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Putin Doesn't Announce Much of Anything in His Annual Victory Day Speech
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From the New York Times news section:

Mr. Putin did not make any major announcements on Monday, concentrating his remarks on paying tribute to the millions of Russians who died in World War II. There had been rampant speculation about whether Mr. Putin might announce a widening of the military draft — an idea that the Kremlin has rejected — or declare victory in Ukraine by citing the territory claimed along the coast.

Instead, he ended his brief speech with: “To Russia! To victory! Hooray!” The soldiers arrayed on Red Square responded: “Hooray!”

A different New York Times reporter had a different take on Putin’s speech, but agreed that there were no announcements of policy shifts:

President Vladimir V. Putin’s speech at the Red Square parade was longer than usual, but did not make any major news. He spent much of it justifying his invasion of Ukraine, describing it as he has in the past as an “the inevitable, timely and only correct decision.”

Here’s Putin’s speech in Russian, which the increasingly amazing Google Translate will translate for you.

 
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  1. neutral says:

    As least they know Putin in charge, no such thing can be expected from a US president ever, they know that it is increasingly just a ceremonial role with all the real decision making done by a hidden group of people that answer to nobody. Obviously they will call it misinformation, but can anyone honestly believe that Trump, Biden, etc, are nothing but useless talking heads?

    • Agree: Paul Mendez
  2. No “mission accomplished” moment, and no mobilization announcement, so those two Western predictions didn’t pan out.

    The subtext is Putin’s not in any rush. His economy has held up despite Western sanctions, the ruble is 26% higher than when he launched the invasion, and his popularity is near ~80%. He seems content to let his armed forces methodically inch forward as they pummel Ukrainian troops with artillery, while minimizing Russian casualties.

  3. J.Ross says:

    … so admitted rampant speculation by frequently wrong liars (whose only interest in things Russian is destruction) turned out to not be a good source of information. Who’da think it? I wonder if our chief disinformer Censor Janky will use this as an example of modern informational technology remaining as squarely as previous technologies within the grasp of our human flaws?

  4. Every day, in every way, Mr. Putin demonstrates he is more of a statesman than any of the ass-clowns leading the “Free World.”

    Our own President Gas would have used the occasion to announce a new Green-Rainbow CRT school initiative … for the children, of course. Because LGBTQIAPPQWERTYUIOP+ types don’t reproduce, they recruit.

  5. J says:

    It appears that his operation could last years. The West is prepared to fight to the last Ukrainian soldier. Putin will fight to the last Chechen, Tatar, Evenki volunteer.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  6. @Dave Pinsen


    This is the WSJ. Almost a master class in subtle propagandizing. And the WSJ likes to think of itself as running against the tide.

    1. Woman with little dog. Rescued!
    2. Man crying. What we’ve come to!
    3. Comforting the victims. Succor!
    4. Los Angeles. See we’re just like you!
    5. Ukraine sank Russian boats! Glorious Victory!
    6. Russians killed civilians! Nazis!
    7. Latest Updates! Breathless!
    8. EU Prepares Ban. We’re United!
    9. Russia-Israel ties. I’ll let J.D. take this one
    10. Did someone say Hitler?

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @HA
    , @Hypnotoad666
  7. Putin welcomed the fighters from the battleground in Donbass. He said Donbass, not Ukraine.

    Btw.: He looked quite ok. Not like a man who is terminally ill (Scott Adams). And not like the psychopath, some psychiatrists claimed he’d be. I wonder what the US-viewers think in case they make the comparison to Joe Biden.

  8. Thank you. I looked for a transcript on Russia Today, but in the UK my European browser (Startpage) returns “DNS Address not found” if you look for RT.com.

    I looked for the RT Twitter feed, to find that “Account Withheld – @RT_com’s account has been withheld in Portugal, Finland, Sweden, Ireland, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Italy, Malta, Germany, Greece, Romania, Netherlands, Bulgaria, Austria, Luxembourg, Latvia, United Kingdom, Denmark, Lithuania, Croatia, Estonia, Cyprus, France, Spain, Belgium in response to a legal demand.”

    Eventually I found TASS, seemingly the only Russian state media the UK government thinks we can be allowed to read. No transcript alas, so I tried RT with TOR.

    https://www.rt.com/russia/555178-russia-preemptive-rebuff-aggression-putin/

    Putin not only praised the achievement of the Soviet people during World War II, but also addressed the Kremlin’s reasons for the ongoing conflict between Moscow and Kiev. Russia had to act because a large-scale offensive against the breakaway republics in the eastern Donbass region was being planned, he claimed.

    We saw the military infrastructure unfolding [in Ukraine]; hundreds of foreign advisers starting their work; there were regular deliveries of the most modern weapons from NATO countries. The danger grew every day,” the president explained.

    Russia gave a preemptive rebuff to aggression – this was a forced, timely and the only right decision by a sovereign, strong and independent country,” he added, referring to the launch of the military operation.

    Despite all the disagreements in international relations, Russia has always advocated the creation of a system of equal and indivisible security,” Putin continued.

    He cited Moscow’s attempts to engage in dialogue on security guarantees with Washington late last year, which failed to yield results.

    NATO countries didn’t want to hear us, which means that, in fact, they harbored completely different plans, and we saw it,” he elaborated. There were open preparations for a punitive operation in the Donbass and “an invasion of our historical lands, including Crimea,” Putin insisted, adding that Kiev also announced plans to restore its nuclear capabilities.

    Call me a Putinist (© Jack) or fanboy (© HA) but that doesn’t seem an unfair summing up of the position.

  9. @Dave Pinsen

    Agree. What has changed since February is external to the Kremlin. As the Ukraine’s government has increasingly hardened against any negotiated settlement to the conflict, Russia will have to abandon its limited aims (Ukrainian neutrality, Donbas independence) in favor of total conquest, ironically, in order to achieve limited aims.

    Of course, the Ukraine’s government’s bellicosity is at the behest of the White House, to whom it is of little consequence if the Ukraine is entirely laid waste.

  10. @Almost Missouri

    do you think he will conquer all of the Ukraine? Then will he split NATO and offer Lviv back to Poland, and the Hungarian speaking region back to Hungary?’

    For Putin not to lose in the UKR will be another blow to the Western media credibility as their daily analysis assures us that the Russians are losing ….

  11. anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:

    Is there a Google translate to convert NY Timespeak into the truth?

    • Thanks: Charon
    • LOL: Hypnotoad666
  12. Beyond picking NYTs, what do you think of the speech?

    The Putin-obsessed seldom deal with what he actually says.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
  13. @Almost Missouri

    the Ukraine’s government’s bellicosity is at the behest of the White House,

    During negotiations in Instabul a few weeks ago Zelensky was saying he would agree to some form of neutrality. But the U.S. and U.K. apparently freaked out and told him he can’t do that and that Ukraine must fight on to “victory.” On the other hand, besides pumping out more propaganda, our military brain trust appears to have zero ideas about how to actually not lose the war.

    They keep pushing this absurd line that, unlike us, the Russians don’t know how to run a real military campaign. I can’t tell if they believe their own propaganda or if this is some psychological self-soothing technique.

  14. @YetAnotherAnon

    Some mainstream media sources did print Purim’s quote about Ukraine planning an invasion of Donbas and Crimea, but as with anything Putin says, the had the disclaimer “without presenting any evidence”. Only Russians and right-wingers are required to “present evidence”. Anything said by the left, the neocons, and Ukrainians can just be taken as the truth. They don’t need no stinking evidence.

    • Replies: @Redman
  15. Mike Tre says:

    Steve is there anything Putin might say that you wouldn’t criticize?

  16. @Dave Pinsen

    Some pundits were also predicting an official declaration of war against Ukraine (since what they are doing now is technically a special military operation… like Iraq was).

  17. I can’t tell if they believe their own propaganda or if this is some psychological self-soothing technique.

    They might just be playing along with the zeiteist – like in CRT and other cases. The military seems to be mentally almost like erverybody else (s. how they bow their heads to CRT …). Colonel Douglas Macgregor seems to be one of those old types they don’t have any more.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  18. @houston 1992

    do you think he will conquer all of the Ukraine?

    Yes, I believe Russia will conquer all of Ukraine. I believe this war will continue until American influence is purged from the entire European continent and Europe accepts its natural place as an economic partner of Russia.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @zundel
  19. @Greta Handel

    My upthread comment is being whimmed.

    {#15}

  20. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    that doesn’t seem an unfair summing up of the position.

    That’s a fair summation of Putin’s position but it’s also completely false. There were NO plans to invade Russia, no nuclear weapons in Ukraine. If Putin’s claims were true, a preemptive war might have been justified but what he stated was a complete fantasy. I don’t know which is scarier – that Putin really believes what he is saying or that he doesn’t.

    PS RT.com works just fine in the US.

  21. ic1000 says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I don’t know how this war is going; there are two narratives, and only one is broadly correct.

    It does seem that the issue will be decided on the battlefield.

    1905 redux scenario: The Ukrainian army and their NATO weapons will attrit the Russians to the point of irrelevance or collapse, and then who-knows-what.

    1943 redux scenario: With the Ukrainian army committed to their forward positions in the East, slow, methodical Russian encirclement efforts will create “cauldrons” that force mass surrenders, leading to a settlement on Russian terms.

    For 1905 updates, all I need is the NYT, NBC News, and default Twitter.

    1943 updates are harder to come by. Below the fold are two threads by one Erik Zimerman, a seemingly well-informed pro-Russian Israeli commenter (I think).

    [MORE]

    The start of a recent thread on the Donbass:

    Erik Zimerman @ZimermanErik
    6:24 PM · May 8, 2022

    Now that #Popasna has fallen & the #Siverskyi Donets has been crossed, #Russia is poised to finish the first dramatic encirclement of the war. Any UA troops not falling back to at least the Bakhmut-Siversk line & better the Slovyansk-Kramatorsk-Toretsk line will be surrounded.

    And from two days past, the opening tweets of a contrarian analysis on how the Biden/Austin/Blinken “fight to the last Ukrainian” war strategy may bear bitter fruit:

    9:37 PM · May 7, 2022

    The #Biden administration, #EU and much of the elite in the West think that that they are using #Ukrainian blood to weaken #Russia.

    Just some central bank stimulus, money out of thin air, providing support & weapons to #Ukraine whose soldiers will do the actual fighting.

    Some may even see parallels, in how American industry supported the Soviet destruction of the Wehrmacht. The Russians provided the endless blood to win WWII. If not they at least cynically use the #Ukraine media craze, built on illogical conclusions derived from false premises to leverage their uninformed citizens’ good will (or shallow need to virtue signal) to meet their strategic geopolitical ends. If a whole lot of Ukrainian and Russian soldiers die in the process, perhaps all the better they say.

  22. Jack D says:
    @Almost Missouri

    in favor of total conquest

    Putin may be in favor of total conquest but this is far beyond Russia’s actual current capabilities. Even their limited offensive in the east is going poorly and more NATO weapons arrive every day. Putin does not appear to intend to stop the war but neither is he making much progress.

    You are correct that Ukraine is not in favor of a “negotiated settlement” that rewards Russian military conquests with permanent territorial concessions. That’s a good way to turn this war into another interim round where Russia gets to digest what it has bitten off and then in a few years bite off another chunk.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
  23. @Dieter Kief

    The US military leadership seemed almost peevish about the order to withdraw from Afghanistan. They didn’t bother to plan a secure withdrawal, abandoning their toys on the way out and resulting in 13 lucky Marines winning the Last Man to Die Lotto.

    In other words, the US military has succumbed completely to Pournelle’s Iron Law. There may be a few islands of professionalism in the aviators’ and submariners’ corps and in special forces, but I imagine the bureaucrats are sharpening their knives for them as well.

    • Replies: @Colinsky
  24. Voltarde says:

    Why America fails to commemorate victory over the Nazis while Russia still celebrates

    8 May 2022 by Larry Johnson
    https://sonar21.com/why-america-fails-to-commemorate-victory-over-the-nazis-while-russia-still-celebrates/

    ” … I have written previously about the horror of Stalingrad–an estimated 478,741 Soviet personnel were killed or missing. In that one battle, the Soviet people (primarily Russian) endured more killed in action than the United States suffered in all the theaters from all services in World War II. …”

    About the author:
    “Larry C Johnson is a veteran of the CIA and the State Department’s Office of Counter Terrorism. He is the founder and managing partner of BERG Associates, which was established in 1998. Larry provided training to the US Military’s Special Operations community for 24 years. He has been vilified by the right and the left, which means he must be doing something right.”

  25. Paul Rise says:

    Wait … the wild internet rumors that Putin was going to nuke everyone or declare war on France weren’t true? Who could have guessed?

    OT – any idea why we never see any discussion of how covid is or isn’t impacting the outcome for either side in Ukraine war?

    • Replies: @HA
  26. Jack D says:
    @J

    Ukraine needs to bring the war home so that it is not only affects Ukraine but that it affects ordinary Russians. The war needs to be something that Russians don’t just see on TV in carefully edited clips (“over one thousand Russia soldiers dead so far”). Sanctions will do that to some extent and also there will be mysterious “explosions” and “fires” in Russian oil depots, military labs and so on.

    PS Putin seemed unwell today – sat like an old man with a blanket draped over his lap. Appeared very padded like he was wearing extra bullet proof gear. The flyovers cancelled due to “bad weather” even though it wasn’t – the same kind of bad weather that sunk the Moskva. Putin’s paranoia must be dialed up to 11 – he thought that Russia was being targeted by NATO even though it wasn’t. How must he feel now that it really is?

    Gerasimov nowhere to be seen. Is he leading at the front in Ukraine or was he really wounded last week? 10 or 12 Russian generals and 39 colonels killed so far – no country has suffered losses in its command structure like this since WWII. This has to affect not only morale but Russia’s actual fighting ability. And the officers must be afraid to use their comms for fear of being targeted further but how do you fight effectively without using them?

    • Thanks: Muggles
    • LOL: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    , @Voltarde
  27. @houston 1992

    do you think he will conquer all of the Ukraine? Then will he split NATO and offer Lviv back to Poland, and the Hungarian speaking region back to Hungary?

    I’ve thought of that, and it would be a funny—and not completely implausible—outcome, but, I think, not quite darkly funny enough for the Current Year.

    Still, that hasn’t stopped me from mischievously suggesting it to Hungarian and Polish acquaintances, as I shall also to any un-throned Hapsburg princes I run across.

  28. @anonymous

    Would need quantum computing, with more power than the world currently generates.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  29. @Jack D

    You sound

    Ukraine needs to bring the war home so that it is not only affects Ukraine but that it affects ordinary Russians. The war needs to be something that Russians don’t just see on TV in carefully edited clips (“over one thousand Russia soldiers dead so far”). Sanctions will do that to some extent and also there will be mysterious “explosions” and “fires” in Russian oil depots, military labs and so on.

    aroused.

    {#23}

    • LOL: JimDandy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
  30. Unbeknownst to many, Zelensky also gave a speech yesterday. It was very short and my fantastically well educated friend Mr. Frisby translated it for me. It went:

    “I should have listened to John Mearsheimer.”

  31. @Jack D

    There were NO plans to invade Russia, no nuclear weapons in Ukraine.

    The US has extensive plans to start wars on Russia’s borders, start a color revolution in Russia, bribe and buy Russian leaders, break Russia up into smaller weaker polities, and make Russia a political and economic vassal of the US. If I were a Russian I would consider that an invasion.
    But since I am an American, I just want my country to stay out of European affairs.

    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
  32. anon[284] • Disclaimer says:

    In the Telegraph’s broadcast of the whole parade, when Putin leaves the reviewing stand and walks along, he shows a marked lack of right arm swing to match the left, at times that should show symmetry. Combine this with that definitely undoctored video from several weeks ago, in which he gripped a table with his right hand and fidgeted a fair bit with his right foot, plus a video I’m a little less certain of that showed an outright pill-rolling tremor in his right hand.

    Parkinson’s disease almost always begins with strong lateralization. The table-grabbing ‘trick’ is well known for PD patients to reduce tremor.

    Writing as a neurologist and very longstanding Steve fan, I will state right here on his blog that I believe Putin has PD. If so, it’s rather early, most of the symptoms (but tremor not so much) can be well-controlled with levodopa, and it is unlikely to affect the next one or two years of his political career. Theoretically, he could continue to function pretty well as President for years after that, but if it becomes highly visible, even with entirely intact cognition, that would undermine confidence somewhat, especially in a civilization that does not share the West’s ‘cult of the broken.’

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  33. Mr Mox says:
    @Jack D

    PS RT.com works just fine in the US.

    Banned over here.

    Our European deciders has decided RT is not good for us. To watch RT you have to use a US proxy server. The funny (or sad) thing is that RT has quite a balanced and neutral view on most things IMHO. No doubt because they (had) to walk a narrow line as they were being scrutinized 24/7 by our “fact checkers”.

    Little good did it do them.

    I argued with a couple of “RT is pure lies & propaganda!” persons and challenged them to come up with an example of the lies – they couldn’t.

    I guess the problem with RT is they tell the inconvenient stories our deciders don’t want told.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Muggles
  34. Jack D says:
    @ic1000

    slow, methodical Russian encirclement efforts will create “cauldrons” that force mass surrenders, leading to a settlement on Russian terms

    Emphasis on “slow”. We are on day 75 of Putin’s two day war. Whenever you see the word “cauldron” , you can pretty much dismiss the writer as being in the tank for Putin. I’ve been hearing about how the Ukrainian army is going to get caught in a cauldron any day now for months and yet it never seems to actually happen. If anyone is getting encircled in Ukraine, it’s Russian forces – they are the ones in hostile country with extended supply lines and weak logistics. The set piece battles with opposing tank forces maneuvering WWII style which video game fans would love to see never seem to happen – instead a Russian tank or two gets picked off here by a drone, there by a Javelin, in another spot by indirect fire, etc. – they just get eaten up bit by bit but after a while the bits really add up (638 Russian tanks lost so far, along with thousands of other fighting vehicles and for every destroyed APC you have a dead or wounded crew). Ukraine is a really big country (for Europe) and if you spread 80,000 troops over a 300 mile long front you are spread pretty thin.

    https://www.oryxspioenkop.com/2022/02/attack-on-europe-documenting-equipment.html

    You can infer the situation on the battlefield from the pronouncement of the Ukrainian leadership at the bargaining table. When their prognosis seemed grim, the Ukrainians appeared to be willing to make various concession but as their confidence has increased they are less and less willing to offer the Russians any concessions.

    Maybe they are overconfident but I don’t think time is on the Russian’s side here. Putin has not committed to a general mobilization so he has to fight with the forces and equipment he already has and these forces grow weaker every day while NATO pours more and more equipment into the Ukrainian side.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @anon
  35. HA says:
    @HammerJack

    “Almost a master class in subtle propagandizing.”

    You forgot about the poor shelled children of Donbass — 14 thousand of them! To be fair, Putin and the Russians seem to have forgotten them, too, but the useful idiots can’t seem to stop yammering about them.

    Let’s see what nearby residents of Donbass have to say:

    KRYVYI RIH, Ukraine — The solicitation to commit treason came to Oleksandr Vilkul on the second day of the war, in a phone call from an old colleague.

    Vilkul, the scion of a powerful political family in southeastern Ukraine that was long seen as harboring pro-Russian views, took the call as Russian troops were advancing to within a few miles of his hometown, Kryvyi Rih.

    “He said, ‘Oleksandr Yurivich, you are looking at the map, you see the situation is predetermined,’” Vilkul said,…

    “Sign an agreement of friendship, cooperation and defense with Russia and they will have good relations with you,..You will be a big person in the new Ukraine.”

    The offer failed spectacularly…“I responded with profanity,” Vilkul said… [I.e. not one thought about the poor shelled children of Donbass. Heartless!]

    The Kremlin entered the war expecting a quick and painless victory, predicting that the government of President Volodymyr Zelenskyy would fracture and that leading officials in the largely Russian-speaking eastern region would gladly switch sides. That has not happened.

    The political myopia was most significant in the country’s east, political analysts say.

    In all but a tiny number of villages, Russia failed to flip local politicians to its side. […they forgot to say “despite the cruel shelling the children of Donbass endured for EIGHT YEARS I TELL YOU!] Ukrainian authorities have opened 38 cases of treason, all targeting low-level officials in individual instances of betrayal.

    “Nobody wanted to be part of that thing behind the wall,” said Kostyantyn Usov, a former member of Parliament from Kryvyi Rih, referring to Russia’s isolated, authoritarian system.

    He said that system had dismal appeal in Ukraine and noted the absence of widespread collaboration with Russia, including among Ukrainians who speak Russian and share the country’s cultural values.

    “We are part of something bright,” he said of Ukraine. “It is here, with us, in our group. And they have nothing to offer.”

    …Along with leaders in the southeast, Ukrainian people also resisted. Street protests against occupation in Kherson continue despite lethal dangers for participants. One man stood in front of a tank. Kryvyi Rih’s miners and steelworkers have shown no signs of pivoting allegiance to Russia.

    “Before the war, we had ties to Russia,” said Serhiy Zhyhalov, 36, a steel mill engineer, referring to familial, linguistic and cultural bonds. But no longer, he said. “No one has any doubts that Russia attacked us.”

    Ukraine’s southeastern regions, an expanse of steppe and blighted industrial and mining cities, is now the focus of fighting in the war….The region for years elected Russian-leaning politicians such as Vilkul, a favorite villain to Ukrainian nationalists for promoting Soviet-style cultural events that angered many Ukrainians…Vilkul ascended in politics under the former, pro-Russian president, Viktor Yanukovych, in whose government he served as deputy prime minister until street protesters deposed Yanukovych in 2014.

    Much of the rest of Yanukovych’s Cabinet fled with him to Russia. But Vilkul remained in Ukraine as a de facto political boss of Kryvyi Rih while his aging father served as the city’s mayor.

    And he caught Moscow’s eye. In 2018, Vilkul said, he was told through an intermediary that “the time of chaos is over” and that he should now follow orders from Moscow if he wished to remain in politics in the southeast. He said he refused.

    The Russians, he said, had not even bothered to court him, they only leveled demands. He said Moscow took the same approach to other politicians in Ukraine’s east. “They didn’t even try to convince us,” he said. “They just thought we would be, a priori, on their side.”

    On the eve of the war, Vilkul was most likely the Russian-leaning politician in Ukraine with the broadest popular support. “I was alone on this level,” he said. He was also viewed by Moscow as a promising potential convert to its side when it invaded Ukraine.

    That’s when the call came to Vilkul’s cellphone from Vitaly Zakharchenko, a Ukrainian in exile in Russia who had served as interior minister under Vilkul in Yanukovych’s government. He recommended Vilkul cooperate with the Russians.

    “I told him to get lost,” Vilkul said. “I didn’t even consider it.”

    Vilkul said he had been misunderstood — by Russia’s leadership and his nationalist opposition at home. A great-grandfather, he said, had fought White Russians in the civil war. The Vilkul family, he said, “has been fighting Russians on this land for a hundred years.”

    The Kremlin, he said, had misinterpreted his respect for World War II veterans and support for rights of Russian speakers as potential support for a renewed Russian empire, something he said was a mistake. He called the Russians “classic megalomaniacs.”

    “They mistook common language and values like attitudes to the Second World War and Orthodoxy as a sign that somebody loves them,” he said.

    A second offer, this time presented publicly by another Ukrainian exile, Oleh Tsaryov, in a post on Telegram, came about a week later, when Russian troops had advanced to within 6 miles of the city. “My fellow party members and I have always taken a pro-Russian stance,” the post said, referring to Vilkul and his father, and added ominously that “cooperation with the Russian army means preserving the city and lives.”

    Vilkul responded with an obscene post on Facebook…

    Vilkul has taken to wearing fatigues and a camouflage bandanna. A parade of Ukrainian nationalists, including the leader of the Right Sector paramilitary, Dmytro Yarosh,… once sworn enemies of the Vilkul family, have shown up in his office to shake his hand.

    “If we fight the Russians,” he said, “were we ever really pro-Russian, in essence?”

  36. @Dave Pinsen

    > while minimizing Russian casualties.

    No, they are not exactly minimal. Ukraine is good at letting the Ruskis bleed.

  37. Forbes says:
    @anonymous

    Is there a Google translate to convert NY Timespeak into the truth?

    Assume the opposite, and you won’t be far off…

  38. @YetAnotherAnon

    Why are fans of Putin so defensive? No one is saying you are a fan of gay porn- a lot of Putin fans are of course- but your, no doubt bountiful, porn collection is undoubtedly mostly hetero. though if i had to guess it features a large amount of bruthas. Virulent anti-Americanism and interracial porn are two peas in a pod.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon, Charon
    • Replies: @Coemgen
  39. keypusher says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    No “mission accomplished” moment, and no mobilization announcement, so those two Western predictions didn’t pan out.

    There’s nothing good to say about how the war is going from Russia’s perspective, so he didn’t say anything. How we interpret speeches tends to depend on our priors.

    • Thanks: HA
  40. @Jack D

    He’s in the UK, tovarish.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  41. @ic1000

    I can’t see Russia wanting Lvov etc – or Poland either. The EU would love an excuse to give the Poles a kick.

  42. HA says:
    @ic1000

    “With the Ukrainian army committed to their forward positions in the East, slow, methodical Russian encirclement efforts will create ‘cauldrons’ that force mass surrenders, leading to a settlement on Russian terms.”

    Yeah, that cauldron word gets used a lot, and it’s downright appropriate in the case of Mariupol, but elsewhere it seems to be applied more tenuously. Of course, I’m not the esteemed military analyst that Scott Ritter is, so I’ll let him have a say. This was the Scott Ritter on Apr 18: “now Russia is getting ready to launch Phase II and I think we’re about to see the wisdom of the Russian strategic decision to shape the battlefield in the way that they did…just yesterday, we had a thousand Ukrainian marines surrender; the day before it was 200. In the days to come, you’re going to see 5,000…10,000 Ukrainian troops surrendered at a time because they’re caught up in a cauldron they can’t escape.”

    I guess I missed that 5-10K/day surrender in the slew of propaganda related to Putin’s upcoming speech. But hold on. Don’t anyone think that means the invasion has STALLED. No, that, again, is just crude Western propaganda. The correct term, according to Ritter is that “the Russians are going VERY SLOW”, because their victory is so inescapable, well, at some point they’re bound to ask themselves why even bother continuing? Or something like that. According to Ritter, those massive weapons NATO countries have agreed to send just aren’t going to make it to the front, because there’s just no point and the supply lines have already been strangled inside these “cauldrons”. In fact, in and around Kharkiv, the Russians are apparently going so slow they’re actually retreating and burning bridges behind them, because they’re so convinced they’ve already won, so that they know that when they return, the locals will just welcome them back, having learned their lesson. Or something.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  43. anon[138] • Disclaimer says:

    http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/transcripts/68366

    Last December we proposed signing a treaty on security guarantees. Russia urged the West to hold an honest dialogue in search for meaningful and compromising solutions, and to take account of each other’s interests. All in vain.

    US-Ukraine Charter on Strategic Partnership

    https://www.state.gov/u-s-ukraine-charter-on-strategic-partnership/

    Or how non-NATO Ukraine was becoming a partner rather than a member of NATO, to fight to their death for their right to beg to become a member which they were also told wouldn’t happen, and was subsequently refused. They retained the right to go on asking.

    But the US is not at war with Russia. Although there are increasing calls for the US to get more and more involved. If our leaders want anything short of destroying Russia to be a loss for the US, they have come close to achieving it.

    An hysterical info war in the Western media is increasingly tiresome and boring. People are rapidly losing interest. And enthusiasm for US sanctions which aren’t working, yet are costly to our allies as well as citizens have only been to pile up.

    Once again, the US jumps into someone else’s conflict that will end badly. Not that Ibsee Russia winning in a meaningful way, but rather the US has positioned itself for failure through its self inflicted excesses.

    And the original point of the post…being that original sources are available and more understandable than accounts of them in our mainstream media.

  44. Bert says:

    Following up on my Tora Tora Tora stock market warning of November 22, today on Victory Day, I proclaim a respite from the hellish dive bombing the market has endured for four months. The “victory” is more likely a pause sideways before the next pounding.

    Yes, they are.

  45. HA says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    “the ruble is 26% higher than when he launched the invasion,…

    Case closed, right? And why don’t you ask Sergei in the trench coat and dark sunglasses back in the alleys behind the Kremlin about that? You think he’ll let those dollars go at the accepted exchange rate? From Reuters (now in partnership with TASS!)

    The White House on Thursday said Moscow was artificially “propping up” the rouble, and the role of official measures in the recovery is easy to pinpoint.

    In response to the sweeping sanctions, Russia ramped up interest rates to 20%, restricted local firms’ access to foreign currency cash, barred citizens from withdrawing more than \$10,000 in foreign currency for six months, and stopped banks from selling hard currency in cash.

    Foreign investors have been banned from exiting securities, limiting the scramble to dump roubles, and President Vladimir Putin on Thursday demanded that foreign buyers pay in roubles for Russian gas from April 1.

    …Part of the rouble recovery is however genuine: currencies can perform well even if an economy is tanking, as long as the balance of payment position is improving…

    IIF chief economist Robin Brooks acknowledged questions about the rouble move were legitimate given capital controls, though he deemed the recovery “genuine”, pointing to fellow oil exporter Kazakhstan’s currency, which has recouped half its post-invasion losses.

    In the longer term, the rouble’s fortunes look less favourable.

    Ostracism from the West is likely to mean fewer buyers for Russia’s exports, and should oil prices tumble the rouble will struggle. With half its \$640 billion of gold and foreign exchange reserves frozen, Russia has less much scope to defend the currency.

    So as with most everything else about this war, it’s a case of “I guess we’ll see” whether efforts to artificially prop up the dollar will last longer than efforts to artificially prop up the rouble. And once the inevitable recession/slowdown hits, that won’t impact oil prices at all, I expect. Nah, that never happens. By the way, that’s why it makes sense for the Russian invasion to slow down. It totally does. The logic, I’m told, is inescapable.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    , @Kratoklastes
  46. JimB says:
    @neutral

    As least they know Putin in charge, no such thing can be expected from a US president ever, they know that it is increasingly just a ceremonial role with all the real decision making done by a hidden group of people that answer to nobody.

    The hidden group of people answer to the billionaire oligarchs, progressive NGOs, military lobbyists, and international corporate boards.

  47. anon[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Then you don’t have to argue so hard, Jack. Ukraine is just mopping up after months of victories.

  48. @Dave Pinsen

    He seems content to let his armed forces methodically inch forward as they pummel Ukrainian troops with artillery, while minimizing Russian casualties.

    The Ukrainians are making the Russkie soldier bleed for Putin every day.

    US M777 howitzers now in battle.

    Frog CAESAR 155mm Self-Propelled Howitzers

    Kraut Panzerhaubitze 2000 to Ukies

    Look at that, a pulsejet powered missile!

  49. Dumbo says:

    Perhaps just there wasn’t all that much to say?

    The campaign to take over the Donbass appears to be going well, and the Ukrainians should have negotiated from the beginning. Now they will be half-destroyed, poorer, and probably still without the Donbass. It all seems a waste. All those dead people, all those billions of dollars in weapons, when negotiations from the beginning would have been better. America and NATO also should have stayed out of this mess.

    As for Google Translate, it improved a lot, but still far from perfect. For some languages it appears better than for others. Russian, surprisingly, it appears to translate quite well, but it has more difficulty with French and Italian for some reason.

    Video and audio translation (captions) is still very basic and not too good.

  50. JimB says:

    Putin doesn’t need to announce anything. John Mearsheimer stated Russia’s goals in plain English eight years ago. Either Ukraine adopts a position of total neutrality with respect to NATO, or the Russian military will wreck the country. So while Ukrainian nationalists try to hold off Russia’s armored columns with hand held weapons, Zelensky and his mafia cronies are selling off billions in US humanitarian aid and military equipment on the black markets of Europe. I suspect the US military knows this but doesn’t care. The fraud will go on until Joe Biden’s goose is cooked. Then Zelensky will zip off to Tel Aviv where he will live happily ever after, funding a celebrity lifestyle with his Cayman Island bank accounts.

    The point of the Ukraine war is easy to see. The US wants to deplete it’s stockpile of portable weapons which would be most useful to Taiwan against a Chinese invasion. That way, Biden can say to the Taiwanese “oops, we’d like to help but we’re skint.” In this way he accommodates both Biden family paymasters, the CCP and the Ukrainian/Soros regime in Kiev.

  51. Jack D says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I understand. That’s why I specified that it works in the US. Maybe the UK is now behind a digital Iron Curtain like Russia has tried to put up though I doubt it. More likely the cyberwarriors are attacking RT.com with DDOS – today they hacked Russian cable and satellite providers so the program guide read:

    “On your hands is the blood of thousands of Ukrainians and their hundreds of murdered children. TV and the authorities are lying. No to war”

    If he is that eager to read Russian propaganda, he can buy a VPN like millions of Russians have done so they can get something OTHER than Russian propaganda:

    https://www.techradar.com/news/vpn-downloads-in-russia-have-skyrocketed

    I can save him the cost of the VPN though. Whatever happens, RT.com will say that it’s not Russia’s fault. It’s never Russia’s fault. They are the dindu nothings of the international world. A school is hit by a Russian airstrike and 60 children are murdered – must be a false flag attack. Or maybe it’s fake news and didn’t happen at all.

  52. Mr. Anon says:

    I’ll just leave Jack D and HA to hash this out, as they are ones who are so personally invested in this war between two foreign countries, neither of which are my own.

  53. keypusher says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    During negotiations in Instabul a few weeks ago Zelensky was saying he would agree to some form of neutrality. But the U.S. and U.K. apparently freaked out and told him he can’t do that and that Ukraine must fight on to “victory.”

    The latest Putin party line seems to be that Zelensky really wants to surrender but Boris Johnson and Joe Biden said keep fighting, so the Ukrainians saluted and dived head first back into the meat grinder.

    The Ukrainians are fighting because they want to. Our erstwhile Afghan allies didn’t want to, so they didn’t.

    Like most things in this war, this isn’t complicated.

  54. keypusher says:
    @ic1000

    1943 redux scenario: With the Ukrainian army committed to their forward positions in the East, slow, methodical Russian encirclement efforts will create “cauldrons” that force mass surrenders, leading to a settlement on Russian terms.

    I first recall hearing the term “cauldron” (kessel) used in connection with the surrounded 6th Army at Stalingrad. I don’t recall it being used re encirclements generally in World War II, but I was generally reading secondary sources in English, so maybe I just missed it.

    The term has really come into its own in this war, but examples of it on the ground, as opposed to on the internet, have been pretty much nonexistent. (I don’t think Mariupol qualifies; it’s a siege of a fairly small defensive force, not the encirclement of an army.)

    And “slow, methodical encirclement” is a contradiction in terms. You need to move faster than your enemy in order to encircle him, as the Soviets did at Stalingrad and the Germans did on a number of occasions. I would be amazed if the Russians achieved any actual cauldrons in this war, given how slow their advances have been. Even if the long-awaited encirclement in the Donbass finally occurred, which i don’t expect to see, the Ukrainians would have plenty of time to retreat.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  55. JimB says:

    By the way, here’s food for thought. If the Russian military are such ass-clowns, incapable of defeating a single weak, corrupt former soviet bloc country, why is the EU shitting bricks and doubling defense spending? Why are Finland and Sweden, after decades of nonchalant independence, desperate to crowd into the NATO alliance? Most likely because the Russian military is a slowly plodding doomsday machine backed up by infinite energy and material resources and a gargantuan pile of conventional weapons. They may not get the job done fast, especially when they they are opposed by fanatical Slavs, but I suspect they will cut through the girlymen armies of Western Europe like butter. And the longer the Russian army stays in the field, the more experienced they will get.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  56. @HA

    Yes, one thing all the pro-Russian leftists want to ignore is that life under Russian rule simply sucks. 2014 became the bright dividing line in Ukrainian history because any Russian-speaking Ukrainian who compared life in Poland, Czechia or Lithuania to life in Donbass or Crimea saw very quickly that the choice was very simple – life in the EU is better in every respect.

    Igor Girkin has made this point repeatedly. Instead of trying to invest in Donbass and making it an attractive places to live, Russia simply handed the territory over to criminals.

    Putin’s greatest error over the past 20 years has been how he has squandered Russia’s cultural and economic soft power.

  57. @Peter Akuleyev

    Life under Ukrainian rule sucks as well. That Slavs just kind of suck at the whole idea of ordered liberty doesn’t really prove anything.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  58. @HA

    Russia’s path to victory at this point basically consists of sitting tight for the next six months and trying to dig in. If Ukraine can’t dislodge Russian troops than eventually the Europeans will tire of the whole mess and want their cheap gas back, the Ukrainian economy will buckle since the coast is blockaded, and there is a good chance the new GOP Congress in 2023 will be much less enthusiastic about helping Ukraine than Biden is. Not a great strategy, since it requires Russia to feed a steady stream of conscripts into the meat grinder, and it is not particularly glamorous, but it has a decent shot of putting Ukraine into a position where Zelensky will be forced to negotiate. Over the longer run time is still probably on Russia’s side if they can stop seeking the quick kill.

    • Replies: @HA
  59. @Dave Pinsen

    while minimizing Russian casualties

    That is: with respect to your remark.

    There’s nothing funny about how many Russians have died, and who are going to die.

    But go on writing bro I’m sure you know WTF you’re talking about.

  60. keypusher says:
    @JimB

    So while Ukrainian nationalists try to hold off Russia’s armored columns with hand held weapons, Zelensky and his mafia cronies are selling off billions in US humanitarian aid and military equipment on the black markets of Europe. I suspect the US military knows this but doesn’t care. The fraud will go on until Joe Biden’s goose is cooked. Then Zelensky will zip off to Tel Aviv where he will live happily ever after, funding a celebrity lifestyle with his Cayman Island bank accounts.

    These posts that could have been written — hell, many were written — on February 24 have a special place in my heart.

    Have you been in a coma since Invasion Day?

  61. @JimB

    The US wants to deplete it’s stockpile of portable weapons which would be most useful to Taiwan against a Chinese invasion.

    WASHINGTON ― Lockheed Martin aims to nearly double production for Javelin anti-tank missiles from 2,100 to 4,000 per year, but it needs the supply chain to “crank up,” according to its chief executive.

    As the U.S. sends Javelins from its own military stockpiles to Ukraine’s fight against Russia, Lockheed is boosting Javelin production ― but getting to its goal could take as long as a couple of years, Jim Taiclet said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

    “We’re endeavoring to take that up to 4,000 per year, and that will take a number of months, maybe even a couple of years to get there because we have to get our supply chain to also crank up,” Taiclet said. “We think we can almost double the capacity in a reasonable amount of time.”

    Congress can help by passing the Bipartisan Innovation Act to invest in domestic design, manufacturing and testing of microprocessors, to reduce reliance on foreign supplies, Taiclet said. Each Javelin contains 250 microprocessors, and Lockheed more broadly is collaborating with chipmaker Intel, he added.

    https://www.defensenews.com/industry/2022/05/09/lockheed-aiming-to-double-javelin-production-seeks-supply-chain-crank-up/#:~:text=Industry-,Lockheed%2C%20aiming%20to%20double%20Javelin%20production,seeks%20supply%20chain%20’crank%20up’&text=WASHINGTON%20%E2%80%95%20Lockheed%20Martin%20aims%20to,according%20to%20its%20chief%20executive.

    MIC has gotten the message.

  62. Catdog says:
    @Jack D

    There were NO plans to invade Russia, no nuclear weapons in Ukraine.

    How can you definitively claim that?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  63. Colinsky says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I didn’t know Pournelle’s Iron Law:
    In any bureaucracy, the people devoted to the benefit of the bureaucracy itself always get in control and those dedicated to the goals that the bureaucracy is supposed to accomplish have less and less influence, and sometimes are eliminated entirely.

  64. @keypusher

    And “slow, methodical encirclement” is a contradiction in terms. You need to move faster than your enemy in order to encircle him

    That is true only when your enemy is smart enough and mobile enough to pull up stakes and retreat in a hurry. But the Ukrainians are dug in deep and are apparently under “no retreat” orders to defend every inch of ground at all costs. I recently learned that the front in the East consists of a mini-Maginot Line of trenches that the Ukrainians built over the last 8-years.

    As to “cauldron,” the term was commonly used in WWII Eastern Front military histories that I had read, so I knew what it referred to and didn’t think twice when it started coming up now. But it seems to trigger some people.

    In German the word Kessel (literally a cauldron) is commonly used to refer to an encircled military force, and a Kesselschlacht (cauldron battle) refers to a pincer movement. The common tactic which would leave a Kessel is referred to Keil and Kessel (Keil means wedge). Kessel is a loanword in English texts about World War II. Another use of Kessel is to refer to Kessel fever, the panic and hopelessness felt by any troops who were surrounded with little or no chance of escape.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocket_(military)#Kessel

  65. @Hypnotoad666

    They keep pushing this absurd line that, unlike us, the Russians don’t know how to run a real military campaign

    Most grunts will tell you it’s the question of “who sucks less”.

    Until this brilliant move by Putin (sarc) – we had no idea.

    Now: no one, who knows what they are talking about, has any questions. It’s a settled matter.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  66. Steve, thanks for putting up a Russia-Ukraine War post, so everyone can air their deep emotional commitments to whatever side they are on … without actually having to go over there to fight.

    For myself, I’m an opponent of imperialism whoever’s doing it. The US, the Brits, the French, the Germans, the Japanese, the Chinese and yes, even the poor misunderstood Russians. People of any nation should govern themselves.

    I feel bad all the Ukrainians and hope they can prevail and preserve their right to govern their nation. But also feel bad for the Russian boys being sucked into this. My advice: grab your girlfriend and head to Canada. (Ok, maybe that doesn’t work so well over there. Shame they don’t have somewhere handy to leave to.)

    Meanwhile on America’s southern border … something that will actually affect the future my kids, and their kids will have.

  67. @HammerJack

    No pregnant lady or crying baby? They’re slipping.

    By the way, how did Steve miss the kerfuffel about Lavrov claiming Hitler was 1/4 Jewish, by way of proving there is nothing inconsistent about Zelensky being a Jewish Nazi. Jerusalem Post pre-fact checked the claim as true! (maybe).

    In 2019 the Jerusalem Post reported of new research on the issue:

    [A] study by psychologist and physician Leonard Sax has shed new light supporting the claim that Hitler’s father’s father had Jewish roots.
    The study, titled “Aus den Gemeinden von Burgenland: Revisiting the question of Adolf Hitler’s paternal grandfather,” which was published in the current issue of the Journal of European Studies, examines claims by Hitler’s lawyer Hans Frank, who allegedly discovered the truth.

    Hitler asked Frank to look into the claim in 1930, after his nephew William Patrick Hitler threatened to expose that the leader’s grandfather was Jewish.

    In his 1946 memoir, which was published seven years after he was executed during the Nuremberg trials, “Frank claimed to have uncovered evidence in 1930 that Hitler’s paternal grandfather was a Jewish man living in Graz, Austria, in the household where Hitler’s grandmother was employed,” and it was in 1836 that Hitler’s grandmother Maria Anna Schicklgruber became pregnant, Sax explained.

    Sax writes in the study that according to the letters in Frank’s memoir, “Frankenberger Sr. sent money for the support of the child from infancy until its 14th birthday.”

    “The motivation for the payment, according to Frank, was not charity but primarily a concern about the authorities becoming involved: ‘The Jew paid without a court order, because he was concerned about the result of a court hearing and the connected publicity,’” the letters state.

    https://www.moonofalabama.org/2022/05/on-lavrovs-spat-with-israel-who-is-right.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @AnotherDad
  68. keypusher says:

    That is true only when your enemy is smart enough and mobile enough to pull up stakes and retreat in a hurry.

    No, actually “you need to move faster than your enemy to encircle him” is true 100% of the time.

    But the Ukrainians are dug in deep and are apparently under “no retreat” orders to defend every inch of ground at all costs.

    So they’ll just sit there while the Russians v e r y s l o w l y surround them? Makes perfect sense. If the Russians ever actually begin moving forward, I guess we’ll find out.

  69. Anon[127] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Have you noticed what’s happening in the stock market? It looks like higher interest rates are wiping out options traders. There are stupid options traders that borrow money to trade options, but that means when interest rates go up, they have to make a higher profit from their trading just to cover their interest payments. Since options traders already have a to pay a fee to trade, known as a premium, it’s getting harder and harder for them to trade options at all. If rates go up to an historical 4%, that plus the premium with make a lot of options traders disappear, and the stock market will trade like it did back in the 1950s, with the casino aspect gone and overinflated stock values gone. Warren Buffett will be happy.

    But the interesting thing is, a lot of traders own Bitcoin. When their trades go bad if they’re trading options, they have to come up with a lot of money very fast to cover their debts, and they’re selling everything they’ve got, including their Bitcoin. Bitcoin has been crashing like it’s doing a bank run for the past week, except there’s no FDIC to save Bitcoin holders. It’s not pegged to anything in the real world. It could go to zero if there’s a complete loss of faith in it.

  70. HA says:
    @Paul Rise

    “why we never see any discussion of how covid is or isn’t impacting the outcome for either side in Ukraine war?”

    Of course not — “chemo-brain” is only useful to the fanboys and their ilk if it can be used to dismiss Sailer’s deplorable tendency to treat COVID as something that actually exists (unlike, say, “chemo-brain”).

    But with regard to COVID itself, it does get frequently lumped in alongside Putin’s numerous other health concerns:

    Over the years there have been several rumours about Vladimir Putin’ s health, with reports suggesting that he is suffering from cancer and Parkinson’s disease – and more recently that he’s been affected by ‘brain fog’ due to long Covid.

    Apparently, “chemo-brain” is something that real he-men like Putin are immune to.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  71. @Mr Mox

    I guess the problem with RT is they tell the inconvenient stories our deciders don’t want told.

    That can also be said of al-Jazeera and the Daily Mail. All have their flaws, too, but nowhere near as bad as our media’s.

  72. 30k dead Russians and we still have pathetic the pro-Putin contingent telling us that everything is going just fine. The 72 hour special military operation is a success.

    The same contingent that told us the war would never happen and the CIA was just trying to antagonize Putin. We were also told that “the Jews” would somehow be the losing party even though Israel is profiting from the war since they aren’t expected to impose energy sanctions.

    Next time don’t bet on a dictator that wears shoe steppers and doesn’t allow an open internet.

    Putin may be worth 135 billion but he is still a loser incel. In an alternate world he would be still be a paper pushing bureaucrat that resents women. He was never in charge of the KGB or even an agent. He was a mid level government worker and nothing more.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    , @Wokechoke
  73. HA says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    “If Ukraine can’t dislodge Russian troops than eventually the Europeans will tire of the whole mess and want their cheap gas back… Not a great strategy, since it requires Russia to feed a steady stream of conscripts into the meat grinder…”

    I take your point, though I myself don’t think Putin cares all that much about how many men he loses (any more than he cares about how many Ukrainians die). It’s a feature, not a bug, since the survivors are that much more likely to regard their sons as cruel victims of neo-fascists and NATO — something large and heroic like that — than of something as pathetically trivial and meaningless as his own aggrandizement. Besides, his soldiers are disproportionately central Asian and other outlander yokels (i.e., he regards them almost as sub-human and expendable as Ukrainians), so, really, no big loss. I mean, Putin did forego a mass mobilization, so that means he must care at least a little about manpower attrition, but he has to keep a card in his pocket for the actual NATO invasion that he’s trying so hard to bring about.

    Moreover, “No Ukrainian counter-offensive [is] expected before mid-June, presidential adviser says”. That’s because, unlike super-human Russian conscripts, who can transition in a flash from “they told us it would just be some military training exercise” to WWIII-levels of readiness, those sub-par-IQ Ukrainians need several weeks to learn how to use those fancy toys the West finally decided to send them (though they’ll probably never make it to the front anyway, since I’ve been assured by the fanboys that just about the only remaining supply line that hasn’t been completely cut off is reserved for Western politicians and celebrities coming to Kiev to film promos and selfies and that’s obviously occupied 24/7.) So, like everything else, it remains to be seen what effect that and the sanctions and everything else will eventually have.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  74. Voltarde says:
    @Jack D

    “Ukraine needs to bring the war home so that it is not only affects Ukraine but that it affects ordinary Russians. …”

    The oligarchs who control the Ukraine have “brought the war home” to anyone–especially Ukrainian citizens–who want to live in peace with Russia.

    BURNT ALIVE IN ODESSA. Documentary

    The oligarch-funded Azov Nazi goons that burnt >40 Ukrainian anti-Maidan protestors alive in Odessa are the same oligarch-funded thugs who opened fire at the Maidan during the 2014 coup in Kiev.

    Watch the video carefully. After some of the Odessa anti-Maidan protestors jumped from windows to escape the fire, the Azov Nazis clubbed the wounded to death with pieces of rebar and metal pipes. Not only have none of the thugs ever been charged for their crimes in Odessa in 2014; the leaders of this pogrom were subsequently rewarded with senior leadership roles in the Ukrainian military and internal security services.

    These same thugs were used by the oligarchs in Ukraine to make sure that Zelensky renounced his 2019 election campaign pledge to adhere to the Minsk agreements that the Ukraine had signed earlier, and thereby achieve a peaceful compromise with Russia.

    • Replies: @HA
  75. ‘Putin not only praised the achievement of the Soviet people during World War II, but also addressed the Kremlin’s reasons for the ongoing conflict between Moscow and Kiev. Russia had to act because a large-scale offensive against the breakaway republics in the eastern Donbass region was being planned, he claimed.

    I doubt it.

    “We saw the military infrastructure unfolding [in Ukraine]; hundreds of foreign advisers starting their work; there were regular deliveries of the most modern weapons from NATO countries. The danger grew every day,” the president explained.

    That’s true.

    “Russia gave a preemptive rebuff to aggression – this was a forced, timely and the only right decision by a sovereign, strong and independent country,” he added, referring to the launch of the military operation.’

    Not really.

    “Despite all the disagreements in international relations, Russia has always advocated the creation of a system of equal and indivisible security,” Putin continued.

    Possibly.

    ‘He cited Moscow’s attempts to engage in dialogue on security guarantees with Washington late last year, which failed to yield results.

    Very true. It was Putin that started this war — but we gave him a helpful push. Let’s give ourselves a pat on the back.

    “NATO countries didn’t want to hear us, which means that, in fact, they harbored completely different plans, and we saw it,” he elaborated. There were open preparations for a punitive operation in the Donbass and “an invasion of our historical lands, including Crimea,” Putin insisted, adding that Kiev also announced plans to restore its nuclear capabilities.’

    Yes on one, no on two and three.

    Compared to the Biden administration, pretty honest.

    Just for reference, should we get tired of the war, everything that implies Russia will take over Ukraine — or even convert it into another Belarus — is conspicuously missing. There’s nothing about the Ukraine ‘really’ being part of Russia, nothing about the need to denazify it, and it would appear that merely capping Ukraine’s level of armaments would suffice.

  76. anon[346] • Disclaimer says:

    The biggest deal in that speech is, amid the evocation of total war in WWII, the line “there is no place in the world for torturers, death squads and Nazis.”

    CIA’s core competences. The СБРФ knows who they’re fighting.

  77. @Almost Missouri

    No need to conquer all of Ukraine. Anyway, that’s beyond Russia’s capabilities and not in its interests.
    All it has to do is destroy the Ukrainian army in the Donbas. Once completed, Ukraine will have lost most of its forces. Even now, it is calling up middle-aged reservists, and trying to get them to the frontline.

    Ukraine will have a choice – capitulation or continuation. I don’t see the latter. By then the very heavy Ukrainian losses – and the military strategy that caused them – will be absorbing the Ukrainian public. The Ukrainian economy will be imploding, as Russia continues to bomb the oil distilleries and electricity substations. Popular unrest will force Zelensky and his puppets to flee abroad. He will be replaced by a Government that will negotiate with the Russians and ultimately capitulate.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  78. @The Anti-Gnostic

    Life under Ukrainian rule sucks as well. That Slavs just kind of suck at the whole idea of ordered liberty doesn’t really prove anything.

    The Ukrainians are at least not ruled by a dictator and have an open press and internet.

    They can vote out Zelenskyy if they so choose. Real men aren’t afraid of competition.

    Weak little men poison the opposition and feel threatened by the internet.

    Liberals and Putin agree: The state needs to control the internet and press. We can’t let people discuss reality openly.

    Your argument is weak if you need to control the medium.

  79. It doesn’t make sense to argue with the people who support Ukraine. They do not understand.

    Anyway this is not “the Putin’s invasion” – Putin is who had been holding the people back for eight years, and he is still holding them back now. The war should have begun seven years ago.

    The Russians are winning, like they always do, but Putin is missing the historical chance to undo the damage which had been done before him.

    He is the enemy of the people. He belongs to prison.

  80. HA says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Life under Ukrainian rule sucks as well.”

    Oh, it can always be worse — i.e. DONBASS worse:

    Nothing de-russified East Ukraine so quickly and irreversibly as the Donbass catastrophe. I’m not talking about the war, I’m talking about a general socio-economic conditions there. Under Russian control, Donbass fall under the rule of the criminal gangs, presented as the “levy”. They were usually guys from below the social hierarchy who saw this war as a chance to rise up. And they did. With their power unchecked, they started systematic plunder. Take people’s homes, cars, businesses, kill those who object. Arrest someone, torture and release for ransom. It’s not only how much these guys stole, it’s how much they destroyed. If a normal Russian bureaucrat might destroy 10 rubles of value to steal 1, these guys would destroy 10 000. They destroyed Donbass economy, inflicted the socio-economic collapse and humanitarian catastrophe... You could sell this Donbass catastrophe as a Ukrainian problem to Russians or to the Westerners. But it was impossible to present it as such to the Ukrainians. People in Kharkiv, Sumy, Mariupol saw that nothing comparable is happening on territories under the Ukrainian control. East Ukrainians saw that the Russian-controlled zone turned into a nightmare with warlord gangs robbing, killing and torturing. With no protection and no security. With no employment either, because businesses were destroyed by pro-Russian warlords. You could join them or starve.

    Putin manufactured Donbass conflict and exacerbated it to later come out as the saviour. But he didn’t consider that Ukrainians have agency, too. For the East Ukraine Russian control was associated with Donbass, and Russian invasion would mean turning them into the Donbass. Extremely tough Ukrainian resistance against superior Russian forces is understandable only in this context. East Ukraine doesn’t believe Putin will “save” them. They saw what’s happening on territories he captured and are fighting hard to avoid the same scenario on their land. Putin’s conflict manufacturing strategy irreversibly de-Russified East Ukraine. Whatever pro-Russian sentiments existed there, are gone now. Ties with Russian kins over the border severed. Donbass War triggered this process and Z-invasion completed it. Russian Ukraine is no more.

    I.e. the line about how Zelensky is destroying Ukraine to enrich himself is, upon closer inspection, nothing more than fanboy projection regarding what happens to territories that Russians have “liberated”. So yeah, let’s hear another round for the poor shelled children of Donbass, cruelly cut down by neo-fascist Azovians.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  81. Jack D says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Instead of trying to invest in Donbass and making it an attractive places to live, Russia simply handed the territory over to criminals.

    Putin didn’t see the Donbass as a place to invest in. Remember that (up until recent days when Russia switched to Plan B) these were supposed to be “independent republics” and not ruled directly from Moscow. The main function of the “republics” were to act as spoilers that prevented Ukraine from joining NATO. This is not unique – Russia has set up these sham “breakaway republics” in various ex-Soviet countries, generally by exploiting ethnic divides.

    Putin cares little for how Russians in his own distant provinces live, let alone how the non-citizens of Russia lived in the Donbass. In this war he has shown a complete willingness to kill Russian speaking civilians who he supposedly wanted to “protect” not to mention thousands of Russia troops.

    Generally speaking, the biggest mistake you can make is to assume that Putin has any feelings of humanity or good faith or is interested in the betterment of anyone outside of his inner circle. This is (almost) as true of Russian speakers and Russian citizens as it is of non-Russians. Maybe he cares slightly more about the former but not much.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  82. @John Johnson

    In reply to no one in particular, you say

    we still have [the pathetic] pro-Putin contingent telling us that everything is going just fine.

    You couldn’t back up another broad-brushed caricature the other day (“ACLU Worries That Elon Musk Might Allow Free Speech on Twitter,” Kevin Barrett • May 1, 2022) when I asked.

    Why shadow box straw men? Pick a comment and try to refute what someone has actually said.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Thanks: JimDandy
  83. AKAHorace says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Life under Ukrainian rule sucks as well. That Slavs just kind of suck at the whole idea of ordered liberty doesn’t really prove anything.

    Do you consider Czechs and Poles Slavs ? Or do you think their countries are badly run ?

    The Czech Republic and Poland are looking increasingly attractive as places to live.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  84. @John Johnson

    The Ukrainians are ruled by oligarchs, as is Russia. Like I said, Slavs just really aren’t good at that whole ordered liberty thing. This is why I’m not exercised over which set of Slavs rules Ukraine.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Art Deco
  85. @rebel yell

    Do you want Russia to stop sponsoring BLM and funding the kind of organizations that wind up people like the Christmas parade attacker? Or nah?

    Russia has been pouring active measures millions into this country since the 1920s. I don’t understand why I’m supposed to feel bad for them that are less skilled at it and have less money to spend on it because of their relative poverty. At every opportunity to cause upheaval in America’s backyard Russia has leaped in eagerly.

    What is this slave morality it’s ok when I do it because I’m weak BS. Just be honest- your loyalty has leap-frogged to Russia. And unlike shitlibs who do it for humanitarian albeit warped reasons you do it out of spite.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  86. Jack D says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    According to the Washington Post:

    “There was no Jewish family called Frankenberger in Graz in the 1830s,” wrote Ian Kershaw in his 1998 biography of Hitler titled “Hubris.” “A family named Frankenreiter did live there, but was not Jewish. There is no evidence that Maria Anna was ever in Graz, let alone employed by the butcher Leopold Frankenreiter.”

    Moreover, no correspondence detailing an affair and child support payments as described by Frank have ever been discovered. The family was in fact too poor to have paid any child support. To top it off, the son of Frankenreiter — the alleged grandfather — would only have been 10 when Alois was born.

    As for the nephew, William Patrick Hitler, who allegedly tried to blackmail Hitler, he never made such claims publicly, even after he moved to the United States.

    Historians have also cited an official prohibition on Jews residing in that part of Austria until the 1860s.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/05/03/roots-zombie-claim-that-hitler-had-jewish-blood/

    William Patrick Hitler had 4 sons but none of them had any children and they are all dead now. I don’t know whether there are any Hitler cousins living elsewhere. If there are (or if any of the WPH sons have preserved DNA) then DNA testing might furnish a clue, especially if “Frankenberger” descendants can be located.

    Another contradictory narrative which Hitler supposedly told Frank was that Frankenberger was not the father but that his grandmother had tricked the Jews into believing that he was.

  87. @HA

    DONBASS is 10,000 times worse than Ukraine–got it. I’ll even hit the caps lock button, to emphasize the factor of ten thousandness here.

    Ukraine is a corrupt hole, like Russia, with sub-replacement TFR, like Russia, and net emigration, like Russia. Again, I don’t get the foaming at the mouth over this war.

    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @HA
    , @Mike Tre
    , @Jack D
  88. Coemgen says:
    @Matt Buckalew

    Many readers will see “fans of Putin” (or Putin’s fanbois, Putin’s puppets, etc) but read “straw man.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_man

  89. JimDandy says:
    @Greta Handel

    They don’t call it a mushroom cloud for nothing.

  90. @The Anti-Gnostic

    This is the correct take. Furthermore, shouldn’t this cauldron (rofl)of founding stock Americana naturally default to this perspective. The second we were hewn from the craggy vistas of New England the Mongloslavs represented everything base, degraded and yet dull. May the lord bless and keep the Slav… far away from us. (That’s for Jack D.)

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  91. @Hypnotoad666

    This story has generally been debunked, but easy to check:

    DNA test one of Patrick Hitler’s kids. (I don’t know if any are still alive. They are boomers, so one or two might still be kicking around.)

    The best bets are the ones always mentioned: Johann Georg Heidler who moved in with the Schicklgruber’s and married Maria. Or his younger brother Johann Nepomuk who took in Alois when he was 10–since he was married would not have wanted to acknowledge knocking up Maria–but who later swore an affidavit, that Alois’s dad was indeed his older brother.

  92. Jack D says:
    @HA

    the Europeans will tire of the whole mess and want their cheap gas back

    If it wasn’t for the whole climate change thing, you might have been right. But it just so happens that the stars have aligned in such a way that the European desire to wean themselves off of Russian fossil fuels reinforces their desire to wean themselves off of fossil fuels period. Any return to buying Russian hydrocarbons, regardless of the political situation in Ukraine (or in Russia) will be seen as a step in the wrong direction. Higher fuel prices will be seen as a positive because they will make alternative energy sources more economically competitive.

    The link to the story about how many of the “Russian troops” are not ethnic Russians is the wrong link.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  93. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:

    This is pretty interesting. A boys choir celebrating the Victory Day in some town in Russia sings a song with revanchist lyrics about returning Alaska to Russia:

  94. HA says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Again, I don’t get the foaming at the mouth over this war.”

    As far as being a resident of Ukraine who is peering through the barbed wire fence to see what is happening in the Donbass, it was just explained to you. And to the extent that you believe Putin has no intention of stopping if things go his way (like, say, Lukashenko clearly believes), the logic of putting a few more road blocks on his way to Donbassizing, say, Transnistria or Finland, or the Baltic states, shouldn’t be that mystifying. But clearly, I’ve overestimated you. That seems to happen a lot when the topic is Russia and its many sympathizers, shills, fellow travelers, and useful idiots.

  95. @Jack D

    Generally speaking, the biggest mistake you can make is to assume that Putin has any feelings of humanity or good faith or is interested in the betterment of anyone outside of his inner circle. This is (almost) as true of Russian speakers and Russian citizens as it is of non-Russians. Maybe he cares slightly more about the former but not much.

    There’s an underlying assumption here that rulers are motivated by the milk of human kindness. I’m not sure that’s a good assumption. The very fact that people generally look out for #1 is precisely why we have and need checks and balances. People like George Washington, who held the British empire in North America south of the 49th parallel in the palm of his hand, yet chose not to make himself king, are the exception to the rule. What makes Putin exceptional isn’t that he’s doing what he’s doing, but that he has the untrammeled authority, inherited from the imperial governmental structures of the Russian state for the last 1000 years, to do so. It is only in a handful of countries around the world that national leaders remain kings in all but name, and are free to pursue, unopposed, the kinds of vanity projects like the one Putin has kicked off in Ukraine.

    • Thanks: HA
  96. HA says:
    @Jack D

    “The link to the story about how many of the “Russian troops” are not ethnic Russians is the wrong link.”

    Thanks.

  97. Mike Tre says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    My good man, have you not heard of Hitler? This war is literally Hitler.

    If he were alive.

    And relevant.

  98. Muggles says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    No “mission accomplished” moment, and no mobilization announcement, so those two Western predictions didn’t pan out.

    I’m not in favor of a US proxy war with Russia, but your comment here stinks.

    What “predictions” did Putin actually make? None. But his fanboys here sure did.

    So as we slowly roll into month three of the “special military operation” (how’s that for transparency?) what has Putin given the Russians but dead boys and wounded soldiers? And a lot of nonsensical claims about “fighting Nazis.”

    He’s worse than Hollywood about that stuff.

    You and Putin stooges here can make no predictions since you have no more idea of what’s going on with this than does Putin.

    This sad mess is all his fault and pretending that “all is well” here is laughable, if not so pathetic.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  99. @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Ukrainians are ruled by oligarchs, as is Russia. Like I said, Slavs just really aren’t good at that whole ordered liberty thing. This is why I’m not exercised over which set of Slavs rules Ukraine.

    You can’t just make up facts in your head.

    The Ukrainians have an elected president. Zelenskyy beat 38 other candidates.

    Go ahead and look up the last time that Putin actually had to run for office.

    Ukrainians also have independent media. They are allowed full access to the internet.

    Putin only allows state news and in fact made it illegal to call it a war:
    https://news.yahoo.com/russia-cracks-down-free-speech-040014673.html?msclkid=757a4feecfdd11ec95c5ad9b9b6d46fe

    You can get 15 years for calling it a war. No exaggeration.

    Stop defending this 2 bit dictator. Russian soldiers would vote against this war if they had the choice. This is a dictator vs a free country. He doesn’t have the support of the people and just wants to turn Ukraine into a puppet state. Putin is a LOSER that can’t compete like a real man.

    Only liberals, leftists and loser dictators are afraid of free speech. Weak men and weak ideologies require information control.

  100. Muggles says:
    @Mr Mox

    I agree that RT and other Russian outlets should not be banned or limited.

    Nor should ordinary Russians be targeted, or most Russian imports.

    The silly personification of “evil” in all of this Blame Russia mentality is childish and counterproductive.

    Who wants to bear the burden of the many US government actions in the past which have proven stupid and deadly? Neocons and War Party apologists get strangely silent on that.

  101. They might want to rename it Pyrrhic Victory Day. Although the West is also busily shooting itself in both feet and points north.

  102. @Muggles

    So as we slowly roll into month three of the “special military operation” (how’s that for transparency?) what has Putin given the Russians but dead boys and wounded soldiers? And a lot of nonsensical claims about “fighting Nazis.”

    He’s worse than Hollywood about that stuff.

    Anglin’s Incel Defense Force seems to think that if we are against Putin’s pointless war then we must be on the side of Hollywood and western media. They seem unable to comprehend the possibility of being against both. They logically conclude that we should cheer a war between White countries that Putin hasn’t been able to consistently explain. In their minds this somehow sticks it to the Jews. How does this make any sense?

    But then they follow a self-described White nationalist that openly hates White women and sleeps with Asians.

    Making sense isn’t their forte.

    • Agree: Dream
  103. @HA

    HA, the master hater is at it again. It’s obvious HA that you have contempt for Russian and Ukrainian lives. Indeed, you mock anyone who calls for “the killing to stop.” And in a previous thread you even expressed your outrage that a Ukrainian general had withdrawn his troops from Kherson, rather than have them stand, fight, and be destroyed. How dare that traitorous general save his soldiers lives.

    However, you outdid even your own loathsome self with the following comment that you made:

    “You forgot about the poor shelled children of Donbass — 14 thousand of them! To be fair, Putin and the Russians seem to have forgotten them, too, but the useful idiots can’t seem to stop yammering about them.”

    “Useful idiots can’t seem to stop yammering about them.” Really? Are you so full of hate that you can’t even RELATE to the notion that people “are yammering about them,” because they are disturbed by the tragedy of the deaths of these children?

    • Replies: @HA
  104. @anon

    You’re either an imposter or a shitty doctor. A real and good doctor would know you can’t diagnose without a decent history and an exam. For example, Putin’s hanging right arm goes back years. People speculate it is a nod to his KGB training, although it might be something other idiosyncrasy, like a judo injury.

    We went through this on iSteve back in 2016, too, with “doctor” commenters diagnosing Hillary’s illness.

    Give it a rest.

    • Replies: @anon
  105. JimDandy says:
    @JimB

    I stand by the prediction I made before this all really got going: Russia ultimately secures the statelets’ “independence” and the rest of Ukraine stays out of NATO–OR the Neocon death cultists get us all killed for nothing in a nuclear war. My fear of the latter scenario is enough to make me a “fan boy” of a foreign leader I don’t really give a shit about. It’s pretty funny to watch The Usual Suspects swarm to posts like this with identical comments (though they sometimes make a big deal out of quibbling with each other in an attempt to trick morons into thinking they aren’t all part of the same machine). The following take, which they are all basically cutting and pasting into their comments as of late, is particular hilarious. As in, I laugh out loud at the… what’s the word I’m looking for… oh yeah: the ridiculous chutzpah of their crude propaganda campaign:


    Putin may be worth 135 billion but he is still a loser incel. In an alternate world he would be still be a paper pushing bureaucrat that resents women. He was never in charge of the KGB or even an agent. He was a mid level government worker and nothing more.

    They are evil and depraved, but they have a cornball, Catskills-level knack for cracking me up. Must be in their genes.

    • Agree: Peterike
    • Replies: @JimB
  106. @HA

    The main thing Russia did to prop up its currency was raise its key rate to 20%, but they’ve lowered it twice since the invasion, first to 17% and now to 14%.

    • Replies: @HA
  107. Jack D says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Yeah, it’s like Germany and Czechoslovakia in 1938. What possible concern could what happens overseas be to any red blooded American?

    It’s not like Putin sees himself in an existential struggle with the whole NATO alliance and the US – he just wants a little bit of Ukraine and then everything will be fine and we can go back to business as usual.

    It’s hard (for me at least) to keep track of who are the Putinists who actually WANT America to be destroyed and who are the Isolationists who think that ignoring Putin would serve America’s interests, but in the end it doesn’t make any difference because they amount to the same thing. You may not be interested in Putin but Putin is interested in you. There is no amount of American withdrawal from the world that would satisfy Putin.

  108. @neutral

    The reduction of the presidency to the level of a figurehead, a “ceremonial role” as you put it, has been a work in progess, dating back decades.

  109. Corvinus says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    You’re providing misinformation here.

    “The subtext is Putin’s not in any rush…He seems content to let his armed forces methodically inch forward as they pummel Ukrainian troops with artillery, while minimizing Russian casualties.”

    Sacking a number of his generals over military loses in the Ukraine shows otherwise.

    “His economy has held up despite Western sanctions, the ruble is 26% higher than when he launched the invasion”

    Russia is enduring its worst bout of inflation in the past twenty years, Russian companies are shutting down, international supply chains are leaking oil, and Moscow’s mayor stated that there has been a couple hundred thousand job losses.

    “and his popularity is near ~80%.”

    How can you say with a straight face that this number is accurate given that Putin controls the narrative by way of the Russian media?

  110. It’s hard (for me at least) to keep track of who are the Putinists who actually WANT America to be destroyed and who are the Isolationists who think that ignoring Putin would serve America’s interests, but in the end it doesn’t make any difference because they amount to the same thing. You may not be interested in Putin but Putin is interested in you. There is no amount of American withdrawal from the world that would satisfy Putin.

    The same isolationist arguments were made over Crimea which invalidates their position.

    Basically let him have it because he will stop there and we don’t want to cause a conflict.

    The entire world let him take Crimea with that attitude. Which is also what happened with Hitler and the Munich agreement. In both cases the dictators got too greedy for their own good. Hitler ruined any remaining credibility with the British after taking all of Czechoslovakia. And for what? He took the German heavy section under the same false guise of “protection” and then took the rest after making a deal with world leaders. Then Putin does the same with Crimea but without a deal. They just looked the other way in the hope that he would stop.

    That was the point when Ukraine needed their own 2A with AR-15s in every home. Let fake Russian separatists (little green men) deal with scoped AR-15s from every window.

    Zelenskyy was actually in denial that a full scale invasion would happen up until the last minute. Fortunately they had spent the last 8 years preparing for a war with Russia which meant they had an immediate plan of action.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  111. @Jack D

    Tell us specifically how Russia is a conventional military threat to the United States. Then explain what interest we have in Ukraine.

    You can’t.

    Btw, isolationist isn’t a derogatory term. The United States had no business in any war since the Civil War and even that’s debatable.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @HA
  112. Here’s a topic that draws the trolls out of the woodwork. You can tell they are trolls by how much they post, their silly contemptuousness, and their capping everything. Then, if somebody responds, Bingo! they get a quarter.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  113. @Corvinus

    Russia is enduring its worst bout of inflation in the past twenty years, Russian companies are shutting down, international supply chains are leaking oil, and Moscow’s mayor stated that there has been a couple hundred thousand job losses.

    Oh I’m sure that the mayor will re-assess the situation and declare that it was an error. The jobs have been found. Magnificent jobs in fact.

    Russia is enduring its worst bout of inflation in the past twenty years, Russian companies are shutting down, international supply chains are leaking oil, and Moscow’s mayor stated that there has been a couple hundred thousand job losses.

    It’s no longer a market floated currency. They are trying to limit supply and still have runaway inflation.

    Putin thinks he can play beat the market with his ruble games. His defenders here are in for a rude awakening.

    You can’t hide a sh-tty economy with currency games. Artificial price controls won’t bring back actual investors.

  114. @Jack D

    “Higher fuel prices will be seen as a positive because they will make alternative energy sources more economically competitive.”

    Solar, nuclear, wind, wave, natural gas, beans (magical fruit), spider monkeys on small tricycles, anti-matter, the corbomite maneuver, puppy treadmills and, yes, oil. Beautiful oil; Texas tea. We need it all. Green solutions supplying the world’s energy needs is phantasy. Stop listening to the genocidist elites who seek depopulation to save mother earth through any means necessary.

  115. Alfa158 says:

    It’s been over two months now, and so far all of the Russia-stooges and MIC-stooges are still here wearing the team jerseys of their favored autocrat, Putin or Zelensky, and firing endless barrages of verbal artillery at each other. I don’t remember this level of choosing your home team to root for when Iraq invaded Iran, or the Serbians were fighting Kosovo, or any other myriad wars.
    As far as I can tell none of them has done a Wali-the-sniper and headed over there to volunteer to fight as he very briefly did. I wonder if it is because of the average age of all these keyboard Clausewitz’s. Are they too old for direct involvement? I’ve never seen anything from Ron Unz where he has tried to figure out the demographics of his commentariat, but I would guess most are old White guys like Steve and myself.
    These armchair generals are utterly confident they know what is really happening, and how it is going to end because they swallow whole the propaganda of their chosen authoritarian state, and think they are supporting victory and Justice in this shit-show war by endlessly firing spit-balls at each other. In reality the only victors are going to be China and this will end badly for everyone involved.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  116. @Corvinus

    Sacking a number of his generals over military loses in the Ukraine shows otherwise.

    Bearing in mind that the claim about Putin sacking several generals came from the Ukraine government, which has lied repeatedly about the war, changing leadership (two months ago) doesn’t indicate he’s in a rush; it suggests he was unhappy with the initial conduct of the war.

    Russia is enduring its worst bout of inflation in the past twenty years, Russian companies are shutting down, international supply chains are leaking oil, and Moscow’s mayor stated that there has been a couple hundred thousand job losses.

    America is enduring its worst bout of inflation in forty years. You can go to YouTube and find recent videos of foreigners and English-speaking Russians shopping for food and filling up their cars with gas in Russia. You might be surprised at the prices they’re paying. Even the neoliberal Economist concedes that Russia’s economy is back on its feet.

    How can you say with a straight face that this number is accurate given that Putin controls the narrative by way of the Russian media?

    Because Biden has the U.S. media controlling the narrative for him and his approval rate is half as high.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  117. Redman says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    There’s no other way IMO to view what Putin has said is the truth at this point. I don’t mean about everything. But about this current crisis.

    Russia did see a buildup of NATO and particularly US high-tech weapons on its border in a hostile and unstable (2 coups within 10 years, the last 8 years ago) country. Russia did try diplomacy. The Minsk agreements and then further outreach to NATO countries. But was totally rebuffed.

    The US government wanted this war and was going to get it one way or the other. And since it didn’t require US troops the US population didn’t need to worry their little heads about it.

    Putin appears to be a true national leader who understands protecting the lives of his nation’s people is his primary responsibility. Can anyone honestly say that Biden is even fit to shine Putin’s shoes?

  118. @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    Now: no one, who knows what they are talking about, has any questions. It’s a settled matter.

    That’s what everyone says. But when it come to why, they got nothing. (Except maybe they saw a burned tank on YouTube).

  119. @Corvinus

    “controls the narrative”

    Who controls the narrative at your favorite news outlets?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  120. Corvinus says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    “America is enduring its worst bout of inflation in forty years.”

    Red herring.

    “You can go to YouTube and find recent videos of foreigners and English-speaking Russians shopping for food and filling up their cars with gas in Russia.”

    Right, compliments of Putin’s propaganda machine.

    ” You might be surprised at the prices they’re paying. Even the neoliberal Economist concedes that Russia’s economy is back on its feet.”

    That article is behind a paywall. But from what I gathered, there are caveats–“Russia’s apparently robust financial situation is something of a chimera”, one that “masks the real pain being experienced by Russians and stress on the economy”, with Russians “encountering shortages of a wide range of goods, including pharmaceutical supplies and drugs for Parkinson’s disease”. And the picture is “particularly grave in the information technology sector”, which is “dependent on imported hardware and software”.

    “Because Biden has the U.S. media controlling the narrative for him and his approval rate is half as high.”

    Misinformation on your part.

    Regardless, let’s stay on point. Putin has reasserted state control over Russia’s news agencies, evening signing into law a measure criminalizing reporting that contradicts the government’s version of events. Again, how can you say with a straight face that 80 percent of Russian citizens support Putin in light of these facts?

  121. @Catdog

    There were NO plans to invade Russia, no nuclear weapons in Ukraine.

    How can you definitively claim that?

    The Russians had the keys, and took their ball home.

  122. Redman says:
    @houston 1992

    He has no interest in conquering all of Ukraine. The parts in the west aren’t worth it. Too much built up anti-Russian hostility there.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  123. Redman says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Exactly. Like the 51 intel folks who said the Hunter Biden laptop was Russian Disinformation.

    But there, the media lapdogs printed it without even noting the caveat that said intel folks specifically said they had no evidence. Just lots of “expertise” dontcha know.

  124. @Dave Pinsen

    “Because Biden …”

    We need to stop speaking of this person as if he’s actually sentient. It’s Obama’s harem of harridans lurking around the White House and Old Executive Office Building that are running the administration for global H aka Global h. Joe needs to retire and join my Travelling Exhibit of the Macabre. There’s a place for him on the wagon, right next to Emmett.

  125. Jack D says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    The United States had no business in any war since the Civil War and even that’s debatable.

    Well if that’s your standard then obviously there is nothing I can say that is going to convince you that we have to trim Putin’s sails.

    For those willing to listen, Russia (and China) would not have to physically invade the US in order to cripple its economy and interests. We are interested in the system of global free trade and exchange of knowledge among democracies. They would like to bring the reign of the US as the global reserve currency and guarantor of international peace and freedom of navigation to an end. For the US, this role is expensive. The only thing that would be MORE expensive is NOT having that role anymore.

  126. anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    The brigade of Wisconsin frat boys who got away with arsonizing Althea Bernstein looks to be behind another attack in Madison, WI. This time it’s a false flag action designed to silence, marginalize, and otherwise otherize pro-choice activists.

    Madison police investigating arson, threat at office of prominent anti-abortion group

    Molly Beck

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    MADISON – Madison police are investigating arson after a fire broke out early Sunday in the offices of a prominent anti-abortion group and a threat was spray painted on the group’s building.

    The incident took place a week after a leaked draft of U.S. Supreme Court decision showing a majority of justices plan to vote to overturn the court’s landmark 1973 ruling that legalized abortion. If that happens an 1849 law banning most abortions would go into effect in Wisconsin.

    If abortions aren’t safe then you aren’t either” was scrawled in black paint across the outside wall of Wisconsin Family Action’s offices in Madison — a threat that was found by police while responding to a call early Sunday reporting flames inside the building on the capital city’s north side.

    Say her name! Althea Bernstein!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  127. zundel says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    holy shit i wonder what stupid dasein would say

  128. Jack D says:
    @Redman

    Can anyone honestly say that Biden is even fit to shine Putin’s ELEVATOR shoes?

    FIFY.

    • Thanks: utu
    • LOL: John Johnson
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
  129. @Hypnotoad666

    But when it come to why, they got nothing. (Except maybe they saw a burned tank on YouTube).

    You probably believe that

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  130. anon[325] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Jack, I agree with you 1,000%. All our wars and interventions have been a total mitzvah!

  131. Anonymous[384] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimB

    If Russia was powerful the Fins wouldn’t dare try to join NATO.

  132. HA says:
    @EddieSpaghetti

    “Are you so full of hate that you can’t even RELATE to the notion that people ‘are yammering about them,’ because they are disturbed by the tragedy of the deaths of these children?”

    Ah yes, the horseshoe theory wherein everyone who doesn’t buy into narratives that the loons on the left and right are spinning can only be motivated by “racism” or “hate”, as the case may be. Or how about a term they both seem to be gravitating towards, like say, “fascism”? So convincing!

    No, Eddie, right now I’m amused by the notion that you would believe ANYTHING that comes out of Putin’s propaganda ministry, when he himself has put their “content-providers” under house arrest. When HE HIMSELF seems to have forgotten about the poor shelled children of Donbass, presumably because after Mariupol and Kramatorsk and Bucha, the notion that Putin cares about shelled children is too ridiculous even for him to bring up, knowing the lampooning he’ll get.

    And when anyone looks closer at all the evil that happened in Donbass, past the fog of RT propaganda, then neo-fascist shelling doesn’t seem to be what most horrifies the people who actually live there. It’s the rape, murder, and general squalor of life under Putin-ization that seems to be the bigger problem.

    So clutch your pearls ever tighter, Eddie. The shelling of innocent children will stop as soon as Putin unclamps his grubby little fingers from Donbass. If you really cared about the children there, that’s what you’d be clamoring for instead of begging for some new-and-improved “compromise” (i.e. Donbass 2.0) that subjects an even larger portion of Ukraine to the Donbass treatment, and sets the stage for even more reboots of the same tired seen-it-all-before franchise that sensible people panned the first time around.

    • Replies: @EddieSpaghetti
  133. J.Ross says:

    OT Egghead McMuffin, a Mormon and previously outspokenly pro-life, is now pro-abortion, because the CIA is a postdated organization which produces losers.

  134. HA says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    “The main thing Russia did to prop up its currency was raise its key rate to 20%, but they’ve lowered it twice since the invasion, first to 17% and now to 14%.”

    Oh, only 14%, you say? Yeah, that sounds totally workable for a healthy economy. Moreover, what does “Sergei” with the trench coat and the dark glasses and the Armenian accent say about all that? Is he now willing to give you any number of legit dollars you want at that exchange rate? And what about that link I gave where it was noted that Russia “restricted local firms’ access to foreign currency cash, barred citizens from withdrawing more than \$10,000 in foreign currency for six months, and stopped banks from selling hard currency in cash.”

    In other words, you ignored everything except the first item on that list, and really, didn’t do much to address the first one. I’m guessing that’s not going to fool Sergei.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  135. Wokechoke says:

    Does this mean we can forget about ww2 then?

    What a relief.

  136. Wokechoke says:
    @John Johnson

    I said that Russians will sacrifice 200,000-250,000 soldiers to keep Crimea etc.

    Ukraine can’t.

    • Replies: @Marat
  137. HA says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    “Tell us specifically how Russia is a conventional military threat to the United States. Then explain what interest we have in Ukraine.”

    Apart from living up the terms of an argument we willingly and justifiably signed regarding security assurances to Ukraine? You may not think America’s signature means something, and that flouting it won’t have long-term harmful consequences but not everyone is that dumb.

    But even if I’ve overestimated you (as I seem to keep doing when it comes to Moscow and their useful idiots) and you are indeed that dumb, all you’re pitching here is the alt-right’s version of the immigration two-step shuffle. You remember how that one goes? Step 1: immigration is too small to bother with, we’re told, so we should just ignore it. Step 2: immigration is also too BIG to do anything about at this point — we’re talking tens of millions of illegals — so, that’s all the more reason we should just accept it. Rinse, repeat. I’ve seen threads where both of those arguments are being made simultaneously — regardless, the overall advice is to just keep upping the temperature and let the frog boil.

    How’s that working out? Anyone?

    In the case of Putin, we are similarly told we should ignore him as being too small a threat when he swipes Crimea and Donbass and anything else he wants in Ukraine (if not this time, then the next time his new-and-improved “peace compromises” has to reluctantly be scrubbed because the neo-fascists made him do it). No, we should wait until he’s incorporated all that and moved on to Transinistria, and Moldova and Kazakhstan (do a ctrl-f for Lukashenko and check the link if you want to pretend I’m lying), and then the Baltics, or Finland or Sweden,… so that at some point, Putin and his copycats (e.g. China vis-à-vis Taiwan) will grow into a problem too BIG to do anything about, which means we’ll have to give them whatever they want just because of that. In fact, maybe he’s actually too big a problem already, given those nukes. And there are also generally a few Putin trolls and useful idiots simultaneously dispensing both those arguments on any thread like this.

    You think that’s going to work out any better then that immigration scam, long term?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  138. @Redman

    Russia did see a buildup of NATO and particularly US high-tech weapons on its border in a hostile and unstable (2 coups within 10 years, the last 8 years ago) country. Russia did try diplomacy. The Minsk agreements and then further outreach to NATO countries.

    There was no build up of NATO on the Russian border.

    Ukraine is an autonomous country that Russia agreed to recognize in the 1994 Budapest convention.

    Ukraine is free to get military consulting from NATO or any other organization.

    There was never a plan to put nukes in Ukraine. Ukraine doesn’t qualify for NATO nor did they apply.

    If this was really about stopping the expansion of NATO then the logical move would be to at least try and get Ukraine to sign an agreement first. No such offer was ever given. In fact Russia stopped taking calls from Ukraine during the last days of the build up.

    This was never about NATO and Putin has already backed away from that explanation. His explanation for the war has now changed 3 times. First NATO, then Nazis, and now Donbass.

    This is just a bitter little dictator that wants to take a piece of Ukraine for the empire. That’s all it is.

    Russia has had a declining economy and negative population growth for over a decade. Putin is a bitter little man that should not be defended just because the Western media is against him. The whole world hates him and that includes the European right.

    He isn’t some genius playing the globalist West. He is bombing White women and children. He doesn’t understand the Russian economy and that will be clear in 6 months.

  139. keypusher says:
    @Redman

    Russia did see a buildup of NATO and particularly US high-tech weapons on its border in a hostile and unstable (2 coups within 10 years, the last 8 years ago) country.

    Yeah, amazing how invading a country will make them hostile. But the 2014 invasion also made Ukraine a lot less unstable, because Ukrainians realized who the common enemy of them all was.

    Your weapons timeline is off.

    For two years after Putin’s first invasion, U.S. aid was limited to non-lethal equipment (night goggles, body armor, vehicles etc.)

    Trump finally sent actual weapons (Javelins, 37 launchers, 210 missiles) in December 2017.

    You can’t threaten Russia with 37 bazookas. Even if they’re “high-tech” bazookas.

    In 2019 Congress authorized \$400 million in aid, which Trump withheld while he tried to enlist Zelensky in the Hunt for Hunter Biden. After the attempted quid pro quo became public, Trump released the aid.

    The United States finally started sending meaningful amounts of assistance in December 2021, when people began to realize that Putin might launch a full-scale invasion.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/2022/02/27/ukraine-us-arms-supply/

  140. @Jack D

    I happen to know a bit about economics and international trade. You are correct that this war is about more than territory in the Ukraine. Russia is attempting to break the stranglehold of the dollar, both as as the global currency (dollar) and the reserve asset (treasuries).

    As you mention, being the GFC isn’t just a privilege. However, it’s also burden. Being the GFC means you hollow out your manufacturing sector. (Check out the Triffin dilemma or the Dutch Disease.) Basically, being the GFC is good for Washington and Wall Street at the expense of flyover country.

    Naturally, this is why you and your kin, who have so much control over Washington and Wall Street, love it. But it’s not so great for the dumb goys – my people.

    Losing GFC status will be expensive for some groups – the primary of which is yours – but it will be good for others – my people. So I’m fine with it. Naturally, you’re against since, correctly, you’re a Jewish patriot. I have no problem with your loyalty. I just wish that you’d be more honest about it.

    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
  141. HA says:
    @Voltarde

    “the Azov Nazis clubbed the wounded to death with pieces of rebar and metal pipes”

    Sure they did. Wow, those Azov Nazis sure do get around. Now you’re saying they’re in Odessa, now they’re all being snuffed out in Mariupol… but WAIT! Once Bucha is liberated, they’ve somehow wound up there as well, presumably right before returning back to Mariupol to get snuffed out. You thought the Ghost of Kiev was too good to be true, we got some extra spooky Spiderman superpowers going on here. “They seek them here. They seek them there. Those Russkies seek them everywhere…”

    And it all comes from Putin’s ministry of truth. Who could argue with that?

    • Replies: @Voltarde
    , @Ummm
  142. J.Ross says:

    The snap response to Steve’s idea that Russia is corruption should be that Ukraine is corrupt by Russian standards, objectively self-defeatingly corrupt, like Chicago and Detroit both being famously corrupt but Chicago still knowing how to make money and provide basic services, however, the real burial is that America is the corrupt one here. America is not in Ukraine to save Ukrainians or to defeat Russia. America is in Ukraine so that war profiteers can clear inventory and move product and receive new orders. This was clearest with Lockheed, which hadn’t been flying so good, rocketing back. It is also clear in this passage at Saker:

    The collective west supplies [r]ubbish!

    Becoming more clear now is that the countries of the North Atlantic Alliance are using the conflict in Ukraine in order to get rid of obsolete and decommissioned weapons. Rubbish is being brought to the Ukraine, and then the Russians destroy it. This is now obvious. The disgusting quality of the Javelin anti-tank missile systems (ATGM) supplied by the United States and the Swedish-British portable anti-tank guided missiles NLAW were recently reported by a prisoner – a former soldier of the Ukrainian army.

    Vadim Zholko, a soldier of the Armed Forces of Ukraine: “Their Javelin and NLAW grenade launchers, which were very much advertised, showed themselves in practice as they really were. There were misfires. They usually shoot one out of four, ”said the prisoner. The fired projectiles explode at fifty meters before reaching the target, or do not work at all. “That is, there were many of those whose batteries were expired,” the prisoner of war shared his impression of what he saw. The man complained that the training at the training grounds was mainly theoretical – “they showed it in a fast way.” Why misfires regularly occur was not explained to recruits. The reason became clear during the fighting – most of the batches of weapons had an expired shelf life. Cheaper NLAW complexes also turned out to be far from perfect.

    Bloomberg reported that Kyiv is losing a week-long supply of weapons every day.

    And that’s intentional. Ukraine is another Afghanistan sure enough — for us.

  143. @HA

    It really speaks volumes about the capability of modern society to support its cognitively-weak cohort, that you survived to adulthood without realising the identify hallmark of bullshit is “anything that starts with

    The White House [] said”

    Grow up, man.

    Aside from that, why on earth would you trust anything from GloboShlomo? Have you been trapped in a basement?

    These are the people who spent the last 2 years (actually the last 20 if you consider all their post-9/11 propaganda), accidentally taking all the sting out of the term ‘conspiracy theory’.

    They’ve basically turned things on their heads, where ‘conspiracy theory’ is just their term for “shit we’ve been told we can’t tell you today – wait a week or so“.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @Coemgen
  144. The Western objective seems to be regime change (deadly threat to Putin) and integrating Ukraine into NATO (existential threat to Russia, according to Putin). Merely repelling Russian troops from the original pre-war boundaries of Ukraine seems unlikely given that Putin has vast resources at his disposal, though in a degraded state. I do not doubt that Putin will throw away his citizens’ lives to prevent defeat and personal ruin. It would not be new in Russian history. Ukraine does not have an endless supply of men, and both USG and Putin are willing to fight to the last Ukrainian. Putin might even prefer that.

    The Western objective is insane. We cannot accomplish it short of getting NATO directly involved in the war. That means WWIII, which no world leader is willing to explicitly endorse. Yet. There is always tomorrow.

    We should be looking for ways to let Putin save face and make a deal. I don’t know what that looks like. Right now, it would mean that a large portion of eastern and southern Ukraine is lost, but the country survives as a cohesive entity. It is a difficult proposition. It avoids a generational conflict that would consume the best elements of the Ukrainian people. It avoids Armageddon.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @John Johnson
    , @HA
  145. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    By the standard you set here we should be at war with Joseph Biden, and our handling of Ukraine (which has disastrously wrecked our interests domestically and internationally) has been backwards. I hear legislation is coming together to enable parties in the US to sue the OPEC cartel for being a cartel and doing what cartels do. OPEC should respond by cutting us off.

  146. Voltarde says:
    @HA

    You can’t make a convincing or even a coherent argument, so you make a puerile attempt at humor about a horrific pogrom that is fully documented by on-the-scene video.

    People interested in objective evidence can watch the documentary about this pogrom for themselves and make up their own minds about your murderous {Azov Battalion/Right Sector/Banderite/Fascist/S.A./Nazi} friends. Different names, same bunch of despicable criminals.

    Tens of thousands of Ukrainians are dead and tens of thousands more Ukrainians are likely to die because of these thugs and the Ukrainian oligarchs who fund and control them.

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • Replies: @HA
  147. @Jack D

    LOL. We’ve shut down global free trade purportedly to help your countrymen. Supply chain issues, shortages and rising prices all over the place.

  148. @HA

    Europe is a bunch of old white people slowly disappearing under a tide of Arabs and Africans. Russians–assuming they could ever manage plus-replacement TFR, and they won’t–would be an improvement.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  149. @John Johnson

    Where have I defended Putin?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  150. JimDandy says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    It doesn’t matter what you did or didn’t say–if you don’t want to die for the Neocon deathcult you’re a Putin fanboy because you’re an incel and Putin is the King of the Incels and he was just a nerdy pencil-pusher for most of his life and that’s all he’d be now but for a weird twist of blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Got it? Good.

  151. HA says:
    @Voltarde

    “You can’t make a convincing or even a coherent argument…”

    You first. Don’t even think that your RT propaganda counts. It doesn’t. Remember, Putin put the people peddling this stuff under house arrest. He obviously has no faith in it at this point. What’s you’re excuse?

    People without Azov-bogeyman-issues have analyzed the Odessa fire. As justifications for starting a war in Europe go, it’s pretty weak stuff.

    “Tens of thousands of Ukrainians are dead and tens of thousands more Ukrainians are likely to die because of these thugs…”

    As opposed to the Moscow-based thug who started this war? That just happened to slip your mind? See above about first making a convincing or coherent argument if you want to be taken seriously.

  152. @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    But when it come to why, they got nothing. (Except maybe they saw a burned tank on YouTube).

    You probably believe that

    Like I thought, you got nothing. You just heard someone say it on TV so it must be true.

  153. @neutral

    but can anyone honestly believe that Trump, Biden, etc, are nothing but useless talking heads?

    Perhaps you meant anything?

  154. @HA

    Oh, only 14%, you say? Yeah, that sounds totally workable for a healthy economy.

    Having your key rate in the mid-teens is appropriate when you have inflation in the mid-teens. As their inflation target is reached, they’ll lower their rate. That’s what we used to do too. If anything, our Fed has been behind the curve.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @Brutusale
  155. Ummm says:

    You can also type “en.” in front of the kremlin URL. Russian -> English translators are, as far as I can tell, fairly dilligent.

    I mean, I trust them more than google. Which is hilariously sad.

  156. Ummm says:
    @HA

    “And it all comes from Putin’s ministry of truth. Who could argue with that?”

    What percentage of the US medias reporting on the war in Ukraine is accurate, do you think?

    • Replies: @HA
  157. @Jack D

    Yeah, it’s like Germany and Czechoslovakia in 1938. What possible concern could what happens overseas be to any red blooded American?

    On the one hand, Russia is weak, being defeated by little Ukraine, and can’t fight its way out of a paper bag.
    On the other hand, if we don’t stop Putin he will conquer all of Europe, cross the Atlantic, and occupy every corner of the United States.
    So which is it?

    It’s hard (for me at least) to keep track of who are the Putinists who actually WANT America to be destroyed and who are the Isolationists who think that ignoring Putin would serve America’s interests

    Ah yes – people who don’t share your hometown loyalty for the Polish shtetl are the dreaded Isolationists.
    People who ask simple questions like “Is my country’s security at stake?” are the dreaded Isolationists.
    People who point to the Rio Grande instead of the Dnieper are the dreaded Isolationists.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  158. HA says:
    @Ummm

    “What percentage of the US medias reporting on the war in Ukraine is accurate”

    It doesn’t have to be all that accurate to beat a state-owned news outlet where refusal to toe the company line gets you the Navalny treatment, and where the chief propaganda dispensers have been put under house arrest by the deep-state ex-KGB stooge who hired them to tell him things that he wants to hear. If that really needs to be explained to you, then maybe you should find another cause to be a useful idiot for.

  159. HA says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Tell it to Sergei — I doubt it’s going to convince him. And if it does, I’d check the watermark on any dollar bills he gives you.

  160. HA says:
    @Kratoklastes

    “Aside from that, why on earth would you trust anything from GloboShlomo?”

    Because the only alternative the Putin fanboys are offering is RT and TASS, outlets run by an ex-KGB deep state stooge, and where too much independent reporting gets your name on a Chechen assassin’s hit list.

    I tell you what: When all those “Syrians” on their way to Berlin decide that, actually, Minsk is “good enough, and who needs that stinking Western globo-whatever anyway?”, and when all those sons and daughters of Western oligarchs decide that Russia is really the place to be (instead of the other way around), and when you yourself say, “hey, let me ditch this sorry has-been civilization I was cursed to live in and move up north to where Putin runs the show”, let’s revisit this pathetically lame argument of yours, you poor victim of GloboShlomo, you.

    • Replies: @neutral
  161. @HA

    HAteboy, I didn’t call you a “racist.” And I didn’t call you a “fascist.” I described you as someone who hates Russians and Ukrainians, and I gave the reasons why I believe that to be the case. After your nearly 300 word (mostly non-)response, I still believe that you hate Russians and Ukrainians. I am guessing that you can live with that.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  162. anon[211] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    This is an exercise, not a contractual doctor-patient relationship. An essentially identical exercise, presentation of videos of movement disorder patients for the audience to diagnose, has been an extremely popular event at neurology conferences for four decades. In parallel, that also became common in residents’ training. Parkinson specialists were very early adopters in the retail camcorder market, for exactly that purpose.

  163. @John Johnson

    “The Ukrainians have an elected president. Zelenskyy beat 38 other candidates. Go ahead and look up the last time that Putin actually had to run for office. Ukrainians also have independent media. They are allowed full access to the internet. Putin only allows state news”

    America has “independent media” too, which is why we’re all here rather than CNN or the NYT.

    For the truth about the Zelensky regime, search for these names:

    Vlodymyr Struk
    Denis Kireev
    Mikhail & Aleksander Kononovich
    Nestor Shufrych
    Yan Taksyur
    Dmitri Djangirov
    Elena Berezhnaya (not the figure skater AFAIK)

    Wouldn’t want to live in either Russia OR Ukraine, but then I’m not a Slav. Don’t fancy Poland or Bulgaria (music excepting) either.

    I always find Corvinus an excellent negative indicator, so I’m pleased to see he’s on your side rather than mine.

    It has to be said that America’s Emotional Engineers, funded by the global oligarch class, are the best in the world. From Occupy Wall Street in 2011 to Black Lives Matter in 2020, to Stop The Russian Beast in 2022 – amazing turnaround – while all the time living standards fall.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  164. neutral says:
    @HA

    I trust anything made anywhere in the world more than any those official ZOG propaganda outlets. That is a rational position to take considering that all ZOG outlets (Fox, Economist, CNN, WSJ, NYT, etc) are all producing fanatically anti white propaganda, as well as increasingly just pumping outright lies that are profoundly more detached from reality than anyone else. So how about you answer the question and explain why you believe anything those anti white lunatics say???

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @HA
  165. @Verymuchalive

    All it has to do is destroy the Ukrainian army in the Donbas. Once completed, Ukraine will have lost most of its forces.

    Will it? The Ukraine has something like 600,000 men under arms. That’s a lot killing or capturing to be done in a conflict that so far has only yielded casualties in dribs and drabs of dozens or very occasionally hundreds.

    To be fair, the core of the Ukraine’s military seems to be only about 25,000 NATO-trained personnel, but what is their disposition? For all the conflict-trackers of missiles and tanks out there, I haven’t seen any for the truly precious resource of human lives, and particularly the NATO-trained lives. Where is that crucial 4%? Are they stranded in the Donbas within Russian encirclement? Or were they pulled back to continue to harass the Russians with the incoming supply of infinite Western lethal aid?

    The Ukrainian economy will be imploding

    Seems that the Ukrainian economy, such as it was, has already imploded … and been replaced with an economy of grifting off of Western aid. And as we know from too many third world examples, that state of affairs can persist for as long as the West can.

    … will be absorbing the Ukrainian public. … Popular unrest will force …

    The Kiev regime has already banned opposition parties and arrested dissenting journalists. Public opinion in the Ukraine is no longer a matter that troubles the regime, if it ever did.

    He will be replaced by a Government that will negotiate with the Russians and ultimately capitulate.

    Not sure how a disenfranchised public can replace a regime that has infinite Western backing. In any case, Russia may prefer that Zelensky remain, since he has already been anointed by the West as the super-duper legitimate voice of the Ukrainians. If Russia can get Zelensky to capitulate, job done. If Zelensky is somehow deposed and the new regime capitulates, the “West” (i.e., the White House) will simply declare it illegitimate and continue the conflict in the name of a “government in exile”.

    Either way, Russia now has to defeat the majority weight of an increasingly up-armed Ukrainian military in order to obtain Russia’s original limited objectives.

    In other words, the the White House (or rather the trans-institutional oligarchy that controls the White House) has successfully raised the stakes in the Ukrainian conflict. Of course, raising the stakes in a nuclear world when you have nothing to protect is an extremely foolish thing to do. And the United States, and the West in general, have nothing to protect in the Ukraine. The trans-institutional oligarchy with their Ukrainian aid grifts, board positions, mistresses, and slush funds sure do though. But they are cleverly outsourcing the risk to the West in general while they keep the gains to themselves, so no worries.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  166. Coemgen says:
    @Kratoklastes

    It’s funny how conspiracy theory has become a disparaging epithet (who made that happen?).

    Are we to believe that conspiracies do not exist?

    Theory implies science. Has the scientific method been discredited?

    Is it ok for us to have a theory of a conspiracy?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  167. Art Deco says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Like I said, Slavs just really aren’t good at that whole ordered liberty thing.

    They do just fine west of White Russia.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  168. Art Deco says:
    @Coemgen

    (who made that happen?).

    Sensible people who have sampled the literature produced by the John Birch Society or by the four-digit population who’ve produced books on the Kennedy assassination.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
  169. Art Deco says:
    @EddieSpaghetti

    I described you as someone who hates Russians and Ukrainians

    He’s given no evidence of hating either. He’s just lampooned the Putin press agents on this board, who’ve been asking for it.

  170. Dream says:

    Russia fans.

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  171. Brutusale says:
    @Matt Buckalew

    Do you want George Soros to stop sponsoring BLM and funding the kind of organizations that wind up people like the Christmas parade attacker? Or nah?

    FIFY

    Can we reach a consensus as to what the Russkis are? Are they super Svengalis clandestinely controlling everything bad in America or drunken assclowns who can’t win a war against the poor little Ukes?

    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
  172. Brutusale says:
    @obwandiyag

    Then, if somebody responds, Bingo! they get a shekel.

    FIFY

  173. Brutusale says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Dealing with this kind of shithead must be exasperating for investment professionals.

    Hopefully, he’s long Lockheed Martin and Raytheon, which is what this is all about.

    https://search.brave.com/search?q=lockheed+martin+stock&source=desktop&rh_type=st&range=1y

    https://search.brave.com/search?q=raytheon+stock+price&source=web&rh_type=st&range=1y

  174. Coemgen says:
    @Art Deco

    There are examples of fallacious reasoning associated with, for example, JFK’s assassination but what serious thinker calls these fallacies theories?

    Is it not possible to have a (scientific) theory of a conspiracy?

  175. Dream says:

  176. Jack D says:
    @aNewBanner

    Merely repelling Russian troops from the original pre-war boundaries of Ukraine seems unlikely given that Putin has vast resources at his disposal, though in a degraded state.

    Everyone thought that Russia would defeat Ukraine in a matter of days and that didn’t happen. Maybe Russia’s resources aren’t as vast as they appear and the degradation goes deeper than you think?

    Ukraine now has has the resources of the West at it’s disposal – those ARE truly vast. Pushing the Russians back to their border doesn’t seem to be a completely unrealistic goal. The Russians left Kyiv and they are currently pulling out of Kharkiv, blowing the bridges behind them, which indicates that they don’t intend to return. If the Ukrainians can’t push Russia out of 100% of their territory, they may be able to push it out of additional areas.

    Any “face saving” deal for Putin that allows him to be rewarded for his aggression would be a recipe for Russia to return and finish off the rest of the job later. But this is ultimately up to the Ukrainians to decide, not people here who in some cases don’t really wish the Ukrainians well (despite their phony “the killing must stop” pronouncements) and others who are by their own declaration indifferent at best.

  177. Anonymous[126] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    The Bernstein girl was obviously mixed up in the firebombing of the Madison jail (i.e. attempted mass murder) that happened the same night. I assume she wasn’t throwing firebombs herself but was standing close enough to the people who were to get splashed with burning fuel.

  178. @Redman

    He has no interest in conquering all of Ukraine. The parts in the west aren’t worth it. Too much built up anti-Russian hostility there.

    I think you mean he no longer has interest since the original battle plan was leaked around the time of the invasion. He in fact sent four different teams to try and take Zelenskyy.

    The original plan was to take the capital and thus the country.

    Now he has the changed the plan to taking eastern territory.

  179. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Very roughly speaking, places where the dominant religion was Roman Catholicism or Protestant have a “Western” mentality and attitude toward limited government and separation of church and state (the secular power of the Church was broken long ago in the West) while places where the dominant religion was Orthodoxy have an Eastern or Byzantine mentality where the Emperor (Caesar, Czar) has absolute power.

    Ukraine falls right on the border, with Western Ukraine at least having a more Western tradition. If Russia had played its cards right then eastern Ukraine would have been very naturally sympathetic to it, but Russians generally prefer trickery (or if that doesn’t work, brute force) to winning the battle of ideas in an open marketplace. Whatever goodwill they had has now been destroyed for generations.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  180. @aNewBanner

    The Western objective seems to be regime change (deadly threat to Putin) and integrating Ukraine into NATO (existential threat to Russia, according to Putin).

    Why do you keep repeating this non-sense? Are you incapable of sourcing information outside of PutinTV?

    Verify any of the following on your own:
    1. Ukraine has not applied to NATO
    2. NATO is on record as not interested in Ukraine
    3. Ukraine does not qualify for NATO

    Do your own research and tell me if any of those statements are false .

    The Western objective is insane.

    No it’s insane to invade your neighbor and think you can take the capital in 72 hours when the people hate you and have over 20k personal anti-tank and anti-air missiles.

    Putin and his cheerleaders need to take a modern military tactics class. Followed by a class in international economics. Putin doesn’t even understand his own economy. He thinks it is 1985 and that they will only take a minor hit by losing US and German companies.

    This is a massive disaster. It will only get worse as his pathetic currency schemes fail and investors realize that the bear is going to collapse. This is a repeat of the past where a loser Tsar gets in over his head and doesn’t know what to do.

    • Agree: Jack D
  181. Jack D says:
    @rebel yell

    your hometown loyalty for the Polish shtetl

    This has absolutely nothing to do with that. If for some reason, the anti-Semites of Unz had chosen to back the Ukrainians and I was backing Putin, you would be making the exact same accusation.

    For those who don’t know the history, many Ukrainians, especially the Western, anti-Moscow ones, collaborated with the Nazis and murdered many Jews even without Nazi assistance. And while the Russians/Soviets treated my family quite poorly, in the end they did not kill a single one of them and ultimately saved their lives by deporting them out of Nazi/Ukrainian collaborator reach. So I have to admit it was quite the opposite – my natural sympathy was not with the Ukrainians.

    Also, and this is even less known in the West, the Ukrainians ethnically cleansed (in other words, murdered) the Poles in what used to be part of Poland but is now Western Ukraine:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacres_of_Poles_in_Volhynia_and_Eastern_Galicia

    Not only did they murder them, but in some kind of crazy coverup to make it look like it was done by local peasants with pitchforks rather than as an organized effort of the Ukrainian Army, the Poles were murdered in gruesome ways, literally with pitchforks, etc.

    Despite this awful history, today’s Poles have welcomed millions of Ukrainian refugees and assisted the Ukrainians with military equipment. That was then and this is now. Different people, different times, different aggressor.

  182. Day 75 of the 72 special military operation now in mop up phase and the Ukrainians are taking out naval targets:

    What will Putin’s next explanation for the war be? Will he change the goal to protecting Crimea?

  183. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    Constitutional government is a technology whose operation is regulated by culture. See Larry Diamond on this point: there are no categorical prerequisites for it to appear and prove self-sustaining (other than the attitudes of the political class), although its appearance may be more or less likely in a given set of circumstances. If anything, the strongest vector in influencing its likelihood may be affluence. Technologies have early-adopters and late adopters. Proximity to the British isles is a vector influencing that. Have a gander at the Balkans. It’s been economically laggard for a very long time, it was subjugated by the Ottomans up until the last quarter of the 19th century and partially subjugated by Russia for a large slice of the 20th. Every part of Eastern Europe, when they had the opportunity, copied the coarse features of evolving constitutional systems in the rest of Europe. There was a great deal of corruption and failure, notably during the inter-war period, but it wasn’t a specifically Slavic failure; parliamentary institutions during the inter-war period failed in a broad array of countries, some of which they’d been present in for generations. Now what happens after 1989 – given the opportunity, every part of Eastern Europe re-establishes its parliamentary institutions. The one place it was an abject failure was White Russia. (It was a failure in Russia as well, but Putinist Russia is pluralistic in manner and degree that exceeds ever part of the Soviet era except the but end).

  184. HA says:
    @aNewBanner

    “We should be looking for ways to let Putin save face and make a deal.”

    He doesn’t need you or anyone in the West to manufacture a face-saving narrative for him. He can do that himself. He already has a stranglehold on his media. He could announce tomorrow that “We have 100% fulfilled our objectives and demonstrated, with nothing more than a few training exercises, the awesome might and expertise of our military and have withstood the full force of NATO. Therefore, no one will ever dare to attack Russia again, and since the Ukrainians (and Finland and Sweden and all of NATO) will forever more live in abject fear of us, there is no longer any need for us to station any troops outside our borders or keep funding these pitiful republics. Rather than waste time with pointless peace accords that everyone has learned by now not to trust, we can rest secure in the knowledge that that fear in our neighbors’ eyes is our guarantee that no one will ever mess with us again. You’re welcome.” Then for the rest of the allotted 3 hours, he can blather on about how he was right all along.

    What, you think the Russian people will rise up to denounce him — as opposed to giving him a standing ovation? You think his fanboys will ever admit that Putin lost? Not gonna happen. Putin can just click his ruby red elevator lifts and return back to Kansas — he could have done that all along.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  185. @Art Deco

    The term you’re looking for is the Hajnal Line.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  186. @Art Deco

    Have a gander at the Balkans.

  187. @AKAHorace

    “The West” can be said to encompass Warsaw and Czechia, and it’s downhill from there. There are lots of Poles who prefer not to live in Poland.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Art Deco
  188. Jack D says:
    @HA

    It’s funny that the same people who are advocating now for giving Putin a face saving way out weren’t advocating for a face saving solution for Zelensky.

    When Putin had (what he thought was) the upper hand, he wasn’t interested in making any “face saving” deal with Zelensky. In fact, he sent assassins to shoot Zelensky’s face off.

    Just after the war started, before it all started going badly for Russia, oligarch Roman Abramovich brought Putin a handwritten note from Zelensky describing the terms that Ukraine would consider accepting (in order to thank Abramovich for his mediation efforts and remind him never to put any daylight between himself and Czar Putin, Putin had Abramovich poisoned, but just a little). When Abramovich asked Putin what he should tell Zelensky in response, Putin replied, “Tell him I will crush them.”

    https://www.infobae.com/en/2022/03/28/tell-him-ill-crush-him-vladimir-putins-response-to-roman-abramovich-when-he-brought-him-a-note-written-by-zelensky/

    Ukraine should offer Putin the same amount of face saving as he was willing to give to the Ukrainian “Nazis” when the war was going his way.

  189. Jack D says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    There are lots of Poles who prefer not to live in Poland.

    At least until very recently (the gaps are shrinking) there was a big difference in wage levels between Poland and say the UK or France. Having your country destroyed in two world wars plus being ruled by Communists for almost 50 years tends to have a negative impact on your economy. I think most Polish people would prefer to live among their own people in Poland but you can understand that if you could move a few hundred miles (Warsaw to Paris is about as far as New York to Chicago) you could quadruple your income for doing the same work, you might be tempted to do so.

  190. Art Deco says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Poland’s per capita product is similar to that of the United States ca. 1976, that of Sweden and Japan ca. 1990 and that of New Zealand ca. 2000. Its immediate peers are Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Portugal, and Slovakia. Latvia’s a tad worse off, the Czech Republic and Slovenia a tad better off. The most dynamic economies in Europe since 1988 (net) have been (in descending order) Ireland, Roumania, Poland, Norway, Albania, Malta, Montenegro, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Russia, Switzerland, Netherlands, Bulgaria, Spain, Lithuania, Germany.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @John Johnson
  191. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    “Most dynamic” is deceptive in that, for example German and Swiss incomes were already high and Romanian and Polish were low. So if Poles starts out at \$2,000/capita and go to \$15,000 and Germans start out at \$20,000 and go to \$40,000 then while it’s true the Poles grew by a factor of 7x and the Germans by only 2x , in the end Poles are still making less than 1/2 of what Germans make today and still less than the Germans were making 30 years ago.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  192. @Almost Missouri

    To be fair, the core of the Ukraine’s military seems to be only about 25,000 NATO-trained personnel, but what is their disposition? For all the conflict-trackers of missiles and tanks out there, I haven’t seen any for the truly precious resource of human lives, and particularly the NATO-trained lives. Where is that crucial 4%? Are they stranded in the Donbas within Russian encirclement? Or were they pulled back to continue to harass the Russians with the incoming supply of infinite Western lethal aid?

    Even the ever unreliable Wikipedia says that there are 40 to 50 thousand Ukrainian troops in the Donbas. Other sources claim 60,000 +.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Donbas_(2022)
    As the Ukrainian Armed Forces only have a regular complement of less than 200,00, this is a large part of their best soldiers. Unless they surrender quickly, tens of thousands will be killed or injured. Ukrainian Presidents don’t last long , and Zelensky won’t last this.

    As Russia pivots towards Asia this year, less and less gas and oil will go to Europe, precipitating an economic collapse in the EU and the end of the USD’s status as World Reserve Currency. Western resistance to Russia will collapse and with it your fantasy of “infinite Western lethal aid.”

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    , @Jack D
  193. Corvinus says:
    @Matt Buckalew

    How mighty anti-white of you to say.

  194. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    No, it’s not deceptive. It refers to a rate and not a level. Which is perfectly plain.

  195. @Brutusale

    Nothing would make me happier than for George Soros to have his entire fortune expropriated.

    I’m curious where in my comment there was any suggestion of hypercompetence on the part of Russians. Russians are in large part a dumb, spiteful people unbearably boastful in their rare moments of triumph and completely petulant in their far more frequent moments of defeat. The kind of country whose premier would bang his shoe on a table and snarl “we will bury you” only to turn around and act blameless and self pitying when they are buried instead. The kind of country that with zero sense of paradox or irony- simply out of pure unbridled sluggish opportunism- would claim the “glory” of Stalinism and also claim to be its greatest victim.

  196. JimDandy says:
    @Verymuchalive

    I’ve seen an intense amount of mockery of Putin’s “fan boys” and assertions that this war has been an unmitigated disaster for Russia, but I don’t think I’ve seen many clear-cut predictions from the Triumphalist Neocon internet army about what the outcome will be. I made my prediction early–Russia will achieve its primary objectives:
    1.) Ukraine won’t join NATO and 2.) Russia will secure “independence ” for the Donbass statelets.

    I don’t see any indication that Russia isn’t steadily advancing toward achieving #2 and it seems like everyone agrees that #1 is in the bag, though now some are claiming that Ukraine never wanted to join NATO, and NATO never entertained the idea of Ukraine joining NATO. This seems kind of silly to me, but whatever.

    ***
    April 14, 2022
    “Up until a few weeks ago, Zelenskyy was very clear that Ukrainian membership in NATO was central to Ukraine’s national security objectives,” said Joshua Shifrinson, associate professor of international relations at Boston University.

    NATO, meanwhile, has repeatedly said its door remains open. In a statement to PolitiFact, a NATO official said the alliance has never shut out aspiring new members, and that Russia has no veto or right to influence its neighboring countries in their pursuit of NATO membership. U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said in 2021, “We support Ukraine membership in NATO.”

  197. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    It’s often hard to tell on here what people mean when they speak of my people. Far too often the same people who claim founding stock certification are when excited the exact same people that start saying we when talking about Russia and let forth non-stop invectives against Anglos. So taking you at face value some of what you say is true. It exaggerates Jack D propinquity to the halls of power but the point is taken- certain tribes have made out better from American hegemony than others.

    But the idea that your average Anglo-American will benefit from the precipitous collapse of American hegemony is completely belied by history. The malaise that is sweeping through an alarming portion of the white working class is not solely the malaise of free trade and off shoring- especially if you limit the analysis to true founding stock Americans not ethnic whites. Automization is coming regardless hegemony affords the US the surplus wealth, if the will to seize can be mustered, to deal with these issues.

    Only by recapturing the leviathan can founding stock Americans have a chance to divert that surplus wealth to their cause. Post war prosperity is never coming back. Goldman Sachs isnt why the factory closed, but Goldman Sachs is why we aren’t taxing the shit out of the imported cars via tariffs. The choice is between taming the leviathan or dealing with a precipitous irreversible decline in standard of living. The mediating, galvanizing institutions around which American order and prosperity could be rebuilt post collapse simply don’t exist.

  198. Jack D says:
    @Verymuchalive

    And Putin will march to Rome and be crowned Czar of the World. The End.

    Talk about a fantasy. Hasn’t the fact that none of the other Putinist fantasies have come true discouraged you yet?

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  199. @YetAnotherAnon

    America has “independent media” too, which is why we’re all here rather than CNN or the NYT.

    Yes we have both corporate and independent media while the Russians have PutinTV and locked down internet.

    I don’t trust CNN or NYT. However there are plenty of media sources around the world that are showing what is happening in Ukraine. I trust media sources that are actually on the ground and interviewing Ukrainians. There are hundreds of options.

    Russians are not given that point of view nor are they given any sense of the war.

    For the truth about the Zelensky regime, search for these names

    Zelenskyy is an elected president and not a regime.

    He is popular and unlike Putin will have to run again and has a term limit.

    Not sure what your point is.

  200. @Art Deco

    The most dynamic economies in Europe since 1988 (net) have been (in descending order) Ireland, Roumania, Poland, Norway, Albania, Malta, Montenegro, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Russia, Switzerland, Netherlands, Bulgaria, Spain, Lithuania, Germany.

    What do you mean by most dynamic?

    Poland’s GDP per capita is 50% higher than Russia. Germany is 400% higher.

    Canada has a higher GDP than Russia. Not just per capita but total and Russia has over 3x the population plus vast energy resources. They are getting beat by the maple syrup masters of the north.

    What is your point here?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  201. Art Deco says:
    @John Johnson

    “Dynamic” refers to the rate of improvement in domestic product per capita measured at purchasing-power-parity. At purchasing power parity, Germany’s domestic product per capita exceeds Poland’s by about 65%, but has had since 1988 a lower rate of improvement.

  202. @Jack D

    “Can anyone honestly say that [Diaper Joe] is even fit to shine President Putin’s ELEVATOR shoes?”

    B.S. President Putin is extremely flexible from his decades of judo training, he’s not wearing high heels.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  203. Coemgen says:

    Well, Putin still has an ace-up-his-sleeve.

    He hasn’t yet sicced the Internet Research Agency, with a budget of many thousands of dollars, on the Biden administration.

  204. HA says:
    @neutral

    So how about you answer the question and explain why you believe anything those anti white lunatics say???

    Last time I checked, just about everyone in this conflict is white, and maybe if you take off your one-issue-only tunnel-vision spectacles you’d see that. And anyway, I already answered your question clearly enough: Because when it comes to Ukraine, this so-called anti-white narrative holds a lot more water than the alternative the fanboys are offering. Any number of Western outlets openly admit that Popasna fell on May 7, and that long-term, there is still no guarantee that Ukraine will win. And yet, according to the fanboys, everyone in the ShlomoNews monopoly, or whatever you call it, is spouting the party line that “The Ukrainians will take Moscow by Christmas!” Yeah, right.

    True, the UK is significantly more bullish on the Ukrainians’ chances than the US, and I’m not sure why. Does MI5 have access to better intel than the CIA? Or is the person who is feeding MI5 with whistleblower tell-alls (like the one published in the London Times a few weeks ago) someone that the CIA regards as a double agent or simply untrustworthy? There could be a dozen other explanations, but regardless, that’s the kind of minor inconsistency I can live with. Whereas someone like Scott Ritter — even if we ignore the mountain of kompromat someone like him has generated during the time he lived in Russia, given his “proclivities” — heatedly told us about two weeks ago that “In the days to come, you’re going to see 5,000…10,000 Ukrainian troops surrendered at a time because they’re caught up in a cauldron they can’t escape”. I’m just not seeing that. Or what about the time MacGregor assured us that by the 15th day of the invasion (i.e. 10 days after the Russians stopped being “too gentle”) Ukraine would be “completely over”? That didn’t happen either or we wouldn’t be arguing about here on day 75 (or thereabouts).

    I’ll give Karlin some credit for coming up with a metric of “winning” that can actually be measured: he predicted the other day that by the end of the year Russia will hold more Ukrainian territory than it does now, and I’m not saying he’s wrong about that. However, I’m sure that if Zelinsky were to make the same claim about Ukraine, the fanboys would rise up as one to denounce this cold, callous and horrid Jew monster (i.e. even more Jewish than Karlin himself!) who overlooks the suffering and death of his people so as to measure the progress of this war primarily in terms of acreage. But curiously, there’s not a peep of criticism for Karlin.

    So overall, there are just too many holes, failed predictions, and hypocrisy. Eight years ago I was criticizing Putin’s trolls and useful idiots for sneering at actual verifiable agreements the US signed on Ukraine’s behalf while at the same time bewailing some fictitious not-one-inch-to-the-East NATO promise the West made and then broke. They’ve had plenty of opportunities to up their game since then, but they keep striking out.

    Again, you find me a better alternative in the case of Ukraine to old Shlomo and his MSM party line, I’ll check it out.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  205. HA says:
    @Art Deco

    “Proximity to the British isles is a vector influencing that.”

    Someone similarly once told me that the percentage of time a train arrives on schedule anywhere in Central or Eastern Europe decays in rough proportion to the station’s distance from Berlin. The same can be said for punctuality in general. When it comes to planning trips and meetings, that’s a bit of advice that has always served me well.

  206. Art Deco says:
    @HA

    I think you mean MI6 (“Secret Service”). MI5 is the ‘Security Service’; I think their book of business is counter-intelligence and some other things.

    • Thanks: HA
  207. Peterike says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    “life in the EU is better in every respect”

    Only if you want your Ukrainian daughter giving birth to black babies and your son wearing a dress.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  208. Peterike says:
    @John Johnson

    “The Ukrainians are at least not ruled by a dictator and have an open press and internet”

    Lol! They are completely censored. People with anti-regime views are hunted down. That’s some freedom.

    “They can vote out Zelenskyy if they so choose.”

    Except he outlawed opposition parties.

    Don’t be such a stooge.

    • Troll: Corvinus
  209. Peterike says:
    @Jack D

    “Yeah, it’s like Germany and Czechoslovakia in 1938. What possible concern could what happens overseas be to any red blooded American?”

    It was of zero concern to the Unites States. Zero.

  210. @JimDandy

    I made my prediction early–Russia will achieve its primary objectives:
    1.) Ukraine won’t join NATO and 2.) Russia will secure “independence ” for the Donbass statelets.

    That’s not a prediction.

    #1 was an accepted fact that pre-dates the war.

    1. Ukraine hasn’t applied for NATO.
    2. Ukraine doesn’t qualify for NATO.
    3. NATO is on record stating that they don’t want Ukraine. They said they would consider the applications of other countries like Finland.

    Do you deny any of those facts or are you just poor at processing information outside the Putin/Incel cheerleader squad of Unz?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  211. @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    B.S. President Putin is extremely flexible from his decades of judo training, he’s not wearing high heels.

    Yes I’m sure the videos of his weird knee angles from the inserts are all faked just like the phone calls from demoralized Russian soldiers.

    He really seems like a confident guy.

    Confident guys like to do things like take pictures of themselves shirtless on a horse or execute journalists that ask too many questions.

    Just brimming with confidence like Stalin.

  212. JimDandy says:
    @John Johnson

    Sorry, dude, I thought America was in NATO. Not only that, I thought America had some pull in NATO. But I’m glad we agree that Ukraine shan’t join NATO, even though they wanted to and America wanted them to, and NATO repeatedly said the door was open.

    April 14, 2022
    “Up until a few weeks ago, Zelenskyy was very clear that Ukrainian membership in NATO was central to Ukraine’s national security objectives,” said Joshua Shifrinson, associate professor of international relations at Boston University.

    NATO, meanwhile, has repeatedly said its door remains open. In a statement to PolitiFact, a NATO official said the alliance has never shut out aspiring new members, and that Russia has no veto or right to influence its neighboring countries in their pursuit of NATO membership. U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said in 2021, “We support Ukraine membership in NATO.”

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  213. J.Ross says:
    @JimDandy

    The best part is, after they’re “done” getting Ukrainians killed, they’ll start the whole public Satanic ritual all over again someplace else, and all the “smart” people will clamor for the shedding of blood and will smartly evince shock at the officially confirmed atrocities and not know about the officially unconfirmed atrocities, as it was in Iraq, and Afghanistan, and everywhere we can bomb, wherever a local minority group thinks receiving arms and training from the CIA is a good idea, forever and ever until the Han stops us with righteous mercilessness, Amen.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  214. @Dave Pinsen

    If you want to crush a commodity-based economy like Russia then don’t do it during an upturn in the commodity cycle. And make sure the world’s largest commodity consumer (China) is on page with what you’re doing. Also, if you’re trying to topple a populist leader make sure your sanctions hit the lower-middle class, rather than his wealthy oligarch opponents. A crackdown on SWIFT transactions doesn’t mean that much to the average Russian bus driver.

    This isn’t the Arab Spring neocons, you need to up your game.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @John Johnson
  215. @JimDandy

    1.) Ukraine won’t join NATO and 2.) Russia will secure “independence ” for the Donbass statelets.

    Very perceptive of you. Those were more or less the terms Ukraine seemed willing to accept at the Istanbul talks with Russia on March 29.Neutrality, Ukraine accepted, but it wanted security guarantees from other states, including NATO ones. However, these guarantees would not include Crimea and Lugansk and Donetsk oblasts, so this was tacit acceptance of the loss of these territories. Sources at the time said that this would be acceptable to Russia.

    However, since then Ukraine has refused to negotiate with Russia, and latterly has been demanding that Russia surrender and hand back all territory ( ha, ha, ha). Why it has done this volte face, we can only speculate. Western pressure? ( highly likely) Russian withdrawal from areas round Kiev, Northern Ukraine and Nikolayev? ( possible). Zelensky threatened with removal and liquidation by hardliners? ( possible)

    Regardless, this has backfired and has only enabled Russia to up the stakes. I now think Russia will incorporate nearly all the ethnic Russian in the south and the east. This is confirmed by events. Already, plans are being made for independence/unification referenda in Kharkhov and Kherson oblasts. If the war continues long enough, the Russians may take Odessa as well. Obstinacy and stupidity in war only make the end results worse, as the Ukies are finding out.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  216. @Peterike

    Only if you want your Ukrainian daughter giving birth to black babies and your son wearing a dress.

    I have met a lot more „black“ Russians (usually fathered by students at Patrice Lumumba University) in my life than „black“ Poles or Czechs (never met one). Russia is not a country you turn to if racial purity is your thing.

  217. @Jack D

    Jack, all the iSteve regulars know that you have nothing sensible to say about Russia and Russians. And this contribution is no exception.

  218. Corvinus says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    “Who controls the narrative at your favorite news outlets?”

    Is this a trick question! It’s J—- Let me try again. It’s J—- Ok, I can do this. It’s J—-. Well, you know who.

    At least that’s what I’ve been told by the Unz intelligentsia.

  219. Art Deco says:
    @Alt Right Moderate

    If you want to crush a commodity-based economy like Russia then don’t do it during an upturn in the commodity cycle.

    Fuel and mineral exports account for about 15% of Russia’s nominal gross domestic product. Extractive industries are important, but there’s lots else going on there.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  220. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    This is a meaningless statistic. Auto exports account for 3% of German GDP but this doesn’t mean that the auto industry is not important to Germany. In any country, exports are only going to be a small share of total GDP which is the sum of all goods and services produced. 60% of Russian GDP is related to services alone (retail trade counts as a service) and of course much of the oil gets used domestically.

    Oil accounts for around 1/2 of Russian tax revenues:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/russia-oil-taxes-idUSL8N15C3Z1

    If you look at Russia’s exports, they are mostly commodities and extractive industries – in addition to oil and gas (54% of the total), you have metals (11%), chemicals (8%) , food (7%) and timber (4%), leaving only 16% for everything else. These are all relatively low value added products – most of the value comes out of the vast Russian earth and not as a result of the talents of its people – the very opposite of say Japan (and BTW, Japan exports twice as much despite having fewer people).

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  221. @JimDandy

    A quote from a random professor is not evidence of anything. The US would like Ukraine to join but that doesn’t negate anything that I stated.

    Ukraine doesn’t qualify for NATO because of Donbass and Crimea. You can’t apply with a contended border. It is in the rules. There are also other reasons they don’t qualify but that is the main reason. Ironically this means that Putin just needed to keep Donbass in contention to keep them out of NATO. A full scale invasion made zero sense and only affirms the need for NATO. But that of course was just the excuse at the time (Putin has given 4 different explanations for the war).

    In any case Germany and France do not want them. It isn’t an organization where the US can overrule other members. There has to be consensus and Germany isn’t interested in pushing NATO that far. Ukraine never had full support in fact.

    Maybe next time just ask instead of assuming the half pint dictator or his fanboys here are being honest or know what they are talking about.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  222. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    This is a meaningless statistic.

    No, it’s a statistic whose meaning you find it inconvenient to acknowledge. Kuwait is a resource based economy. Russia and Norway have contextually large extractive industries.

    Oil accounts for around 1/2 of Russian tax revenues:

    That’s almost certainly in error and to the extent it’s not, it’s an indicator of their tax policy, not their productive base.

    If you look at Russia’s exports, they are mostly commodities and extractive industries –

    Yes, that’s true. However, it’s a country with a large domestic market and their production is largely for local use.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  223. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Kuwait is a resource based economy.

    In other words, Russia is Kuwait with nuclear weapons. Without the ability to steal/buy/copy technology from the West they would be back to the 1970s (and even then they had stolen/bought/copied most of their technology).

    That’s almost certainly in error

    https://www.reuters.com/article/russia-oil-taxes-idUSL8N15C3Z1

    These are older numbers. I think most recently it was something like 36% of the Russian government budget came from oil taxes.

    I suppose they could tax other things but oil exports represents a juicy target for taxation which is why they chose to tax it and not other things in the first place. For example, an increased VAT tax would hurt Russian consumers and decrease Putin’s popularity.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Art Deco
  224. @Jack D

    In other words, Russia is Kuwait with nuclear weapons. Without the ability to steal/buy/copy technology from the West they would be back to the 1970s (and even then they had stolen/bought/copied most of their technology).

    The sad thing is that their half pint dictator doesn’t understand their economic limitations on even a basic level.

    He thinks they can tell the big US and German corps to shove off and RussoSoft and IvanBayer will pop up overnight. He really has no understanding of how much work has gone into these advanced companies. Already there are shortages of medicine which is exactly what happened with Venezuela. But I guess Putin doesn’t read Dictator News Daily or much of anything related to economics.

    Reminds me of liberals that have no clue as to how the modern economy works. Libs with sociology degrees that think the modern economy is mostly a White man’s scam so they can play more golf. A bitter child’s view based on movies.

    Terrible strategizing and his move to playing currency games shows that he is well in over his head. You can’t outscheme the market through currency games. Currency is a means of trade and you are botching the trading. It would be like screwing up your supplies to a restaurant and then thinking you can make up for it by manipulating the prices on the menu. It’s all part of the same system. Playing with money isn’t going to hide your shortages.

    He should really just go the Asian route and hang himself.

  225. @Alt Right Moderate

    Also, if you’re trying to topple a populist leader make sure your sanctions hit the lower-middle class, rather than his wealthy oligarch opponents. A crackdown on SWIFT transactions doesn’t mean that much to the average Russian bus driver.

    Are you not paying attention? Russian inflation is on track to hit 25% this year and Putin is trying to prop up their currency through schemes. It won’t work so they will have massive inflation on top of crushed purchasing power.

    They will also have shortages of basic goods and medicine. This is exactly what happened to Venezuela.

    Putin isn’t a populist leader. He is a ruthless dictator and totally clueless when it comes to economics.

    Average bus drivers are not happy and it will only get worse. Russia is headed for a depression and there is no way out. He planned on taking all of Ukraine and then negotiating away any sanctions. Well that isn’t happening and the US/German companies have already left. It’s a complete disaster.

    • Thanks: HA, Jack D
  226. Anonymous[409] • Disclaimer says:

    Are you not paying attention? Russian inflation is on track to hit 25% this year and Putin is trying to prop up their currency through schemes. It won’t work so they will have massive inflation on top of crushed purchasing power.

    This should make you, Jack D’Jew, and HA happy right? Assuming you’re not all the same person.

    Well that isn’t happening and the US/German companies have already left. It’s a complete disaster.

    Is this what explains your extreme emotional interest in this conflict? Can we get several dozen more posts on this topic from you, all saying the same thing again?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  227. Marat says:
    @Wokechoke

    And solid access to the Black Sea west of Crimea.

  228. JimDandy says:
    @John Johnson

    Dude, you’re basically straight-up calling Anthony Blinken a lying Jew. That’s a major red flag, in my book. Are you or have you ever been a member of the Azov Battalion? But, yeah, you’re so right–if Germany didn’t want to do something for fear it would upset Russia, no one could ever immediately twist their arm into acquiescence, right?

  229. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    In other words, Russia is Kuwait with nuclear weapons.

    No it is not. Russia does not import masses of guest workers to do work it’s domestic population lacks the skill to do and fuel and mineral exports do not account for 50% of its output.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  230. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Russia does not import masses of guest workers

    Sure it does. There are 2 million Muslims in Moscow. Some are Russian citizens and some are from ex-Soviet countries.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/3623adf431d541719d8a6b53dc82dd5a_18.jpeg?resize=770%2C513

    Eid el-Fitr prayers at Moscow’s central mosque. Russia has restricted mosque building (the “official” Muslim population of Moscow is only 300,000) so the worshippers spill over into the street.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  231. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    extreme emotional interest in this conflict

    Yeah, it’s much better to maintain a detached, cynical attitude while another genocide takes place in Europe and the genocider’s followers spout denial and lies. Getting emotional is so uncool. Who are these furreners to us, anyway? Genocides happen all the time, man. No point in getting all excited.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  232. Anonymous[772] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    . Who are these furreners to us, anyway? Genocides happen all the time, man. No point in getting all excited.

    Now its been promoted to “genocide”. Good lord Jack, just when I thought you couldn’t be any more full of shit. Anyway, there are all sorts of conflicts going on all over the world. Yemen and the Saudis…Mali has it going on…

    Why are you and your goy doppelganger Johnny John Johnson focused on this one? Could it be the ethnic angle?

    Instead of just being another Jewish Loudmouth (we already have Bill Kristol, Max Boot, and countless others for that role), banging out comments by the thousands, why don’t you buck the stereotype of you people as mouthy but physical cowards and head over to Ukraine and do a little fighting? Put down the keyboard and pick up a rifle.

  233. @HA

    Your argument seems to be that the shelling from Ukr wasn’t that bad. What would United States do if a single rocket would have fallen on land that it claims? Forget about an attack from Mexico – what would the USG do if the Syrians would attack one of the bases that Americans built in the Syrian oilfields?

    So why would Russians take anything from the ZOG satrapy of “Kiv”?

    Would Americans tolerate shelling because “it killed our children, but not in the thousands”?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  234. Jack D says:
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Before this war started, not a single shell fell on Russian territory and not a single Russian citizen was harmed. (However, the Ukrainians have now raided Russian oil depots and so on – these are legitimate targets in a defensive war and thousands of young Russian soldiers have died – Putin has a talent for bringing about that which he was supposedly seeking to prevent – ditto the expansion of NATO which will now include Finland and Sweden. Putin singlehandedly increased support for NATO from 25% to 75% in Finland. He should get a medal from NATO for this.) In 2014 Russia fomented the creation of “breakaway republics” on Ukrainian soil (republics that have not been recognized by anyone except Russia) and there has been an ongoing civil war in this territory (BTW, this little slice of “Russian World” was run by gangsters and was a miserable place to live due to their criminal extortion of everyone). In recent years this war proceeded at an extremely low level and is what, excuse #11 among Putin’s rotating cast of excuses for this war? Putin killed maybe 100,000 Russian civilians in Chechnya so he cares nothing about the killing of Russian children.

  235. JimB says:
    @JimDandy

    The thing is, Ukraine will never get into NATO for the same reason Finland and Sweden won’t: because Turkey will veto their application for membership

  236. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    Sure it does. There are 2 million Muslims in Moscow. Some are Russian citizens and some are from ex-Soviet countries.

    No clue where you got that datum. That aside, there are 9 million Muslims among the antique Turkic minority in Russia.

    In Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Emirates, 52% of the population are foreign residents. That’s what it looks like when you’re importing masses of guest workers due to skill deficiencies in your native population.

  237. Anonymous[121] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson

    Crimea is full of Russians. It was hard to criticize Russian invasions when Russia was just occupying territories that wanted to be occupied by Russia.

    The attack on Ukraine is very different. This is a new Russian doctrine: We have the right to invade any country that we deem to be “Nazi”. Suddenly a lot of countries that were previously unconcerned about Russia feel threatened.

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