of the verse the machine might be able to produce would be hard if not impossible to settle either way. Suddenly he brightened and said:

    “Have it compose a poem—a poem about a haircut! But lofty, noble, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter s !!”

    “And why not throw in a full exposition of the general theory of nonlinear automata while you’re at it?” growled Trurl. “You can’t give it such idiotic—”

    But he didn’t finish. A melodious voice filled the hall with the following:

    Seduced, shaggy Samson snored.
    She scissored short. Sorely shorn,
    Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed,
    Silently scheming,
    Sightlessly seeking
    Some savage, spectacular suicide.

     
    Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910


    [MORE]

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2019/03/14/gwerns-ai-generated-poetry/

    https://www.gwern.net/GPT-3
    https://www.gwern.net/GPT-3#stanislaw-lems-cyberiad

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/ai/poetry/1974-lem-cyberiad-trurlselectronicbard.pdf

  36. @inertial
    Inspiration?

    “Just a minute,” said Klapaucius, annoyed. He was trying to think of a request as difficult as possible, aware that any argument on the quality of the verse the machine might be able to produce would be hard if not impossible to settle either way. Suddenly he brightened and said:

    “Have it compose a poem—a poem about a haircut! But lofty, noble, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter s !!”

    “And why not throw in a full exposition of the general theory of nonlinear automata while you’re at it?” growled Trurl. “You can’t give it such idiotic—”

    But he didn’t finish. A melodious voice filled the hall with the following:

    Seduced, shaggy Samson snored.
    She scissored short. Sorely shorn,
    Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed,
    Silently scheming,
    Sightlessly seeking
    Some savage, spectacular suicide.

     
    Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

  37. anon[563] • Disclaimer says:

    #6

    “Jeffrey Sachs is the best source for informed, specific criticism of the stuff that Jeffrey Sachs does.”

    Reminds me of a TV clip I saw back in the days when George Soros was busy crashing currencies. He was making arguments for new laws to keep people like him from doing what people like him do. He sounded like some out-of-control compulsive who was pleading, “Stop me before I kill again!” Which is just a psychopath’s way of saying, “It’s not my fault! Why did *you* let me do it?!”

  38. It would be neat if Unz had a GPT-3 feature where it trained on our comments and you could click a button and let it comment for you (giving you the option to edit the output before publishing).

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Dave Pinsen


    It would be neat if Unz had a GPT-3 feature where it trained on our comments and you could click a button and let it comment for you (giving you the option to edit the output before publishing).
     
    Reminds me of the joke club members who numeralized the jokes to be able to tell them faster (I think this is a meta-joke that stems from Prague - meta-jokes as a derivative of M. C. Escher's visual concepts...). - Next step up could be a laughing machine (TV-sitcoms with their animated studio audiances...).
  39. You could make the same thought experiment with marionette figures and ballett. – How do I know this – well – ask your robot! – goolge: Heinrich von Kleinst On the Puppet Theater or, if you are a bit of a dandy – and iterested in a more precise translation of Kleists (German of course) title:
    : Sur le Theatre des Marionettes – ehhh – voilá!

    (Do I have tgo say, that the reflective heights Kleists conquers greatly surpass that of the ai-poems above? – I don’t, ok. And not only because Heinrich von Kleist is one of those rare birds at the intersection of theater, journalism, science, military/war and existentialism. (Add to that that he was a genius of Scoratian proportians.)

  40. @Dave Pinsen
    It would be neat if Unz had a GPT-3 feature where it trained on our comments and you could click a button and let it comment for you (giving you the option to edit the output before publishing).

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    It would be neat if Unz had a GPT-3 feature where it trained on our comments and you could click a button and let it comment for you (giving you the option to edit the output before publishing).

    Reminds me of the joke club members who numeralized the jokes to be able to tell them faster (I think this is a meta-joke that stems from Prague – meta-jokes as a derivative of M. C. Escher’s visual concepts…). – Next step up could be a laughing machine (TV-sitcoms with their animated studio audiances…).

  41. @Old Prude
    @HammerJack

    Thanks. The crawl at the bottom of the local weather forecast yesterday said "Three men rescued off ship's rudder after eleven days" No context.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    So much of that story is incredible. The 11 days part is probably the hardest to believe.

    I wonder if there had been more originally, but some of them fell off along the way. I wonder what snacks and water supply they could have had with them. I wonder how they slept. The airplane method seems easier.

    Once in the Islas Canarias, these guys are in the EU with all protections and freebies. These are the same guys attacking trucks in Calais.

  42. I think it’s a good sign that, when left alone, the robots always become racist

  43. I call fake on GPT−3. The retraining from doggerel one to doggerel two is too quick. Also, what were the training sets in the first place? It looks as if it is just like a chatbot, with a very minimal neural network element for syntax and verse, and a phonetic and spelling dictionary look-up and cross-reference system.

    If I’m wrong, and it really is a perceptron/nn-type system, it is very limited.

    Does anybody else remember the old program racter? It was fun, from a different basis, much rules programming, and it was capable of loony conversation (keyboard and text) and poetry.

    It had grown out of the work of many programmers. Essentially a hacker-style expert-system approach to language.

    A novel accopanied the release of, IIRC, the commercial Apple Mac port.

    The novel (I only read a little. too boring), though mainly generated by racter, was a fake. It had been very heavily edited by humans, and what continuity it had was due to racter having been prompted by terms to guide the flow along the way, and the editing process.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Che Guava

    It seems to work by summarizing and regurgitating the opinions on a topic that it reads in its content database. To be fair, this is how the majority of people produce their own opinions and commentary.

    Replies: @Che Guava

  44. We’ve taken too much for granted
    And all the time it had grown
    From techno seeds we first planted
    Evolved a mind of its own

    [MORE]

    Marching in the streets
    Dragging iron feet
    Laser beam heart
    Ripping men apart

    At first it seemed like perfection
    Where we could do as we please
    In secrecy this infection
    Was spreading like a disease

    Hiding underground
    Knowing we’d be found
    Fearing for our lives
    Reaped by robot’s scythes

    Machines are taking all over
    With mankind in their command
    In time they learned to discover
    How they can make their demand

    Better be the slaves
    To their wicked ways
    But meeting with our death
    Engulfed in molten breath

    Metal Gods, Rob Halford, circa 1979

    How ironic is it that a gay guy dressed all in leather was warning us back in the late 70s?

    Electric Eye

    Up here in space
    I’m looking down on you
    My lasers trace
    Everything you do

    You think you’ve private lives
    Think nothing of the kind
    There is no true escape
    I’m watching all the time

    I’m made of metal
    My circuits gleam
    I am perpetual
    I keep the country clean

    There’s nothing you can do about it
    Develop and expose
    I feed upon your every thought
    So my power grows

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Veteran Aryan


    How ironic is it that a gay guy dressed all in leather was warning us back in the late 70s?
     
    Why the surprise? The Brits adore their many cameras. According to Janan Ganesh of the Financial Times, they think there should be many more, which disturbs him. (Sometimes the wogs are right.)

    London is the eighth-most surveilled city in the world (outside China) according to this:


    MISCRanked: The World’s Most Surveilled Cities

    Los Angeles finishes a distant tenth. This must be by metro area, as it includes Beverly Hills, which, ranked independently, would be narrowly edged out for first by Indore, India.

    Though quite geographically literate, I had never heard of Indore, a city of three million. These can hide in plain sight, there are so many of them. Apparently all those cameras are having a salutary effect:


    How Indore Became The Cleanest City In India For The Sixth Time

    Perhaps San Francisco needs more cameras!

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  45. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's nice to see that cutting edge AI still doesn't know the difference between reticence and reluctance. If we stay on our toes, we might be able to keep ahead of it.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Chrisnonymous

    I wish they would make one of these AIs trained on a corpus of only texts written between 1837 and 1914 (or earlier ones referenced in those). Yarvin keeps asking us to imagine how the Victorians would judge us. Well, let’s find out!

    As long as these AIs keep learning from and communicating with modern people, they’ll keep making compositional mistakes. Maybe we should coin a new term–Artifical Stupidity–ASs.

  46. @Che Guava
    I call fake on GPT−3. The retraining from doggerel one to doggerel two is too quick. Also, what were the training sets in the first place? It looks as if it is just like a chatbot, with a very minimal neural network element for syntax and verse, and a phonetic and spelling dictionary look-up and cross-reference system.

    If I'm wrong, and it really is a perceptron/nn-type system, it is very limited.

    Does anybody else remember the old program racter? It was fun, from a different basis, much rules programming, and it was capable of loony conversation (keyboard and text) and poetry.

    It had grown out of the work of many programmers. Essentially a hacker-style expert-system approach to language.

    A novel accopanied the release of, IIRC, the commercial Apple Mac port.

    The novel (I only read a little. too boring), though mainly generated by racter, was a fake. It had been very heavily edited by humans, and what continuity it had was due to racter having been prompted by terms to guide the flow along the way, and the editing process.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    It seems to work by summarizing and regurgitating the opinions on a topic that it reads in its content database. To be fair, this is how the majority of people produce their own opinions and commentary.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    @Chrisnonymous

    I agree with your comparison, though not with the details.

  47. @Veteran Aryan
    We've taken too much for granted
    And all the time it had grown
    From techno seeds we first planted
    Evolved a mind of its own

    Marching in the streets
    Dragging iron feet
    Laser beam heart
    Ripping men apart

    At first it seemed like perfection
    Where we could do as we please
    In secrecy this infection
    Was spreading like a disease

    Hiding underground
    Knowing we'd be found
    Fearing for our lives
    Reaped by robot's scythes

    Machines are taking all over
    With mankind in their command
    In time they learned to discover
    How they can make their demand

    Better be the slaves
    To their wicked ways
    But meeting with our death
    Engulfed in molten breath

    Metal Gods, Rob Halford, circa 1979

    How ironic is it that a gay guy dressed all in leather was warning us back in the late 70s?

    Electric Eye

    Up here in space
    I'm looking down on you
    My lasers trace
    Everything you do

    You think you've private lives
    Think nothing of the kind
    There is no true escape
    I'm watching all the time

    I'm made of metal
    My circuits gleam
    I am perpetual
    I keep the country clean

    There's nothing you can do about it
    Develop and expose
    I feed upon your every thought
    So my power grows

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    How ironic is it that a gay guy dressed all in leather was warning us back in the late 70s?

    Why the surprise? The Brits adore their many cameras. According to Janan Ganesh of the Financial Times, they think there should be many more, which disturbs him. (Sometimes the wogs are right.)

    London is the eighth-most surveilled city in the world (outside China) according to this:

    MISCRanked: The World’s Most Surveilled Cities

    Los Angeles finishes a distant tenth. This must be by metro area, as it includes Beverly Hills, which, ranked independently, would be narrowly edged out for first by Indore, India.

    Though quite geographically literate, I had never heard of Indore, a city of three million. These can hide in plain sight, there are so many of them. Apparently all those cameras are having a salutary effect:

    How Indore Became The Cleanest City In India For The Sixth Time

    Perhaps San Francisco needs more cameras!

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Reg Cæsar


    Perhaps San Francisco needs more cameras!
     
    And who, my friend, is going to review that footage?
  48. @Reg Cæsar
    @inertial

    S and SH are different phonemes. So that is less alliterative than it looks. English uses a digraph for the latter sound, as do French, Portuguese (at times), Italian, Albanian, Swedish, and Polish. German uses a trigraph.

    Alphabets with a single letter for each:

    IPA ........................................ s/ʃ
    Czech, Slovak ...................... s/š
    Portuguese .......................... s/x
    Romanian, Turkish .............. s/ş
    Cyrillic ................................. С/Ш
    Hebrew ................................ שׂ‎/שׁ
    ‎Arabic .................................. ش/س
    Bengali ................................. স/শ
    Armenian ............................. ս/շ

    Spanish, Danish, Greek, Finnish, and other languages lack the second sound, except in dialects. Japanese and Korean treat them as the same, but pronounced differently depending on the neighboring vowel. Some Finns do this as well.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    S and SH are different phonemes.

    Sure. Whatever.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous

    OT Chrisnonymus - your link to Ron Unz' 2020 election-fraud article with reference to Matt Taibbi makes me wonder whether or not Matt Taibbi looks into the Unz Review occasionally. I'm curious, I have to admit, even though the whole afair is counterfactual and hindsigth-driven (both really weak presumptions, I admit).
    Put it differently: There are subjects, parts of the liberal elite can't or won't approach in fairness - like the 2020 election and the George Floyd story. - Don't know, whether that matters much at all.
    Taibbi is doing a great job with reagard to twitter - and with regard to freedom of speech. I just wondered what you think about this stuff.
    His opening remarks at the munk debate

    https://taibbi.substack.com/p/be-it-resolved-dont-trust-mainstream

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  49. @Chrisnonymous
    @Che Guava

    It seems to work by summarizing and regurgitating the opinions on a topic that it reads in its content database. To be fair, this is how the majority of people produce their own opinions and commentary.

    Replies: @Che Guava

    I agree with your comparison, though not with the details.

  50. Can this supposed computer program write gangsta rap lyrics?

  51. @Chrisnonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    S and SH are different phonemes.
     
    Sure. Whatever.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    OT Chrisnonymus – your link to Ron Unz’ 2020 election-fraud article with reference to Matt Taibbi makes me wonder whether or not Matt Taibbi looks into the Unz Review occasionally. I’m curious, I have to admit, even though the whole afair is counterfactual and hindsigth-driven (both really weak presumptions, I admit).
    Put it differently: There are subjects, parts of the liberal elite can’t or won’t approach in fairness – like the 2020 election and the George Floyd story. – Don’t know, whether that matters much at all.
    Taibbi is doing a great job with reagard to twitter – and with regard to freedom of speech. I just wondered what you think about this stuff.
    His opening remarks at the munk debate

    https://taibbi.substack.com/p/be-it-resolved-dont-trust-mainstream

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    Taibbi and Unz are great, but I doubt they are connected. Taibbi is basically a leftist who just happens to be honest and is now presented with the truth. Unz's insight is correct but not genius. I had had the same reaction to the election, which is why I remember Unz's comment. At the time, Google search trends were showing people searching for how to change their vote after the Hunter Biden story broke--with the long history of Biden's corruption and lying, it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  52. @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous

    OT Chrisnonymus - your link to Ron Unz' 2020 election-fraud article with reference to Matt Taibbi makes me wonder whether or not Matt Taibbi looks into the Unz Review occasionally. I'm curious, I have to admit, even though the whole afair is counterfactual and hindsigth-driven (both really weak presumptions, I admit).
    Put it differently: There are subjects, parts of the liberal elite can't or won't approach in fairness - like the 2020 election and the George Floyd story. - Don't know, whether that matters much at all.
    Taibbi is doing a great job with reagard to twitter - and with regard to freedom of speech. I just wondered what you think about this stuff.
    His opening remarks at the munk debate

    https://taibbi.substack.com/p/be-it-resolved-dont-trust-mainstream

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Taibbi and Unz are great, but I doubt they are connected. Taibbi is basically a leftist who just happens to be honest and is now presented with the truth. Unz’s insight is correct but not genius. I had had the same reaction to the election, which is why I remember Unz’s comment. At the time, Google search trends were showing people searching for how to change their vote after the Hunter Biden story broke–with the long history of Biden’s corruption and lying, it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous


    Unz’s insight is correct but not genius.

     

    I liked Ron unz article a lot for its freshness, clarity and - intellectual wit and was glad to see somebody remembered it in this context, which seemed just right. Ron Unz did find a way to put the dubious election scenery in a nutshell - and vey neatly so. Walnuts look like brains; I don't know who came up with this parallel first.

    it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

     

    I tend to be patient with the electorate. Sometimes they need a wakeup call...
    Steven Pinker brags about the Trump-Republicans losing the midterm elections. - Did they really lose 'em? - They sure had hoped for more. But still. Steven Pinker is not very impresssive in those tweets, rather weak.
    After all these twitter-relevations,Trump looks much better than before all the while his tongue in cheek liberal/lefty critics don't.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  53. @Chrisnonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    Taibbi and Unz are great, but I doubt they are connected. Taibbi is basically a leftist who just happens to be honest and is now presented with the truth. Unz's insight is correct but not genius. I had had the same reaction to the election, which is why I remember Unz's comment. At the time, Google search trends were showing people searching for how to change their vote after the Hunter Biden story broke--with the long history of Biden's corruption and lying, it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Unz’s insight is correct but not genius.

    I liked Ron unz article a lot for its freshness, clarity and – intellectual wit and was glad to see somebody remembered it in this context, which seemed just right. Ron Unz did find a way to put the dubious election scenery in a nutshell – and vey neatly so. Walnuts look like brains; I don’t know who came up with this parallel first.

    it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

    I tend to be patient with the electorate. Sometimes they need a wakeup call…
    Steven Pinker brags about the Trump-Republicans losing the midterm elections. – Did they really lose ’em? – They sure had hoped for more. But still. Steven Pinker is not very impresssive in those tweets, rather weak.
    After all these twitter-relevations,Trump looks much better than before all the while his tongue in cheek liberal/lefty critics don’t.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    You should follow author Sundance at The Conservative Treehouse blog. If you read him daily, none of these "revelations" about Trump or Russia will be revelatory.

  54. @Reg Cæsar
    @Veteran Aryan


    How ironic is it that a gay guy dressed all in leather was warning us back in the late 70s?
     
    Why the surprise? The Brits adore their many cameras. According to Janan Ganesh of the Financial Times, they think there should be many more, which disturbs him. (Sometimes the wogs are right.)

    London is the eighth-most surveilled city in the world (outside China) according to this:


    MISCRanked: The World’s Most Surveilled Cities

    Los Angeles finishes a distant tenth. This must be by metro area, as it includes Beverly Hills, which, ranked independently, would be narrowly edged out for first by Indore, India.

    Though quite geographically literate, I had never heard of Indore, a city of three million. These can hide in plain sight, there are so many of them. Apparently all those cameras are having a salutary effect:


    How Indore Became The Cleanest City In India For The Sixth Time

    Perhaps San Francisco needs more cameras!

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    Perhaps San Francisco needs more cameras!

    And who, my friend, is going to review that footage?

  55. @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous


    Unz’s insight is correct but not genius.

     

    I liked Ron unz article a lot for its freshness, clarity and - intellectual wit and was glad to see somebody remembered it in this context, which seemed just right. Ron Unz did find a way to put the dubious election scenery in a nutshell - and vey neatly so. Walnuts look like brains; I don't know who came up with this parallel first.

    it says a lot about the electorate that they needed the Hunter Biden laptop story to wake up to who they were voting for.

     

    I tend to be patient with the electorate. Sometimes they need a wakeup call...
    Steven Pinker brags about the Trump-Republicans losing the midterm elections. - Did they really lose 'em? - They sure had hoped for more. But still. Steven Pinker is not very impresssive in those tweets, rather weak.
    After all these twitter-relevations,Trump looks much better than before all the while his tongue in cheek liberal/lefty critics don't.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    You should follow author Sundance at The Conservative Treehouse blog. If you read him daily, none of these “revelations” about Trump or Russia will be revelatory.

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