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From the Opinion section of the New York Times:

The Forgotten Lessons of the Recovered Memory Movement

By Ethan Watters

Mr. Watters is a journalist and author whose work focuses on psychiatry and social psychology. Ethan Watters is a co-author of “Making Monsters: False Memories, Psychotherapy, and Sexual Hysteria” and the author of “Crazy Like Us: The Globalization of the American Psyche.”

The latter book is about how American mental health fads influence the rest of the world (usually for the worse). For example, nobody in Hong Kong suffered anorexia until the Hong Kong media, watching American media, started warning of the coming anorexia menace. And, sure enough, moody Hong Kong girls shortly started to develop anorexia.

Obviously, Watters’ perspective is instructive in understanding the current wave of Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria among moody American teenage girls demanding “top surgery.” But transgenderism is sacred, so he writes a long allegory about America’s 1980-90s mania about recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse and bravely squeezes in one mention of “gender dysphoria” along the way.

Sept. 27, 2022

Most students in psychology and psychiatry programs today are too young to have any firsthand memory of the moral panic engendered by the recovered memory movement in the 1980s and early 1990s. This was a time when therapists proudly advertised their ability to help clients unearth supposedly repressed memories of childhood sexual abuse; the accusations that followed shattered families and communities across the country.

The belief that such memories could be repressed and then recovered through special techniques was widespread among mental health professionals for well over a decade. In books and on television, therapists portrayed themselves as the first generation of healers to understand both these mechanisms of repression and how to unlock them without contaminating the story that emerged. The results were dramatic: Patients often recovered abuse memories that began in infancy and lasted for decades. Some came to believe not only that they had repressed memories but also that their minds had fractured into many personalities to manage the pain and betrayal.

With a few decades’ perspective, it’s clear this level of confidence led to disastrous results. In 2005 a Harvard psychology professor, Richard McNally, called the recovered memory movement “the worst catastrophe to befall the mental health field since the lobotomy era.”

At the height of the controversy in 1994, I co-wrote a book, “Making Monsters,” on the topic with the sociologist Richard Ofshe. In writing it, we hoped to help stop the practice that was harming so many. We also wanted to create a historical record that might help prevent the profession from going down another rabbit hole.

Just what happened to lead so many well-intentioned people down such a road is not a simple story. Understanding the power of recovered memory therapy requires an examination not just of the memory retrieval techniques used by individual therapists but also of how the movement created a tide of popular belief that bordered on mass hysteria. Recovered memory stories were, for a time, pervasive and inescapable. These stories influenced both patients and therapists as they hunted for hidden histories of abuse.

Considering the speed at which ideas spread on the internet and social media, a deep understanding of how cultural trends and psychology interact is more important than ever. We tend not to want to believe that we or our healers are susceptible to social contagions — which is why the recovered memory movement remains a cautionary tale with much to teach us.

It sounds like the recovered memory whoop-tee-doo started out among feminist intellectuals talking back to Freud, who first decided from talking to his women patients that there must have been an epidemic of childhood sex abuse in Victorian Vienna, then changed his mind and decided that women be crazy and they just wanted to sleep with their fathers. Later it went downscale and was taken up by fundamentalists convinced that P&G was a satanist organization. (And now it pops up again in QAnon theories.)

The seeds of recovered memory therapy were planted in the 1970s, as the women’s rights movement brought attention to the subject of sexual abuse. As women began to fill academic and clinical positions, the topics of incest and child sexual exploitation began appearing in scholarly and popular books. The public reckoning revealed that child sexual abuse was far from uncommon and that these horrors had been largely dismissed or ignored for centuries.

It’s probably fairly common among the mom’s-latest-alcoholic-boyfriend class, but less so among women who can afford Freudian psychiatrists.

Some writers at the time argued that public attention on the topic had unlocked the ability of individuals to recover their abuse memories. “The ordinary response to atrocities is to banish them from consciousness,” wrote Dr. Judith Herman in her book “Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence — From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror.” She argued that the human mind could hold trauma memories in its consciousness only with the support of “political movements that give voice to the disempowered.” If the personal is political, as the popular slogan had it, it made a kind of sense that individuals might have repressed their memories, in the same way society had long repressed collective awareness.

In step with these new ideas, therapists of the time reanimated an early Freudian theory that repressed early experiences of sexual abuse were the root cause of all hysterical symptoms. Freud had subsequently pivoted to argue that symptoms came not from repressed memories but from repressed sexual fantasies — but Dr. Herman and others argued that Freud was right the first time.

What happened during recovered memory therapy sessions is no mystery. Therapists candidly revealed their techniques in books, conference speeches and academic papers and on daytime television talk shows. The process of hunting for abuse memories and overcoming the patient’s “denial” was not a subtle one.

Therapists used relaxation exercises, age regression, dream interpretation, psychodrama, sodium amytal and hypnosis to help clients visualize abuse. All of these techniques, we know now, are much more likely to distort memory than to enhance recall. Still, it is hard to believe that these tactics alone could have persuaded so many people to rewrite the histories of their childhoods so dramatically; what is often underappreciated is that much of the belief-building power of recovered memory therapy came from outside the consultation room.

… Lists of the symptoms that supposedly indicated repressed abuse often went on for pages in these texts. E. Sue Blume’s book “Secret Survivors” listed over 70 symptoms indicative of repressed abuse. The psychologist Renee Fredrickson’s book “Repressed Memories” describes over 60. Do you have trouble trusting your intuition? Do you neglect your teeth? Have joint pain? Do certain foods nauseate you? Do you sometimes space out or daydream? If you have some of these warning signals, “you probably do have repressed memories,” wrote Dr. Fredrickson.

Or, these days, that you were assigned the wrong gender at birth and you are really a boy.

… It was partly because of its novelty that stories about recovered memory therapy were, for a time, everywhere in popular culture. Recovered memory therapists became go-to guests on daytime television talk shows. Well-known celebrities came out to tell their stories of recovering memories of abuse. Promoters of recovered memory therapy held regional and national conferences; states changed their statute of limitation laws to allow for criminal prosecutions based on repressed memories. The movement rode a tide of public belief that therapists helped create.

That popular culture influenced what happened in therapy is clear. Recovered memory therapists themselves recognized that abuse beliefs were, to a degree, contagious. One therapist recommended that patients struggling to uncover memories should continually expose themselves to stories of incest and abuse by reading articles and popular books, attending lectures and seeing movies on the topic.

… Stories of satanic cults have arisen in different times and places for over a millennium, but “Michelle Remembers” gets credit for kicking off the particular hysteria that struck the 1980s. The book describes the treatment of Michelle Smith, who recovered memories of being held captive in cages filled with snakes and witnessing the butchering of kittens and stillborn babies.

The popularity of “Michelle Remembers” was a precursor to hundreds of stories that began popping up across the country about day cares and preschools suspected of harboring Satan-worshiping child abusers. In a parallel development, patients in recovered memory therapy began to “recover” stories of satanic abuse from their childhoods. These types of memories were far from uncommon: One survey of clinicians taken in 1994 revealed that 13 percent reported seeing at least one case of a patient remembering ritualistic abuse. Thousands of patients described truly incredible scenes of ritual murders, cannibalization, gang rapes and forced pregnancies.

For quite a long time, there was a broad consensus in popular opinion that memories recovered in therapy — including the outlandish satanic cult tales — were true. Nearly a decade after the publication of “Michelle Remembers,” Ms. Smith appeared on Oprah Winfrey’s daytime talk show. Her stories of torture and human sacrifice were portrayed by the host as if they were indisputable facts. …

Whatever the actual number of patients who came to believe they had unearthed repressed memories, it would drastically understate the number of people affected. Parents, relatives and other accused parties were expected to confess or be shunned. Criminal and civil litigation based on recovered memories tore apart families and sometimes whole communities.

*
How could the mental health profession have had such a catastrophic misadventure?

Across history, patients have shown themselves willing to adopt their healers’ beliefs and manifest expected symptoms accordingly.

… With historical distance, it’s easier to see how this process works. In the 1880s, Jean-Martin Charcot, the leading neurologist of his day, became world famous for the regular performances he held with his hysterical patients. For audiences of other doctors, he had his patients demonstrate the dramatic symptoms of the disorder, including fainting, muscle spasms and semierotic convulsions.

With his prominence in the profession and his gift of showmanship, he deeply impressed other learned men — including the young Sigmund Freud, who idolized Charcot. As more and more healers spread their certainties about hysteria through culture, more and more patients showed up in treatment consciously or unconsciously predisposed to express their distress through those well-known symptoms. Hysteria reigned for several decades as the quintessential mental health malady across Europe and America; a generation later, hysteria in its 19th-century configuration had essentially vanished from the symptom pool.

… In her 2021 book “The Sleeping Beauties,” the neurologist Dr. Suzanne O’Sullivan wrote compellingly of immigrant children falling into comalike states and groups of young women experiencing seizures without organic cause. Her insights into the connection between culture and these unique symptoms of psychopathology are trenchant. “We embody narratives,” she explained. “Some are told to us by powerful people — doctors, politicians, activists, public figures, celebrities.” She continued, “If a model for illness is vivid enough and the basis for the illness is sufficiently salient, it is easily internalized by the individual and then passed from person to person.”

… But the impact of cultural beliefs on the rise of recovered memory therapy is simply impossible to ignore. The process that recovered memory therapists describe in their books was the looping effect on steroids. Patients began with vague symptoms of distress and ended up with a compelling story of why they were unhappy — a story that was embraced and promoted in both the mental health profession and popular culture. In the end, the patients had new memories, a new designation as a survivor and altered relationships with everyone in their lives. The transformation into a new identity — a new way of being — could hardly have been more dramatic.

Remind you of anything lately?

But what motivated therapists to buy into recovered memory therapy? Certainly there was the competition for patients and the financial rewards of a treatment regimen that often lasted for years. But I think these reasons are secondary. The therapists’ writings from the period reveal their passion and zeal for the movement. This was a group of healers who believed that they not only had discovered the key to their patients’ suffering but also were exposing a hidden evil across society. The therapists, in short, were as caught up in the cultural currents as their patients.

A lot of people sincerely believe that a vast number of individuals were “assigned” the wrong identity at birth. They didn’t believe that ten years ago, but what else could explain why all the nice people now believe that must be true other that that it must be true.

… Dr. O’Sullivan found few patients, caregivers or kin willing to entertain the idea that seizures, comalike states or other debilitating symptoms could be caused by something as ephemeral as cultural beliefs and social expectations. Americans, in particular, tend to reject the notion. We believe in the egocentric mind. We are captains of our own ship and abhor the idea that our most profound sense of self might be malleable to cultural forces outside our control.

… But the evidence for the harm done in therapy continued to pile up, and more people and institutions became skeptical. Courts began to reject testimony based on recovered memories as unreliable. Some former patients successfully sued their therapists after realizing they had been badly misled. Dissociative disorder units that specialized in recovered memories and multiple personality disorders were shut down. The stories of cult abuse became too incredible to be believed, and the satanic panic broke like a fever to go dormant for another generation.

But, recovered memory true believers never really developed a political identity or political allies the way trans has, with, say, Admiral Levine in the Biden Administration. Over time, it became an increasingly downscale fervor among Christian evangelicals, where as subscribing to trans ideology is seen by huge numbers of people as proving that they have 3 digit IQs.

… Recently, I spent an afternoon watching various TikTok channels under the hashtags #recoveredmemory and #dissociativeidentitydisorder. The ideas and themes I heard, mostly from young adults, were disturbingly familiar. Belief in memory repression and the idea that the mind can split into dozens of distinct personalities are alive and well. Across social networking sites, I also found a maelstrom of information, opinion and conversation about mental health topics, including Tourette’s syndrome, gender dysphoria, attention deficit disorder, self-harm, eating disorders, anxiety, depression and suicide.

He did it! He slipped the words “gender dysphoria” into his huge essay in the New York Times. Watters is a brave man.

The internet as we know it didn’t exist during the rise of recovered memory therapy, but it is a powerful cultural force now and may be ground zero for the creation of new symptom pools, new looping effects and new ways of being.

What takes place on social media will, no doubt, influence what develops during private therapy sessions. Effectively treating this new generation will require an understanding of how culture is once again shaping the symptoms of patients and the certainties of healers. Without that knowledge, mental health professionals will risk engendering new hysterias that they can neither control nor cure.

Back in 1997, I reviewed Elaine Showalter’s book Hystories for National Review:

Hysteria, His and Hers

published in National Review, 9/1/97 — by STEVE SAILER

SOMETIMES you get what you ask for. Back in 1985 Elaine Showalter, a Princeton English professor specializing in the social history of mental health, concluded her critique of the traditional psychotherapy profession by proclaiming: “The best hope for the future is the feminist therapy movement.” By 1997, the mental-health industry has become thoroughly feminized, but Professor Showalter has had second thoughts: “The therapist’s role is more and more to affirm, support, and endorse the patient’s narrative, . . . and not to challenge the truth or historical reality of the patient’s assertions.”

This credulous atmosphere, she believes, has helped unleash “hysterical epidemics,” such as the disgraceful witchhunts for satanic cults running day-care centers. Mrs. Showalter cites five other “hysterical'” outbreaks: the booms in recovered memory of incestuous abuse, multiple-personality disorders, alien abductions, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Gulf War Syndrome. For an academic treatise with a first printing of only 7,500 copies, Hystories has already generated quite a backlash. In hounding the author, Chronic Fatigue sufferers have proved especially energetic…

Mrs. Showalter’s strongest chapters are on epidemics like the satanic-abuse and alien-abduction scares, whose alleged causes are wholly imaginary; and on Gulf War Syndrome, whose primary cause is real but not specific to that conflict: “war makes people sick.” While it may turn out that chemical weapons or sand fleas really did afflict some minority of the sufferers, on the whole GWS appears to be the latest version of what other eras labeled “shell shock,” “battle fatigue,” or “post-traumatic stress disorder.” America must realize that one of the costs of going to war is later paying fully for treatment and disability leaves for a substantial number of psychologically injured soldiers, although treating mental traumas as honorable wounds will no doubt let some hypochondriacs and malingerers slip through…

Unfortunately, Miss Showalter’s literary world view is too black-and-white for those epidemics where some but not all of the patients’ stories are true, e.g., incestuous abuse. The acrimony of these debates stems in part from both sides’ thinking about all patients as Platonic abstractions (“incest victims” v. “hysterics”). In reality, mental health is more like an unsettlingly random pachinko game.

The classic case study of how psychological debates tend toward dogmatism has been running for a full century since Sigmund Freud analyzed 18 unhappy young women. After much bullying by Freud, they all produced stories of childhood sexual abuse. First announcing an epidemic of incest, Freud then publicly changed his mind and blamed all the women for repressing Oedipal fantasies. Millions of words have since been written about this controversy. Most feminists contend that all 18 really were incest victims. In contrast, after a decade of listening to the nonsensical narratives that present-day therapists can elicit, Professor Showalter thinks Freud was right to recant…

Few, however, seem to have remarked how unlikely it is that any single diagnosis was right for all 18. In truth, some of the troubled women probably were child-abuse victims, while some others may have been repressing guilty fantasies. Probably a large proportion were suffering from other root problems that weren’t understood back then, such as chemical imbalances in the brain that strike largely at random. Serotonin, for instance, acts rather like motor oil for your emotional engine, keeping your mental gears from grinding. It can run low — often, it appears, just from wear and tear. Since the cause of the emotional illnesses stemming from serotonin shortages is commonly not apparent, victims are susceptible to whatever tall tales (a/k/a hysterical epidemics) their therapists or the media happen to be spreading at the moment. Thankfully, we now have drugs like Prozac, and a new, more pragmatic school of psychiatrists who no longer set out on ideologically motivated searches for the root causes of your unhappiness, but instead concentrate on rebalancing your brain chemistry…

A beneficial side effect of a more realistic conception of hysterical epidemics allows this useful concept to be profitably applied to other current brouhahas where facts and feelings get hopelessly entangled, e.g., date rape and sexual harassment…

This sensible but limited book illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of what has recently become a lonely rump of feminism: “equity” or “rationalist” feminism. Appalled by the flapdoodle peddled by most feminists today, Mrs. Showalter wearily protests, “Feminism has a strong Enlightenment, rationalist tradition of debate and skepticism, whose memory I attempt to recover and reassert.” She bravely points out that the great majority of these epidemics’ self-proclaimed victims are women, even the alien abductees. (Gulf War Syndrome, of course, is the exception, but the number of soldiers’ wives who have also come down with GWS is striking.)…

Unfortunately, rationalist feminism is itself founded on a death-defying leap of faith: the assumption that there are no biological bases for differences in behavior between the sexes. Thus, equity feminism was much to blame for the imprisoning of so many young women day-care workers on absurd charges of raping children and eating babies. If we know anything about sex abuse, we know it’s a solitary male crime, not something women do, especially not in groups. But equity feminism has made such stereotypes unacceptable, so all those young women, whose only crime was that they loved little kids so much they’d work with them for $5 an hour, had to go to jail…

Further, rationalist feminism’s fundamental dogma of sexual uniformity prevents Miss Showalter from grasping why feminist movements are so vulnerable to the irrationalism she despises. It’s not because women aren’t as smart as men. Although the sexes do differ on average in mathematical skills, women may well be superior in verbal logic. (Try eavesdropping on two teenage girls analyzing the endless possibilities of what some boy really meant when he said, “Maybe, like, I’ll see you around sometime, you know?”)

So why, in practice, are the terms “feminist theory” and “scientific theory” mutually exclusive? … The particular form of rationality that originated in the Enlightenment requires more than just the ability to construct castles of logical conjecture in the air. Galileo wasn’t any more ingenious at conceiving interlocking celestial spheres than his ancient rival Ptolemy. What distinguished Galileo, and the Enlightenment in general, was that masculine competitive delight in risking the destruction of your own hypotheses in order to smash the other guy’s beautiful celestial spheres of theory. The Enlightenment turned reason into a contact sport. Feminist movements careen into gullibility because women, especially when talking mostly to other women, find it more emotionally difficult than men to treat intellectual debate as a game. Women tend to take it much more personally, closing their minds to opponents and pulling their punches with friends.

 
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  1. Not knowing the past (forget about “not remembering the past”–to remember, one must have known it at one point) is a feature, not a bug.

    Someone once wrote something about that, in a book about some year. Eh, I forget the details…

    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Matthew Kelly

    “To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic, to repudiate morality while laying claim to it, to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy, to forget whatever it was necessary to forget, then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed, and then promptly to forget it again:

    ===> and above all, to apply the same process to the process itself <===

    -- that was the ultimate subtlety: consciously to induce unconsciousness, and then, once again, to become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you had just performed. Even to understand the word 'doublethink' involved the use of doublethink.”
    ― George Orwell, 1984

    Everyone probably knew what you were referring to, but here it is, anyway, Matthew Kelly.

  2. Articles like this is probably where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don’t hurt the Deep State. This way, when he’s needed to push a Narrative, the lower IQ crowd will listen to him.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    , @New Dealer
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Don't be silly.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    , @Matt Buckalew
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Ok but what would you expect Ron Unz was a deep state asset that got cut loose after he got humiliated by Pete Wilson.

    “America is the Great Satan and what can fix it is more taco trucks.” That’s Ron Unz’s perfect distilled and that’s why the deep state brought him on board. But unz couldn’t hit his sales goals so know he’s cut loose desperately trying to get the old flames attention with sadder and sadder displays of ostentation

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don’t hurt the Deep State.
     
    You are comparing donkeys to roses.
    Something lots of disappointed romantics tend to do.
    All the while roses are nice - as are donkeys. So - none
    of the two can prove the other one being X. Or Y, or
    - whatever.

    (This is a brilliant / insightful post of Mr. Sailer.
    But of course: Feel free not to like it - for whatever
    reason(s). Just understand, this then is about you, not
    about this - as I said: great and admirably
    insightful article.)

    Replies: @J.Ross

  3. Anon[233] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I reviewed Showalter's "Hystories" in 1997 for National Review -- it's the second review down on its Amazon page:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Hysterical-Epidemics-Modern-Media/dp/B000OPGK1Y

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    , @Rob McX
    @Anon

    It's easy to see how the lethargy caused by depression could be translated into "chronic fatigue syndrome". Antidepressants may not be as effective as they're made out to be, but at least the doctor would be targeting the real illness rather than inventing a new one.

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    , @possumman
    @Anon

    Long Covid--the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome----same people--same vague symptoms---if you have a mysterious bug bite even better---Lyme Disease

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Anon

    Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    There would be a lot less of this if more workers had the attitude of a woman I used to work with. Our boss was complaining to her about her sick day frequency and she told him, "Look, there's three times when I'm sick:

    1. when I'm sick
    2. when one of my kids is sick
    3. when I'm sick of you"

    , @Sideshow Bob Too
    @Anon

    CFS is often hypothyroidism.

    Most doctors don't know how to diagnose or treat it. Protip: you need to do a full thyroid panel, not just TSH.

    , @EH
    @Anon

    "CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system"

    Nonsense. CFS is very real, has multiple causes (mostly various viral infections, also mitrochondrial disorders), has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers and others. Doctors don't want to hear about CFS symptoms from patients at all, and usually prescribe exercise, which has been proven over and over again to cause deterioration, often to the point of becoming completely bedridden.

    It's depression that is over-diagnosed, with no reliable tests, and the serotonin theory of depression (and the chemical imbalance / drug-deficiency hypothesis in general) that has been completely disproven, with the drugs being no better than placebos but with dangerous side-effects.

    You're also wrong about Gulf-War syndrome, and the guy Steve quotes at length is wrong about multiple personalities not existing (very rare, though and over-diagnosed). The idea that memories are never repressed is idiotic as well, though not as idiotic as the idea that just because false memories can me implanted with hypnosis that disproves all recovered memories, including the ones not implanted by hypnosis.

    The fact that psychiatry is 95% BS and outright fraud in no way disproves the existence of psychological processes such as repression and projection - not to mention mass psychosis.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous

  4. Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @R.G. Camara


    Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.
     
    I don't think that this will happen. Too many are complicit.
    , @Colin Wright
    @R.G. Camara

    '...They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning...'

    Well, not sued. There's too much litigation as it is.

    It's a tad melodramatic, but doesn't the 'Doctors trial' at Nuremberg offer a precedent? Wasn't there something like that?

    , @personfellowindividual
    @R.G. Camara

    I have an expectation that there will be an outbreak of violence from enraged fathers whose daughters were tricked into acquiescing, then mutilated and sterilized by fashionable quacks. When their little girls come back to them in tears after realizing they weren't actually boys (all too late), there's going to be hell to pay. At least there should be.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  5. Can’t wait for the Regression sequel! Emma Watson may be a tranny by the time that gets greenlighted (greenlit?) anyway, so maybe easy casting…

  6. I wonder how many NYT readers will persevere far enough to be induced to demand his firing.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Anonymous

    I suspect there is a code among that crowd: if you write enough words before mentioning the unmentionable, you're good.

  7. It’s almost as if a certain, not inconsiderable subset of girls are highly impressionable, easily manipulated, and prone to hysteria. A crazy idea, I know.

  8. I’ve got repressed memories myself myself of really, really stupid ideas being promoted in the NY Times when I was young. Reading your blog has brought out many of these memories. Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?

    Watch what you write here about the new genderbending though. It’s bad for business, your peeing in the symptom pool like this.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?"

    Yes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corvinus

    , @James N. Kennett
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I’ve got repressed memories myself myself of really, really stupid ideas being promoted in the NY Times when I was young.
     
    Brilliant.
  9. On the other hand, the false memory syndrome foundation was founded by an accused pedophile and had on its scientific board people like this:

    The article contained statements which were interpreted as supportive of paedophilia. In particular, when asked “Is choosing paedophilia for you a responsible choice for the individuals?” Underwager responded,

    Certainly it is responsible. What I have been struck by as I have come to know more about and understand people who choose paedophilia is that they let themselves be too much defined by other people. That is usually an essentially negative definition. Paedophiles spend a lot of time and energy defending their choice. I don’t think that a paedophile needs to do that. Paedophiles can boldly and courageously affirm what they choose. They can say that what they want is to find the best way to love. I am also a theologian and as a theologian, I believe it is God’s will that there be closeness and intimacy, unity of the flesh, between people. A paedophile can say: “This closeness is possible for me within the choices that I’ve made.” Paedophiles are too defensive. They go around saying, “You people out there are saying that what I choose is bad, that it’s no good. You’re putting me in prison, you’re doing all these terrible things to me. I have to define my love as being in some way or other illicit.” What I think is that paedophiles can make the assertion that the pursuit of intimacy and love is what they choose. With boldness, they can say, “I believe this is in fact part of God’s will.”

    Hmmm…

    There are certainly a lot more cases of child sexual abuse than criminal convictions of it. By orders of magnitude.

    Just something to keep in mind when someone makes a “scientific” theory that also serves as his personal defense.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Whereismyhandle

    So Ralph Underwager claimed to be a theologian? I don’t claim to be a theologian but in addition to my undergraduate degree in Engineering I do have a ThM (Master of Theology) from a prominent seminary. I have a simple response to his assertion about the morality of pedophilia:

    1Thessalonians 4:3-4: For this is God’s will: that you become holy, that you keep away from sexual immorality, that each of you know how to possess his own body in holiness and honor, not in lustful passion like the [pagans] who do not know God.

    Underwager is a pervert who has no knowledge of the living God.

  10. And if you still don’t believe Satanists are at the wheel of western civilization, I’m not sure what sign you’re waiting for.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Whereismyhandle

    Bad people who hate religion, sure.

    But I don’t think they go to Black Mass.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Anon
    @Whereismyhandle

    Satanism is used by Christfags who can't grok the idea of people not believing in any religion and caring only about the real world. So when they see atheists who obviously aren't Christian, they explain their behavior by positing a hidden, conspiratorial religion.

  11. In just the past 24 hours Joe Biden appears to have repressed his memory of Rep. Jackie Walorski and her aides being killed in a car-crash this summer.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Nico

    CNN wrote a pretty savage critique of the incident.

    There's no way they will allow him to win in 2024 even if he convinces himself to run for reelection. The only question is if they'll let him finish his term.

    , @aNewBanner
    @Nico

    My wife today admitted to me that it looks like Biden has “low-grade” dementia. She tends to represent that part of the population with minimal interest in politics and current events. If she’s noticing it, then there’s a lot more people who are noticing this now.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Legba
    @Nico

    To be fair, Joe Biden has suppressed lots of memories.

  12. Circa 1992, my cousin, born in 1965, accused her father of having sexually abused her as a child. My aunt divorced him the following year, and he never forgave her or had a normal relationship with his daughter again.

    It’s certainly possible that my cousin actually was abused, but I assume she was just another victim of this mass hysteria.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @AndrewR

    Familial relationships are rather fragile things.

    Some things aren't mentioned for the diplomatic factor.

    Some things get mentioned/claimed just to blow things up.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    I knew a woman who told me that she had recovered a repressed memory of her Dad having abused her, Andrew. She had told at least one of her brothers, and maybe everyone in her family knew of this, as far as what she told me. Ten years later, I think she had realized it was all BS. Her Dad had died by that time.

  13. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    I reviewed Showalter’s “Hystories” in 1997 for National Review — it’s the second review down on its Amazon page:

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer

    https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1575553251264471040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1575553251264471040%7Ctwgr%5E2f9af0d3d03a55f4f75133a83c0059ccf19e5a4d%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fredstate.com%2Fbonchie%2F2022%2F09%2F29%2Ffirst-transgender-army-officer-turns-out-to-be-a-russian-spy-n635169

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

  14. How could the mental health profession have had such a catastrophic misadventure?

    Hahahaha!

    The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we’re outlawed entirely.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Cloudbuster

    The village always had a few centered, reasonable people with people skills who did some good, as much as anything since.

    But others saw that the local blacksmith shop was expanded into the modern metallurgy industry with the addition of science etc., so they tried the same with casual council and things went the other way.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Carol
    @Cloudbuster

    And if your "brain chemistry" wasn't really "unbalanced" to begin with, it will be after a few years of the typical drug cocktail the shrinks prescribe...

    , @Colin Wright
    @Cloudbuster

    '...The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we’re outlawed entirely.'

    I hear ya, man. The difficulty is there really are people who are crazy. When you meet one, you'll know.

  15. I can now see one obvious benefit of living in a post-nuclear winter: society will be unable to indulge the fantasies of these neurotics and hysterics. People will be too busy finding enough food to eat or fuel to keep warm to have time to listen to some cat-lady drone on about how she’s really a man who was serially molested when she was a little boy in the first grade.

  16. Anon[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    Articles like this is probably where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don't hurt the Deep State. This way, when he's needed to push a Narrative, the lower IQ crowd will listen to him.

    Replies: @Anon, @New Dealer, @Matt Buckalew, @Dieter Kief

    Oh please. Let’s not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn’t a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the “alternative right” or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I’m being generous.

    • LOL: Muggles
    • Troll: James N. Kennett
    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
    @Anon

    What good luck we enjoy that you are among the 2%!

    , @New Dealer
    @Anon

    I know how you feel. No one here is aware of the Seven Mysteries of the Universe.

    I found them on 49 golden plates buried under my chicken coop. They are in ancient Carthaginian which my uncle happened to teach me as a lad.

    Apologies, I'm too busy with secret investigations of gravity to translate them right now, but when I get around to it I'll let the world know.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    , @SFG
    @Anon

    A bit overblown, but it is true the English language Internet has its own preoccupations.

    , @Pat Hannagan
    @Anon

    It seems so at first sight, But seriously, these guys are True Believers.

    Especially, Steve.

    You cannot convince him otherwise, his motto is "my country right or wrong".

    Rest of the world beware.

    Australians: we are being suckered into a false sense of loyalty it will not be reciprocated.

    Americans, of which Sailer typifies, have no allegiance or loyalties nor ridiculous antiquated ideas like esteem and the Mos Maiorum

    Jews have no conception of sportsmanship, honour and decency. You may as well be speaking in hieroglyphs and kicking them out of your kingdom on account of their indecency.

    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny's with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it's at a price befitting a Kang.

    He feels zero connection to you. It's only letters and grammar and bank accounts to the likes of him.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXkN3nJyWEA

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon


    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I’m being generous.
     
    Thanks for your faith in me, Anon #360. It's tough being part of the 2%, among all these people hanging out.
    , @David Davenport
    @Anon


    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.


    So why are you here?

  17. OT — Jews arrested south of the border for doing the same thing they did during the Ottoman and Roman empires and what Joseph’s brothers did to him. Notice this is a new story, not to be confused with the last five or six times this happened. Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.
    https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-america-latina-63054397

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @J.Ross

    Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.

    On the contrary, it is very much associated with a religious cult. Lev Tahor (Pure Heart) is the brainchild of the late, unlamented and deeply deranged Rabbi Shlomo Helbrans. If David Koresh and Jim Jones had a child ( don't assume gender you hater!) he would be a lot like Helbrans. They have fled from country to country one step ahead - sometimes behind - the authorities.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Alden
    @J.Ross

    It would be interesting to know how this group of approximately 250, most of whom appear to be children, acquires the money to make international flights and set up living compounds as soon as they arrive in a new country.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  18. OT — the Ukrainian laundramat will clean $1.1B more, this isn’t part of the $12B from a few days ago, or all the money laundered up to now.

    • Thanks: Ron Mexico
  19. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    It’s easy to see how the lethargy caused by depression could be translated into “chronic fatigue syndrome”. Antidepressants may not be as effective as they’re made out to be, but at least the doctor would be targeting the real illness rather than inventing a new one.

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @Rob McX

    Many people with CFS strongly resist the idea that their illness is really depression. Even if you do not deny the existence of CFS, and stick to the story that CFS and depression have a high level of comorbidity, the patient often does not want to be treated for depression, but rather for the CFS that "causes" the depression.

    If the patient agrees to treatment, it does not help that finding a suitable dose of a suitable antidepressant can take as long as a year: for example, the drugs of first choice, SSRIs, are ineffective for many people but it can take 3 months just to exclude them from use by a particular patient. This gives the CFS patient ample opportunities to abandon treatment for depression and claim that it didn't work.

  20. After the transgender thing blows over, there’ll be host of lawsuits over abuse and professional malpractice. Except this time the grievances will be mostly true.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @International Jew

    See: https://www.medscape.co.uk/viewarticle/1000-families-sue-tavistock-gender-service-2022a10021ac


    The UK's only children's gender identity development service (GIDS), run by the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, is to be sued by "at least a thousand families" who allege that their children were rushed into taking life-changing puberty blocking drugs. As a result they were facing "physical and psychological permanent scarring that will last the rest of these victims’ lifetimes", alleged the law firm involved.
     
  21. “In hounding the author, Chronic Fatigue sufferers have proved especially energetic…”

    Whatever else, that was a funny line.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Hell yeah, it was! Re this Chronic Fatigue syndrome, I'm not a doctor, but I do know that Red Bull can be purchased over the counter... just sayin'...

    Regarding this line:


    Later it went downscale and was taken up by fundamentalists convinced that P&G was a satanist organization.
     
    If Proctor & Gamble was really Satanist, they would quit churning out those tampons at 20 pc/sec out of each of those big machines in Cincinnati.

    I'll tell you what big corporation is really Satinist. That'd be Sherwin Williams.

  22. I treated a female patient in the mid-1980s who became one of the leaders of the CFS movement in my state. She was a middle school teacher who was tired all the time and hated her job, especially lunch room duty. She brought up the idea that she had a lingering infectious mononucleosis state. She’d had a few mono spot tests, some positive, some negative. More refined antibody tests failed to confirm ongoing infection, but she wasn’t convinced. Eventually she had the energy to run the state CFS organization but not to teach. She fired me when I declined to back her disability claim for which there was no objective evidence. She’s still out there promoting her “illness.”

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dan Smith

    It amazes me how much oral history, between stuff like this and things like white flight of the 60s, remains untold and will probably be lost to history. Some Studs Terkel of the right should collect it.

    Replies: @pirelli

    , @stillCARealist
    @Dan Smith

    A old friend of mine suffered from various maladies for years. She claimed a thyroid problem and chronic fatigue as the root causes. She was not a happy person, as most of her hopes and dreams for life never panned out. Many, many disappointments.

    Then, she started a new diet, largely vegan, lost lots of weight... and the problems all went away.

    Honestly, I think the weight loss (and she kept it off) was her first true accomplishment in a long time. She got endless compliments and jealous questions about diet and nutrition which made her feel socially important. Plus being lighter just feels better physically.

    Chronic fatigue may just be chronic dashed hopes and constant irritations.

    Replies: @clifford brown

    , @Anon
    @Dan Smith

    Chronic fatigue syndrome sounds like it could be pinpointed to a thyroid disorder complicated by poor nutrition.

  23. @Whereismyhandle
    And if you still don't believe Satanists are at the wheel of western civilization, I'm not sure what sign you're waiting for.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anon

    Bad people who hate religion, sure.

    But I don’t think they go to Black Mass.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @SFG

    They don't need to. It's online now.

    https://twitter.com/ArchBudzar/status/1572317215755743232

    [note top surgery scars]

  24. Let’s make fibromyalgia fashionable again!

    At least it didn’t cause permanent damage to bodies or families, that I know of.

  25. No one has mentioned the latest predominantly feminine post viral fatituge syndrome on its way to becoming the next “identity group” yet…

    • Agree: botazefa
  26. Anonymous[189] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    After the transgender thing blows over, there'll be host of lawsuits over abuse and professional malpractice. Except this time the grievances will be mostly true.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    See: https://www.medscape.co.uk/viewarticle/1000-families-sue-tavistock-gender-service-2022a10021ac

    The UK’s only children’s gender identity development service (GIDS), run by the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, is to be sued by “at least a thousand families” who allege that their children were rushed into taking life-changing puberty blocking drugs. As a result they were facing “physical and psychological permanent scarring that will last the rest of these victims’ lifetimes”, alleged the law firm involved.

  27. It sounds like the recovered memory whoop-tee-doo started out among feminist intellectuals talking back to Freud, who first decided from talking to his women patients that there must have been an epidemic of childhood sex abuse in Victorian Vienna, then changed his mind and decided that women be crazy and they just wanted to sleep with their fathers.

    There’s something to this of course… IMHO the quality of the father-daughter relationship during childhood and puberty goes a long way in determining an adult woman’s self-esteem and ability to form a strong, lasting bond with a potential mate. Women whose fathers abandoned the family during that critical period are far less likely to have stable relationships with men (to say nothing about women whose fathers sexually abused them during that period).

  28. @Matthew Kelly
    Not knowing the past (forget about "not remembering the past"--to remember, one must have known it at one point) is a feature, not a bug.

    Someone once wrote something about that, in a book about some year. Eh, I forget the details...

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers

    “To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic, to repudiate morality while laying claim to it, to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy, to forget whatever it was necessary to forget, then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed, and then promptly to forget it again:

    ===> and above all, to apply the same process to the process itself <===

    — that was the ultimate subtlety: consciously to induce unconsciousness, and then, once again, to become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you had just performed. Even to understand the word 'doublethink' involved the use of doublethink.”
    ― George Orwell, 1984

    Everyone probably knew what you were referring to, but here it is, anyway, Matthew Kelly.

    • Thanks: bomag, Matthew Kelly
  29. • Agree: EH
    • Replies: @Dan Smith
    @Bardon Kaldian

    CFS is completely subjective with zero objective findings. It’s a mental disorder. I have a hard time squaring the fatigue part with the boundless energy of its victims with respect for agitating for disability and seeking recognition by the medical profession.

    Replies: @EH

    , @Dutch Boy
    @Bardon Kaldian

    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body:

    "XMRV was made in recombination with mouse cells. Before we could grow cells in labs we would pass cells through mice in order to attenuate them. But we found that by passing cancer cells through mice we could grow tumors; the cells had recombined with a retrovirus. Everyone before 1980 did this. It was standard laboratory procedure. We learned that anything we passed through animal tissues could make replication competent recombinant retroviruses in only ten days. All of our NIH research is based on mouse research. And those cell lines I worked with daily for more than 30 years have the potential to produce novel retroviruses."
    "If HHS gave you the power to re-name CFS, what would you call it?
    Non-HIV AIDS. It is an acquired immune deficiency, beyond a shadow of a doubt."
    http://www.cfstreatmentguide.com/blog/plague-an-interview-with-judy-mikovits

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    , @Rupert Pupkin
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I was a normal young dude of 31, living in NYC w a job and girlfriend etc, when I got the worst flu of my life w a fever of around 103 and a heavy malaise that lingered for maybe 2 mos. This was 20 yrs ago and I was never the same after that and could barely move or think. First the docs said maybe mono or hep but eventually after years of not really getting better and not getting an official diagnosis, I was shunted into the "Chronic Fatigue" medical Bermuda's Triangle.
    What I seem to have is some sort of postviral infection or syndrome that has tripwired my immune system into an aggressive response that it can't turn off.
    Anyway, when I go to a doc the waiting room is usually me and a gaggle of cat ladies and all the most blatantly insane women I've met in the past 20 years have all said "I have CFS too!" when I mention my health.
    So at least from my experience there does seem to some postviral infections that linger and cause health havoc that modern medicine haven't figured out, and also at the same time these "umbrella diagnoses" are magnets for every demented crazy woman in the world.
    Both can be true.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Bardon Kaldian, @Another Canadian

  30. The sex mutilation fad seems like a combination of the recovered memory craze and the lobotomy fad of the mid-20th Century. Lobotomies, like mutilations, last a lot longer than false memories.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Henry Canaday

    It's not a fad, it's an industry. And sponsored by all the wrong people: the globalist/ transhumanist WEF Davos clique, the WHO, the Media/ Entertainment/ Syllicon Valley post-industrial complex, the government, UNESCO..you name it.

    , @Art Deco
    @Henry Canaday

    The recovered memory business made plain that there are a lot of people in the junior grades of the mental health trade who have no business being licensed to mess with anyone's head. That they slipped through the professional screens is an indicator that those screens aren't worth much.

    The recent mania for mutilation and poisoning implicates a much wider swath of professionals and implicates institutional administration as well as there is now professional retaliation against dissenters.

    The mania for lobotomy lasted from about 1937 to about 1955 and its principal promoter was Walter Freeman, at one time of Johns Hopkins. It arguably flourished in part because doctors in that era were unwilling to critique the activity of other doctors outside of professional settings whose deliberations did not reach the broad public. Another motor was the ineffectuality of the competing therapeutic programs for mental patients in place at the time. When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.

    Replies: @Henry Canaday, @Anonymous

  31. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is today’s Long Covid.

  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    I've got repressed memories myself myself of really, really stupid ideas being promoted in the NY Times when I was young. Reading your blog has brought out many of these memories. Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?

    Watch what you write here about the new genderbending though. It's bad for business, your peeing in the symptom pool like this.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @James N. Kennett

    “Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?”

    Yes.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Heh! That was in reference to a recent problem in which millions of people's chipped CC's were not working. My wife sent me article (Zerohedge or something like that) in which this happening was the beginning of the financial SHTF. "Nah," I told her, "not yet."

    , @Corvinus
    @Steve Sailer

    "For example, nobody in Hong Kong suffered anorexia until the Hong Kong media, watching American media, started warning of the coming anorexia menace. And, sure enough, moody Hong Kong girls shortly started to develop anorexia."

    It’s nothing short of amazing when you make these statements as if they were true without even going into depth as to how and why you believe it to he true. But I guess you have feed Fido at the expense of being more precise.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1946859


    A prospective study of sixteen Chinese anorexic patients in Hong Kong indicates that they were single young females who came from lower social class, exhibited severe self-induced weight loss, rigid maintenance of low body weight and amenorrhea. Weight reduction was primarily by dietary restriction. The typical bulimic syndrome and major depression were uncommon. There were multiple aetiological factors, but no pre-morbid obesity and little pressure to pursue slimness for beauty. Instead of displaying an intense fear of obesity and a distorted body image, patients more commonly attributed poor food intake to abdominal bloating. As such, they only partially fulfilled current criteria for diagnosis. It is argued that such clinical patterns arise logically from their sociocultural backgrounds, but may gradually change with Westernization.
     
    Dr. Sing Feel, psychiatrist and research in Hong Kong, witnessed in real time the Westernization of eating disorders. From 1987-1992, he documented a culturally specific form of anorexia nervosa. Compared to Western anorexia, his patients rarely dieted nor expressed a fear of becoming fat. Rather, Lee NOTICED they complained of bloated stomachs.

    Then, in November 1994, a story of an anorexic girl who died brought on local media attention, with the reporting wrongly stating this disorder was the exact same one as the West. As the Chinese general public and their mental-health professionals came to understand the American diagnosis of anorexia, the presentation of the illness in Lee's patient population by the Chinese media began to transform into the more virulent American standard. As a result, Lee handled dozens of new patients who had conformed to the Western version of the disease.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/224891994_Anorexia_nervosa_in_Hong_Kong_Why_not_more_Chinese

    Anorexia nervosa is a geographically distinct psychiatric disorder; it is rapidly increasing in incidence in Western countries, while being virtually unreported in China, or in the Chinese community of Hong Kong. This is surprising when the Chinese preoccupation with food and their reported readiness to somatise dysphoria are considered. Three Chinese anorectics born and living in Hong Kong and exhibiting mostly typical clinical features are reported. The rarity of the disorder in the East could be related to protective biological and socio-cultural factors specific to the Chinese, and while it may become more common, anorexia nervosa is unlikely to reach Western proportions.
     
  33. @Dan Smith
    I treated a female patient in the mid-1980s who became one of the leaders of the CFS movement in my state. She was a middle school teacher who was tired all the time and hated her job, especially lunch room duty. She brought up the idea that she had a lingering infectious mononucleosis state. She’d had a few mono spot tests, some positive, some negative. More refined antibody tests failed to confirm ongoing infection, but she wasn’t convinced. Eventually she had the energy to run the state CFS organization but not to teach. She fired me when I declined to back her disability claim for which there was no objective evidence. She’s still out there promoting her “illness.”

    Replies: @SFG, @stillCARealist, @Anon

    It amazes me how much oral history, between stuff like this and things like white flight of the 60s, remains untold and will probably be lost to history. Some Studs Terkel of the right should collect it.

    • Replies: @pirelli
    @SFG

    An old lawyer I used to work with went off one time about “white flight.” His rant went something like this: “Yeah you always hear about ‘white flight,’ but you never hear about what actually caused it. It was scary. Things were violent. White kids were getting beaten up left and right. If you were a white boy, and you weren’t fast enough to get away, you had to learn to fight, or at least how to protect yourself from getting seriously injured. Black girls were holding white girls down in the cafeteria and cutting off their hair. White families were getting stolen from all the time. People left for the suburbs because they had to. The judges ordering desegregation all lived in segregated neighborhoods themselves. There was no one to go to for help.”

    All of the (white) millennial lawyers present, myself included, were very quiet.

  34. The world has gone completely crazy, it’s batshit insane, girls are having their tits chopped off and boys are stabbing their dicks as naggers roam buckwild through various American showcases of tat, and, let’s be honest, Steve…it’s your Jews who’ve led the whole shebang.

    Now, I know you weep nightly at a menorah wailing at your own wall “how could those meshuganas
    have landed on the moon before our people!?”

    But, as they say in the Holloywood Classics: it’s all Showbiz.

    And I know you worry that Greater Israel may not be realised in your own lifetime, but, I ask you to spare a dime of time for this thought:

    Where would America be if it never let in Ellis Island immigrants.

    Sure, you’d be in the Pale of the Settlement, but still, I think a part of you laments that loss for a world that wouldn’t be so war torn, that would have appreciated art based on beauty, a science based on physics, a mathematics not based on propaganda, and an English language not struggling in a basement gagged and beaten, with the threats of being torched alive.

    I know you long for that world. Fark me, every post you post is like a despairing love song to the gods who’ve forsaken you, beseeching them to grant you this world: where decency, forgiveness, and humility sets the discourse and all behaviour follows.

    I’m on board with you, mate.

    I stand with you, athwart the Hun and his oncoming rush of infidels against our sanctuary.

    Just want to let you know, Steve: You’re a good bloke. But your nation is the epitomy of evil and I don’t hold you or your fellow White Americans to account for that fact.

    You’re as entrapped and held hostage to history as we are in the Antipodes.

    The one thing I know holds true for all stages of life, like the 7 that Shakespear told of, it’s Truth.

    Truth is real, it’s not a Platonic ideal. If you could encapsulate what binds all White people together, with our gods, and God, or what we philosophically disbelief it’s our belief in the the Truth.

    As John quoted: “The Truth will set you free.”

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.

    I'm willing to discuss it, no holds barred, let's set a time and date where those who love your blog, and all you use to represent can talk the present you and everything about modern you that's reviled can be brought up, and pored over.

    Setting it Right For White.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdEIr_dhzwU

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

  35. Remind you of anything lately?

    Thank you Steve for reading the NYT so we don’t have to. There’s some hope that the little bit of ‘therapy’ in the article will shake folks loose of the idea that gender identity and biological sex are the same thing.

    After reading, I’m much reminded of Covid mass hysteria. Lots of people are still wearing masks. Some are even taking Covid vaccine boosters.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  36. @Nico
    In just the past 24 hours Joe Biden appears to have repressed his memory of Rep. Jackie Walorski and her aides being killed in a car-crash this summer.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @aNewBanner, @Legba

    CNN wrote a pretty savage critique of the incident.

    There’s no way they will allow him to win in 2024 even if he convinces himself to run for reelection. The only question is if they’ll let him finish his term.

  37. stillCARealist [AKA "ForeverCARealist"] says:
    @Dan Smith
    I treated a female patient in the mid-1980s who became one of the leaders of the CFS movement in my state. She was a middle school teacher who was tired all the time and hated her job, especially lunch room duty. She brought up the idea that she had a lingering infectious mononucleosis state. She’d had a few mono spot tests, some positive, some negative. More refined antibody tests failed to confirm ongoing infection, but she wasn’t convinced. Eventually she had the energy to run the state CFS organization but not to teach. She fired me when I declined to back her disability claim for which there was no objective evidence. She’s still out there promoting her “illness.”

    Replies: @SFG, @stillCARealist, @Anon

    A old friend of mine suffered from various maladies for years. She claimed a thyroid problem and chronic fatigue as the root causes. She was not a happy person, as most of her hopes and dreams for life never panned out. Many, many disappointments.

    Then, she started a new diet, largely vegan, lost lots of weight… and the problems all went away.

    Honestly, I think the weight loss (and she kept it off) was her first true accomplishment in a long time. She got endless compliments and jealous questions about diet and nutrition which made her feel socially important. Plus being lighter just feels better physically.

    Chronic fatigue may just be chronic dashed hopes and constant irritations.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @stillCARealist

    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  38. @Dan Smith
    I treated a female patient in the mid-1980s who became one of the leaders of the CFS movement in my state. She was a middle school teacher who was tired all the time and hated her job, especially lunch room duty. She brought up the idea that she had a lingering infectious mononucleosis state. She’d had a few mono spot tests, some positive, some negative. More refined antibody tests failed to confirm ongoing infection, but she wasn’t convinced. Eventually she had the energy to run the state CFS organization but not to teach. She fired me when I declined to back her disability claim for which there was no objective evidence. She’s still out there promoting her “illness.”

    Replies: @SFG, @stillCARealist, @Anon

    Chronic fatigue syndrome sounds like it could be pinpointed to a thyroid disorder complicated by poor nutrition.

  39. @Anonymous
    I wonder how many NYT readers will persevere far enough to be induced to demand his firing.

    Replies: @bomag

    I suspect there is a code among that crowd: if you write enough words before mentioning the unmentionable, you’re good.

  40. @Pat Hannagan
    The world has gone completely crazy, it's batshit insane, girls are having their tits chopped off and boys are stabbing their dicks as naggers roam buckwild through various American showcases of tat, and, let's be honest, Steve...it's your Jews who've led the whole shebang.

    Now, I know you weep nightly at a menorah wailing at your own wall "how could those meshuganas
    have landed on the moon before our people!?"

    But, as they say in the Holloywood Classics: it's all Showbiz.

    And I know you worry that Greater Israel may not be realised in your own lifetime, but, I ask you to spare a dime of time for this thought:

    Where would America be if it never let in Ellis Island immigrants.

    Sure, you'd be in the Pale of the Settlement, but still, I think a part of you laments that loss for a world that wouldn't be so war torn, that would have appreciated art based on beauty, a science based on physics, a mathematics not based on propaganda, and an English language not struggling in a basement gagged and beaten, with the threats of being torched alive.

    I know you long for that world. Fark me, every post you post is like a despairing love song to the gods who've forsaken you, beseeching them to grant you this world: where decency, forgiveness, and humility sets the discourse and all behaviour follows.

    I'm on board with you, mate.

    I stand with you, athwart the Hun and his oncoming rush of infidels against our sanctuary.

    Just want to let you know, Steve: You're a good bloke. But your nation is the epitomy of evil and I don't hold you or your fellow White Americans to account for that fact.

    You're as entrapped and held hostage to history as we are in the Antipodes.

    The one thing I know holds true for all stages of life, like the 7 that Shakespear told of, it's Truth.

    Truth is real, it's not a Platonic ideal. If you could encapsulate what binds all White people together, with our gods, and God, or what we philosophically disbelief it's our belief in the the Truth.

    As John quoted: "The Truth will set you free."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8CDxQc_9-E

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.

    I’m willing to discuss it, no holds barred, let’s set a time and date where those who love your blog, and all you use to represent can talk the present you and everything about modern you that’s reviled can be brought up, and pored over.

    Setting it Right For White.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Pat Hannagan


    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.
     
    "Conversation" meaning posting boring and stupid videos?
    , @ThreeCranes
    @Pat Hannagan

    Yeah, let's talk about Steve behind his back to his face.

  41. @R.G. Camara
    Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Colin Wright, @personfellowindividual

    Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.

    I don’t think that this will happen. Too many are complicit.

  42. @AndrewR
    Circa 1992, my cousin, born in 1965, accused her father of having sexually abused her as a child. My aunt divorced him the following year, and he never forgave her or had a normal relationship with his daughter again.

    It's certainly possible that my cousin actually was abused, but I assume she was just another victim of this mass hysteria.

    Replies: @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman

    Familial relationships are rather fragile things.

    Some things aren’t mentioned for the diplomatic factor.

    Some things get mentioned/claimed just to blow things up.

  43. @Cloudbuster
    How could the mental health profession have had such a catastrophic misadventure?

    Hahahaha!

    The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we're outlawed entirely.

    Replies: @bomag, @Carol, @Colin Wright

    The village always had a few centered, reasonable people with people skills who did some good, as much as anything since.

    But others saw that the local blacksmith shop was expanded into the modern metallurgy industry with the addition of science etc., so they tried the same with casual council and things went the other way.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @bomag

    The village always had a few centered, reasonable people with people skills who did some good, as much as anything since.

    I think it was Hans Eysenck who said "psychotherapy is the prostitution of friendship."

  44. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    Articles like this is probably where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don't hurt the Deep State. This way, when he's needed to push a Narrative, the lower IQ crowd will listen to him.

    Replies: @Anon, @New Dealer, @Matt Buckalew, @Dieter Kief

    Don’t be silly.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @New Dealer

    Well let's see, we know the feds spend millions every year to push fake "rightwing" groups that are full of informers to trap people. We know the CIA spent money to push lousy modern art in some silly attempt to co-opt leftwing intellectuals. We know they funded Gloria Steinem at one point.

    But tying up white dissidents in 30 year discussions to neutralize them? Nah, you're right, they'd never do that.

  45. > In hounding the author [Princeton prof Elaine Showalter], Chronic Fatigue sufferers have proved especially energetic…

    As designed, that ancestral sentence made me chuckle by bringing to mind one of the Current Year’s recurring iSteve themes.

    In hounding critics of the transgender movement, energetic and accomplished autogynephilic male-to-female transwomen have proved especially masculine…

  46. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    What good luck we enjoy that you are among the 2%!

    • LOL: James N. Kennett
  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?"

    Yes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corvinus

    Heh! That was in reference to a recent problem in which millions of people’s chipped CC’s were not working. My wife sent me article (Zerohedge or something like that) in which this happening was the beginning of the financial SHTF. “Nah,” I told her, “not yet.”

  48. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    I know how you feel. No one here is aware of the Seven Mysteries of the Universe.

    I found them on 49 golden plates buried under my chicken coop. They are in ancient Carthaginian which my uncle happened to teach me as a lad.

    Apologies, I’m too busy with secret investigations of gravity to translate them right now, but when I get around to it I’ll let the world know.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @New Dealer


    For quite a long time, there was a broad consensus in popular opinion that memories recovered in therapy — including the outlandish satanic cult tales — were true.
     
    How can this be established? What forums gave outlet to scepticism? What do opinion polls tell us except that the disinterested majority are usually prepared to nod their heads toward received wisdom?
  49. Holy shit..I don’t know what else to write…

  50. @New Dealer
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Don't be silly.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Well let’s see, we know the feds spend millions every year to push fake “rightwing” groups that are full of informers to trap people. We know the CIA spent money to push lousy modern art in some silly attempt to co-opt leftwing intellectuals. We know they funded Gloria Steinem at one point.

    But tying up white dissidents in 30 year discussions to neutralize them? Nah, you’re right, they’d never do that.

  51. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    A bit overblown, but it is true the English language Internet has its own preoccupations.

  52. @Cloudbuster
    How could the mental health profession have had such a catastrophic misadventure?

    Hahahaha!

    The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we're outlawed entirely.

    Replies: @bomag, @Carol, @Colin Wright

    And if your “brain chemistry” wasn’t really “unbalanced” to begin with, it will be after a few years of the typical drug cocktail the shrinks prescribe…

  53. @Whereismyhandle
    And if you still don't believe Satanists are at the wheel of western civilization, I'm not sure what sign you're waiting for.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anon

    Satanism is used by Christfags who can’t grok the idea of people not believing in any religion and caring only about the real world. So when they see atheists who obviously aren’t Christian, they explain their behavior by positing a hidden, conspiratorial religion.

  54. A week ago, I posted this video of Chloe Cole, an 18 year-old girl who was diagnosed at age 12 as “actually a boy” and given surgery and hormones. She transitioned back at age 16 when she realized it was all a lie; this is her testimony.

    [MORE]

  55. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    It seems so at first sight, But seriously, these guys are True Believers.

    Especially, Steve.

    You cannot convince him otherwise, his motto is “my country right or wrong”.

    Rest of the world beware.

    Australians: we are being suckered into a false sense of loyalty it will not be reciprocated.

    Americans, of which Sailer typifies, have no allegiance or loyalties nor ridiculous antiquated ideas like esteem and the Mos Maiorum

    Jews have no conception of sportsmanship, honour and decency. You may as well be speaking in hieroglyphs and kicking them out of your kingdom on account of their indecency.

    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny’s with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it’s at a price befitting a Kang.

    He feels zero connection to you. It’s only letters and grammar and bank accounts to the likes of him.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @Pat Hannagan


    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny’s with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it’s at a price befitting a Kang.
     
    What has Steve ever said about Australia ? He barely mentions the place.

    Many of you seem to believe that because he does not completely agree with you he is in the service of the deep state/Israel/inner party.

    You don't think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree ?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  56. Steve, Oprah seems to have played some role in propagating “recovered memory syndrome” and other fads with her show. Overall how would you rate Oprah’s influence in American culture? A positive or a negative? Could she be the one influential enough to put an end to this trans fad if she were so inclined?

  57. @New Dealer
    @Anon

    I know how you feel. No one here is aware of the Seven Mysteries of the Universe.

    I found them on 49 golden plates buried under my chicken coop. They are in ancient Carthaginian which my uncle happened to teach me as a lad.

    Apologies, I'm too busy with secret investigations of gravity to translate them right now, but when I get around to it I'll let the world know.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    For quite a long time, there was a broad consensus in popular opinion that memories recovered in therapy — including the outlandish satanic cult tales — were true.

    How can this be established? What forums gave outlet to scepticism? What do opinion polls tell us except that the disinterested majority are usually prepared to nod their heads toward received wisdom?

  58. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    Long Covid–the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome—-same people–same vague symptoms—if you have a mysterious bug bite even better—Lyme Disease

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @possumman


    Long Covid–the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome—-same people–same vague symptoms—if you have a mysterious bug bite even better—Lyme Disease
     
    And if you work for the government and have ever been outside the country you should ask your doctor about Havana Syndrome. It has the same symptoms as all other fake diseases (brain fog, lethargy, general aches and pains), but it's caused by Ruskie thought-control rays instead of tick bites.
  59. @Henry Canaday
    The sex mutilation fad seems like a combination of the recovered memory craze and the lobotomy fad of the mid-20th Century. Lobotomies, like mutilations, last a lot longer than false memories.

    Replies: @BB753, @Art Deco

    It’s not a fad, it’s an industry. And sponsored by all the wrong people: the globalist/ transhumanist WEF Davos clique, the WHO, the Media/ Entertainment/ Syllicon Valley post-industrial complex, the government, UNESCO..you name it.

  60. @Bardon Kaldian
    Disagree about CFS
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-fatigue-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20360490

    and MPD
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dissociative-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20355215

    These are real illnesses, unlike alien abductions etc.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Dutch Boy, @Rupert Pupkin

    CFS is completely subjective with zero objective findings. It’s a mental disorder. I have a hard time squaring the fatigue part with the boundless energy of its victims with respect for agitating for disability and seeking recognition by the medical profession.

    • Replies: @EH
    @Dan Smith

    You're entirely ignorant of the research, which is quite typical of arrogant boomer MDs, though no excuse for your malpractice..

    See for example: Institute of Medicine 2015. Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/19012 (305pp. PDF)

  61. Anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:

    Just a minor caveat re “Victorian Vienna”.

    Empress Sissi was Empress Consort of Austria from 1854 to 1898 (Queen Victoria was 1837-1901) so the Hapsburgs were very much their own thing.

    It’s a sad thing as to how longevity and the “Power Laws” affect Monarchies. There were many very great Monarchies throughout history but it is only the British Queen & Royal Family that is seen as an universal monarchy of sorts.

  62. Feminism has a strong Enlightenment, rationalist tradition of debate and skepticism, whose memory I attempt to recover and reassert.”

    A bit ironic that he’s trying to recover a memory, no?

  63. That last sentence of Watters’ is something:

    “Without that knowledge, mental health professionals will risk engendering new hysterias that they can neither control nor cure.”

    Is the NY Times putting out a subliminal message to its readers?

  64. Over time, it became an increasingly downscale fervor among Christian evangelicals

    Who did you have in mind?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Art Deco

    My recollection is the same as yours. The recovered memories of incestuous abuse were the province of psychologists and counselors with bourgeois patients, and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia. I don't remember Evangelicals on that bandwagon at all.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Daniel H

  65. @Bardon Kaldian
    Disagree about CFS
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-fatigue-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20360490

    and MPD
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dissociative-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20355215

    These are real illnesses, unlike alien abductions etc.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Dutch Boy, @Rupert Pupkin

    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body:

    “XMRV was made in recombination with mouse cells. Before we could grow cells in labs we would pass cells through mice in order to attenuate them. But we found that by passing cancer cells through mice we could grow tumors; the cells had recombined with a retrovirus. Everyone before 1980 did this. It was standard laboratory procedure. We learned that anything we passed through animal tissues could make replication competent recombinant retroviruses in only ten days. All of our NIH research is based on mouse research. And those cell lines I worked with daily for more than 30 years have the potential to produce novel retroviruses.”
    “If HHS gave you the power to re-name CFS, what would you call it?
    Non-HIV AIDS. It is an acquired immune deficiency, beyond a shadow of a doubt.”
    http://www.cfstreatmentguide.com/blog/plague-an-interview-with-judy-mikovits

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @Dutch Boy


    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body
     
    It was later found that the XMRV was introduced by contamination of lab samples.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/ct-met-chronic-fatigue-xmrv-20110317-story.html?page=1

    There was a similar episode in the history of Gulf War Syndrome. Garth Nicolson claimed that GWS was caused by infection with a bacterium, Mycoplasma fermentans. Some of Nicolson's GWS patients benefited from intensive antibiotic treatment, and his work was so well regarded by veterans' groups that he was made an honorary Colonel of the US Army Special Forces, and an honorary U.S. Navy SEAL. Unfortunately the presence of M. fermentans was again the result of laboratory contamination - Nicolson's work was mistaken.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/3B714A2CDDD667FEC2ACAA28DE70A531/S0950268800004891a.pdf/div-class-title-lack-of-serological-evidence-for-span-class-italic-mycoplasma-fermentans-span-infection-in-army-gulf-war-veterans-a-large-scale-case-control-study-div.pdf

    Replies: @Dutch Boy

  66. Here’s a way to get marginalized.

    Take this line of thought and apply it to the more flamboyant tales retailed by Holocaust survivors.

  67. This is a fascinating topic especially to women who so often find themselves caught up in the latest social contagion. I vaguely remember writing a paper in which I related false recovered memories to problems with eyewitness testimony and leading questions when interviewing witnesses/victims of crime. I was taking a course in memory which limited the range of discussion but there are other potential angles on social contagions that would be worth exploring: personality traits, media transmission of said contagion, antecedents from previous years culminating in outbreak, cultural differences in susceptibility or type of contagion, etc. Group hysterias have always been with us: seemingly involving the need to feel special and/or destroy superiors or competitors with accusations not easily refuted.

    I sometimes wish I had studied the topic through the lens of social psychology because I believe therein lies the means of identifying the underlying mechanisms of group hysterias. A means to neutralize these social contagions as they emerge would certainly save some lives. In recent years I’ve even searched for old textbooks on social psychology. I’ve only found books from the early oughts, however, and those were ominously woke.

    Thanks for the chick bait, Sailer, so much better than golf!

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Unintended Consequence


    Thanks for the chick bait, Sailer, so much better than golf!
     
    Blasphemer!
  68. I don’t think the current crew promoting poisoning people with hormones and mutilating their bodies is well-intentioned. They look thoroughly self-aggrandizing, as did the promoters of ‘recovered memory’.

    One of the few promoters of ‘recovered memory’ who did not seem self-aggrandizing was Ross Cheit, the Brown University professor who maintained that he himself had recovered memories of being molested as an adolescent. The man he identified as a molester was a counselor at a music camp he’d attended and there had been repeated complaints about that man for just this sort of thing over a period of > 25 years. Cheit’s experience of him was the experience others had had. Cheit remembered the incident spontaneously when he was told a nephew of his had joined a boys’ chorus, which seems rather different than being manipulated by a psychotherapist to ‘remember something’. Cheit’s work on recovered memory is critiqued by KC Johnson here (https://www.commentary.org/articles/kc-johnson/revisionism-gone-wild/).

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Art Deco

    which seems rather different than being manipulated by a psychotherapist to ‘remember something’.

    Frederick Crews makes precisely that point in his excellent "The Memory Wars".

  69. @Henry Canaday
    The sex mutilation fad seems like a combination of the recovered memory craze and the lobotomy fad of the mid-20th Century. Lobotomies, like mutilations, last a lot longer than false memories.

    Replies: @BB753, @Art Deco

    The recovered memory business made plain that there are a lot of people in the junior grades of the mental health trade who have no business being licensed to mess with anyone’s head. That they slipped through the professional screens is an indicator that those screens aren’t worth much.

    The recent mania for mutilation and poisoning implicates a much wider swath of professionals and implicates institutional administration as well as there is now professional retaliation against dissenters.

    The mania for lobotomy lasted from about 1937 to about 1955 and its principal promoter was Walter Freeman, at one time of Johns Hopkins. It arguably flourished in part because doctors in that era were unwilling to critique the activity of other doctors outside of professional settings whose deliberations did not reach the broad public. Another motor was the ineffectuality of the competing therapeutic programs for mental patients in place at the time. When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.

    • Replies: @Henry Canaday
    @Art Deco

    Thanks for refreshing my memory. Cable TV is now advertising that "thousands" of students walked out of school to protest Va. Governor Youngkin's rather mild restraints on the sex-mutilation craze. And I'm wondering:

    - aren't the fans of sex-mutilation basically the same people who enjoy condemning Joseph P. Kennedy for having one of his daughters lobotomized?

    - whatever happened to "primum non nocere," first do no harm?

    Replies: @Carol

    , @Anonymous
    @Art Deco


    When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.
     
    Lobotomies were more humane than physical restraint and beatings, which is how manic patients were previously dealt with. But yes, pharmacological advances made all previous treatments instantly obsolete, as well as immoral.

    (I do wonder though if future generations will look back on our current mania for drugging people, especially kids, with the same horror that we now regard lobotomies.)
  70. I wonder how much collective hysteria there was in the great Covid epidemic?

    We tended to ignore it around here, but elsewhere, apparently, people got caught up in it.

  71. @Cloudbuster
    How could the mental health profession have had such a catastrophic misadventure?

    Hahahaha!

    The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we're outlawed entirely.

    Replies: @bomag, @Carol, @Colin Wright

    ‘…The mental health profession is one giant, catastrophic misadventure. We would arguably be no worse off if psychiatry and all related disciplines we’re outlawed entirely.’

    I hear ya, man. The difficulty is there really are people who are crazy. When you meet one, you’ll know.

  72. women may well be superior in verbal logic. (Try eavesdropping on two teenage girls analyzing the endless possibilities of what some boy really meant when he said, “Maybe, like, I’ll see you around sometime, you know?”)

    True for the close-in right tail. (And wonderfully put; wish I could do that.) But when you consider the far far end of the right tail, you find Tennessee Williams, Eugene O’Neil, Edward Albee, and so on – – men. Arthur Miller, in “The Crucible,” gave us one of the best analyses of the phenomenon described in the essay.

    Dan Henninger’s entire column in today’s WSJ deals with a new federal task force report that recommends anxiety-screening for all children and adults.

  73. @Art Deco
    @Henry Canaday

    The recovered memory business made plain that there are a lot of people in the junior grades of the mental health trade who have no business being licensed to mess with anyone's head. That they slipped through the professional screens is an indicator that those screens aren't worth much.

    The recent mania for mutilation and poisoning implicates a much wider swath of professionals and implicates institutional administration as well as there is now professional retaliation against dissenters.

    The mania for lobotomy lasted from about 1937 to about 1955 and its principal promoter was Walter Freeman, at one time of Johns Hopkins. It arguably flourished in part because doctors in that era were unwilling to critique the activity of other doctors outside of professional settings whose deliberations did not reach the broad public. Another motor was the ineffectuality of the competing therapeutic programs for mental patients in place at the time. When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.

    Replies: @Henry Canaday, @Anonymous

    Thanks for refreshing my memory. Cable TV is now advertising that “thousands” of students walked out of school to protest Va. Governor Youngkin’s rather mild restraints on the sex-mutilation craze. And I’m wondering:

    – aren’t the fans of sex-mutilation basically the same people who enjoy condemning Joseph P. Kennedy for having one of his daughters lobotomized?

    – whatever happened to “primum non nocere,” first do no harm?

    • Replies: @Carol
    @Henry Canaday

    The Kennedys are nothing to the younger generations. History started in 2000. Which is only fair.

    As for primum no nocere, best happened were the WPATH standard of ("affirmative") care and the money to be made from taking these people apart and later trying to put them back together.

    The kids wanted autonomy and now the adults are giving it to them, good and hard.

  74. Why are you so obsessed with the trans movement, Steve?

    If it is even a problem, measured in societal cost-benefit terms, it is minuscule in overall impact. It may even be a net benefit.

    Isn’t it just a big distraction?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Who benefits?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Henry's Cat
    @Anonymous

    OTish...

    This is pretty good stuff, but was it all for election show?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eez5jGZ1zM8

  75. @Henry Canaday
    @Art Deco

    Thanks for refreshing my memory. Cable TV is now advertising that "thousands" of students walked out of school to protest Va. Governor Youngkin's rather mild restraints on the sex-mutilation craze. And I'm wondering:

    - aren't the fans of sex-mutilation basically the same people who enjoy condemning Joseph P. Kennedy for having one of his daughters lobotomized?

    - whatever happened to "primum non nocere," first do no harm?

    Replies: @Carol

    The Kennedys are nothing to the younger generations. History started in 2000. Which is only fair.

    As for primum no nocere, best happened were the WPATH standard of (“affirmative”) care and the money to be made from taking these people apart and later trying to put them back together.

    The kids wanted autonomy and now the adults are giving it to them, good and hard.

  76. Freud, who first decided from talking to his women patients that there must have been an epidemic of childhood sex abuse in Victorian Vienna, then changed his mind and decided that women be crazy and they just wanted to sleep with their fathers.

    Did Freud grow up in a Sabbatean or Frankist influenced family? Might this explain his obsession with the incest and the harms of sexual repression? Frankists embraced sexual depravity and incest as a means of immanentizing the eschaton through sexual perversity. The thinking goes, the Mashiach shall come when Jews follow all mitzvot, but under the Sabbatean heresy, the Messianic Age could be triggered also by violating all of God’s Laws, Redemption Through Sin.

    Freud’s deconstruction of sexual mores and obsession with incest was effectively his way of bringing his religious heresy to the broader world. Freud’s patients were largely bourgeois Jewish women of Belle Époque Vienna, many of whom may have grown up in Frankist households or households aware of the Frankist heresy. This means many of Freud’s patients may have actually been disproportionally subject to incest and sexual abuse as that was central to their clandestine cult. Thus, with Freudism, we have a psychotherapist from a sex cult treating members of the same sex cult. In the process, the perverse sexual norms of this sex cult were normalized and spread to the world via the media and academia.

    Freud may now be largely ignored in our psychopharmacological age, but the norms he preached, sexual liberation and depravity have been normalized the world over. The globalized cult of Freud dominating our understanding of the psyche and human sexuality was in effect immanentizing of the eschaton by spreading the Sabbatean embrace of sexual sin worldwide.

    Sexual liberation, feminism, gay liberation, trangenderism, all seem to fit neatly into this inversion of traditional moral principles. A quick perusal of certain corners of the internet, it is hard not to believe that the Freudian Sabbateans have won. Humanity has embraced redemption through sin for some occult purpose.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @clifford brown


    Freud’s deconstruction of sexual mores and obsession with incest was effectively his way of bringing his religious heresy to the broader world.
     
    How would you define “deconstruction”?
  77. @Bardon Kaldian
    Disagree about CFS
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-fatigue-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20360490

    and MPD
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dissociative-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20355215

    These are real illnesses, unlike alien abductions etc.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Dutch Boy, @Rupert Pupkin

    I was a normal young dude of 31, living in NYC w a job and girlfriend etc, when I got the worst flu of my life w a fever of around 103 and a heavy malaise that lingered for maybe 2 mos. This was 20 yrs ago and I was never the same after that and could barely move or think. First the docs said maybe mono or hep but eventually after years of not really getting better and not getting an official diagnosis, I was shunted into the “Chronic Fatigue” medical Bermuda’s Triangle.
    What I seem to have is some sort of postviral infection or syndrome that has tripwired my immune system into an aggressive response that it can’t turn off.
    Anyway, when I go to a doc the waiting room is usually me and a gaggle of cat ladies and all the most blatantly insane women I’ve met in the past 20 years have all said “I have CFS too!” when I mention my health.
    So at least from my experience there does seem to some postviral infections that linger and cause health havoc that modern medicine haven’t figured out, and also at the same time these “umbrella diagnoses” are magnets for every demented crazy woman in the world.
    Both can be true.

    • Replies: @Paleo Retiree
    @Rupert Pupkin

    I had a very similar experience with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: had a bad flu, recovered about 50%, then never got any better. I was exhausted all the time. It was the early days of the CFS diagnosis and docs were generally skeptical. Luckily for me, after a little more than a year I woke up one day feeling completely normal. Zero idea what might have prompted my recovery.

    I don’t know whether what I had was technically CFS or something else, like nervous exhaustion. I was definitely going through a challenging stretch at that point. But I definitely had **something**.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Rupert Pupkin

    I am sorry to hear that, and I hope you are better- or shall be better. Although I am skeptical about charlatans, I would recommend a visit to complementary medicine specialists, especially Chinese traditional medicine.

    You have nothing to lose except your money.

    As far as CFS goes, it is, in my opinion, a cover term for a variety of illnesses. We simply don't know what a bunch of dis-eases are & it would be stupid to pretend otherwise. For instance, long Covid is real, but many dumbfucks live in denial of it because it happens to others.

    After my 2nd Covid; I was very- not excessively- tired for 5-6 months. And was completely cured by a Pfizer shot.

    , @Another Canadian
    @Rupert Pupkin

    Tested for HLA-B27? Epstein-Barr combined with HLA-B27 can trigger all kinds of weird autoimmune responses after the primary infection passes.

  78. @stillCARealist
    @Dan Smith

    A old friend of mine suffered from various maladies for years. She claimed a thyroid problem and chronic fatigue as the root causes. She was not a happy person, as most of her hopes and dreams for life never panned out. Many, many disappointments.

    Then, she started a new diet, largely vegan, lost lots of weight... and the problems all went away.

    Honestly, I think the weight loss (and she kept it off) was her first true accomplishment in a long time. She got endless compliments and jealous questions about diet and nutrition which made her feel socially important. Plus being lighter just feels better physically.

    Chronic fatigue may just be chronic dashed hopes and constant irritations.

    Replies: @clifford brown

    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @clifford brown


    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.
     
    So does getting a good night's sleep on a regular basis. The world looks much better and is easier to deal with if you are well rested.

    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.

    Time for another martini!

    Replies: @Anon, @clifford brown

  79. The new book by Rick Emerson on the”Go Ask Alice” literary phenomenon looks at the impact of a followup “Jays Journal” on spreading the “satanic panic” a decade later.Much fakery involved in both books. But then fakery helped sell a lot of books in the 1970’s.

    https://quillette.com/2022/08/02/go-ask-beatrice/

  80. John Irving’s novel “The World According to Garp” predicted all of today’s “lunacy” when published in 1978. Made into a movie with Robin Williams in 1982 (which made it more a comedy), the incidents then today seem ripped off the headlines (and Steve Sailer’s blog).

    Pseudo artificial insemination (no father needed), a transgender dress wearing NFL football player (played by large 6’ 4” actor John Arthur Lithgow), young girl mutilations (tongues surgically removed), open marriages, and insane ‘gun violence’ shooters are rolled into a life story full of liberalism at its finest.

    From Wikipedia, this is best – The story contains a great deal of (in the words of Garp’s fictional teacher) “lunacy and sorrow”. – Can you say it any better with today’s world?

  81. As with the Salem witch trials this all seems to be an extended phenotype of BPD and other cluster B traits too.

    Tumblr, home to girls with cluster B traits and or autism was famously home to anorexia subcultures before it became home to neopronouns. (Remember in 2017-2018 when they tried to introduce those into the real world and it was too much and so began the era of ‘They/them’, a rare case of Tumblr craziness being banished.) and FtM.

    The best analogy really is just anorexia from the perspective of the girls but Steve is right that from the perspective of the adults and authorities it is more like the Satanic abuse hysteria.

    It continues to blow my mind though that these adults don’t see the highly obviously gender stereotypes in play where FtM transition because they’re easily influenced by others and desire to fit into a group and MtF transition because they have low social empathy and don’t care what others think or if they fit in.

    There is no ‘social contagion’ with MtFs. They tend to be highly male in that they are less concerned with what others think and let this guide their actions to pathological ends. This explains to me the bimodal examples of turbo asshole jocks and somewhat autistic nerds. Though seemingly polar opposites of each other they both share a reduced social empathy or concern about what others think about their actions, though for very different reasons and to very different in almost all cases. I suspect there is a much broader array of men who have this fetish but who would never think of actually transitioning because they’d be too embarrassed and ashamed.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Altai


    Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria Is the New Recovered Memories of Satanist Abuse Mania
     
    Or it's the New Anorexia

    Or maybe it's just the Gucci handbag.

    https://www.barnhardt.biz/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/img_7488.jpg

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

  82. @clifford brown

    Freud, who first decided from talking to his women patients that there must have been an epidemic of childhood sex abuse in Victorian Vienna, then changed his mind and decided that women be crazy and they just wanted to sleep with their fathers.
     
    Did Freud grow up in a Sabbatean or Frankist influenced family? Might this explain his obsession with the incest and the harms of sexual repression? Frankists embraced sexual depravity and incest as a means of immanentizing the eschaton through sexual perversity. The thinking goes, the Mashiach shall come when Jews follow all mitzvot, but under the Sabbatean heresy, the Messianic Age could be triggered also by violating all of God's Laws, Redemption Through Sin.

    Freud's deconstruction of sexual mores and obsession with incest was effectively his way of bringing his religious heresy to the broader world. Freud's patients were largely bourgeois Jewish women of Belle Époque Vienna, many of whom may have grown up in Frankist households or households aware of the Frankist heresy. This means many of Freud's patients may have actually been disproportionally subject to incest and sexual abuse as that was central to their clandestine cult. Thus, with Freudism, we have a psychotherapist from a sex cult treating members of the same sex cult. In the process, the perverse sexual norms of this sex cult were normalized and spread to the world via the media and academia.

    Freud may now be largely ignored in our psychopharmacological age, but the norms he preached, sexual liberation and depravity have been normalized the world over. The globalized cult of Freud dominating our understanding of the psyche and human sexuality was in effect immanentizing of the eschaton by spreading the Sabbatean embrace of sexual sin worldwide.

    Sexual liberation, feminism, gay liberation, trangenderism, all seem to fit neatly into this inversion of traditional moral principles. A quick perusal of certain corners of the internet, it is hard not to believe that the Freudian Sabbateans have won. Humanity has embraced redemption through sin for some occult purpose.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Freud’s deconstruction of sexual mores and obsession with incest was effectively his way of bringing his religious heresy to the broader world.

    How would you define “deconstruction”?

  83. @R.G. Camara
    Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Colin Wright, @personfellowindividual

    ‘…They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning…’

    Well, not sued. There’s too much litigation as it is.

    It’s a tad melodramatic, but doesn’t the ‘Doctors trial’ at Nuremberg offer a precedent? Wasn’t there something like that?

  84. @Pat Hannagan
    @Anon

    It seems so at first sight, But seriously, these guys are True Believers.

    Especially, Steve.

    You cannot convince him otherwise, his motto is "my country right or wrong".

    Rest of the world beware.

    Australians: we are being suckered into a false sense of loyalty it will not be reciprocated.

    Americans, of which Sailer typifies, have no allegiance or loyalties nor ridiculous antiquated ideas like esteem and the Mos Maiorum

    Jews have no conception of sportsmanship, honour and decency. You may as well be speaking in hieroglyphs and kicking them out of your kingdom on account of their indecency.

    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny's with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it's at a price befitting a Kang.

    He feels zero connection to you. It's only letters and grammar and bank accounts to the likes of him.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXkN3nJyWEA

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny’s with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it’s at a price befitting a Kang.

    What has Steve ever said about Australia ? He barely mentions the place.

    Many of you seem to believe that because he does not completely agree with you he is in the service of the deep state/Israel/inner party.

    You don’t think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree ?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @AKAHorace

    '...You don’t think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree ?'

    I'm overwhelmingly tempted to disagree.

  85. Related:

    A Johns Hopkins anesthesiologist and her spouse, a doctor and major in the U.S. Army, were federally indicted for attempting to provide medical information about members of the military to the Russian government. Anna Gabrielian and Jamie Lee Henry, who had a secret security clearance as a doctor at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, communicated and met several times with an undercover FBI agent who they believed was from the Russian embassy,…

    “My point of view is until the United States actually declares war against Russia, I’m able to help as much as I want,” Henry, 39, told the agent, according to the indictment. “At that point, I’ll have some ethical issues I’ll have to work through.”

    “You’ll work through those ethical issues,” Gabrielian replied… Gabrielian called Henry a “coward” for being concerned about violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA,)… She told the person she did not share those concerns because she violated the law “all the time.”

    Henry received attention in 2015 after becoming the first known active-duty Army officer to come out as transgender. A Buzzfeed article from that time said she was also to her knowledge and to the knowledge of LGBT advocates the first and only active duty service member who had changed her name and gender within the United States military.

    I have repeatedly been told that Putin and his many stooges were going to the very ones who would save us from all the Buzzfeed-gender-weird insanity prowling about our beds at night, so I don’t know what to make of this. I’m starting to think the rank-and-file Unz-dot-com commentariat are not the bulwark of truth and consistency they claim to be.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Pixo
    @HA

    I like the DailyMail version. They are great at covering the growing level of shemale hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by “the Army’s first trans officer.”

    They are especially good at the comic trannie photos and aren’t shy about including the perverts’ before photos.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11263375/Armys-trans-officer-wife-INDICTED-trying-pass-medical-records-Russians.html

    I especially like how the tranny army doc’s objection to his Russian wife’s urging him to spy for Russia isn’t that it is an evil betrayal of his oath, but would be a HIPPA violation:

    “Gabrielian was allegedly fueled by her patriotism for Russia, and told Henry not be a 'coward' when she expressed concerns about violating HIPPA.”

    Replies: @HA, @Carol

  86. @Anonymous
    Why are you so obsessed with the trans movement, Steve?

    If it is even a problem, measured in societal cost-benefit terms, it is minuscule in overall impact. It may even be a net benefit.

    Isn’t it just a big distraction?

    Replies: @Anon, @Henry's Cat

    Who benefits?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon



    Why are you so obsessed with the trans movement, Steve?

    If it is even a problem, measured in societal cost-benefit terms, it is minuscule in overall impact. It may even be a net benefit.

    Isn’t it just a big distraction?
     
    Who benefits?
     
    Society benefits. Transism gives the lie to equalism and related myths. It helps advance awareness of human biodiversity, and in particular differences between the sexes.

    End sex discrimination in sports and other pursuits. Help women cheer and admire men again.
  87. @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.

    I'm willing to discuss it, no holds barred, let's set a time and date where those who love your blog, and all you use to represent can talk the present you and everything about modern you that's reviled can be brought up, and pored over.

    Setting it Right For White.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdEIr_dhzwU

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.

    “Conversation” meaning posting boring and stupid videos?

  88. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    There would be a lot less of this if more workers had the attitude of a woman I used to work with. Our boss was complaining to her about her sick day frequency and she told him, “Look, there’s three times when I’m sick:

    1. when I’m sick
    2. when one of my kids is sick
    3. when I’m sick of you”

  89. @Art Deco
    I don't think the current crew promoting poisoning people with hormones and mutilating their bodies is well-intentioned. They look thoroughly self-aggrandizing, as did the promoters of 'recovered memory'.

    One of the few promoters of 'recovered memory' who did not seem self-aggrandizing was Ross Cheit, the Brown University professor who maintained that he himself had recovered memories of being molested as an adolescent. The man he identified as a molester was a counselor at a music camp he'd attended and there had been repeated complaints about that man for just this sort of thing over a period of > 25 years. Cheit's experience of him was the experience others had had. Cheit remembered the incident spontaneously when he was told a nephew of his had joined a boys' chorus, which seems rather different than being manipulated by a psychotherapist to 'remember something'. Cheit's work on recovered memory is critiqued by KC Johnson here (https://www.commentary.org/articles/kc-johnson/revisionism-gone-wild/).

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    which seems rather different than being manipulated by a psychotherapist to ‘remember something’.

    Frederick Crews makes precisely that point in his excellent “The Memory Wars”.

  90. Most students in psychology and psychiatry programs today are too young to have any firsthand memory of the moral panic engendered by the recovered memory movement in the 1980s and early 1990s.

    The recovered memory movement continues today. It is responsible for prosecutions of Jerry Sandusky, Harvey Weinstein, and many others. The prosecution witnesses changed their stories, and experts testified that it is normal to repress the truth.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Roger

    The Harvey Weinstein accusers weren’t recovered memory fakers. They never forgot that vile obese pig with the diseased genitalia. Come on, who’d ever forget the perv jacking off into a plant in a hotel hallway? Or all 350 pounds of his naked self strutting into a hotel sitting room? He’s still facing various charges in Los Angeles.

    Replies: @Roger

  91. Interesting piece I saw today on Salon. Trump tried to fire Javanka, but underlings would not carry out orders

    The money quote

    Although Trump repeatedly gave orders to Kelly and McGahn, the two refused to adhere to the request amid fears that “he would not back them once his daughter and son-in-law pushed back.”

    Whatever you think of Trump getting cockblocked, it is really bad for the permanent government/rotating appointee classes to disobey the President. Especially the military. Do we want generals to decide which orders to obey?

    I know “election fraud” is a conspiracy theory now. But what if DeSantis wins, but black Democrats in the South cry foul, claiming widespread disfranchisement, perhaps the legislatures should just require everyone to report their vote totals at (not by) a certain time on election night. Not sure how to do mail-in voting. Maybe mail-in voting ends well before election night, then the post office closes for a week or two, so there are no shenanigans with ballots being found that put someone just over the top after a few days (or weeks) of counting? If people are going to cheat with mail-ins, maybe they should have to guess the appropriate bias in fake votes well ahead of time.

    I’d feel better about the election deniers if they had plans for making elections less cheatable. Maybe they do, but our terrible media doesn’t report on it? Agreeing on who just got elected is important in a democracy. In an oligarchy? Well, who benefits from red and blue teams hating each other?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Rob

    There was no need to fire Kushner. All Trump had to do was to not fire Bannon. The two (Kushner vs. Bannon) counterbalanced each other and curbed each others excesses. After Bannon was fired it just became the Kushner administration. Trying to bring back Bannon at the 11th hour was pointless since by then Kushner was too powerful. Trump is supposed to be a managerial expert, yet he made the rookie mistake of allowing one of his underlings to get too big.

    Replies: @anonymous

  92. @AndrewR
    Circa 1992, my cousin, born in 1965, accused her father of having sexually abused her as a child. My aunt divorced him the following year, and he never forgave her or had a normal relationship with his daughter again.

    It's certainly possible that my cousin actually was abused, but I assume she was just another victim of this mass hysteria.

    Replies: @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman

    I knew a woman who told me that she had recovered a repressed memory of her Dad having abused her, Andrew. She had told at least one of her brothers, and maybe everyone in her family knew of this, as far as what she told me. Ten years later, I think she had realized it was all BS. Her Dad had died by that time.

  93. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I’m being generous.

    Thanks for your faith in me, Anon #360. It’s tough being part of the 2%, among all these people hanging out.

  94. “Thankfully, we now have drugs like prozac…” uh…Serotonin fixers may be as much group think and social contagion as everything else described here. There is a hard minimum of stupid built into both psyche and society and it compresses easily into new and recurring forms.

  95. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    "In hounding the author, Chronic Fatigue sufferers have proved especially energetic…"

    Whatever else, that was a funny line.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Hell yeah, it was! Re this Chronic Fatigue syndrome, I’m not a doctor, but I do know that Red Bull can be purchased over the counter… just sayin’…

    Regarding this line:

    Later it went downscale and was taken up by fundamentalists convinced that P&G was a satanist organization.

    If Proctor & Gamble was really Satanist, they would quit churning out those tampons at 20 pc/sec out of each of those big machines in Cincinnati.

    I’ll tell you what big corporation is really Satinist. That’d be Sherwin Williams.

    • LOL: Alden
  96. @AKAHorace
    @Pat Hannagan


    Remember: Steve will happily see Oz be turned into a glass carpark just so he can dine at Denny’s with naggers and fellow cohorts, so long as it’s at a price befitting a Kang.
     
    What has Steve ever said about Australia ? He barely mentions the place.

    Many of you seem to believe that because he does not completely agree with you he is in the service of the deep state/Israel/inner party.

    You don't think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree ?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘…You don’t think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree ?’

    I’m overwhelmingly tempted to disagree.

    • LOL: AKAHorace
  97. @Unintended Consequence
    This is a fascinating topic especially to women who so often find themselves caught up in the latest social contagion. I vaguely remember writing a paper in which I related false recovered memories to problems with eyewitness testimony and leading questions when interviewing witnesses/victims of crime. I was taking a course in memory which limited the range of discussion but there are other potential angles on social contagions that would be worth exploring: personality traits, media transmission of said contagion, antecedents from previous years culminating in outbreak, cultural differences in susceptibility or type of contagion, etc. Group hysterias have always been with us: seemingly involving the need to feel special and/or destroy superiors or competitors with accusations not easily refuted.

    I sometimes wish I had studied the topic through the lens of social psychology because I believe therein lies the means of identifying the underlying mechanisms of group hysterias. A means to neutralize these social contagions as they emerge would certainly save some lives. In recent years I've even searched for old textbooks on social psychology. I've only found books from the early oughts, however, and those were ominously woke.

    Thanks for the chick bait, Sailer, so much better than golf!

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Thanks for the chick bait, Sailer, so much better than golf!

    Blasphemer!

  98. @Rupert Pupkin
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I was a normal young dude of 31, living in NYC w a job and girlfriend etc, when I got the worst flu of my life w a fever of around 103 and a heavy malaise that lingered for maybe 2 mos. This was 20 yrs ago and I was never the same after that and could barely move or think. First the docs said maybe mono or hep but eventually after years of not really getting better and not getting an official diagnosis, I was shunted into the "Chronic Fatigue" medical Bermuda's Triangle.
    What I seem to have is some sort of postviral infection or syndrome that has tripwired my immune system into an aggressive response that it can't turn off.
    Anyway, when I go to a doc the waiting room is usually me and a gaggle of cat ladies and all the most blatantly insane women I've met in the past 20 years have all said "I have CFS too!" when I mention my health.
    So at least from my experience there does seem to some postviral infections that linger and cause health havoc that modern medicine haven't figured out, and also at the same time these "umbrella diagnoses" are magnets for every demented crazy woman in the world.
    Both can be true.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Bardon Kaldian, @Another Canadian

    I had a very similar experience with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: had a bad flu, recovered about 50%, then never got any better. I was exhausted all the time. It was the early days of the CFS diagnosis and docs were generally skeptical. Luckily for me, after a little more than a year I woke up one day feeling completely normal. Zero idea what might have prompted my recovery.

    I don’t know whether what I had was technically CFS or something else, like nervous exhaustion. I was definitely going through a challenging stretch at that point. But I definitely had **something**.

  99. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    CFS is often hypothyroidism.

    Most doctors don’t know how to diagnose or treat it. Protip: you need to do a full thyroid panel, not just TSH.

  100. @clifford brown
    @stillCARealist

    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.

    So does getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis. The world looks much better and is easier to deal with if you are well rested.

    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.

    Time for another martini!

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jim Don Bob


    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.
     
    As a health favor to some of us here, would you mind providing additional detail about his practices and routine? Such as: What time were his meals? What did they consist of usually? What time did he go to sleep and wake up?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @clifford brown
    @Jim Don Bob

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZezO-Zb_Hc

  101. @Rupert Pupkin
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I was a normal young dude of 31, living in NYC w a job and girlfriend etc, when I got the worst flu of my life w a fever of around 103 and a heavy malaise that lingered for maybe 2 mos. This was 20 yrs ago and I was never the same after that and could barely move or think. First the docs said maybe mono or hep but eventually after years of not really getting better and not getting an official diagnosis, I was shunted into the "Chronic Fatigue" medical Bermuda's Triangle.
    What I seem to have is some sort of postviral infection or syndrome that has tripwired my immune system into an aggressive response that it can't turn off.
    Anyway, when I go to a doc the waiting room is usually me and a gaggle of cat ladies and all the most blatantly insane women I've met in the past 20 years have all said "I have CFS too!" when I mention my health.
    So at least from my experience there does seem to some postviral infections that linger and cause health havoc that modern medicine haven't figured out, and also at the same time these "umbrella diagnoses" are magnets for every demented crazy woman in the world.
    Both can be true.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Bardon Kaldian, @Another Canadian

    I am sorry to hear that, and I hope you are better- or shall be better. Although I am skeptical about charlatans, I would recommend a visit to complementary medicine specialists, especially Chinese traditional medicine.

    You have nothing to lose except your money.

    As far as CFS goes, it is, in my opinion, a cover term for a variety of illnesses. We simply don’t know what a bunch of dis-eases are & it would be stupid to pretend otherwise. For instance, long Covid is real, but many dumbfucks live in denial of it because it happens to others.

    After my 2nd Covid; I was very- not excessively- tired for 5-6 months. And was completely cured by a Pfizer shot.

  102. @Whereismyhandle
    On the other hand, the false memory syndrome foundation was founded by an accused pedophile and had on its scientific board people like this:

    The article contained statements which were interpreted as supportive of paedophilia. In particular, when asked "Is choosing paedophilia for you a responsible choice for the individuals?" Underwager responded,

    Certainly it is responsible. What I have been struck by as I have come to know more about and understand people who choose paedophilia is that they let themselves be too much defined by other people. That is usually an essentially negative definition. Paedophiles spend a lot of time and energy defending their choice. I don't think that a paedophile needs to do that. Paedophiles can boldly and courageously affirm what they choose. They can say that what they want is to find the best way to love. I am also a theologian and as a theologian, I believe it is God's will that there be closeness and intimacy, unity of the flesh, between people. A paedophile can say: "This closeness is possible for me within the choices that I've made." Paedophiles are too defensive. They go around saying, "You people out there are saying that what I choose is bad, that it's no good. You're putting me in prison, you're doing all these terrible things to me. I have to define my love as being in some way or other illicit." What I think is that paedophiles can make the assertion that the pursuit of intimacy and love is what they choose. With boldness, they can say, "I believe this is in fact part of God's will."


    Hmmm...


    There are certainly a lot more cases of child sexual abuse than criminal convictions of it. By orders of magnitude.

    Just something to keep in mind when someone makes a "scientific" theory that also serves as his personal defense.

    Replies: @FPD72

    So Ralph Underwager claimed to be a theologian? I don’t claim to be a theologian but in addition to my undergraduate degree in Engineering I do have a ThM (Master of Theology) from a prominent seminary. I have a simple response to his assertion about the morality of pedophilia:

    1Thessalonians 4:3-4: For this is God’s will: that you become holy, that you keep away from sexual immorality, that each of you know how to possess his own body in holiness and honor, not in lustful passion like the [pagans] who do not know God.

    Underwager is a pervert who has no knowledge of the living God.

  103. Anonymous[873] • Disclaimer says:

    But for the fact that the Satanic Ritual Abuse(SRA) was (and is…looking at you Utah County) real and the recovered memory aspect was overplayed as a method to “mask and discredit”.

    How anyone can operate in this environment of state-sponsored child grooming and still doubt that the Luciferian Predator Class has not been supporting child trafficking and abuse rings for generations…well, how are you doing staying up to date on your COVID shots?

  104. @Anonymous
    Why are you so obsessed with the trans movement, Steve?

    If it is even a problem, measured in societal cost-benefit terms, it is minuscule in overall impact. It may even be a net benefit.

    Isn’t it just a big distraction?

    Replies: @Anon, @Henry's Cat

    OTish…

    This is pretty good stuff, but was it all for election show?

  105. I am a black woman. I know that now. Don’t touch my hair!

  106. Good topic today.

    Yes, “medical science” comes up with all kinds of fake diseases and illnesses which eventually quietly fade away.

    In the 19th century they had the “vapors” and “fainting couches.”

    Mainly for depressed married women. Some may have been related to migraines or menstruation. Or sometimes chemical imbalances causing actual depression.

    One commonality to most of this junk is that “victims” expect and often receive something like welfare or unemployment benefits. These conditions let the “suffers” be treated as ill or sick but actually are just invented mental constructs. Now on rare occasions something might really be off or medically wrong. But how to tell. Fakers enjoy less work/responsibility.

    Very few poor or hardscrabble rural people, peasants, working class folks have these imaginary conditions unless they can profit somehow. These fake diseases are for the already comfortable and often just lazy malingerers. (Oh, we can’t say that now, publicly…)

    The fact that young women, or even early teen females, are the main “victims” is telling. Most of this is just TikTok syndrome before TikTok. Anxiety, eating “disorders”, narcissism run riot, etc.

    The “repressed memory” scam got a lot of people put in prison for a terrible thing that didn’t happen.

    Now more than a few mutilated young people will regret this horrible fad for the rest of their lives.

    Someone should inform them that these trans types can’t have normal sex and what they do have is likely to be far worse than what they might have had. That’s one Freak Show Circus that you can’t quit. That stuff won’t grow back…

    Like the tattooed uglies out there, growing old, flabby and poisoned with ink, this is a lifetime of regrets.

    • Replies: @Carol
    @Muggles

    Haha you've got to be kidding. Out here in flyover, getting SSI or SSDI is the Holy Grail to the poors. Then they can work some side hustles, get Medicaid, section 8, EBT, etc.

    Diabetes (morbid obesity) is a listed ailment and so is fibro. Not sure how many of the other fake syndromes are covered.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Muggles

    Hear, hear! Well said.

  107. @Art Deco
    Over time, it became an increasingly downscale fervor among Christian evangelicals

    Who did you have in mind?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    My recollection is the same as yours. The recovered memories of incestuous abuse were the province of psychologists and counselors with bourgeois patients, and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia. I don’t remember Evangelicals on that bandwagon at all.

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ....and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia.
     
    Janet Reino and Jane Swift. Never called to account for the crimes they committed against innocent accused.

    Replies: @ex-banker

    , @Daniel H
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ....and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia.
     
    Janet Reno and Jane Swift. Never called to account for the crimes they committed against innocent accused.
  108. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Art Deco

    My recollection is the same as yours. The recovered memories of incestuous abuse were the province of psychologists and counselors with bourgeois patients, and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia. I don't remember Evangelicals on that bandwagon at all.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Daniel H

    ….and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia.

    Janet Reino and Jane Swift. Never called to account for the crimes they committed against innocent accused.

    • Replies: @ex-banker
    @Daniel H

    Martha Coakley was the prosecutor in the Fells Acre case. She still refuses to admit her mistake in the case. Jane Swift was later the governor who refused (at Coakley's request) to grant clemency to the wrongly convicted.

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

  109. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Art Deco

    My recollection is the same as yours. The recovered memories of incestuous abuse were the province of psychologists and counselors with bourgeois patients, and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia. I don't remember Evangelicals on that bandwagon at all.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Daniel H

    ….and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia.

    Janet Reno and Jane Swift. Never called to account for the crimes they committed against innocent accused.

    • Thanks: The Anti-Gnostic
  110. Anonymous[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @Henry Canaday

    The recovered memory business made plain that there are a lot of people in the junior grades of the mental health trade who have no business being licensed to mess with anyone's head. That they slipped through the professional screens is an indicator that those screens aren't worth much.

    The recent mania for mutilation and poisoning implicates a much wider swath of professionals and implicates institutional administration as well as there is now professional retaliation against dissenters.

    The mania for lobotomy lasted from about 1937 to about 1955 and its principal promoter was Walter Freeman, at one time of Johns Hopkins. It arguably flourished in part because doctors in that era were unwilling to critique the activity of other doctors outside of professional settings whose deliberations did not reach the broad public. Another motor was the ineffectuality of the competing therapeutic programs for mental patients in place at the time. When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.

    Replies: @Henry Canaday, @Anonymous

    When antipsychotic medications hit the town, Freeman was out of business. He died discredited.

    Lobotomies were more humane than physical restraint and beatings, which is how manic patients were previously dealt with. But yes, pharmacological advances made all previous treatments instantly obsolete, as well as immoral.

    (I do wonder though if future generations will look back on our current mania for drugging people, especially kids, with the same horror that we now regard lobotomies.)

  111. @Muggles
    Good topic today.

    Yes, "medical science" comes up with all kinds of fake diseases and illnesses which eventually quietly fade away.

    In the 19th century they had the "vapors" and "fainting couches."

    Mainly for depressed married women. Some may have been related to migraines or menstruation. Or sometimes chemical imbalances causing actual depression.

    One commonality to most of this junk is that "victims" expect and often receive something like welfare or unemployment benefits. These conditions let the "suffers" be treated as ill or sick but actually are just invented mental constructs. Now on rare occasions something might really be off or medically wrong. But how to tell. Fakers enjoy less work/responsibility.

    Very few poor or hardscrabble rural people, peasants, working class folks have these imaginary conditions unless they can profit somehow. These fake diseases are for the already comfortable and often just lazy malingerers. (Oh, we can't say that now, publicly...)

    The fact that young women, or even early teen females, are the main "victims" is telling. Most of this is just TikTok syndrome before TikTok. Anxiety, eating "disorders", narcissism run riot, etc.

    The "repressed memory" scam got a lot of people put in prison for a terrible thing that didn't happen.

    Now more than a few mutilated young people will regret this horrible fad for the rest of their lives.

    Someone should inform them that these trans types can't have normal sex and what they do have is likely to be far worse than what they might have had. That's one Freak Show Circus that you can't quit. That stuff won't grow back...

    Like the tattooed uglies out there, growing old, flabby and poisoned with ink, this is a lifetime of regrets.

    Replies: @Carol, @Jim Don Bob

    Haha you’ve got to be kidding. Out here in flyover, getting SSI or SSDI is the Holy Grail to the poors. Then they can work some side hustles, get Medicaid, section 8, EBT, etc.

    Diabetes (morbid obesity) is a listed ailment and so is fibro. Not sure how many of the other fake syndromes are covered.

    • Agree: Pixo
  112. OT: Virgin airlines is scrapping its “gendered unforms”, and male staff can now wear skirts. Here’s a non-binary model wearing one of their outfits to celebrate the change.

    When you’re six miles up in the air travelling at 500mph, it’s reassuring to know your pilot could be mentally ill and being encouraged in his delusions by his employer.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @Rob McX

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39GTH8UlXK8

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Rob McX

    Blacks seem to have high rates of androgen uptake issues. Have endocrinologists ever looked at this, or is this one of those Here Be Dragons areas nobody can go anywhere near?

    Replies: @Corvinus

  113. Anonymous[281] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob
    Interesting piece I saw today on Salon. Trump tried to fire Javanka, but underlings would not carry out orders

    The money quote

    Although Trump repeatedly gave orders to Kelly and McGahn, the two refused to adhere to the request amid fears that "he would not back them once his daughter and son-in-law pushed back."

     

    Whatever you think of Trump getting cockblocked, it is really bad for the permanent government/rotating appointee classes to disobey the President. Especially the military. Do we want generals to decide which orders to obey?

    I know “election fraud” is a conspiracy theory now. But what if DeSantis wins, but black Democrats in the South cry foul, claiming widespread disfranchisement, perhaps the legislatures should just require everyone to report their vote totals at (not by) a certain time on election night. Not sure how to do mail-in voting. Maybe mail-in voting ends well before election night, then the post office closes for a week or two, so there are no shenanigans with ballots being found that put someone just over the top after a few days (or weeks) of counting? If people are going to cheat with mail-ins, maybe they should have to guess the appropriate bias in fake votes well ahead of time.

    I’d feel better about the election deniers if they had plans for making elections less cheatable. Maybe they do, but our terrible media doesn’t report on it? Agreeing on who just got elected is important in a democracy. In an oligarchy? Well, who benefits from red and blue teams hating each other?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There was no need to fire Kushner. All Trump had to do was to not fire Bannon. The two (Kushner vs. Bannon) counterbalanced each other and curbed each others excesses. After Bannon was fired it just became the Kushner administration. Trying to bring back Bannon at the 11th hour was pointless since by then Kushner was too powerful. Trump is supposed to be a managerial expert, yet he made the rookie mistake of allowing one of his underlings to get too big.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Anonymous


    There was no need to fire Kushner. All Trump had to do was to not fire Bannon.
     
    He really had no choice politically after Richard Spencer had managed to smear, in the public’s mind, the Trump movement and the alt right with Nazism. Spencer apparently is an agent of destruction.

    But Bannon was also a jackass. The administration made some very poor strategic decisions in the first year.
  114. The not-so-nice side of my personality thinks that a healthy proportion of those having “recovered memories” are indulging in wishful thinking. Which leads me to wonder who would want to imagine they were horribly abused as a child. And why does it often happen to radical leftist women?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Enemy of Earth

    People who want to blame someone else for their failures and their dissatisfaction with life.

  115. @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, we need to have a serious conversation about you and your people.

    I'm willing to discuss it, no holds barred, let's set a time and date where those who love your blog, and all you use to represent can talk the present you and everything about modern you that's reviled can be brought up, and pored over.

    Setting it Right For White.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdEIr_dhzwU

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @ThreeCranes

    Yeah, let’s talk about Steve behind his back to his face.

  116. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    Articles like this is probably where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don't hurt the Deep State. This way, when he's needed to push a Narrative, the lower IQ crowd will listen to him.

    Replies: @Anon, @New Dealer, @Matt Buckalew, @Dieter Kief

    Ok but what would you expect Ron Unz was a deep state asset that got cut loose after he got humiliated by Pete Wilson.

    “America is the Great Satan and what can fix it is more taco trucks.” That’s Ron Unz’s perfect distilled and that’s why the deep state brought him on board. But unz couldn’t hit his sales goals so know he’s cut loose desperately trying to get the old flames attention with sadder and sadder displays of ostentation

  117. @HA
    Related:

    A Johns Hopkins anesthesiologist and her spouse, a doctor and major in the U.S. Army, were federally indicted for attempting to provide medical information about members of the military to the Russian government. Anna Gabrielian and Jamie Lee Henry, who had a secret security clearance as a doctor at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, communicated and met several times with an undercover FBI agent who they believed was from the Russian embassy,...

    “My point of view is until the United States actually declares war against Russia, I’m able to help as much as I want,” Henry, 39, told the agent, according to the indictment. “At that point, I’ll have some ethical issues I’ll have to work through.”

    “You’ll work through those ethical issues,” Gabrielian replied... Gabrielian called Henry a “coward” for being concerned about violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA,)... She told the person she did not share those concerns because she violated the law “all the time.”

    Henry received attention in 2015 after becoming the first known active-duty Army officer to come out as transgender. A Buzzfeed article from that time said she was also to her knowledge and to the knowledge of LGBT advocates the first and only active duty service member who had changed her name and gender within the United States military.
     

    I have repeatedly been told that Putin and his many stooges were going to the very ones who would save us from all the Buzzfeed-gender-weird insanity prowling about our beds at night, so I don't know what to make of this. I'm starting to think the rank-and-file Unz-dot-com commentariat are not the bulwark of truth and consistency they claim to be.

    Replies: @Pixo

    I like the DailyMail version. They are great at covering the growing level of shemale hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by “the Army’s first trans officer.”

    They are especially good at the comic trannie photos and aren’t shy about including the perverts’ before photos.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11263375/Armys-trans-officer-wife-INDICTED-trying-pass-medical-records-Russians.html

    I especially like how the tranny army doc’s objection to his Russian wife’s urging him to spy for Russia isn’t that it is an evil betrayal of his oath, but would be a HIPPA violation:

    “Gabrielian was allegedly fueled by her patriotism for Russia, and told Henry not be a ‘coward’ when she expressed concerns about violating HIPPA.”

    • Replies: @HA
    @Pixo

    "hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by 'the Army’s first trans officer.'”

    I'm wondering if the military will dock the sentence given that this was technically attempted literal treason since they were intercepted and diverted to an FBI sting at some point along the way, hopefully before they actually passed on something to any real Russian spies.

    I'm sure at least a few activists (not to mention Putin stooges) will want to know how specifically they got outed (so to speak). Maybe the confluence of rabidly pro-Russian sentiment and the drama/alienation/isolation that comes with this kind of first-of-its-kind celebrity (some similarities to that ironically named "Manning" court martial) tripped some potentially-easy-to-compromise red flag on some watchlist generator. If that's the case, then whoever (or, if it was AI software, whatever) put them on any such watchlist might also at some point find himself court-martialed for such blatant trans-phobia, and the fact that the profile totally nailed it is going to be a very thin reed to hang a defense on. As in, "But you ARE in a chicken-and-waffle restaurant!"

    Nah, more likely, they'll let people think it was just dumb luck on the part of the FBI, and just plain old being dumb in the case of the traitors themselves that happened to save the day. Spying for the Russians is one thing, but red-flag watchlists? No, that's truly a bridge too far.

    , @Carol
    @Pixo

    It's HIPAA.

    Typical sloppy Brit writing.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    I reviewed Showalter's "Hystories" in 1997 for National Review -- it's the second review down on its Amazon page:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Hysterical-Epidemics-Modern-Media/dp/B000OPGK1Y

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hypnotoad666

    Uh, shouldn't "medical info" pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Hypnotoad666

    How about a drum head court martial followed by Ze being stood up against a wall and shot.

    These traitorous morons think this is a game. Perhaps the above might get their attention.

  119. @Anon
    There’s a good book on this from the last century written by a feminist scholar:

    https://www.amazon.com/Hystories-Elaine-Showalter/dp/0231104596

    She included chronic fatigue syndrome among the mass delusions of the time. CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system. Like transgenderism it’s comorbid with depression and anxiety disorders, and like transgenderism it’s probably an expression of those underlying mental illnesses. If chronic fatigue syndrome can hang on for decades as it has, it doesn’t bode well for efforts to get rid of transgender ideology. Also, like CFS, transgender treatment is becoming a big moneymaker for the medical profession.

    Another of the delusions that she wrote about, Gulf War Syndrome, has thankfully been pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob McX, @possumman, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Sideshow Bob Too, @EH

    “CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system”

    Nonsense. CFS is very real, has multiple causes (mostly various viral infections, also mitrochondrial disorders), has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers and others. Doctors don’t want to hear about CFS symptoms from patients at all, and usually prescribe exercise, which has been proven over and over again to cause deterioration, often to the point of becoming completely bedridden.

    It’s depression that is over-diagnosed, with no reliable tests, and the serotonin theory of depression (and the chemical imbalance / drug-deficiency hypothesis in general) that has been completely disproven, with the drugs being no better than placebos but with dangerous side-effects.

    You’re also wrong about Gulf-War syndrome, and the guy Steve quotes at length is wrong about multiple personalities not existing (very rare, though and over-diagnosed). The idea that memories are never repressed is idiotic as well, though not as idiotic as the idea that just because false memories can me implanted with hypnosis that disproves all recovered memories, including the ones not implanted by hypnosis.

    The fact that psychiatry is 95% BS and outright fraud in no way disproves the existence of psychological processes such as repression and projection – not to mention mass psychosis.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @EH


    CFS ... has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers
     
    Nope. Fake. Read any such claims in the original research and judge how solid they sound for yourself.

    The clearest way to see how fake CFS is, is to follow the history of its development via the CFS pages on the CDC website on the Wayback Machine.

    Originally there were "clusters," particular doctors who would diagnose it for all comers.

    The CDC sent an epidemiologist out to the clusters and he found that the doctors could not even give a consistent list of symptoms, so it was impossible to define. It was "Here's a list of twenty psychogenic, non-biomarker symptoms, and if you have any three of them, you've got CFS."

    Then the thing happened where the hysterical wife of a congressman got him to put in an amendment to a bill that required the CDC to conduct more studies. This is like how the wife of another congressman in the 1990s got her husband to add something to a bill to force the Air Force to issue a report on the Roswell UFO crash.

    What the CDC did was put up a page saying they were doing this study and for doctors to please report patients that had a few of maybe a dozen symptoms (they pared it down a bit). (Activists claimed that this was some sort of affirmation from the CDC.) There was a committee of doctors and epidemiologists who would look at submissions.

    At that point nobody took is seriously. But gradually doctors discovered there was money and prestige in CFS: Being on the committee looked good on your CV, so to speak, and you could get referrals. They started to prescribe depression drugs "off label" for CFS (just a coincidence that they worked for both conditions).

    The fact that these patients are 90 percent women of course launched the "doctors don't take women seriously" thing.

    This whole thing has repeated for a number of these condidions. The CDC was forced to look into Morgellons, for instance, with hilarious results. Read the report on that one.

    Anyway, I do recommend the Showalter book, and also you can Google what happened to Showalter after publication. It was somewhere between the Arthur Jensen treatment and the Salmon Rushdie treatment. She had to law low for quite awhile and not make any public appearances. There's some funny video out there.

    Replies: @EH

    , @Anonymous
    @EH

    Gulf War syndrome may have been legit, the problem is that since it's self-diagnosed and offered the prospect of compensation payments, how do you tell the grifters from the real cases?

  120. @SFG
    @Dan Smith

    It amazes me how much oral history, between stuff like this and things like white flight of the 60s, remains untold and will probably be lost to history. Some Studs Terkel of the right should collect it.

    Replies: @pirelli

    An old lawyer I used to work with went off one time about “white flight.” His rant went something like this: “Yeah you always hear about ‘white flight,’ but you never hear about what actually caused it. It was scary. Things were violent. White kids were getting beaten up left and right. If you were a white boy, and you weren’t fast enough to get away, you had to learn to fight, or at least how to protect yourself from getting seriously injured. Black girls were holding white girls down in the cafeteria and cutting off their hair. White families were getting stolen from all the time. People left for the suburbs because they had to. The judges ordering desegregation all lived in segregated neighborhoods themselves. There was no one to go to for help.”

    All of the (white) millennial lawyers present, myself included, were very quiet.

  121. @possumman
    @Anon

    Long Covid--the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome----same people--same vague symptoms---if you have a mysterious bug bite even better---Lyme Disease

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Long Covid–the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome—-same people–same vague symptoms—if you have a mysterious bug bite even better—Lyme Disease

    And if you work for the government and have ever been outside the country you should ask your doctor about Havana Syndrome. It has the same symptoms as all other fake diseases (brain fog, lethargy, general aches and pains), but it’s caused by Ruskie thought-control rays instead of tick bites.

  122. @Dan Smith
    @Bardon Kaldian

    CFS is completely subjective with zero objective findings. It’s a mental disorder. I have a hard time squaring the fatigue part with the boundless energy of its victims with respect for agitating for disability and seeking recognition by the medical profession.

    Replies: @EH

    You’re entirely ignorant of the research, which is quite typical of arrogant boomer MDs, though no excuse for your malpractice..

    See for example: Institute of Medicine 2015. Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/19012 (305pp. PDF)

  123. @Rob McX
    OT: Virgin airlines is scrapping its "gendered unforms", and male staff can now wear skirts. Here's a non-binary model wearing one of their outfits to celebrate the change.


    https://evoke.ie/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/SEI127202497.jpg


    When you're six miles up in the air travelling at 500mph, it's reassuring to know your pilot could be mentally ill and being encouraged in his delusions by his employer.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @The Anti-Gnostic

  124. Females are prone to hysteria when they aren’t getting laid properly. The Greek philosophers realized this thousand of years ago. In ancient medical texts, written all the way back in 500 B.C., Hippocrates suggested that a variety of ailments that seem to affect females instead of males could be traced back to the womb. A Roman physician named Galen theorized that hysteria was caused by sexual deprivation. Women who were married had an easy fix – simply enlisting their husbands to help them out. However, for unmarried women and widows things weren’t so easy. Therefore, Galen proposed the groundbreaking idea of pelvic massage. The result of the massage brought on the intended cure, a “hysterical paroxysm.” That is, an orgasm. Specifically, a good orgasm. From then on, medical professionals would cite his technique, one that would be used without much change for hundreds of years. Through almost every century leading up to the hysteria boom of the 1800s, manual sexual relief of women was mentioned in medical journals and home health guides as a diagnosis of hysteria became more widespread. By the 1800s, hysteria was widely accepted as the most common disease among women and one that doctors found themselves treating with increasing frequency. However, since they’d been doing it for several centuries, doctors were beginning to tire of the old method described by Galen. Literally, they were “paroxysing” so many women that their fingers had begun to cramp, and they started to look for alternative methods. Soon enough another doctor decided that there was a better way, and came up with the Manipulator, the first vibrator…

    Today 30% of White American females are on psychotropic drugs and millions of teenage girls suffer from Gender Dysphoria and other hysterical conditions for the same reasons the Greeks identified in Ancient times. Young females are not getting laid enough. Never have so we had so many females not getting the sexual release they need to stay sane. Teens today get laid less than our great grandmothers did a century ago, and are getting far less sex than in any point in history. This has resulted in increased hysteria among women. all of us, regardless of age, are having less sex, with the most dramatic decline among teenagers. At the start of the study in 2009, 75% of those ages 16 to 19, revealed they were not having sex. By 2019, that number rose to 90%

    the cure to many of our problems is the lack of pair bonding and the resulting decrease is sexual activity among young women. Back in the 1950’s most teenage females were married by age 20, thus they were getting laid frequently from their high testosterone husbands. Today the average American teen has less testosterone than a 60 year-old man had in 1970. To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.

    • Agree: Pixo
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Travis

    I’m sure you’re doing your part to reduce female hysteria. Just be sure to obtain consent from the objects of your medical treatment.

    , @Anon
    @Travis


    To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.
     
    Does increasing fitness actually increase t-levels? Is there any evidence of that?

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  125. @J.Ross
    OT -- Jews arrested south of the border for doing the same thing they did during the Ottoman and Roman empires and what Joseph's brothers did to him. Notice this is a new story, not to be confused with the last five or six times this happened. Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.
    https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-america-latina-63054397

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Alden

    Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.

    On the contrary, it is very much associated with a religious cult. Lev Tahor (Pure Heart) is the brainchild of the late, unlamented and deeply deranged Rabbi Shlomo Helbrans. If David Koresh and Jim Jones had a child ( don’t assume gender you hater!) he would be a lot like Helbrans. They have fled from country to country one step ahead – sometimes behind – the authorities.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief, J.Ross
    • Replies: @Anon
    @kaganovitch

    The case has garnered almost zero local news coverage but rather more international interest. The arrest of the twenty-five members seems to have been an Israeli operation, just endangering the lives of the local cops (a four people private security-Mossad team plus a member of the Israeli consulate were present). The Halbrens nutcase drowned in the jungle in 2017. Really? Two charged with drug trafficking left a day before the raid. What a coincidence.

    Are they really being persecuted because of child marriage?

  126. @Rupert Pupkin
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I was a normal young dude of 31, living in NYC w a job and girlfriend etc, when I got the worst flu of my life w a fever of around 103 and a heavy malaise that lingered for maybe 2 mos. This was 20 yrs ago and I was never the same after that and could barely move or think. First the docs said maybe mono or hep but eventually after years of not really getting better and not getting an official diagnosis, I was shunted into the "Chronic Fatigue" medical Bermuda's Triangle.
    What I seem to have is some sort of postviral infection or syndrome that has tripwired my immune system into an aggressive response that it can't turn off.
    Anyway, when I go to a doc the waiting room is usually me and a gaggle of cat ladies and all the most blatantly insane women I've met in the past 20 years have all said "I have CFS too!" when I mention my health.
    So at least from my experience there does seem to some postviral infections that linger and cause health havoc that modern medicine haven't figured out, and also at the same time these "umbrella diagnoses" are magnets for every demented crazy woman in the world.
    Both can be true.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Bardon Kaldian, @Another Canadian

    Tested for HLA-B27? Epstein-Barr combined with HLA-B27 can trigger all kinds of weird autoimmune responses after the primary infection passes.

  127. @bomag
    @Cloudbuster

    The village always had a few centered, reasonable people with people skills who did some good, as much as anything since.

    But others saw that the local blacksmith shop was expanded into the modern metallurgy industry with the addition of science etc., so they tried the same with casual council and things went the other way.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    The village always had a few centered, reasonable people with people skills who did some good, as much as anything since.

    I think it was Hans Eysenck who said “psychotherapy is the prostitution of friendship.”

  128. @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer

    https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1575553251264471040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1575553251264471040%7Ctwgr%5E2f9af0d3d03a55f4f75133a83c0059ccf19e5a4d%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fredstate.com%2Fbonchie%2F2022%2F09%2F29%2Ffirst-transgender-army-officer-turns-out-to-be-a-russian-spy-n635169

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    Uh, shouldn’t “medical info” pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    Uh, shouldn’t “medical info” pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.
     
    Very interesting argument. Do we know anything about the nature of the info that was shared?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  129. @Muggles
    Good topic today.

    Yes, "medical science" comes up with all kinds of fake diseases and illnesses which eventually quietly fade away.

    In the 19th century they had the "vapors" and "fainting couches."

    Mainly for depressed married women. Some may have been related to migraines or menstruation. Or sometimes chemical imbalances causing actual depression.

    One commonality to most of this junk is that "victims" expect and often receive something like welfare or unemployment benefits. These conditions let the "suffers" be treated as ill or sick but actually are just invented mental constructs. Now on rare occasions something might really be off or medically wrong. But how to tell. Fakers enjoy less work/responsibility.

    Very few poor or hardscrabble rural people, peasants, working class folks have these imaginary conditions unless they can profit somehow. These fake diseases are for the already comfortable and often just lazy malingerers. (Oh, we can't say that now, publicly...)

    The fact that young women, or even early teen females, are the main "victims" is telling. Most of this is just TikTok syndrome before TikTok. Anxiety, eating "disorders", narcissism run riot, etc.

    The "repressed memory" scam got a lot of people put in prison for a terrible thing that didn't happen.

    Now more than a few mutilated young people will regret this horrible fad for the rest of their lives.

    Someone should inform them that these trans types can't have normal sex and what they do have is likely to be far worse than what they might have had. That's one Freak Show Circus that you can't quit. That stuff won't grow back...

    Like the tattooed uglies out there, growing old, flabby and poisoned with ink, this is a lifetime of regrets.

    Replies: @Carol, @Jim Don Bob

    Hear, hear! Well said.

  130. Bullying is the solution.

  131. @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer

    https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1575553251264471040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1575553251264471040%7Ctwgr%5E2f9af0d3d03a55f4f75133a83c0059ccf19e5a4d%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fredstate.com%2Fbonchie%2F2022%2F09%2F29%2Ffirst-transgender-army-officer-turns-out-to-be-a-russian-spy-n635169

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    How about a drum head court martial followed by Ze being stood up against a wall and shot.

    These traitorous morons think this is a game. Perhaps the above might get their attention.

  132. @Pixo
    @HA

    I like the DailyMail version. They are great at covering the growing level of shemale hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by “the Army’s first trans officer.”

    They are especially good at the comic trannie photos and aren’t shy about including the perverts’ before photos.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11263375/Armys-trans-officer-wife-INDICTED-trying-pass-medical-records-Russians.html

    I especially like how the tranny army doc’s objection to his Russian wife’s urging him to spy for Russia isn’t that it is an evil betrayal of his oath, but would be a HIPPA violation:

    “Gabrielian was allegedly fueled by her patriotism for Russia, and told Henry not be a 'coward' when she expressed concerns about violating HIPPA.”

    Replies: @HA, @Carol

    “hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by ‘the Army’s first trans officer.’”

    I’m wondering if the military will dock the sentence given that this was technically attempted literal treason since they were intercepted and diverted to an FBI sting at some point along the way, hopefully before they actually passed on something to any real Russian spies.

    I’m sure at least a few activists (not to mention Putin stooges) will want to know how specifically they got outed (so to speak). Maybe the confluence of rabidly pro-Russian sentiment and the drama/alienation/isolation that comes with this kind of first-of-its-kind celebrity (some similarities to that ironically named “Manning” court martial) tripped some potentially-easy-to-compromise red flag on some watchlist generator. If that’s the case, then whoever (or, if it was AI software, whatever) put them on any such watchlist might also at some point find himself court-martialed for such blatant trans-phobia, and the fact that the profile totally nailed it is going to be a very thin reed to hang a defense on. As in, “But you ARE in a chicken-and-waffle restaurant!”

    Nah, more likely, they’ll let people think it was just dumb luck on the part of the FBI, and just plain old being dumb in the case of the traitors themselves that happened to save the day. Spying for the Russians is one thing, but red-flag watchlists? No, that’s truly a bridge too far.

  133. @Pixo
    @HA

    I like the DailyMail version. They are great at covering the growing level of shemale hijinks, high crimes, and in this case literal treason by “the Army’s first trans officer.”

    They are especially good at the comic trannie photos and aren’t shy about including the perverts’ before photos.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11263375/Armys-trans-officer-wife-INDICTED-trying-pass-medical-records-Russians.html

    I especially like how the tranny army doc’s objection to his Russian wife’s urging him to spy for Russia isn’t that it is an evil betrayal of his oath, but would be a HIPPA violation:

    “Gabrielian was allegedly fueled by her patriotism for Russia, and told Henry not be a 'coward' when she expressed concerns about violating HIPPA.”

    Replies: @HA, @Carol

    It’s HIPAA.

    Typical sloppy Brit writing.

  134. @Rob McX
    OT: Virgin airlines is scrapping its "gendered unforms", and male staff can now wear skirts. Here's a non-binary model wearing one of their outfits to celebrate the change.


    https://evoke.ie/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/SEI127202497.jpg


    When you're six miles up in the air travelling at 500mph, it's reassuring to know your pilot could be mentally ill and being encouraged in his delusions by his employer.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Blacks seem to have high rates of androgen uptake issues. Have endocrinologists ever looked at this, or is this one of those Here Be Dragons areas nobody can go anywhere near?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    With or without adjustment for covariates, there were no significant differences in testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, or SHBG levels by race/ethnicity. DHEAS levels differed by race/ethnicity before covariate adjustment; after adjustment this difference was attenuated. Before adjustment, DHT and DHT to testosterone ratios did not significantly differ by racial/ethnic group. After adjustment, there was evidence of racial/ethnic differences in DHT (P = 0.047) and DHT to testosterone (P = 0.038) levels. Black men had higher DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratios than white and Hispanic men.

    Conclusions: Because there are no racial/ethnic differences in testosterone levels, normative ranges need not be adjusted by race/ethnicity for androgen deficiency diagnosis for men aged 30–79 yr. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratio can help explain racial/ethnic variations in prostate cancer incidence, body composition, and bone mass.

  135. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Who benefits?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Why are you so obsessed with the trans movement, Steve?

    If it is even a problem, measured in societal cost-benefit terms, it is minuscule in overall impact. It may even be a net benefit.

    Isn’t it just a big distraction?

    Who benefits?

    Society benefits. Transism gives the lie to equalism and related myths. It helps advance awareness of human biodiversity, and in particular differences between the sexes.

    End sex discrimination in sports and other pursuits. Help women cheer and admire men again.

  136. @J.Ross
    OT -- Jews arrested south of the border for doing the same thing they did during the Ottoman and Roman empires and what Joseph's brothers did to him. Notice this is a new story, not to be confused with the last five or six times this happened. Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.
    https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-america-latina-63054397

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Alden

    It would be interesting to know how this group of approximately 250, most of whom appear to be children, acquires the money to make international flights and set up living compounds as soon as they arrive in a new country.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Alden

    Keith Rainier, who had a brilliant career abusing women and taking McKinsey types for a ride, proved you only need to bag one liquor heiress, although he bagged two, plus everyone who paid for his sham corporate leadership courses.

  137. Anon[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @clifford brown


    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.
     
    So does getting a good night's sleep on a regular basis. The world looks much better and is easier to deal with if you are well rested.

    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.

    Time for another martini!

    Replies: @Anon, @clifford brown

    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.

    As a health favor to some of us here, would you mind providing additional detail about his practices and routine? Such as: What time were his meals? What did they consist of usually? What time did he go to sleep and wake up?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Anon

    I only knew him after he retired. He'd get up 7 or so, and have a simple breakfast at 8. Then lunch about noon, and dinner at 6. He was a meat and potatoes guy but also ate a lot of fruits and vegetables.
    He'd go to bed at 11 after the news.

    He did not like beer, and he did not drink regularly. When he did, he had a finger or two of white rum.

    I think the regularity of his meals helped him greatly, and I've harped on this to my kids. I see too many people, especially women, skip a meal (usually breakfast), and then pig out later on because they are hungry. This plays havoc with your body's metabolism.

    Replies: @Anon

  138. @Travis
    Females are prone to hysteria when they aren't getting laid properly. The Greek philosophers realized this thousand of years ago. In ancient medical texts, written all the way back in 500 B.C., Hippocrates suggested that a variety of ailments that seem to affect females instead of males could be traced back to the womb. A Roman physician named Galen theorized that hysteria was caused by sexual deprivation. Women who were married had an easy fix – simply enlisting their husbands to help them out. However, for unmarried women and widows things weren’t so easy. Therefore, Galen proposed the groundbreaking idea of pelvic massage. The result of the massage brought on the intended cure, a “hysterical paroxysm.” That is, an orgasm. Specifically, a good orgasm. From then on, medical professionals would cite his technique, one that would be used without much change for hundreds of years. Through almost every century leading up to the hysteria boom of the 1800s, manual sexual relief of women was mentioned in medical journals and home health guides as a diagnosis of hysteria became more widespread. By the 1800s, hysteria was widely accepted as the most common disease among women and one that doctors found themselves treating with increasing frequency. However, since they’d been doing it for several centuries, doctors were beginning to tire of the old method described by Galen. Literally, they were “paroxysing” so many women that their fingers had begun to cramp, and they started to look for alternative methods. Soon enough another doctor decided that there was a better way, and came up with the Manipulator, the first vibrator...

    Today 30% of White American females are on psychotropic drugs and millions of teenage girls suffer from Gender Dysphoria and other hysterical conditions for the same reasons the Greeks identified in Ancient times. Young females are not getting laid enough. Never have so we had so many females not getting the sexual release they need to stay sane. Teens today get laid less than our great grandmothers did a century ago, and are getting far less sex than in any point in history. This has resulted in increased hysteria among women. all of us, regardless of age, are having less sex, with the most dramatic decline among teenagers. At the start of the study in 2009, 75% of those ages 16 to 19, revealed they were not having sex. By 2019, that number rose to 90%

    the cure to many of our problems is the lack of pair bonding and the resulting decrease is sexual activity among young women. Back in the 1950's most teenage females were married by age 20, thus they were getting laid frequently from their high testosterone husbands. Today the average American teen has less testosterone than a 60 year-old man had in 1970. To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.

    Replies: @Alden, @Anon

    I’m sure you’re doing your part to reduce female hysteria. Just be sure to obtain consent from the objects of your medical treatment.

  139. @Nico
    In just the past 24 hours Joe Biden appears to have repressed his memory of Rep. Jackie Walorski and her aides being killed in a car-crash this summer.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @aNewBanner, @Legba

    My wife today admitted to me that it looks like Biden has “low-grade” dementia. She tends to represent that part of the population with minimal interest in politics and current events. If she’s noticing it, then there’s a lot more people who are noticing this now.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @aNewBanner

    I visited a number of assisted living places before my mother entered one, and about half the people there were in wheel chairs. I asked why and the woman showing me around said that they had simply forgotten how to walk.

    Biden looks like he is forgetting how to walk.

  140. So why, in practice, are the terms “feminist theory” and “scientific theory” mutually exclusive? … The particular form of rationality that originated in the Enlightenment requires more than just the ability to construct castles of logical conjecture in the air. Galileo wasn’t any more ingenious at conceiving interlocking celestial spheres than his ancient rival Ptolemy. What distinguished Galileo, and the Enlightenment in general, was that masculine competitive delight in risking the destruction of your own hypotheses in order to smash the other guy’s beautiful celestial spheres of theory. The Enlightenment turned reason into a contact sport. Feminist movements careen into gullibility because women, especially when talking mostly to other women, find it more emotionally difficult than men to treat intellectual debate as a game. Women tend to take it much more personally, closing their minds to opponents and pulling their punches with friends.

    No one else has said the word, so I’ll say it: empricism.

    This is a fine paragraph Steve, but I think male argumentative competition is only half the story.

    Both men and women live and operate within their particular–ethnic, class, religious, etc. etc.–social milieu. Then tend to think/behave as is appropriate for their social position. But men also have generally had much higher objective “inputs” on their status from the world of things. Who can track? Who can throw the spear more accurately? Who killed the deer? Who is stronger in battle? …. Right on down to who can solve this problem? Who makes the most money?

    The great breakout of the West with modern science, was that a lot of arguments about the world, really could be systematically settled with data–experiment and data. And in doing so a much more dynamic system of science, technology, industry evolved.

    But this power, this scientific/technological breakout is all very highly male. Female feelings need not apply.

    And what we’ve seen is this sort of verbalist–and skewing highly female–rebellions against objective criteria, objective reality.

    An example: the whole BLM thing. Black men are being gunned down by racist trigger happy cops. Ok, it’s no implausible. But there’s data: About 30% of police killing are blacks, twice as high as their young adult population%. But way lower than their involvement in violent crime, up to their 60% share of gun homicides–precisely the sort of thing, that generates “drop it or we’ll shoot” police encounters. Objectively: case closed. BLM is bullshit.

    Race doesn’t exist vs. HBD — voluminous data settles it.

    The “pay gap”–the data is clear, it doesn’t exist. There are gaps in occupational choice, skills, work hours, time in career that more than account for it. I.e. there’s a big productivity gap.

    Etc. etc. etc….

    But all this objective, data stuff contradicts some people’s “lived experience”. Contradicts how they feel–deeply feel–things are, or how they ought to be. Annoys people who do not have the “status” that they feel they should, or who are not “happy”. What they feel, must be real, even though it is in fact … nonsense.

  141. @Roger

    Most students in psychology and psychiatry programs today are too young to have any firsthand memory of the moral panic engendered by the recovered memory movement in the 1980s and early 1990s.
     
    The recovered memory movement continues today. It is responsible for prosecutions of Jerry Sandusky, Harvey Weinstein, and many others. The prosecution witnesses changed their stories, and experts testified that it is normal to repress the truth.

    Replies: @Alden

    The Harvey Weinstein accusers weren’t recovered memory fakers. They never forgot that vile obese pig with the diseased genitalia. Come on, who’d ever forget the perv jacking off into a plant in a hotel hallway? Or all 350 pounds of his naked self strutting into a hotel sitting room? He’s still facing various charges in Los Angeles.

    • Replies: @Roger
    @Alden

    Weinstein's 2020 conviction was based on just 2 incidents, in 2006 and 2013. Those women showed every indication that the incidents were consensual. They only turned against him many years later. Prosecution experts testified that was normal.

    Weinstein has about 100 other accusers who never made it to court. I do not know about those. The case that actually went to trial seemed like recovered memory fakers to me.

  142. @SFG
    @Whereismyhandle

    Bad people who hate religion, sure.

    But I don’t think they go to Black Mass.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    They don’t need to. It’s online now.

    [note top surgery scars]

  143. anonymous[147] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Rob

    There was no need to fire Kushner. All Trump had to do was to not fire Bannon. The two (Kushner vs. Bannon) counterbalanced each other and curbed each others excesses. After Bannon was fired it just became the Kushner administration. Trying to bring back Bannon at the 11th hour was pointless since by then Kushner was too powerful. Trump is supposed to be a managerial expert, yet he made the rookie mistake of allowing one of his underlings to get too big.

    Replies: @anonymous

    There was no need to fire Kushner. All Trump had to do was to not fire Bannon.

    He really had no choice politically after Richard Spencer had managed to smear, in the public’s mind, the Trump movement and the alt right with Nazism. Spencer apparently is an agent of destruction.

    But Bannon was also a jackass. The administration made some very poor strategic decisions in the first year.

  144. @Jim Don Bob
    @clifford brown


    Diet, exercise, meditation/prayer go along way in contributing to health and happiness.
     
    So does getting a good night's sleep on a regular basis. The world looks much better and is easier to deal with if you are well rested.

    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.

    Time for another martini!

    Replies: @Anon, @clifford brown

  145. Ukraine update:

    1. 1500-2500 Russian soldiers are now encircled in the Lyman area according to pro-Russian sources. Most likely outcome is a panicked retreat on foot, bikes, and mopeds, leaving behind all their ammo and heavy equipment. But mass surrender could also happen.

    2. Outside of a few big cities, Russia really is sad corrupt squalor. Here’s a conscripted soldier providing a tour of his barracks, which looks more like a crackhouse.

    3. Ukraine has three large bridgeheads over the Oskel river and is advancing along multiple axes north of Lyman.

    In short, another few weeks of massive globohomo victories.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Pixo

    That's a cultural thing. In Russia, it's unmanly to be clean and tidy.

    (I remember reading about the German settlers invited to Russia by Catherine the Great. They were much mocked by their new Russian neighbors for their fastidious cleanliness/tidiness and personal grooming--cutting their hair and beards. This was how women behaved, not men!)

  146. @Reg Cæsar
    @Hypnotoad666

    Uh, shouldn't "medical info" pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Uh, shouldn’t “medical info” pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.

    Very interesting argument. Do we know anything about the nature of the info that was shared?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @AKAHorace

  147. @Alden
    @Roger

    The Harvey Weinstein accusers weren’t recovered memory fakers. They never forgot that vile obese pig with the diseased genitalia. Come on, who’d ever forget the perv jacking off into a plant in a hotel hallway? Or all 350 pounds of his naked self strutting into a hotel sitting room? He’s still facing various charges in Los Angeles.

    Replies: @Roger

    Weinstein’s 2020 conviction was based on just 2 incidents, in 2006 and 2013. Those women showed every indication that the incidents were consensual. They only turned against him many years later. Prosecution experts testified that was normal.

    Weinstein has about 100 other accusers who never made it to court. I do not know about those. The case that actually went to trial seemed like recovered memory fakers to me.

  148. @Travis
    Females are prone to hysteria when they aren't getting laid properly. The Greek philosophers realized this thousand of years ago. In ancient medical texts, written all the way back in 500 B.C., Hippocrates suggested that a variety of ailments that seem to affect females instead of males could be traced back to the womb. A Roman physician named Galen theorized that hysteria was caused by sexual deprivation. Women who were married had an easy fix – simply enlisting their husbands to help them out. However, for unmarried women and widows things weren’t so easy. Therefore, Galen proposed the groundbreaking idea of pelvic massage. The result of the massage brought on the intended cure, a “hysterical paroxysm.” That is, an orgasm. Specifically, a good orgasm. From then on, medical professionals would cite his technique, one that would be used without much change for hundreds of years. Through almost every century leading up to the hysteria boom of the 1800s, manual sexual relief of women was mentioned in medical journals and home health guides as a diagnosis of hysteria became more widespread. By the 1800s, hysteria was widely accepted as the most common disease among women and one that doctors found themselves treating with increasing frequency. However, since they’d been doing it for several centuries, doctors were beginning to tire of the old method described by Galen. Literally, they were “paroxysing” so many women that their fingers had begun to cramp, and they started to look for alternative methods. Soon enough another doctor decided that there was a better way, and came up with the Manipulator, the first vibrator...

    Today 30% of White American females are on psychotropic drugs and millions of teenage girls suffer from Gender Dysphoria and other hysterical conditions for the same reasons the Greeks identified in Ancient times. Young females are not getting laid enough. Never have so we had so many females not getting the sexual release they need to stay sane. Teens today get laid less than our great grandmothers did a century ago, and are getting far less sex than in any point in history. This has resulted in increased hysteria among women. all of us, regardless of age, are having less sex, with the most dramatic decline among teenagers. At the start of the study in 2009, 75% of those ages 16 to 19, revealed they were not having sex. By 2019, that number rose to 90%

    the cure to many of our problems is the lack of pair bonding and the resulting decrease is sexual activity among young women. Back in the 1950's most teenage females were married by age 20, thus they were getting laid frequently from their high testosterone husbands. Today the average American teen has less testosterone than a 60 year-old man had in 1970. To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.

    Replies: @Alden, @Anon

    To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.

    Does increasing fitness actually increase t-levels? Is there any evidence of that?

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Anon

    Yes. Some basic internet searches will lead you to studies that show exercise, especially weightlifting, and diet can increase T levels.

    The reasons that T levels are dropping among males in the US are many, but one reason is simply the fact that T levels are in many ways a product of necessity. Men who used to spend a significant portion of their waking hours working to provide enough food to eat for themselves and their family required more T than a 25 year old video game addict living still living with his parents. We are more sedentary as a society than ever, and our bodies adapt to that, for better or worse.

  149. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?"

    Yes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corvinus

    “For example, nobody in Hong Kong suffered anorexia until the Hong Kong media, watching American media, started warning of the coming anorexia menace. And, sure enough, moody Hong Kong girls shortly started to develop anorexia.”

    It’s nothing short of amazing when you make these statements as if they were true without even going into depth as to how and why you believe it to he true. But I guess you have feed Fido at the expense of being more precise.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1946859

    A prospective study of sixteen Chinese anorexic patients in Hong Kong indicates that they were single young females who came from lower social class, exhibited severe self-induced weight loss, rigid maintenance of low body weight and amenorrhea. Weight reduction was primarily by dietary restriction. The typical bulimic syndrome and major depression were uncommon. There were multiple aetiological factors, but no pre-morbid obesity and little pressure to pursue slimness for beauty. Instead of displaying an intense fear of obesity and a distorted body image, patients more commonly attributed poor food intake to abdominal bloating. As such, they only partially fulfilled current criteria for diagnosis. It is argued that such clinical patterns arise logically from their sociocultural backgrounds, but may gradually change with Westernization.

    Dr. Sing Feel, psychiatrist and research in Hong Kong, witnessed in real time the Westernization of eating disorders. From 1987-1992, he documented a culturally specific form of anorexia nervosa. Compared to Western anorexia, his patients rarely dieted nor expressed a fear of becoming fat. Rather, Lee NOTICED they complained of bloated stomachs.

    Then, in November 1994, a story of an anorexic girl who died brought on local media attention, with the reporting wrongly stating this disorder was the exact same one as the West. As the Chinese general public and their mental-health professionals came to understand the American diagnosis of anorexia, the presentation of the illness in Lee’s patient population by the Chinese media began to transform into the more virulent American standard. As a result, Lee handled dozens of new patients who had conformed to the Western version of the disease.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/224891994_Anorexia_nervosa_in_Hong_Kong_Why_not_more_Chinese

    Anorexia nervosa is a geographically distinct psychiatric disorder; it is rapidly increasing in incidence in Western countries, while being virtually unreported in China, or in the Chinese community of Hong Kong. This is surprising when the Chinese preoccupation with food and their reported readiness to somatise dysphoria are considered. Three Chinese anorectics born and living in Hong Kong and exhibiting mostly typical clinical features are reported. The rarity of the disorder in the East could be related to protective biological and socio-cultural factors specific to the Chinese, and while it may become more common, anorexia nervosa is unlikely to reach Western proportions.

  150. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    Uh, shouldn’t “medical info” pass back-and-forth freely between enemies? Several conscientious objectors have been awarded the Medal of Honor, and they treated the wounded without discrimination on both sides.
     
    Very interesting argument. Do we know anything about the nature of the info that was shared?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Reg Cæsar


    Why the hell would the Russians want that?
     
    That's what I was thinking. The files are apparently not those of top brass either. Maybe it was a cunning plan by the Russians to set the spy up to be caught and give Americans a glimpse into their tranny-infested military at work.
    , @AKAHorace
    @Reg Cæsar

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?


    Reading the Daily Mail story, there is no mention of the Russians themselves at all.


    The couple, from Rockville, Maryland, had communicated and met with an undercover FBI agent who they believed was from the Russian embassy in order to deliver files that the Kremlin 'could exploit.'
     
    This may be about how ruthless the FBI are, not transexuals or Russian espionage.
  151. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @AKAHorace

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    That’s what I was thinking. The files are apparently not those of top brass either. Maybe it was a cunning plan by the Russians to set the spy up to be caught and give Americans a glimpse into their tranny-infested military at work.

  152. @Nico
    In just the past 24 hours Joe Biden appears to have repressed his memory of Rep. Jackie Walorski and her aides being killed in a car-crash this summer.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @aNewBanner, @Legba

    To be fair, Joe Biden has suppressed lots of memories.

    • LOL: Rob McX
  153. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @EH
    @Anon

    "CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system"

    Nonsense. CFS is very real, has multiple causes (mostly various viral infections, also mitrochondrial disorders), has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers and others. Doctors don't want to hear about CFS symptoms from patients at all, and usually prescribe exercise, which has been proven over and over again to cause deterioration, often to the point of becoming completely bedridden.

    It's depression that is over-diagnosed, with no reliable tests, and the serotonin theory of depression (and the chemical imbalance / drug-deficiency hypothesis in general) that has been completely disproven, with the drugs being no better than placebos but with dangerous side-effects.

    You're also wrong about Gulf-War syndrome, and the guy Steve quotes at length is wrong about multiple personalities not existing (very rare, though and over-diagnosed). The idea that memories are never repressed is idiotic as well, though not as idiotic as the idea that just because false memories can me implanted with hypnosis that disproves all recovered memories, including the ones not implanted by hypnosis.

    The fact that psychiatry is 95% BS and outright fraud in no way disproves the existence of psychological processes such as repression and projection - not to mention mass psychosis.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous

    CFS … has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers

    Nope. Fake. Read any such claims in the original research and judge how solid they sound for yourself.

    The clearest way to see how fake CFS is, is to follow the history of its development via the CFS pages on the CDC website on the Wayback Machine.

    Originally there were “clusters,” particular doctors who would diagnose it for all comers.

    The CDC sent an epidemiologist out to the clusters and he found that the doctors could not even give a consistent list of symptoms, so it was impossible to define. It was “Here’s a list of twenty psychogenic, non-biomarker symptoms, and if you have any three of them, you’ve got CFS.”

    Then the thing happened where the hysterical wife of a congressman got him to put in an amendment to a bill that required the CDC to conduct more studies. This is like how the wife of another congressman in the 1990s got her husband to add something to a bill to force the Air Force to issue a report on the Roswell UFO crash.

    What the CDC did was put up a page saying they were doing this study and for doctors to please report patients that had a few of maybe a dozen symptoms (they pared it down a bit). (Activists claimed that this was some sort of affirmation from the CDC.) There was a committee of doctors and epidemiologists who would look at submissions.

    At that point nobody took is seriously. But gradually doctors discovered there was money and prestige in CFS: Being on the committee looked good on your CV, so to speak, and you could get referrals. They started to prescribe depression drugs “off label” for CFS (just a coincidence that they worked for both conditions).

    The fact that these patients are 90 percent women of course launched the “doctors don’t take women seriously” thing.

    This whole thing has repeated for a number of these condidions. The CDC was forced to look into Morgellons, for instance, with hilarious results. Read the report on that one.

    Anyway, I do recommend the Showalter book, and also you can Google what happened to Showalter after publication. It was somewhere between the Arthur Jensen treatment and the Salmon Rushdie treatment. She had to law low for quite awhile and not make any public appearances. There’s some funny video out there.

    • Replies: @EH
    @Anon

    While no doubt you are a Very Bright Boy, on this topic you're ignorant. See my reply later in this thread.

  154. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    Articles like this is probably where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don't hurt the Deep State. This way, when he's needed to push a Narrative, the lower IQ crowd will listen to him.

    Replies: @Anon, @New Dealer, @Matt Buckalew, @Dieter Kief

    where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don’t hurt the Deep State.

    You are comparing donkeys to roses.
    Something lots of disappointed romantics tend to do.
    All the while roses are nice – as are donkeys. So – none
    of the two can prove the other one being X. Or Y, or
    – whatever.

    (This is a brilliant / insightful post of Mr. Sailer.
    But of course: Feel free not to like it – for whatever
    reason(s). Just understand, this then is about you, not
    about this – as I said: great and admirably
    insightful article.)

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Dieter Kief

    Agree, and, as I have been saying, Steve doesn't know anything about foreign policy. He is of a generation when it was stupid and wierd to worry about it. He is a master of several important aspects of domestic policy, which makes him worth paying attention to, regardless of his blind spots.

  155. “These types of memories were far from uncommon: One survey of clinicians taken in 1994 revealed that 13 percent reported seeing at least one case of a patient remembering ritualistic abuse. Thousands of patients described truly incredible scenes of ritual murders, cannibalization, gang rapes and forced pregnancies.”

    http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~dlheb/introduc.htm

    One of the first criminal cases in England to raise similar allegations (of satanic abuse) occurred in 1988 in the East Midlands city of Nottingham. “The Broxtowe Case” took its name from the Nottingham district where many of the “T. family”, central to the investigation, lived. Notorious as Britain’s biggest ever prosecution of multi- generational incest, the Broxtowe Case began to acquire ‘satanic’ network dimensions.

    This development caused a serious rift between the social workers and police involved. (In other words the police thought the social workers were nuts.)

    In summer 1989, the Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire and the Director of Social Services, Nottinghamshire, agreed to set up a Joint Enquiry Team (JET) to re-investigate the evidence supporting the claims of an organised satanic network at large.

    The team’s full report was completed and submitted at the end of 1989.

    And here it is

    http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~dlheb/jetrepor.htm

    The family were under constant surveillance from the authorities and from an interview with a neighbour it is clear that they attracted attention to themselves as these families often do. The neighbour states that she had “seen young children naked in the garden eating their own excrement and running around the garden naked or [with] very little on even on freezing cold days”. She adds that “any talk of witchcraft or any type of Satanic practices regarding the family surprises me a great deal. I have never head or witnessed anything like that on this estate before”. The neighbours do maintain that the family used to frequently return from the pub and continued ‘parties’ with a lot of shouting and swearing.

    Despite this the social workers have accepted that the family were having witch parties at which sheep were being slaughtered in the front room or the back garden and the front garden and were subsequently left in the garages in wheelie bins, that abortions were committed in the front room, that more than eight witches danced around singing in the front room, that later one of the children had her stomach cut open on a table in the front room and that [Mary] witnessed seven children being killed along with acts of cannibalism. We do not consider that the belief that this could be kept secret matches basic commonsense or reality. Outside of the babies and the children, sheep are large, noisy, difficult animals and when one was slaughtered by an Indian on a council estate in Leicester it hit the national newspaper headlines the following day. In our view another explanation has to be sought.

    Lovely bit of Brit understatement there.

  156. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @AKAHorace

    Turns out it was personal medical files, not improvements in field surgery.

    Why the hell would the Russians want that?

    Reading the Daily Mail story, there is no mention of the Russians themselves at all.

    The couple, from Rockville, Maryland, had communicated and met with an undercover FBI agent who they believed was from the Russian embassy in order to deliver files that the Kremlin ‘could exploit.’

    This may be about how ruthless the FBI are, not transexuals or Russian espionage.

  157. 1997 Steve … ” If we know anything about sex abuse, we know it’s a solitary male crime…”

    Historically, among white men, yes. You might find the odd case of ‘sharing’ among the underclass.

    Other groups, not so much. In the words of the very late Nate Dogg

    “I need me a bitch, like I need my crew
    I need me a bitch to pass on to my boys soon as I get through”

    But there were few Pakistani ghettoes in the US in those days. It’s not uncommon in UK “grooming” cases to find that as well as “the lads” and all their mates, Uncle Ahmed and all his mates get a crack at the goodies.

    https://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/22315703.bradford-historic-sexual-abuse-charges-men-revealed/

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @HA
    @YetAnotherAnon

    "Historically, among white men, yes [it is a 'solitary male crime']. You might find the odd case of ‘sharing’ among the underclass."

    No, pedophilia rings are real, and they're not found chiefly among lower socioeconomic classes. If one looks at the busts for Operation Cathedral (or most any other such bust), one finds anomalous incidences of both "computer consultants" as well as taxi drivers, and therefore cuts across the socioeconomic spectrum. Evidently, knowing how to encrypt and de-mag the database drives containing the child porn is a valued asset among traffickers (as is the lowlier task of transporting victims without arousing too much suspicion).

    The "Finders" commune, which even before being sensationalized by the QAnon types, made for a story that was plenty disturbing enough, wasn't some lower socioeconomic affair either.

  158. @Alden
    @J.Ross

    It would be interesting to know how this group of approximately 250, most of whom appear to be children, acquires the money to make international flights and set up living compounds as soon as they arrive in a new country.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Keith Rainier, who had a brilliant career abusing women and taking McKinsey types for a ride, proved you only need to bag one liquor heiress, although he bagged two, plus everyone who paid for his sham corporate leadership courses.

  159. @Dieter Kief
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    where Sailer tries to maintain credibility with his audience. His musings on this topic don’t hurt the Deep State.
     
    You are comparing donkeys to roses.
    Something lots of disappointed romantics tend to do.
    All the while roses are nice - as are donkeys. So - none
    of the two can prove the other one being X. Or Y, or
    - whatever.

    (This is a brilliant / insightful post of Mr. Sailer.
    But of course: Feel free not to like it - for whatever
    reason(s). Just understand, this then is about you, not
    about this - as I said: great and admirably
    insightful article.)

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Agree, and, as I have been saying, Steve doesn’t know anything about foreign policy. He is of a generation when it was stupid and wierd to worry about it. He is a master of several important aspects of domestic policy, which makes him worth paying attention to, regardless of his blind spots.

  160. Anon[458] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch
    @J.Ross

    Freaky note: this time it does not appear to be associated with a religious cult.

    On the contrary, it is very much associated with a religious cult. Lev Tahor (Pure Heart) is the brainchild of the late, unlamented and deeply deranged Rabbi Shlomo Helbrans. If David Koresh and Jim Jones had a child ( don't assume gender you hater!) he would be a lot like Helbrans. They have fled from country to country one step ahead - sometimes behind - the authorities.

    Replies: @Anon

    The case has garnered almost zero local news coverage but rather more international interest. The arrest of the twenty-five members seems to have been an Israeli operation, just endangering the lives of the local cops (a four people private security-Mossad team plus a member of the Israeli consulate were present). The Halbrens nutcase drowned in the jungle in 2017. Really? Two charged with drug trafficking left a day before the raid. What a coincidence.

    Are they really being persecuted because of child marriage?

  161. @EH
    @Anon

    "CFS, although completely fake, has become deeply entrenched in the American medical system"

    Nonsense. CFS is very real, has multiple causes (mostly various viral infections, also mitrochondrial disorders), has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers and others. Doctors don't want to hear about CFS symptoms from patients at all, and usually prescribe exercise, which has been proven over and over again to cause deterioration, often to the point of becoming completely bedridden.

    It's depression that is over-diagnosed, with no reliable tests, and the serotonin theory of depression (and the chemical imbalance / drug-deficiency hypothesis in general) that has been completely disproven, with the drugs being no better than placebos but with dangerous side-effects.

    You're also wrong about Gulf-War syndrome, and the guy Steve quotes at length is wrong about multiple personalities not existing (very rare, though and over-diagnosed). The idea that memories are never repressed is idiotic as well, though not as idiotic as the idea that just because false memories can me implanted with hypnosis that disproves all recovered memories, including the ones not implanted by hypnosis.

    The fact that psychiatry is 95% BS and outright fraud in no way disproves the existence of psychological processes such as repression and projection - not to mention mass psychosis.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous

    Gulf War syndrome may have been legit, the problem is that since it’s self-diagnosed and offered the prospect of compensation payments, how do you tell the grifters from the real cases?

  162. @Enemy of Earth
    The not-so-nice side of my personality thinks that a healthy proportion of those having "recovered memories" are indulging in wishful thinking. Which leads me to wonder who would want to imagine they were horribly abused as a child. And why does it often happen to radical leftist women?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    People who want to blame someone else for their failures and their dissatisfaction with life.

  163. @Daniel H
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ....and the ritual Satanic abuse cases were local prosecutors and investigators using leading interviews on confused, frightened children and determining that some daycare center somewhere was a hive of Luciferian pedophilia.
     
    Janet Reino and Jane Swift. Never called to account for the crimes they committed against innocent accused.

    Replies: @ex-banker

    Martha Coakley was the prosecutor in the Fells Acre case. She still refuses to admit her mistake in the case. Jane Swift was later the governor who refused (at Coakley’s request) to grant clemency to the wrongly convicted.

    • Replies: @VivaLaMigra
    @ex-banker

    I was a life-long MA resident at the time and recall the hysteria. Everyone wanted to believe that monsters had raped the kids, and that "Tooky" [Geral Amirault] deserved to rot not just in prison, but in Hell. All because a toddler had wet his pants, and Mr. Amirault cleaned the kid up and changed him. Any sensible person would conclude that the day care center was well equipped to deal with this sort of "accident," and that should have been the end of the matter.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  164. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pixo
    Ukraine update:

    1. 1500-2500 Russian soldiers are now encircled in the Lyman area according to pro-Russian sources. Most likely outcome is a panicked retreat on foot, bikes, and mopeds, leaving behind all their ammo and heavy equipment. But mass surrender could also happen.

    2. Outside of a few big cities, Russia really is sad corrupt squalor. Here’s a conscripted soldier providing a tour of his barracks, which looks more like a crackhouse.

    https://twitter.com/wartranslated/status/1575466184845234176

    3. Ukraine has three large bridgeheads over the Oskel river and is advancing along multiple axes north of Lyman.

    In short, another few weeks of massive globohomo victories.

    https://townsquare.media/site/712/files/2016/05/Caitlyn-Jenner.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s a cultural thing. In Russia, it’s unmanly to be clean and tidy.

    (I remember reading about the German settlers invited to Russia by Catherine the Great. They were much mocked by their new Russian neighbors for their fastidious cleanliness/tidiness and personal grooming–cutting their hair and beards. This was how women behaved, not men!)

  165. @YetAnotherAnon
    1997 Steve ... " If we know anything about sex abuse, we know it’s a solitary male crime..."

    Historically, among white men, yes. You might find the odd case of 'sharing' among the underclass.

    Other groups, not so much. In the words of the very late Nate Dogg

    "I need me a bitch, like I need my crew
    I need me a bitch to pass on to my boys soon as I get through"
     
    But there were few Pakistani ghettoes in the US in those days. It's not uncommon in UK "grooming" cases to find that as well as "the lads" and all their mates, Uncle Ahmed and all his mates get a crack at the goodies.

    https://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/22315703.bradford-historic-sexual-abuse-charges-men-revealed/

    Replies: @HA

    “Historically, among white men, yes [it is a ‘solitary male crime’]. You might find the odd case of ‘sharing’ among the underclass.”

    No, pedophilia rings are real, and they’re not found chiefly among lower socioeconomic classes. If one looks at the busts for Operation Cathedral (or most any other such bust), one finds anomalous incidences of both “computer consultants” as well as taxi drivers, and therefore cuts across the socioeconomic spectrum. Evidently, knowing how to encrypt and de-mag the database drives containing the child porn is a valued asset among traffickers (as is the lowlier task of transporting victims without arousing too much suspicion).

    The “Finders” commune, which even before being sensationalized by the QAnon types, made for a story that was plenty disturbing enough, wasn’t some lower socioeconomic affair either.

  166. @Altai
    As with the Salem witch trials this all seems to be an extended phenotype of BPD and other cluster B traits too.

    Tumblr, home to girls with cluster B traits and or autism was famously home to anorexia subcultures before it became home to neopronouns. (Remember in 2017-2018 when they tried to introduce those into the real world and it was too much and so began the era of 'They/them', a rare case of Tumblr craziness being banished.) and FtM.

    The best analogy really is just anorexia from the perspective of the girls but Steve is right that from the perspective of the adults and authorities it is more like the Satanic abuse hysteria.

    It continues to blow my mind though that these adults don't see the highly obviously gender stereotypes in play where FtM transition because they're easily influenced by others and desire to fit into a group and MtF transition because they have low social empathy and don't care what others think or if they fit in.

    There is no 'social contagion' with MtFs. They tend to be highly male in that they are less concerned with what others think and let this guide their actions to pathological ends. This explains to me the bimodal examples of turbo asshole jocks and somewhat autistic nerds. Though seemingly polar opposites of each other they both share a reduced social empathy or concern about what others think about their actions, though for very different reasons and to very different in almost all cases. I suspect there is a much broader array of men who have this fetish but who would never think of actually transitioning because they'd be too embarrassed and ashamed.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria Is the New Recovered Memories of Satanist Abuse Mania

    Or it’s the New Anorexia

    Or maybe it’s just the Gucci handbag.

    • Replies: @VivaLaMigra
    @Almost Missouri


    "Trans Kids are the new Gucci Handbag for the upper middle class wine mommies..."

     

    Yep, having a kid suffering from "ADHD" is So.....Nineteen Nineties!
  167. “Thankfully, we now have drugs like Prozac…”

    Um, leave me out of the group doing the “thanking.” I was on that crap for a while two decades ago. Besides the sexual dysfunction it brings on, it just plain sucks. I think the best description of Prozac I ever read was: “On Prozac, you’re still depressed. You just don’t give a shit.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @VivaLaMigra


    Um, leave me out of the group doing the “thanking.” I was on that crap for a while two decades ago. Besides the sexual dysfunction it brings on, it just plain sucks.
     
    What kind of sexual dysfunction did you experience while on Prozac?
  168. @Almost Missouri
    @Altai


    Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria Is the New Recovered Memories of Satanist Abuse Mania
     
    Or it's the New Anorexia

    Or maybe it's just the Gucci handbag.

    https://www.barnhardt.biz/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/img_7488.jpg

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

    “Trans Kids are the new Gucci Handbag for the upper middle class wine mommies…”

    Yep, having a kid suffering from “ADHD” is So…..Nineteen Nineties!

  169. @ex-banker
    @Daniel H

    Martha Coakley was the prosecutor in the Fells Acre case. She still refuses to admit her mistake in the case. Jane Swift was later the governor who refused (at Coakley's request) to grant clemency to the wrongly convicted.

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

    I was a life-long MA resident at the time and recall the hysteria. Everyone wanted to believe that monsters had raped the kids, and that “Tooky” [Geral Amirault] deserved to rot not just in prison, but in Hell. All because a toddler had wet his pants, and Mr. Amirault cleaned the kid up and changed him. Any sensible person would conclude that the day care center was well equipped to deal with this sort of “accident,” and that should have been the end of the matter.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @VivaLaMigra

    We laugh at the clowns in Salem who believed everyone but themselves was a witch, but how is this any different? (I guess nobody died, so that's an improvement of sorts.)

  170. @Anon
    @Travis


    To correct the situation we need to reduce male obesity and increase male fitness to increase male t levels so more women can get laid properly , thus reducing female hysteria.
     
    Does increasing fitness actually increase t-levels? Is there any evidence of that?

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    Yes. Some basic internet searches will lead you to studies that show exercise, especially weightlifting, and diet can increase T levels.

    The reasons that T levels are dropping among males in the US are many, but one reason is simply the fact that T levels are in many ways a product of necessity. Men who used to spend a significant portion of their waking hours working to provide enough food to eat for themselves and their family required more T than a 25 year old video game addict living still living with his parents. We are more sedentary as a society than ever, and our bodies adapt to that, for better or worse.

  171. @R.G. Camara
    Remember the names of each and every quack doctor who supported or promoted this tranny nonsense. They should all lose their licenses and be sued into oblivion come the reckoning.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Colin Wright, @personfellowindividual

    I have an expectation that there will be an outbreak of violence from enraged fathers whose daughters were tricked into acquiescing, then mutilated and sterilized by fashionable quacks. When their little girls come back to them in tears after realizing they weren’t actually boys (all too late), there’s going to be hell to pay. At least there should be.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @personfellowindividual

    There should be. There never is anymore.

  172. @VivaLaMigra

    "Thankfully, we now have drugs like Prozac..."
     
    Um, leave me out of the group doing the "thanking." I was on that crap for a while two decades ago. Besides the sexual dysfunction it brings on, it just plain sucks. I think the best description of Prozac I ever read was: "On Prozac, you're still depressed. You just don't give a shit."

    Replies: @Anon

    Um, leave me out of the group doing the “thanking.” I was on that crap for a while two decades ago. Besides the sexual dysfunction it brings on, it just plain sucks.

    What kind of sexual dysfunction did you experience while on Prozac?

  173. @VivaLaMigra
    @ex-banker

    I was a life-long MA resident at the time and recall the hysteria. Everyone wanted to believe that monsters had raped the kids, and that "Tooky" [Geral Amirault] deserved to rot not just in prison, but in Hell. All because a toddler had wet his pants, and Mr. Amirault cleaned the kid up and changed him. Any sensible person would conclude that the day care center was well equipped to deal with this sort of "accident," and that should have been the end of the matter.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    We laugh at the clowns in Salem who believed everyone but themselves was a witch, but how is this any different? (I guess nobody died, so that’s an improvement of sorts.)

  174. @personfellowindividual
    @R.G. Camara

    I have an expectation that there will be an outbreak of violence from enraged fathers whose daughters were tricked into acquiescing, then mutilated and sterilized by fashionable quacks. When their little girls come back to them in tears after realizing they weren't actually boys (all too late), there's going to be hell to pay. At least there should be.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    There should be. There never is anymore.

  175. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Rob McX

    Blacks seem to have high rates of androgen uptake issues. Have endocrinologists ever looked at this, or is this one of those Here Be Dragons areas nobody can go anywhere near?

    Replies: @Corvinus

    With or without adjustment for covariates, there were no significant differences in testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, or SHBG levels by race/ethnicity. DHEAS levels differed by race/ethnicity before covariate adjustment; after adjustment this difference was attenuated. Before adjustment, DHT and DHT to testosterone ratios did not significantly differ by racial/ethnic group. After adjustment, there was evidence of racial/ethnic differences in DHT (P = 0.047) and DHT to testosterone (P = 0.038) levels. Black men had higher DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratios than white and Hispanic men.

    Conclusions: Because there are no racial/ethnic differences in testosterone levels, normative ranges need not be adjusted by race/ethnicity for androgen deficiency diagnosis for men aged 30–79 yr. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in DHT levels and DHT to testosterone ratio can help explain racial/ethnic variations in prostate cancer incidence, body composition, and bone mass.

  176. Gender “dysphoria” is hardly a new problem. This quote comes from a publication called “The Scrap Book”, published in 1906, discussing the problems with co-education of boys and girls:

    Dr. G. Stanley Hall, President of Clark University… discussing higher education in this country, he says it reduces the rate of both marriage and offspring, so that barely three-fourths of our male graduates and only about half of our female graduates marry, and those who do so, marry late and have few children:
    Recent studies show that a large percent of girls actually wish they were boys. Their ideals grow masculine, and we seem slowly to be developing a female sex without a female character. So far have the actions against the old restraint gone that feminists still regard every effort to differentiate as endangering a relapse to old conditions.
    “Again, the rapid feminization of our schools encourages women teachers to give their own masculine traits and ideals free rein.”

    The Scrap Book

  177. This was a group of healers who believed that they not only had discovered the key to their patients’ suffering but also were exposing a hidden evil across society.

    Keys to patients’ suffering; and hidden evils of society. Two of those things, like white racist killers, for which there is a great demand but not very much supply.

  178. @Anon
    @Jim Don Bob


    My grandfather lived to be 94. He ate three meals a day at regular times, drank little, and went to bed early all his life. Your mind appreciates it if you treat your body gently.
     
    As a health favor to some of us here, would you mind providing additional detail about his practices and routine? Such as: What time were his meals? What did they consist of usually? What time did he go to sleep and wake up?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I only knew him after he retired. He’d get up 7 or so, and have a simple breakfast at 8. Then lunch about noon, and dinner at 6. He was a meat and potatoes guy but also ate a lot of fruits and vegetables.
    He’d go to bed at 11 after the news.

    He did not like beer, and he did not drink regularly. When he did, he had a finger or two of white rum.

    I think the regularity of his meals helped him greatly, and I’ve harped on this to my kids. I see too many people, especially women, skip a meal (usually breakfast), and then pig out later on because they are hungry. This plays havoc with your body’s metabolism.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Thank you.

  179. @Achmed E. Newman
    I've got repressed memories myself myself of really, really stupid ideas being promoted in the NY Times when I was young. Reading your blog has brought out many of these memories. Do you take Visa chipped cards for payment?

    Watch what you write here about the new genderbending though. It's bad for business, your peeing in the symptom pool like this.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @James N. Kennett

    I’ve got repressed memories myself myself of really, really stupid ideas being promoted in the NY Times when I was young.

    Brilliant.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  180. @aNewBanner
    @Nico

    My wife today admitted to me that it looks like Biden has “low-grade” dementia. She tends to represent that part of the population with minimal interest in politics and current events. If she’s noticing it, then there’s a lot more people who are noticing this now.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I visited a number of assisted living places before my mother entered one, and about half the people there were in wheel chairs. I asked why and the woman showing me around said that they had simply forgotten how to walk.

    Biden looks like he is forgetting how to walk.

  181. @Rob McX
    @Anon

    It's easy to see how the lethargy caused by depression could be translated into "chronic fatigue syndrome". Antidepressants may not be as effective as they're made out to be, but at least the doctor would be targeting the real illness rather than inventing a new one.

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    Many people with CFS strongly resist the idea that their illness is really depression. Even if you do not deny the existence of CFS, and stick to the story that CFS and depression have a high level of comorbidity, the patient often does not want to be treated for depression, but rather for the CFS that “causes” the depression.

    If the patient agrees to treatment, it does not help that finding a suitable dose of a suitable antidepressant can take as long as a year: for example, the drugs of first choice, SSRIs, are ineffective for many people but it can take 3 months just to exclude them from use by a particular patient. This gives the CFS patient ample opportunities to abandon treatment for depression and claim that it didn’t work.

  182. @Jim Don Bob
    @Anon

    I only knew him after he retired. He'd get up 7 or so, and have a simple breakfast at 8. Then lunch about noon, and dinner at 6. He was a meat and potatoes guy but also ate a lot of fruits and vegetables.
    He'd go to bed at 11 after the news.

    He did not like beer, and he did not drink regularly. When he did, he had a finger or two of white rum.

    I think the regularity of his meals helped him greatly, and I've harped on this to my kids. I see too many people, especially women, skip a meal (usually breakfast), and then pig out later on because they are hungry. This plays havoc with your body's metabolism.

    Replies: @Anon

    Thank you.

  183. @Dutch Boy
    @Bardon Kaldian

    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body:

    "XMRV was made in recombination with mouse cells. Before we could grow cells in labs we would pass cells through mice in order to attenuate them. But we found that by passing cancer cells through mice we could grow tumors; the cells had recombined with a retrovirus. Everyone before 1980 did this. It was standard laboratory procedure. We learned that anything we passed through animal tissues could make replication competent recombinant retroviruses in only ten days. All of our NIH research is based on mouse research. And those cell lines I worked with daily for more than 30 years have the potential to produce novel retroviruses."
    "If HHS gave you the power to re-name CFS, what would you call it?
    Non-HIV AIDS. It is an acquired immune deficiency, beyond a shadow of a doubt."
    http://www.cfstreatmentguide.com/blog/plague-an-interview-with-judy-mikovits

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body

    It was later found that the XMRV was introduced by contamination of lab samples.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/ct-met-chronic-fatigue-xmrv-20110317-story.html?page=1

    There was a similar episode in the history of Gulf War Syndrome. Garth Nicolson claimed that GWS was caused by infection with a bacterium, Mycoplasma fermentans. Some of Nicolson’s GWS patients benefited from intensive antibiotic treatment, and his work was so well regarded by veterans’ groups that he was made an honorary Colonel of the US Army Special Forces, and an honorary U.S. Navy SEAL. Unfortunately the presence of M. fermentans was again the result of laboratory contamination – Nicolson’s work was mistaken.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/3B714A2CDDD667FEC2ACAA28DE70A531/S0950268800004891a.pdf/div-class-title-lack-of-serological-evidence-for-span-class-italic-mycoplasma-fermentans-span-infection-in-army-gulf-war-veterans-a-large-scale-case-control-study-div.pdf

    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
    @James N. Kennett

    Dr. Mikovits disagrees. I am not competent to judge in this matter but the medical establishment and Fauci are dead set against her, which increases her credibility in and of itself.

  184. @Anon
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Oh please. Let's not pretend the entire unz.com website, especially Unz himself, isn't a limited hangout Deep State psyop.

    99.99999% of English language websites on the internet, including 99.999% of the "alternative right" or non-mainstream far right websites are limited hangouts by the deep state to give a false sense of strength and to promote ridiculous, crypto- pro deep state narratives.

    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    Maybe 2% of the commentators on this website are genuine, if I'm being generous.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @New Dealer, @SFG, @Pat Hannagan, @Achmed E. Newman, @David Davenport


    If you want any truth on the internet you need to be fluent in Russian, Chinese, Polish, Croatian, Lithuanian, Persian, Serbian, and Hungarian, and go to certain websites where all the text are in those languages. You will almost never find anything of value in this cursed language.

    So why are you here?

  185. @Anon
    @EH


    CFS ... has testable biomarkers including heart function, postural heart rate, post-exercise blood markers
     
    Nope. Fake. Read any such claims in the original research and judge how solid they sound for yourself.

    The clearest way to see how fake CFS is, is to follow the history of its development via the CFS pages on the CDC website on the Wayback Machine.

    Originally there were "clusters," particular doctors who would diagnose it for all comers.

    The CDC sent an epidemiologist out to the clusters and he found that the doctors could not even give a consistent list of symptoms, so it was impossible to define. It was "Here's a list of twenty psychogenic, non-biomarker symptoms, and if you have any three of them, you've got CFS."

    Then the thing happened where the hysterical wife of a congressman got him to put in an amendment to a bill that required the CDC to conduct more studies. This is like how the wife of another congressman in the 1990s got her husband to add something to a bill to force the Air Force to issue a report on the Roswell UFO crash.

    What the CDC did was put up a page saying they were doing this study and for doctors to please report patients that had a few of maybe a dozen symptoms (they pared it down a bit). (Activists claimed that this was some sort of affirmation from the CDC.) There was a committee of doctors and epidemiologists who would look at submissions.

    At that point nobody took is seriously. But gradually doctors discovered there was money and prestige in CFS: Being on the committee looked good on your CV, so to speak, and you could get referrals. They started to prescribe depression drugs "off label" for CFS (just a coincidence that they worked for both conditions).

    The fact that these patients are 90 percent women of course launched the "doctors don't take women seriously" thing.

    This whole thing has repeated for a number of these condidions. The CDC was forced to look into Morgellons, for instance, with hilarious results. Read the report on that one.

    Anyway, I do recommend the Showalter book, and also you can Google what happened to Showalter after publication. It was somewhere between the Arthur Jensen treatment and the Salmon Rushdie treatment. She had to law low for quite awhile and not make any public appearances. There's some funny video out there.

    Replies: @EH

    While no doubt you are a Very Bright Boy, on this topic you’re ignorant. See my reply later in this thread.

  186. @James N. Kennett
    @Dutch Boy


    A virologist named Dr. Judy Mikovits thinks CFS and some other diseases are caused by murine retroviruses (which she termed XMRV) introduced into the human body
     
    It was later found that the XMRV was introduced by contamination of lab samples.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/ct-met-chronic-fatigue-xmrv-20110317-story.html?page=1

    There was a similar episode in the history of Gulf War Syndrome. Garth Nicolson claimed that GWS was caused by infection with a bacterium, Mycoplasma fermentans. Some of Nicolson's GWS patients benefited from intensive antibiotic treatment, and his work was so well regarded by veterans' groups that he was made an honorary Colonel of the US Army Special Forces, and an honorary U.S. Navy SEAL. Unfortunately the presence of M. fermentans was again the result of laboratory contamination - Nicolson's work was mistaken.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/3B714A2CDDD667FEC2ACAA28DE70A531/S0950268800004891a.pdf/div-class-title-lack-of-serological-evidence-for-span-class-italic-mycoplasma-fermentans-span-infection-in-army-gulf-war-veterans-a-large-scale-case-control-study-div.pdf

    Replies: @Dutch Boy

    Dr. Mikovits disagrees. I am not competent to judge in this matter but the medical establishment and Fauci are dead set against her, which increases her credibility in and of itself.

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