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Prohibition Cut Patents by 15%
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From Alex Tabarrok in Marginal Revolution:

I was taken aback by the bottom line of Mike Andrews new working paper Bar Talk: closing the saloons during Prohibition reduced patenting by ~15%. At first, I thought that seemed like a very large decline but bear in mind that saloons were the coffeehouses of the day devoted not just to drinking but to meeting, talking and learning. Indeed, they were much more common than coffeehouses today. …

The saloons also often combined social aspects with a mailbox depot, telegraph or telephone, and a payday lender so they were good places to talk shop.

Andrew’s compares countries that were forced dry by state prohibition laws with previously dry counties, so the estimates are local and from across the country. He has significant patent data including the location of inventors and a variety of important robustness tests. Women, for example, didn’t typically patronize the saloons but also continued to patent at similar rates in wet and dry counties.

Wilfrid Sheed wrote of the mid-century “New Yorker:

“Thurber’s world cannot remotely be understood without understanding Prohibition, or the locker-room version of it: a plot brewed up by women and Protestant ministers while our soldiers were overseas, in order to end America’s men-only culture and bring the boys all the way home, not just as far as the nearest saloon.”

Feminism triumphed in 1919, pushing through both women’s suffrage and prohibition. The latter so alienated creative men that feminism fell out of fashion for a half century.

 
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  1. There is also something to be said of alcohol-fueled inspiration. Drink is a classic double-edged sword.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara, Coemgen
    • Replies: @gent
    , @JMcG
  2. Currahee says:

    Sent to fight a stupid war for no reason, back home to grinning fems and Spanish Flu.

  3. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    but bear in mind that saloons were the coffeehouses of the day devoted not just to drinking but to meeting, talking and learning.

    and coffee houses were the saloons of their day.

    why does evey jew think history began in 1918?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  4. Catdog says:

    closing the saloons during Prohibition reduced patenting by ~15%

    This doesn’t pass the eye-roll test.

  5. SafeNow says:

    E-mail has greatly destroyed “brainstorming,” in many fields. Medicine, law, construction, etc.

    On feminism. A woman possesses the power to derange a man; or, more accurately, get him to derange himself. Poets and novelists have been writing about this for five hundred years. But I don’t know to what degree this power can coëxist with feminism.
    ,

    • Replies: @Undisclosed
    , @Anonymous
  6. Any man forced to work from home with his spouse during this pandemic can probably attest to his creativity and work rate dropping, while men working from home alone probably saw negligible loss in productivity. This is why affluent married men of yesteryear had studies/libraries — the mancaves of their day — which their wives were barred from.

    IIRC, before 1919 bars were not places women went to. The only women to be found in such places were prostitutes or cheap floozies. The flapper era brought some women women to speakeasies, but flappers had reputations as being easier than most (sorry, more “adventurous). By the 1950s, good girls didn’t go to bars, as they were too busy trying to lock down a man for marriage. It was only in the decadent 70s and onwards that “normal” women pushed themselves into bars like we see today, and then only in safe spaces (e.g. IIRC the bar scenes in “Rocky”, set in the 1970s, were barren of women).

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  7. Anon[426] • Disclaimer says:

    Prohibition didn’t cut invention, rather, it cut the the part that made a guy get drunk and agree to make a business deal to develop someone’s patent. It cut the venture capitalism part. To invent something, you have to be sober.

    Most patents are useless and don’t go anywhere.

    • Replies: @Jim from Boston
  8. The Prohibition era was the death knell to populist WASP America of Jennings Bryan & temperance movements. Patrician WASPs were all against it, but didn’t care- they got their stashes of fine spirits for themselves.

    All ethnic Americans were, of course, furious, while Southerners were hypocrites- dry in theory, super-wet in practice.

    A lasting legacy of that era is iconic American literature (F.Scott Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, West, Wolfe, …even oldies like Dreiser and Lewis); then movies (Hawks & many of them later), plus something we could name real organized crime (Dillinger and Bonnie & Clyde were, essentially, a hangover from the James & Dalton gangs).

    For females, it was the era of increase of their promiscuity & idolatry of femme fatale, which run contrary to the Victorian ideal of purity & respectable family life with schoolmarms turning husbands into doormats.

  9. I remember seeing MacKenzie Phillips on TV talking about in rehab there was a bunch of Bell Labs people.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  10. I’ll drink to that!

    Watch this funny 1-minute clip.

  11. Anonymous[305] • Disclaimer says:

    I hope we don’t see a decline in innovation due to the two years Covid lockdown.

    I also hope that all the forced diversity and integration doesn’t disrupt the ability of a critical mass of people to cross pollinate ideas with each other.

  12. Anonymous[268] • Disclaimer says:

    At first, I thought that seemed like a very large decline but bear in mind that saloons were the coffeehouses of the day devoted not just to drinking but to meeting, talking and learning.

    Now consider what banning people from social media does.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  13. gent says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Supposedly the ancient Persians would discuss governmental matters twice, once while sober during the day, and once while drinking in the night and make a conclusion based on the latter. I don’t remember if this is Herodotus though.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    , @bruce
  14. • Replies: @Nathan
  15. @gent

    We used to do something like that with weed in college. Inverted order though.

  16. @Anonymous

    You may be certain that the second, if not both, of your items is happening.

    “Thurber’s world cannot remotely be understood without understanding Prohibition, or the locker-room version of it: a plot brewed up by women and Protestant ministers while our soldiers were overseas, in order to end America’s men-only culture and bring the boys all the way home, not just as far as the nearest saloon.”

    The so-called “locker-room version” appears to be remarkably accurate, particularly when viewed through the long lens of history.

    Now consider what banning people from social media does.

    And consider the lengths TPTB are going to, to ensure that people can’t patronize any alternatives. It’s that freedom thing, I guess.

  17. @Anonymous

    When coffeehouses first appeared in Europe, they sometimes got banned or were considered places of interest for government agents — because they became gathering places of intelligent young men with a lot of time on their hands, and the caffeine got them excited and caused them to have very animated conversations about everything that was wrong in their country and the politics.

    Young smart guys with time on their hands, not a lot to do, gathered together with something to excite them into conversation is a recipe for big problems for a ruling class.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Thanks: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  18. anon[420] • Disclaimer says:

    according to the book “Last Call – The Rise and Fall of Prohibition” jews were 60% of bootleggers during Prohibition. The book was written by (((Daniel Okrent))), a former editor at the New York Times

    apparently though, jewish bootleggers “saved the day” by breaking the goyim’s laws:

    https://vinepair.com/articles/jewish-prohibition-bootlegging/

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Ganderson
  19. Nathan says:

    That’s great and all, but I can’t even imagine what Thurber’s world must have been like. The campaign against male social spaces has been so thoroughly successful that I can hardly get a decent haircut at a proper barber shop. You have to go to the unisex salon and hope the lady there knows how to cut men’s hair. Saloons? Forget about it. Right out.

  20. @anon

    why does evey jew think history began in 1918?

    I thought Tabarrok was Iranian?

    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
  21. Nathan says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s a bunch of propaganda.

    You can go to Thailand for things other than sexual depravity.

    • Replies: @prosa123
  22. @R.G. Camara

    This is why affluent married men of yesteryear had studies/libraries — the mancaves of their day — which their wives were barred from.

    I think we call those “ham shacks” today… this one the wife ‘suggested’ to the hubby…

    • Replies: @Alden
  23. @R.G. Camara

    When coffeehouses first appeared in Europe, they sometimes got banned or were considered places of interest for government agents — because they became gathering places of intelligent young men with a lot of time on their hands….

    This sounds like it’s in part an elite overproduction problem. Something we’re experiencing in our own ways in the US and I’m sure other parts of the West.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
  24. I recall some program on the History Channel or maybe even the Food Network that bragged about how one of the “unexpected benefits” of Prohibition was Jews being admitted to polite society. Kids would go to speakeasies run by Jews (e.g. Toots Shor in NYC) while mom and dad WASP admitted their Jewish bootleggers in the front door (while doctors and other “tradesmen” used the side door).

    Prohibition also made respectability unrespectable. You’d go to Toots Shor’s and not only were you breaking the law, you were drinking along side the Mayor, Jimmy Walker, and a few Supreme Court judges. As Henry Hill says in Goodfellas, “how could I go back to school and listen to all that good government crap?”

    Another Protestant own goal. “We’ll show those drunken micks and dagoes a thing or too, you betcha!”

    • Agree: Ganderson
    • Replies: @Anon
  25. Alden says:
    @R.G. Camara

    It was post 1945 architects and construction companies that destroyed the studies dens and man caves. With that vile abomination the open plan all purpose big room that’s alleged to be kitchen dining area living room for the adults playroom for the kids hobby media library area and home office. And the only traffic way from the exterior doors to the bedrooms. With no hall closet of course. Thus encouraging husbands and kids to scatter jackets shoes backpacks etc all over as they plop down on the couch to watch tv. Before they get to the bedroom closets

    But in reality serves none of these functions well.

    Our first house. We had a 35 percent down payment. And searched all over Marin country Ca for 14 months before we found a house with a real kitchen, a real living room, a real playroom and real hallways from both front and back door to the kids bedrooms. Where they deposited jackets boots back packs etc immediately. As for the playroom. It was theirs. With a wall of shelves for the toys. And they took great pride in keeping their own private territory tidy.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  26. Alden says:
    @Joe Stalin

    My favorite kind of music and my kind of man.

  27. Feminism triumphed in 1919, pushing through both women’s suffrage and prohibition. The latter so alienated creative men that feminism fell out of fashion for a half century.

    Contrast them with modern-day feminists…

    Why women want sugar daddies
    Today’s feminists, when dating, are coldly mercenary

    Feminists of the first wave looked for male allies to get laws changed. Those of the second wave, freeing themselves for the first time from the trappings of normative heterosexuality, had separatist instincts. But those of the present wave see men as pathetic, selfish, hard work — and only good for two things: sex and cash.

    source: https://unherd.com/2021/09/why-women-are-seeking-sugar-daddies/

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Undisclosed
  28. Alden says:

    The KKK was very enthusiastic about prohibition . And succeeded in establishing local prohibition in many towns and counties before 1919. In the Midwest, where there were almost no blacks the KKK took it upon themselves to establish volunteer prohibition enforcement militias. Their habit of setting up roadblocks and searching cars for alcohol was one of the reasons AAA was set up.

    My motto is follow the money. One theory is that the manufacturers had their do gooder wives and spinster daughters set up prohibition as a counter argument to the union and family living wage movement.

    The unions claimed poverty was caused by low wages. The church ladies argued that poverty was caused by the husbands spending all their wages on alcohol in bars. I guess the church ladies didn’t realize it’s cheaper to buy a bottle and drink it at home. \$5 a week wages would buy 100 5 cent beers. No money for rent or food for the starving children. Also bars were places where workers complained about their jobs . And union organizers frequented I always wondered why the breweries and spirits producers didn’t lobby against prohibition more. The vineyards did OK they turned the wine into some kind of grape paste and sold it for home wine making.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Art Deco
  29. Alden says:
    @The Alarmist

    Maybe if you had a relationship with woman you wouldn’t spend so much time searching the internet to heap so much hate on women.

    The women seeking sugar daddies are not feminists and they are young enough to be called girls. 18-25.
    For a group of misogynist women haters, the MEN OF UNZ are the most obsessed with women men I’ve ever come across in my life.

    The Steve blog is bizarrely obsessed with reproduction and fertility. But judging from the comments, 95 percent of the misogynist women hating MEN OF UNZ have no children and have never done the deed that creates a baby. And judging from the human reproduction comments, about 70 percent of the misogynist women hating MEN OF UNZ believe women create babies without men. Check Wikipedia about human reproduction

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @The Alarmist
  30. Alden says:
    @anon

    Back in Russia and Germany occupied Poland, Jews bribed the authorities for exclusive rights to liquor beer and bar licenses. So it was an easy transition. Plus it was illegal. Like pornography.

    • Replies: @Anon
  31. @Alden

    The German-American brewers were hamstrung by anti-German rage during WWI.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  32. bruce says:
    @gent

    Jerry Pournelle said it was Spartans who did that. ‘Tales From the White Hart’ and early Larry Niven both suggest alcohol fuels creativity, though the Free Lunch policy most saloons had (You got a free lunch for the asking, on the assumption you were just between paychecks and would blow your pay on booze in the place you were used to going to all the time) was probably a greater social loss.

  33. @SafeNow

    Oh, it goes back further than that…

    Some time later Samson fell in love with a woman in the Valley of Sorek whose name was Delilah.

    The rulers of the Philistines went to her and said, “See if you can lure him into showing you the secret of his great strength and how we can overpower him so we may tie him up and subdue him. Each one of us will give you 1100 shekels of silver.”

    So Delilah said to Samson, “Please tell me where your strength comes from and how I can make you vulnerable.

    Samson answered her, “If anyone ties me with seven fresh bowstrings that have not been dried, I’ll become as weak as any other man.”

    Then the rulers of the Philistines brought her seven fresh bowstrings that had not been dried, and she tied him with them. With men hidden in the room, she called to him, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!” But he snapped the bowstrings as easily as a piece of string snaps in a flame. So the secret of his strength was not discovered.

    Then Delilah said to Samson, “You have made a fool of me; you lied to me. Come now, tell me how you can be tied.” Se said, “If anyone ties me securely with new ropes that have never been used, I’ll become as weak as any other man.”

    And Delilah took new ropes and tied him with them. Then, with men hidden in the room, she called to him, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!” But he snapped the ropes off his arms as if they were threads.

    And Delilah complained to Samson, “this whole time you’re just making fun of me! You keep lying to me! Now tell me how you can be tied.”

    He replied, “If you weave the seven braids of my head into the fabric on the loom and tighten it with the pin, I’ll become as weak as any other man.” So while he was sleeping, Delilah took the seven braids of his head, wove them into the fabric and tightened it with the pin.

    Again she called to him, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!” He awoke from his sleep and pulled up the pin and the loom, with the fabric.

    Then she said to him, “How can you say, ‘I love you,’ when you don’t trust me? This is the third time you have made a fool of me and haven’t told me the secret of your great strength.”

    And she nagged him so much day after day that he wanted to die so he relented and told her everything.

    “No razor has ever been used on my head,” he said, “because I have been a Nazirite dedicated to God from my mother’s womb. If my head were shaved, my strength would leave me, and I would become as weak as any other man.”

    And when Delilah saw that he had told her everything, she sent word to the rulers of the Philistines, “Come back once more; he has told me everything.” So the rulers of the Philistines returned with the silver in their hands.

    After putting him to sleep on her lap, she called for someone to shave off the seven braids of his hair, and so began to subdue him and he became weak

    Then she shouted, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!”

    He awoke from his sleep thinking to himself, “I’ll go out as before and shake myself free.” But he did not know that the Lord had left him.

    Then the Philistines seized him, gouged out his eyes and took him down to Gaza. Binding him with bronze shackles, they set him to grinding grain in the prison.

    /blockquote>

    Not to mention Rachel, Rebecca, Sarah and – wouldn’t you know it – Eve.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    , @Ganderson
  34. @The Alarmist

    Modern day trads are the worst of them.

    They are all simps who put women on a pedestal and believe they need protection and the like.

    Leftist feminism would lose if rightist girl worship were rectified with a couple of actual sexual relationships.

  35. Thoughts says:

    If there is one thing I know for sure

    Prohibition was a GOOD THING

    And we are Far Worse off For them Undoing It

    No smart, creative, intelligent person Drinks Alcohol. Not One.

    (Worldly success is not smarts ftr)

  36. Thoughts says:

    This is such a misleading post as well

    Prohibition was because the alcohol itself was changing

    The alcohol of today is not the same as the alcohol of the 1800s….

    The shit we drink now isn’t alcohol, it’s poison

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  37. By the way, alcohol is frequently neglected as the midwife of world Socialism. Thus Hunt on Engels ..

    This daily schedule had one exception. “On Sundays,” recalled the communist exile August Bebel, “Engels would throw open his house. On those puritanical days when no merry men can bear life in London, Engels’s house was open to all, and no one left before 2 or 3 in the morning.” All and sundry—“socialists, critics and writers, . . . anybody who wanted to see Engels could just go”—were welcome at No. 122 for an afternoon of wine-fueled discussion assisted by “a fairly ‘liberal’ helping of meat and salad.” The house speciality was a springtime bowl of Maitrank, a May wine flavored with woodruff. There would be German folk songs round the piano or Engels reciting his favorite poem, “The Vicar of Bray,” while the cream of European socialism—from Karl Kautsky to William Morris to Wilhelm Liebknecht to Keir Hardie—all paid court to the man whom the British Marxist Henry Hyndman called the “grand Lama of the Regent’s Park Road.” It was just about as far as you could get from the seedy image of émigré anarchism—the world of dirty pubs, furtive meetings, and Soho porn shops—that Joseph Conrad conjured up in The Secret Agent. The lights were on, the shutters were open, and the Pilsener was flowing.

    The nights of the elections to the German Reichstag were a particularly riotous affair: “Engels laid in a huge cask of special German beer, laid on a special supper, invited his very intimates. Then, as the telegrams came pouring in from all parts of Germany far into the night, every telegram was torn open, its contents read aloud by the General, and if it was victory we drank, and if it was defeat we drank.” But the social pinnacle of the year was Christmas, which Engels, the noted atheist, celebrated with Prince Albert–like enthusiasm. “Christmas was kept by Engels after the English fashion, as Charles Dickens had so delightfully described it in The Pickwick Papers,” Bernstein wrote in his memoirs.

    The room is decorated with green boughs of every kind, between which, in suitable places, the perfidious mistletoe peeps forth, which gives every man the right to kiss any person of the opposite sex who is standing beneath it or whom he can catch in passing. At table the principal dish is a mighty turkey, and if the exchequer will run to it this is supplemented by a great cooked ham. A few additional attractions—one of which, a sweet known as tipsy-cake, is, as the name denotes, prepared with brandy or sherry—make way for the dish of honour, the plum-pudding, which is served up, the room having been darkened, with burning rum. Each guest must receive his helping of pudding, liberally christened with good spirits, before the flame dies out. This lays a foundation which may well prove hazardous to those who do not measure their consumption of the accompanying wines.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
  38. @Joe Stalin

    A friend of mine’s deceased father was a Bell Labs engineer. She is convinced that his life was cut short by 5 to 10 years because of guilt about certain DOD/Intel projects he was involved with.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  39. @Anon

    Prohibition didn’t cut invention, rather, it cut the the part that made a guy get drunk and agree to make a business deal to develop someone’s patent. It cut the venture capitalism part. To invent something, you have to be sober.

    Most patents are useless and don’t go anywhere.

    Having some experience in this realm, I know that the inspiration for innovation often comes when ‘thinking differently’. That said, actually writing the patent is best done with a clear mind.

    Very true on the low relative utility of most patents, alas … I’d read that something like only 1% actually make money. But then again, patents are like a fence, protecting one’s (intellectual) property. Can fences — infrastructure! — ‘make money’..?

  40. Anonymous[612] • Disclaimer says:
    @SafeNow

    E-mail has greatly destroyed “brainstorming,” in many fields. Medicine, law, construction, etc.

    How so?

    On feminism. A woman possesses the power to derange a man; or, more accurately, get him to derange himself. Poets and novelists have been writing about this for five hundred years.

    Could you please elaborate on this? I do not know what you are referring to.

  41. @Undisclosed

    I mean how many iterations of this did they guy go through? The dude was ot-nay ot-tay ight-bray?

  42. prosa123 says:
    @Nathan

    And Thailand no longer has a near-monopoly on US sex tourism. The Dominican Republic has gotten into that business big time, and it’s a lot easier and cheaper to get to than Thailand.
    Most of the women are recruited from Eastern Europe, though some of the resorts also offer local girls at a reduced price.

  43. Ganderson says:
    @R.G. Camara

    MacSorley’s in NYC banned women into the 80’s

  44. Ganderson says:
    @anon

    Okrent was one of the inventors of fantasy (then called rotisserie) baseball.

    Lots of sons of the Emerald Isle were involved in the illegal booze trade, too, with the eager cooperation of many municipal authorities. Supposedly there was a tunnel in St. Paul from the Jacob Schmidt brewery to Harry Sawyer’s saloon downtown.

  45. Anon[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @James J O'Meara

    I recall some program on the History Channel or maybe even the Food Network that bragged about how one of the “unexpected benefits” of Prohibition was Jews being admitted to polite society.

    The Prime Directive: “Is it good for the …”

  46. Corvinus says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “The German-American brewers were hamstrung by anti-German rage during WWI”.

    Indeed, and probably for good reason, at least according to nativists at the time. German Americans miraculously became “hyphenated Americans” who mean-spiritedly and selfishly practiced their own traditions rather than assimilate into the dominant Anglo-American culture.

    On the link between German culture and beer, “Prohibition was more than a mere political issue. It was a symbol of cultural conflict threatening their lifestyle and value system. In contrast, the [Anti-Saloon League] argued that it was not about personal, but about civil liberty. It was about loyalty towards the flag and not the keg. Drinking beer was an expression of German identity and, thus, unpatriotic.” Source –> https://www.wiscontext.org/world-war-i-turned-milwaukees-germans-and-their-beer-targets

    Woodrow Wilson once admonished: “Any man who carries a hyphen about with him, carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic when he gets ready”. Then, after the War to end all Wars concluded, German-Americans became “one of U.S.” again. Pray tell, was it because of “magic dirt”?

    “Feminism triumphed in 1919, pushing through both women’s suffrage and prohibition.”

    Once again, iSteve, you are other than providing the complete picture here. As you stated in the 2013 Taki’s Magazine article (the New Yorker link), “WASP, Scandinavian, and Irish Catholic women had rational reasons to campaign against the saloons where their husbands wasted away their paychecks and health in binge drinking”. However, you conveniently gloss over how men from those three groups played an equally prominent role.

    These individuals laying the groundwork for temperance.

    https://sites.nd.edu/irishstories/student-projects/summer-projects/temperance

    Then, taking the baton in the early 1900’s was Cardinal John Ireland, co-founder of the Anti-Saloon League, and the Catholic Prohibition League, who both declared their goal was for the creation of a dry and saloonless nation. The Michigan Catholic (1911) implored the faithful: “Vote for the saloon if you want future generations to be shriveled, bloodless, prematurely decayed creatures. … Vote against the saloon if you wish to build up a race of giant, healthy manhood and glorious womanhood”.

    When it came to the right for women to vote, Thomas Paine and Thomas Herttell did yeomen’s work in arguing for the “better treatment of women” in the late 1700’s/early 1800’s, and organizations like the New York Men’s League in the early 1900’s took their words and put it into practice. Undoubtedly, faith played an integral role in the support for passage of the 19th Amendment, as a considerable number of Protestant men touted women’s suffrage as being the ultimate pursuit of holiness and divine justice.

    Perhaps, Mr. Sailer, you are tacitly endorsing its repeal, or seeking to minimize the political impact of women in politics, in your own cagey manner?

    Regardless, it was not feminism that triumphed in 1919 with the passage of those two amendments; rather, it was the Progressive male and female reformers who had achieved victory, which included a wide range of groups dedicated to those two causes. Let us do some further NOTICING as to the origins and factors for Prohibition, again to offer proper background and context.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470475/

    “On the other hand, even if Prohibition had worked, Italian and Jewish immigrants hardly needed it. They had ancestors who had been drinking wine almost from the invention of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent. They had thereby evolved defenses, whether cultural or genetic, against the damage alcohol can do.”

    There is absolute truth to what you say here, but let us be more precise, shall we? In that same 2013 Taki’s Magazine article you provide, one of the embedded links indicates that while Jews possesses a particular gene variation that tends to discourage heavier drinking in the persons who have it, “later research has discovered that there is a catch [when it comes to genetic defenses], as the protective effects of [ADH1B] can be minimized by environmental or cultural factors that encourage heavy alcohol consumption”.

  47. JMcG says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I believe it was Homer Simpson who said, “To alcohol: The cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems.”

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  48. JMcG says:
    @R.G. Camara

    As late as 1995, there were still pubs in rural Ireland in which women were not permitted to sit at the bar with the men. And much better places they were for it.

  49. Anon[410] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    The women seeking sugar daddies are not feminists and they are young enough to be called girls. 18-25.

    What would be your explanation as to why they seek sugar daddies? Do you view it favorably or unfavorably?

  50. @Alden

    It was post 1945 architects and construction companies that destroyed the studies dens and man caves.

    I’ve read the government played a role, no doubt through the New Deal Federal Housing Administration and its several programs that guaranteed mortgages. So out went anything that could be a man cave, in went that huge open space and other features you describe.

  51. @kaganovitch

    Isn’t that the other one Nowserthz or whatever who looks nothing like his Charlton Heston- looking Persian “dad” and looks exactly like what I imagine his moms Jewish movie agent looked like.

  52. @Alden

    Wow, you really have your knickers in a knot.

  53. Tom Grey says: • Website

    It might be that the “Agricultural Revolution” of 10,000 years ago was in order to grow grain for making more beer.
    Have you read and reviewed the book Drunk yet?

  54. res says:

    Has anyone read the paper closely enough to evaluate their claims? I am not seeing the effect of national prohibition in the raw numbers (the Great Depression on the other hand…).
    https://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ido/oeip/taf/h_counts.htm

  55. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s interesting that the anti-suffrage movement, which had more members than the pro-suffrage activist groups, has been essentially erased from history. Those advocating women’s voting rights asserted that women voters would right the wrongs perpetuated by male voters, but many women were skeptical, including progressive activist Jane Addams, who wrote, regarding the push for women’s voting rights, “I do not believe that women are better than men. We have not wrecked railroads, nor corrupted legislature, nor done many unholy things that men have done; but then we must remember that we have not had the chance.” Given the chance, she believed, women would doubtless prove as corrupt and bungling as men.
    Here’s a poster created by artist Laura Foster in 1912 illustrating the temptations facing women that would lead to corruption and despair. Notice where suffrage is placed.

    And here is a letter from the Massachusetts Anti-Suffrage Association urging the congress and senate not to pass the women’s suffrage amendment, saying it subverted the will of the majority of American women.

    This episode is another example of how history, as Ron Unz has written, is manipulated and individuals and movements erased, giving us a distorted and often completely false idea of what happened. In this case, outside of a comparatively small number of politically active malcontents and idealistic do-gooders, most women were content with their role in life and wary of social changes that would push them into arenas they did not wish to compete in.

  56. Disrupting social interaction interferes with the exchange of ideas, intellectual stimulation, random inspiration, etc. Prisoners are not creative. They have time to think, but no material.

    The pandemic has led to measurable drops in IQ among very young children, not a surprise. The lagging effect on everyone else of the social disruption, the prevention of normal social interaction, the lack of ideas being circulated, will become more apparent.

    Limiting the exchange of ideas to the increasingly controlled internet gives the Powers that Be more of a handle on what’s going around, by design. The Wuflu, which is more and more apparently something we can get under control by vaccination and effective treatments (and always has been), is the perfect wrench to throw in a society which has accelerated the exchange of ideas and wide scale understanding of the ruling class’ treachery.

    The Wuflu is real and very nasty, but its primary purpose is as a means for social control. If there is a Hell, the avaricious opportunists behind it will roast.

  57. @Thoughts

    The alcohol of today is not the same as the alcohol of the 1800s….

    The shit we drink now isn’t alcohol, it’s poison

    It is? What about the foreign stuff?

  58. @Jim Bob Lassiter

    A friend of mine’s deceased father was a Bell Labs engineer. She is convinced that his life was cut short by 5 to 10 years because of guilt about certain DOD/Intel projects he was involved with.

    Well, you know, Bell Labs was part of TPC (The Phone Company) and financed from AT&T Long Lines profit. They worked on SAGE, Sprint/ Sparton ABM and even the silencer for the OSS M-3 Grease gun.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  59. In order for the USG to enforce alcohol prohibition, it first needed to get permission from the People in the form of a constitutional amendment; that OK was revoked 14 years later. What gives the government the authority to enforce drug prohibition?
    Answer: Nothing.

    Of course.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  60. Art Deco says:
    @Alden

    The KKK was very enthusiastic about prohibition . And succeeded in establishing local prohibition in many towns and counties before 1919.

    The 2d incarnation of the KKK was founded in 1915 subsequent to the release of the film Birth of a Nation. At the beginning of 1919, it was a secret organization with a modest membership. The membership did not explode until a by-law change allowed for public membership. It evaporated almost as rapidly as it arose.

  61. Art Deco says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    What gives the government the authority to enforce drug prohibition?
    Answer: Nothing.

    Shipping contraband across state lines and across the international frontier is something that actually does fall under the delegations in the commerce clause.

  62. Could it just be the redirection of creative talent into skirting the law?

  63. @Anonymous

    It’s interesting that the anti-suffrage movement, which had more members than the pro-suffrage activist groups, has been essentially erased from history.

    Almost erased. Cf. the chapter “Who in Her Right Mind Opposed Woman Suffrage?”

  64. @Joe Stalin

    His business had more to do with missile guidance systems.

  65. @Reg Cæsar

    I oppose women’s suffrage; and men’s.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  66. Corvinus says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    “I oppose women’s suffrage; and men’s.“

    So what do you propose in lieu of voting rights for citizens? Of course, you do realize your position is extremist, right? This fine opinion webzine brings in all kinds, even normies who seek discourse like me.

  67. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    The one who is engaging in historical distortion is you, my fellow white.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anonymous
    , @res
  68. @Anonymous

    Those advocating women’s voting rights asserted that women voters would right the wrongs perpetuated by male voters, but many women were skeptical, including progressive activist Jane Addams…

    And muckraker Ida Tarbell. Can anyone name a suffragist accomplished in any other field, as these two antis were?

    Well, Jeannette Rankin and Sylvia Pankhurst did stand up against sending their menfolk to war. Give them that much.

  69. @Corvinus

    The one who is engaging in historical distortion is you, my fellow white.

    Where is he wrong?

    Bill Kauffman, who wrote the book referenced above, once said that if you lose in this country, you go down the memory hole. Winners write the history books. Rarely without bias.

    Admit it, who really stopped the ERA in its tracks? And started the pro-life movement?

  70. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Hello, Corvinus,

    Why do you assume that I am White? Maybe I am a half-breed Wild Indian. I might even be — gasp! — a female. I know: the horror! The HORROR!

  71. Anon[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    Back in Russia and Germany occupied Poland, Jews bribed the authorities for exclusive rights to liquor beer and bar licenses. So it was an easy transition. Plus it was illegal. Like pornography.

    Why was pornography made illegal?

  72. res says:
    @Corvinus

    Now that is a devastating counterargument. Peak Corvy?

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