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Rep. Alcee Hastings, RIP
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Someday, the white man will lose his chokehold on power in America and be replaced by People of Color. If you want to know what that glorious age will be like, we can study the careers of pioneers like Rep. Alcee Hastings:

From the Washington Post’s obituary:

Rep. Alcee Hastings, civil rights lawyer and judge elected to 15 terms in Congress, dies at 84

By Harrison Smith
April 6, 2021 at 7:18 a.m. PDT

Rep. Alcee L. Hastings, a charismatic civil rights lawyer who became Florida’s first Black federal judge, was impeached on corruption charges and made a remarkable comeback as a liberal Democratic member of the U.S. House and the dean of his state’s congressional delegation, died April 6. He was 84.

… A pathbreaking jurist and politician, Rep. Hastings was appointed to the federal bench by President Jimmy Carter in 1979. He became one of Florida’s first three Black members of Congress since Reconstruction when, in 1992, he was elected alongside fellow Democrats Corrine Brown and Carrie Meek.

Rep. Hastings’s arrival in the House of Representatives was a stunning turn of events. The chamber had voted only five years earlier to impeach him, in the aftermath of an FBI sting operation and bribery investigation that made him the sixth federal judge to be removed from office.

Compared at times to the equally flamboyant Marion Barry, who weathered a drug arrest and jail sentence before winning a fourth term as D.C. mayor, Rep. Hastings went on to win reelection 14 times, …

But throughout his political career he was dogged by allegations of impropriety, corruption and sexual harassment, to which he responded with countercharges of racism. During a bitter 1992 primary battle with a White state lawmaker, Lois Frankel, he told the Palm Beach Post, “The bitch is a racist.”

He later apologized, to a point. “I called her a name,” he told the New York Times, “and I think my remarks were uncalled for, only because I used invective.” He added that he took offense that “she called me a crook, and I have no record anywhere in America of having a felony conviction. My only arrests are civil rights arrests.” In 2012, Rep. Hastings endorsed Frankel when she ran successfully for a nearby congressional seat.

In 2017, Roll Call reported that the congressional Office of Compliance approved a secret $220,000 settlement with one of Rep. Hastings’s former staffers, who alleged that he had made unwanted sexual advances.

Rep. Hastings called the allegations “ludicrous,” and a House ethics investigation cleared him of wrongdoing but chastised him for “certain conduct that is less than professional,” including comments about sex.

Facing little political opposition through the years, Rep. Hastings became what his colleague Meek once called “a folk hero” among African Americans. “He is a man who has come up against all the pressures, all the rage, the racism, all the things that Black men have come against,” she told The Washington Post in 1992.

Political analysts traced his success and endurance to a combination of personal magnetism, a gerrymandered district that included predominantly Black working-class sections of Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, and attention to issues relevant to his constituents, such as funding for Head Start preschool programs.

… Rep. Hastings was a judge for the Southern District of Florida when, in 1981, he was indicted on charges of soliciting a $150,000 bribe in exchange for leniency toward two men convicted of stealing money from a pension fund. While his alleged co-conspirator, Washington lawyer William A. Borders Jr., was found guilty, Rep. Hastings was acquitted by a jury. (Borders was later pardoned by President Bill Clinton.)

Two federal judges suspected Rep. Hastings had committed perjury during the trial, and, after a three-year investigation, an appeals court committee concluded that he had tampered with evidence and lied at least 15 times to win acquittal. Acting on the committee’s recommendation, the U.S. House voted 413 to 3 to impeach him in 1988. The Senate convicted him the next year in a 69-to-26 vote that removed him from the bench.

Rep. Hastings had long insisted that he was innocent, saying he had been “set upon by . . . warlocks.”

In case you are wondering, the Washington Post does not clarify Rep. Hastings’ meaning.

… Two years later, he was elected to represent the state’s newly created 23rd Congressional District. His campaign received a boost from U.S. District Judge Stanley Sporkin, who — weeks before a Democratic primary runoff that effectively secured Rep. Hastings’s victory — overturned his conviction in the Senate.

Rep. Hastings, Sporkin concluded, should have been tried by the entire Senate, rather than a 12-member panel. Ruling in 1993 on a separate case, the U.S. Supreme Court found that impeachment proceedings were not subject to judicial review, effectively upholding his conviction.

By then he was in Congress, where his removal hovered over his tenure even as he tried to reinvent himself as a collegial, hard-working legislator. When Democrats regained the majority in 2006, he was passed over for the chairmanship of the Intelligence Committee, amid criticism that he was not fit for the position.

Rep. Hastings responded in typical fashion. “Sorry, haters,” he wrote in a statement, “God is not finished with me yet.”

… He was expelled from Howard University Law School for what he called “non­seriousness of purpose” before receiving a law degree in 1963 from Florida A&M University.

While in Congress, Rep. Hastings drew scrutiny for his spending habits, including the use of taxpayer money on trips abroad. In 2012, the non­partisan watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington reported that he had paid Patricia Williams, often described as his longtime girlfriend, more than $600,000 from 2007 to 2010 to work as deputy district director of his congressional office. He insisted that she was not “family” and declined to say whether they were in a relationship.

A House ethics investigation into whether he had an improper relationship with Williams was dropped last year, following the disclosure that they had been married since 2019.

He was divorced at least twice and had three children. A complete list of survivors was not immediately available. …

 
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  1. Polistra says:

    What’s even the point of this post? The guy sounds like a typical PoC political figure. Why the axe grinding? Let people be what they wanna be.

    “He is a man who has come up against all the pressures, all the rage, the racism, all the things that Black men have come against.”

    IKR? In particular, white wimmenz who complain too much.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @AndrewR
  2. Polistra says:

    Rep. Alcee L. Hastings, a charismatic civil rights lawyer who became Florida’s first Black federal judge

    Non-racist is capitalizing the word Black wherever it appears.

    Anti-racist is putting all the other words in lower case.

    Think about this, please. Do the work. Do better.

    • LOL: Wade Hampton, Mr. XYZ
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Hans
  3. It’s really disgusting how these guys can jump around from office to office, branch to branch (especially shnook-lawyers who end up in the executive, like Obama and Biden).

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  4. Like Marion Barry, he blamed someone else for his improprieties.

    “Bitch set me up!” and “Racist!” deflections work.

    I should never celebrate the death of anyone, but this POS should never have held any elected office or sat on any bench.

    Steve could very well be right about the future.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @Mr. XYZ
  5. @Polistra

    The Washington Post decided last June to capitalize both black and white. Most other news outlets decided to capitalize black but not white.

  6. What percentage of your readers are women? People of color? non-binary people? Do you have ways of finding this out Steve?

  7. anon[197] • Disclaimer says:

    In the future every black man will be a Big Man for 15 minutes.
    – Alcee Hastings Warhol

  8. It’s not the fact that they are crooks, it’s the fact that they’re so bad at it.

    James Michael Curley was an artist compared to this schlub.

    When Jews taught blacks that screaming “racist” was a viable weapon that the Jews would amplify, blacks thought it meant it was the Swiss army knife of defenses.

    • Agree: p38ace
  9. If he’d come up what other black men had, wouldn’t he have been hung? Or at least be in prison?

  10. @Polistra

    “He is a man who has come up against all the pressures, all the rage, the racism, all the things that Black men have come against.”

    Standards are racist. Live with it.

  11. @Steve Sailer

    The Washington Post decided last June to capitalize both black and white.

    In other words, their standards have reached the level of Jet and Essence.

    Judge accordingly.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  12. Escher says:

    Standards and ethics are racist.
    The Big Man culture be coming to America, yo!

  13. EdwardM says:

    I am grateful for Hastings’s history because it established the precedent that even if someone is removed from office by the Senate, he can still be later elected to office.

    The Dems impeached President Trump for the second time because they were hoping to secure a vote to prevent him from running again under Article 1, Section 3 of the Constitution which states that the Senate can impose “disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States.” Many legal scholars hold that this clause only applies to appointed positions, not elected, so it probably would not have worked to bar Trump even if the Senate had so voted.

    This is how it should be. The people of Hastings’s district certainly knew what they were getting in electing him, which should be their right. And he didn’t disappoint.

  14. TyRade says:

    Netflix surely has the movie in production? A “folk hero” indeed, uber-Floyd even. And candidate for the best euphemism for the moral cess pit of his ilk? “Flamboyant”! Fraudster? Na, just flamboyant. Abuser? Na, just a tad flamboyant. George? Flamboyant.
    One semi-interesting point from airbrushed obit of this midget of a man: he paid “attention to issues relevant to his constituents, such as funding for Head Start preschool programs.” This sounds a lot how other gangsters, like the PLO, IRA, Nation of Islam, Hezbollah, and indeed out-and-out gangsters ‘looked after their own’ and sustained support (between pure intimidation). Maybe the Democrats are the first major party to adopt this longevity stratagem.

  15. Dan Hayes says:

    TRULY, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS!

    • LOL: Hibernian
  16. I grew up in South Florida. I remember when he was just a corrupt local judge. #soproud!

  17. A man who put the “African” in African American.

  18. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, since you’re intimately familiar with the Jet and Essence style guides, tell us: Do/did those magazines actually capitalize both Black and White?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  19. Hibernian says:
    @EdwardM

    Many legal scholars hold that this clause only applies to appointed positions, not elected, so it probably would not have worked to bar Trump even if the Senate had so voted.

    There’s no honor in the Legislative Branch, and we’d be foolish to trust any but a very few of them, but a fair number of them sure know how to profit.

  20. I am not sure what the point of all of this is.
    Is there really any difference between a corrupt black politician and a corrupt white politician, other than the color of their skin?

    It would be more convincing if the people making fun of folks who voted for a corrupt black politician hadn’t knowingly voted for the guy who was behind the Trump University scam.

    I guess the difference is, when a corrupt black Democrat gets caught he cries “racism”, while when a corrupt white Republican gets caught he cries “deep state” or “lying press”.

  21. AndrewR says:
    @Polistra

    He was a corrupt federal judge who then was repeatedly voted into Congress by his low IQ constituents, and he subsequently voted on thousands of bills affecting all Americans. His passing definitely deserves its own post. And a celebratory toast. Sadly the problem with him wasn’t generational.

  22. Walsh2 says:

    Contrary to popular opinion black folks didn’t contribute a whole lot to the building of America. They have and will, however, play an oversized role in the destruction of it.

    • Agree: Detroit Refugee
  23. Hans says:
    @Polistra

    JFK was rayciss. It’s aks.

  24. Hastings’ blatant corruption and peachmint was big news when I worked in Florida — so I was shocked to see him reappear years later enjoying such a, uh, vibrant career. It would be like seeing Johnny Manziel somehow resurface leading his team to the Super Bowl.

    The double standard here of course is how black crooks and charlatans can get a pass thanks to being “charismatic”

  25. “Sorry, haters,” he wrote in a statement, “God is not finished with me yet.”

    God confirmed that today he is in fact “finally finished with that old sinner Alcee.”

    Satan did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

  26. Rep. Hastings was elected and re elected. He was popular with enough of his constituents to never have to do much of anything he did not want to do. That is what representative republicanism is all about. It is OUR fault that we trust any of these mutts with anything important.

    We get what we ask for, not what we expect or deserve.

    • Agree: Orville H. Larson
  27. Rob says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    In defense of Trump voters, who else could they have voted for who wanted to:

    Expel the illegals
    Reshore manufacturing
    End the wars

    Yet we have to do all three and more in the same vein. Literally, give me the name of one other politician who supports all three. Hell, one politician who supports any two of the three. There are maybe a few politicians who support one of the three. By supports, I mean pushes. Privately believing something is not supporting it. Maybe politicians’ private beliefs keep the country from doing things, but if all 535 legislators want something, but will never say or vote for it, it does not even shift the Overton window. Like Obi Wan, Trump was our only hope. Trump betrayed us, and no one else has taken up the torch, but supporting him in 2015 was not stupid.

    There are lots of black politicians who favor the things that any black pol favors. If all of them are scum, that is kinda damning of black people. Arguably, only corrupt people can get through the donors’ filters and be acceptable to already established corrupt politicians. To them, compromisable may be a feature.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  28. Currahee says:

    “attention to issues relevant to his constituents, such as funding for Head Start preschool programs.”
    A record of brilliant success, indeed.

  29. KenH says:

    Alcee Hastings can rot in hell (RIH). He was just a typical black criminal who blacks elect to office because they only standard they care about is skin color.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  30. @EdwardM

    “This is how it should be. The people of Hastings’s district certainly knew what they were getting in electing him, which should be their right. And he didn’t disappoint.”

    The people of Hastings’ district shouldn’t even have the franchise to start with.

  31. AndrewR says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Trump is an outlier. Many people who acknowledged his corruption presumably voted for him in the hopes he would be a good president or at least less bad than the alternatives. Even the most self-centered people can do good things, depending on the incentive structures. Presumably many others refused to trust the meda’s allegations about Trump, which is healthy. 99% of the time, the media intentionally lies or omits information when covering a story. 0.9% of the time they don’t try to lie but their incompetence and low IQs leads them to accidentally give false information or omit an important fact.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  32. Art Deco says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    You voted for Joe Biden. Piss off.

    • Agree: David In TN, Ron Mexico, Ed
  33. Matttt says:

    I’d rather have 1,000 corrupt black big men like Alcee Hastings that one half-wit affirmative-action black woman with a thin resume and a chip on her shoulder. At least we don’t have to pretend the big men are pretty.

  34. Dmitri says:

    Another black pioneer:

    President Carter, before his nomination of Alcee Hastings, nominated Robert F. Collins to the Eastern District of Louisiana in 1978, resulting in his being the first black judge for the EDLA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Frederick_Collins

    Collins also took a bribe, but unlike Hastings he was convicted and served prison time. He would only resign his judgeship the day before his impeachment hearing was scheduled.

    Not to be outdone, the successor to his seat in the EDLA, Thomas Porteous, a white Clinton nomination, was impeached and convicted by the Senate for various wrongdoings but unlike Hastings, forever disqualified from holding Federal office.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  35. Whiskey says: • Website

    Imagine every political leader and bureaucrat like Alcee Hastings. That is the future. There is no escape from it.

  36. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Reg, since you’re intimately familiar with the Jet and Essence style guides, tell us: Do/did those magazines actually capitalize both Black and White?

    Just from the occasional glance at laundromats. Of course, they used to use Negro at the start. But they’ve been “capitalists” for decades. Which is what makes the alt-righters of today look rather whiggerish.

    This is a very old issue: Some Notes on the Capital “N”

    If we’ve traded Negro for Black, why was that first letter demoted back to lowercase, when the argument had already been won? Publications like Essence and Ebony push back, proudly capitalizing the B. But claiming the uppercase as a choice, rather than the rule, feels inadequate.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/19/opinion/the-case-for-black-with-a-capital-b.html

    The Diversity Style Guide adds that “other , like ‘The Chicago Manual of Style,’ allow capitalization if an author or publication prefers. Essence and Ebony magazines, The Chicago Defender, and many other publications serving African-American communities capitalize Black; some, but not all, capitalize White. The National Association of Black Journalists does not capitalize Black in its publications, including the NABJ Style Guide. After much research and consideration, the editor of The Diversity Style Guide elected to capitalize Black and White when used in a racial context, but most would say it’s not incorrect to lowercase those words.”

    https://socapglobal.com/2019/04/conscious-style-guide-the-case-for-capitalizing-black-and-white-in-context-of-racial-identity/

  37. @Art Deco

    Voting for Biden is awful, to put it politely. Still, I’m glad about any such voter who is willing to talk to us, unlike his crazier brothers, so some restraint should be in order.

    • Thanks: Paleo Liberal
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  38. anon[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Is there really any difference between a corrupt black politician and a corrupt white politician, other than the color of their skin?

    The way that the totally unbiased press treats them can be very different.

    I guess the difference is, when a corrupt black Democrat gets caught he cries “racism”, while when a corrupt white Republican gets caught he cries “deep state” or “lying press”.

    That’s one way to look at it. You might also notice the way the totally unbiased press treats them.

    A lie of omission is not as obvious as a deliberate lie of commission, yet it is still a lie.

  39. UFO spotted.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  40. Beyond all the other embarrassments here, it’s embarrassing to have some dude born in 1936 still lounging around the House until he croaks.

    Of course, that’s way, way, way, way less embarrassing than having a President who is a frail demented 78 year old bozo.

    A republic should be able to do better–much better.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  41. @Paleo Liberal

    Trump is embarrassing in all sorts of ways.

    But compared to the criminal, treasonous mis-governance of the United States by our parasitic, minoritarian “liberal” verbalist elites the past 50 years, Trump was pillar of wisdom and sagacity.

    (Which says less about Trump than our establishment elites.)

    • Agree: David In TN, Ron Mexico
  42. His campaign received a boost from [a politically appointed, lawyer-judge protected by lifetime tenure] who .. overturned his conviction

    An impeachment conviction leaves nothing for some appellate judge to “overturn”. As if the ruling could get a thrown out official reinstated.

    Congress should have tossed that other judge, also.

    the congressional Office of Compliance approved a secret $220,000 settlement with one of Rep. Hastings’s former staffers

    The what?

    I am so sick and tired of sucker taxpayers left holding the money bag for the il/licit actions of government officeholders.

  43. @petit bourgeois

    In Marion’s defense, the bitch did set him up.

  44. @Steve Sailer

    The AP style guide is still holding the lower-case line, surprisingly.

  45. @theo the kraut

    Voting for Biden is awful, to put it politely. Still, I’m glad about any such voter who is willing to talk to us, unlike his crazier brothers, so some restraint should be in order.

    That was uncharacteristically rude on A.D.’s part. Our resident fact-checker and P.L. (not to be confused with P.R.* are among the most civil of those who find a need to disagree. They can be useful at times.

    *a.k.a. 🪓⛰️, or 👼 the 🌬️💎

    • Thanks: Paleo Liberal
  46. Rep. Hastings responded in typical fashion. “Sorry, haters,” he wrote in a statement, “God is not finished with me yet.”

    God is finished with Alcee Hastings at this point. He probably wants fuck-all to do with him.

    R.I.P.? Why did you write that, Steve? I’m really curious. Do you admire that he was flamboyant and had some animal magnetism? I would admire him if he did what was RIGHT. That’s not the case. These types are the enemy of White people. You are too nice, Steve. This is a case in which nice guys WILL finish last.

  47. @AnotherDad

    Man, wouldn’t it be COOL if we had a Constitutional Republic?

    Why can’t we have a Constitutional Republic, Mom?!

  48. I was wondering why I had a little extra pep in my step this morning…lol

    Now I know.

    Than you, Steve.

  49. Hibernian says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Let’s see if the Orange Man ever holds public office again, versus a judge who was impeached and convicted and then somehow became a Congressman because, apparently, elected legislative office is not an office of trust and/or profit under the United States.

  50. @Rob

    That was indeed, an intelligent response.

    I don’t argue with people who feel Trump was the lesser of two evils. I disagreed, and thought the Democrats were less evil. We can disagree.

    My point was that Steve is calling Rep H an African style “big man” and saying this is the sort of corruption we can expect from black politicians.

    I merely pointed out that Trump is also a very corrupt politician. In fact, he is of the “big man” or “strong man” style of rule one expects from third world countries.

    And yes, there have been plenty of corrupt white Democrats as well. Plenty.

    • Replies: @Rob
    , @Gabe Ruth
    , @Jim Don Bob
  51. @JohnnyWalker123

    I seen a couple of those flying machines low over New York City at night when I was there in August of ’19. I’m pretty sure they came to pick up Jeffrey Epstein.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  52. @Hibernian

    An office of profit is a government (typically executive branch) job.

    Government jobs were traditionally few and filled by popular election: “He couldn’t even be elected dog catcher!”

    The phenomena we’re all accustomed to, that of numerous appointments and literally millions of government workers, is a big load of political crap.

    As a convicted felon loses his right to [register to] vote, he also becomes ineligible to hold any sort of government office.

  53. MBlanc46 says:

    Old Scratch has one of his own back.

  54. MBlanc46 says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    A lot of us have no more use for the Repubs than we have for the Dems.

  55. @GeneralRipper

    Don’t blame me.

    I voted for Quagmire.

  56. Rob says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Thanks, PR. As others have said, I am glad you are here. I like intelligent liberals. I think they are wrong on some big issues that, due to their unfettered control of the ship of state for umpteen years, have reached the level of existential threats. In fact, immigration. And deindustrialization have passed the hump of existential threat, and are the things that killed America as the nation-state of the American ethnic group.

    Just to take immigration, many liberals are happy that their team has won eternal victory over the hated white Christians, but history is not over. Political struggles have a great many more sides than two. When America dies, and I don’t think we have much chance of surviving, American liberals will likely discover that when blacks say they don’t like whites, and list all the negative traits of whites, they are not excluding liberals from their critique. In fact, urban blacks, and the chattering class blacks we hear from so much, in particular, have very little dealing with deplorables. When they talk about how racist, etc. whites are, they mean you, not deplorables.

    I think white liberals will discover that being one of two sides in a white, first world country was much better for liberals themselves and also their minority clients than what is coming. In fact, what is now inevitable.

    But I digress. I am happy to have you (and Jonathon Mason) here. Though I do wonder how representative liberals/progressives/non-whites who come here to do more than call us deplorable racists are of your side. Please stick around.

  57. Mr. XYZ says:
    @Steve Sailer

    To have REAL emphasis on the word Black, it also needs to be bolded so that it can be really Black.

  58. Mr. XYZ says:
    @petit bourgeois

    I don’t think that he was so much blaming others (other than warlocks!) so much as he was simply living the good life as a black man, which interestingly enough he could probably only do in a white-majority country such as the U.S.! In Africa, there wouldn’t be enough moolah for him to live the good life! Nor the opportunity for engaging in race swindling and race hustling! In Africa, he would probably be some lowly civil servant. He’d probably try to steal, but have less opportunities to do this in Africa than in the U.S.

  59. @Mr. XYZ

    Right. Her, and that Megan Markle, that guy she’s married to, and anyone else I don’t give a flying fuck about. They’re all up in there, so there’s no reason to hear about them anymore… Johnny Walker?

  60. Gabe Ruth says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    If huwhyte men are playing corrupt big man as well, that demonstrates our hosts point. It isn’t a new model for any race, but it used to be a notable situation rather than the norm.

    Good to know you thought the party advocating one sided race war was less evil, appreciate your candor.

  61. He may be a POS, but boy does he stick it to whitey!

  62. @Dmitri

    Convicted Congress critters and federal judges keep getting paid in prison. Only impeachment stops the dollars.

  63. @Paleo Liberal

    I merely pointed out that Trump is also a very corrupt politician.

    How is Trump a very corrupt politician? Serious question.

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