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Screenshot 2015-07-30 21.53.48I’m slowly reading philosopher Robert Nozick’s 1974 book Anarchy, State, and Utopia, which begins with an explanation of why some kind of minimal state would automatically evolve out of a Lockean state of nature: when individuals hired “protective associations” (or private police forces) they’d inevitably evolve toward territorially concentrated monopolies on violence.

And to some extent we see that in the real world. But we also see a trend toward overlapping “protective associations.”

In New Orleans, for example, a trash collection entrepreneur named Sidney Torres (he’s known as “Trashanova” for his boy band Bruce Wayne good looks) has started the French Quarter Task Force to halt gunplay.

He pays armed rent-a-cops in kick-ass golf carts to respond to citizen complaints entered via an Uber-like app.

This is not an isolated example of overlapping police forces. For example, in this post-9/11 era, Washington DC has a remarkable number of federal security forces. (This may be helping propel the rapid gentrification of Washington.)

Another example of overlapping police departments involve college police forces that patrol off campus, which has suddenly become controversial when a U. of Cincinnati cop shot a black motorist.

For example, I visited Tulane a couple of years after Hurricane Katrina, and the university president explained that the Tulane police department patrolled the streets for a mile beyond the campus borders. (Back then, Tulane was the most functional institution in New Orleans, so also the students had organized an ambulance service to get people from the campus area uptown to the Tulane medical center downtown.)

New Orleans is of course a severely dysfunctional, damaged place. But this kind of double protection is also seen in more average cities, like Chicago. Perhaps the most spectacular example is the U. of Chicago’s fiefdom sprawling far beyond its campus. Its police force has full jurisdiction over 50,000 residents who aren’t students.

The President of the United States long made sure to only live within the U. of C. cops’ jurisdiction so he wouldn’t have to put up solely with wimpy Chicago PD protection, but could also call upon the university’s private police force. Or as Obama explained in Dreams from My Father, after one scary night in Hyde Park in which he racially profiled four black youths as being of malevolent intent:

“As I stand there, I find myself thinking that somewhere down the line both guilt and empathy speak to our own buried sense that an order of some sort is required, not the social order that exists, necessarily, but something more fundamental and more demanding; a sense, further, that one has a stake in this order, a wish that, no matter how fluid this order sometimes appears, it will not drain out of the universe.”

I think this means that Obama realized he was on the side of the cops, not the crooks.

One interesting question in the history of thought is whether the University of Chicago having a privatized police force that patrols the nicer part of the South Side has anything to do with the Chicago School views on privatization.

 
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  1. Hmmm, you don’t even have to go as far as looking at private police forces. To citizens of countries with one national police force, the United States’ web of city, state and national police forces (ie, the FBI) is already quite “overlapping”.

  2. The link to “1985” doesn’t work.

  3. The Washington Nationals baseball team gives substantial game ticket discounts to anyone who can prove that they are “first responders”. I wonder if they are afraid of “terrorism” or more general unrest?

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Robert Hume

    When I was a cop they used to pay me twice my regular salary to watch football games, concerts etc. Sometimes it was triple my regular salary for a few hours work.

    Replies: @Robert Hume

  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as ‘bulldogs’ and ‘beadles’, (beadles, mind you, and not ‘beagles,’ it wasn’t entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity – the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Anonymous

    Many British universities are scattered through a city so there is no "campus" to patrol. But as WKPD reports of Cambridge:

    The power of the university to attest constables was granted by the Universities Act 1825 ... the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of the University have the power to appoint constables ... The Act states that these officers, once appointed, will have all the "powers and authorities, privileges, immunities, and advantages as any constables hath or shall have within his constablewick", within a 4 mile radius of the precincts of the university. The precincts of the university are anywhere within three miles of Great St Mary's Church together with Madingly Hall. ...

    Until the 1960s the Proctors and the Constabulary conducted regular street-patrols within the University precincts. Nowadays they operate on a reactive basis when disorder or demonstrations are expected. Generally the constables restrict themselves to internal university matters with all serious crime/incidents being referred to the Cambridgeshire Constabulary, who are the territorial police force responsible for the whole of Cambridgeshire.

    , @hodag
    @Anonymous

    I don't know about that. I recall more than a few Wodehouse stories where policeman's hats were snatched and cow creamers knicked.

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Anonymous

    The UK's police system is entirely different from the USA's. The UK's system is completely centralized. Twenty-three(?) semi-autonomous County police forces are under supervision of the Home Office. The USA has something like 25-30,000 completely autonomous federal, state, county, and local police agencies. In the USA adding some additional private police forces to the mix is hardly noticeable. In the UK doing this would be a direct attack on the perquisites of the national government.

    , @FactsAreImportant
    @Anonymous


    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
     
    The difference between the US and UK on this point may be because the oldest parts of most large US cities slid into chaos about 50 years ago during the Great Migration of blacks from the South into the North.

    Many US universities were established near US cities a long time ago, and as the cities grew, they encircled the universities and the universities found themselves in an "inner city" that was engulfed by the Great Migration.

    Some examples are Yale (New Haven), Columbia (New York), U of Chicago (Chicago), U of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), U of Southern California (Los Angeles), Tulane (New Orleans), and Berkeley (Oakland).

    None of these universities would exist today without a very serious police force. Tens of thousands of tender and naive young students would not be able to survive in these environments without a serious police presence - the easy pickings would attract criminals from many miles around, and waiting for a response from a beleaguered large-city police force would not be adequate.

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    Replies: @Nico, @Anonymous, @Ripple Earthdevil

    , @M_Young
    @Anonymous

    "The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guard"

    I'm guessing either anonymous is not British or didn't attend Uni. "Porters" have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes.

    "Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc."

    Again wrong. They may have come from genteel strata, but 'Town and Gown' riots have a long history, and they weren't all started by townees. See David Cameron's "Bullingdon Club" for one of many examples.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

    , @TWS
    @Anonymous

    The victims are too old for your big paki rape gangs. Of course if you did have a police force they would simply point out the best victims or charge them with crimes for trying to escape your rape gangs.

    Cops, social services, and schools working to ensure there's a never-ending supply of muslim sex slaves. Rule Britannia!

    , @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    I went to college with a guy from England. He was amazed at all our police forces and how each department had different uniforms, car liveries and jurisdictions. I remember explaining the differences between the campus police, the city police, the county sheriff and the state highway patrol. It was a total shock to him. There were times where we would see cars from all four of the above departments simultaneously. His mind was really blown, however, when he found out that committing murder in our state would get you life in prison, but doing the same thing 40 miles east in the neighboring state would get you the death penalty.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marty

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous, A lot of US colleges and universities are in the inner city. The security forces aren't there because the students a troublemakers or thieves. They are there to protect the students, their property and the property of the institution from trouble makers, rapists and thieves

    Replies: @Ivy

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    "Anonymous says:

    August 1, 2015 at 10:29 am GMT • 200 Words

    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears."

    To American ears too, if they are old enough. I went to college in the eighties at large state universities in urban settings. I'm sure there were campus police forces there, but one was barely aware of them. Mostly they regulated parking. "Security" forces in all their many forms became steadily more noticeable and intrusive during the 90s and they really took off after 911. America is now bathed in "security". I write security in quotes as it has little to do with security as far as I can see, and certainly little to do with public safety. It is nothing more than the tyranny part of anarcho-tyranny.

  5. The Harvard University Police have a waaay longer arm than the U. of Chicago cops. From the HUPD website:

    HUPD officers are licensed special State Police officers and deputy sheriffs in both Middlesex and Suffolk Counties. Those powers give them the authority to respond to any crime on our campus and any “breach of the peace” on city streets in Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston. Officers receive the same academy training as officers from Cambridge.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @slumber_j


    The Harvard University Police have a waaay longer arm than the U. of Chicago cops. From the HUPD website:
     
    I deal with many local, state, federal law enforcement each day in my job. Most major universities have police departments which are every bit as good as the surrounding jurisdiction, and in a lot of cases better. Remember, Sean Collier, the MIT police officer killed by the Tsarnaevs, was friends with the MBTA Transit Officer wounded in the shootout because they went to the same police academy. Most university PDs have larger percentages of female officers and will have young (ex-MP) female officers who go under cover as students on campuses. University/college campuses have a very dense, concentrated population and the population is distinct with distinct issues/crimes. The nature of the security and enforcement is different on a college/university campus and leaving it to the surrounding jurisdiction couldn't work well, at all.
    , @Brutusale
    @slumber_j

    As are the Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern University and MIT police.

    Meanwhile, we have the Boston PD and the State Police fighting about jurisdiction over arresting the drunks in the newish Seaport District.

  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @slumber_j
    The Harvard University Police have a waaay longer arm than the U. of Chicago cops. From the HUPD website:

    HUPD officers are licensed special State Police officers and deputy sheriffs in both Middlesex and Suffolk Counties. Those powers give them the authority to respond to any crime on our campus and any "breach of the peace" on city streets in Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston. Officers receive the same academy training as officers from Cambridge.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Brutusale

    The Harvard University Police have a waaay longer arm than the U. of Chicago cops. From the HUPD website:

    I deal with many local, state, federal law enforcement each day in my job. Most major universities have police departments which are every bit as good as the surrounding jurisdiction, and in a lot of cases better. Remember, Sean Collier, the MIT police officer killed by the Tsarnaevs, was friends with the MBTA Transit Officer wounded in the shootout because they went to the same police academy. Most university PDs have larger percentages of female officers and will have young (ex-MP) female officers who go under cover as students on campuses. University/college campuses have a very dense, concentrated population and the population is distinct with distinct issues/crimes. The nature of the security and enforcement is different on a college/university campus and leaving it to the surrounding jurisdiction couldn’t work well, at all.

  7. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    Many British universities are scattered through a city so there is no “campus” to patrol. But as WKPD reports of Cambridge:

    The power of the university to attest constables was granted by the Universities Act 1825 … the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of the University have the power to appoint constables … The Act states that these officers, once appointed, will have all the “powers and authorities, privileges, immunities, and advantages as any constables hath or shall have within his constablewick”, within a 4 mile radius of the precincts of the university. The precincts of the university are anywhere within three miles of Great St Mary’s Church together with Madingly Hall. …

    Until the 1960s the Proctors and the Constabulary conducted regular street-patrols within the University precincts. Nowadays they operate on a reactive basis when disorder or demonstrations are expected. Generally the constables restrict themselves to internal university matters with all serious crime/incidents being referred to the Cambridgeshire Constabulary, who are the territorial police force responsible for the whole of Cambridgeshire.

  8. Today is the 49-year anniversary of the University of Texas clock tower shooting by engineering student, and former Marine, Charles Whitman.

    Kinky Friedman’s The Ballad of Charles Whitman

  9. See “The Seven Samurai.”

  10. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    I don’t know about that. I recall more than a few Wodehouse stories where policeman’s hats were snatched and cow creamers knicked.

  11. Semi-related, but the guy who got shot in Cincinnati had 50 arrests and 13 kids.

  12. In New Jersey, they still have a private marshal organization licensed by the State.

  13. Since most off-campus living students cluster around the university proper, it seems the reason the campus cops are given extended jurisdiction so the local police force is not tied up with noise complaints, public drunkenness, etc. At least in Toledo, I know the city police still handled the more serious crimes.

  14. I guess the UofC police is an effective force though they didn’t do me any good when I was mugged by three maybe 12 yo youths on Cottage Grove about three blocks from the UofC Hospital way back in the eighties.

  15. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    The UK’s police system is entirely different from the USA’s. The UK’s system is completely centralized. Twenty-three(?) semi-autonomous County police forces are under supervision of the Home Office. The USA has something like 25-30,000 completely autonomous federal, state, county, and local police agencies. In the USA adding some additional private police forces to the mix is hardly noticeable. In the UK doing this would be a direct attack on the perquisites of the national government.

  16. Good bless the Temple U cops in Filthadelphia.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Cracker


    Good bless the Temple U cops in Filthadelphia.
     
    I guess. My sister survived a few years working on the Temple campus in the 1990s.
  17. I don’t know that I would call campus police forces private. They would seem to be more ‘supplementary’ police force whose function is not to enforce the law amongst their large student body population but to prevent students from being preyed upon by the ‘community’ around the campus.

    Its an interesting topic though. UC Berkeley had campus police when I was there in the early 1970’s. I remember asking one what their biggest problem was, thinking it was bicycle theft, marijuana use or something like that but he said it was homosexual activity in public toilets! Times do change and with the black ghettos in the Berkeley flatlands and Oakland not far away even the Berkeley campus police were far removed from the outside world on Telegraph and Shattuck Avenues back then.

    Sadly that is no longer the case at most urban universities. Years later around the Virginia Commonwealth University campus in Richmond you’d see these yellow boxes with blinking red lights on them around the campus periphery. These were police call boxes that connected the caller directly with the VCU police. Not the Richmond City police but the campus police. Homosexual activity in campus men’s room was not an issue anymore it was the rape, robbery and murder of students and faculty by marauding packs of hoodrats who live only a few blocks away on the Northern and Southern perimeter of the campus.

    It would make for an interesting study the growth of these campus police forces. Every school seems to have its own police department today. Was this always the case? I don’t think so. I suspect the integration of higher education, the ‘blackening’ of college athletics and the growing sense of entitlement amongst the black underclass have made campus police departments an essential part of both public and private universities even when they are far removed from urban ghettos. I checked and indeed even the private University of Richmond has one though it is in a leafy, very affluent, pure white area just outside the city limits. What links it to urban crime? Well it has a very competitive basketball program and a less powerful football program that plays in a stadium near a black area. Drop the athletic programs and I suspect they could dispense with their campus police department too.

  18. It seems Neal Stephenson should have fused The Big U with Snow Crash to get a better handle on the shape of things to come. Phil Dick appears to have gotten it completely wrong in his early 1970s prognostication on future America Flow my tears, the Policeman said: he has radical infested university campuses ringed by fascist Federal police units to keep the students apart from the rest of the society rather than the police state emerging out of the campuses.

  19. Thirty years ago, businessmen in NYC saw Times Square as a huge opportunity. They created a business improvement district, imposed BID taxes on all the local businesses and hired cleanup people and patrolman to clean up the streets and keep a steady pressure on street people and hustlers. It worked. I don’t know when the last strip club, clip joint, massage parlor, and XXX theater closed, but Times Square is like Disneyland compared to 1975.

    Detroit has maybe 3 working ambulances and the waiting time for a police response to anything other than a shooting is around an hour, and often
    much, much longer
    .

    This private takeover of public functions in the urban core is the wave of the future. It is extremely difficult, particularly in black run cities with a history of race rioting and race advocacy, to make the changes that are necessary through the existing black power structure. Raising taxes “to pay for more teachers, police and firemen” just will not work as long as the same people are in charge.

    Hence white people must organize privately, perhaps coordinating their efforts with the black power structure, but never just giving the black power structure more money. It is almost a reversion to America of 1800, when one contracted with individual private fire “companies” and public fire “departments” did not exist.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Big Bill

    I am not sure that in truly "black-run" districts such as Detroit, Baltimore or Opa-Locka there are sufficient numbers of whites to make such pursuits worthwhile. SWPLs are only attracted to places like NYC, SF or Los Angeles because they can bloc with the few but economically significant normal whites in the cities to keep blacks largely out of power in local elections. The real problem is SWPLs like Bill de Blasio.

    , @WhatEvvs
    @Big Bill

    There are a lot more homeless people on the streets in NYC now than during Bloomberg.

    I can't say I know the whole story but I think Bloomberg paid a lot of money out of his own pocket to various domestic NGOs otherwise known as charities to keep them off the streets. Now that that money's dried up they are back.

    , @prosa123
    @Big Bill

    Times Square still has a few rough edges. In recent years there have been troubles involving people, sometimes skells or ex-cons, who dress up as cartoon characters and pose for photos with tourists. On more than a few occasions they have become abusive or even violent if they think they haven't been tipped enough. Sometimes they get in fistfights with one another over turf.
    More recently there has been an influx of topless women (legal in New York) who also pose for photos with tourists in return for tips. They're better behaved than the cartoon characters, however on some occasions they have p

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  20. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.

    The difference between the US and UK on this point may be because the oldest parts of most large US cities slid into chaos about 50 years ago during the Great Migration of blacks from the South into the North.

    Many US universities were established near US cities a long time ago, and as the cities grew, they encircled the universities and the universities found themselves in an “inner city” that was engulfed by the Great Migration.

    Some examples are Yale (New Haven), Columbia (New York), U of Chicago (Chicago), U of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), U of Southern California (Los Angeles), Tulane (New Orleans), and Berkeley (Oakland).

    None of these universities would exist today without a very serious police force. Tens of thousands of tender and naive young students would not be able to survive in these environments without a serious police presence – the easy pickings would attract criminals from many miles around, and waiting for a response from a beleaguered large-city police force would not be adequate.

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @FactsAreImportant


    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.
     
    Maybe, maybe not. The U.S. pattern of Third World or Third World-extracted concentration inner cities is a very peculiar, very quirky phenomenon, and to some extent rather temporal. Almost everywhere else you look - the barrios of Mexico City, the favelas of São Paolo, the banlieues of Paris, the shantytowns of Istanbul - it is the outer rims and/or near-suburbs which are the slums, while the city cores have without interruption remained vibrant and wealthy. And the trend in the U.S. has for at least two decades *generally* been revitalization and whitening of core neighborhoods and the ghettoization of suburbs and exurbs, although the speed with which this takes place is of course proportional to the state of the economy and more specifically the real estate market.
    , @Anonymous
    @FactsAreImportant

    Tulane is located in the wealthiest part of New Orleans, much like SMU is located near the wealthiest area of Dallas. Rice University's not too poorly situated in Houston for that matter either.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Ripple Earthdevil
    @FactsAreImportant

    While the area surrounding UC Berkeley has its problems stemming mostly from transients, homeless, and the mentally ill of various races, the Oakland ghettos are several miles away.

  21. See chapter ‘A Glance At The State ‘ in Nietzsche’s ‘Human, All Too Human’.

  22. ‘….slowly reading…’ I too have this problem. Nothing brings on drowsiness quicker than heavy prose, especially in the prone position. My advice is to read first thing in the morning, even if it means going to bed and waking up earlier. Refreshed with some oatcakes and milk, your day couldn’t wish for a brighter start.

  23. That night, well past midnight, a car pulls up in front of my apartment building, carrying a troop of teenage boys and a set of stereo speakers so loud that the floor of my apartment begins to shake. I’ve learned to ignore such disturbances — where else do they have to go? I say to myself. But on this particular evening I have someone staying over …

    “‘Listen, people, are trying to sleep around here. Why don’t y’all take it someplace else?’

    “The four boys inside say nothing, don’t even move. The wind wipes away my drowsiness, and I feel suddenly exposed, standing in a pair of shorts on the sidewalk in the middle of the night.

    This probably happened to Bill Ayers, who wrote the book, not to Barack Obama.

    The noise was bothering Bernardine Dohrn, so she made hubby go outside and beg for quiet.

    Nobody was “staying over” in Obama’s apartment in those days.

  24. Speaking of African migration into Britain, the news footage makes clear that almost all the migrants are young men. This makes the current migration an incredibly concentrated bad thing and very different from the current migration into the US.

    In the US, a large portion of the immigration is families (or when a single man comes first, he brings his extended family later.) But the African migration to Britain is all young men. So the most dangerously explosive fraction of the African population has been distilled out and is being imported at full strength. The US is imbibing a strong red wine, while Britain is downing a bottle of pure grain alcohol.

    Plus, the young African men do not have the moderating influence of family that makes the Latino immigrants into the US relatively docile. There are also few potential mates for the young migrants — young men don’t behave very well when there is a shortage of potential mates from their own culture. I don’t think they are going to be particularly chivalrous to the native women.

    Yikes.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @FactsAreImportant

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jan/22/number-rapes-police-england-wales-rises-31-percent

    Mind you, just in one year:
    "violent crime recorded by the police has jumped by 11 per cent ... More than 22,100 rapes were recorded, a 29 per cent rise"

    Gotta love the liberal view of the world: "The unexpectedly large increase in overall violent crime</b"

    , @ben tillman
    @FactsAreImportant


    In the US, a large portion of the immigration is families (or when a single man comes first, he brings his extended family later.) But the African migration to Britain is all young men. So the most dangerously explosive fraction of the African population has been distilled out and is being imported at full strength.
     
    Horizontal transmission breeds virulence.
  25. One interesting question in the history of thought is whether the University of Chicago having a privatized police force that patrols the nicer part of the South Side has anything to do with the Chicago School views on privatization.

    Great point!!!

    Begs the question which came first the chicken or the egg, or perhaps “the security or the eggheads”.

    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???

    • Replies: @Larry, San Francisco
    @anonymous-antimarxist

    The conservative Chicago school started much earlier. In Economics Frank Knight who could be considered the founder taught in the 1920's (he became a mentor to both George Stigler and Milton Friedman). The other important early conservative economist Gary Becker, came to Chicago in the 1950's. The sociology department in that time was also relatively conservative and believed in close examination of empirical facts. Although the area around Hyde Park started declining in the 1950's the university engaged in redlining and kept the area fairly safe. According to a professor I was friends with who had been at the university since the 1950's, the area did not become dangerous until the mid 1960's and then declined rapidly. Many years after the Chicago School of Economics was founded.
    The university managed to salvage the situation by creating a redevelopment district that destroyed a lot of poor people's apartments and beefing up the campus police. However, when I was there in the late 70's it was still pretty dangerous. Everyone I knew was mugged at least once.

    , @Anonymous
    @anonymous-antimarxist


    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???
     
    My two cents:

    The south side of Chicago north of the University of Chicago used to be quite nice and heavily Jewish before 1960. The Jews fled the city in the 60s, many going to suburbs along Lake Michigan north of the city (Evanston, Highland Park, Glencoe, etc.). Some of the oldest Jewish country clubs are on the south side, outside the city limits (e.g., Ravisloe).

    The townhouses were high-quality with stone fronts, much like those on the north side around the Lincoln Park area. Most of the original housing stock has been destroyed though, while in Lincoln Park that type of townhouse is worth millions of dollars.

    The south side of Chicago had many sketchy neighborhoods (e.g., around the stockyards, and Al Capone's club, "The Four Deuces" was at 2222 S. Wabash) but immediately north of the U of C, it used to be quite nice.
    , @fnn
    @anonymous-antimarxist

    University of Chicago was founded in 1890. James T. Farrell's fictional Irish tough Studs Lonigan committed crimes on the streets of Hyde Park in the 1920s , but I don't think the university ever saw the Irish as much of a threat. The area didn't become "sketchy" until some time after WWII. A major "urban renewal" project in the 1950s came to the rescue and bulldozed the working class housing in Hyde Park (both blacks and whites) and almost all of the many bars on 55th St. The now iconic Jimmy's Woodlawn Tap was allowed to remain for some reason I can't recall.

  26. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    “The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guard”

    I’m guessing either anonymous is not British or didn’t attend Uni. “Porters” have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes.

    “Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc.”

    Again wrong. They may have come from genteel strata, but ‘Town and Gown’ riots have a long history, and they weren’t all started by townees. See David Cameron’s “Bullingdon Club” for one of many examples.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @M_Young

    "I’m guessing either anonymous is not British or didn’t attend Uni. “Porters” have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes."

    There's a big difference between a few tough-looking slags hired to be bouncers and a police force. Nearly every state university of any size in the US has its own police force - uniformed, state-employed agents who carry tasers, batons, and pistols.

    , @Anonymous
    @M_Young

    Yes, but 'porters' are hardly sworn, uniformed police officers, with badges, batons, patrol cars, guns and police offices etc.
    As the man said, apart from doing their portering duty, porters basically just played at being the 'daddy' or the bouncer.

  27. Isn’t that quote from Obama just the perfect one to capture his pompous vacuity?

    He pretends to be black when he’s actually a white man professor of the third rank who tried to swallow a dictionary and can’t get it unstuck from his throat.

  28. @Robert Hume
    The Washington Nationals baseball team gives substantial game ticket discounts to anyone who can prove that they are "first responders". I wonder if they are afraid of "terrorism" or more general unrest?

    Replies: @TWS

    When I was a cop they used to pay me twice my regular salary to watch football games, concerts etc. Sometimes it was triple my regular salary for a few hours work.

    • Replies: @Robert Hume
    @TWS

    Was that in or out of uniform. In the case of the Nationals I'm pretty sure it's out of uniform.

    Replies: @TWS

  29. …then there are the k-12 police departments like the one for LAUSD. My ex employer had a big contract with them but it fell apart in confusion and corruption, but not after we pumped a lot of money out of ’em.

  30. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    The victims are too old for your big paki rape gangs. Of course if you did have a police force they would simply point out the best victims or charge them with crimes for trying to escape your rape gangs.

    Cops, social services, and schools working to ensure there’s a never-ending supply of muslim sex slaves. Rule Britannia!

  31. When I read Anarchy, State, and Utopia a few years back the thing I remember best (and I may not have the wording just right) was the single exception Nozick made to the idea that every man should have a full right to all the property he inherited or otherwise legally owned: that exception was when the property had somehow been illegally or involuntarily acquired either by him or one of his benefactors. But since if you trace back the origins of all capital (savings, wealth) you come to the inescapable and in fact tautological truth that capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries, plus interest — when you come to this realization you realize that Zozick’s libertarian philosophy has a hole in it big enough to drive a truck through.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Luke Lea


    capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries
     
    Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn't quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!

    Replies: @Anonymous Bro, @tbraton

    , @SFG
    @Luke Lea

    He apparently moderated his positions later, in _The Examined Life_ (1989).

    , @AnAnon
    @Luke Lea

    Yep, life is what it is, and the idea of respect for rights is very new.

  32. Though it is not a police force, what about the Hatzalah ambulance service?

  33. On the Southside of Chicago, Jesse Jackson’s small neighborhood of Jackson Park Highlands has employed private security for years. Additionally, near the UofC, in the neighborhood of Kenwood (where Obama owns a home) the Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan owns a home and garage/bunkhouse across the street that was allegedly connected by a tunnel. Supposedly, his Nation of Islam body guards stayed in the bunkhouse/garage to provide protection. There were reports of the secret service and reporters having a slight misunderstanding with Farrakans forces when Obama first was elected.

  34. iSteveFan says:
    @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    I went to college with a guy from England. He was amazed at all our police forces and how each department had different uniforms, car liveries and jurisdictions. I remember explaining the differences between the campus police, the city police, the county sheriff and the state highway patrol. It was a total shock to him. There were times where we would see cars from all four of the above departments simultaneously. His mind was really blown, however, when he found out that committing murder in our state would get you life in prison, but doing the same thing 40 miles east in the neighboring state would get you the death penalty.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @iSteveFan

    I guess he was also amazed at the violence and criminality of US streets despite the number of policemen and variety of police forces.

    , @Marty
    @iSteveFan

    A career prosecutor in L.A. County says that in California, a sentence of "life" for murder results in actual prison time of 5.5 years, median.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Criminal-Justice-Club-Media/dp/0978787005

  35. “New Orleans is of course a severely dysfunctional, damaged place. But this kind of double protection is also seen in more average cities, like Chicago. Perhaps the most spectacular example is the U. of Chicago’s fiefdom sprawling far beyond its campus. Its police force has full jurisdiction over 50,000 residents who aren’t students.”

    U of C police are all moonlighting Chicago cops. Also, police on state college campuses are usually State Police.

  36. @FactsAreImportant
    @Anonymous


    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
     
    The difference between the US and UK on this point may be because the oldest parts of most large US cities slid into chaos about 50 years ago during the Great Migration of blacks from the South into the North.

    Many US universities were established near US cities a long time ago, and as the cities grew, they encircled the universities and the universities found themselves in an "inner city" that was engulfed by the Great Migration.

    Some examples are Yale (New Haven), Columbia (New York), U of Chicago (Chicago), U of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), U of Southern California (Los Angeles), Tulane (New Orleans), and Berkeley (Oakland).

    None of these universities would exist today without a very serious police force. Tens of thousands of tender and naive young students would not be able to survive in these environments without a serious police presence - the easy pickings would attract criminals from many miles around, and waiting for a response from a beleaguered large-city police force would not be adequate.

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    Replies: @Nico, @Anonymous, @Ripple Earthdevil

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    Maybe, maybe not. The U.S. pattern of Third World or Third World-extracted concentration inner cities is a very peculiar, very quirky phenomenon, and to some extent rather temporal. Almost everywhere else you look – the barrios of Mexico City, the favelas of São Paolo, the banlieues of Paris, the shantytowns of Istanbul – it is the outer rims and/or near-suburbs which are the slums, while the city cores have without interruption remained vibrant and wealthy. And the trend in the U.S. has for at least two decades *generally* been revitalization and whitening of core neighborhoods and the ghettoization of suburbs and exurbs, although the speed with which this takes place is of course proportional to the state of the economy and more specifically the real estate market.

  37. Steve, you might find Hans Hermann-Hoppe or Gustave Molinari more worth your while than Nozick, maybe.

  38. @anonymous-antimarxist

    One interesting question in the history of thought is whether the University of Chicago having a privatized police force that patrols the nicer part of the South Side has anything to do with the Chicago School views on privatization.
     
    Great point!!!

    Begs the question which came first the chicken or the egg, or perhaps "the security or the eggheads".

    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @Anonymous, @fnn

    The conservative Chicago school started much earlier. In Economics Frank Knight who could be considered the founder taught in the 1920’s (he became a mentor to both George Stigler and Milton Friedman). The other important early conservative economist Gary Becker, came to Chicago in the 1950’s. The sociology department in that time was also relatively conservative and believed in close examination of empirical facts. Although the area around Hyde Park started declining in the 1950’s the university engaged in redlining and kept the area fairly safe. According to a professor I was friends with who had been at the university since the 1950’s, the area did not become dangerous until the mid 1960’s and then declined rapidly. Many years after the Chicago School of Economics was founded.
    The university managed to salvage the situation by creating a redevelopment district that destroyed a lot of poor people’s apartments and beefing up the campus police. However, when I was there in the late 70’s it was still pretty dangerous. Everyone I knew was mugged at least once.

  39. @Big Bill
    Thirty years ago, businessmen in NYC saw Times Square as a huge opportunity. They created a business improvement district, imposed BID taxes on all the local businesses and hired cleanup people and patrolman to clean up the streets and keep a steady pressure on street people and hustlers. It worked. I don't know when the last strip club, clip joint, massage parlor, and XXX theater closed, but Times Square is like Disneyland compared to 1975.

    Detroit has maybe 3 working ambulances and the waiting time for a police response to anything other than a shooting is around an hour, and often
    much, much longer
    .

    This private takeover of public functions in the urban core is the wave of the future. It is extremely difficult, particularly in black run cities with a history of race rioting and race advocacy, to make the changes that are necessary through the existing black power structure. Raising taxes "to pay for more teachers, police and firemen" just will not work as long as the same people are in charge.

    Hence white people must organize privately, perhaps coordinating their efforts with the black power structure, but never just giving the black power structure more money. It is almost a reversion to America of 1800, when one contracted with individual private fire "companies" and public fire "departments" did not exist.

    Replies: @Nico, @WhatEvvs, @prosa123

    I am not sure that in truly “black-run” districts such as Detroit, Baltimore or Opa-Locka there are sufficient numbers of whites to make such pursuits worthwhile. SWPLs are only attracted to places like NYC, SF or Los Angeles because they can bloc with the few but economically significant normal whites in the cities to keep blacks largely out of power in local elections. The real problem is SWPLs like Bill de Blasio.

  40. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    Anonymous, A lot of US colleges and universities are in the inner city. The security forces aren’t there because the students a troublemakers or thieves. They are there to protect the students, their property and the property of the institution from trouble makers, rapists and thieves

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Buffalo Joe

    USC alumni may mention what used to be called the bicycle tax.

    Over the course of four years on campus, students are likely to lose a bike to the brothers. Update that to iPhones, gold chains, the odd BMW and you get the picture.

    Security has increased more recently due to the murder of Chinese students. That triggered a round of reputation repairs and more rigorous policies. One consequence of the tighter cordon has been the exclusion from campus of wanna-bes, hangers-on, potential non-matriculating Mrs. degree candidates looking for Mr. Right, and other assorted street-level entrepreneurs.

  41. @Luke Lea
    When I read Anarchy, State, and Utopia a few years back the thing I remember best (and I may not have the wording just right) was the single exception Nozick made to the idea that every man should have a full right to all the property he inherited or otherwise legally owned: that exception was when the property had somehow been illegally or involuntarily acquired either by him or one of his benefactors. But since if you trace back the origins of all capital (savings, wealth) you come to the inescapable and in fact tautological truth that capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries, plus interest -- when you come to this realization you realize that Zozick's libertarian philosophy has a hole in it big enough to drive a truck through.

    Replies: @International Jew, @SFG, @AnAnon

    capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries

    Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn’t quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!

    • Replies: @Anonymous Bro
    @International Jew

    I think that by "capital" Luke was referring to the ownership stake in the capital items.

    So in your tractor example the tractor itself is newly made, but businessman X only owns it because businessman X's ancestors got lucky or stole someone else's property. Otherwise businessman X wouldn't be able to afford the tractor.

    , @tbraton
    @International Jew

    "Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn’t quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!"

    I believe you are confusing capital goods with the money used to acquire those capital goods. It was the French novelist Balzac who was the source of the expression "Behind every great fortune there is a crime." (Incidentally, that served as the epigraph of the novel "The Godfather.") I believe that is what LukeLea was alluding to. Balzac's actual expression was "The secret of a great success for which you are at a loss to account is a crime that has never been found out, because it was properly executed."

  42. The universities was supposed to be independent of government, to aid in the ‘free inquiry’, hence the need for their own police force.

  43. WhatEvvs [AKA "AamirKhanFan"] says:
    @Big Bill
    Thirty years ago, businessmen in NYC saw Times Square as a huge opportunity. They created a business improvement district, imposed BID taxes on all the local businesses and hired cleanup people and patrolman to clean up the streets and keep a steady pressure on street people and hustlers. It worked. I don't know when the last strip club, clip joint, massage parlor, and XXX theater closed, but Times Square is like Disneyland compared to 1975.

    Detroit has maybe 3 working ambulances and the waiting time for a police response to anything other than a shooting is around an hour, and often
    much, much longer
    .

    This private takeover of public functions in the urban core is the wave of the future. It is extremely difficult, particularly in black run cities with a history of race rioting and race advocacy, to make the changes that are necessary through the existing black power structure. Raising taxes "to pay for more teachers, police and firemen" just will not work as long as the same people are in charge.

    Hence white people must organize privately, perhaps coordinating their efforts with the black power structure, but never just giving the black power structure more money. It is almost a reversion to America of 1800, when one contracted with individual private fire "companies" and public fire "departments" did not exist.

    Replies: @Nico, @WhatEvvs, @prosa123

    There are a lot more homeless people on the streets in NYC now than during Bloomberg.

    I can’t say I know the whole story but I think Bloomberg paid a lot of money out of his own pocket to various domestic NGOs otherwise known as charities to keep them off the streets. Now that that money’s dried up they are back.

  44. WhatEvvs [AKA "AamirKhanFan"] says:

    I’m surprised Steve left out mall cops in his analysis.

    As for Nozick, that’s true in the West but in India they have caste. With a caste system you don’t need police. Everyone polices their own. There is no public society, no general public. Still it sounds interesting and it’s now on my list.

  45. FactsAreImportant makes a very important point about UK African migrants. Things will get bad and very bad very quickly. A lot more quickly than with Pakistani Rotherham type migrants. District 9 without the Alien angle will seem like a documentary in a few years.
    ————
    Privatized police forces are just Feudalism The Beginning, if you want to think of it that way. A function of the failure of the State.

    Looking at the thousands pouring in through Calais, surely only to get far worse, I would say England faces a Majority African future very quickly. Perhaps as soon as ten years or less. While Elites will stay with Universal Utopian “Uplift Worship” of Africans as a way to completely exterminate the White working and middle classes, I expect something even more feudalistic to arrive in the UK.

    There ARE Mercenary forces at call, in places like Russia, China, Indonesia. You don’t physically need to have a group of armed men beat or kill the Third World Migrants molesting your daughter, wife, property. When for a convenient fee, Cyber Criminals can arrange unhappy accidents to said Third World Migrants; all the while collecting money on the other end with partners smuggling in the Migrants to First World nations.

    Of course, once that state of mind step is made, i.e. recognize and reject the failure of the State and seek private/feudal arrangements, DIY is sure to make its appearance. Oh well, its a good thing White working class soccer hooligans only exist in fiction and not reality!

    I’m sure everything will work out just fine according to Thomas Friedman and David Brooks. After all, they should now, right? They work for Carlos Slim and Friedman married lots of money.

  46. @Luke Lea
    When I read Anarchy, State, and Utopia a few years back the thing I remember best (and I may not have the wording just right) was the single exception Nozick made to the idea that every man should have a full right to all the property he inherited or otherwise legally owned: that exception was when the property had somehow been illegally or involuntarily acquired either by him or one of his benefactors. But since if you trace back the origins of all capital (savings, wealth) you come to the inescapable and in fact tautological truth that capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries, plus interest -- when you come to this realization you realize that Zozick's libertarian philosophy has a hole in it big enough to drive a truck through.

    Replies: @International Jew, @SFG, @AnAnon

    He apparently moderated his positions later, in _The Examined Life_ (1989).

  47. @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    I went to college with a guy from England. He was amazed at all our police forces and how each department had different uniforms, car liveries and jurisdictions. I remember explaining the differences between the campus police, the city police, the county sheriff and the state highway patrol. It was a total shock to him. There were times where we would see cars from all four of the above departments simultaneously. His mind was really blown, however, when he found out that committing murder in our state would get you life in prison, but doing the same thing 40 miles east in the neighboring state would get you the death penalty.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marty

    I guess he was also amazed at the violence and criminality of US streets despite the number of policemen and variety of police forces.

  48. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous-antimarxist

    One interesting question in the history of thought is whether the University of Chicago having a privatized police force that patrols the nicer part of the South Side has anything to do with the Chicago School views on privatization.
     
    Great point!!!

    Begs the question which came first the chicken or the egg, or perhaps "the security or the eggheads".

    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @Anonymous, @fnn

    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???

    My two cents:

    The south side of Chicago north of the University of Chicago used to be quite nice and heavily Jewish before 1960. The Jews fled the city in the 60s, many going to suburbs along Lake Michigan north of the city (Evanston, Highland Park, Glencoe, etc.). Some of the oldest Jewish country clubs are on the south side, outside the city limits (e.g., Ravisloe).

    The townhouses were high-quality with stone fronts, much like those on the north side around the Lincoln Park area. Most of the original housing stock has been destroyed though, while in Lincoln Park that type of townhouse is worth millions of dollars.

    The south side of Chicago had many sketchy neighborhoods (e.g., around the stockyards, and Al Capone’s club, “The Four Deuces” was at 2222 S. Wabash) but immediately north of the U of C, it used to be quite nice.

  49. As an alumni of the University of Chicago, I will make a few observations. Real estate values near the University of Chicago were collapsing in the 1950’s/1960’s. It had gotten to the point that by the 60’s, the campus itself was not safe and students were banding together for mutual protection. The private police force shored up values in Hyde Park, the area north of campus and that has gotten more extended. The thing is, when Chicago School Economics was developing a lot of faculty members were highly motivated to expand fund raising because their personal real estate equity was gone.

  50. @FactsAreImportant
    @Anonymous


    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
     
    The difference between the US and UK on this point may be because the oldest parts of most large US cities slid into chaos about 50 years ago during the Great Migration of blacks from the South into the North.

    Many US universities were established near US cities a long time ago, and as the cities grew, they encircled the universities and the universities found themselves in an "inner city" that was engulfed by the Great Migration.

    Some examples are Yale (New Haven), Columbia (New York), U of Chicago (Chicago), U of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), U of Southern California (Los Angeles), Tulane (New Orleans), and Berkeley (Oakland).

    None of these universities would exist today without a very serious police force. Tens of thousands of tender and naive young students would not be able to survive in these environments without a serious police presence - the easy pickings would attract criminals from many miles around, and waiting for a response from a beleaguered large-city police force would not be adequate.

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    Replies: @Nico, @Anonymous, @Ripple Earthdevil

    Tulane is located in the wealthiest part of New Orleans, much like SMU is located near the wealthiest area of Dallas. Rice University’s not too poorly situated in Houston for that matter either.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    People complain all the time about Houston, but most of the time I spent in Houston was along Main Street next to the Rice campus, which features a rather utopian collection of urban amenities, like a huge medical center, a giant park, a zoo, museums, landmark hotel, fountains, etc.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @ben tillman

  51. I live in a upper crust suburb and the proliferation of security cameras on private residences (many recording the public streets) are now cheap and effective enough to where home burglary and auto theft is rapidly dwindling. The neighborhood figured out , with the help of a technical expert, all the angles so we knew where to place the cameras. Our local police force not only cheers this on but they let it be known. Criminals talk in prison and they all know which neighborhoods to rip off and which ones to avoid. The neighborhood is now its own virtual police force.

    • Agree: unit472
  52. I think this means that Obama realized he was on the side of the cops, not the crooks.

    That was then and this is now, eh?

  53. When visiting South Africa about ten years ago private security was and had been the fastest growing sector of employment. Each home in the suburbs of Johannesburg and Cape Town was surrounded by twelve foot walls–some with bastions–and private armed guards patrolling the streets.

    Here in the Central Valley those with money have begun the transition. Country homes are normally bordered with trees and shrubbery like Italian villas and now wrought-iron fences and cinder-block walls are becoming in fashion. It’s a pain-in-the-ass to have to open and close gates repeatedly on a working farm/ranch but having your copper wires and machinery constantly stolen is a violating nuisance.

  54. @Anonymous
    The notion of 'university police forces' is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guards. Previous to recent decades there was hardly any visible security personnel of any type to be found in British seats of higher learning, though I suppose there were such exotica as 'bulldogs' and 'beadles', (beadles, mind you, and not 'beagles,' it wasn't entirely canine). The most you got was the handyman/caretaker type of guy occasionally keeping a look out. Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc. Outsiders, generally, had no interest in universities as a crime opportunity - the mere smell of chalk dust was enough to put those types off. Anyhow, in the halls of residence, students generally had very little property worth stealing.

    Replies: @dearieme, @hodag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @FactsAreImportant, @M_Young, @TWS, @iSteveFan, @Buffalo Joe, @Mr. Anon

    “Anonymous says:

    August 1, 2015 at 10:29 am GMT • 200 Words

    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.”

    To American ears too, if they are old enough. I went to college in the eighties at large state universities in urban settings. I’m sure there were campus police forces there, but one was barely aware of them. Mostly they regulated parking. “Security” forces in all their many forms became steadily more noticeable and intrusive during the 90s and they really took off after 911. America is now bathed in “security”. I write security in quotes as it has little to do with security as far as I can see, and certainly little to do with public safety. It is nothing more than the tyranny part of anarcho-tyranny.

  55. @M_Young
    @Anonymous

    "The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guard"

    I'm guessing either anonymous is not British or didn't attend Uni. "Porters" have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes.

    "Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc."

    Again wrong. They may have come from genteel strata, but 'Town and Gown' riots have a long history, and they weren't all started by townees. See David Cameron's "Bullingdon Club" for one of many examples.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

    “I’m guessing either anonymous is not British or didn’t attend Uni. “Porters” have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes.”

    There’s a big difference between a few tough-looking slags hired to be bouncers and a police force. Nearly every state university of any size in the US has its own police force – uniformed, state-employed agents who carry tasers, batons, and pistols.

  56. @anonymous-antimarxist

    One interesting question in the history of thought is whether the University of Chicago having a privatized police force that patrols the nicer part of the South Side has anything to do with the Chicago School views on privatization.
     
    Great point!!!

    Begs the question which came first the chicken or the egg, or perhaps "the security or the eggheads".

    Because much of the south side of Chicago, even along the gorgeous lakefront, has been sketchy for at least as long as University of Chicago has had a campus there.

    Any experts on the history of UofC or Chicago out there???

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @Anonymous, @fnn

    University of Chicago was founded in 1890. James T. Farrell’s fictional Irish tough Studs Lonigan committed crimes on the streets of Hyde Park in the 1920s , but I don’t think the university ever saw the Irish as much of a threat. The area didn’t become “sketchy” until some time after WWII. A major “urban renewal” project in the 1950s came to the rescue and bulldozed the working class housing in Hyde Park (both blacks and whites) and almost all of the many bars on 55th St. The now iconic Jimmy’s Woodlawn Tap was allowed to remain for some reason I can’t recall.

  57. “I think this means that Obama realized he was on the side of the cops, not the crooks.”

    Or that he is on the side of whoever is most useful to him at the time.

    “Perhaps the most spectacular example is the U. of Chicago’s fiefdom sprawling far beyond its campus. Its police force has full jurisdiction over 50,000 residents who aren’t students.”

    How does that work, in practice. Do they only police students? Doesn’t an arrangment like that violate the very idea of representative government. And police certainly are “the government” in its most essential form – them what gets to tell people what to do.

    If I don’t like what the police do, I can (in theory, anyway) seek redress from the mayor. If I don’t like what sheriff’s deputies do, I can vote out the sheriff. What influence would I have on a police force that is regulated and paid by a private entity?

    • Replies: @FWIW
    @Mr. Anon

    I have never really figured out the University of Chicago, although I usually have a reason to go there a few times a year.
    Around the campus, there are very few through streets. The main quad area is a maze, impossible to park nearby, and has a limited number of entrances and exits.
    With one way streets, plus a few dead ends .. no one would bother to just 'drive through' instead of around the area.
    Also, walking around, there seem to be a lot of official or semi official guys standing around, always glad to give directions. They aren't cops, but seem to be large black guys ... older, friendly, but clearly no one to casually fuck with. Especially in an area to the South, across the Midway, where the the law school and some other University Schools/Institutes. It kind of looks like there is the beginning of a gentrification push to the south.

    Here is a map of the place: http://wvaughan.org/uchicagogrid.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  58. Wasn’t George Zimmerman acting as an unpaid private police force for his townhouse condominium association a few years back? Didn’t he cite “Anarchy, State, and Utopia” as intellectual justification at his trial?

  59. I’m surprised no one has mentioned George Zimmerman; that was a form of private law enforcement. Indeed, if you know southern Florida, you know that everybody from lower middle class on up lives in a gated community. That’s thousands of instances of private law enforcement.

    OT, but this story about a white gun owner killing an unarmed African lion is just getting bigger and bigger. And now it seems the lion’s brother was shot today — culprit’s race so far unknown.

  60. @International Jew
    @Luke Lea


    capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries
     
    Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn't quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!

    Replies: @Anonymous Bro, @tbraton

    I think that by “capital” Luke was referring to the ownership stake in the capital items.

    So in your tractor example the tractor itself is newly made, but businessman X only owns it because businessman X’s ancestors got lucky or stole someone else’s property. Otherwise businessman X wouldn’t be able to afford the tractor.

  61. @Luke Lea
    When I read Anarchy, State, and Utopia a few years back the thing I remember best (and I may not have the wording just right) was the single exception Nozick made to the idea that every man should have a full right to all the property he inherited or otherwise legally owned: that exception was when the property had somehow been illegally or involuntarily acquired either by him or one of his benefactors. But since if you trace back the origins of all capital (savings, wealth) you come to the inescapable and in fact tautological truth that capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries, plus interest -- when you come to this realization you realize that Zozick's libertarian philosophy has a hole in it big enough to drive a truck through.

    Replies: @International Jew, @SFG, @AnAnon

    Yep, life is what it is, and the idea of respect for rights is very new.

  62. @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    I went to college with a guy from England. He was amazed at all our police forces and how each department had different uniforms, car liveries and jurisdictions. I remember explaining the differences between the campus police, the city police, the county sheriff and the state highway patrol. It was a total shock to him. There were times where we would see cars from all four of the above departments simultaneously. His mind was really blown, however, when he found out that committing murder in our state would get you life in prison, but doing the same thing 40 miles east in the neighboring state would get you the death penalty.

    Replies: @BB753, @Marty

    A career prosecutor in L.A. County says that in California, a sentence of “life” for murder results in actual prison time of 5.5 years, median.

  63. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I was hoping you were going to talk about privatized police forces where the government run police force was disbanded and contracted out to a private company. in my dreams 99% of all public employee jobs are contracted out to private contractors rather than be paid directly by the state. I think that would be far more effective and efficient

  64. @Anonymous
    @FactsAreImportant

    Tulane is located in the wealthiest part of New Orleans, much like SMU is located near the wealthiest area of Dallas. Rice University's not too poorly situated in Houston for that matter either.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    People complain all the time about Houston, but most of the time I spent in Houston was along Main Street next to the Rice campus, which features a rather utopian collection of urban amenities, like a huge medical center, a giant park, a zoo, museums, landmark hotel, fountains, etc.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    @Steve Sailer

    I visited Houston three weeks ago and my cousin drove me around Rice campus. It is a beautiful school.

    , @ben tillman
    @Steve Sailer

    Lived at Kirby & Holcombe for a while. I have no complaints.

  65. @slumber_j
    The Harvard University Police have a waaay longer arm than the U. of Chicago cops. From the HUPD website:

    HUPD officers are licensed special State Police officers and deputy sheriffs in both Middlesex and Suffolk Counties. Those powers give them the authority to respond to any crime on our campus and any "breach of the peace" on city streets in Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston. Officers receive the same academy training as officers from Cambridge.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Brutusale

    As are the Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern University and MIT police.

    Meanwhile, we have the Boston PD and the State Police fighting about jurisdiction over arresting the drunks in the newish Seaport District.

  66. @Buffalo Joe
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous, A lot of US colleges and universities are in the inner city. The security forces aren't there because the students a troublemakers or thieves. They are there to protect the students, their property and the property of the institution from trouble makers, rapists and thieves

    Replies: @Ivy

    USC alumni may mention what used to be called the bicycle tax.

    Over the course of four years on campus, students are likely to lose a bike to the brothers. Update that to iPhones, gold chains, the odd BMW and you get the picture.

    Security has increased more recently due to the murder of Chinese students. That triggered a round of reputation repairs and more rigorous policies. One consequence of the tighter cordon has been the exclusion from campus of wanna-bes, hangers-on, potential non-matriculating Mrs. degree candidates looking for Mr. Right, and other assorted street-level entrepreneurs.

  67. @TWS
    @Robert Hume

    When I was a cop they used to pay me twice my regular salary to watch football games, concerts etc. Sometimes it was triple my regular salary for a few hours work.

    Replies: @Robert Hume

    Was that in or out of uniform. In the case of the Nationals I’m pretty sure it’s out of uniform.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Robert Hume

    In uniform. I was well liked by the high school in the town where I worked so I also got contracted for uniformed work at parties, dances, football games etc for the school. That really paid well I could get a week's wages for five hours work.

  68. @FactsAreImportant
    @Anonymous


    The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
     
    The difference between the US and UK on this point may be because the oldest parts of most large US cities slid into chaos about 50 years ago during the Great Migration of blacks from the South into the North.

    Many US universities were established near US cities a long time ago, and as the cities grew, they encircled the universities and the universities found themselves in an "inner city" that was engulfed by the Great Migration.

    Some examples are Yale (New Haven), Columbia (New York), U of Chicago (Chicago), U of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), U of Southern California (Los Angeles), Tulane (New Orleans), and Berkeley (Oakland).

    None of these universities would exist today without a very serious police force. Tens of thousands of tender and naive young students would not be able to survive in these environments without a serious police presence - the easy pickings would attract criminals from many miles around, and waiting for a response from a beleaguered large-city police force would not be adequate.

    The British have no idea how bad US inner cities are. After a decade or two of large-scale African migration, though, they will have a very good idea.

    Replies: @Nico, @Anonymous, @Ripple Earthdevil

    While the area surrounding UC Berkeley has its problems stemming mostly from transients, homeless, and the mentally ill of various races, the Oakland ghettos are several miles away.

  69. @FactsAreImportant
    Speaking of African migration into Britain, the news footage makes clear that almost all the migrants are young men. This makes the current migration an incredibly concentrated bad thing and very different from the current migration into the US.

    In the US, a large portion of the immigration is families (or when a single man comes first, he brings his extended family later.) But the African migration to Britain is all young men. So the most dangerously explosive fraction of the African population has been distilled out and is being imported at full strength. The US is imbibing a strong red wine, while Britain is downing a bottle of pure grain alcohol.

    Plus, the young African men do not have the moderating influence of family that makes the Latino immigrants into the US relatively docile. There are also few potential mates for the young migrants -- young men don't behave very well when there is a shortage of potential mates from their own culture. I don't think they are going to be particularly chivalrous to the native women.

    Yikes.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jan/22/number-rapes-police-england-wales-rises-31-percent

    Mind you, just in one year:
    “violent crime recorded by the police has jumped by 11 per cent … More than 22,100 rapes were recorded, a 29 per cent rise”

    Gotta love the liberal view of the world: “The unexpectedly large increase in overall violent crime</b"

  70. “Another example of overlapping police departments involve college police forces that patrol off campus, which has suddenly become controversial when a U. of Cincinnati cop shot a black motorist.”

    I can’t speak for the other 49 states, but in NC, sworn officer campus cops (whether they be for state university system institutes or private institutes) in addition to performing law enforcement activities on campus properties proper can:

    a- Perform LEO activities on any section of public street/highway that is road frontage contiguous to institutional property.

    b- Perform LEO activities resulting from a pursuit or investigation originating in areas mentioned in (a) and second paragraph.

    c- Perform LEO activities in local ad-hoc multi-agency law enforcement projects.

    All that bullshit said, at the end of the day, the primary unstated mission statement of any Kampus Kop force is to maximize parking ticket revenue and minimize campus scandals.

  71. @Robert Hume
    @TWS

    Was that in or out of uniform. In the case of the Nationals I'm pretty sure it's out of uniform.

    Replies: @TWS

    In uniform. I was well liked by the high school in the town where I worked so I also got contracted for uniformed work at parties, dances, football games etc for the school. That really paid well I could get a week’s wages for five hours work.

  72. prosa123 [AKA "Peter"] says: • Website
    @Big Bill
    Thirty years ago, businessmen in NYC saw Times Square as a huge opportunity. They created a business improvement district, imposed BID taxes on all the local businesses and hired cleanup people and patrolman to clean up the streets and keep a steady pressure on street people and hustlers. It worked. I don't know when the last strip club, clip joint, massage parlor, and XXX theater closed, but Times Square is like Disneyland compared to 1975.

    Detroit has maybe 3 working ambulances and the waiting time for a police response to anything other than a shooting is around an hour, and often
    much, much longer
    .

    This private takeover of public functions in the urban core is the wave of the future. It is extremely difficult, particularly in black run cities with a history of race rioting and race advocacy, to make the changes that are necessary through the existing black power structure. Raising taxes "to pay for more teachers, police and firemen" just will not work as long as the same people are in charge.

    Hence white people must organize privately, perhaps coordinating their efforts with the black power structure, but never just giving the black power structure more money. It is almost a reversion to America of 1800, when one contracted with individual private fire "companies" and public fire "departments" did not exist.

    Replies: @Nico, @WhatEvvs, @prosa123

    Times Square still has a few rough edges. In recent years there have been troubles involving people, sometimes skells or ex-cons, who dress up as cartoon characters and pose for photos with tourists. On more than a few occasions they have become abusive or even violent if they think they haven’t been tipped enough. Sometimes they get in fistfights with one another over turf.
    More recently there has been an influx of topless women (legal in New York) who also pose for photos with tourists in return for tips. They’re better behaved than the cartoon characters, however on some occasions they have p

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @prosa123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXteef_a_G8

  73. @International Jew
    @Luke Lea


    capital is nothing else than the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries
     
    Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn't quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!

    Replies: @Anonymous Bro, @tbraton

    “Land, perhaps, but not capital. Capital has to be manufactured, and the average age of a farm tractor, jet transport or industrial robot doesn’t quite go back as far as the Indian Removal Act, much less the conquest of Gaul!”

    I believe you are confusing capital goods with the money used to acquire those capital goods. It was the French novelist Balzac who was the source of the expression “Behind every great fortune there is a crime.” (Incidentally, that served as the epigraph of the novel “The Godfather.”) I believe that is what LukeLea was alluding to. Balzac’s actual expression was “The secret of a great success for which you are at a loss to account is a crime that has never been found out, because it was properly executed.”

  74. @prosa123
    @Big Bill

    Times Square still has a few rough edges. In recent years there have been troubles involving people, sometimes skells or ex-cons, who dress up as cartoon characters and pose for photos with tourists. On more than a few occasions they have become abusive or even violent if they think they haven't been tipped enough. Sometimes they get in fistfights with one another over turf.
    More recently there has been an influx of topless women (legal in New York) who also pose for photos with tourists in return for tips. They're better behaved than the cartoon characters, however on some occasions they have p

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  75. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    People complain all the time about Houston, but most of the time I spent in Houston was along Main Street next to the Rice campus, which features a rather utopian collection of urban amenities, like a huge medical center, a giant park, a zoo, museums, landmark hotel, fountains, etc.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @ben tillman

    I visited Houston three weeks ago and my cousin drove me around Rice campus. It is a beautiful school.

  76. @M_Young
    @Anonymous

    "The notion of ‘university police forces’ is entirely unknown to the UK, and sounds bizarre to British ears.
    The closest Britain gets is a few, any, rather doddery middle aged, contracted, security guard"

    I'm guessing either anonymous is not British or didn't attend Uni. "Porters" have long existed at UK HE institutions, and more than a few of them are tough and rough looking blokes.

    "Anyhow, in a previous age, UK university students almost exclusively came from the genteel strata, so they inherently caused very very little trouble, theft etc."

    Again wrong. They may have come from genteel strata, but 'Town and Gown' riots have a long history, and they weren't all started by townees. See David Cameron's "Bullingdon Club" for one of many examples.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

    Yes, but ‘porters’ are hardly sworn, uniformed police officers, with badges, batons, patrol cars, guns and police offices etc.
    As the man said, apart from doing their portering duty, porters basically just played at being the ‘daddy’ or the bouncer.

  77. @Cracker
    Good bless the Temple U cops in Filthadelphia.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Good bless the Temple U cops in Filthadelphia.

    I guess. My sister survived a few years working on the Temple campus in the 1990s.

  78. @FactsAreImportant
    Speaking of African migration into Britain, the news footage makes clear that almost all the migrants are young men. This makes the current migration an incredibly concentrated bad thing and very different from the current migration into the US.

    In the US, a large portion of the immigration is families (or when a single man comes first, he brings his extended family later.) But the African migration to Britain is all young men. So the most dangerously explosive fraction of the African population has been distilled out and is being imported at full strength. The US is imbibing a strong red wine, while Britain is downing a bottle of pure grain alcohol.

    Plus, the young African men do not have the moderating influence of family that makes the Latino immigrants into the US relatively docile. There are also few potential mates for the young migrants -- young men don't behave very well when there is a shortage of potential mates from their own culture. I don't think they are going to be particularly chivalrous to the native women.

    Yikes.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman

    In the US, a large portion of the immigration is families (or when a single man comes first, he brings his extended family later.) But the African migration to Britain is all young men. So the most dangerously explosive fraction of the African population has been distilled out and is being imported at full strength.

    Horizontal transmission breeds virulence.

  79. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    People complain all the time about Houston, but most of the time I spent in Houston was along Main Street next to the Rice campus, which features a rather utopian collection of urban amenities, like a huge medical center, a giant park, a zoo, museums, landmark hotel, fountains, etc.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @ben tillman

    Lived at Kirby & Holcombe for a while. I have no complaints.

  80. @Mr. Anon
    "I think this means that Obama realized he was on the side of the cops, not the crooks."

    Or that he is on the side of whoever is most useful to him at the time.

    "Perhaps the most spectacular example is the U. of Chicago’s fiefdom sprawling far beyond its campus. Its police force has full jurisdiction over 50,000 residents who aren’t students."

    How does that work, in practice. Do they only police students? Doesn't an arrangment like that violate the very idea of representative government. And police certainly are "the government" in its most essential form - them what gets to tell people what to do.

    If I don't like what the police do, I can (in theory, anyway) seek redress from the mayor. If I don't like what sheriff's deputies do, I can vote out the sheriff. What influence would I have on a police force that is regulated and paid by a private entity?

    Replies: @FWIW

    I have never really figured out the University of Chicago, although I usually have a reason to go there a few times a year.
    Around the campus, there are very few through streets. The main quad area is a maze, impossible to park nearby, and has a limited number of entrances and exits.
    With one way streets, plus a few dead ends .. no one would bother to just ‘drive through’ instead of around the area.
    Also, walking around, there seem to be a lot of official or semi official guys standing around, always glad to give directions. They aren’t cops, but seem to be large black guys … older, friendly, but clearly no one to casually fuck with. Especially in an area to the South, across the Midway, where the the law school and some other University Schools/Institutes. It kind of looks like there is the beginning of a gentrification push to the south.

    Here is a map of the place: http://wvaughan.org/uchicagogrid.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @FWIW

    Oak Park, IL similarly built dead-ends to block off through traffic from the Austin neighborhood of Chicago.

  81. @FWIW
    @Mr. Anon

    I have never really figured out the University of Chicago, although I usually have a reason to go there a few times a year.
    Around the campus, there are very few through streets. The main quad area is a maze, impossible to park nearby, and has a limited number of entrances and exits.
    With one way streets, plus a few dead ends .. no one would bother to just 'drive through' instead of around the area.
    Also, walking around, there seem to be a lot of official or semi official guys standing around, always glad to give directions. They aren't cops, but seem to be large black guys ... older, friendly, but clearly no one to casually fuck with. Especially in an area to the South, across the Midway, where the the law school and some other University Schools/Institutes. It kind of looks like there is the beginning of a gentrification push to the south.

    Here is a map of the place: http://wvaughan.org/uchicagogrid.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Oak Park, IL similarly built dead-ends to block off through traffic from the Austin neighborhood of Chicago.

  82. I know I’m late to this post, but I have to add my two cents. While I would never dispute the benefit of having a professional university police force in an urban city like Chicago, my experience with one particular campus PD has been quite different. A family friend has a niece at the University of Michigan and she was cited for a minor in possession of alcohol. A first time offense is a misdemeanor. Yes, that’s right, an underage college student who has never done anything wrong in her life, is subjected to criminal treatment for having a beer. After discussing this with the prosecutor, she was offered a diversion program and nothing would remain on her “permanent record”. What a waste of time, but certainly not of money. She paid $1,000 total for the citation, counseling, rehab, etc. What a sham. In helping her out, I spoke to a former prosecutor (now defense attorney) that admitted the campus PD hands out about 1,000 of these citations every home football game weekend. If it’s an UM-Michigan State game, he said it can be double that amount.

    Again, in Chicago, the university PD are likely a very welcomed sight. Ann Arbor, however, is safer than Disneyland. This is nothing but a money grab.

  83. I generally dismiss Libertarian, privatize everything, free markets will save the world types.
    When there are clear racial, cultural conflicts, wars between “us” and “them” – there is always some BSing Libertarian trying to change the subject to “economics” – well, I’ve spent 2/3 of my life in the University of Chicago Hyde Park Community mentioned in Steve Sailers article. Yes, we are the home of the Chicago School of economics, free markets, privatize everything.

    And yes, we do have a very large, and effective private U of C police force.

    When urban civilization collapses, it’s an option to retreat behind heavily guarded walls – and we most certainly have that here.

    We haven’t privatized education – which would have great appeal.

  84. I just realized this article was the NY Times way of warning their national audience that the French Quarter has gone to crap. Given the Politburo’s edict about reporting crime news in the national media, a think piece on policing trends is the only way to get the word out.

  85. Robert Nozick sued his landlord Erich Segal for violating the city’s rent control law. Doesn’t sound very libertarian of him. But maybe he was just trying to make a point– perhaps Segal was the rent-control believer.

    Anarchy, state, and never having to say you’re sorry?

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