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Prosecution Demands Jury Convict Derek Chauvin of First-Degree Grinchism
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From WQOW:

Prosecution says George Floyd died because Derek Chauvin’s ‘heart was too small’

April 19, 2021, 4:12 pm
by Clint Berge

MINNEAPOLIS (WQOW) – Jury deliberations are underway in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial for the death of George Floyd.

In the prosecution’s final closing argument, attorney Jerry Blackwell said while some believe George Floyd died from an enlarged heart, he actually died because ex-officer Derek Chauvin’s heart was too small.

“Mr. Floyd died because his heart was too big. You heard that testimony. And now have seen all of the evidence and heard all of the evidence, you know the truth. And the truth of the matter is, that the reason George Floyd is dead, is because Mr. Chauvin’s heart was too small,” Blackwell said.

 
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  1. Ummm….. is that from the Bee, or Not the Bee?

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Sollipsist
  2. Arclight says:

    I feel like the judge’s comment about how Maxine Waters’ comments may have opened the door to the trial being thrown out is basically telling the jury “go ahead and convict to keep yourselves and families safe even if you aren’t sure, your verdict isn’t likely the end of this.”

  3. @Arclight

    I hate to say that, but you may be right.

    My take was the judge wasn’t sure as to whether he should throw the case out and decided to leave it to an appeals court. Safer for the judge that way.

    Note that the motion was for a mistrial. If the motion were granted it would result in a new trial, and not a dismissal of charges. If the case is thrown out on appeal, it will be a new trial.

    Ms. Waters should have kept her mouth shut.

  4. anon[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @Arclight

    That, plus the refusal to sequester the jury after yet another riot peaceful protest in the Minneapolis area, plus obvious threats made to one of the witnesses, plus the NYT’s efforts to dox the jurors, plus the judge’s refusal of a venue change — all adds up to “go ahead and convict him, it will be overturned on appeal in a year or so”.

    This is a form of mob rule. Modern progressivism / liberalism at work.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @ic1000
    , @SMK
  5. @Arclight

    Did Maxine Waters cross state lines for the purposes of jury intimidation in a state where she holds no public office, or even resides?

    Isn’t that some sort of crime – a federal crime?

  6. Mike Tre says:

    “And the truth of the matter is, that the reason George Floyd is dead, is because Mr. Chauvin’s heart was too small,”

    is the jury made up of 12 year old girls?

  7. Alden says:
    @Arclight

    I don’t believe so. I kinda sorta hope the statement was a subtle hint to the jury go ahead and acquit because Chauvin will win on appeal. I still have hope Chauvin will be acquitted.

    If I were on the jury the riots would just make me strongly in favor of acquitting Chauvin. But then I have a serious case of oppositional defiance disorder to White hating liberals.

    All the big city city courthouses are staffed mostly with snarling black women and black men with criminal records. I have to go to one every once in a while whatever government office it is, passport, DMV post office, vicious blacks hogging the only reasonably secure decent pay middle class jobs.

    • Agree: JMcG
  8. I really don’t care about Derek Chauvin.

    I’m sick of these White guys trying to play cowboy in Black areas that are managed by anti-White liberals.

    Give these anti-White mayors what they really want which is an all Black police force.

    Of course this will require lowering standards but since race doesn’t exist I’m sure it will only be a temporary encumbrance.

    • Disagree: TTSSYF, James Braxton
  9. Cortes says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Was Ms Waters just carrying out her instructions…to ensure that the can get kicked down the road? Too early perhaps for the unleashing of righteous indignation on the streets? Maybe forecast to be cold weather too?

  10. @Paleo Liberal

    A mistrial due to government mistakes merits a dismissal (jeopardy applies).

    Waters might have even precluded the USDoJ from jeopardizing the cop.

    (If that idiot even “resides” in her district, it’s probably just a cheap, studio apartment with voice mail and a straight-to-trash P.O. box.)

  11. White Americans should either move to the rural areas and complete cut themselves off from the system, or simply emigrate to Europe or Latin America.

    Both Russia and Ukraine have lots of fertile land and could use white farmers. Russia could certianly use skilled white technicians. Same with Brazil and Argentina. Brazil may be blacker than America but its nowhere near as anti-white. There if you kill a negro robber in your house lawn, the police won’t bug you. Its more like, good job, less work for us.

    Whatever you do, don’t feed the American beast any more. Its white taxes, labor and military manpower that keeps the American satan running. Stop providing it with your productivity and it will fall to reflect the standards of its favorite demographics: Blacks and mestizos.

    America is the global cancer, don’t feed it.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  12. AndrewR says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Ms Waters should, at an absolute minimum, be expelled from Congress immediately.

    But Maxi Pad is but a symptom of a much, much deeper problem. Expelling her would be like putting a single drop of aloe vera on the toe of a person with 95% third degree burns. The solution to the disease she represents must be holistic and systemic.

  13. JimDandy says:
    @Arclight

    Yes. But let’s please call this judge what his is: a mewling little coward. His assertion that the jurors won’t hear Waters’ direct threat against them because they’ve been told not to watch the news is a sick joke. And this:

    “A congresswoman’s opinion doesn’t matter a whole lot,” he added, denying Nelson’s motion for a mistrial.

    proves he is totally unfit for his job.

    • Replies: @Redman
  14. Remember that scene in Home Alone 2?

    Start watching the above clip at 2:20. I bet Chauvin made that facial expression.

    By the way, Donald Trump gave directions to a lost child.

  15. I read in other coverage that the prosecution claimed that if the neck hold was even “a contributing factor” in the death then the jury should convict. Any more legally minded commenters care to comment on that? It seems to me like if the main cause of death was some combination of drug intoxication, panic attack due to being arrested and heart disease then you could make a case that all those factors would still have been present even if Chauvin had chosen some other method of physical restraint. I guess that would mean that you don’t think his actions were a contributing factor? Also what do the prediction markers think? I feel like the odds of acquittal on all counts have to be in the low single digits.

  16. ATBOTL says:

    After Floyd went unconscious would have been a good time to do was take his knee off his neck, better yet before he went unconscious. A handcuffed man cannot escape or threaten multiple armed police and we have to stop treating garden variety criminals like Hannibal Lecter. That will stop most of these kinds of incidents before they start. Without excessive police control tactics, this would be just another overdose out of something like 50,000 a year.

    Whether Chauvin’s actions contributed to Floyd’s death or not, it was foolish to do what he did with people watching and filming. Even if no one was watching, he should have shown more care with a person in custody. If the left didn’t racialize the issue, most commenters here would see what happened in a more nuanced way. The left’s radicalizing the issue has distracted from legitimate issues of police brutality and abuse of authority that affect all Americans.

  17. Opening and closing arguments are not legal evidence, they are pure spin

    • Agree: Curmudgeon
  18. Read this.

    https://religionsmn.carleton.edu/exhibits/show/st-louis-park-eruv-jewish/history/anti-semtisim-in-minneapolis

    In 1946, the popular American journalist Carey McWilliams called Minneapolis the anti-Semitic capital of the United States. In his article “Minneapolis: the Curious Twin,” he writes that “in almost every walk of life, ‘an iron curtain’ separates the Jews from the non-Jews in Minneapolis. Nor is this ‘iron curtain’ a matter of recent origin; on the contrary, it seems have always existed.” Jews faced discrimination in employment, housing and were barred from many organizations and clubs.

    Minneapolis, on the other hand, had a higher population of people of Scandinavian and Protestant Anglo-Saxon background that had settled and established major industries before the less assimilated Eastern-European Jews came. Their exclusivity to Jews, along with economic pressures before and during the Great Depression fueled much of this prejudice. A 1931 survey of Minneapolis employers who wrote on their job applications “gentiles preferred,” revealed that they discriminated for such reasons as Jews were too social and took off work for Jewish holidays, to “Jews showed too much familiarity with those in authority” and “Jewish employees represented the danger of ultimate business competition.”

    TLDR Summary:

    -Minneapolis was the anti-Semitic capital of the United States in the 40s
    -Employers thought Jews talked too much, took too many holidays, and mouthed off to their bosses. So they preferred Gentiles.
    -Jews got a better deal with the Catholics than the Protestants.

  19. Maxine Waters?

    The Civil War just wasn’t worth it…

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  20. The prosecutor must think the jury are morons. What contempt he must have for them. But the jurors probably are morons if they couldn’t get out of this jury duty. If a prosecutor tried that garbage with a jury I was on, I would be very strongly tempted to acquit almost regardless of the facts just to show the prosecutor what I thought of him.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    , @AnotherDad
  21. Hibernian says:
    @Arclight

    Saying that in front of the jury is horrendous, if that’s what happened. (And I don’t think it would become public knowledge, at least immediately, if it was said in chambers._

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  22. unit472 says:

    If Chauvin is convicted it is in large part because his defense was underfunded and Eric Nelson did not push back against Dr. Martin Toobin, the pulmonologist, who presented a series of diagrams and junk equations. Toobin’s testimony was full of ‘scientific’ precision even claiming that Chauvins knee was exerting exactly 91.2 lbs of pressure on Floyds neck Not 91.7 or 90. 5 but 91.2 lbs!

    Nelson not having a team of lawyers or investigators to assist him let it all pass instead of showing video of Floyd yelling ” I can’t breathe ” when Chauvin’s knee was not on his neck and Floyd was still upright with no cop on him. Nelson could have shown the video and asked Toobin “How much pressure was on Floyd’s neck at this time, Doctor. Care to show the jury your calculations for that?

    It was clear Toobin was not a unbiased expert opinon but a man out to ‘get’ Chauvin when prosecutors said Toobin called them and asked to testify again to rebut the defense medical expert, Dr. Fowler.

  23. Michelle says:

    Having been born in Oakland, California, and having lived most of my life there, I have been subject to/been the victim of, lots and lots of harassment from/by, “Minorities”. As I have aged, the incidents have become fewer and far between, thanks be to Allah. However, just in the last 2 weeks, during rides on public transit, 2 different Latino men decided to make me a focus of attention, despite the fact they were accompanied by their women. One kept leaning around to look into my face. I kept the usual, poker face white people employ when crazy ass minoritie’s are acting like fools in your face. Before disembarking, the guy stopped in front of me, introduced himself and told me “You have a good heart, but not a big heart”. Yeah, I am the effing Grinch!

    • Thanks: vhrm
  24. Blodgie says:

    We DO know that Chauvin has a tiny brain, that much is certain.

    He should do ten years for creating the optics that he did.

    How could anyone in his job have less situational awareness?

    Thanks a lot Derek, you fucking Normandale food preparation dropout!

    Yet this union dunce had TWO houses thanks to the police keeping Democrats elected in cities like MPLS.

    Asshole.

    • Troll: TTSSYF, Forbes
    • Replies: @Aeronerauk
    , @Reg Cæsar
  25. jason y says:

    future cyborg historians will divide this period into the pre and post diversity eras and note that the latter is the origin of the curse, “may you live in diverse times.”

  26. I prefer negro lawyers who rhyme.

    • Replies: @europeasant
  27. @Paleo Liberal

    Three possible outcomes to the current trial : acquittal, mistrial, guilty verdict. An acquittal ends it (unless the Feds try some BS “civil rights” charges). A mistrial or guilty verdict will probably result in a new trial. The judge likely did Mr. Chauvin a favor by allowing him the chance, albeit slim, of an acquittal in the current trial.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  28. Well, whatever the verdict…

    Riots would be appropriate.

    Either they will riot, or we should riot.

    • Replies: @Travis
  29. tyrone says:

    “Ms. Waters should have kept her mouth shut.”…..my neighbor has a jackass ,it brays day and night……another dumb animal that’s a law unto itself.

    • LOL: europeasant
  30. There a solution to all of this:

    2022: Trump elected in 2022 to the House, and takes control of the House.

    2023: House Committee on UnAmerican Activities investigates

    2024: Pelosi, Waters, Harris etc are indicted for Treason

    2025: Pres DeSantis restores order. The Gang of Three on trial.

    2026: Speaker of the House Trump makes America great again.

  31. SafeNow says:

    The “sympathetic heart” standard was being substituted for the relevant standards, such as the police procedure regulations. I once read about a case in which the prosecutor argued that the “Golden Rule” should be applied, and that was ruled to be error. I’ll bet there’s case law saying that substituting “big heart” is like that.

    Assuming I am right and this was error, was it harmless. The defense attorney could have made my point in his closing argument. The judge could have made my point. Perhaps either or both did ..I not watch it.

    If this were a priest or mortician on trial, he would be expected to have a sympathetic heart. Thus, the argument could be made. But only by referring to standards in the priest manual, or expert testimony about sympathetic heart that came out during the priest’s trial.

    That’s what I think based on having seen many many Perry Mason programs, so I am like a legal expert.

  32. Anon7 says:

    Saint George died in police custody, even though the police followed their own procedures, that’s a fact. The family could try to sue for civil damages. That’s it.

    Oh, and let the riots begin!

    • Replies: @Patrick in SC
    , @TTSSYF
  33. @JohnnyWalker123

    It must have been tough for Rod Carew being Jewish in Minneapolis

  34. @War for Blair Mountain

    ‘Maxine Waters?

    ‘The Civil War just wasn’t worth it…’

    What? I can’t guarantee it, but maybe if we’d won, we wouldn’t have to listen to her today.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
  35. Art Deco says:
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    A hung jury is a possibility, and more likely than an acquittal

  36. Anonymous[209] • Disclaimer says:

    Legal Insurrection did a great job covering the trial. It’s clear Chauvin should never have been hauled into court over these bogus charges. And the black prosecutor sounded like Kamala Harris trying to prosecute Brett Kavanaugh for being a ham sandwich. What a moron.

  37. I’ve watched most of the trial and think acquittal is still possible, but can’t factor in the jurors’ legit fears for their lives. An anonymous jury with protection like in el chapo’s trial would have been nice.
    Judging by comments from Maxine Waters
    I don’t think people understand that chauvin isn’t charged with any form of intentional homicide. The most serious charges must be supported by finding that chauvin killed Floyd while committing an unlawful assault (felony murder) or was so reckless his death could be expected. In the absence of a scared or biased jury I just don’t see it.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  38. anon[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @unit472

    He closed with the video of Floyd saying he couldn’t breathe while standing, along with all his other erratic behavior.

  39. bucky says:
    @ATBOTL

    Agree. While Floyd was a mess of a person, and over 50% of his death is because of his own actions, Chauvin contributed to his death at the very least 25% and that should be enough to convict of one of the lesser charges.

    But Chauvin should also be convicted for being a spectacular dumbass in knowing he’s being filmed and continuing with the behavior. Cops need to be aware of appearances.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    , @gandydancer
  40. Anon7 says:
    @Wade Hampton

    150 years ago:

    When the peremptory challenges were all exhausted, a jury of twelve men was impaneled—a jury who swore they had neither heard, read, talked about nor expressed an opinion concerning a murder which the very cattle in the corrals, the Indians in the sage-brush and the stones in the streets were cognizant of! It was a jury composed of two desperadoes, two low beer-house politicians, three bar-keepers, two ranchmen who could not read, and three dull, stupid, human donkeys! It actually came out afterward, that one of these latter thought that incest and arson were the same thing…

    The jury system puts a ban upon intelligence and honesty, and a premium upon ignorance, stupidity and perjury. It is a shame that we must continue to use a worthless system because it was good a thousand years ago. In this age, when a gentleman of high social standing, intelligence and probity, swears that testimony given under solemn oath will outweigh, with him, street talk and newspaper reports based upon mere hearsay, he is worth a hundred jurymen who will swear to their own ignorance and stupidity, and justice would be far safer in his hands than in theirs. Why could not the jury law be so altered as to give men of brains and honesty and equal chance with fools and miscreants? Is it right to show the present favoritism to one class of men and inflict a disability on another, in a land whose boast is that all its citizens are free and equal?

    Mark Train, Roughing It, 1872

    • Thanks: Wade Hampton
  41. CCZ says:

    Woebegone Minneapolis!!

    Sacred Heart of Jesus, Polish National Catholic Church, Minneapolis

    Initial Report:
    – Multiple callers report smoke emitting from roof at 6:55pm CST
    – Fire personnel arrive shortly after
    – Fire quickly consumes building
    – No people found inside
    – An arson investigator is now on scene

  42. @JohnnyWalker123

    And now they are getting their revenge. When it comes to vengeance, nobody has a longer memory or is more obsessed with it than the Jews.

  43. @unit472

    Due to your prompting about equations, I pulled up the YouTube video of the MD’s direct testimony.

    I won’t watch 10 hours of dry, medical testimony (especially not from a prosecution witness), but I did FF/RW around the videos.

    I did not once see doctor standing in front of a grease board, writing equations, e.g. concentrations, partial pressures, etc.

    I did see him sitting in the box, explaining basic notions in qualitative terms, such as “in the absence of breathing, CO2 builds-up at a predictable rate”.

    Is that what you mean?

    • Replies: @unit472
  44. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    …plus obvious threats made to one of the witnesses…</blockquote

    I don't think a dead animal body part left at a very out of date address counts for much.

    …plus the NYT’s efforts to dox the jurors…

    That I hadn’t heard of.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @anon
  45. tyrone says:
    @Charles St. Charles

    Big shot democrats can’t be charged with crimes…….unless other democrats want them destroyed for some reason……no, just wait, she will get some reward.

  46. @ATBOTL

    “A handcuffed man cannot escape or threaten multiple armed police.”

    That’s actually not true.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Spud Boy
  47. @Blodgie

    “Yet this union dunce had TWO houses thanks to the police keeping Democrats elected in cities like MPLS.” Well there it is, that’s also fueling a lot of cop hate from the other side. HOW DARE THIS BLUE COLLAR JOB PAY WELL?!

    • Replies: @Blodgie
  48. @Anon7

    The family could try to sue for civil damages. That’s it.

    Someone, presumably Floyd’s family, has already been paid 27 million dollars, presumably in exchange for signing a release of all claims against the city and the cops.

  49. @Mike Tre

    “And the truth of the matter is, that the reason George Floyd is dead, is because Mr. Chauvin’s heart was too small,”

    is the jury made up of 12 year old girls?

    You nailed it for me, Mike.

    I read that and thought “what is this kindergarten?”

    This nation was conceived of as republic governed by responsible free men. My ancestors got rid of the faggotty, i’m in charge because of my daddy, king shit, and put themselves–as responsible, productive men–in charge. As it should be.

    Now we’re a minoritarianized, feminized … oh, oh, feelings … joke.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
  50. @Mike Tre

    “And the truth of the matter is, that the reason George Floyd is dead, is because Mr. Chauvin’s heart was too small,”

    is the jury made up of 12 year old girls?

    Don’t you mean “12 year old girls, 50 years ago”?

    12 year old girls today are no longer steeped in Dr. Seuss from the age of 6 – they have far more important and progressive things to learn, or rather accept, these days.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
  51. anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian

    Let me see if this works:

    https://web.archive.org/web/*/https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/30/us/chauvin-trial-jurors.html

    MINNEAPOLIS — A white intensive care nurse who said if she saw someone on the street who needed help, she would feel obligated to step in. A Black grandmother who said she had no personal experience with the police or the criminal justice system.

    A white widow who rides a motorcycle in her spare time and said she believes that “all lives matter.” A Black man who works in banking and said he was eager to serve on the jury of “the most historic case of my lifetime.”

    These are some of the jurors appointed to weigh the evidence in the case of Derek Chauvin, the white former police officer who is accused of murdering George Floyd, a Black man.

    The jury is a demographic mix: three Black men, one Black woman, and two women who identified themselves as multiracial. There are two white men and four white women. They are urban and suburban, ranging in age from their 20s to their 60s. The two alternates are white women.

    Of course it is just a human interest story. That’s why the Times kept sneaking in more details about the anonymous jurors. There could be no other possible reason. Human interest!

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  52. I’m just glad I moved very far away from blacks between the Summer of St. Fentanyl and this clown show trial verdict.

    When the mob of maskless blacks and purple-haired fatties stalked and shrieked down my street in the San Fernando Valley last June and vandalized several buildings on my block that was it for me. Now I’m swimming in a sea of rural Midwestern Whiteness and if I see the riots at all it will be remotely, very remotely.

  53. @ATBOTL

    Without the media scanning the country to find any racially tinged use of force incident at that precise moment in time (an election year) this would have also just been another overdose death.

  54. Prosa123 says:

    Are you going to have an RIP post for Walter Mondale?

    • Agree: Paleo Liberal
  55. JimDandy says:
    @Charles St. Charles

    Nancy Pelosi answered that question with an emphatic “NO!”

    So, case closed.

  56. @AnotherDad

    This nation was conceived of as republic governed by responsible free men. My ancestors got rid of the faggotty, i’m in charge because of my daddy, king shit, and put themselves–as responsible, productive men–in charge.

    I’d take that faggotty aristocratic rule over kneeling before dusky savages and shrieking harridans any day – at least the English monarchy was White and patriarchal.

    And though they didn’t say so explicitly, this nation was conceived of as republic governed by responsible free WHITE MEN.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  57. @JohnnyWalker123

    Jews had a thousand years to integrate with the European peoples they lived around.

    They–most of them–didn’t want to do it. They wanted to stay a separate tribe.

    So some gentiles treat them as … a separate tribe. Anti-Semitism!!!! Worst thing ever.

    Yawn.

  58. @Wade Hampton

    The prosecutor must think the jury are morons. What contempt he must have for them. But the jurors probably are morons if they couldn’t get out of this jury duty. If a prosecutor tried that garbage with a jury I was on, I would be very strongly tempted to acquit almost regardless of the facts just to show the prosecutor what I thought of him.

    One would like to think that there is at least one American man on the jury.

    A man who would stick to his gun, acquit and tell the truth: Chauvin’s a bozo who did a crappy job handling the situation and should not be a cop. But he is not primarily responsible for Floyd’s death–much less “murder” him. Floyd is primarily responsible for his own death, by taking a massive amount of drugs, freaking out and resisting arrest.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave, Mark G., Kylie
    • Replies: @bucky
    , @Anonymous
    , @Pericles
    , @Feryl
  59. bucky says:
    @AnotherDad

    But for him to be convicted it is not “primary” responsibility, just “contributing” responsibility.

    He definitely contributed. He should be convicted.

    • Disagree: gandydancer
    • Replies: @Pericles
    , @AnotherDad
  60. @ATBOTL

    Surely the Left can agree that we should re-introduce conscription for police officers. Only high IQ liberals will be accepted. Yes, such conscription will interrupt their other plans, but surely it is a small price to pay to avoid the annual 6-12 approx deaths of African Americans at the hands of the police. Five years in then we can compare their performance in policing diverse communities to those police officers selected by the current method.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  61. @Hibernian

    Hibernian wrote:

    Saying that in front of the jury is horrendous, if that’s what happened.

    My understanding is that discussing motions of this sort is normally made without the jury present.

    I took the judge’s demeanor to be “This case stinks, but under our system the jury decides the facts.”

    For what it is worth, I think that Chauvin made some bad decisions but that he is not guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

    Is there anyone on the jury with the guts to stand by that point?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Hibernian
  62. Kylie says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    “Ms. Waters should have kept her mouth shut.”

    Yes, she should have. And she would have had she had any sense of decency. But she doesn’t. And her running her big mouth has opened some people’s eyes, woke them up, so to speak. The kind of “woke” we need more of in this country, if it’s not already too late.

    I’m very glad she just couldn’t shut her big, ugly mouth.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  63. Anonymous[341] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    A man who would stick to his gun, acquit and tell the truth: Chauvin’s a bozo who did a crappy job handling the situation and should not be a cop.

    Where exactly did Chauvin err?

    • Replies: @Blodgie
  64. Anonymous[341] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    For what it is worth, I think that Chauvin made some bad decisions but that he is not guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

    “Some,” eh? One, two, three? What “bad decision” precisely did he make?

    • Replies: @vhrm
  65. @Kylie

    As they say in the California Caliphate Republic, “Grody to the Maxine.”

    • LOL: El Dato
    • Replies: @Kylie
  66. Blodgie says:
    @Aeronerauk

    The only way the midwit was able to make that money was by getting Democrats elected who agreed to the outrageous union demands.

    Are you OK with that trade off?

    The cops are.

    Wake up, bootlicker.

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @Aeronerauk
    , @Buycotter
  67. @Reg Cæsar

    Oh no, the real issue is the heart, a healthy, empathetic feeling of loyalty to your own people. You see, lots of clever sociopaths have inflicted misery on millions.

    They prance around telling other White people that there’s no anti-White agenda or that segregation needs to be forcefully ended, etc.

    Notice they spend a LOT of time trying to disrupt discourse on any site where White unity might come up, instead of spewing their nonsense on a Black, Latino or Asian site.

    You’ll never catch them posting on a BLM site. Because they’re actually anti-White.

  68. unit472 says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    No! Toobin never solved an equation. He simply said he had used a mathematical formula to calculate the pressure on Floyd’s neck and then showed a slide ( for a few seconds) to the jury purporting to be the relevant equation to derive the answer but without ( as math teachers would insist) showing his work. I was surprised Nelson let it pass without objection.

    Toobin was the prosecution’s key witness for asphyxiation but, other than his credentials as a pulmonary doctor ( and the judge even questioned his ‘expertise’ when he began opining on cardiology) but since Nelson did not object let it stand. This was a big problem. Eric Nelson did not have the expertise or resources to cross examine a hostile medical expert. In fact, Nelson bitterly began his cross examination of Toobin. by noting that he had only received from the prosecution Toobin’s exhibits the evening before he testified!

  69. Polistra says:
    @bucky

    Cops are aware of appearances, among other things. Do you really believe that Chauvin would have continued if he thought for a minute that the man beneath his knee was dying? Even at serious risk of dying? Not to mention that he knew full well that he was being recorded the entire time?

    Well, we have a nation of idiots who would believe such a thing, because they’ve been brainwashed by the mass media for the past few decades. But what excuse have people here, on this site?

    Separately: the quantifications you offer in your first paragraph are patently ridiculous. You’re no more qualified to make them than the man in the moon.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @Elli
  70. CCZ says:

    Competition for the lack of brains award:

  71. anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian

    I don’t think a dead animal body part left at a very out of date address counts for much.

    The dead animal part in question being the head of a pig, I recall. Some possible symbolism? Especially after all the rioting peaceful protesting last year and right up to the Current Week?

    Anyway, as the saying goes, “It’s the thought that counts”.

  72. Polistra says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Teenage Judy Garland Was Repeatedly Molested by Munchkins on Set of Wizard of Oz

    “They thought they could get away with anything because they were so small,” writes Garland’s ex-husband Sid Luft in a new memoir

    Dear God. My sides…my sides…

    No specific actors were accused of abuse in Luft’s memoir.

    Well no duh. Who could tell them apart?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @AceDeuce
  73. @Polistra

    They didn’t call them “munch-kins” for nothing!

  74. @Blodgie

    Yet this union dunce had TWO houses thanks to the police keeping Democrats elected in cities like MPLS.

    Every halfway successful white person in the Twin Cities has two houses, not counting the portable one used for ice fishing. It’s a Swedish thing.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  75. I just had an idea! There’s so many problems,and so many hurt feelings in Minnesota,why don’t we ask a Minnesotanof wisdom and compassion for advice. Someone whom we all can look up to.
    Walter Mondale! He is respected by all for his fairness and statesmanship. Yep,lets turn to Mondale.
    I don’t see any way my idea wouldn’t work! What could go wrong?f

  76. Pericles says:
    @AnotherDad

    Let us furthermore not forget that George Floyd was a scumbag who died of an overdose, yet might not have wanted prog trash antifa nor marxist BLM to burn down the hood for a few months with his death as an excuse.

  77. Pericles says:
    @bucky

    As a contributor, you will definitely be convicted when the day comes for Unz.com.

  78. anon[932] • Disclaimer says:

    Looks like CBS has joined in the effort to doxx “tell human interest stories” about the jurors.

    Ah, Liberalism…always lowering the bar.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  79. @bucky

    Chauvin contributed to his death at the very least 25% and that should be enough to convict of one of the lesser charges…

    You arrived at this number how?

    And, no, the charges differ in their elements, not according to the percentage of Chauvin’s contribution.

    The correct answer, given the “no reasonable doubt” standard, is 0%.

  80. @Charles St. Charles

    Yes, according to the Ninth Circus. Using the same federal law used to go after “white supremacists” crossing state lines to incite a riot, 18 USC 2101(a):

    https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2021/03/04/19-50189.pdf

    Good luck getting a federal prosecutor on board to go after that racist hag.

  81. Shouldn’t the be “If the heart don’t fit…” ?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  82. bomag says:
    @Blodgie

    Seems to be separate problems.

    One is over-payment in the public sector.

    The other is police work attracting people who are a ways out on the spectrum of criminality; and the buddy system that keeps them in place.

    Which is probably going to get worse as decent people are dissuaded by the current climate. The psychopathic are happy to back-fill.

  83. TTSSYF says:
    @Caspar von Everec

    Yes, it’s past time to go Galt.

  84. ic1000 says:
    @anon

    > the judge’s refusal of a venue change

    But Judge Cahill granting a Change of Venue so disinterested jurors could evaluate the evidence and render a verdict would have been Unconstitutional.

    Minnesota’s leadership is respecting George Floyd’s Right to a Fair Trial that ends in Chauvin’s conviction of murder.

    It’s the Jim Snow way to heed Lester Holt’s nightly command, “Take care of yourself and each other… nice city you got there, it’d be a shame if anything more happened to it.” Everybody wins.

  85. TTSSYF says:
    @Anon7

    How much more than $27 million do you think they should get?

  86. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    A white widow who rides a motorcycle in her spare time shouldn’t be that hard to find for a leftist organization with the money to hire a good P. I.

  87. Hibernian says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I think sometimes they might send the jury out of the courtroom rather than discuss the motion in chambers, now that I think of it. I was trying to figure out how the media was able to report it.

  88. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    This is worse than the NYT article.

  89. AceDeuce says:
    @Polistra

    Teenage Judy Garland Was Repeatedly Molested by Munchkins on Set of Wizard of Oz

    Hence the scrapped extra verse to the well-known “Wizard of Oz” song, to have been sung by a frustrated Munchkin–“If I Only had Five Inches”

  90. Feryl says:
    @Polistra

    My first reaction to the video wasn’t “what a monster for doing that” (which 99% lame stream “conservatives” stated without even knowing the context of the situation), it was empathizing with a cop trying to corral a large criminal while camera holding bystanders questioned him, and the other (multi-racial) police after a certain point distanced themselves from Chauvin and Floyd.

    This wasn’t Rodney King where the cops had zero awareness of being filmed. And phone cameras and eventually body cams have probably cut down on police inflicted violence a lot.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  91. Spud Boy says:
    @Aeronerauk

    ““A handcuffed man cannot escape or threaten multiple armed police.”

    That’s actually not true.”

    OK, then zip tie his legs together, and then zip tie the leg zip tie to the handcuffs behind his back. Where’s he going to go when hog tied like that?

    • LOL: Aeronerauk
    • Replies: @vhrm
  92. Feryl says:
    @AnotherDad

    Were all armchair cop critics now. Back in 1992, people hated criminals so much that a fair number of people enjoyed the beating of Rodney King. But nowadays even dissident right website commenters show contempt for Derek Chauvin, a hapless slightly built white guy who sheepishly kept a knee on a drug addict career criminal built like a line-backer while a crowd of people spazzed out and screamed at him. And did I mention that Floyd actually requested removal from a police vehicle due to a stated lack of comfort and inability to breathe, which the police complied with, and the police did notify and did await a medical response team.

    And did you know that criminal aresstees frequently feign medical distress to gain opportunities to escape and/or attack the cops? How many times had Chauvin heard that kind of BS from criminals?

    Did Chauvin screw up? Maybe. But in the course of dealing with the George Floyd’s of the world, things can get ugly. And….
    Difficult. And complicated.

  93. Feryl says:
    @Houston 1992

    One wonders why all the Left wing cop haters don’t just, ya know, try to become the cops themselves.

    • Replies: @Blodgie
    , @Blodgie
  94. G. Poulin says:
    @Charles St. Charles

    Dr. Suess has been cancelled and will soon be memory-holed. Couldn’t have happened tp a nicer commie propagandist.

  95. @The Alarmist

    Defence counsel – “If Floyd’s heart was shit, you must acquit“.

  96. Redman says:
    @JimDandy

    I think you’re being a bit harsh. Judge Cahill has little choice in the matter. Motions for mistrials are made and denied all the time. Often several times during the same trial.

    Cahill knows that the standard he’d be judged on is extremely harsh. If riots breaking out in Brooklyn didn’t merit a mistrial, anything Crazy Maxine (“Aunt Esther”) says surely doesn’t.

    • Disagree: Abolish_public_education
    • Replies: @anon
    , @JimDandy
  97. Dan Smith says:

    An appeal based on prosecutorial misconduct is likely given that the affirmative action attorney doing the rebuttal repeatedly indicated that defense counsel was lying, which in a criminal trial is a huge no go. Blackwell specializes in civil suits where that kind of grandstanding is allowed. If Nelson demonstrates misconduct occurred, it’s grounds for dismissal of charges with prejudice, meaning Chauvin walls and Minnesota burns.

    • Thanks: vhrm
  98. Not one politician has the guts to tell the lynch mob to back off, or tell them to respect due process.

    Chauvin did nothing wrong. He inflicted no harm on Floyd as he waited for the paramedics.

    The last thing he wanted was for the gentle giant Floyd to begin a wild struggle, as shackled arrestees sometimes do. That would have sent the hostile crowd into a frenzy, and could have endangered all of the officers. Chauvin was a veteran of working outside bars. He knew better than anyone how out-numbered cops have to keep things calm.

    Chauvin did a better job than 99 percent of the armchair quarterbacks could have.

    • Agree: James Braxton
    • Replies: @Alden
  99. @Just another serf

    “I prefer negro lawyers who rhyme”

    I’m not a negro or lawyer but I’m going to channel Johnnie Cochran on this one “if the knee don’t fit you must acquit”.

  100. Travis says:
    @Colin Wright

    we should have rioted when the Black cop executed the unarmed white female in the Capital.

    It is clear from video footage that Ashli Babbitt was not a threat to the officer, or any other person, when she was shot. Ashli was unarmed. She did not assault anyone. She did not threaten to harm anyone. There was no excuse for shooting her, without warning or any verbal commands to stop.

    At the time of the shooting, there were over a half-dozen police officers in close proximity to the Speaker’s door where Ashli was standing. None of them attempted to stop her, in fact they stepped away from the door to allow the protestors to give them access.

    Ashli Babbit was 5’2″ tall and weighed just 110 pounds. It would have been simple to restrain her. yet the half-dozen cops within 9 feet of her made no attempt to subdue or arrest her. She was simply executed by a BLM activist police officer in cold blood without warning.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  101. Blodgie says:
    @Anonymous

    Keeping his knee on an already cuffed and soon to be unconscious black man on the pavement while another black man was filming him and telling him to stop was beyond stupid and obtuse.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  102. Blodgie says:
    @Feryl

    Why do all of you bootlicking, jock sniffing dorks think you have to be a leftist to criticize the unionized police that have done so much to put Democrats in power?

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  103. Blodgie says:
    @Feryl

    Why do all of you bootlicking, jock sniffing dorks think you have to be a leftist to criticize the unionized police that have done so much to put Democrats in power?

  104. @bucky

    But for him to be convicted it is not “primary” responsibility, just “contributing” responsibility.

    He definitely contributed. He should be convicted.

    Bucky, your “definitely” here is just wrong. You don’t know that. I don’t know it. No one knows it. It is possible. That’s all.

    I.e. it is possible that Floyd’s OD and resisting arrest was survivable with some alternative subduing actions from Chauvin.

    But
    a) we don’t even know that
    b) Chauvin’s job is not “the best medically appropriate arrest method for this particular suspect” it is to arrest anyone requiring arrest according to MPD policy and methods.

    Floyd caused his own death–period:
    — Floyd abused drugs and engaged in behavior (along with whatever genetics) that gave him a weak, crappy heart
    — Floyd (guessing) took drugs earlier that day
    — Floyd engaged in behavior–trying to pass a fake bill–that got him arrested.
    — Floyd apparently consumed some of his supply to avoid being caught with it–OD
    — Floyd resisted arrest forcing the officers to engage in a physical struggle to subdue him; which perhaps pushed his heart, along with his OD, over the edge
    — Somehow the ambulance dispatchers under-prioritized the ambulance dispatch
    — Derek Chauvin used an MPD approved method to subdue/restrain Floyd

    We simply don’t know whether some other MPD approved subdue/restrain method would have kept Floyd alive.

    But more importantly, Floyd is not entitled to “best medically appropriate” subdue/restrain procedures when he resists arrests. If Floyd wants/needs kid glove treatment … don’t resist arrest! Chauvin isn’t a nurse, he’s a cop.

    And most importantly if the neck kneel technique offends elite sensibilities as beyond the pale, that is not Chauvin’s fault.

    Those procedures are the responsibility of the MPD brass and ultimately the Antifa loving mayor Jacob Frey. If the the neck kneel is a structurally racist killer, put Jacob Frey in the dock.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @bucky
    , @anon
  105. SMK says: • Website
    @anon

    “Modern progressivism/liberalism at work.” With a few exceptions, liberalism is dead. True liberals support freedom of speech and presumption of innocence and due process under the law even for people they hate and dislike. And in what sense is this mob of fanatics and vigilantes and all of the MSM with the exception of Fox and virtually all democrats “progressive,” a word that has positive connotations? Maxine Watters is a “liberal” and “progressive”?! And has even one leftist in the MSM or Democrat condemned her hatred and incitements to violence and advocacy and celebration of mob rule. This is white-hating left-wing racial totalitarianism.

  106. anon[149] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redman

    anything Crazy Maxine (“Aunt Esther”) says surely doesn’t.

    Meh. I bet Maxine Waters never lit anyone’s cigarette using fire on her fingertips.

  107. @Blodgie

    Bootlicker? That yoga must be paying off.

    But anyway you’re not completely off base to associate strong unions with shitty democrat politicians getting elected. Here’s an easy solution: Republicans should support unions that benefit their voters.

    Pretty sure cops individually vote republican even in spite of the latter’s anti union policies.

    • Replies: @Blodgie
  108. Buycotter says:
    @Blodgie

    “I know a way we can save money on policing!” Signed, a Communist.

  109. Travis says:
    @unit472

    did the defense mention that George Floyd died while fighting COVID ?

    His death would have been counted as another COVID fatality if he died at the hospital from a drug overdose, since he tested positive for the deadly coronavirus. I wonder how many other drug deaths were attributed to COVID during the pandemic.

  110. AndrewR says:
    @Charles St. Charles

    Her fellow octogenarian terrorist, Queen Nancy, has openly backed her, so Maxine is safe from that

  111. JimDandy says:
    @Redman

    Give me a break. His comments were pathetic. And he wouldn’t even sequester the jury earlier. He’s a joke.

  112. Elli says:
    @Polistra

    I think that Chauvin was so determined to stand firm and unyielding before the crowd that he discounted their correct assessments of Floyd’s condition and the reports of his own officers that they could not find a pulse.

    And perhaps, it did sink in at some point, and he thought, oh shit, what have I done, I have to pretend nothing has happened.

    Gross, inexcusable negligence, born out of the belief that he had to demonstrate command at all costs.

    • Disagree: El Dato
    • Replies: @anon
  113. Forbes says:
    @ATBOTL

    Since the officer was following policy and training, i.e. doing his job, the argument asserting foolishness is that–foolish. The rest is just a distraction.

  114. anon[202] • Disclaimer says:

    Primary source: Rep. Maxine Waters via Unicorn Riot. Her own words, right here. She’s fine with the results.

  115. CCZ says:

    “Prosecution Demands Jury Convict Derek Chauvin

    And so does Joe:

    “President Joe Biden Calls George Floyd’s Family As Jury Deliberates, Says He Hopes ‘Everything Will Come Out OK’”

    Mr. Biden said that he is praying the verdict is the “right” verdict.

    “I can only imagine the pressure and the anxiety they’re feeling,” he said. “They’re a good family and they’re calling for peace and tranquility.”

    White House press secretary Jen Psaki tweeted on Tuesday that Mr. Biden spoke with Floyd “to check in with them and also share that the family was in his prayers.”

    Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, said in an interview with NBC News that Mr. Biden called him earlier this week.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/george-floyd-joe-biden-derek-chauvin-trial-verdict/

    • Replies: @El Dato
  116. unit472 says:

    A note aside, everyone focuses on the initial charge of passing counterfeit money but, had not Floyd died, its reasonable to assume he would also have been charged with operating a motor vehicle under the influence and possession of narcotics. He was found in and in control of an autombile and in a condition that no officer could overlook and drugs were found in the car and on his person.

  117. vhrm says:
    @Anonymous

    “Some,” eh? One, two, three? What “bad decision” precisely did he make?

    After another officer told Chauvin that Floyd had no pulse, Chauvin and his fellow officers held the position for 2½ minutes instead of attempting CPR or chest compressions to revive him.
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/04/07/derek-chauvin-trial-duty-care-george-floyd-minneapolis-police/7106082002/

    For anyone who’d had first aid and CPR training, as Chauvin had, that is a very serious mistake. “I can’t find a pulse” is about equivalent to “hey your pants are on fire” in terms of promoting SOME response (1)

    Even more so for someone who knows about positional asphyxia and excited delirium, and is in the process of restraining a dude on his stomach who has stopped talking fire the first time since you got there and had also entirely stopped moving.

    I’d speculate it’s probable that the heckling crowd distracted him enough that he didn’t absorb that message, but still , a big mistake.

    1) Unless you’re doing open heart surgery or are the stuntman in that Pink Floyd video/movie with the dude on fire, respectively. Then it would be expected.

    • Replies: @Alden
  118. vhrm says:
    @Spud Boy

    OK, then zip tie his legs together, and then zip tie the leg zip tie to the handcuffs behind his back. Where’s he going to go when hog tied like that?

    Chauvin and the others considered doing just that when discussing getting a hobble.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/explainer-decision-hobble-issue-chauvin-trial-76911886

  119. Alden says:
    @beavertales

    Agree agree agree agree.

    Los Angeles tries to hire nothing but Hispanic and asian cops. Because most blacks have minor criminal records and its heresy and illegal
    to hire Whites

    So we have a city full of 5’7 asian Hispanic men and 5’2 Asian Hispanic women uniformed patrol chasing after 6’ plus black men. The solution seems to be at least 4, preferably 6 of the midget cops after one black man.

    It’s a sight to behold. Four 5’7 Hispanic men cops questioning a 6’3 black man and the 5’2 Hispanic woman sergeant standing a safe 12 feet away supervising.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  120. Alden says:
    @vhrm

    The prosecutor and the lynch Chauvin mob don’t seem to understand the different standards of care expected of a medical doctor treating a patient and a police officer restraining a violent criminal who weighed 90 pounds more than the officer.

    90 pounds that’s normal weight of a 12 year old boy and many full grown adult Asian women.

    Floyd’s numerous booking sheets recorded his height as 6’6 and weight 230 pounds. Chauvin is 5’9 140 pounds. That’s slim enough for a woman to be a model or 1960s airline stewardess as they were called then.

    Before the satanic supremes found for plaintiff Griggs, the minimum height for a man police officer was usually 5’9 150 pounds. A man the size of Chauvin would barely make the height requirement and would have to pork up on ice cream and pizza a month before the annual physical.

    There are some jobs short thin Americans just can’t do, whether they’re short thin asian Hispanic men or short thin American women of all races. .

    5’7 uniformed men cops are fine in Mexico and S America where the criminals are also 5’7.
    5’5 uniformed men cops are fine in Asia where the criminals are also 5’5.

    But in America the criminals, especially the ones who violently resist arrest are the biggest race, blacks. And because of the satanic supremes, departments are forced to recruit uniformed patrol from the smallest races, Asians and Hispanics.

    Police is not the only occupation small people have trouble doing. One major such profession is nursing. Before the satanic supremes finding in Griggs the minimum height weight requirement for admission to nursing school was 5’4 120 or 125 pounds. That’s because nurses spend much of their day moving patients bigger than themselves around and reaching up to shelves.

    Workmen’s Compensation insurance costs have soared since the satanic supremes forced teeny tiny little Asians and Phillipinas into nursing. Years of 105 pound nurses hauling 200 pound patients around causes orthopedic problems. Climbing up on footstools several times a day. Eventually she’ll fall.

    Advice to White high school boys. Apply to nursing school. It’s the only profession that welcomes White men any more. Because men are tall enough to reach up to shelves and haul patients around.

    And due to the fact that nurses.
    1 need only a 4 year degree
    2 have a union
    3 don’t have to borrow 100K -300K for 8 years of school and 5 or 6 years of internship and residency
    4 start a well paid career at 22-23 rather than 35,

    Make more money than Drs over a lifetime. Can even have kids, buy a house and make some investments before age 40.

    But most of all, nurses have a union and Drs don’t.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Hibernian
  121. @Charles St. Charles

    And though they didn’t say so explicitly, this nation was conceived of as republic governed by responsible free WHITE MEN.

    They were somewhat explicit:

    “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity

    pos·​ter·​i·​ty | \ pä-ˈster-ə-tē
    \
    Definition of posterity

    1 : the offspring of one progenitor to the furthest generation

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  122. anon[347] • Disclaimer says:

    For any who were wondering, the “who” of the pig head in the Chauvin trial.

    https://nypost.com/2021/04/18/pigs-head-left-at-former-home-of-derek-chauvin-defense-witness/

    Maybe there should be some laws about attempted intimidation of witnesses. If such laws existed, maybe they could be enforced?

    Oh, wait, “Who? Whom?” is probably more important, at least to truly enlightened, progressive and Liberal people.

  123. bucky says:
    @AnotherDad

    There is what is in the rules and then there is what is ethical. Chauvin may have technically been using an approved restraint, but there is discretion in an officer in using the appropriate restraint technique. He is not a rule-following robot.

    What is more likely is that Chauvin was being a dick. He knew that the knee to the neck is uncomfortable, but he was frustrated with Floyd being a jerk, as would anyone. He held him like that to “teach him a lesson” which would have worked out fine for him if Floyd were a normal healthy person, but Floyd was overdosing on Fent at the time and so he passed away as a result.

    This is a fairly convincing explanation of the restraint technique: https://apnews.com/article/was-officer-knee-on-george-floyd-neck-authorized-639cab5a670173ea9cc311db4386abf2

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    , @Mike Tre
  124. Kylie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol! Maxine is as ugly on the inside as she is on the outside, giving the lie to Fred Sanford’s famous quip on Sanford and Son:

    https://yarn.co/yarn-clip/50a9ab61-2c55-4079-86e0-63c484f05102

  125. @Colin Wright

    It’s not the listening to her that grates, it’s looking at that gorgon that’s so painful to the retinas.

    Where’s Perseus when you need him?

  126. El Dato says:
    @CCZ

    “President Joe Biden Calls George Floyd’s Family As Jury Deliberates, Says He Hopes ‘Everything Will Come Out OK’”

    What if he wanted to call Putin about Ukraine but mixed up the numbers in his Rolodex.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  127. El Dato says:
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Activists said they were skeptical that much has changed.

    “What they have attempted to do is mount a PR campaign rather than really deal with the brutality of policing,” said Melina Abdullah, a professor at California State University Los Angeles and co-founder of Black Lives Matter in Los Angeles.

    Ms. Abdullah said that the city should be taking money away from the police department rather than giving them more money for training. She would like to see the funding directed to programs that address poverty and inequity among other issues.

  128. anon[106] • Disclaimer says:
    @Elli

    I think you don’t know much about the case other than what CNN has injected into your skull.

  129. @Paleo Liberal

    “Ms. Waters should have kept her mouth shut.”

    It is a waste of time to expect a mental and physical impossibility.

  130. anon[106] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    — Floyd (guessing) took drugs earlier that day

    If you had actually bothered to follow the trial and knew the facts, you would not have to guess.

    “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to poast and remove any doubt”.

  131. ATBOTL says:
    @bucky

    But if Floyd’s death was caused by an overdose and/or heart attack, he wasn’t resisting arrest, he was dying. That’s something that the bootlickers can’t answer. Police need to consider that someone who says they can’t breathe is telling truth. Either Floyd was telling the truth or he was killed solely by police action. You bootlickers can’t have it both ways.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Anonymous
  132. Mike Tre says:
    @bucky

    “There is what is in the rules and then there is what is ethical. Chauvin may have technically been using an approved restraint, but there is discretion in an officer in using the appropriate restraint technique. He is not a rule-following robot. ”

    This is nonsense. You’re wrong and are resorting to hypothetical hindsight.

  133. raga10 says:

    Well, it looks like charge of first-degree grinchism didn’t stick, but second-degree manslaughter, third-degree murder and second-degree unintentional murder did.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
  134. @Alden

    I think Chauvin should be acquitted, as there is lots of room for “reasonable doubt”. However, I am not convinced he will be. IMO, it was impossible for those jurors not to have formed some sort of opinion, almost certainly negative, regardless of what they said on selection. The Stalinist show trial should have been moved.
    On the off chance he is acquitted, like the cops in the Rodney King case, he will be prosecuted for something else.
    https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/people/a-wyatt-mann/photos/page/2

  135. JimDandy says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    We are all Chauvinists now.

  136. Derek Chauvin was sacrificed so hundreds wouldn’t die and cities wouldn’t be burnt to the ground.

    “And I’m proud to be an American
    Where at least I know I’m free

    ……

    From the lakes of Minnesota
    To the hills of Tennessee”

  137. MEH 0910 says:

  138. Hibernian says:
    @Alden

    Los Angeles tries to hire nothing but Hispanic and asian cops. Because most blacks have minor criminal records and its heresy and illegal
    to hire Whites

    In the crazy world we live in, that’s a rational policy in the city, inner ring suburbs, and sheriff’s departments in counties containing major cities, such as LA, Wayne, and Cook, except it wouldn’t fly in Wayne if only because Detroit has a very small Hispanic population, and in Chicago/Cook the pressure for patronage hiring of Black men and women is enormous.

    The days of Asian and Hispanic men or even women being midgets is past. It’s not uncommon for East Asian women from East Asia to be 5’10” or taller. As for the men, think Yao Ming and Jeremy Lin. American born Andrew Yang is no giant, but no midget either.

  139. @raga10

    “Well, it looks like charge of first-degree grinchism didn’t stick, but second-degree manslaughter, third-degree murder and second-degree unintentional murder did”

    Defense attorney moved for mistrial because nonsensical verdict, right? Or was it a Shroedinger’s killing: simultaneously intentional and accidental?

    • Replies: @raga10
  140. Hibernian says:
    @Alden

    …and Drs don’t.

    This organization has historically inflated physician incomes by restricting medical school enrollment:

    What is the AMA?

    Dr. incomes have been going down because of all the foreign medical graduates admitted to the US by INS, or whatever they’re called now, and admitted to practice by the states. Surgeons and specialists still do very well.

  141. When I was a kid, I watched a lot of football and coaches seemed to always punt on 4th down even if it was just inches. The reason was obvious to me, even as a kid, that the incentives were screwed up. The coach only gets blamed if he goes on 4th and fails. Nobody blames him for punting.

    I’m beginning to think the same is true for not advising murder defendants to testify. Attorneys almost always advise against testifying because THEY will look bad (the odds of ever being acquitted are lousy), not because it actually reduces the odds of winning. In fact, in a case like this, where humanizing Derek Chauvin was absolutely paramount, he should have testified.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  142. @Blodgie

    Would it have made a difference if he wasn’t unionized? Was Chauvin responsible for the MPD becoming unionized?
    Are you so personally acquainted with Chauvin that he tells you how he votes?
    At first, I thought you were suffering from cranio-anal inversion, but now I see it is anacephaly.

    • Replies: @Blodgie
  143. raga10 says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Or was it a Shroedinger’s killing: simultaneously intentional and accidental?

    As far as I’m concerned it was only intentional, but I’m not the jury.

    • Replies: @anon
  144. Corvinus says:
    @William Badwhite

    Per usual, you need a history lesson.

    “Posterity” has three possible meanings: one’s actual legal descendants and heirs, one’s succeeding generations, or simply refers to later times. Samuel Johnson in his dictionary preceding the Revolution and in his edition contemporary with defines it as both descendants and succeeding generations. Note if “succeeding generations” means the same thing as descendants, or vice versa, it would have been unnecessary to include both definitions. He also cited to Latin, wherein posterity as refers means future generations, one’s actual descendants, AND future times.

    Now, Johnson was NOT descended from the successful revolutionaries of 1776 nor even related to the statesmen of 1789. Thus, we could discount him and his dictionary. Yet, Webster’s Dictionary at that same time uses the same definitions, and employs the same language of the day. How do we address “the addition of the word ‘our’ must restrict it to descendants alone?” Simply, we add “our” to either definition and both stand equally well on their own – “our descendants,” “our succeeding generations” – without changing their relationship or meaning.

    Indeed, Madison and company COULD have meant only the descendants of the then “People of the United States”, which includes the half-white, half-Indian, and Dutch, German, Scots, Irish, and French. half breeds from Indian-settler matches, Dutch and Germans, Scots and Irish. Lafayette, von Steuben, Pulaski, and Kosciuszko, not native born, so they had to go back.

    However, it would have been easy enough for the Founding Fathers to have written into the Constitution, words to the effect of, “The law for citizenship in the United States shall be the same as prevailed in that other great democracy, Athens, at the time of Pericles”, which would given special consideration in deserving cases, most notably Pericles’ son by the courtesan, Aspasia, was granted citizenship, even though not full blooded Athenian. There were dozens of ways to have restricted citizenship, but the Founding Fathers, being educated and intelligent men, neglected to make those distinctions.

    Rather, they wrote into the Constitution an understanding and intent to permit naturalization, with the implication of immigration, in Article 1, Section 2, Clause 2—“No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty-five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen” AND Article One, Section Three, Clause Three—“No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.”

    The Founding Fathers here were focusing exclusively on higher qualifications for more important offices, in the context of permitting people who were not citizens, who came from outside, to come in and become citizens. Shortly thereafter, the Naturalization Act of 1790, written by men closely in tune with the tenor of the times and either drafters of the Constitution, or associates of those who drafted it – permitted free white aliens, who had been resident for two years, to become citizens.

    YET, the Founding Fathers granted Congress the expressive permission to change such criteria. While this act was restrictive, it was not restricted to British white people, and certainly not only descendants of those here prior to the Revolution. What about Negroes and Asians and womenfolk? Well, we have an amendment process.

  145. @Alden

    I’m inclined to say that in 20 years this will largely regarded by all upcoming lawyers-in-training as an example of a fraudulent show trial. The more technical question is will Chauvin be acquitted next year or does he have to look forward to a lifetime of continued prosecutions in a way similar to John Demjanjuk. That I can’t say.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
  146. Blodgie says:
    @Aeronerauk

    But cops union dues have been used to elect Dems for decades.

    They got in bed with the left and thought it would work out.

    Now the left has turned on the cops and I have no sympathy for them.

  147. Blodgie says:
    @Curmudgeon

    Union dues, not voting.

    These greedy bastards thought it was OK to get Dems elected as long as the Dems kept the gravy train rolling.

    Great plan, guys.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  148. @Arclight

    Failure to grant a change of venue makes it all an academic exercise.

  149. anon[227] • Disclaimer says:
    @raga10

    As far as I’m concerned

    No one cares.

    • Replies: @raga10
  150. @ATBOTL

    …You bootlickers can’t have it both ways.’

    ? The bootlickers were on the jury.

  151. @Blodgie

    ‘Keeping his knee on an already cuffed and soon to be unconscious black man on the pavement while another black man was filming him and telling him to stop was beyond stupid and obtuse.’

    As you describe it, it sounds like he was doing his job.

  152. raga10 says:
    @anon

    Bless the posters who care enough to post that they don’t care!

  153. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:
    @Morris Applebaum IV

    In fact, in a case like this, where humanizing Derek Chauvin was absolutely paramount, he should have testified.

    Not only was he mum, but his face was obscured behind a mask. It all gave an impression consistent with the misleading image on the video of his being unfeeling, uncaring.

  154. Anonymous[319] • Disclaimer says:
    @ATBOTL

    Police need to consider that someone who says they can’t breathe is telling truth. Either Floyd was telling the truth or he was killed solely by police action.

    Most people who complain they cannot breath when being arrested are lying in an attempt to escape arrest. Police know this. Since Floyd was complaining even while standing, they had reason to believe he was lying like all the rest.

  155. @Patrick McNally

    I’m inclined to say that in 20 years this will largely regarded by all upcoming lawyers-in-training as an example of a fraudulent show trial.

    Cock-eyed optimist.

  156. @Blodgie

    Police unions are not into “woke”, or “liberal” prosecutors, judges and politicians. Cops, in general, are quite conservative, other than their philandering. Unions reflect their members. Other unions see police unions, and for that matter firefighters as part of the “establishment”.
    Unions are not required to, and seldom do, back members in criminal procedings. The police union in Minneapolis voted to donate to Chauvin’s defense. You can bet they don’t back “Dems”.

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