The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Rams Players Working on Plan to Address Racial Inequality
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

They are going to start a South Asian at cornerback?

Actually, one of the last nonblack players to start at cornerback was Kevin Kaesviharn, who played some cornerback in the early 2000s before getting shifted to safety. He’s half-Thai.

One of the really strange things in football history that nobody remembers is that the NFL had a league Most Valuable Player in the 1960s who was half-Filipino: the Los Angeles Rams’ quarterback when I was a kid, Roman Gabriel.

Another odd thing was that Gabriel was perhaps the first giant quarterback at 6’5″ and 225 pounds, which is still a big QB today and was huge then. So, I don’t imagine his father was all Southeast Asian but might have also been part conquistador.

He threw the football extremely hard, which meant he wasn’t intercepted often: only 7 times in his 1969 MVP year to go along with 24 touchdown passes in 14 games. But his hard-spinning throws were difficult for his receivers to catch: only a 54.4% completion percentage that year.

Maybe the reason I never got hung up like everybody else on white vs. black was the diversity of quarterbacks in the 1969 football season from my 10-year-old perspective in Southern California. In Los Angeles, the Rams had Gabriel, the USC Trojans had a black quarterback, Jimmy Jones, and UCLA a white QB, Dennis Dummit. Among rivals, the Minnesota Vikings, who beat the Rams in the playoffs, were quarterbacked by Joe Kapp, a half-Mexican guy from the San Fernando Valley. And Stanford was led by Jim Plunkett, who is an Old New Mexican, part-Hispanic and part American-Indian.

 
Hide 108 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Until we have Pygmy offensive linemen, the NFL isn’t trying.

    • LOL: Gunga Din
    • Replies: @Russ
    @Redneck farmer

    So now the SJWs in the NHL want to change the blue lines into black lines on the ice. Black line, black puck: More unintended evidence of IQ disparity.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Redneck farmer


    Until we have Pygmy offensive linemen, the NFL isn’t trying.
     
    Pygmies could work on defense, as they could run between the legs of the O-line and grab the quarterback by the ankles.

    OTOH, the NFL could just continue to draft 350 lb. Samoans to throw people around. The "race is a social construct" people got some 'splainin' to do when it comes to Samoans in the NFL.

    When University of Washington Defensive Tackle Danny Shelton arrived for the NFL Draft in Chicago wearing traditional Samoan dress and almost choked the life out of Commissioner Goodell in an on-stage hug, it symbolized the amazing dominance that one tiny island and its’ Polynesian neighbors have in NFL football. Five Polynesian players were selected in the first 66 picks of the 2015 NFL Draft, the most ever for the first three rounds. Over 70 players in the NFL are of Polynesian descent. There are 30 players from American Samoa in the NFL and more than 200 play Division I NCAA Football. A Samoan male is 56 times more likely to play in the NFL than an American non-Samoan.

    Super Bowl Champions Jesse Sapolu and Ma’a Tanuvassa along with Kevin Kaplan and his company Coaching Charities decided to pay recognition to the contributions by establishing a Polynesian Football Hall of Fame in 2013. It had its’ first group of inductees the next year including players like Junior Seau, Kevin Mawae and Jack Thompson (“The Throwing Samoan”). Earlier this year it inducted players like Jesse Sapolu and Mark Tuinei. University of Oregon QB Marcus Mariota, selected 2nd in this year’s draft was honored as the 2014 College Player of the Year. The Hall is located in the Polynesian Cultural Center on Oahu in Hawaii.


    A pioneering group of college coaches recognized the uniqueness of Polynesia (Hawaii, Samoa,Tonga, Easter Island, and New Zealand) in the quality of football athletes it produces. Dick Vermeil, Dick Tomey, and LaVell Edwards made early trips. Former Hawaii and SMU Coach June Jones established a special relationship with Samoa and established a foundation there to help with Samoan athletics.”They have a unique culture that venerates family and work ethic” Coach Jones says.”There is an amazing spirit and feeling that one feels interacting with these warm and spiritual people.”



    NFL stars Paul Soliai and Isaako Aaitui returned to Samoa, bringing with them new additions to the program – players Olivier Vernon and Samson Satele.

    The tiny island of Samoa, often referred to as “Football Island” has a population of 65,000 people. This is smaller than my city of Newport Beach, a very active and athletic area that has only Matt Barkley in the NFL. How is the hyper-productivity of Samoa even possible? It starts with a culture that emphasizes community, self-discipline, respect, and spirituality. Families are close and supportive. The athletes tend to be humble, it may be the last bastion of youth outside the American South that says “Yes, Sir”. There is pride instead of jealousy for the accomplishments of other athletes. Passion for every activity is bred into young Samoans.

    Physical anthropology somehow must play into the massive size and strength and speed of most of the athletes. One theory holds that the residents migrated far in the past from much colder climes and needed bodies that could add weight to protect them. Another theory is that there was a history of strife and warfare and a love of contact is part of the culture. There is poverty present in Samoa and other islands which serves as a motivating factor in using sports to advance.
    The Polynesian Football Hall of Fame will continue to grow with the rising number of Polynesian players at every level. It celebrates a special culture and tradition. Tiny Samoa is an amazing anomaly in the history of sports.
     
    https://www.thecoconet.tv/cocoblog/how-can-tiny-samoa-dominate-the-nfl/#:~:text=Over%2070%20players%20in%20the,than%20an%20American%20non%2DSamoan.
  2. Taylor Rapp, who was a rookie safety on the Rams last year, is half-Chinese.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @anon

    I'll see you that raise you Hines Ward.

    Replies: @black sea

    , @Gabe Ruth
    @anon

    Last time I paid attention there were some good white safeties. Steve's talking about cornerbacks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  3. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    But his hard-spinning throws were hard for his receivers to catch: only a 54.4% completion percentage that year.

    Maybe for his tight ends, but for his primary wide-receiver, Jack Snow, the general rule was if the ball touched Jack’s hands, it was caught. And Jack was rarely caught from behind once he had the ball. He was kind of known for that. He and Gabriel worked well together. He had a burning pass, but Gabriel’s problem was his front line wasn’t always as good as could be, and he’d overthrow the ball when under immediate pressure.

    However, again, he could drill it as hard as he wanted to Jack. No problem.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    @Anonymous

    In those days, a QB who completed over 50%mof his passes was pretty accurate; they didn't throw three-yard dump-offs to the "featured back" or whatever he's called these days. And they didn't just throw slant passes to the receivers--they threw downfield. The short stuff featured screen passes, but that was a time when the guards were a bit more mobile and could form a blocking wedge for the running back.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

  4. Anonymous[412] • Disclaimer says:

    One of the really strange things in football history that nobody remembers is that the NFL had a league Most Valuable Player in the 1960s who was half-Filipino: the Los Angeles Rams’ quarterback when I was a kid, Roman Gabriel.

    Teddy Bruschi was a linebacker for the Patriots and also half-Filipino. I don’t think most people knew he was half-Filipino though. Bruschi and Gabriel look like they could be brothers:

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @Anonymous

    Nope, I never knew that. I thought Bruschi was Italian.

    Roman Gabriel, who I knew about, but who was a bit before my NFL kid-loving prime, I just thought was white too, if I thought about it all. So apparently did everyone in his North Carolina school district when he was growing up.

    Gabriel played an Indian on a couple tv shows. Half-Filipinos are convincing Indians. Just ask Lou Diamond Phillips.

  5. They are going to start a South Asian at cornerback?

    He can wear the number H-1B.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

  6. Rams players working on plan to address racial inequality…

    In related news, the cast of “The View” is designing a cold fusion reactor.

  7. @Reg Cæsar

    They are going to start a South Asian at cornerback?
     
    He can wear the number H-1B.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21ixwIaN7qw


    They took the whole Cherokee nation
    Put us on this reservation
    Took away our ways of life
    The tomahawk and the bow and knife
    Took away our native tongue
    And taught their English to our young
    And all the beads we made by hand
    Are nowadays made in Japan
    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die
    They took the whole Indian nation
    Locked us on this reservation
    Though I wear a shirt and tie
    I'm still part redman deep inside

    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die


    But maybe someday when they learn
    Cherokee nation will return, will return, will return
    Will return, will return
     
    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Sixkiller could lead an Indian division of Anti-Fa.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @S. Anonyia, @duncsbaby

    , @TWS
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Still is, last I checked.

    , @jsm
    @JohnnyWalker123

    If we have to have anti-White policies in America, I'd much rather see the spoils go to enrolled members of Indian tribes here in US when we did our Western Expansion...the Cherokees, Sioux, etc.

    Why do we have to import Nigerians and Jamaican Hindus? Why don't blacks and Apache Indians object to this? Are they that stoned / drunk that they just don't notice?

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "Sonny Sixkiller"

    Awesome name. My new nom de plume. I am now a person of colour.

    , @Deckin
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Beat me to it. A Pac 8 legend when I was growing up.

  8. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

    They took the whole Cherokee nation
    Put us on this reservation
    Took away our ways of life
    The tomahawk and the bow and knife
    Took away our native tongue
    And taught their English to our young
    And all the beads we made by hand
    Are nowadays made in Japan
    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die
    They took the whole Indian nation
    Locked us on this reservation
    Though I wear a shirt and tie
    I’m still part redman deep inside

    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die

    But maybe someday when they learn
    Cherokee nation will return, will return, will return
    Will return, will return

    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Sixkiller could lead an Indian division of Anti-Fa.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    , @S. Anonyia
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Lol. Always liked this song but this guy looks even less “Cherokee” than my relatives. One of my grandparents long claimed they got their dark looks from their Cherokee heritage, but I did some extensive family research and found out they were mainly Irish, Scottish, and Swiss German (and possibly even Romansch, as their ancestors came from the cantons where it was spoken).

    , @duncsbaby
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Just wait, I know you’re kidding, but the Indians will start throwing their weight around too. I live in North Dakota, I daily followed the happenings in the south central part of the state when Indians & antifa sympathizers laid siege to the building of the Dakota Access pipeline just a few years ago. That wasn’t even ON the reservation. Of course it’s all Indian land – if we allow it. We can’t allow it.

  9. That photograph, Gabriel with a crewcut, does make him look Filipino, but I recall Gabriel with his modish, beatle-esque haircuts of the lates 60s.

    Anyway, I wouldn’t have know what a Filipino was in the 1960s. Back then, in my hood there were only three races: white, black and porto rican.

  10. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21ixwIaN7qw


    They took the whole Cherokee nation
    Put us on this reservation
    Took away our ways of life
    The tomahawk and the bow and knife
    Took away our native tongue
    And taught their English to our young
    And all the beads we made by hand
    Are nowadays made in Japan
    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die
    They took the whole Indian nation
    Locked us on this reservation
    Though I wear a shirt and tie
    I'm still part redman deep inside

    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die


    But maybe someday when they learn
    Cherokee nation will return, will return, will return
    Will return, will return
     
    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Sixkiller could lead an Indian division of Anti-Fa.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @S. Anonyia, @duncsbaby

    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Anonymous

    Yep, the casinos are the red man’s revenge on the pale faces - take all their wampum when they’re tipsy with firewater. Hey, where’s big chief Pontiac to weigh in?

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.
     
    The song was written by John D Loudermilk, who gave conflicting stories of its origin. The one that got around was that he was held hostage on a reservation until he agreed to write something for them. His bio is typical good-ol'-by:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._Loudermilk

    The singer, Mark Lindsay, grew up in Idaho and was told he was 1/8 Cherokee. He could easily pass for more. Paul Revere Dick, the band's leader, was a blond Teutonic type and never claimed any aboriginal stock.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @TWS
    @Anonymous

    Damn right. Rezes are too comfortable now. Yeah they'll support blm because f*ck white people but no way they're risking that sweet per cap. New cars several times a year big screen TVs and houses paid for by HUD.

    It's changed a ton since I was a kid. In the sixties and seventies good money from white run businesses.

    Big losses from from Boldt decision and other efforts to let the tribes run the business. Came in the late seventies and all through the eighties into the early nineties then came gambling and they knew not to f*ck that up. They let guys with experience handle it. Sure some tribes got burned by trying to pad the payroll too much. Some tribes had all adults working cushy jobs at the casino and nothing left for the kitty.

    But they learned and now it's money hand over fist and real prosperity for those with any savvy.

    Those Indian-money checks are too good to blow. They have enough that everyone can skim and there's still too much to spend.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anonymous

    "Paul Revere was a fucking hack."

    Were the Gilbert and Sullivan costumes the give-away? Is it fair to say Paul Revere and his raiders were the 60s version of KISS?

    "Ever been to an Indian casino?"

    There are several in my area. They seem to employ a lot of attractive young Asian women. Gambling is a pursuit for dummies but the food is good and largely subsidized by the busloads of Asians who come to gamble and ogle the cute Asian girls serving them drinks.

    , @Clyde
    @Anonymous

    Cher also contributed. Her mother claims some Cherokee blood. What an enthusiastic audience from 1998! A rousing Half-Breed and more. btw Sonny was big Stones collaborator when they were in LA to record. Sonny gets song writing credit for one tune on December's Children. Not to mention the late great Jack Nitzsche, a (literally) German farm boy, who blew in from from Michigan fully formed.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmPGiCRD2Is

    , @bored
    @Anonymous

    Can't beat the late Jesse Ed Davis, who was on everything from session work for the Monkees to Taj Majal's original band to John Lennon. That's him taking the solo on "Doctor My Eyes" by Jackson Browne. Just marvelous touch and phrasing.

    https://www.rockpaperphoto.com/media/catalog/product/i/m/image_2018.jpg

  11. • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Altai

    Cross another one off the shopping list...sigh. Before long I'll have to be drinking Moxie.

    , @Polynikes
    @Altai

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!


    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Altai, @Anon

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Altai

    Altai, "Dear Mountain Dew, Nice business you have there. I want a Midwest distributorship for my sons." Signed, Jesse Jackson

    , @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    It's Pepsi. Multi-national globohomo capital with the Indian gal--also a Tamil Brahmin--CEO.

    I like some Diet Dew in my afternoon seltzer, but am happy with the knock-offs. Not that Walmart or Kroger are "un-woke".

    You buy from corporate American now, you contribute to BLM terrorism.

    Minoritarianism is an infectious disease ideology. Everyone must get it, must swear it's great, must work to propagate it and must berate you if you aren't on board.

  12. @anon
    Taylor Rapp, who was a rookie safety on the Rams last year, is half-Chinese.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Gabe Ruth

    I’ll see you that raise you Hines Ward.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @R.G. Camara

    Two words: Dat Nguyen:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcJPjcf8MYQ

    Replies: @anonymous

  13. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/WokeCapital/status/1299179181335552001

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Polynikes, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad

    Cross another one off the shopping list…sigh. Before long I’ll have to be drinking Moxie.

  14. Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn’t match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn’t have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50’s or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda’s longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn’t been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Good point: among Republican presidents, Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, and Reagan all played college football. Since then, the Bushes played college baseball at Yale and Trump played high school baseball.

    Biden played college football.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @black sea
    @R.G. Camara

    "Rugby is a game for hooligans played by gentlemen, and [European] football is a game for gentlemen played by hooligans."

    , @Henry's Cat
    @R.G. Camara

    The same contrast applies between football and cricket in the UK. There are many well-known cricket writers and journalists. Cricket also has an annual 'Bible' called Wisden: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisden_Cricketers%27_Almanack

    , @Marty
    @R.G. Camara

    In one of the Mantle biographies, Frank Gifford is quoted as saying, “we thought baseball players were gay.” He was referring to 1951, when a 590 ft. Mantle homer in an exhibition at SC hit him on the leg during football practice.

    , @Jon
    @R.G. Camara


    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.
     
    Baseball is just a lot whiter than football. And it even has a decent number of Asians. Nobody thinks quarterbacks or kickers are thugs, but everyone knew Darryl Strawberry was.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  15. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/WokeCapital/status/1299179181335552001

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Polynikes, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!

    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    , @Altai
    @Polynikes

    If ever there was an opening for professional knight fighting leagues.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z31XexB7ys4

    , @Anon
    @Polynikes


    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!

    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.
     
    I was a serious sports devotee up until ~4 years ago or whenever the politics started to enter into coverage. It got me enervated and I started to drift from it. Like a toxic person, you consciously avoid them for your own mental health. In the gym I always had on ESPN while running on the treadmill or while riding the bike. I followed scores religiously and read books dealing with sports history, etc.

    I have watched ESPN or gone to their website in ~3+ years. I no longer look forward to and follow the NFL. I did watch the Super Bowls but was disengaged from it and was doing other things during it.

    I have continued to follow the NHL and will watch the NHL Network channel for analysis. Their actions yesterday soured me a bit. Might skip the rest of the playoffs even though some series will be epic (e.g., Bruins v. Lightning and Isles v. Flyers -> winners from each in next round)

    IndyCar remains relatively politics free (especially compared to NASCAR and Formula 1) and there’s a lot there in terms of good competition, strategy, and engineering to keep one consumed. In F-1 Lewis Hamilton (mixed race) has embraced BLM and has been bitching about racial inequality in auto racing. He even disrespected the legend Mario Andretti (who has racing teams in IndyCar) when Andretti said to keep politics out of racing. The IndyCar series is owned by billionaire Roger Penske (who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2019) and it’s sponsored by Japanese telecom NTT. Many of the drivers and sponsors are foreign (though majority American). The drivers are a lot like the type of guys you’d find in the ranks of fighter pilots: high IQand solid character.

    Also, IMSA (sports car) racing has stayed out of politics.

    For those looking to follow IndyCar and/or IMSA I suggest learning the fundamentals for extra interest, and in particular the book Physics for Gearheads by Randy Beikmann:



    https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/rennlist.com-vbulletin/1024x768/physics_for_gearheads_c76f6c95399e003c208af17127c5f737800b0765.jpg
    https://i1.wp.com/alternatesupercars.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/71aoYBSRLvL.jpg

     

    Nb: only pre-req is high school math . The author, Randy Beikmann (Ph.D., mechanical engineering, Michigan) is an engineer at General Motors.
  16. @Polynikes
    @Altai

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!


    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Altai, @Anon

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    • Agree: Polynikes
    • Replies: @Altai
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe he can get away with just writing Jacob Blake's name on his shoes like Cameron Champ. (Who would like to remind you that he is sort of black)

    https://twitter.com/espn/status/1298998077894922240

    , @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    I am not a Tiger fan so maybe I am bias, but that hardly seemed terse to me. He is not going to drop out with two majors coming this fall, but he said he supported the commissioner's statement about supporting racial equity. Other than loving the military and his money, I get no impression Tiger cares about right wing politics. I seriously doubt we will ever see him in opposition to a globohomo corporate cause.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    , @Polynikes
    @Steve Sailer

    Jim Nantz tried to get Harold Varner to take the race bait in a post round interview after the first round of St. Floyd riots. Varner, who is black but seems like he might’ve grown up sounds a country club, essentially laughed in his face and then ignored the question.

    But the TV guys found their new symbol of oppression in Cameron Champ, who looks white but has a mixed race father. When he was briefly in contention for the PGA championship, the telecast had about a dozen profiles on him, his dad, and blacks in golf. Maybe they’ll try and drive their audiences away yet.

    Replies: @Russ

    , @carbolibre
    @Steve Sailer

    "Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay"
    Steve, you are a genius with words. I think I have rhabdo from laughing.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, I love ya man, but if you think Tiger Woods is to the right of Curtis LeMay, I got a golf course to sell you in Manitoba.

  17. @R.G. Camara
    Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn't match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn't have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50's or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda's longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn't been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @black sea, @Henry's Cat, @Marty, @Jon

    Good point: among Republican presidents, Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, and Reagan all played college football. Since then, the Bushes played college baseball at Yale and Trump played high school baseball.

    Biden played college football.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    That's rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Bacchae." It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb, @slumber_j, @Johnny789

  18. @Polynikes
    @Altai

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!


    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Altai, @Anon

    If ever there was an opening for professional knight fighting leagues.

  19. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    Maybe he can get away with just writing Jacob Blake’s name on his shoes like Cameron Champ. (Who would like to remind you that he is sort of black)

    • Agree: Polynikes
  20. @R.G. Camara
    @anon

    I'll see you that raise you Hines Ward.

    Replies: @black sea

    Two words: Dat Nguyen:

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @black sea

    Dat Nguyen's DNA is pure East-Asian. His career was relatively short.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  21. The white guy should be given the marker pen at the team’s think-tank session, because 1) standing by the whiteboard at least he’ll have company, and 2) he’s the only one with a decent chance of correctly spelling SYSTEMIC.

  22. @R.G. Camara
    Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn't match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn't have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50's or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda's longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn't been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @black sea, @Henry's Cat, @Marty, @Jon

    “Rugby is a game for hooligans played by gentlemen, and [European] football is a game for gentlemen played by hooligans.”

  23. I know Steve likes them, but pro sports are dead to me. I’m rooting for all the leagues to go under.

  24. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Good point: among Republican presidents, Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, and Reagan all played college football. Since then, the Bushes played college baseball at Yale and Trump played high school baseball.

    Biden played college football.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    That’s rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of “The Pirates of Penzance” or “The Bacchae.” It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Reagan did college theater among much else:

    "He attended Eureka College, a Disciples-oriented liberal arts school, where he became a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, a cheerleader. He was an indifferent student, majored in economics and sociology and graduated with a C grade.[27] He developed a reputation as a "jack of all trades", excelling in campus politics, sports, and theater. He was a member of the football team and captain of the swim team. He was elected student body president and participated in student protests against the college president"

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    "presidents ... The Pirates of Penzance"

    The image of President Blumpft! all tricked-out in the flamboyant style of a Gilbert and Sullivan British officer comes immediately to mind.

    , @slumber_j
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The late Sultan Qaboos of Oman was a huge Gilbert & Sullivan fan--and almost certainly gay. He was a great national leader, who singlehandedly pulled his countrymen out of miserable medieval penury. We could use someone like him.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Johnny789
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    My best friend from college was a wrestler and is now a Theatre Prof that has put on two shows a year for the last 30 years. I’ll have to ask him. He seems to hate it now, but it felt like he really liked it back when.

  25. @R.G. Camara
    Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn't match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn't have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50's or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda's longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn't been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @black sea, @Henry's Cat, @Marty, @Jon

    The same contrast applies between football and cricket in the UK. There are many well-known cricket writers and journalists. Cricket also has an annual ‘Bible’ called Wisden: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisden_Cricketers%27_Almanack

  26. The people of Los Angeles embraced the Dodgers and Lakers and yet never fully got behind the Rams. The Rams were a damn good franchise who made the playoffs consistently right up until the 90’s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

  27. @black sea
    @R.G. Camara

    Two words: Dat Nguyen:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcJPjcf8MYQ

    Replies: @anonymous

    Dat Nguyen’s DNA is pure East-Asian. His career was relatively short.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    But Dat Nguyen was pretty great when he was healthy. He was pretty much of a one-man team for Texas A&M against UCLA in the 1998 Cotton Bowl:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQL8--4vE_M

  28. @anonymous
    @black sea

    Dat Nguyen's DNA is pure East-Asian. His career was relatively short.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    But Dat Nguyen was pretty great when he was healthy. He was pretty much of a one-man team for Texas A&M against UCLA in the 1998 Cotton Bowl:

  29. @anonymous
    The people of Los Angeles embraced the Dodgers and Lakers and yet never fully got behind the Rams. The Rams were a damn good franchise who made the playoffs consistently right up until the 90's.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    It’s an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don’t ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Magic

  30. @anonymous
    The people of Los Angeles embraced the Dodgers and Lakers and yet never fully got behind the Rams. The Rams were a damn good franchise who made the playoffs consistently right up until the 90's.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    It’s an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don’t ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Steve Sailer

    Lakers vs. Celtics was always about money vs. brains. Brains (Auerbach) usually won. Who else had the balls, or was it smarts, to start 5 blacks in the early 60s? Or hire the first black coach?

    Replies: @Wake up

    , @Rohirrimborn
    @Steve Sailer

    Is your omission of Magic intentional or just an oversight?

    Replies: @Rouetheday

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.
     
    They won the NFL championship in 1945, and immediately left town. Cleveland, that is. The Dodgers won the NL in their penultimate season in Brooklyn. If you're going to steal a franchise, steal a winner.

    Or a loser with top draft choices. The early-'50s Lakers were champs in Minneapolis, but bombed by the end of the decade. That's how they got Elgin Baylor and Jerry West.
    , @mousey
    @Steve Sailer

    The comparison of LA Rams vs Raiders is similar to the NY Jets vs Giants. The Rams were the favorite of the upper class but the Raiders were the favorite of the working class.

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    I think it's basically that pro football functions best in cold weather. The Packers, the Bears, the Steelers, the Giants, etc. all have loyal followings despite their ups and way downs. Even horrid teams like the Browns and the Lions have loyal rooters.

    Warm weather pro teams get practically no attendance or support when they're down or just mediocre, e.g. even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren't good; Jerry Jones deserves a lot of credit for keeping them competitive and therefore popular. Texas folks will tell you they are fanatic about high school and college football, but as for the Cowboys, they are only fair-weather fans.

    I don't know why this is.

    Replies: @FPD72

  31. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    That's rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Bacchae." It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb, @slumber_j, @Johnny789

    Reagan did college theater among much else:

    “He attended Eureka College, a Disciples-oriented liberal arts school, where he became a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, a cheerleader. He was an indifferent student, majored in economics and sociology and graduated with a C grade.[27] He developed a reputation as a “jack of all trades”, excelling in campus politics, sports, and theater. He was a member of the football team and captain of the swim team. He was elected student body president and participated in student protests against the college president”

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Reagan was a very remarkable man. Historians and partisans can bicker over the ups or downs of his legacy, but he was on a Teddy Roosevelt-level remarkable as a person. I have no firm opinion about his political achievements, good or bad, I was simply impressed by him the way I was impressed by Pope John Paul II.

    The fact that he was a mediocre student at a third-tier school only underscores the fact that he was a very busy man, and his genius lay not in strict academic achievement, but in being, like Odysseus, "andra polutropon."

    But the argument with respect to college athletics has changed; it once had value in cultivating character and leadership skills among actual bona-fide students, but it has of course turned into a bizarre pre-professional training ground for otherwise illiterate thugs. If you want to be a serious person now and cultivate yourself through formal discipline, you're better off studying karate and directing "The Threepenny Opera." Barriers to entry and what-not; and Robyn Archer's covers of "Pirate Jenny" and "The Ballad of Sexual Obsession" are things of genius.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

    Lakers vs. Celtics was always about money vs. brains. Brains (Auerbach) usually won. Who else had the balls, or was it smarts, to start 5 blacks in the early 60s? Or hire the first black coach?

    • Replies: @Wake up
    @Brutusale

    I couldn’t give a flip about the Celtics, Lakers, Yankees, Patriots, or any pro sports leagues.

  33. Reading classes? Cold showers?

  34. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    Yep, the casinos are the red man’s revenge on the pale faces – take all their wampum when they’re tipsy with firewater. Hey, where’s big chief Pontiac to weigh in?

  35. @Steve Sailer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Reagan did college theater among much else:

    "He attended Eureka College, a Disciples-oriented liberal arts school, where he became a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, a cheerleader. He was an indifferent student, majored in economics and sociology and graduated with a C grade.[27] He developed a reputation as a "jack of all trades", excelling in campus politics, sports, and theater. He was a member of the football team and captain of the swim team. He was elected student body president and participated in student protests against the college president"

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Reagan was a very remarkable man. Historians and partisans can bicker over the ups or downs of his legacy, but he was on a Teddy Roosevelt-level remarkable as a person. I have no firm opinion about his political achievements, good or bad, I was simply impressed by him the way I was impressed by Pope John Paul II.

    The fact that he was a mediocre student at a third-tier school only underscores the fact that he was a very busy man, and his genius lay not in strict academic achievement, but in being, like Odysseus, “andra polutropon.”

    But the argument with respect to college athletics has changed; it once had value in cultivating character and leadership skills among actual bona-fide students, but it has of course turned into a bizarre pre-professional training ground for otherwise illiterate thugs. If you want to be a serious person now and cultivate yourself through formal discipline, you’re better off studying karate and directing “The Threepenny Opera.” Barriers to entry and what-not; and Robyn Archer’s covers of “Pirate Jenny” and “The Ballad of Sexual Obsession” are things of genius.

    • Thanks: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Reagan was a very remarkable man.
     
    Reagan had some seriously based comments about rioters in '69...his final quip indicates they also had soibois back then:

    https://twitter.com/ReaganBattalion/status/1298649381344862208

    The guy had several qualities that really made him a terrific speaker.
  36. I could half way respect a millionaire idiot athlete if he would put his money where his mouth is and say something like “When you see me kneeling for the national anthem that means I’m donating my pay for the game” to this cause or that charity, and then show proof of the donation. As it is this is just virtue signalling fashion.

    So my solution to the kneeling thing was to have the announcer say “As a reminder, the national anthem will not be played in the presence of athletes as this would defile the performance. We thank you for your understanding.” Then as the athletes come out play the Three Stooges theme.

  37. Joe Kapp certainly wasn’t the best QB in NFL history (not sure about his place in the CFL pantheon) but he was among the most entertaining. The 1969 playoff game against Gabriel and the Rams was a classic that I was fortunate enough to be able to attend. A cold December day in Bloomington- (we always thought that the Rams couldn’t take the cold) the Vikings came back from a 17-7 halftime deficit to win the game. Grant and Kapp- an early version of Bellichik and Brady? Nah, it’s stupid, I know, but those two brought the Vikings to relevance, (even though Kapp was gone after the 1969 season) making them, over the following 15 years or so the greatest underachievers in NFL history. YouTube has a Joe Kapp highlight reel – kinda fun.

    As for the History question, it always seemed to me that the NFL ignored the history of its game- how many know about the AAFC (and the story of the early Browns); and who knows who Bobby Layne was anymore?

    Baseball, on the other hand, wallows in its own history. Is it the availability of stats? Is it the fact that the old timer gridiron stars were mostly white, although certainly the same could be said for baseball? Now, since the American sporting press has largely given itself over to Negro worship, I’d expect the histories of both sports to be deemphasized.

    As to relative behavior of pro atheletes, , I think it’s safe to say that if an NBA player bought your neighbor’s house you’d move. If an NHLer moved in next door he’d come help you shovel your driveway.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Ganderson


    who knows who Bobby Layne was anymore?
     
    Bobby Layne? AA QB at the University of Texas, NFL career for Detroit and Pittsburgh? Little known fact: Layne was a high school teammate of Doak Walker at Highland Park High, so he was the first of two HPHS QBs to play for Detroit, along with Bret Stafford. Walker went on to win the Heisman at SMU before joining Layne at Detroit, where they won NFL championships in 1952 and 1953.

    That Bobby Layne?

    Replies: @Ganderson

  38. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

    Is your omission of Magic intentional or just an oversight?

    • Replies: @Rouetheday
    @Rohirrimborn

    I would imagine Steve left out Magic because he was drafted by the Lakers, he basically fell into their lap. The others were either traded for or signed as free agents. The Lakers had to use strategy and guile to obtain their services. I can think of one other prominent name Steve didn't mention- Jerry West. I'm pretty sure he was also a draft pick.

  39. Anon[191] • Disclaimer says:
    @Polynikes
    @Altai

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!


    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Altai, @Anon

    Gotta get them electrolytes before you go out and achieve equality!

    On a side note, I grew up a huge sports fan, but I think they’re on the brink of becoming irrelevant. Oddly enough golf and MMA are the two sports who came back to play during the shutdowns and are the least woke. It’ll be interesting to see if they can sustain some of the momentum they have.

    I was a serious sports devotee up until ~4 years ago or whenever the politics started to enter into coverage. It got me enervated and I started to drift from it. Like a toxic person, you consciously avoid them for your own mental health. In the gym I always had on ESPN while running on the treadmill or while riding the bike. I followed scores religiously and read books dealing with sports history, etc.

    I have watched ESPN or gone to their website in ~3+ years. I no longer look forward to and follow the NFL. I did watch the Super Bowls but was disengaged from it and was doing other things during it.

    I have continued to follow the NHL and will watch the NHL Network channel for analysis. Their actions yesterday soured me a bit. Might skip the rest of the playoffs even though some series will be epic (e.g., Bruins v. Lightning and Isles v. Flyers -> winners from each in next round)

    IndyCar remains relatively politics free (especially compared to NASCAR and Formula 1) and there’s a lot there in terms of good competition, strategy, and engineering to keep one consumed. In F-1 Lewis Hamilton (mixed race) has embraced BLM and has been bitching about racial inequality in auto racing. He even disrespected the legend Mario Andretti (who has racing teams in IndyCar) when Andretti said to keep politics out of racing. The IndyCar series is owned by billionaire Roger Penske (who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2019) and it’s sponsored by Japanese telecom NTT. Many of the drivers and sponsors are foreign (though majority American). The drivers are a lot like the type of guys you’d find in the ranks of fighter pilots: high IQand solid character.

    Also, IMSA (sports car) racing has stayed out of politics.

    For those looking to follow IndyCar and/or IMSA I suggest learning the fundamentals for extra interest, and in particular the book Physics for Gearheads by Randy Beikmann:

    Nb: only pre-req is high school math . The author, Randy Beikmann (Ph.D., mechanical engineering, Michigan) is an engineer at General Motors.

  40. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    The song was written by John D Loudermilk, who gave conflicting stories of its origin. The one that got around was that he was held hostage on a reservation until he agreed to write something for them. His bio is typical good-ol’-by:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._Loudermilk

    The singer, Mark Lindsay, grew up in Idaho and was told he was 1/8 Cherokee. He could easily pass for more. Paul Revere Dick, the band’s leader, was a blond Teutonic type and never claimed any aboriginal stock.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks for that.

    I believe the song was written in 1959 (first recorded that year, anyway), a reminder that pro-minority sentiment has always been around -- just seems to be at toxic levels these days.

  41. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    Damn right. Rezes are too comfortable now. Yeah they’ll support blm because f*ck white people but no way they’re risking that sweet per cap. New cars several times a year big screen TVs and houses paid for by HUD.

    It’s changed a ton since I was a kid. In the sixties and seventies good money from white run businesses.

    Big losses from from Boldt decision and other efforts to let the tribes run the business. Came in the late seventies and all through the eighties into the early nineties then came gambling and they knew not to f*ck that up. They let guys with experience handle it. Sure some tribes got burned by trying to pad the payroll too much. Some tribes had all adults working cushy jobs at the casino and nothing left for the kitty.

    But they learned and now it’s money hand over fist and real prosperity for those with any savvy.

    Those Indian-money checks are too good to blow. They have enough that everyone can skim and there’s still too much to spend.

  42. Roman Gabriel played college football at North Carolina State. He made most All American teams in his senior year 1961. That fall Sport Magazine did a story on him, a big thing then. He was married to a (white) North Carolina girl.

    His being a Filipino was mentioned in the 1961 Sport story but as I recall, wasn’t a big thing. In 1961 the ACC and all Southern football was all white. Roman Gabriel was very welcome.

    During the 60’s the NFL began to be attacked for having no black QBs. The critics regularly complained “Pro football QBs are all white.”

    Roman Gabriel, as anyone around back then knows, was one of the most famous QBs of the time. Gabriel was considered white. Gabriel himself never made anything of it as far I remember.

    Funny thing, in the 1969 John Wayne movie, “The Undefeated,” Gabriel plays an Indian. The character is the adopted son of the cavalry colonel Wayne plays.

  43. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

    Still is, last I checked.

  44. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    I am not a Tiger fan so maybe I am bias, but that hardly seemed terse to me. He is not going to drop out with two majors coming this fall, but he said he supported the commissioner’s statement about supporting racial equity. Other than loving the military and his money, I get no impression Tiger cares about right wing politics. I seriously doubt we will ever see him in opposition to a globohomo corporate cause.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Barnard

    I would guess the money has him paying the bare minimum lip service given his Nike deal. I would guess he’s to the right, but much like Jordan he views it all as a business.

  45. Gabriel finished his career with 5 seasons on the no-good, horrible, unwatchable Philadelphia Eagles teams of the mid-70s. If he had instead played for a team with a semblance of an offensive line, Gabriel probably could have put up decent numbers enough to get into the HOF.

  46. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

    If we have to have anti-White policies in America, I’d much rather see the spoils go to enrolled members of Indian tribes here in US when we did our Western Expansion…the Cherokees, Sioux, etc.

    Why do we have to import Nigerians and Jamaican Hindus? Why don’t blacks and Apache Indians object to this? Are they that stoned / drunk that they just don’t notice?

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

    The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    They won the NFL championship in 1945, and immediately left town. Cleveland, that is. The Dodgers won the NL in their penultimate season in Brooklyn. If you’re going to steal a franchise, steal a winner.

    Or a loser with top draft choices. The early-’50s Lakers were champs in Minneapolis, but bombed by the end of the decade. That’s how they got Elgin Baylor and Jerry West.

  48. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/WokeCapital/status/1299179181335552001

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Polynikes, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad

    Altai, “Dear Mountain Dew, Nice business you have there. I want a Midwest distributorship for my sons.” Signed, Jesse Jackson

  49. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

    “Sonny Sixkiller”

    Awesome name. My new nom de plume. I am now a person of colour.

  50. @R.G. Camara
    Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn't match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn't have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50's or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda's longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn't been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @black sea, @Henry's Cat, @Marty, @Jon

    In one of the Mantle biographies, Frank Gifford is quoted as saying, “we thought baseball players were gay.” He was referring to 1951, when a 590 ft. Mantle homer in an exhibition at SC hit him on the leg during football practice.

  51. Shows you how much I’ve cared about the NFL: I though the Rams were still decamped to St. Louis.

  52. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    That's rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Bacchae." It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb, @slumber_j, @Johnny789

    “presidents … The Pirates of Penzance”

    The image of President Blumpft! all tricked-out in the flamboyant style of a Gilbert and Sullivan British officer comes immediately to mind.

  53. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

    The comparison of LA Rams vs Raiders is similar to the NY Jets vs Giants. The Rams were the favorite of the upper class but the Raiders were the favorite of the working class.

  54. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    “Paul Revere was a fucking hack.”

    Were the Gilbert and Sullivan costumes the give-away? Is it fair to say Paul Revere and his raiders were the 60s version of KISS?

    “Ever been to an Indian casino?”

    There are several in my area. They seem to employ a lot of attractive young Asian women. Gambling is a pursuit for dummies but the food is good and largely subsidized by the busloads of Asians who come to gamble and ogle the cute Asian girls serving them drinks.

  55. In 1969, 54% completion was third in the NFL.

    Nothing to do with arm strength, it was a function of the rules/style of play.

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    Jim Nantz tried to get Harold Varner to take the race bait in a post round interview after the first round of St. Floyd riots. Varner, who is black but seems like he might’ve grown up sounds a country club, essentially laughed in his face and then ignored the question.

    But the TV guys found their new symbol of oppression in Cameron Champ, who looks white but has a mixed race father. When he was briefly in contention for the PGA championship, the telecast had about a dozen profiles on him, his dad, and blacks in golf. Maybe they’ll try and drive their audiences away yet.

    • Replies: @Russ
    @Polynikes


    But the TV guys found their new symbol of oppression in Cameron Champ, who looks white but has a mixed race father.
     
    Champ (PGA); Ryan Reaves (NHL); Bubba Wallace ( NASCAR); Jack Flaherty (MLB); Jussie; Kaepernick (NFL); Barry Obama; Talcum X -- obviously a mulatto phenomenon underpinning "Black" lives mattering.
  57. You know that people are serious about addressing social problems when they put pro athletes in charge of fixing them. FINALLY! I’ve always said that people who can turn themselves from losers into millionaires then back into into bankrupt losers have special talents that normal people don’t possess.

  58. @R.G. Camara
    Football history lags behind baseball history as an interesting subject for young boys, and has for generations.

    Baseball cards and statistics in the papers were devoured by myself and all my friends from 9-13, and most other boys with fathers. Plus baseball has long made a big to do about its history; witness the kids in the 1960s-set movie The Sandlot all knowing everything about Babe Ruth, who died before they were born.

    Football, meanwhile, never tried that route until the 1980s. NFL films has done some good work over the years, but it doesn't match up to the nostalgia-filled haze of so many baseball documentaries and old movies.

    And football is a vastly different game today than in 1960 or 1920. We can fantasize Ty Cobb playing against (or with!) Barry Bonds and hitting off of Randy Johnson or Sandy Koufax, because the rules are all (mostly) the same. But pull some big-name palooka off a college or pro championship football team in 1925 and plopping him onto the same-level team today and he wouldn't have a clue and get killed. Rules have changed too much. So historical callbacks or matchups are harder to get interested in in Football.

    All this is to say that I know way WAY more about Satchel Paige (played pr baseball into his late 50's or early 60s) than George Blanda, even though Blanda's longevity is arguably more interesting. In fact, if it hadn't been for Steve, I would have never have heard of Blanda.

    This is also the point I like to note the complete reversal of roles of Football v. Baseball in terms of player images. From 1880-1930 or 1940, baseball was the game for the thugs: low-class, rough, nasty, gambling drunks and womanizing guys and cheats, while football was the sport of refined college gentlemen.

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @black sea, @Henry's Cat, @Marty, @Jon

    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.

    Baseball is just a lot whiter than football. And it even has a decent number of Asians. Nobody thinks quarterbacks or kickers are thugs, but everyone knew Darryl Strawberry was.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Jon

    It's more than that. Even the black guys in baseball are usually Dominican, and Dominicans have no racial thug chip on their shoulder (at least publicly), and usually just come off as happy to be making millions after growing up poor. Or, if actually American black, they tend to be the sons and grandsons of successful blacks.

    The roughest guys in baseball these days tends to be non-black or lighter-skinned-black hispanic, and even that 's not close to football thuggery.

  59. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.
     
    The song was written by John D Loudermilk, who gave conflicting stories of its origin. The one that got around was that he was held hostage on a reservation until he agreed to write something for them. His bio is typical good-ol'-by:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._Loudermilk

    The singer, Mark Lindsay, grew up in Idaho and was told he was 1/8 Cherokee. He could easily pass for more. Paul Revere Dick, the band's leader, was a blond Teutonic type and never claimed any aboriginal stock.

    Replies: @bomag

    Thanks for that.

    I believe the song was written in 1959 (first recorded that year, anyway), a reminder that pro-minority sentiment has always been around — just seems to be at toxic levels these days.

  60. It was racist to give Roman Gabriel the role of a headhunter on Gilligan’s Island. He should have been the gentle native who saved Ginger’s life by fighting a tiger to his death.

  61. You’d be surprised how big some Jungle Asians can get on the American diet. Plus some – Filipinos in particular – can get quite muscular. They’re still mostly small, obviously, but living in the Bay Area for several years I met several full Filipinos over 6ft (although 6-1/6-2 seems to be their equivalent to 6-4 for Whites – the point at which the bell curve really starts to taper out). And don’t forget Dave Bautista.

    If Amerindians could but down the bottle and get past their despair I’m certain there’s more Jim Thorpes amongst them.

    I like to point out to Progressives that we need affirmative action in sports. It’s at least as symbolically important as POC CEOs, politicians etc. More importantly, E Asians and Mestizos’ absence in sports sets a good example for Blacks. Short, small Brown people don’t succeed in that, the reasons are obviously genetic, but you know what: that’s OK. Our sports should be a model for a racially diverse society; let the chips fall where they may. Stop your complaining (and your rioting).

  62. Gabriel was born to Edna Mae Wyatt and Roman Ildonzo Gabriel Sr., a Filipino immigrant, in Wilmington, North Carolina.[2] Gabriel grew up poor and suffered from asthma,[3] but he played high school football at New Hanover High School and graduated in 1958. He went on to star at quarterback at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

    So,half-Filipino Roman Gabriel played QB for North Carolina State at Raleigh in the late ’50s and early ’60s….And yet somehow this Civil Rights milestone in the Jim Crow South has gone unheralded….

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Gabriel

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about Sonny Sixkiller?

    He was Indian.

    https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/11162018_football_204322-1560x1072.jpg

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @TWS, @jsm, @SunBakedSuburb, @Deckin

    Beat me to it. A Pac 8 legend when I was growing up.

  64. @Brutusale
    @Steve Sailer

    Lakers vs. Celtics was always about money vs. brains. Brains (Auerbach) usually won. Who else had the balls, or was it smarts, to start 5 blacks in the early 60s? Or hire the first black coach?

    Replies: @Wake up

    I couldn’t give a flip about the Celtics, Lakers, Yankees, Patriots, or any pro sports leagues.

  65. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    Cher also contributed. Her mother claims some Cherokee blood. What an enthusiastic audience from 1998! A rousing Half-Breed and more. btw Sonny was big Stones collaborator when they were in LA to record. Sonny gets song writing credit for one tune on December’s Children. Not to mention the late great Jack Nitzsche, a (literally) German farm boy, who blew in from from Michigan fully formed.

  66. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/WokeCapital/status/1299179181335552001

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Polynikes, @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad

    It’s Pepsi. Multi-national globohomo capital with the Indian gal–also a Tamil Brahmin–CEO.

    I like some Diet Dew in my afternoon seltzer, but am happy with the knock-offs. Not that Walmart or Kroger are “un-woke”.

    You buy from corporate American now, you contribute to BLM terrorism.

    Minoritarianism is an infectious disease ideology. Everyone must get it, must swear it’s great, must work to propagate it and must berate you if you aren’t on board.

  67. I used to love to watch the NFL and MLB. Those days are gone.
    I really despise these spoiled, ill-informed, under-educated jocks.

  68. One utterly overlooked black quarterback from the late 60s was Marlin Briscoe, who entertainingly QB’d the then-lousy Broncos for a year before getting switched to receiver and ending up with the Bills. Wiki in fact claims he was the first starting black QB in pro football, stepping in when Steve Tensi got injured.

  69. The detailed 5 point plan was just released, they said they drew on decades of black advocacy work and the great legacy of the civil rights movement in designing something that truly reflects the desires of those activists doing the hard work of untangling our legacy of systemic racism.

    1) MO

    2) MONEY

    3) FO

    4) DEM

    5) PROGRAMS!

  70. @Jon
    @R.G. Camara


    These days, baseball players are seen as nicer guys, usually smarter and more polite, while Football is the land of thugs.
     
    Baseball is just a lot whiter than football. And it even has a decent number of Asians. Nobody thinks quarterbacks or kickers are thugs, but everyone knew Darryl Strawberry was.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    It’s more than that. Even the black guys in baseball are usually Dominican, and Dominicans have no racial thug chip on their shoulder (at least publicly), and usually just come off as happy to be making millions after growing up poor. Or, if actually American black, they tend to be the sons and grandsons of successful blacks.

    The roughest guys in baseball these days tends to be non-black or lighter-skinned-black hispanic, and even that ‘s not close to football thuggery.

  71. @Redneck farmer
    Until we have Pygmy offensive linemen, the NFL isn't trying.

    Replies: @Russ, @Hypnotoad666

    So now the SJWs in the NHL want to change the blue lines into black lines on the ice. Black line, black puck: More unintended evidence of IQ disparity.

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Rohirrimborn, @Reg Cæsar, @mousey, @R.G. Camara

    I think it’s basically that pro football functions best in cold weather. The Packers, the Bears, the Steelers, the Giants, etc. all have loyal followings despite their ups and way downs. Even horrid teams like the Browns and the Lions have loyal rooters.

    Warm weather pro teams get practically no attendance or support when they’re down or just mediocre, e.g. even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren’t good; Jerry Jones deserves a lot of credit for keeping them competitive and therefore popular. Texas folks will tell you they are fanatic about high school and college football, but as for the Cowboys, they are only fair-weather fans.

    I don’t know why this is.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @R.G. Camara


    even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren’t good;
     
    The Cowboys claim that every game they have played, both home and away, has been a sellout since 2002. Although their stadium will hold 100,000, there are fewer than 93,000 seats; it is that number of tickets sold that determines a sellout.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/11/27/when-sellout-sellout/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  73. If black athletes (Black!) actually wanted to do something constructive other than to get paid for not working, and pat themselves on the back, they would form a public coalition where each would agree to write a check for say, $100,000 to the United Negro College Fund.

    Black or white (or other) athletes.

    I’m not a fan of racial causes, but this one is Old School and seems legit if not racist.

    Don’t hold your breath getting these mooks to hand over any cash. Talk is cheap.

    I’ve never seen any research published (maybe iSteve needs a topic) that documents the percentage of professional athletes who actually donate to their collegiate alma maters. These “student athletes” get lavish scholarships, free room and board, usually special (easy) classes they can pass, sometimes informal bribes and girlfriends supplied, etc. etc. So how many of them donate any portion of those multi-million dollar salaries to their schools?

    Where I went, one (now dead) famous (white) footballer did go on to donate and lead alumni fundraising for sports and other things. He had a nice business career. But overall I think the number of grateful jocks is very small. And since we are now in full racist mode socially, let’s break those stats down by race and sport. I’m sure some grad student needs a project.

    “Giving Back” isn’t just a slogan for others.

  74. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Reagan was a very remarkable man. Historians and partisans can bicker over the ups or downs of his legacy, but he was on a Teddy Roosevelt-level remarkable as a person. I have no firm opinion about his political achievements, good or bad, I was simply impressed by him the way I was impressed by Pope John Paul II.

    The fact that he was a mediocre student at a third-tier school only underscores the fact that he was a very busy man, and his genius lay not in strict academic achievement, but in being, like Odysseus, "andra polutropon."

    But the argument with respect to college athletics has changed; it once had value in cultivating character and leadership skills among actual bona-fide students, but it has of course turned into a bizarre pre-professional training ground for otherwise illiterate thugs. If you want to be a serious person now and cultivate yourself through formal discipline, you're better off studying karate and directing "The Threepenny Opera." Barriers to entry and what-not; and Robyn Archer's covers of "Pirate Jenny" and "The Ballad of Sexual Obsession" are things of genius.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Reagan was a very remarkable man.

    Reagan had some seriously based comments about rioters in ’69…his final quip indicates they also had soibois back then:

    The guy had several qualities that really made him a terrific speaker.

    • Thanks: danand
  75. @Polynikes
    @Steve Sailer

    Jim Nantz tried to get Harold Varner to take the race bait in a post round interview after the first round of St. Floyd riots. Varner, who is black but seems like he might’ve grown up sounds a country club, essentially laughed in his face and then ignored the question.

    But the TV guys found their new symbol of oppression in Cameron Champ, who looks white but has a mixed race father. When he was briefly in contention for the PGA championship, the telecast had about a dozen profiles on him, his dad, and blacks in golf. Maybe they’ll try and drive their audiences away yet.

    Replies: @Russ

    But the TV guys found their new symbol of oppression in Cameron Champ, who looks white but has a mixed race father.

    Champ (PGA); Ryan Reaves (NHL); Bubba Wallace ( NASCAR); Jack Flaherty (MLB); Jussie; Kaepernick (NFL); Barry Obama; Talcum X — obviously a mulatto phenomenon underpinning “Black” lives mattering.

  76. Will the Rams hire an African American kicker?

  77. @Redneck farmer
    Until we have Pygmy offensive linemen, the NFL isn't trying.

    Replies: @Russ, @Hypnotoad666

    Until we have Pygmy offensive linemen, the NFL isn’t trying.

    Pygmies could work on defense, as they could run between the legs of the O-line and grab the quarterback by the ankles.

    OTOH, the NFL could just continue to draft 350 lb. Samoans to throw people around. The “race is a social construct” people got some ‘splainin’ to do when it comes to Samoans in the NFL.

    When University of Washington Defensive Tackle Danny Shelton arrived for the NFL Draft in Chicago wearing traditional Samoan dress and almost choked the life out of Commissioner Goodell in an on-stage hug, it symbolized the amazing dominance that one tiny island and its’ Polynesian neighbors have in NFL football. Five Polynesian players were selected in the first 66 picks of the 2015 NFL Draft, the most ever for the first three rounds. Over 70 players in the NFL are of Polynesian descent. There are 30 players from American Samoa in the NFL and more than 200 play Division I NCAA Football. A Samoan male is 56 times more likely to play in the NFL than an American non-Samoan.

    Super Bowl Champions Jesse Sapolu and Ma’a Tanuvassa along with Kevin Kaplan and his company Coaching Charities decided to pay recognition to the contributions by establishing a Polynesian Football Hall of Fame in 2013. It had its’ first group of inductees the next year including players like Junior Seau, Kevin Mawae and Jack Thompson (“The Throwing Samoan”). Earlier this year it inducted players like Jesse Sapolu and Mark Tuinei. University of Oregon QB Marcus Mariota, selected 2nd in this year’s draft was honored as the 2014 College Player of the Year. The Hall is located in the Polynesian Cultural Center on Oahu in Hawaii.

    A pioneering group of college coaches recognized the uniqueness of Polynesia (Hawaii, Samoa,Tonga, Easter Island, and New Zealand) in the quality of football athletes it produces. Dick Vermeil, Dick Tomey, and LaVell Edwards made early trips. Former Hawaii and SMU Coach June Jones established a special relationship with Samoa and established a foundation there to help with Samoan athletics.”They have a unique culture that venerates family and work ethic” Coach Jones says.”There is an amazing spirit and feeling that one feels interacting with these warm and spiritual people.”

    https://www.thecoconet.tv/cocoblog/how-can-tiny-samoa-dominate-the-nfl/#:~:text=Over%2070%20players%20in%20the,than%20an%20American%20non%2DSamoan.

  78. The NFL needs to address racism. Blacks are 13% of the population yet more than 70% of NFL players. There almost zero Hispanics and Asians! And women are never even drafted! We need quotas to correct his obvious racism and sexism.

    FYI – I’m joking, but in our crazy world there are folks who agree with this.

  79. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    “Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay”
    Steve, you are a genius with words. I think I have rhabdo from laughing.

  80. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    That's rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Bacchae." It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb, @slumber_j, @Johnny789

    The late Sultan Qaboos of Oman was a huge Gilbert & Sullivan fan–and almost certainly gay. He was a great national leader, who singlehandedly pulled his countrymen out of miserable medieval penury. We could use someone like him.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @slumber_j

    It is, it is, a glorious thing
    To be a Pirate King.

  81. @slumber_j
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The late Sultan Qaboos of Oman was a huge Gilbert & Sullivan fan--and almost certainly gay. He was a great national leader, who singlehandedly pulled his countrymen out of miserable medieval penury. We could use someone like him.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    It is, it is, a glorious thing
    To be a Pirate King.

  82. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21ixwIaN7qw


    They took the whole Cherokee nation
    Put us on this reservation
    Took away our ways of life
    The tomahawk and the bow and knife
    Took away our native tongue
    And taught their English to our young
    And all the beads we made by hand
    Are nowadays made in Japan
    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die
    They took the whole Indian nation
    Locked us on this reservation
    Though I wear a shirt and tie
    I'm still part redman deep inside

    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die


    But maybe someday when they learn
    Cherokee nation will return, will return, will return
    Will return, will return
     
    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Sixkiller could lead an Indian division of Anti-Fa.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @S. Anonyia, @duncsbaby

    Lol. Always liked this song but this guy looks even less “Cherokee” than my relatives. One of my grandparents long claimed they got their dark looks from their Cherokee heritage, but I did some extensive family research and found out they were mainly Irish, Scottish, and Swiss German (and possibly even Romansch, as their ancestors came from the cantons where it was spoken).

  83. @Anonymous

    One of the really strange things in football history that nobody remembers is that the NFL had a league Most Valuable Player in the 1960s who was half-Filipino: the Los Angeles Rams’ quarterback when I was a kid, Roman Gabriel.
     
    Teddy Bruschi was a linebacker for the Patriots and also half-Filipino. I don't think most people knew he was half-Filipino though. Bruschi and Gabriel look like they could be brothers:

    https://newyork.cbslocal.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14578484/2010/12/82887002.jpg

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Nope, I never knew that. I thought Bruschi was Italian.

    Roman Gabriel, who I knew about, but who was a bit before my NFL kid-loving prime, I just thought was white too, if I thought about it all. So apparently did everyone in his North Carolina school district when he was growing up.

    Gabriel played an Indian on a couple tv shows. Half-Filipinos are convincing Indians. Just ask Lou Diamond Phillips.

  84. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21ixwIaN7qw


    They took the whole Cherokee nation
    Put us on this reservation
    Took away our ways of life
    The tomahawk and the bow and knife
    Took away our native tongue
    And taught their English to our young
    And all the beads we made by hand
    Are nowadays made in Japan
    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die
    They took the whole Indian nation
    Locked us on this reservation
    Though I wear a shirt and tie
    I'm still part redman deep inside

    Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
    So proud to live, so proud to die


    But maybe someday when they learn
    Cherokee nation will return, will return, will return
    Will return, will return
     
    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.

    Sixkiller could lead an Indian division of Anti-Fa.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @S. Anonyia, @duncsbaby

    Just wait, I know you’re kidding, but the Indians will start throwing their weight around too. I live in North Dakota, I daily followed the happenings in the south central part of the state when Indians & antifa sympathizers laid siege to the building of the Dakota Access pipeline just a few years ago. That wasn’t even ON the reservation. Of course it’s all Indian land – if we allow it. We can’t allow it.

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @Polynikes

    Tiger Woods was really terse when asked after his 73 in the BMW Championship on Thursday about whether the PGA players would boycott.

    The US Open is in 3 weeks and at age 44 Tiger does not want another major championship canceled with him still 3 major wins behind Jack Nicklaus.

    Also, Tiger is slightly to the right of Curtis LeMay.

    Replies: @Altai, @Barnard, @Polynikes, @carbolibre, @duncsbaby

    Steve, I love ya man, but if you think Tiger Woods is to the right of Curtis LeMay, I got a golf course to sell you in Manitoba.

  86. Good luck to professional sports. I couldn’t care less. I am sick and tired of the years of protests, union problems, bitching, crying and attitudes of these wimps. There was a time, not too long ago, that people who had the love of sports in their hearts, played because of that love, not because of the love of the money and power it gave them. The population of the United States would in fact improve mentally speaking if big sports were eliminated. Then, we would have a public that learns by amusing themselves with every kind of game or entertainment, not one that sits around like couch potatoes getting obese, with grown men wearing T-shirts that idolized the name of some buffoon who makes millions throwing a ball thru a hoop, etc.

  87. @Anonymous

    But his hard-spinning throws were hard for his receivers to catch: only a 54.4% completion percentage that year.
     
    Maybe for his tight ends, but for his primary wide-receiver, Jack Snow, the general rule was if the ball touched Jack's hands, it was caught. And Jack was rarely caught from behind once he had the ball. He was kind of known for that. He and Gabriel worked well together. He had a burning pass, but Gabriel's problem was his front line wasn’t always as good as could be, and he’d overthrow the ball when under immediate pressure.

    However, again, he could drill it as hard as he wanted to Jack. No problem.

    Replies: @36 ulster

    In those days, a QB who completed over 50%mof his passes was pretty accurate; they didn’t throw three-yard dump-offs to the “featured back” or whatever he’s called these days. And they didn’t just throw slant passes to the receivers–they threw downfield. The short stuff featured screen passes, but that was a time when the guards were a bit more mobile and could form a blocking wedge for the running back.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @36 ulster

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: "Heave it deep and see what happens."

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @David In TN

    , @Anonymous
    @36 ulster

    Rams weren’t a big passing team back then. Gabriel said he never got the chance to play a real passing game until after he was traded from the Rams.

    https://youtu.be/aaSv3tVLmLs

    When he did throw the long ones, if Snow could get a hand on the ball, it was most often a completion. Again, they worked well together.

    https://youtu.be/9i6m1FjnNgc

  88. Cycling, both civilian and professional, is having some of the strangest struggle sessions. The Tour de France begins tomorrow. As if the racing, training and travel wasn’t enough of a burden, now everyone’s got to be racially conscious (and wear a mask when not riding).

    All of the cycling press have been scrambling to showcase CoCs (cyclists of colour). It’s really awkward to watch. There’s a single domestique de couleur in this year’s roster, so queue gnashing of teeth.

    Cycling’s traditionally been a working class sport in Europe, Britain, and most commonwealth nations. But when it really took off in the States, it was the more well-to-do and university educated who embraced it. And that combo means many wokes on spokes.

  89. @Ganderson
    Joe Kapp certainly wasn’t the best QB in NFL history (not sure about his place in the CFL pantheon) but he was among the most entertaining. The 1969 playoff game against Gabriel and the Rams was a classic that I was fortunate enough to be able to attend. A cold December day in Bloomington- (we always thought that the Rams couldn’t take the cold) the Vikings came back from a 17-7 halftime deficit to win the game. Grant and Kapp- an early version of Bellichik and Brady? Nah, it’s stupid, I know, but those two brought the Vikings to relevance, (even though Kapp was gone after the 1969 season) making them, over the following 15 years or so the greatest underachievers in NFL history. YouTube has a Joe Kapp highlight reel - kinda fun.

    As for the History question, it always seemed to me that the NFL ignored the history of its game- how many know about the AAFC (and the story of the early Browns); and who knows who Bobby Layne was anymore?

    Baseball, on the other hand, wallows in its own history. Is it the availability of stats? Is it the fact that the old timer gridiron stars were mostly white, although certainly the same could be said for baseball? Now, since the American sporting press has largely given itself over to Negro worship, I’d expect the histories of both sports to be deemphasized.

    As to relative behavior of pro atheletes, , I think it’s safe to say that if an NBA player bought your neighbor’s house you’d move. If an NHLer moved in next door he’d come help you shovel your driveway.
    https://youtu.be/NiVlcjWBj00

    Replies: @FPD72

    who knows who Bobby Layne was anymore?

    Bobby Layne? AA QB at the University of Texas, NFL career for Detroit and Pittsburgh? Little known fact: Layne was a high school teammate of Doak Walker at Highland Park High, so he was the first of two HPHS QBs to play for Detroit, along with Bret Stafford. Walker went on to win the Heisman at SMU before joining Layne at Detroit, where they won NFL championships in 1952 and 1953.

    That Bobby Layne?

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @FPD72

    Yes, that Bobby Layne. I hope you didn’t think I was trying to slight him. Given the NFL’s attitude toward its history I’ll bet there are even a lot of Lions fans who don’t know who he is. Sadly, I was too young to ever have seen him play. I read a book in 8th grade, one of those Scholastic Book Services books, that had short bios of NHL greats. Layne was one of them, been a fan (of sorts, I guess) ever since.

    Replies: @Ganderson

  90. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I predict a mass outbreak of rioting on the reservations.
     
    Ever been to an Indian gambling casino? It’s there they get their reparations from the white people.
    I got hosed every time I’ve gone to one. You have to pay a fee for every round of blackjack you play. Ruthless fucking savages! They don’t care what happens to me there!

    Paul Revere was a fucking hack. He’s got less Indian blood in him than Elizabeth Warren. Indians are far more practical than vengeful. Their contributions to pop music is celebratory, not that Paul Revere instigator crybaby shit.

    https://youtu.be/Dj0drevGOgA

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @TWS, @SunBakedSuburb, @Clyde, @bored

    Can’t beat the late Jesse Ed Davis, who was on everything from session work for the Monkees to Taj Majal’s original band to John Lennon. That’s him taking the solo on “Doctor My Eyes” by Jackson Browne. Just marvelous touch and phrasing.

  91. @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    I am not a Tiger fan so maybe I am bias, but that hardly seemed terse to me. He is not going to drop out with two majors coming this fall, but he said he supported the commissioner's statement about supporting racial equity. Other than loving the military and his money, I get no impression Tiger cares about right wing politics. I seriously doubt we will ever see him in opposition to a globohomo corporate cause.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    I would guess the money has him paying the bare minimum lip service given his Nike deal. I would guess he’s to the right, but much like Jordan he views it all as a business.

  92. @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    I think it's basically that pro football functions best in cold weather. The Packers, the Bears, the Steelers, the Giants, etc. all have loyal followings despite their ups and way downs. Even horrid teams like the Browns and the Lions have loyal rooters.

    Warm weather pro teams get practically no attendance or support when they're down or just mediocre, e.g. even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren't good; Jerry Jones deserves a lot of credit for keeping them competitive and therefore popular. Texas folks will tell you they are fanatic about high school and college football, but as for the Cowboys, they are only fair-weather fans.

    I don't know why this is.

    Replies: @FPD72

    even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren’t good;

    The Cowboys claim that every game they have played, both home and away, has been a sellout since 2002. Although their stadium will hold 100,000, there are fewer than 93,000 seats; it is that number of tickets sold that determines a sellout.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/11/27/when-sellout-sellout/

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @FPD72

    IIRC, if the stadium is not "sold out", then the game is not shown on local TV, so sometimes the owner will "buy" all the unsold tickets so that there is a sellout. I do not know if this is an NFL rule that the owner can waive.

  93. @36 ulster
    @Anonymous

    In those days, a QB who completed over 50%mof his passes was pretty accurate; they didn't throw three-yard dump-offs to the "featured back" or whatever he's called these days. And they didn't just throw slant passes to the receivers--they threw downfield. The short stuff featured screen passes, but that was a time when the guards were a bit more mobile and could form a blocking wedge for the running back.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: “Heave it deep and see what happens.”

    • Agree: 36 ulster
    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Steve Sailer

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: “Heave it deep and see what happens.”

    My neighbors in New York once ran across "Hollywood Joe" in a restaurant. They sent their kinda faggy kid to his table for an autograph and Joe politely complied.

    Sure, Joe probably had a few drinks under his belt. But he is such a better man than my ex-neighbor, who now prowls the Village looking for novel STDs.

    , @David In TN
    @Steve Sailer

    That was Namath's strategy. I read somewhere (maybe SI writer Paul Zimmerman) that Namath would be a couple of touchdowns behind and just heave it downfield which is one reason he had so many interceptions and his stats don't look that good by today's standards.

    Joe Namath is said to have cared little about statistics.

    In a 1969 pro football preview magazine, Namath called Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson an "NFL Style Quarterback." This meant Dawson's completion percentage was high due to throwing to his running backs and short passes in general.

    Namath said "If I played like that I would complete 80-90 per cent." Namath was considered the prototype AFL Style QB.

    Ironically, that very season (1969) the Chiefs beat the Vikings in Super Bowl IV.

  94. Can’t beat the late Jesse Ed Davis, who was on everything from session work for the Monkees to Taj Majal’s original band to John Lennon. That’s him taking the solo on “Doctor My Eyes” by Jackson Browne. Just marvelous touch and phrasing.

    That’s cool, I didn’t know that. Wonder what setup he had in that session.

    Bending with joyous abandon.

  95. @Steve Sailer
    @36 ulster

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: "Heave it deep and see what happens."

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @David In TN

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: “Heave it deep and see what happens.”

    My neighbors in New York once ran across “Hollywood Joe” in a restaurant. They sent their kinda faggy kid to his table for an autograph and Joe politely complied.

    Sure, Joe probably had a few drinks under his belt. But he is such a better man than my ex-neighbor, who now prowls the Village looking for novel STDs.

  96. @FPD72
    @Ganderson


    who knows who Bobby Layne was anymore?
     
    Bobby Layne? AA QB at the University of Texas, NFL career for Detroit and Pittsburgh? Little known fact: Layne was a high school teammate of Doak Walker at Highland Park High, so he was the first of two HPHS QBs to play for Detroit, along with Bret Stafford. Walker went on to win the Heisman at SMU before joining Layne at Detroit, where they won NFL championships in 1952 and 1953.

    That Bobby Layne?

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Yes, that Bobby Layne. I hope you didn’t think I was trying to slight him. Given the NFL’s attitude toward its history I’ll bet there are even a lot of Lions fans who don’t know who he is. Sadly, I was too young to ever have seen him play. I read a book in 8th grade, one of those Scholastic Book Services books, that had short bios of NHL greats. Layne was one of them, been a fan (of sorts, I guess) ever since.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Ganderson

    NFL greats, sorry.

  97. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    That's rather a lot of presidents who played college football.

    Maybe this would be a better country if we had more presidents who instead of playing college sports, directed college productions of "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Bacchae." It actually requires more focus and leadership skills than playing cornerback.

    I played ice hockey with some serious bad-asses, and also directed Euripides. Trust me, Euripides was harder.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb, @slumber_j, @Johnny789

    My best friend from college was a wrestler and is now a Theatre Prof that has put on two shows a year for the last 30 years. I’ll have to ask him. He seems to hate it now, but it felt like he really liked it back when.

  98. @Rohirrimborn
    @Steve Sailer

    Is your omission of Magic intentional or just an oversight?

    Replies: @Rouetheday

    I would imagine Steve left out Magic because he was drafted by the Lakers, he basically fell into their lap. The others were either traded for or signed as free agents. The Lakers had to use strategy and guile to obtain their services. I can think of one other prominent name Steve didn’t mention- Jerry West. I’m pretty sure he was also a draft pick.

  99. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @36 ulster
    @Anonymous

    In those days, a QB who completed over 50%mof his passes was pretty accurate; they didn't throw three-yard dump-offs to the "featured back" or whatever he's called these days. And they didn't just throw slant passes to the receivers--they threw downfield. The short stuff featured screen passes, but that was a time when the guards were a bit more mobile and could form a blocking wedge for the running back.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Rams weren’t a big passing team back then. Gabriel said he never got the chance to play a real passing game until after he was traded from the Rams.

    When he did throw the long ones, if Snow could get a hand on the ball, it was most often a completion. Again, they worked well together.

    • Agree: 36 ulster
  100. @Ganderson
    @FPD72

    Yes, that Bobby Layne. I hope you didn’t think I was trying to slight him. Given the NFL’s attitude toward its history I’ll bet there are even a lot of Lions fans who don’t know who he is. Sadly, I was too young to ever have seen him play. I read a book in 8th grade, one of those Scholastic Book Services books, that had short bios of NHL greats. Layne was one of them, been a fan (of sorts, I guess) ever since.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    NFL greats, sorry.

  101. @FPD72
    @R.G. Camara


    even the vaunted Dallas Cowboys have very empty stadiums when they aren’t good;
     
    The Cowboys claim that every game they have played, both home and away, has been a sellout since 2002. Although their stadium will hold 100,000, there are fewer than 93,000 seats; it is that number of tickets sold that determines a sellout.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/11/27/when-sellout-sellout/

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    IIRC, if the stadium is not “sold out”, then the game is not shown on local TV, so sometimes the owner will “buy” all the unsold tickets so that there is a sellout. I do not know if this is an NFL rule that the owner can waive.

  102. @Steve Sailer
    @36 ulster

    The offensive strategy in the Joe Namath Era was: "Heave it deep and see what happens."

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @David In TN

    That was Namath’s strategy. I read somewhere (maybe SI writer Paul Zimmerman) that Namath would be a couple of touchdowns behind and just heave it downfield which is one reason he had so many interceptions and his stats don’t look that good by today’s standards.

    Joe Namath is said to have cared little about statistics.

    In a 1969 pro football preview magazine, Namath called Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson an “NFL Style Quarterback.” This meant Dawson’s completion percentage was high due to throwing to his running backs and short passes in general.

    Namath said “If I played like that I would complete 80-90 per cent.” Namath was considered the prototype AFL Style QB.

    Ironically, that very season (1969) the Chiefs beat the Vikings in Super Bowl IV.

  103. @anon
    Taylor Rapp, who was a rookie safety on the Rams last year, is half-Chinese.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Gabe Ruth

    Last time I paid attention there were some good white safeties. Steve’s talking about cornerbacks.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Gabe Ruth

    Safeties typically line up deeper in the defense than cornerbacks. Safeties are supposed to be the last line of defense. So they are typically moving forward toward the line of scrimmage when they make plays. Cornerbacks are typically moving backwards away from the line of scrimmage, ideally while keeping the receiver in front of them and their eyes on him.

    How much of being a cornerback is the ability to run fast backwards? That's a curious skill. I'm not sure how much it comes up outside of American football. It would be interesting to try to figure out how it evolved, what selected for it, if anything selected for it rather than some other skills of which it happens to be a byproduct.

    Replies: @David In TN, @Desiderius

  104. Rams Players Working on Plan to Address Racial Inequality

    For that to happen, enough Black players would have to quit to allow Whites to be “proportionately represented.”

    Someone with access to the live game microphone, please, tell them so!
    🙂

  105. @Gabe Ruth
    @anon

    Last time I paid attention there were some good white safeties. Steve's talking about cornerbacks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Safeties typically line up deeper in the defense than cornerbacks. Safeties are supposed to be the last line of defense. So they are typically moving forward toward the line of scrimmage when they make plays. Cornerbacks are typically moving backwards away from the line of scrimmage, ideally while keeping the receiver in front of them and their eyes on him.

    How much of being a cornerback is the ability to run fast backwards? That’s a curious skill. I’m not sure how much it comes up outside of American football. It would be interesting to try to figure out how it evolved, what selected for it, if anything selected for it rather than some other skills of which it happens to be a byproduct.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Steve Sailer

    Somewhere I saw a cornerback's job description includes the ability to run backwards (or somehow not let the WR get behind him) as fast as a wide receiver is running straight ahead. The free safety is supposed to help him out if possible. The safety is supposed to be able to "read" the play.

    , @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Hip fluidity is the main thing in corners.

    Blacks are also considered better dancers for similar reasons.

  106. @Steve Sailer
    @Gabe Ruth

    Safeties typically line up deeper in the defense than cornerbacks. Safeties are supposed to be the last line of defense. So they are typically moving forward toward the line of scrimmage when they make plays. Cornerbacks are typically moving backwards away from the line of scrimmage, ideally while keeping the receiver in front of them and their eyes on him.

    How much of being a cornerback is the ability to run fast backwards? That's a curious skill. I'm not sure how much it comes up outside of American football. It would be interesting to try to figure out how it evolved, what selected for it, if anything selected for it rather than some other skills of which it happens to be a byproduct.

    Replies: @David In TN, @Desiderius

    Somewhere I saw a cornerback’s job description includes the ability to run backwards (or somehow not let the WR get behind him) as fast as a wide receiver is running straight ahead. The free safety is supposed to help him out if possible. The safety is supposed to be able to “read” the play.

  107. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    It's an interesting question why. My best guess is that the Dodgers won the World Series in their second year in LA, while the Lakers often lost in the Finals to the Celtics but did win the NBA championship in 1972. The Raiders moved to town and quickly won the Super Bowl in 1983-84. But the Rams have only won the Super Bowl under Kurt Warner and Marshall Faulk when they were in St. Louis. The Rams have been quite good in L.A. but have never won a Super Bowl here.

    I have a friend who has season tickets for the L.A. Clippers. His view is that the Lakers appeal to the majority of Angelenos who love a winner, while the Clips appeal to the minority of Angelenos who like an underdog and are cheapskates.

    The Laker theory is that you deserve to win because you went out and got the biggest, baddest star: Wilt, Kareem, Shaq, Kobe, LeBron. Don't ask how Jerry West got 17-year-old Kobe, the point is that he got him.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Magic

  108. @Steve Sailer
    @Gabe Ruth

    Safeties typically line up deeper in the defense than cornerbacks. Safeties are supposed to be the last line of defense. So they are typically moving forward toward the line of scrimmage when they make plays. Cornerbacks are typically moving backwards away from the line of scrimmage, ideally while keeping the receiver in front of them and their eyes on him.

    How much of being a cornerback is the ability to run fast backwards? That's a curious skill. I'm not sure how much it comes up outside of American football. It would be interesting to try to figure out how it evolved, what selected for it, if anything selected for it rather than some other skills of which it happens to be a byproduct.

    Replies: @David In TN, @Desiderius

    Hip fluidity is the main thing in corners.

    Blacks are also considered better dancers for similar reasons.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS