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Retconning Statue of Liberty Into Statue of Immigration Is Racist Insult to African-Americans
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From the NYT:

Brand New Colossus: A Statue of Liberty Revival Amid Immigration Woes
By ELI ROSENBERG MARCH 30, 2017

In another telling sign of how the last presidential election may have shifted the civic landscape, the Statue of Liberty has re-emerged as a potent and resonant symbol amid a polarizing debate about immigration. …

The statue, “Liberty Enlightening the World,” was dedicated in 1886, but was not originally intended to be a symbol of immigration.

With a broken chain at Liberty’s feet, the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War. But the meaning shifted over time because of the statue’s prominence in New York Harbor at a time when immigrants were arriving at nearby Ellis Island and the addition of the Lazarus poem in 1903.

In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

 
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  1. In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

    I understand using black political capital against your enemies but even if you’re successful, you just end up strengthening a precedent that will cause far more damage than any good you ever did.

    Unless you’re truly willing to embrace the primacy of black interests across the board, you’re also being incredibly hypocritical in addition to playing with fire.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Guy de Champlagne

    I read it more as a restatement of the argument as opposed to an endorsement.

    , @IHTG
    @Guy de Champlagne

    In a choice between two fires, choose the one under control. Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Almost Missouri, @Alden

    , @Spmoore8
    @Guy de Champlagne

    I don't think Steve is playing with fire, I think he just has a great sense of humor.

    I am looking forward to the cultural appropriation war over the Statue.

    , @AndrewR
    @Guy de Champlagne

    The precedent has been set many times. The black political cat is not going back in the bag. Might as well sic it on some mice.

  2. Expert trolling, Mr. Sailer!!

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @ziel


    Expert trolling, Mr. Sailer!!
     
    Your projection is just another example of a disgusting troll consuming bandwidth that honest people might put to good use.
  3. At least they’re admitting that the Statue was co-opted, that the poem and the immigration scam were added on later.

    I still say the Statue never should have been placed out there in the harbor like a lawn ornament at the end of our national driveway — for all the wretched refuse to see.

    It’s like those Bob’s Big Boy statues that used to be in front of those hamburger joints.

    Some of you may remember what I’m talking about:

    http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/restaurants/sdut-bobs-big-boy-closes-el-cajon-parkway-2013jun14-story.html

    Good for hamburgers; bad for a national and worldwide symbol of Liberty.

    • Replies: @eD
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I've wondered if the Statue of Liberty could have gone elsewhere, particularly as Boston and Philadelphia played more important roles in establishing independence (in fact New York was the stronghold of the bad guys).

    I did a few minutes of research, and the answer turns out to be no. They were mindful of the precedent of the Colossus of Rhodes, and wanted the statue in a harbor right from the start. And New York has the best harbor in the East Coast, so there was no consideration given to other sites.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Ha! A classic prank throughout the Midwest for decades has been stealing a Big Boy statue and setting it up in your high school parking lot.

    Maybe some clever American could convince the Eli Rosenbergs of the world that stealing Lady Liberty and setting her up in Port of Haifa would be comedy gold. I'd certainly get a good chuckle out of it.

  4. “I still say the Statue never should have been placed out there in the harbor like a lawn ornament at the end of our national driveway — for all the wretched refuse to see.”

    That was funny , I’m not rolling on the floor laughing my ass off , but my belly is shaking like jelly .

    I do remember Bob’s Big Boy too . The burgers were great and juicy .

  5. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Trump announced the formation of a commission today to study the drug problem.

    This is cynical box-checking. Hand-waving!

    Government forms a commission in order to avoid taking meaningful action.

    Trump could’ve put 1000 troops on the border in January as a powerful statement and staunched a lot of the drug flow. Every drug corridor is known. The big banks and the CIA know every detail of the cartel’s operations.

    Hey, in the state of Ohio they’re renting portable refrigerated space to store the overflow of corpses due to the opioid epidemic! So let’s not take any action yet let’s form a committee and study this situation.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  6. @ziel
    Expert trolling, Mr. Sailer!!

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Expert trolling, Mr. Sailer!!

    Your projection is just another example of a disgusting troll consuming bandwidth that honest people might put to good use.

  7. the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War.

    The monument was conceived as a celebration of the abolition of slavery, and the abolition of independence.

    The monument was conceived as a celebration of the abolition of a wife’s right to beat her servants, and the enshrinement of a husband’s right to beat his wife.

    No contradiction there eh, Frenchie?

  8. Does anyone know how and why NYC managed to grab it?

    It would have been more appropriate somewhere in DC.

  9. eD says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    At least they're admitting that the Statue was co-opted, that the poem and the immigration scam were added on later.

    I still say the Statue never should have been placed out there in the harbor like a lawn ornament at the end of our national driveway -- for all the wretched refuse to see.

    It's like those Bob's Big Boy statues that used to be in front of those hamburger joints.

    Some of you may remember what I'm talking about:

    http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/restaurants/sdut-bobs-big-boy-closes-el-cajon-parkway-2013jun14-story.html

    Good for hamburgers; bad for a national and worldwide symbol of Liberty.

    Replies: @eD, @Gunnar von Cowtown

    I’ve wondered if the Statue of Liberty could have gone elsewhere, particularly as Boston and Philadelphia played more important roles in establishing independence (in fact New York was the stronghold of the bad guys).

    I did a few minutes of research, and the answer turns out to be no. They were mindful of the precedent of the Colossus of Rhodes, and wanted the statue in a harbor right from the start. And New York has the best harbor in the East Coast, so there was no consideration given to other sites.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @eD

    Bob's Big USA -- Servin' Up Citizenship on a Platter Since 1965

    Cheap Workers Welcome!

    Our Motto: "The Immigrant Is Always Right."

    - Look For the Green Lady -

  10. I actually thought about this intersectional stumbling block, if you will, during the recent Colossus Meme Boom. Of which I’m not proud. (I spend too much time inside the PC thought prison.) Blacks forever win the diversity sweepstakes, obviously, and blacks came over before peak wretched refuse. Black victimhood supremacy therefore poses a problem for the Nation of Immigrants Narrative.

    Sure, there were dirty Paddies and Fritzes, but far fewer (((others))). How do we square the arrival of Swarthiness and the suffering of Black Blodies as twin centers of the American Experience? For when we tell the story of black bondage, we are stuck in WASP America. And who wants to admit that existed?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @guest


    Blacks forever win the diversity sweepstakes, obviously, and blacks came over before peak wretched refuse. Black victimhood supremacy therefore poses a problem for the Nation of Immigrants Narrative.
     
    The purpose of the Nation of Immigrants Narrative was to displace blacks from their hallowed place in the diversity sweepstakes. Relentlessly publicizing weak cases for black victimization is likewise toward that goal.
  11. @eD
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I've wondered if the Statue of Liberty could have gone elsewhere, particularly as Boston and Philadelphia played more important roles in establishing independence (in fact New York was the stronghold of the bad guys).

    I did a few minutes of research, and the answer turns out to be no. They were mindful of the precedent of the Colossus of Rhodes, and wanted the statue in a harbor right from the start. And New York has the best harbor in the East Coast, so there was no consideration given to other sites.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Bob’s Big USA — Servin’ Up Citizenship on a Platter Since 1965

    Cheap Workers Welcome!

    Our Motto: “The Immigrant Is Always Right.”

    – Look For the Green Lady –

  12. Hail says: • Website

    the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery

    Does he have a specific source on this?

    So the idea was not to celebrate the principles and ideals of democracy and republicanism — in the 1870s, when the idea was presumably conceived, France had just started up their Third Republic after the humiliating loss to Germany in 1870 and collapse of the Second French Empire — but specifically about the U.S. slavery issue?

    I find this hard to believe.

    Edit: (from Wiki):

    She holds a torch above her head, and in her left arm carries a tabula ansata inscribed “July 4, 1776”

    Hmm… If I remember my history, 1776 was not the abolition of slavery, was it!

    the statue was most likely conceived in 1870

    Suggesting my version involving French domestic upheaval (fall of the empire, rise of the new republic) is much more likely.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Hail

    I don't know if it was related, but the idea to build the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sacré Coeur) at Montmartre was conceived at about the same time. It was a symbol of atonement for the loss of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and a call for religious revival. (It wasn't finished until 1919).

    , @res
    @Hail

    This page talks more about the motivations: https://www.nps.gov/stli/learn/historyculture/the-french-connection.htm

    The first paragraph looks to me like the original explanation with the second a retcon.


    The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the French people commemorating the alliance of France and the United States during the American Revolution. Yet, it represented much more to those individuals who proposed the gift.

    In 1865, Edouard de Laboulaye(a French political thinker, U.S. Constitution expert, and abolitionist) proposed that a monument be built as a gift from France to the United States in order to commemorate the perseverance of freedom and democracy in the United States and to honor the work of the late president Abraham Lincoln. Laboulaye hoped that by calling attention to the recent achievements of the United States, the French people would be inspired to create their own democracy in the face of a repressive monarchy. In 1865, France was divided between people who were still committed to the monarchy and people who supported the Enlightenment ideals (the belief that people had natural rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness). It was the hope of many French liberals that democracy would prevail and that freedom and justice for all would be attained.

     

    P.S. I seem to recall learning the statue was to commemorate the Centennial in history class. Though perhaps I am confusing that with the arm being at the Centennial: https://www.nypl.org/blog/2015/04/07/statue-liberty-pedestal

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Alden
    @Hail

    You are right. Every history book I have ever read claimed that the statue was made both as a gift to recognize America's 100 year anniversary and as PR for the third Republic.

    But history must be remade to accommodate the latest liberal narrative
    Actually the latest idea is that lady liberty is a Muslim woman

    Next year she will be transgender or non normative gender

  13. Pat Casey says:

    I want the magdala stone in Ireland please. The fake one as well to be sure. I would like an Irish emissary to meet an Israeli emissary in Paris to pick it up in front of the biggest mosque in Paris with some amount of ceremony and I’m not joking. I’m going to protect the children of Israel. But I want that stone. It shall be brought to St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Armagh. The Pope shall provide funds for twelve guards on three shifts all day everyday and they shall be baptized Catholics and the Pope shall pay them the equivalent of 250,000 dollars a year. I’m going to pick the guards myself when I arrive in about a month so there is plenty of time to make preparations. Francis will look like that King in Braveheart if he thinks I’m not serious.

    Look, I know: he cometh quickly. But He knew what my plain ticket said before I got the big nod. So I know we got some time.

    I’m tired. OBVIOUSLY, we should all be praying the rosary.

    I’m not going to turn this into a jolly escapade but this matters to me: Oakley’s jersey shall be retired by Mr. Dolan graciously or I’m going to destroy some of his property. I assume someone can get him in the loop.

  14. @Hail

    the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery
     
    Does he have a specific source on this?

    So the idea was not to celebrate the principles and ideals of democracy and republicanism -- in the 1870s, when the idea was presumably conceived, France had just started up their Third Republic after the humiliating loss to Germany in 1870 and collapse of the Second French Empire -- but specifically about the U.S. slavery issue?

    I find this hard to believe.

    Edit: (from Wiki):


    She holds a torch above her head, and in her left arm carries a tabula ansata inscribed "July 4, 1776"
     
    Hmm... If I remember my history, 1776 was not the abolition of slavery, was it!

    the statue was most likely conceived in 1870
     
    Suggesting my version involving French domestic upheaval (fall of the empire, rise of the new republic) is much more likely.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @res, @Alden

    I don’t know if it was related, but the idea to build the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sacré Coeur) at Montmartre was conceived at about the same time. It was a symbol of atonement for the loss of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and a call for religious revival. (It wasn’t finished until 1919).

  15. With a broken chain at Liberty’s feet, the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War.

    I always thought the statue was originally set to celebrate America’s Centennial (1876) in breaking the chains that bound the country slavishly to England, and the French were reaffirming their support after a hundred years, but the sculptor was tardy in getting the job done – thus the ‘July 4, 1776’ on the tablet and the late unveiling. Nothing to do with Civil War and Negro freedom.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Hubbub

    I was in New York in 1986, during the Statue of Liberty's four day centennial celebration, Liberty Weekend, which was huge. Immigration wasn't a big theme—it was alluded to in passing. The friendship between France and the United States was huge, as the theme of freedom. The French President, Francois Mitterrand gave a speech, there was the biggest ever flotilla of tall ships, a naval revue, and the massive USS Iowa steaming at near full speed on the Hudson, past Lower Manhattan. Ronald Reagan's main speech (he gave two) is striking to me in retrospect, because it reminds me how recent the retconning is.

    Perhaps, indeed, these vessels embody our conception of liberty itself: to have before one no impediments, only open spaces; to chart one's own course and take the adventure of life as it comes; to be free as the wind – as free as the tall ships themselves. It's fitting, then, that this procession should take place in honor of Lady Liberty.

    Everyone was saying "liberty" and "freedom." Lee Iacocca, the head of the organizing committee, had a minor event devoted to immigrants of the past, but that was all.

    If the event isn't completely forgotten, I expect it, too, will be retconned in time, with Reagan's speech becoming a statement of the freedom of all people in the world to sail into America, freely.

    , @Forbes
    @Hubbub

    Exactly my recollection of the teaching of the history of the gift from France--to celebrate America's centennial of the War for Independence. The other retconing nonsense is just that...

  16. @Hubbub

    With a broken chain at Liberty’s feet, the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War.
     
    I always thought the statue was originally set to celebrate America's Centennial (1876) in breaking the chains that bound the country slavishly to England, and the French were reaffirming their support after a hundred years, but the sculptor was tardy in getting the job done - thus the 'July 4, 1776' on the tablet and the late unveiling. Nothing to do with Civil War and Negro freedom.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Forbes

    I was in New York in 1986, during the Statue of Liberty’s four day centennial celebration, Liberty Weekend, which was huge. Immigration wasn’t a big theme—it was alluded to in passing. The friendship between France and the United States was huge, as the theme of freedom. The French President, Francois Mitterrand gave a speech, there was the biggest ever flotilla of tall ships, a naval revue, and the massive USS Iowa steaming at near full speed on the Hudson, past Lower Manhattan. Ronald Reagan’s main speech (he gave two) is striking to me in retrospect, because it reminds me how recent the retconning is.

    Perhaps, indeed, these vessels embody our conception of liberty itself: to have before one no impediments, only open spaces; to chart one’s own course and take the adventure of life as it comes; to be free as the wind – as free as the tall ships themselves. It’s fitting, then, that this procession should take place in honor of Lady Liberty.

    Everyone was saying “liberty” and “freedom.” Lee Iacocca, the head of the organizing committee, had a minor event devoted to immigrants of the past, but that was all.

    If the event isn’t completely forgotten, I expect it, too, will be retconned in time, with Reagan’s speech becoming a statement of the freedom of all people in the world to sail into America, freely.

  17. @Guy de Champlagne

    In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

     

    I understand using black political capital against your enemies but even if you're successful, you just end up strengthening a precedent that will cause far more damage than any good you ever did.

    Unless you're truly willing to embrace the primacy of black interests across the board, you're also being incredibly hypocritical in addition to playing with fire.

    Replies: @anon, @IHTG, @Spmoore8, @AndrewR

    I read it more as a restatement of the argument as opposed to an endorsement.

  18. @Guy de Champlagne

    In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

     

    I understand using black political capital against your enemies but even if you're successful, you just end up strengthening a precedent that will cause far more damage than any good you ever did.

    Unless you're truly willing to embrace the primacy of black interests across the board, you're also being incredibly hypocritical in addition to playing with fire.

    Replies: @anon, @IHTG, @Spmoore8, @AndrewR

    In a choice between two fires, choose the one under control. Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @IHTG

    This statement is patently false. Are you not familiar with the Most Important Graph in the World, as popularised by Steve?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @IHTG

    , @Almost Missouri
    @IHTG


    "Black birthrates are below replacement level."
     
    This is false. But it is a falsehood that is easy to fall for because so many official organs try to give this impression.

    First of all, birth rate does not really have a "replacement level", so when people say "birthrate below replacement level" they probably mean that the birthrate is below the death rate (or technically that the Rate of Natural Increase is negative). But birth statistics are not usually published this way. The usual birth statistics are Total Fertility Rate or Gross or Net Reproduction Rate. These statistics involve estimates and probabilities about the future of the population, or to give it its non-technical name, they are guesses. But they are guesses that do indeed show, if only in a few recent years, US blacks falling below replacement rate. So if you trust the guesses, the statement "black birthrates are below replacement level" seems plausible. But there is a fly in the ointment. Two flies, actually.

    1) Total Fertility Rate and related measures are based on female reproduction. This is not unreasonable, for obvious reasons, but, for statistical convenience, it means that whenever it is calculated by race, the race of the child is assumed to be the same as the mother. This assumption may once have been unimportant with errors from it averaging out, but this is no longer true, particularly with regard to white and black fertility. As you no doubt know, white female + black male pairings are far more common than white male + black female pairings. So for TFR purposes, a chunk of the "white" fertility is actually white mothers birthing half-black babies, which statisticians count as "white", while the inverse set of black mothers birthing half-white babies, which statisticians count as "black", is much smaller. What this means is that all published statistics of fertility rates by race significantly overstate the white rate and understate the black rate. And since we know from the Barack Obamas and Colin Kaepernicks of the world that mulatto children almost always identify--often militantly--as "black", the cultural skew is even greater than the statistical error.

    2) Even if black fertility someday really does fall below replacement level (so far it has not), that won't necessarily matter in the bigger picture if everyone else's fertility rate is even lower than the black rate: blacks will still compose a larger and larger share of the population. And historically, since about the 1930s (the beginning of the welfare state) everyone else's fertility has been below blacks, with the temporary exception of recent Mexican immigrants. You can decide for yourself whether that is a good thing or not.

    Or, if this is all tl;dr, you can just go to your local ghetto-y area and see for yourself the massively wide demographic pyramid around you in all its manifestations. Who are you gonna believe, the clever statisticians or your lyin' eyes?

    , @Alden
    @IHTG

    Thanks to abortion.

  19. @Guy de Champlagne

    In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

     

    I understand using black political capital against your enemies but even if you're successful, you just end up strengthening a precedent that will cause far more damage than any good you ever did.

    Unless you're truly willing to embrace the primacy of black interests across the board, you're also being incredibly hypocritical in addition to playing with fire.

    Replies: @anon, @IHTG, @Spmoore8, @AndrewR

    I don’t think Steve is playing with fire, I think he just has a great sense of humor.

    I am looking forward to the cultural appropriation war over the Statue.

  20. @IHTG
    @Guy de Champlagne

    In a choice between two fires, choose the one under control. Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Almost Missouri, @Alden

    This statement is patently false. Are you not familiar with the Most Important Graph in the World, as popularised by Steve?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Autochthon

    He obviously meant black Americans. Turn your autism down.

    , @IHTG
    @Autochthon

    This post is about African-Americans.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  21. @Autochthon
    @IHTG

    This statement is patently false. Are you not familiar with the Most Important Graph in the World, as popularised by Steve?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @IHTG

    He obviously meant black Americans. Turn your autism down.

  22. @Guy de Champlagne

    In other words, the retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration is a racist insult to African-Americans, a hijacking by non-blacks of their ancestors’ suffering.

     

    I understand using black political capital against your enemies but even if you're successful, you just end up strengthening a precedent that will cause far more damage than any good you ever did.

    Unless you're truly willing to embrace the primacy of black interests across the board, you're also being incredibly hypocritical in addition to playing with fire.

    Replies: @anon, @IHTG, @Spmoore8, @AndrewR

    The precedent has been set many times. The black political cat is not going back in the bag. Might as well sic it on some mice.

  23. Well, scrawling a swastika on a wall is now used in hate hoaxes to represent racist animosity against blacks, so it all evens out.

  24. @Buzz Mohawk
    At least they're admitting that the Statue was co-opted, that the poem and the immigration scam were added on later.

    I still say the Statue never should have been placed out there in the harbor like a lawn ornament at the end of our national driveway -- for all the wretched refuse to see.

    It's like those Bob's Big Boy statues that used to be in front of those hamburger joints.

    Some of you may remember what I'm talking about:

    http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/restaurants/sdut-bobs-big-boy-closes-el-cajon-parkway-2013jun14-story.html

    Good for hamburgers; bad for a national and worldwide symbol of Liberty.

    Replies: @eD, @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Ha! A classic prank throughout the Midwest for decades has been stealing a Big Boy statue and setting it up in your high school parking lot.

    Maybe some clever American could convince the Eli Rosenbergs of the world that stealing Lady Liberty and setting her up in Port of Haifa would be comedy gold. I’d certainly get a good chuckle out of it.

  25. Ha! A classic prank throughout the Midwest for decades has been stealing a Big Boy statue and setting it up in your high school parking lot.

    We did it in college.

    Bob stood proudly in front of our dormitory until the powers that be made us take him back.

    Fun was had by all, and no one got hurt.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, back when prankish fun was still allowed of campus. Today you'd get arrested.

  26. @Autochthon
    @IHTG

    This statement is patently false. Are you not familiar with the Most Important Graph in the World, as popularised by Steve?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @IHTG

    This post is about African-Americans.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @IHTG


    Black birthrates are below replacement level.
     
    Are the Negroes from outside America not black...? I've seen and met a lot; they are not purple.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  27. Britain used anti-slavery activity ant its powerful Navy to justify it’s preeminent position in the world and intervene whenever it saw fit.

  28. @guest
    I actually thought about this intersectional stumbling block, if you will, during the recent Colossus Meme Boom. Of which I'm not proud. (I spend too much time inside the PC thought prison.) Blacks forever win the diversity sweepstakes, obviously, and blacks came over before peak wretched refuse. Black victimhood supremacy therefore poses a problem for the Nation of Immigrants Narrative.

    Sure, there were dirty Paddies and Fritzes, but far fewer (((others))). How do we square the arrival of Swarthiness and the suffering of Black Blodies as twin centers of the American Experience? For when we tell the story of black bondage, we are stuck in WASP America. And who wants to admit that existed?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Blacks forever win the diversity sweepstakes, obviously, and blacks came over before peak wretched refuse. Black victimhood supremacy therefore poses a problem for the Nation of Immigrants Narrative.

    The purpose of the Nation of Immigrants Narrative was to displace blacks from their hallowed place in the diversity sweepstakes. Relentlessly publicizing weak cases for black victimization is likewise toward that goal.

  29. Let’s go, children of the Fatherland,
    the day of glory is here!
    The tyranny has raised against us its bloody flag.

    Listen to the howling of the fierce soldiers in our countryside.
    They aim to come among us and choke our children and spouses.

    Arm yourselves, fellow citizens! Assume your combat formations!

    Onward march, that with a polluted blood,
    we may water our plow furrows!

  30. @Hail

    the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery
     
    Does he have a specific source on this?

    So the idea was not to celebrate the principles and ideals of democracy and republicanism -- in the 1870s, when the idea was presumably conceived, France had just started up their Third Republic after the humiliating loss to Germany in 1870 and collapse of the Second French Empire -- but specifically about the U.S. slavery issue?

    I find this hard to believe.

    Edit: (from Wiki):


    She holds a torch above her head, and in her left arm carries a tabula ansata inscribed "July 4, 1776"
     
    Hmm... If I remember my history, 1776 was not the abolition of slavery, was it!

    the statue was most likely conceived in 1870
     
    Suggesting my version involving French domestic upheaval (fall of the empire, rise of the new republic) is much more likely.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @res, @Alden

    This page talks more about the motivations: https://www.nps.gov/stli/learn/historyculture/the-french-connection.htm

    The first paragraph looks to me like the original explanation with the second a retcon.

    The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the French people commemorating the alliance of France and the United States during the American Revolution. Yet, it represented much more to those individuals who proposed the gift.

    In 1865, Edouard de Laboulaye(a French political thinker, U.S. Constitution expert, and abolitionist) proposed that a monument be built as a gift from France to the United States in order to commemorate the perseverance of freedom and democracy in the United States and to honor the work of the late president Abraham Lincoln. Laboulaye hoped that by calling attention to the recent achievements of the United States, the French people would be inspired to create their own democracy in the face of a repressive monarchy. In 1865, France was divided between people who were still committed to the monarchy and people who supported the Enlightenment ideals (the belief that people had natural rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness). It was the hope of many French liberals that democracy would prevail and that freedom and justice for all would be attained.

    P.S. I seem to recall learning the statue was to commemorate the Centennial in history class. Though perhaps I am confusing that with the arm being at the Centennial: https://www.nypl.org/blog/2015/04/07/statue-liberty-pedestal

    • Replies: @Alden
    @res

    In 1865 Bonaparte 2 was the second emperor. He overthrew the last monarch in 1848. Bonaparte was absolutely not overthrown by an uprising by liberals seeking democracy and Liberty for all

    Bonaparte's government was overturned when the Prussians won a war in 1870. Bonaparte fled to England. The remaining officials cobbled together a peace with Prussia. France paid Prussia huge reparations. Prussia left. The not specially popular Third Republic was formed.

    The statue was part of the Third Republics PR effort

  31. @IHTG
    @Autochthon

    This post is about African-Americans.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    Are the Negroes from outside America not black…? I’ve seen and met a lot; they are not purple.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Autochthon

    Belay my last; I've since learned my inability to read one term and mentally substitute another when and only when the music of the spheres and other mystical forces so guide me is in fact autism. Carry on.

  32. @Autochthon
    @IHTG


    Black birthrates are below replacement level.
     
    Are the Negroes from outside America not black...? I've seen and met a lot; they are not purple.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Belay my last; I’ve since learned my inability to read one term and mentally substitute another when and only when the music of the spheres and other mystical forces so guide me is in fact autism. Carry on.

  33. @IHTG
    @Guy de Champlagne

    In a choice between two fires, choose the one under control. Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Almost Missouri, @Alden

    “Black birthrates are below replacement level.”

    This is false. But it is a falsehood that is easy to fall for because so many official organs try to give this impression.

    First of all, birth rate does not really have a “replacement level”, so when people say “birthrate below replacement level” they probably mean that the birthrate is below the death rate (or technically that the Rate of Natural Increase is negative). But birth statistics are not usually published this way. The usual birth statistics are Total Fertility Rate or Gross or Net Reproduction Rate. These statistics involve estimates and probabilities about the future of the population, or to give it its non-technical name, they are guesses. But they are guesses that do indeed show, if only in a few recent years, US blacks falling below replacement rate. So if you trust the guesses, the statement “black birthrates are below replacement level” seems plausible. But there is a fly in the ointment. Two flies, actually.

    1) Total Fertility Rate and related measures are based on female reproduction. This is not unreasonable, for obvious reasons, but, for statistical convenience, it means that whenever it is calculated by race, the race of the child is assumed to be the same as the mother. This assumption may once have been unimportant with errors from it averaging out, but this is no longer true, particularly with regard to white and black fertility. As you no doubt know, white female + black male pairings are far more common than white male + black female pairings. So for TFR purposes, a chunk of the “white” fertility is actually white mothers birthing half-black babies, which statisticians count as “white”, while the inverse set of black mothers birthing half-white babies, which statisticians count as “black”, is much smaller. What this means is that all published statistics of fertility rates by race significantly overstate the white rate and understate the black rate. And since we know from the Barack Obamas and Colin Kaepernicks of the world that mulatto children almost always identify–often militantly–as “black”, the cultural skew is even greater than the statistical error.

    2) Even if black fertility someday really does fall below replacement level (so far it has not), that won’t necessarily matter in the bigger picture if everyone else’s fertility rate is even lower than the black rate: blacks will still compose a larger and larger share of the population. And historically, since about the 1930s (the beginning of the welfare state) everyone else’s fertility has been below blacks, with the temporary exception of recent Mexican immigrants. You can decide for yourself whether that is a good thing or not.

    Or, if this is all tl;dr, you can just go to your local ghetto-y area and see for yourself the massively wide demographic pyramid around you in all its manifestations. Who are you gonna believe, the clever statisticians or your lyin’ eyes?

  34. This decision by NY City Mayor de Blasio should help reduce the offense blacks feel from any “retconning of the Statue of Liberty into the Statue of Immigration.”

    Mayor Backs Plan to Close Rikers and Open Jails Elsewhere
    NY Times 3/31/2017

    Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed on Friday to close the troubled jail complex on Rikers Island that has spawned state and federal investigations, brought waves of protest and become a byword for brutality, in a move he said was intended to end an era of mass incarceration in New York City.

    The pledge to eventually close Rikers, a proposition once thought to be politically and practically unfeasible, came just as an independent commission was about to release a 97-page report that recommended replacing jails on Rikers with a system of smaller, borough-based jails, at a cost of $10.6 billion.

  35. @Hubbub

    With a broken chain at Liberty’s feet, the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery and the Union’s victory in the Civil War.
     
    I always thought the statue was originally set to celebrate America's Centennial (1876) in breaking the chains that bound the country slavishly to England, and the French were reaffirming their support after a hundred years, but the sculptor was tardy in getting the job done - thus the 'July 4, 1776' on the tablet and the late unveiling. Nothing to do with Civil War and Negro freedom.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Forbes

    Exactly my recollection of the teaching of the history of the gift from France–to celebrate America’s centennial of the War for Independence. The other retconing nonsense is just that…

  36. @Buzz Mohawk

    Ha! A classic prank throughout the Midwest for decades has been stealing a Big Boy statue and setting it up in your high school parking lot.
     
    We did it in college.

    Bob stood proudly in front of our dormitory until the powers that be made us take him back.

    Fun was had by all, and no one got hurt.

    Replies: @Forbes

    Yeah, back when prankish fun was still allowed of campus. Today you’d get arrested.

  37. @Hail

    the monument was conceived in France as a celebration of the abolition of slavery
     
    Does he have a specific source on this?

    So the idea was not to celebrate the principles and ideals of democracy and republicanism -- in the 1870s, when the idea was presumably conceived, France had just started up their Third Republic after the humiliating loss to Germany in 1870 and collapse of the Second French Empire -- but specifically about the U.S. slavery issue?

    I find this hard to believe.

    Edit: (from Wiki):


    She holds a torch above her head, and in her left arm carries a tabula ansata inscribed "July 4, 1776"
     
    Hmm... If I remember my history, 1776 was not the abolition of slavery, was it!

    the statue was most likely conceived in 1870
     
    Suggesting my version involving French domestic upheaval (fall of the empire, rise of the new republic) is much more likely.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @res, @Alden

    You are right. Every history book I have ever read claimed that the statue was made both as a gift to recognize America’s 100 year anniversary and as PR for the third Republic.

    But history must be remade to accommodate the latest liberal narrative
    Actually the latest idea is that lady liberty is a Muslim woman

    Next year she will be transgender or non normative gender

  38. @IHTG
    @Guy de Champlagne

    In a choice between two fires, choose the one under control. Black birthrates are below replacement level.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Almost Missouri, @Alden

    Thanks to abortion.

  39. @res
    @Hail

    This page talks more about the motivations: https://www.nps.gov/stli/learn/historyculture/the-french-connection.htm

    The first paragraph looks to me like the original explanation with the second a retcon.


    The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the French people commemorating the alliance of France and the United States during the American Revolution. Yet, it represented much more to those individuals who proposed the gift.

    In 1865, Edouard de Laboulaye(a French political thinker, U.S. Constitution expert, and abolitionist) proposed that a monument be built as a gift from France to the United States in order to commemorate the perseverance of freedom and democracy in the United States and to honor the work of the late president Abraham Lincoln. Laboulaye hoped that by calling attention to the recent achievements of the United States, the French people would be inspired to create their own democracy in the face of a repressive monarchy. In 1865, France was divided between people who were still committed to the monarchy and people who supported the Enlightenment ideals (the belief that people had natural rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness). It was the hope of many French liberals that democracy would prevail and that freedom and justice for all would be attained.

     

    P.S. I seem to recall learning the statue was to commemorate the Centennial in history class. Though perhaps I am confusing that with the arm being at the Centennial: https://www.nypl.org/blog/2015/04/07/statue-liberty-pedestal

    Replies: @Alden

    In 1865 Bonaparte 2 was the second emperor. He overthrew the last monarch in 1848. Bonaparte was absolutely not overthrown by an uprising by liberals seeking democracy and Liberty for all

    Bonaparte’s government was overturned when the Prussians won a war in 1870. Bonaparte fled to England. The remaining officials cobbled together a peace with Prussia. France paid Prussia huge reparations. Prussia left. The not specially popular Third Republic was formed.

    The statue was part of the Third Republics PR effort

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