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Prince Philip, RIP
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The royal consort of the UK has died at age 99. An acerbic individual, here are a selection of Prince Philip’s greatest hits, including his long-running wars against Tom Jones and Elton John, from a 2011 article in The Independent:

1. “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Beijing, during a 1986 tour of China.

2. “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.

7. “How do you keep the natives off the booze long enough to pass the test?” Asked of a Scottish driving instructor in 1995.

8. “Damn fool question!” To BBC journalist Caroline Wyatt at a banquet at the Elysée Palace after she asked Queen Elizabeth if she was enjoying her stay in Paris in 2006.

11. “We don’t come here for our health. We can think of other ways of enjoying ourselves.” During a trip to Canada in 1976.

13. “British women can’t cook.” Winning the hearts of the Scottish Women’s Institute in 1961.

15. “What do you gargle with – pebbles?” To Tom Jones, after the Royal Variety Performance, 1969. He added the following day: “It is very difficult at all to see how it is possible to become immensely valuable by singing what I think are the most hideous songs.”

16. “It’s a vast waste of space.” Philip entertained guests in 2000 at the reception of a new £18m British Embassy in Berlin, which the Queen had just opened.

18. “If it has four legs and it is not a chair, if it has got two wings and it flies but is not an aeroplane and if it swims and it is not a submarine, the Cantonese will eat it.” Said to a World Wildlife Fund meeting in 1986.

22. “I would like to go to Russia very much – although the bastards murdered half my family.” In 1967, asked if he would like to visit the Soviet Union.

24. “Oh, it’s you that owns that ghastly car is it? We often see it when driving to Windsor Castle.” To neighbour Elton John after hearing he had sold his Watford FC-themed Aston Martin in 2001.

25. “The problem with London is the tourists. They cause the congestion. If we could just stop the tourism, we could stop the congestion.” At the opening of City Hall in 2002.

28. “You must be out of your minds.” To Solomon Islanders, on being told that their population growth was 5 per cent a year, in 1982.

30. “Your country is one of the most notorious centres of trading in endangered species.” Accepting a conservation award in Thailand in 1991.

31. “Aren’t most of you descended from pirates?” In the Cayman Islands, 1994.

34. “If you travel as much as we do you appreciate the improvements in aircraft design of less noise and more comfort – provided you don’t travel in something called economy class, which sounds ghastly.” To the Aircraft Research Association in 2002.

39. “I wish he’d turn the microphone off!” The Prince expresses his opinion of Elton John’s performance at the 73rd Royal Variety Show, 2001.

49. Philip: “Who are you?”
Simon Kelner: “I’m the editor-in-chief of The Independent, Sir.”
Philip: “What are you doing here?”
Kelner: “You invited me.”
Philip: “Well, you didn’t have to come!”
An exchange at a press reception to mark the Golden Jubilee in 2002.

51. “Any bloody fool can lay a wreath at the thingamy.” Discussing his role in an interview with Jeremy Paxman.

52. “Holidays are curious things, aren’t they? You send children to school to get them out of your hair. Then they come back and make life difficult for parents. That is why holidays are set so they are just about the limit of your endurance.” At the opening of a school in 2000.

58. “I have never been noticeably reticent about talking on subjects about which I know nothing.” Addressing a group of industrialists in 1961.

59. “It’s not a very big one, but at least it’s dead and it took an awful lot of killing!” Speaking about a crocodile he shot in Gambia in 1957.

71. “It is my invariable custom to say something flattering to begin with so that I shall be excused if by any chance I put my foot in it later on.” Full marks for honesty, from a speech in 1956.

73. “In education, if in nothing else, the Scotsman knows what is best for him. Indeed, only a Scotsman can really survive a Scottish education.” Said when he was made Chancellor of Edinburgh University in November 1953.

84. “What about Tom Jones? He’s made a million and he’s a bloody awful singer.” Response to a comment at a small-business lunch about how difficult it is in Britain to get rich.

86. “I’d much rather have stayed in the Navy, frankly.” When asked what he felt about his life in 1992.

Here’s a fictionalized scene from an episode of Peter Morgan’s The Crown called “The Balmoral Test” in which Diana Spencer wins the approval of Prince Philip:

 
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  1. I figured it out Steve!

    The message that Harry and Meghan wrote

    It’s a Threat..it’s a direct Threat

    From whoever is behind Harry and Meghan.

    “Thank you for your service…you will be greatly missed”

    The Monarchy only has one job left…and to keep that job….they must do what they are told. Thank you for your service. Thank you for doing what you were told. Don’t step out of line, we’re watching.

    That’s creepy stuff.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Thoughts

    Yes I don't envy them much. And I'm legitimately saddened by his death. He was old af but I wanted to see him celebrate his 100th birthday in two short months. And his childhood was far worse than mine, and I dare to say the childhood of anyone reading this comment. I don't envy the royals much at all. The wealth and privilege seems to be overshadowed by a sincere sense of extreme duty, and a horrific amount of public scrutiny and lack of privacy. I don't really blame Liz for trying to sneak herself a billion pounds or two. I think that family has earned it. Harry ofc is an idiot and Andrew isn't much to brag about either but on the whole I deeply respect them and their role.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

  2. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    No.

    Replies: @guest007

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?
     
    Why does that sound gastrointestinal?


    Will the Cantonese eat it?

    https://www.redco.com/images/D/5%20PIN%20XLR.jpg

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    https://twitter.com/NakedSavior/status/1380572485729533957

  3. Talking about his equestrian-inclined daughter, Princess Anne: ‘If it doesn’t fart or eat hay, she isn’t interested.’

  4. A great man of supernatural temperament.

  5. I’m a dyed in the cotton republican, but as princes go, he was an entertaining one.

    A competent–much better than average–naval officer, one wonders why the kids are all such mediocrities and his eldest a pathetic blob of nothingness.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
    • Replies: @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.

    The British press blames Harry and Meghan for the death of 99 year and 10 months old Phillip

    My favorite Royal tv series isn’t The Crown. It’s The Windsors mean spirited nasty and hilarious.
    Charles’ visit to Meghan’s Mom’s little middle class home is the best episode. I recommend it.

    Replies: @Flip, @S. Anonyia

    , @Barnard
    @AnotherDad


    52. “Holidays are curious things, aren’t they? You send children to school to get them out of your hair. Then they come back and make life difficult for parents. That is why holidays are set so they are just about the limit of your endurance.” At the opening of a school in 2000.
     
    Based on this quote, he doesn't seem to have been a very involved father. I doubt it would have made a huge difference, but he could have taken an interest in making sure the schools his children attended weren't being taking over by people who hated his nation and its people. Charles shares his concerns about the environment, but neither one from any record I can find has ever criticized letting third worlders move into Great Britain. There are a lot of great lines on the list, I enjoy his bashing of second rate entertainers, but if he opposed globalism in any way, he didn't seem to show it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @MBlanc46
    @AnotherDad

    I think that the Mum pretty first-rate, too. Regression to the mean, perhaps.

    , @David In TN
    @AnotherDad

    I recall reading in, I think, the 1970s that a poll showed if Britain became a republic, the choice for President of a British republic would be Prince Philip.

  6. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    No.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, you should remark on the number of children, baby momma, and mug shots that DMX had before he died. DMX is a good example of who actually owns the future much like Prince Philip.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @Truth

  7. I absolutely adored him. Had to take his role seriously and he did. Refusing to take anything else too seriously was, all things considered, a harmless way of expressing himself and venting what must have been his considerable frustration.

    He stood behind his wife and sovereign, literally and figuratively, for nearly three quarters of a century without ever seeming diminished as a man by his lesser official status.

    RIP.

  8. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?

    Why does that sound gastrointestinal?

    Will the Cantonese eat it?

    • LOL: Kylie
  9. When he worried Meghan about Archie’s color coming through, he was talking about the ginger.

    • LOL: Kolya Krassotkin
  10. In the royal soap opera, he got all the best lines.

  11. As for DMX: probably the first BBC obituary to include the words “A father of 15, he served jail sentences on charges including animal cruelty, reckless driving, drug possession and weapons possession.”

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @Joe S.Walker

    The BBC's musical news coverage seems to consist entirely of aspiring rappers with legal troubles, billionaire hip-hop types and Taylor Swift.

  12. My goodness this is like the greatest obituary ever. I find it hard to believe you cooked this up between time of the announcement of the croaking and now. Do you keep a group of Mechanical Turk Bangalorians on payroll for research?

    I heard he had long interviews with an outer-space-type alien and there was extensive documentation in the MI* files but I haven’t seen anything definitive.

  13. @AnotherDad
    I'm a dyed in the cotton republican, but as princes go, he was an entertaining one.

    A competent--much better than average--naval officer, one wonders why the kids are all such mediocrities and his eldest a pathetic blob of nothingness.

    Replies: @Alden, @Barnard, @MBlanc46, @David In TN

    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.

    The British press blames Harry and Meghan for the death of 99 year and 10 months old Phillip

    My favorite Royal tv series isn’t The Crown. It’s The Windsors mean spirited nasty and hilarious.
    Charles’ visit to Meghan’s Mom’s little middle class home is the best episode. I recommend it.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Alden


    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.
     
    Rumors are that Charles and Anne are his while Andrew is from Lord Porchester and Edward is from Baron Plunket.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous, @Alden

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Alden

    Anne was average as a young woman. Pretty in a few photos, even.

    Also Elizabeth was average looking herself (like her daughter only pretty in certain photos, and she had the benefit of being photographed often in flattering, high-contrast black and white), especially compared to her sister.

    Think it’s far more like Harry isn’t Charles’ s than any of Phillip’s aren’t his.

    Replies: @Alden

  14. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    No.

    Replies: @guest007

    Steve, you should remark on the number of children, baby momma, and mug shots that DMX had before he died. DMX is a good example of who actually owns the future much like Prince Philip.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    @guest007

    DMX had 15 children.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rWU_VDa1Js

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Truth
    @guest007

    Yes, a useless, debauched, criminal who did nothing to earn his considerable reputation, from an lineage of bottom-dwelling scallywags in a family that has been living of the public dole since before his birth, died today.

    ... And so did some rapper.

  15. Trump needs to study that guy.

  16. “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.

    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, “Oh noo, you don’t want to go theah, ” and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America’s china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can’t imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Stoke is pretty ghastly. The Five Towns area is known as the Potteries and was the subject of a damning chapter comparing it to the smoky fires of hell in JB Priestley's English Journey travelogue written in the 1930s.

    The deceased
    reminded me of my father.

    Prince Philip was a lot more typical of a certain type of British man of his generation than many people might think.

    The John Cleese character of hotelier Basil Fawlty was based on Cleese's own father, but Fawlty was portrayed as an upper lower middle class character who fawned over (what he thought was) aristocracy, but mercilessly bullied those whom he perceived as of lowest social status.

    However one can often see the kinship between Fawlty and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.

    The most remarkable thing about the Duke and his widow, though, is that there is hardly anybody alive in Britain today who has not known these two people all their life, so they are kind of family regardless of what you think of them.

    https://youtu.be/eUUyCjeTV7Y

    Replies: @Mj

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    I can’t imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.
     
    Stoke is ghastly in a crappy post-war-let's-put-a-motorway-down-the-middle sort of way. Even crappy English towns tend to have pleasant centres built on a medieval street plan, but Stoke doesn't even have that. Presumably, the Luftwaffe had a decent moon when they paid a visit.

    Stoke has a bit of a drug problem, but that is an English style problem of synthetic cannabis users getting caught in the Ladies powder room, rather than swarthy Latinos slaughtering their rivals, or Carribeans shooting guns at each other.

    That said, there are some potteries that are worth a visit, and the nearby countryside is nice.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Prosa123
    @Jack D

    About 30 miles further north, Paterson makes Trenton look wonderful by comparison. Its reputation has been so bad for so long that almost 50 years ago East Paterson went through the expense of changing its name to Elmwood Park

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @JMcG

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Good article about Stoke here by Margaret Drabble.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/jan/26/art.society

    , @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    Trenton makes; the world takes.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Jack D


    I have seen Trenton, NJ. Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque.
     
    If you think Trenton is bad, go 30 miles south to Camden. It makes Trenton look like paradise.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @Anonymous

  17. @Thoughts
    I figured it out Steve!

    The message that Harry and Meghan wrote

    It's a Threat..it's a direct Threat

    From whoever is behind Harry and Meghan.

    "Thank you for your service...you will be greatly missed"

    The Monarchy only has one job left...and to keep that job....they must do what they are told. Thank you for your service. Thank you for doing what you were told. Don't step out of line, we're watching.

    That's creepy stuff.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Yes I don’t envy them much. And I’m legitimately saddened by his death. He was old af but I wanted to see him celebrate his 100th birthday in two short months. And his childhood was far worse than mine, and I dare to say the childhood of anyone reading this comment. I don’t envy the royals much at all. The wealth and privilege seems to be overshadowed by a sincere sense of extreme duty, and a horrific amount of public scrutiny and lack of privacy. I don’t really blame Liz for trying to sneak herself a billion pounds or two. I think that family has earned it. Harry ofc is an idiot and Andrew isn’t much to brag about either but on the whole I deeply respect them and their role.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @AndrewR

    Is Harry really an idiot?

    It looks like he will keep the fame and fortune part while getting rid of the grind.

    He’s the spare anyway, and quite redundant since George was born.

    You don’t have to like Harry or Meghan, but their leaving the UK may have been a smart move. Time will tell.

    Replies: @jon, @Alden

  18. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.

    The British press blames Harry and Meghan for the death of 99 year and 10 months old Phillip

    My favorite Royal tv series isn’t The Crown. It’s The Windsors mean spirited nasty and hilarious.
    Charles’ visit to Meghan’s Mom’s little middle class home is the best episode. I recommend it.

    Replies: @Flip, @S. Anonyia

    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.

    Rumors are that Charles and Anne are his while Andrew is from Lord Porchester and Edward is from Baron Plunket.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Flip

    There was some question as to Harry’s father, but Harry looks so much like Prince Phillip at the same age. Which leads me to believe that Phillip was the true father of Charles and Charles the true father of Harry.

    Charles looks like his mother. Spitting image.

    , @Anonymous
    @Flip


    Rumors are that ... Andrew is from Lord Porchester ...
     
    Porchester died 9/11/2001.

    Replies: @Canadian Observer

    , @Alden
    @Flip

    Andrew and Edward do look like Porchester and Plunkett. As for Anne there’s no way a 6 or 7 out of 10 woman and a 12 out of 10 man could have produced someone who looks like Anne. I think she looks a lot like brother Edward and Lord Plunkett. Phillip has kids by a French woman named Helene. Philip, like Profumo was a client of osteopath/pimp Stephen Ward.

    I enjoy the Royal women’s fashion show more and more every year as American fashion descends into black sweatpants black T shirts and hoodies.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @David In TN

  19. No stamina.

    Another couple of months and he was due The Telegram.

  20. @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    Stoke is pretty ghastly. The Five Towns area is known as the Potteries and was the subject of a damning chapter comparing it to the smoky fires of hell in JB Priestley’s English Journey travelogue written in the 1930s.

    The deceased
    reminded me of my father.

    Prince Philip was a lot more typical of a certain type of British man of his generation than many people might think.

    The John Cleese character of hotelier Basil Fawlty was based on Cleese’s own father, but Fawlty was portrayed as an upper lower middle class character who fawned over (what he thought was) aristocracy, but mercilessly bullied those whom he perceived as of lowest social status.

    However one can often see the kinship between Fawlty and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.

    The most remarkable thing about the Duke and his widow, though, is that there is hardly anybody alive in Britain today who has not known these two people all their life, so they are kind of family regardless of what you think of them.

    • Replies: @Mj
    @Jonathan Mason

    Try Arnold Bennett’s novels. They portray the Potteries in a less lurid light.

  21. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    I can’t imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Stoke is ghastly in a crappy post-war-let’s-put-a-motorway-down-the-middle sort of way. Even crappy English towns tend to have pleasant centres built on a medieval street plan, but Stoke doesn’t even have that. Presumably, the Luftwaffe had a decent moon when they paid a visit.

    Stoke has a bit of a drug problem, but that is an English style problem of synthetic cannabis users getting caught in the Ladies powder room, rather than swarthy Latinos slaughtering their rivals, or Carribeans shooting guns at each other.

    That said, there are some potteries that are worth a visit, and the nearby countryside is nice.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Anonymous

    Ghastly or not ghastly? A rainy day in Stoke. In the mid ground on the chimney, you see the name Spode in vertical letters.

    From Wikipedia:

    Spode is an English brand of pottery and homewares produced by the company of the same name, which is based in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Spode was founded by Josiah Spode (1733–1797) in 1770, and was responsible for perfecting two extremely important techniques that were crucial to the worldwide success of the English pottery industry in the century to follow.

    He perfected the technique for transfer printing in underglaze blue on fine earthenware in 1783–1784 – a development that led to the launch in 1816 of Spode's Blue Italian range, which has remained in production ever since. Josiah Spode is also often credited with developing, around 1790, the formula for fine bone china that was generally adopted by the industry. His son, Josiah Spode II, was certainly responsible for the successful marketing of English bone china.

    The bone china was an art form (it used ground up bones mixed with china clay), but the factories it were made in were some of the ugliest products of the industrial revolution. (I do not think the factory shown in the photo here is the original Spode factory, though.)

    Stoke was also home to the Wedgwood factories, owned by close relatives of Charles Darwin who was influential, to say the least, in a number of ways.

    As far as the city--connurbation would be a better word--Prince Philip was right about Stoke.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02860/Stoke-on-Trent_2860171b.jpg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  22. @AnotherDad
    I'm a dyed in the cotton republican, but as princes go, he was an entertaining one.

    A competent--much better than average--naval officer, one wonders why the kids are all such mediocrities and his eldest a pathetic blob of nothingness.

    Replies: @Alden, @Barnard, @MBlanc46, @David In TN

    52. “Holidays are curious things, aren’t they? You send children to school to get them out of your hair. Then they come back and make life difficult for parents. That is why holidays are set so they are just about the limit of your endurance.” At the opening of a school in 2000.

    Based on this quote, he doesn’t seem to have been a very involved father. I doubt it would have made a huge difference, but he could have taken an interest in making sure the schools his children attended weren’t being taking over by people who hated his nation and its people. Charles shares his concerns about the environment, but neither one from any record I can find has ever criticized letting third worlders move into Great Britain. There are a lot of great lines on the list, I enjoy his bashing of second rate entertainers, but if he opposed globalism in any way, he didn’t seem to show it.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Barnard

    Based on this quote, he doesn’t seem to have been a very involved father.

    Are any British parents involved?

    Replies: @Alden

  23. @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    About 30 miles further north, Paterson makes Trenton look wonderful by comparison. Its reputation has been so bad for so long that almost 50 years ago East Paterson went through the expense of changing its name to Elmwood Park

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Prosa123

    Paterson is 60 miles north of Trenton, not 30. Also, in 2009 the former town of West Paterson became Woodland Park for the same reason East Paterson became Elmwood Park.

    Replies: @Polymath

    , @JMcG
    @Prosa123

    There’s footage on YT of aero engine production at the Wright Aero factory in Paterson during WWII. It’s fascinating if you find that kind of thing interesting. Apparently, Paterson was able to supply a highly skilled workforce 80 years ago.
    Does the sign saying”Trenton makes, the World Takes” still adorn the entrance to town coming from Pennsylvania?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

  24. jon says:

    18. “If it has four legs and it is not a chair, if it has got two wings and it flies but is not an aeroplane and if it swims and it is not a submarine, the Cantonese will eat it.” Said to a World Wildlife Fund meeting in 1986.

    Hilariously accurate. I have heard this quote many times, but I never knew the source.

    Also, after reading this, I think I need to add ‘Ghastly!’ to my vocabulary, a perfect word for these times.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @jon

    As in Harry and Megan — ghastly couple!

  25. @AndrewR
    @Thoughts

    Yes I don't envy them much. And I'm legitimately saddened by his death. He was old af but I wanted to see him celebrate his 100th birthday in two short months. And his childhood was far worse than mine, and I dare to say the childhood of anyone reading this comment. I don't envy the royals much at all. The wealth and privilege seems to be overshadowed by a sincere sense of extreme duty, and a horrific amount of public scrutiny and lack of privacy. I don't really blame Liz for trying to sneak herself a billion pounds or two. I think that family has earned it. Harry ofc is an idiot and Andrew isn't much to brag about either but on the whole I deeply respect them and their role.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    Is Harry really an idiot?

    It looks like he will keep the fame and fortune part while getting rid of the grind.

    He’s the spare anyway, and quite redundant since George was born.

    You don’t have to like Harry or Meghan, but their leaving the UK may have been a smart move. Time will tell.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Paleo Liberal

    When Archie is old enough to understand that he could have been a prince living in a castle his whole life, that he could have been in line to the throne of the British Empire, that little girls all over the world would have gronw up dreaming about meeting and marrying him, and instead he is stuck in some 2,400 square foot home on a 1/4 acre "compund" in the LA hills, he will murder them both.

    , @Alden
    @Paleo Liberal

    They will make a fortune. 100 mil here 50 mil there, it all adds up. I’d love to see them richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses.

    Replies: @Kylie

  26. @Flip
    @Alden


    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.
     
    Rumors are that Charles and Anne are his while Andrew is from Lord Porchester and Edward is from Baron Plunket.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous, @Alden

    There was some question as to Harry’s father, but Harry looks so much like Prince Phillip at the same age. Which leads me to believe that Phillip was the true father of Charles and Charles the true father of Harry.

    Charles looks like his mother. Spitting image.

  27. @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    Good article about Stoke here by Margaret Drabble.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/jan/26/art.society

  28. Philip: “Who are you?”
    Simon Kelner: “I’m the editor-in-chief of The Independent, Sir.”
    Philip: “What are you doing here?”
    Kelner: “You invited me.”
    Philip: “Well, you didn’t have to come!”

    And in this vein, an apt quote comes to mind:

    “The lamps are going out all over Europe. We shall not see them lit again in our time”.

    The Prince may not have been PC, but he most certainly was lit during his lifetime.

    A true class individual, willing to do his bit for his adopted nation and united to his sweet tender soulmate for nearly a three-quarter century.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @TyRade
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "The lamps are going out" quote was Sir Edward Grey, British foreign secretary for the first half of WW1. Grey was a man of his time; landed gentry, outdoorsman (keen hunter, fisherman and bird watcher - his 'The Charm of Birds' written after he left office is simply uplifting). My point I suppose, is that Prince Phillip, born only 3 years after WW1 ended, is arguably more a man of Grey's time. It seems a thousand years ago rather than a century. Phillip was indeed 'true class' - and we've lost the very concept today.

  29. My favorite of his quips comes from an aside he said to a blind woman with a seeing-eye dog making her way through a function – “he leaned over and said to her, madam, do you know that they now have eating dogs for anorexics?”

    • LOL: JMcG
  30. @Paleo Liberal
    @AndrewR

    Is Harry really an idiot?

    It looks like he will keep the fame and fortune part while getting rid of the grind.

    He’s the spare anyway, and quite redundant since George was born.

    You don’t have to like Harry or Meghan, but their leaving the UK may have been a smart move. Time will tell.

    Replies: @jon, @Alden

    When Archie is old enough to understand that he could have been a prince living in a castle his whole life, that he could have been in line to the throne of the British Empire, that little girls all over the world would have gronw up dreaming about meeting and marrying him, and instead he is stuck in some 2,400 square foot home on a 1/4 acre “compund” in the LA hills, he will murder them both.

  31. Anonymous[391] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on the passing of DMX?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

  32. Bit like Donald Bradman, never quite making the big one. Makes you wonder though how some people seem to go on forever and some people die far too early, well before their time. One of the mysteries of life.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Jiminy

    Shakespeare died at 52; Vermeer at 43; Robert Burns only made it to 37.

    Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O'Donnell keep on going.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @Orville H. Larson

  33. Ahhhhaahh…. pure genius.

    Rest in peace, Philip

  34. Anonymous[765] • Disclaimer says:
    @Flip
    @Alden


    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.
     
    Rumors are that Charles and Anne are his while Andrew is from Lord Porchester and Edward is from Baron Plunket.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous, @Alden

    Rumors are that … Andrew is from Lord Porchester …

    Porchester died 9/11/2001.

    • Replies: @Canadian Observer
    @Anonymous

    NHL player Nick Robertson was born on 9/11/2001.

  35. I remember hearing “Just Who Is The 5 O’Clock Hero” by the Jam back in ‘82 or so and wondering just who “that bloody Prince Philip” was. Quite a wit, it seems. RIP

  36. @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    Trenton makes; the world takes.

  37. Kamala Harris, when asked today to comment on the Prince’s death, responded “Oh, snap! Purple Rain is my jam!”

  38. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.

    The British press blames Harry and Meghan for the death of 99 year and 10 months old Phillip

    My favorite Royal tv series isn’t The Crown. It’s The Windsors mean spirited nasty and hilarious.
    Charles’ visit to Meghan’s Mom’s little middle class home is the best episode. I recommend it.

    Replies: @Flip, @S. Anonyia

    Anne was average as a young woman. Pretty in a few photos, even.

    Also Elizabeth was average looking herself (like her daughter only pretty in certain photos, and she had the benefit of being photographed often in flattering, high-contrast black and white), especially compared to her sister.

    Think it’s far more like Harry isn’t Charles’ s than any of Phillip’s aren’t his.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @S. Anonyia

    My sister’s sister in law went to Benenden with Princess Anne. Says Anne was hideous as a teen and young woman. Brother in law went to events at Benenden. So did the parents. All agree Anne was really ugly.

    A couple hours with the best make up artists and the most skilled photographers managed to make Anne looking average. In person though, she was really bad and a lot like Lord Plunkett as many people noticed at the time.

    Philip was supposed to improve the line. Dianna was supposed to improve the line. Judging by they way William and Harry look as they approach 40 it has not worked.

    The Middleton grandparents are still very good looking at 70 or so. Maybe William’s children will look like the Middleton rather than the Saxe Coburg Glucksberg grandchildren. One can but hope.

  39. I met the Duke once (technically, I was ‘presented’ to him), and he was a real prince of a guy. He had a good sense of humour in a very non-PC, good old days sense of the phrase. The world is dimished by losing one of the true old guard at the top of the house.

    One wonders how his sons turned out as poorly as they did; I wonder if Anne might make a better successor to Her Majesty.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @Marat
    @The Alarmist

    Indeed, Anne has been a devoted workhorse all along. She's taken over much of Harry's portfolio in addition to her Military assignments. The lady is all business, no nonsense, and didn't give an inch when kidnappers tried to capture her in the 70s.

    Replies: @David In TN

  40. I am not too interested in that family, but to me it is evident he was the father of all these children. To surmise otherwise looks petty minded & neither realistic nor benevolent.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  41. @Jiminy
    Bit like Donald Bradman, never quite making the big one. Makes you wonder though how some people seem to go on forever and some people die far too early, well before their time. One of the mysteries of life.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Shakespeare died at 52; Vermeer at 43; Robert Burns only made it to 37.

    Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O’Donnell keep on going.

    • Replies: @Single Malt
    @AceDeuce

    John Keats died when 25 (TB).

    , @Orville H. Larson
    @AceDeuce

    "Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O'Donnell keep on going."

    It's not for us to divine the intention of the Almighty!

  42. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, you should remark on the number of children, baby momma, and mug shots that DMX had before he died. DMX is a good example of who actually owns the future much like Prince Philip.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @Truth

    DMX had 15 children.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @TelfoedJohn

    And a rap sheet a mile long.

  43. @Prosa123
    @Jack D

    About 30 miles further north, Paterson makes Trenton look wonderful by comparison. Its reputation has been so bad for so long that almost 50 years ago East Paterson went through the expense of changing its name to Elmwood Park

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @JMcG

    Paterson is 60 miles north of Trenton, not 30. Also, in 2009 the former town of West Paterson became Woodland Park for the same reason East Paterson became Elmwood Park.

    • Replies: @Polymath
    @ScarletNumber

    They both kept the initials!

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  44. @Jack D

    “Ghastly.” Prince Philip’s opinion of Stoke-on-Trent, as offered to the city’s Labour MP Joan Walley at Buckingham Palace in 1997.
     
    Once, a few years before that, I was in a china shop in London (the exchange rate was good that year and my wife dragged me into it. Our wedding china was from one of the then still working potteries in Stoke-on-Trent (now out of business) and she wanted a few matching pieces.) The salesman was one of those S. Asian gentlemen who is more British than the British.

    We were chit-chatting and I happened to speculate on whether it would be possible to visit the pottery and buy directly from the factory store (in fact it was but we had neither the time nor the inclination to visit Stoke). The salesman must have had visions of his commission walking out the door and he (a little too quickly) blurted out, "Oh noo, you don't want to go theah, " and went on to describe Stoke as rather, uh, ghastly. So he and the late Prince were in agreement on at least this much.

    I never did see Stoke but I have seen Trenton, NJ, the former home of America's china industry (which has, surprise surprise, moved back to its namesake origin). Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque. I can't imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Prosa123, @Jonathan Mason, @Hibernian, @ScarletNumber

    I have seen Trenton, NJ. Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque.

    If you think Trenton is bad, go 30 miles south to Camden. It makes Trenton look like paradise.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @ScarletNumber

    And Asbury Park is "Camden by the Sea"!

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Dan Hayes
    @ScarletNumber

    And Asbury Park is "Camden by the Sea"!

    , @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    Much of Camden has literally been bulldozed and flattened in the last 20 years.

  45. @Joe S.Walker
    As for DMX: probably the first BBC obituary to include the words "A father of 15, he served jail sentences on charges including animal cruelty, reckless driving, drug possession and weapons possession."

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    The BBC’s musical news coverage seems to consist entirely of aspiring rappers with legal troubles, billionaire hip-hop types and Taylor Swift.

  46. @Flip
    @Alden


    It’s not entirely clear which, if any, of the 4 children of ER2 are her husband’s. Princess Anne; it’s impossible to believe Anne is the child of an average pretty woman and an extremely handsome father.
     
    Rumors are that Charles and Anne are his while Andrew is from Lord Porchester and Edward is from Baron Plunket.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous, @Alden

    Andrew and Edward do look like Porchester and Plunkett. As for Anne there’s no way a 6 or 7 out of 10 woman and a 12 out of 10 man could have produced someone who looks like Anne. I think she looks a lot like brother Edward and Lord Plunkett. Phillip has kids by a French woman named Helene. Philip, like Profumo was a client of osteopath/pimp Stephen Ward.

    I enjoy the Royal women’s fashion show more and more every year as American fashion descends into black sweatpants black T shirts and hoodies.

    • Replies: @Single Malt
    @Alden

    So you must have liked “Phantom Thread”. (English high fashion in the 50s.)

    , @David In TN
    @Alden

    Once in a book store I glanced at Swedish actress Britt Ekland's book. She wrote that her father was a "True Viking" in appearance, and that when she was introduced to Prince Philip, she noticed Philip looked like her father.

    Replies: @Flip

  47. @Paleo Liberal
    @AndrewR

    Is Harry really an idiot?

    It looks like he will keep the fame and fortune part while getting rid of the grind.

    He’s the spare anyway, and quite redundant since George was born.

    You don’t have to like Harry or Meghan, but their leaving the UK may have been a smart move. Time will tell.

    Replies: @jon, @Alden

    They will make a fortune. 100 mil here 50 mil there, it all adds up. I’d love to see them richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Alden

    "I’d love to see them [the Markles] richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses."

    Why? The toxic two have behaved dishonestly and dishonorably since she decided they'd get married. Their words and actions that are matters of public record are damning enough. (Just two examples: the timing and content of the O interview, in which both lied and smeared the BRF and Handbag's snubbing of the military so he could shill for his drab at that movie premiere.) Then there are the rumors that she worked as a escort and that he roughed up the sex workers unlucky enough to be hired to service him. Buckingham Palace was kept busy burying his misdeeds and crimes and scrubbing her past. Only the Clintons are more despicable and morally bankrupt.

    Replies: @Alden

  48. “Aren’t most of you descended from pirates?”

    Like any sane person I enjoy the misanthropic edge of a grumpy old man. I hope to be one soon; preferably in a country that is currently not enjoying being raped by the Obama cabal. But get a grip: this ancient reptile prospered in the most debauched aristocracy in Europe.

  49. @S. Anonyia
    @Alden

    Anne was average as a young woman. Pretty in a few photos, even.

    Also Elizabeth was average looking herself (like her daughter only pretty in certain photos, and she had the benefit of being photographed often in flattering, high-contrast black and white), especially compared to her sister.

    Think it’s far more like Harry isn’t Charles’ s than any of Phillip’s aren’t his.

    Replies: @Alden

    My sister’s sister in law went to Benenden with Princess Anne. Says Anne was hideous as a teen and young woman. Brother in law went to events at Benenden. So did the parents. All agree Anne was really ugly.

    A couple hours with the best make up artists and the most skilled photographers managed to make Anne looking average. In person though, she was really bad and a lot like Lord Plunkett as many people noticed at the time.

    Philip was supposed to improve the line. Dianna was supposed to improve the line. Judging by they way William and Harry look as they approach 40 it has not worked.

    The Middleton grandparents are still very good looking at 70 or so. Maybe William’s children will look like the Middleton rather than the Saxe Coburg Glucksberg grandchildren. One can but hope.

  50. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, you should remark on the number of children, baby momma, and mug shots that DMX had before he died. DMX is a good example of who actually owns the future much like Prince Philip.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @Truth

    Yes, a useless, debauched, criminal who did nothing to earn his considerable reputation, from an lineage of bottom-dwelling scallywags in a family that has been living of the public dole since before his birth, died today.

    … And so did some rapper.

    • Troll: AndrewR
  51. I do not see the one where he’s examining a telephone exchange box (on a ship? a military installation) and it’s all a mare’s nest of spaghetti, and he goes, “Good Lord, looks like it was put in by an Indian!”

  52. @Barnard
    @AnotherDad


    52. “Holidays are curious things, aren’t they? You send children to school to get them out of your hair. Then they come back and make life difficult for parents. That is why holidays are set so they are just about the limit of your endurance.” At the opening of a school in 2000.
     
    Based on this quote, he doesn't seem to have been a very involved father. I doubt it would have made a huge difference, but he could have taken an interest in making sure the schools his children attended weren't being taking over by people who hated his nation and its people. Charles shares his concerns about the environment, but neither one from any record I can find has ever criticized letting third worlders move into Great Britain. There are a lot of great lines on the list, I enjoy his bashing of second rate entertainers, but if he opposed globalism in any way, he didn't seem to show it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Based on this quote, he doesn’t seem to have been a very involved father.

    Are any British parents involved?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Art Deco

    If not really uncle by marriage Louis Mountbatten nee Battenberg hadn’t assumed guardianship of Phillip at a very young age. Phillip would have ended up in either a French orphanage or raised by an older sister and fighting with the Germans against England in WW2.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @ScarletNumber

  53. @Prosa123
    @Jack D

    About 30 miles further north, Paterson makes Trenton look wonderful by comparison. Its reputation has been so bad for so long that almost 50 years ago East Paterson went through the expense of changing its name to Elmwood Park

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @JMcG

    There’s footage on YT of aero engine production at the Wright Aero factory in Paterson during WWII. It’s fascinating if you find that kind of thing interesting. Apparently, Paterson was able to supply a highly skilled workforce 80 years ago.
    Does the sign saying”Trenton makes, the World Takes” still adorn the entrance to town coming from Pennsylvania?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @JMcG

    Ford City in Chicago used to make the engines for the B-29 Superfortress bombers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t3akMEm9bI

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Anonymous
    @JMcG

    Yes, they restored the lighted sign a decade or so ago. If ot wasn’t the State Capitol it would be worse than Camden.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @AceDeuce
    @JMcG

    The sign (at least the most well-known one-I know of no other) is a lighted sign on the side of a bridge-and it's still there.

  54. His most famous quip is not on OPs list:

    “In the event that I am reincarnated, I would like to return as a deadly virus, to contribute something to solving overpopulation.”

  55. @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    I can’t imagine Stoke is anywhere near as ghastly.
     
    Stoke is ghastly in a crappy post-war-let's-put-a-motorway-down-the-middle sort of way. Even crappy English towns tend to have pleasant centres built on a medieval street plan, but Stoke doesn't even have that. Presumably, the Luftwaffe had a decent moon when they paid a visit.

    Stoke has a bit of a drug problem, but that is an English style problem of synthetic cannabis users getting caught in the Ladies powder room, rather than swarthy Latinos slaughtering their rivals, or Carribeans shooting guns at each other.

    That said, there are some potteries that are worth a visit, and the nearby countryside is nice.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Ghastly or not ghastly? A rainy day in Stoke. In the mid ground on the chimney, you see the name Spode in vertical letters.

    From Wikipedia:

    Spode is an English brand of pottery and homewares produced by the company of the same name, which is based in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Spode was founded by Josiah Spode (1733–1797) in 1770, and was responsible for perfecting two extremely important techniques that were crucial to the worldwide success of the English pottery industry in the century to follow.

    He perfected the technique for transfer printing in underglaze blue on fine earthenware in 1783–1784 – a development that led to the launch in 1816 of Spode’s Blue Italian range, which has remained in production ever since. Josiah Spode is also often credited with developing, around 1790, the formula for fine bone china that was generally adopted by the industry. His son, Josiah Spode II, was certainly responsible for the successful marketing of English bone china.

    The bone china was an art form (it used ground up bones mixed with china clay), but the factories it were made in were some of the ugliest products of the industrial revolution. (I do not think the factory shown in the photo here is the original Spode factory, though.)

    Stoke was also home to the Wedgwood factories, owned by close relatives of Charles Darwin who was influential, to say the least, in a number of ways.

    As far as the city–connurbation would be a better word–Prince Philip was right about Stoke.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason

    I inherited my grandparents' complete set of Spode's Tower china. Dates glazed on the back: 1910, 1913, 1920 and 1923. At least the scene portrayed on the stuff itself is nice.


    https://i.etsystatic.com/7003465/r/il/89e4a8/1991285702/il_794xN.1991285702_nmlm.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Truth

  56. @Alden
    @Paleo Liberal

    They will make a fortune. 100 mil here 50 mil there, it all adds up. I’d love to see them richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “I’d love to see them [the Markles] richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses.”

    Why? The toxic two have behaved dishonestly and dishonorably since she decided they’d get married. Their words and actions that are matters of public record are damning enough. (Just two examples: the timing and content of the O interview, in which both lied and smeared the BRF and Handbag’s snubbing of the military so he could shill for his drab at that movie premiere.) Then there are the rumors that she worked as a escort and that he roughed up the sex workers unlucky enough to be hired to service him. Buckingham Palace was kept busy burying his misdeeds and crimes and scrubbing her past. Only the Clintons are more despicable and morally bankrupt.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Kylie

    The whatever’s have done far far less damage to the White people of the USA than the Zuckerbergs and Gateses.

    Zuckerberg and Gates fund BLM. Zuckerberg gave tens of millions to the anti Trump campaign.

    The whatever’s are not proven powerful enemies of American Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos and the rest of the American elites want you me and all of us Whites dead.

    Rumors Markle worked as an escort. Prove it At least her child looks like her husband. And was born 9 months after Markle and husband lived together in the same home. Unlike ER2 whose 3 youngest look exactly like her lovers. And whose 3rd child was born exactly 10 months and some days after Prince Philip left on a world wide ocean trip for the World Wildlife organization.

    Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos Sergei Brin and the rest are dedicated to the extermination of you, me, and every White person in America.

    If it makes you feel better, the Oprah interview really made the British Royal fans turn against Harry and Meghan .

    Look at the money Obama and wife have made since leaving the presidency. The Clinton’s grifted about 700 million after leaving the presidency. And those two couples are enemies of Whites.

    Replies: @Kylie

  57. @The Alarmist
    I met the Duke once (technically, I was ‘presented’ to him), and he was a real prince of a guy. He had a good sense of humour in a very non-PC, good old days sense of the phrase. The world is dimished by losing one of the true old guard at the top of the house.

    One wonders how his sons turned out as poorly as they did; I wonder if Anne might make a better successor to Her Majesty.

    Replies: @Marat

    Indeed, Anne has been a devoted workhorse all along. She’s taken over much of Harry’s portfolio in addition to her Military assignments. The lady is all business, no nonsense, and didn’t give an inch when kidnappers tried to capture her in the 70s.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Marat

    I recall at the time, Prince Philip said something like, "Ann would have given them hell if captured."

  58. @Alden
    @Flip

    Andrew and Edward do look like Porchester and Plunkett. As for Anne there’s no way a 6 or 7 out of 10 woman and a 12 out of 10 man could have produced someone who looks like Anne. I think she looks a lot like brother Edward and Lord Plunkett. Phillip has kids by a French woman named Helene. Philip, like Profumo was a client of osteopath/pimp Stephen Ward.

    I enjoy the Royal women’s fashion show more and more every year as American fashion descends into black sweatpants black T shirts and hoodies.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @David In TN

    So you must have liked “Phantom Thread”. (English high fashion in the 50s.)

  59. @Art Deco
    @Barnard

    Based on this quote, he doesn’t seem to have been a very involved father.

    Are any British parents involved?

    Replies: @Alden

    If not really uncle by marriage Louis Mountbatten nee Battenberg hadn’t assumed guardianship of Phillip at a very young age. Phillip would have ended up in either a French orphanage or raised by an older sister and fighting with the Germans against England in WW2.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Again, Louis Mountbatten was his maternal-side uncle. This isn't that difficult to understand.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Alden

    Art Deco is correct; Louis Mountbatten was Philip's maternal uncle by blood. More importantly, he introduced Philip to then-Princess Elizabeth in 1939, where she promptly fell in love. He tried for the exacta in 1974 when he suggested to Charles that he marry his granddaughter Amanda. Charles ended up proposing in 1979, but she refused as her grandfather had been killed by the IRA during The Troubles*. He later proposed to Diana Spencer in 1981, who accepted. They married that summer.
    *The greatest euphemism ever

  60. @ScarletNumber
    @Jack D


    I have seen Trenton, NJ. Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque.
     
    If you think Trenton is bad, go 30 miles south to Camden. It makes Trenton look like paradise.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @Anonymous

    And Asbury Park is “Camden by the Sea”!

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    AP had race riots in the 60's but I didn't know it then. My wife's family did. AP has changed a lot since I first knew the area in the early 80's. Stayed way down into the 90's. At least for by the boardwalk area you can picture Bruce Springsteens' "Tunnel of Love" video. At the time the neighboring town Ocean Grove would shut the small bridges to AP at nite. Maybe it still does.

    An at first gay led revival (hey, this is closer and cheaper than going to Fire Island) brought the area back from Main Street to the Boardwalk, with restaurants, bars, shops and condos. Good luck now parking on a Saturday nite in the Summer. Asbury Ocean Club residence has units for sales for close to $2M.

    But different if you have school age kids. White families in neighboring towns whose kids would normally attend AP High School still heavily send their kids to Catholic or other private schools to avoid AP HS.

    Replies: @Prosa123, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes

  61. @ScarletNumber
    @Jack D


    I have seen Trenton, NJ. Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque.
     
    If you think Trenton is bad, go 30 miles south to Camden. It makes Trenton look like paradise.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @Anonymous

    And Asbury Park is “Camden by the Sea”!

  62. He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie’s uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.

    The disaster of the Soap Opera that passes for Royals now is all them.
    Harry and Meghan are a symptom of what ails Britain.

    Tolerance is no virtue. Extreme tolerance is cowardice at best.
    The Fall of the Empire is a slow motion disaster for Western Civilization.

    Only an armed Imperium can turn the tides of barbarians back now…

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Dr. Doom

    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.

    What gave you the idea that Britain had the resources to hang on to its dependencies? Why do you fancy having a portfolio of impoverished African dependencies would benefit Britain? Britain's principal overseas possession was India, which was relinquished in August of 1947, when Elizabeth was the 21 year old heir to the throne and Philip her naval officer / fiance. What do you fancy they should have done?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Dr. Doom


    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie’s uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.
     
    The House of Windsor (nee Hanover) was the classic puppet dynasty from the git-go with even less real power than Japan's Emperors, who have been under the thumb of either shoguns or military cliques for the last 800 years. Think of the Windsors' relationship to Parliament in the same light as the Merovingians in their last century vis-a-vis the Carolingians (whose leading light Charles Martel, of Tours/Poitiers fame, stopped bothering to appoint a puppet Merovingian king, perhaps to save himself a bunch of money on ceremonial frivolities that were nonetheless a non-trivial expense, at a time when he was getting ready to ward off the Arabs looking to expand their foothold in Europe from bases in Spain).

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @RAZ
    @Dr. Doom

    Exhausted and bankrupt (rationing was maintained for years after the war), Britain was not capable of maintaining The Empire post WWII. Even if not exhausted and bankrupt, The Empire would've been on its way out amid rising feelings for independence within The Empire, and calls for change from outside it.

    Former British colonies have made out better than other former colonies. The British can feel some satisfaction in that, but it was time for them to be free.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  63. @AceDeuce
    @Jiminy

    Shakespeare died at 52; Vermeer at 43; Robert Burns only made it to 37.

    Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O'Donnell keep on going.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @Orville H. Larson

    John Keats died when 25 (TB).

  64. No wonder the Yaohnanen people of Vanuatu thought Philip was a divine being- the ninety quotes on this list are truths revealed from above.

  65. @Kylie
    @Alden

    "I’d love to see them [the Markles] richer than the Zuckerbergs or Gateses."

    Why? The toxic two have behaved dishonestly and dishonorably since she decided they'd get married. Their words and actions that are matters of public record are damning enough. (Just two examples: the timing and content of the O interview, in which both lied and smeared the BRF and Handbag's snubbing of the military so he could shill for his drab at that movie premiere.) Then there are the rumors that she worked as a escort and that he roughed up the sex workers unlucky enough to be hired to service him. Buckingham Palace was kept busy burying his misdeeds and crimes and scrubbing her past. Only the Clintons are more despicable and morally bankrupt.

    Replies: @Alden

    The whatever’s have done far far less damage to the White people of the USA than the Zuckerbergs and Gateses.

    Zuckerberg and Gates fund BLM. Zuckerberg gave tens of millions to the anti Trump campaign.

    The whatever’s are not proven powerful enemies of American Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos and the rest of the American elites want you me and all of us Whites dead.

    Rumors Markle worked as an escort. Prove it At least her child looks like her husband. And was born 9 months after Markle and husband lived together in the same home. Unlike ER2 whose 3 youngest look exactly like her lovers. And whose 3rd child was born exactly 10 months and some days after Prince Philip left on a world wide ocean trip for the World Wildlife organization.

    Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos Sergei Brin and the rest are dedicated to the extermination of you, me, and every White person in America.

    If it makes you feel better, the Oprah interview really made the British Royal fans turn against Harry and Meghan .

    Look at the money Obama and wife have made since leaving the presidency. The Clinton’s grifted about 700 million after leaving the presidency. And those two couples are enemies of Whites.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Alden

    "Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites."

    Sure they have. They have smeared the BRF very successfully. Not even during the Diana debacle did I see the Queen referred to as an old woman no longer able to put duty before family, people saying they are longer royalists and calls for a republic. Handbag and the Duchess of LA have glommed onto every anti-White "woke" cause. If they haven't done more damage than the others you mention, it's for lack of brains, not malice.

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs. I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they're only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    Replies: @anon, @Truth, @Alden

  66. Anon[235] • Disclaimer says:

    28. “You must be out of your minds.” To Solomon Islanders, on being told that their population growth was 5 per cent a year, in 1982.

    I assume this is a racistish reference to the repellent, aboriginesque appearance of their women?

    The coconut never falls far from the palm:

    Prince Charles charms Solomon Islanders as he speaks in pidgin English before being presented with a hog-tied live pig

    His delighted audience reacted with raucous laughter and applause as the Prince recounted: “Queen blong yumi and Duke blong Edinburgh telling me such a good memories blong time algeter visitin this islands.”

    https://www.the-sun.com/news/91001/prince-charles-charms-solomon-islanders-as-he-speaks-in-pidgin-english-before-being-presented-with-a-hog-tied-live-pig/

  67. @Alden
    @Art Deco

    If not really uncle by marriage Louis Mountbatten nee Battenberg hadn’t assumed guardianship of Phillip at a very young age. Phillip would have ended up in either a French orphanage or raised by an older sister and fighting with the Germans against England in WW2.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @ScarletNumber

    Again, Louis Mountbatten was his maternal-side uncle. This isn’t that difficult to understand.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Art Deco

    Phillips mother was the daughter of a cousin of the Czar of Russia, husband of Mountbatten’s maternal aunt, Princess of Hesse Czarina of Russia Alexandra, sister of Mountbatten’ s mother.
    Thus relative by marriage not blood. No matter what Wikipedia says.

    Very luckily for Phillip.

    Replies: @Ralph L

  68. @Dr. Doom
    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie's uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.

    The disaster of the Soap Opera that passes for Royals now is all them.
    Harry and Meghan are a symptom of what ails Britain.

    Tolerance is no virtue. Extreme tolerance is cowardice at best.
    The Fall of the Empire is a slow motion disaster for Western Civilization.

    Only an armed Imperium can turn the tides of barbarians back now...

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Johann Ricke, @RAZ

    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.

    What gave you the idea that Britain had the resources to hang on to its dependencies? Why do you fancy having a portfolio of impoverished African dependencies would benefit Britain? Britain’s principal overseas possession was India, which was relinquished in August of 1947, when Elizabeth was the 21 year old heir to the throne and Philip her naval officer / fiance. What do you fancy they should have done?

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Art Deco

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco, @Ali Choudhury, @dfordoom

  69. @JMcG
    @Prosa123

    There’s footage on YT of aero engine production at the Wright Aero factory in Paterson during WWII. It’s fascinating if you find that kind of thing interesting. Apparently, Paterson was able to supply a highly skilled workforce 80 years ago.
    Does the sign saying”Trenton makes, the World Takes” still adorn the entrance to town coming from Pennsylvania?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

    Ford City in Chicago used to make the engines for the B-29 Superfortress bombers.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Joe Stalin

    My uncle worked there. It was briefly the plant for the abortive effort to build the Tucker car. It became a Ford aircraft engine plant during the Korean war. I think that's when my uncle worked there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_City_Mall

  70. @ScarletNumber
    @Prosa123

    Paterson is 60 miles north of Trenton, not 30. Also, in 2009 the former town of West Paterson became Woodland Park for the same reason East Paterson became Elmwood Park.

    Replies: @Polymath

    They both kept the initials!

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Polymath

    I'm pretty sure they did that on purpose, as to reduce the cost of the name change. Any items that simply had the town's initials on it could remain in use. East Paterson High School could keep their EPHS uniforms.

    A relic of the former name exists in the municipality codes. When you fill out your NJ income tax form, you are given a 4-digit code corresponding to what town you live in. The list goes alphabetically by county, but when East Paterson changed its name, the list wasn't renumbered. So it goes:

    • 0210: Dumont
    • 0211: Elmwood Park
    • 0212: East Rutherford
    • 0213: Edgewater
    • 0214: Emerson

    Similarly, Princeton used to be divided into two independent towns with codes 1109 and 1110. When they merged, the couldn't agree which code the new town should use, so they were issued a new one: 1114.

  71. We had a revolution so that I don’t have to care about these inbred dullards.

    • Agree: JMcG, Liza
    • Replies: @Truth
    @Mr. Anon

    Grasshopper, it has taken 13 years, but you are learning. Black belt status is near.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Mr. Anon

    , @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    We had a revolution so that I don’t have to care about these inbred dullards.

    1. The Queen has six adult grandchildren, all of whom took blindly graded O-level and A-level examinations. Four of the six had perfectly respectable scores (three A-levels with middling marks), two were under par (two A-levels with a middling mark and a low pass). Each of the Queen's children and Princess Margaret's children took O-level and A-level examinations as well and all passed at least one A-level. If they're 'dullards', north of 2/3 of the population of Britain qualifies as 'dullards'.

    2. The term 'in-bred' doesn't mean what you fancy it means. The Queen and Prince Philip were 3d cousins. Prince Margaret and her husband were unrelated. All of their children and grandchildren have married unrelated persons. George VI and his wife were unrelated. Three of his siblings married unrelated persons, the fourth married a 2d cousin. George V married a 2d cousin. Edward Vii married an unrelated person. Victoria actually did marry a 1st cousin. That's four generations back.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Mr. Anon

    , @Boomthorkell
    @Mr. Anon

    I'm fond of his wit, but when I saw a magazine in a teacher's lounge talking about a royal wedding, I said the same thing (minus the inbred comment.)

    I'm not really against Monarchy though (done right, it can be very Spartan and inspirational.) Everyone has a system that works for them that they need to figure out. I think the British might be better off as a Republic, but then, I think Thailand and Japan do better with their (very different) monarchies. China...well, they decided they wanted elected Emperors, and that's fine too.

    Americans though, I think we are meant to be kingless.

  72. @AnotherDad
    I'm a dyed in the cotton republican, but as princes go, he was an entertaining one.

    A competent--much better than average--naval officer, one wonders why the kids are all such mediocrities and his eldest a pathetic blob of nothingness.

    Replies: @Alden, @Barnard, @MBlanc46, @David In TN

    I think that the Mum pretty first-rate, too. Regression to the mean, perhaps.

  73. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:
    @JMcG
    @Prosa123

    There’s footage on YT of aero engine production at the Wright Aero factory in Paterson during WWII. It’s fascinating if you find that kind of thing interesting. Apparently, Paterson was able to supply a highly skilled workforce 80 years ago.
    Does the sign saying”Trenton makes, the World Takes” still adorn the entrance to town coming from Pennsylvania?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

    Yes, they restored the lighted sign a decade or so ago. If ot wasn’t the State Capitol it would be worse than Camden.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Anonymous

    https://i.ibb.co/YBzrXdW/Screenshot-20210412-150726-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

  74. @Dr. Doom
    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie's uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.

    The disaster of the Soap Opera that passes for Royals now is all them.
    Harry and Meghan are a symptom of what ails Britain.

    Tolerance is no virtue. Extreme tolerance is cowardice at best.
    The Fall of the Empire is a slow motion disaster for Western Civilization.

    Only an armed Imperium can turn the tides of barbarians back now...

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Johann Ricke, @RAZ

    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie’s uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.

    The House of Windsor (nee Hanover) was the classic puppet dynasty from the git-go with even less real power than Japan’s Emperors, who have been under the thumb of either shoguns or military cliques for the last 800 years. Think of the Windsors’ relationship to Parliament in the same light as the Merovingians in their last century vis-a-vis the Carolingians (whose leading light Charles Martel, of Tours/Poitiers fame, stopped bothering to appoint a puppet Merovingian king, perhaps to save himself a bunch of money on ceremonial frivolities that were nonetheless a non-trivial expense, at a time when he was getting ready to ward off the Arabs looking to expand their foothold in Europe from bases in Spain).

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Johann Ricke

    with even less real power than Japan’s Emperors,

    Not true. Members of Japan's royal family are actually prisoners of the Imperial Household Agency. The current Empress appears to have been on some sort of strike for the last 20 years, refusing to make public appearances.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  75. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber
    @Jack D


    I have seen Trenton, NJ. Ghastly does not begin to describe it. Horrifying, perhaps. Third-world-esque.
     
    If you think Trenton is bad, go 30 miles south to Camden. It makes Trenton look like paradise.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes, @Anonymous

    Much of Camden has literally been bulldozed and flattened in the last 20 years.

  76. @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Again, Louis Mountbatten was his maternal-side uncle. This isn't that difficult to understand.

    Replies: @Alden

    Phillips mother was the daughter of a cousin of the Czar of Russia, husband of Mountbatten’s maternal aunt, Princess of Hesse Czarina of Russia Alexandra, sister of Mountbatten’ s mother.
    Thus relative by marriage not blood. No matter what Wikipedia says.

    Very luckily for Phillip.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Alden

    Philip's mother was Alice of Battenberg, sister of Earl Mountbatten. Their mother was born Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, sister of Czarina Alexandra (wife of Nich II), both granddaughters of Queen Victoria.

    Philip's father's mother was Queen Olga of Greece, a daughter of Czar Nicholas I's second son. She was first cousin of Alexander III, Nich II's father.

    Replies: @Ralph L

  77. @JMcG
    @Prosa123

    There’s footage on YT of aero engine production at the Wright Aero factory in Paterson during WWII. It’s fascinating if you find that kind of thing interesting. Apparently, Paterson was able to supply a highly skilled workforce 80 years ago.
    Does the sign saying”Trenton makes, the World Takes” still adorn the entrance to town coming from Pennsylvania?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce

    The sign (at least the most well-known one-I know of no other) is a lighted sign on the side of a bridge-and it’s still there.

  78. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Stoke is pretty ghastly. The Five Towns area is known as the Potteries and was the subject of a damning chapter comparing it to the smoky fires of hell in JB Priestley's English Journey travelogue written in the 1930s.

    The deceased
    reminded me of my father.

    Prince Philip was a lot more typical of a certain type of British man of his generation than many people might think.

    The John Cleese character of hotelier Basil Fawlty was based on Cleese's own father, but Fawlty was portrayed as an upper lower middle class character who fawned over (what he thought was) aristocracy, but mercilessly bullied those whom he perceived as of lowest social status.

    However one can often see the kinship between Fawlty and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.

    The most remarkable thing about the Duke and his widow, though, is that there is hardly anybody alive in Britain today who has not known these two people all their life, so they are kind of family regardless of what you think of them.

    https://youtu.be/eUUyCjeTV7Y

    Replies: @Mj

    Try Arnold Bennett’s novels. They portray the Potteries in a less lurid light.

  79. @Mr. Anon
    We had a revolution so that I don't have to care about these inbred dullards.

    Replies: @Truth, @Art Deco, @Boomthorkell

    Grasshopper, it has taken 13 years, but you are learning. Black belt status is near.

    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @Truth

    Ah, the memories. The amount of bubble gum that I had to consume to get the whole set of Kung fu cards, I’m surprised that I’ve still got all my teeth in my head.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Truth

    Speaking of inbred dullards..............."Truth" appears.

  80. @AnotherDad
    I'm a dyed in the cotton republican, but as princes go, he was an entertaining one.

    A competent--much better than average--naval officer, one wonders why the kids are all such mediocrities and his eldest a pathetic blob of nothingness.

    Replies: @Alden, @Barnard, @MBlanc46, @David In TN

    I recall reading in, I think, the 1970s that a poll showed if Britain became a republic, the choice for President of a British republic would be Prince Philip.

  81. @Alden
    @Flip

    Andrew and Edward do look like Porchester and Plunkett. As for Anne there’s no way a 6 or 7 out of 10 woman and a 12 out of 10 man could have produced someone who looks like Anne. I think she looks a lot like brother Edward and Lord Plunkett. Phillip has kids by a French woman named Helene. Philip, like Profumo was a client of osteopath/pimp Stephen Ward.

    I enjoy the Royal women’s fashion show more and more every year as American fashion descends into black sweatpants black T shirts and hoodies.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @David In TN

    Once in a book store I glanced at Swedish actress Britt Ekland’s book. She wrote that her father was a “True Viking” in appearance, and that when she was introduced to Prince Philip, she noticed Philip looked like her father.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @David In TN

    Well, his great grandfather was the King of Denmark.

  82. @Marat
    @The Alarmist

    Indeed, Anne has been a devoted workhorse all along. She's taken over much of Harry's portfolio in addition to her Military assignments. The lady is all business, no nonsense, and didn't give an inch when kidnappers tried to capture her in the 70s.

    Replies: @David In TN

    I recall at the time, Prince Philip said something like, “Ann would have given them hell if captured.”

  83. Best quote of his:

    When a man opens the door of a car for a woman it is either a new car or a new woman.

    • LOL: petit bourgeois
  84. @Alden
    @Kylie

    The whatever’s have done far far less damage to the White people of the USA than the Zuckerbergs and Gateses.

    Zuckerberg and Gates fund BLM. Zuckerberg gave tens of millions to the anti Trump campaign.

    The whatever’s are not proven powerful enemies of American Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos and the rest of the American elites want you me and all of us Whites dead.

    Rumors Markle worked as an escort. Prove it At least her child looks like her husband. And was born 9 months after Markle and husband lived together in the same home. Unlike ER2 whose 3 youngest look exactly like her lovers. And whose 3rd child was born exactly 10 months and some days after Prince Philip left on a world wide ocean trip for the World Wildlife organization.

    Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites. Zuckerberg Gates Bezos Sergei Brin and the rest are dedicated to the extermination of you, me, and every White person in America.

    If it makes you feel better, the Oprah interview really made the British Royal fans turn against Harry and Meghan .

    Look at the money Obama and wife have made since leaving the presidency. The Clinton’s grifted about 700 million after leaving the presidency. And those two couples are enemies of Whites.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites.”

    Sure they have. They have smeared the BRF very successfully. Not even during the Diana debacle did I see the Queen referred to as an old woman no longer able to put duty before family, people saying they are longer royalists and calls for a republic. Handbag and the Duchess of LA have glommed onto every anti-White “woke” cause. If they haven’t done more damage than the others you mention, it’s for lack of brains, not malice.

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs. I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they’re only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @anon
    @Kylie


    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs.
     
    The Obamas feel insecure and envious toward Whites. That is in fact what is dangerous, because there is only one solution.

    Gates and Clinton are just riding the wave.

    Replies: @Truth

    , @Truth
    @Kylie


    I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they’re only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.
     
    Sportette, I have to admit, that does sound pretty good.
    , @Alden
    @Kylie

    Neither I , nor you, nor any White American is a member of the Royal Family smeared by Harry and Meghan.

    Gates has employed nothing but immigrant Indians and Chinese since he laid off the last White Americans about 25 years ago. That socialist alternative politician in Seattle Sawant leader of the anti fa BLM came to America on her husband’s Microsoft H IB visa. Gates, Zuckerberg Sergei Brin etc have poured billions into the anti White American cause.

    Ever been to the residential neighborhoods of Silicon Valley? Full of Indian and Chinese working at the tech industry the White American men with whom I went to college with built. A week after graduation they moved a few miles east to Mountain View worked for NASA and NASA contractors and created the internet, space travel and the computer tech world we live in today. 20 years later they were laid off in the prime of their careers and replaced by non White immigrants.

    And SV tech is the biggest donor to anti White organizations aside from George Soros.

    I’ve read a little about the November 2020 stolen election. There’s a lot being discovered about the tens of millions Zuckerberg alone gave to vote stealing organizations. Learn about the vote tabulating and switching in favor of the anti White democrats and decide who is more dangerous to White America, Meghan and Harry or Zuckerberg. Gates, Brin, Bezos and the rest of the billionaires using their money to eradicate White Americans and used their money and tech expertise to steal the election. If you think Trump was not helpful to White Americans, Biden and his Jewish crew is actively and vociferously anti White

    Or just take a trip to Seattle and Redmond Wa and Santa Clara county Ca and look at what the tech billionaires replaced White Americans with. Non White immigrants.

    Worry about your own children and grandchildren if you have any; not the children and grandchildren of one of the ten richest persons in the world.

    Don’t worry about the Queen of England and her children and descendants. Worry about your own children and descendants banned from making a living because they are White, vulnerable to unspeakable black on White crime and declared the lowest untouchable caste by the government and the wealthiest and most powerful people in America.

    Harry and Meghan haven’t harmed American Whites at all. The English people and media have completely turned against them. And unlike many UNZ fertility fanatics, they have a red headed very pale White boy.

  85. @Kylie
    @Alden

    "Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites."

    Sure they have. They have smeared the BRF very successfully. Not even during the Diana debacle did I see the Queen referred to as an old woman no longer able to put duty before family, people saying they are longer royalists and calls for a republic. Handbag and the Duchess of LA have glommed onto every anti-White "woke" cause. If they haven't done more damage than the others you mention, it's for lack of brains, not malice.

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs. I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they're only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    Replies: @anon, @Truth, @Alden

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs.

    The Obamas feel insecure and envious toward Whites. That is in fact what is dangerous, because there is only one solution.

    Gates and Clinton are just riding the wave.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @anon

    Are you sure you don't seem insecure and envious toward the Obamas?

  86. @Truth
    @Mr. Anon

    Grasshopper, it has taken 13 years, but you are learning. Black belt status is near.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Mr. Anon

    Ah, the memories. The amount of bubble gum that I had to consume to get the whole set of Kung fu cards, I’m surprised that I’ve still got all my teeth in my head.

    • Thanks: Truth
  87. @Alden
    @Art Deco

    Phillips mother was the daughter of a cousin of the Czar of Russia, husband of Mountbatten’s maternal aunt, Princess of Hesse Czarina of Russia Alexandra, sister of Mountbatten’ s mother.
    Thus relative by marriage not blood. No matter what Wikipedia says.

    Very luckily for Phillip.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    Philip’s mother was Alice of Battenberg, sister of Earl Mountbatten. Their mother was born Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, sister of Czarina Alexandra (wife of Nich II), both granddaughters of Queen Victoria.

    Philip’s father’s mother was Queen Olga of Greece, a daughter of Czar Nicholas I’s second son. She was first cousin of Alexander III, Nich II’s father.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Ralph L

    To add to the confusion, Alexander III's mother was also of Hesse and by Rhine, Victoria Battenberg's great aunt.

  88. @Art Deco
    @Dr. Doom

    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.

    What gave you the idea that Britain had the resources to hang on to its dependencies? Why do you fancy having a portfolio of impoverished African dependencies would benefit Britain? Britain's principal overseas possession was India, which was relinquished in August of 1947, when Elizabeth was the 21 year old heir to the throne and Philip her naval officer / fiance. What do you fancy they should have done?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Same could be said of WWI.

    Thirty Years War 2, pneumatic rendezvous

    , @Art Deco
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.

    You mean you've conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?


    The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Point already refuted.


    Try growing a brain.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @dfordoom

    , @Ali Choudhury
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Reputational?

    , @dfordoom
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.
     
    The US was also the only winner in the First World War.

    The British Empire was doomed from the moment Britain entered the First World War. After that Britain could not afford the Empire.

    Chamberlain tried to avoid war because he knew it would be the end of Britain as a Great Power.
  89. @Jonathan Mason
    @Anonymous

    Ghastly or not ghastly? A rainy day in Stoke. In the mid ground on the chimney, you see the name Spode in vertical letters.

    From Wikipedia:

    Spode is an English brand of pottery and homewares produced by the company of the same name, which is based in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Spode was founded by Josiah Spode (1733–1797) in 1770, and was responsible for perfecting two extremely important techniques that were crucial to the worldwide success of the English pottery industry in the century to follow.

    He perfected the technique for transfer printing in underglaze blue on fine earthenware in 1783–1784 – a development that led to the launch in 1816 of Spode's Blue Italian range, which has remained in production ever since. Josiah Spode is also often credited with developing, around 1790, the formula for fine bone china that was generally adopted by the industry. His son, Josiah Spode II, was certainly responsible for the successful marketing of English bone china.

    The bone china was an art form (it used ground up bones mixed with china clay), but the factories it were made in were some of the ugliest products of the industrial revolution. (I do not think the factory shown in the photo here is the original Spode factory, though.)

    Stoke was also home to the Wedgwood factories, owned by close relatives of Charles Darwin who was influential, to say the least, in a number of ways.

    As far as the city--connurbation would be a better word--Prince Philip was right about Stoke.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02860/Stoke-on-Trent_2860171b.jpg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I inherited my grandparents’ complete set of Spode’s Tower china. Dates glazed on the back: 1910, 1913, 1920 and 1923. At least the scene portrayed on the stuff itself is nice.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Nice to have as a memento.

    Are you sure about the dates? The pink colored transfer ware tower pattern for export to the United States started around 1923, although production of the pattern in various different colors actually started in 1814.

    This stuff was made when the Spode company was under the ownership of the Copeland family, and many pieces were dated in this manner:

    F
    25

    The letter indicated the month so this piece would have been made in February. Pieces made in August had the letter T since the A was already reserved for April.

    The two numbers indicated the year, so this piece would have been made in February 1925.

    Usually the dates were stamps into flat pieces like saucers, but would not be found in shaped pieces like cups.

    The pattern is based on a representation of a fortified bridge near Rome, which I believe is still standing.

    (My father was a dealer in antiques, and I spent much of my teens in auction rooms looking at this kind of stuff.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Truth
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Don't put your address in chat!

    Alden will hire a couple of knee-grows to do a home invasion with her.

  90. @Truth
    @Mr. Anon

    Grasshopper, it has taken 13 years, but you are learning. Black belt status is near.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Mr. Anon

    Speaking of inbred dullards……………”Truth” appears.

  91. @Ralph L
    @Alden

    Philip's mother was Alice of Battenberg, sister of Earl Mountbatten. Their mother was born Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, sister of Czarina Alexandra (wife of Nich II), both granddaughters of Queen Victoria.

    Philip's father's mother was Queen Olga of Greece, a daughter of Czar Nicholas I's second son. She was first cousin of Alexander III, Nich II's father.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    To add to the confusion, Alexander III’s mother was also of Hesse and by Rhine, Victoria Battenberg’s great aunt.

  92. @jon

    18. “If it has four legs and it is not a chair, if it has got two wings and it flies but is not an aeroplane and if it swims and it is not a submarine, the Cantonese will eat it.” Said to a World Wildlife Fund meeting in 1986.
     
    Hilariously accurate. I have heard this quote many times, but I never knew the source.

    Also, after reading this, I think I need to add 'Ghastly!' to my vocabulary, a perfect word for these times.

    Replies: @NickG

    As in Harry and Megan — ghastly couple!

  93. I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair. It was taken front on with her mouth shut, and she was stunning. I’ve seen similar photos of Barbara Streisand, and they both had that same look. A face that the camera lens loves – but in real life.
    Later photos show her wearing that permanent bouffant which I’m starting to think is there to hide her familial bald spot. She’s certainly got her mothers nose and mouth and I’m sure she’s got Phillips long thin face as well. But Christ when she opens her mouth she’s got more than the prerequisite 32 teeth in there. I’m sure that woman could eat apples through a barb wire fence.
    With Phillip just missing out on getting a telegram from the Queen ( probably a French maid singing telegram) why didn’t they do like in the movie “A weekend at Bernie’s “. Sit him down in a wheelchair with a blanket, add some sunnies and a panama, and push him around from one function to another. Only had to keep up the charade for about two months, and he would have made 100. Don’t they know that everyone loves a happy ending.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Jiminy


    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.
     
    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain's Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth's sister and Princess Anne's maternal aunt.


    https://i.imgur.com/wZWTp8E.jpg


    Here's another picture of her from that time.

    https://i.imgur.com/GW3cjaw.jpg?1

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

  94. @Polymath
    @ScarletNumber

    They both kept the initials!

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I’m pretty sure they did that on purpose, as to reduce the cost of the name change. Any items that simply had the town’s initials on it could remain in use. East Paterson High School could keep their EPHS uniforms.

    A relic of the former name exists in the municipality codes. When you fill out your NJ income tax form, you are given a 4-digit code corresponding to what town you live in. The list goes alphabetically by county, but when East Paterson changed its name, the list wasn’t renumbered. So it goes:

    • 0210: Dumont
    • 0211: Elmwood Park
    • 0212: East Rutherford
    • 0213: Edgewater
    • 0214: Emerson

    Similarly, Princeton used to be divided into two independent towns with codes 1109 and 1110. When they merged, the couldn’t agree which code the new town should use, so they were issued a new one: 1114.

  95. @Alden
    @Art Deco

    If not really uncle by marriage Louis Mountbatten nee Battenberg hadn’t assumed guardianship of Phillip at a very young age. Phillip would have ended up in either a French orphanage or raised by an older sister and fighting with the Germans against England in WW2.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @ScarletNumber

    Art Deco is correct; Louis Mountbatten was Philip’s maternal uncle by blood. More importantly, he introduced Philip to then-Princess Elizabeth in 1939, where she promptly fell in love. He tried for the exacta in 1974 when he suggested to Charles that he marry his granddaughter Amanda. Charles ended up proposing in 1979, but she refused as her grandfather had been killed by the IRA during The Troubles*. He later proposed to Diana Spencer in 1981, who accepted. They married that summer.
    *

    [MORE]
    The greatest euphemism ever

  96. @Jiminy
    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair. It was taken front on with her mouth shut, and she was stunning. I’ve seen similar photos of Barbara Streisand, and they both had that same look. A face that the camera lens loves - but in real life.
    Later photos show her wearing that permanent bouffant which I’m starting to think is there to hide her familial bald spot. She’s certainly got her mothers nose and mouth and I’m sure she’s got Phillips long thin face as well. But Christ when she opens her mouth she’s got more than the prerequisite 32 teeth in there. I’m sure that woman could eat apples through a barb wire fence.
    With Phillip just missing out on getting a telegram from the Queen ( probably a French maid singing telegram) why didn’t they do like in the movie “A weekend at Bernie’s “. Sit him down in a wheelchair with a blanket, add some sunnies and a panama, and push him around from one function to another. Only had to keep up the charade for about two months, and he would have made 100. Don’t they know that everyone loves a happy ending.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.

    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain’s Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth’s sister and Princess Anne’s maternal aunt.

    Here’s another picture of her from that time.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @PiltdownMan

    Anne in her youth had a body that could make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window.

    https://i.postimg.cc/MTzKPSyS/annevalerie.jpg

    Nice tribute by the remaining real Londoners - The Mall lined end to end with black cabs yesterday.

    https://twitter.com/TheLTDA/status/1380576338214588419

    anon - deer must be disembowelled and drained of blood very quickly after death, or the meat is tainted. The "gralloching knife" is tool of choice.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @PiltdownMan

    She looked all right for the time, which was 1960s Britain. You can't compare her to Hollywood standards of 2020.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Art Deco

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @PiltdownMan

    She had a "friendly" relationship with Mike Jagger. Reportedly her sister was not happy about it.

    , @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    Every woman has her day.

    I was surprised recently to see old pictures of an ugly woman I've only ever known since she was middle aged. She used to be pretty! It was hard to believe. For a brief few years she actually looked good, but it was gone by her mid-20s.

  97. Anonymous[335] • Disclaimer says:

    Famously, Princess Diana ‘fainted at the gralloch’.

    Or – to translate, the tender hearted princess – who won an award at boarding school for caring for her pet hamster – was overcome with emotion to the point of fainting at the ‘gralloch’ , which is ancient and odd British royal tradition. Basically it means the ritual disembowelment of the slain deer, in front of an audience, accompanied by the ritualistic smearing of blood on the faces of the participants.
    Such a rite is likely pre historic in origin.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anonymous

    Princess Dianna was probably on the 5th day of a water only 5 day fast when she fainted. Potassium depletion does that. Fasting works but you have to be careful..

  98. Mr. Sailer has given us a representative assortment of quotes, but the original article, with a full ninety quotes from Prince Philip, is worth perusing, too.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/prince-philip-quotes-jokes-gaffes-b1829205.html

    He was very much the archetype of the bluff and plain-spoken, yet light-hearted and very funny, British military man of that generation. It is impossible for the young generation of today to understand that not one of his quips was mean-spirited.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @PiltdownMan

    Not mean perhaps but not so harmless as what tries, and fails, to pass for wit in too-polite present company.

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    , @Alden
    @PiltdownMan

    My favorite Prince Phillip remark; a dress designer was invited to a royal reception . The dress designer had a beard. Prince Philip advised the man to find someone who could design a decent looking beard for him.

    My British BIL make remarks like that all the time. It’s a British thing considered rude and hurtful in America. He calls American politics
    “ native affairs” .

  99. Anonymous[335] • Disclaimer says:

    Back in the 1970s, British actor/comedian John Cleese starred in a comedy spoof of the ‘Zulu’ movies, with Cleese playing the part of a British army officer, garbed in a scarlet tunic and white pith helmet.
    Being filmed in the UK, outdoor shooting was, of course, continuously delayed by pouring rain. Black British film extras were used to represent Zulus. Being vexed by the filming delays, Cleese in a comedy moment exclaimed to the tribal adorned extras languishing on set “which one of you bastards just did a rain dance!”.

  100. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Philip: “Who are you?”
    Simon Kelner: “I’m the editor-in-chief of The Independent, Sir.”
    Philip: “What are you doing here?”
    Kelner: “You invited me.”
    Philip: “Well, you didn’t have to come!”

    And in this vein, an apt quote comes to mind:

    "The lamps are going out all over Europe. We shall not see them lit again in our time”.

    The Prince may not have been PC, but he most certainly was lit during his lifetime.

    A true class individual, willing to do his bit for his adopted nation and united to his sweet tender soulmate for nearly a three-quarter century.

    Replies: @TyRade

    “The lamps are going out” quote was Sir Edward Grey, British foreign secretary for the first half of WW1. Grey was a man of his time; landed gentry, outdoorsman (keen hunter, fisherman and bird watcher – his ‘The Charm of Birds’ written after he left office is simply uplifting). My point I suppose, is that Prince Phillip, born only 3 years after WW1 ended, is arguably more a man of Grey’s time. It seems a thousand years ago rather than a century. Phillip was indeed ‘true class’ – and we’ve lost the very concept today.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  101. @TelfoedJohn
    @guest007

    DMX had 15 children.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rWU_VDa1Js

    Replies: @AndrewR

    And a rap sheet a mile long.

  102. @PiltdownMan
    @Jiminy


    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.
     
    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain's Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth's sister and Princess Anne's maternal aunt.


    https://i.imgur.com/wZWTp8E.jpg


    Here's another picture of her from that time.

    https://i.imgur.com/GW3cjaw.jpg?1

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    Anne in her youth had a body that could make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window.

    Nice tribute by the remaining real Londoners – The Mall lined end to end with black cabs yesterday.

    anon – deer must be disembowelled and drained of blood very quickly after death, or the meat is tainted. The “gralloching knife” is tool of choice.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Nice tribute by the remaining real Londoners – The Mall lined end to end with black cabs yesterday.
     
    Prince Philip used an old taxi to travel incognito around London.
  103. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Art Deco

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco, @Ali Choudhury, @dfordoom

    Same could be said of WWI.

    Thirty Years War 2, pneumatic rendezvous

  104. @PiltdownMan
    Mr. Sailer has given us a representative assortment of quotes, but the original article, with a full ninety quotes from Prince Philip, is worth perusing, too.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/prince-philip-quotes-jokes-gaffes-b1829205.html

    He was very much the archetype of the bluff and plain-spoken, yet light-hearted and very funny, British military man of that generation. It is impossible for the young generation of today to understand that not one of his quips was mean-spirited.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Alden

    Not mean perhaps but not so harmless as what tries, and fails, to pass for wit in too-polite present company.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Desiderius

    You can't fake being witty.

    It is a fine line that divides the witty quip from sticking your foot in your mouth. Most people give up trying.

  105. She is a descendant of (John) Churchill, so the vignette fits. If only York were as savvy as Edinburgh.

    Makes a good bookend with the fainting at the Gralloch* to give some useful insight into the unique charm of Lady Di.

    * – sounds like at least in part an ancient fitness (aka shit) test for femininity that she passed with flying colors

  106. Anon[411] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    @ScarletNumber

    And Asbury Park is "Camden by the Sea"!

    Replies: @Anon

    AP had race riots in the 60’s but I didn’t know it then. My wife’s family did. AP has changed a lot since I first knew the area in the early 80’s. Stayed way down into the 90’s. At least for by the boardwalk area you can picture Bruce Springsteens’ “Tunnel of Love” video. At the time the neighboring town Ocean Grove would shut the small bridges to AP at nite. Maybe it still does.

    An at first gay led revival (hey, this is closer and cheaper than going to Fire Island) brought the area back from Main Street to the Boardwalk, with restaurants, bars, shops and condos. Good luck now parking on a Saturday nite in the Summer. Asbury Ocean Club residence has units for sales for close to $2M.

    But different if you have school age kids. White families in neighboring towns whose kids would normally attend AP High School still heavily send their kids to Catholic or other private schools to avoid AP HS.

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Prosa123
    @Anon

    At its nadir in the early 1990's the main "industry" remaining in Asbury Park consisted of boarding houses for deinstitutionalized mental patients. They pocketed the residents' SSDI checks in return for providing space in shared bedrooms, something passing for food, and almost no supervision.

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Anon

    And even I must (reluctantly) give gays credit for being the first wave of urban pioneers reclaiming Asbury Park from the perditions of local bros!

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Anon

    And even I must (reluctantly) give gays credit for being the first wave of urban pioneers reclaiming Asbury Park from the perditions of local bros!

  107. @Mr. Anon
    We had a revolution so that I don't have to care about these inbred dullards.

    Replies: @Truth, @Art Deco, @Boomthorkell

    We had a revolution so that I don’t have to care about these inbred dullards.

    1. The Queen has six adult grandchildren, all of whom took blindly graded O-level and A-level examinations. Four of the six had perfectly respectable scores (three A-levels with middling marks), two were under par (two A-levels with a middling mark and a low pass). Each of the Queen’s children and Princess Margaret’s children took O-level and A-level examinations as well and all passed at least one A-level. If they’re ‘dullards’, north of 2/3 of the population of Britain qualifies as ‘dullards’.

    2. The term ‘in-bred’ doesn’t mean what you fancy it means. The Queen and Prince Philip were 3d cousins. Prince Margaret and her husband were unrelated. All of their children and grandchildren have married unrelated persons. George VI and his wife were unrelated. Three of his siblings married unrelated persons, the fourth married a 2d cousin. George V married a 2d cousin. Edward Vii married an unrelated person. Victoria actually did marry a 1st cousin. That’s four generations back.

    • Thanks: Alden
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Art Deco

    Interesting.

    Fun fact:

    26 states in the U.S. allow 1st cousin marriages--19 without conditions and 7 under certain restrictions.

    Even more interesting:

    For those who traffic in stereotypes, it's noteworthy that 1st cousin marriage is prohibited in Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is legal, with no restrictions, in California, New York, and Washington DC.

    Replies: @res

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    Leave it to an odious popinjay like "Art Deco" to put in a good word for Britain's odious royal family.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  108. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Art Deco

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco, @Ali Choudhury, @dfordoom

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.

    You mean you’ve conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?

    The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Point already refuted.

    Try growing a brain.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Ah, that was not his point.

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined. Its American "allies" (documented in other articles on this and other sites) even went so far as during the war to force it into terrible bankruptcy and sell the Empire. They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war, but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    I don't pity them, of course. They had their time in the sun, and like all peoples committed great goods and great evils. There is a price and a consequence for all things, and some saying about he who is first will become the last, etc.

    Or, in short, Karma aside, if you don't want your empire to get ruthlessly taken advantage of, like you took advantage of others, don't fight two worlds wars.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    , @dfordoom
    @Art Deco



    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.
     
    You mean you’ve conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?
     
    The British lost WW2 in the sense that they were much worse off after fighting the war. Chamberlain was morally right in making the decision to fight Hitler but for Britain the war was all loss and no gain.

    For the US WW2 was all gain and no loss.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  109. @Johann Ricke
    @Dr. Doom


    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie’s uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.
     
    The House of Windsor (nee Hanover) was the classic puppet dynasty from the git-go with even less real power than Japan's Emperors, who have been under the thumb of either shoguns or military cliques for the last 800 years. Think of the Windsors' relationship to Parliament in the same light as the Merovingians in their last century vis-a-vis the Carolingians (whose leading light Charles Martel, of Tours/Poitiers fame, stopped bothering to appoint a puppet Merovingian king, perhaps to save himself a bunch of money on ceremonial frivolities that were nonetheless a non-trivial expense, at a time when he was getting ready to ward off the Arabs looking to expand their foothold in Europe from bases in Spain).

    Replies: @Art Deco

    with even less real power than Japan’s Emperors,

    Not true. Members of Japan’s royal family are actually prisoners of the Imperial Household Agency. The current Empress appears to have been on some sort of strike for the last 20 years, refusing to make public appearances.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Art Deco


    Not true. Members of Japan’s royal family are actually prisoners of the Imperial Household Agency. The current Empress appears to have been on some sort of strike for the last 20 years, refusing to make public appearances.
     
    I should have qualified my comment by stating that it did not apply to the era following Japan's unconditional surrender.
  110. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason

    I inherited my grandparents' complete set of Spode's Tower china. Dates glazed on the back: 1910, 1913, 1920 and 1923. At least the scene portrayed on the stuff itself is nice.


    https://i.etsystatic.com/7003465/r/il/89e4a8/1991285702/il_794xN.1991285702_nmlm.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Truth

    Nice to have as a memento.

    Are you sure about the dates? The pink colored transfer ware tower pattern for export to the United States started around 1923, although production of the pattern in various different colors actually started in 1814.

    This stuff was made when the Spode company was under the ownership of the Copeland family, and many pieces were dated in this manner:

    F
    25

    The letter indicated the month so this piece would have been made in February. Pieces made in August had the letter T since the A was already reserved for April.

    The two numbers indicated the year, so this piece would have been made in February 1925.

    Usually the dates were stamps into flat pieces like saucers, but would not be found in shaped pieces like cups.

    The pattern is based on a representation of a fortified bridge near Rome, which I believe is still standing.

    (My father was a dealer in antiques, and I spent much of my teens in auction rooms looking at this kind of stuff.)

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason

    I just looked. They are two-digit numbers, "10" on many I just looked at, "13" on some others, and "23" as I remember on still others.

    Each also has:

    "Copeland
    Spode's Tower
    England"

    inside an oval.

  111. @David In TN
    @Alden

    Once in a book store I glanced at Swedish actress Britt Ekland's book. She wrote that her father was a "True Viking" in appearance, and that when she was introduced to Prince Philip, she noticed Philip looked like her father.

    Replies: @Flip

    Well, his great grandfather was the King of Denmark.

  112. @Dr. Doom
    He and his wife stood idly by while the British Empire collapsed.
    Lizzie's uncle was not a warmonger and was removed for being nice to Hitler.

    The disaster of the Soap Opera that passes for Royals now is all them.
    Harry and Meghan are a symptom of what ails Britain.

    Tolerance is no virtue. Extreme tolerance is cowardice at best.
    The Fall of the Empire is a slow motion disaster for Western Civilization.

    Only an armed Imperium can turn the tides of barbarians back now...

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Johann Ricke, @RAZ

    Exhausted and bankrupt (rationing was maintained for years after the war), Britain was not capable of maintaining The Empire post WWII. Even if not exhausted and bankrupt, The Empire would’ve been on its way out amid rising feelings for independence within The Empire, and calls for change from outside it.

    Former British colonies have made out better than other former colonies. The British can feel some satisfaction in that, but it was time for them to be free.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @RAZ

    Britain came close to defaulting on some notes in 1976 (and borrowed from the IMF) and imposed an involuntary hair-cut on bondholders in 1932. That's the closest it has been to bankrupt.

    What's odd about the British Empire was not that it was relinquished, but that it was built in the first place. That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes. In the 1950s, they faced insurgencies in Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus and disorders elsewhere as the local political classes built a following. Ultimately, you ask yourself if you can make a business case for the grief you're getting. (Compare residual French holdings with residual British holdings and you can make the case that the British were too thorough; still, who wants Tanganyika?).

    Note also, Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically. They needed to concentrate their attention on improving domestic productivity. They didn't get around to it until Mrs. T took the helm.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @PiltdownMan

  113. @Desiderius
    @PiltdownMan

    Not mean perhaps but not so harmless as what tries, and fails, to pass for wit in too-polite present company.

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    You can’t fake being witty.

    It is a fine line that divides the witty quip from sticking your foot in your mouth. Most people give up trying.

  114. @PiltdownMan
    @Jiminy


    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.
     
    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain's Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth's sister and Princess Anne's maternal aunt.


    https://i.imgur.com/wZWTp8E.jpg


    Here's another picture of her from that time.

    https://i.imgur.com/GW3cjaw.jpg?1

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    She looked all right for the time, which was 1960s Britain. You can’t compare her to Hollywood standards of 2020.

    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @Jonathan Mason

    True, but don’t forget that a lot of Hollywood starlets would have their noses altered, teeth removed, chin implant added, ears pinned, cheekbones enhanced, jawline shaved and botoxed by her age. And I’m sure that the Vanity Fair photograph was taken before computerised alterations were made possible.

    , @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    Anne was satisfactory looking ca. 1966. Between the age of 15 and 26 her face grew quite distorted, as if she had acromegaly. Not many women age that way during that set of years. Her daughter is plain, but not distorted. Both mother and daughter seem to draw in men with common interests. (Horses, sports-in-general).

    The Queen was a looker when she was young and she's always been handsome in comparison to her cohort. You could say the same of her sister up to age 35. After that, bad habits appended to bad sartorial choices ruined her.

  115. @AceDeuce
    @Jiminy

    Shakespeare died at 52; Vermeer at 43; Robert Burns only made it to 37.

    Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O'Donnell keep on going.

    Replies: @Single Malt, @Orville H. Larson

    “Yet the likes of Whoopie Goldberg, Madonna, and Rosie O’Donnell keep on going.”

    It’s not for us to divine the intention of the Almighty!

  116. @PiltdownMan
    Mr. Sailer has given us a representative assortment of quotes, but the original article, with a full ninety quotes from Prince Philip, is worth perusing, too.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/prince-philip-quotes-jokes-gaffes-b1829205.html

    He was very much the archetype of the bluff and plain-spoken, yet light-hearted and very funny, British military man of that generation. It is impossible for the young generation of today to understand that not one of his quips was mean-spirited.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Alden

    My favorite Prince Phillip remark; a dress designer was invited to a royal reception . The dress designer had a beard. Prince Philip advised the man to find someone who could design a decent looking beard for him.

    My British BIL make remarks like that all the time. It’s a British thing considered rude and hurtful in America. He calls American politics
    “ native affairs” .

  117. @Anonymous
    Famously, Princess Diana 'fainted at the gralloch'.

    Or - to translate, the tender hearted princess - who won an award at boarding school for caring for her pet hamster - was overcome with emotion to the point of fainting at the 'gralloch' , which is ancient and odd British royal tradition. Basically it means the ritual disembowelment of the slain deer, in front of an audience, accompanied by the ritualistic smearing of blood on the faces of the participants.
    Such a rite is likely pre historic in origin.

    Replies: @Alden

    Princess Dianna was probably on the 5th day of a water only 5 day fast when she fainted. Potassium depletion does that. Fasting works but you have to be careful..

  118. @Kylie
    @Alden

    "Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites."

    Sure they have. They have smeared the BRF very successfully. Not even during the Diana debacle did I see the Queen referred to as an old woman no longer able to put duty before family, people saying they are longer royalists and calls for a republic. Handbag and the Duchess of LA have glommed onto every anti-White "woke" cause. If they haven't done more damage than the others you mention, it's for lack of brains, not malice.

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs. I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they're only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    Replies: @anon, @Truth, @Alden

    I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they’re only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    Sportette, I have to admit, that does sound pretty good.

  119. @anon
    @Kylie


    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs.
     
    The Obamas feel insecure and envious toward Whites. That is in fact what is dangerous, because there is only one solution.

    Gates and Clinton are just riding the wave.

    Replies: @Truth

    Are you sure you don’t seem insecure and envious toward the Obamas?

  120. @PiltdownMan
    @Jiminy


    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.
     
    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain's Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth's sister and Princess Anne's maternal aunt.


    https://i.imgur.com/wZWTp8E.jpg


    Here's another picture of her from that time.

    https://i.imgur.com/GW3cjaw.jpg?1

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    She had a “friendly” relationship with Mike Jagger. Reportedly her sister was not happy about it.

  121. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason

    I inherited my grandparents' complete set of Spode's Tower china. Dates glazed on the back: 1910, 1913, 1920 and 1923. At least the scene portrayed on the stuff itself is nice.


    https://i.etsystatic.com/7003465/r/il/89e4a8/1991285702/il_794xN.1991285702_nmlm.jpg

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Truth

    Don’t put your address in chat!

    Alden will hire a couple of knee-grows to do a home invasion with her.

  122. @Art Deco
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.

    You mean you've conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?


    The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Point already refuted.


    Try growing a brain.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @dfordoom

    Ah, that was not his point.

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined. Its American “allies” (documented in other articles on this and other sites) even went so far as during the war to force it into terrible bankruptcy and sell the Empire. They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war, but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    I don’t pity them, of course. They had their time in the sun, and like all peoples committed great goods and great evils. There is a price and a consequence for all things, and some saying about he who is first will become the last, etc.

    Or, in short, Karma aside, if you don’t want your empire to get ruthlessly taken advantage of, like you took advantage of others, don’t fight two worlds wars.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined.

    You and he are wrong about the 1st point and the 3d point.

    1. We had no 'Global Empire', just a mess of military and naval bases. On average, about 22% of our military manpower was deployed abroad, the bulk in western Germany, Japan, and south Korea.

    2. Britain wasn't ruined by the war, though it was injured by the war. War or no war, their position abroad was untenable. The same observation applies to France, the Netherlands, &c. Portugal also had to liquidate its overseas territories, even though it suffered no war damage and it was experiencing rapid growth for much of the post-war period.

    3. Britain had the world's 3d largest Navy in 1982. The country was still capable at that date of operating on its own. So was France at that time.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    , @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war,

    No, they didn't. Britain was not in 1945 a humiliated occupied country. Quit talking rot.



    but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    Japan's per capita income did not surpass Britain's until 1973. Britain's surpassed Japan's in terms of puchasing-power-parity in 2001 and has remained ahead ever since. It surpassed Japan's in nominal terms in 2004 and has remained ahead 3 years out of 4 since then. Britain's total fertility rate surpassed Japan's in 1983 and has been higher ever since (currently 26% higher). Britain's military is capable of distant deployments, and always has been; Japan's is confined to its home islands.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  123. @Mr. Anon
    We had a revolution so that I don't have to care about these inbred dullards.

    Replies: @Truth, @Art Deco, @Boomthorkell

    I’m fond of his wit, but when I saw a magazine in a teacher’s lounge talking about a royal wedding, I said the same thing (minus the inbred comment.)

    I’m not really against Monarchy though (done right, it can be very Spartan and inspirational.) Everyone has a system that works for them that they need to figure out. I think the British might be better off as a Republic, but then, I think Thailand and Japan do better with their (very different) monarchies. China…well, they decided they wanted elected Emperors, and that’s fine too.

    Americans though, I think we are meant to be kingless.

  124. @Jonathan Mason
    @PiltdownMan

    She looked all right for the time, which was 1960s Britain. You can't compare her to Hollywood standards of 2020.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Art Deco

    True, but don’t forget that a lot of Hollywood starlets would have their noses altered, teeth removed, chin implant added, ears pinned, cheekbones enhanced, jawline shaved and botoxed by her age. And I’m sure that the Vanity Fair photograph was taken before computerised alterations were made possible.

  125. @Jonathan Mason
    @PiltdownMan

    She looked all right for the time, which was 1960s Britain. You can't compare her to Hollywood standards of 2020.

    Replies: @Jiminy, @Art Deco

    Anne was satisfactory looking ca. 1966. Between the age of 15 and 26 her face grew quite distorted, as if she had acromegaly. Not many women age that way during that set of years. Her daughter is plain, but not distorted. Both mother and daughter seem to draw in men with common interests. (Horses, sports-in-general).

    The Queen was a looker when she was young and she’s always been handsome in comparison to her cohort. You could say the same of her sister up to age 35. After that, bad habits appended to bad sartorial choices ruined her.

  126. @Kylie
    @Alden

    "Harry and Meghan have done no harm to Whites."

    Sure they have. They have smeared the BRF very successfully. Not even during the Diana debacle did I see the Queen referred to as an old woman no longer able to put duty before family, people saying they are longer royalists and calls for a republic. Handbag and the Duchess of LA have glommed onto every anti-White "woke" cause. If they haven't done more damage than the others you mention, it's for lack of brains, not malice.

    My personal feeling is that the Obamas are less dangerous than the Gates, Clintons and Zuckerbergs. I suspect that deep down, like a lot of blacks, they want the trappings of power, the status, the flash and the cash more than the opportunity to shape public policy. I get the feeling they're only as political as they need to be to rake in the goodies and join the cool clubs. I could be wrong.

    Replies: @anon, @Truth, @Alden

    Neither I , nor you, nor any White American is a member of the Royal Family smeared by Harry and Meghan.

    Gates has employed nothing but immigrant Indians and Chinese since he laid off the last White Americans about 25 years ago. That socialist alternative politician in Seattle Sawant leader of the anti fa BLM came to America on her husband’s Microsoft H IB visa. Gates, Zuckerberg Sergei Brin etc have poured billions into the anti White American cause.

    Ever been to the residential neighborhoods of Silicon Valley? Full of Indian and Chinese working at the tech industry the White American men with whom I went to college with built. A week after graduation they moved a few miles east to Mountain View worked for NASA and NASA contractors and created the internet, space travel and the computer tech world we live in today. 20 years later they were laid off in the prime of their careers and replaced by non White immigrants.

    And SV tech is the biggest donor to anti White organizations aside from George Soros.

    I’ve read a little about the November 2020 stolen election. There’s a lot being discovered about the tens of millions Zuckerberg alone gave to vote stealing organizations. Learn about the vote tabulating and switching in favor of the anti White democrats and decide who is more dangerous to White America, Meghan and Harry or Zuckerberg. Gates, Brin, Bezos and the rest of the billionaires using their money to eradicate White Americans and used their money and tech expertise to steal the election. If you think Trump was not helpful to White Americans, Biden and his Jewish crew is actively and vociferously anti White

    Or just take a trip to Seattle and Redmond Wa and Santa Clara county Ca and look at what the tech billionaires replaced White Americans with. Non White immigrants.

    Worry about your own children and grandchildren if you have any; not the children and grandchildren of one of the ten richest persons in the world.

    Don’t worry about the Queen of England and her children and descendants. Worry about your own children and descendants banned from making a living because they are White, vulnerable to unspeakable black on White crime and declared the lowest untouchable caste by the government and the wealthiest and most powerful people in America.

    Harry and Meghan haven’t harmed American Whites at all. The English people and media have completely turned against them. And unlike many UNZ fertility fanatics, they have a red headed very pale White boy.

  127. It’s amazing how low the standards are for the British royals. Show up, dress nice, don’t screw little kids and the public will say how lovely these people are. How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that, giving back to the people your country brutalized. (And no, jetting in for a photo op isn’t giving back) Of course we get the usual eejits on this forum who plug the royals into their “white identity” algorithm and take offense at any criticism. All Brits, I should imagine.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bragadocious

    It’s amazing how low the standards are for the British royals. Show up, dress nice, don’t screw little kids and the public will say how lovely these people are. How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that, giving back to the people your country brutalized. (And no, jetting in for a photo op isn’t giving back) Of course we get the usual eejits on this forum who plug the royals into their “white identity” algorithm and take offense at any criticism. All Brits, I should imagine.

    Just who did they brutalize? And who did they brutalize more severely and thoroughly than what's been the norm among local elites?


    How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that

    It'll be amusing to see how you move the goalposts around in this discussion. Two of Prince Philip's sons and two of his grandsons have had military service, with 45 man-year's in service total. Two of the Queen's (royal) 1st cousins were career military, a 3d was in the diplomatic corps, and a fourth was an architect. Prince Charles has a hat full of properties to manage, restoration projects, and real-estate developments in addition to his philanthropic promotions. Princess Margaret's son founded a handsome business. Princess Anne and her daughter have been Olympic class equestriennes.

    Replies: @Bragadocious

  128. Nice to have as a memento.

    Are you sure about the dates? The pink colored transfer ware tower pattern for export to the United States started around 1923, although production of the pattern in various different colors actually started in 1814.

    I’m sure. They are simply whole year numbers as I typed them. There are other stamps, glazed in, like “Copeland.” When I get a chance, I will get them out and give you more information.

    My grandparents were around San Francisco, which then was perhaps even more of a special, international city, so maybe they had access to imports before what you describe as beginning in 1923. (That was the year of my father’s birth, BTW.) Grandfather was quite a guy, popular, with political connections, so nothing would surprise me.

  129. Nah. Those persons at the receiving end of his “quips” might beg to differ. Philip was just a mean prick.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Liza

    No, British women can't cook. Deal with it.

    Replies: @Liza

  130. @Liza
    Nah. Those persons at the receiving end of his "quips" might beg to differ. Philip was just a mean prick.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    No, British women can’t cook. Deal with it.

    • Replies: @Liza
    @Art Deco

    OK. So he got one thing correct. Just about all those other statements are outright mean, apparently because he just enjoys being this way and no one dares hammering him in his ugly face.

    Re British women's cooking, I guess he tasted too many of his wife's meals. Actually, the biddy never did cook. They say she just chows down on the corn flakes every morning.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @RSDB

  131. @YetAnotherAnon
    @PiltdownMan

    Anne in her youth had a body that could make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window.

    https://i.postimg.cc/MTzKPSyS/annevalerie.jpg

    Nice tribute by the remaining real Londoners - The Mall lined end to end with black cabs yesterday.

    https://twitter.com/TheLTDA/status/1380576338214588419

    anon - deer must be disembowelled and drained of blood very quickly after death, or the meat is tainted. The "gralloching knife" is tool of choice.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn

    Nice tribute by the remaining real Londoners – The Mall lined end to end with black cabs yesterday.

    Prince Philip used an old taxi to travel incognito around London.

  132. @RAZ
    @Dr. Doom

    Exhausted and bankrupt (rationing was maintained for years after the war), Britain was not capable of maintaining The Empire post WWII. Even if not exhausted and bankrupt, The Empire would've been on its way out amid rising feelings for independence within The Empire, and calls for change from outside it.

    Former British colonies have made out better than other former colonies. The British can feel some satisfaction in that, but it was time for them to be free.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Britain came close to defaulting on some notes in 1976 (and borrowed from the IMF) and imposed an involuntary hair-cut on bondholders in 1932. That’s the closest it has been to bankrupt.

    What’s odd about the British Empire was not that it was relinquished, but that it was built in the first place. That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes. In the 1950s, they faced insurgencies in Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus and disorders elsewhere as the local political classes built a following. Ultimately, you ask yourself if you can make a business case for the grief you’re getting. (Compare residual French holdings with residual British holdings and you can make the case that the British were too thorough; still, who wants Tanganyika?).

    Note also, Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically. They needed to concentrate their attention on improving domestic productivity. They didn’t get around to it until Mrs. T took the helm.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Art Deco

    "Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically."

    Socialism and punitive taxation will do that quickly, but their relative position began to decline well before WW I. Germany getting knocked to its knees 3 times in 30 years did delay it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Art Deco


    That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes.
     
    An Indian professor of economic history at the London School of Economics has a measured and insightful take on the British Empire in India. It's a must read for anyone interested in the topic—and perhaps not what one would expect.


    https://tirthankarroyblog.wordpress.com/category/uncategorized/

  133. @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    AP had race riots in the 60's but I didn't know it then. My wife's family did. AP has changed a lot since I first knew the area in the early 80's. Stayed way down into the 90's. At least for by the boardwalk area you can picture Bruce Springsteens' "Tunnel of Love" video. At the time the neighboring town Ocean Grove would shut the small bridges to AP at nite. Maybe it still does.

    An at first gay led revival (hey, this is closer and cheaper than going to Fire Island) brought the area back from Main Street to the Boardwalk, with restaurants, bars, shops and condos. Good luck now parking on a Saturday nite in the Summer. Asbury Ocean Club residence has units for sales for close to $2M.

    But different if you have school age kids. White families in neighboring towns whose kids would normally attend AP High School still heavily send their kids to Catholic or other private schools to avoid AP HS.

    Replies: @Prosa123, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes

    At its nadir in the early 1990’s the main “industry” remaining in Asbury Park consisted of boarding houses for deinstitutionalized mental patients. They pocketed the residents’ SSDI checks in return for providing space in shared bedrooms, something passing for food, and almost no supervision.

  134. @Joe Stalin
    @JMcG

    Ford City in Chicago used to make the engines for the B-29 Superfortress bombers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t3akMEm9bI

    Replies: @Hibernian

    My uncle worked there. It was briefly the plant for the abortive effort to build the Tucker car. It became a Ford aircraft engine plant during the Korean war. I think that’s when my uncle worked there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_City_Mall

  135. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Ah, that was not his point.

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined. Its American "allies" (documented in other articles on this and other sites) even went so far as during the war to force it into terrible bankruptcy and sell the Empire. They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war, but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    I don't pity them, of course. They had their time in the sun, and like all peoples committed great goods and great evils. There is a price and a consequence for all things, and some saying about he who is first will become the last, etc.

    Or, in short, Karma aside, if you don't want your empire to get ruthlessly taken advantage of, like you took advantage of others, don't fight two worlds wars.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined.

    You and he are wrong about the 1st point and the 3d point.

    1. We had no ‘Global Empire’, just a mess of military and naval bases. On average, about 22% of our military manpower was deployed abroad, the bulk in western Germany, Japan, and south Korea.

    2. Britain wasn’t ruined by the war, though it was injured by the war. War or no war, their position abroad was untenable. The same observation applies to France, the Netherlands, &c. Portugal also had to liquidate its overseas territories, even though it suffered no war damage and it was experiencing rapid growth for much of the post-war period.

    3. Britain had the world’s 3d largest Navy in 1982. The country was still capable at that date of operating on its own. So was France at that time.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    That isn't ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else's alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Not that the empires were good, of course, just, instead of an organic process of liberation, etc. It was an often chaotic and violent separating, brought about of course by the chaos of the world wars and the crises and blunders and scrabbling that followed post war.

    I'm not talking about ruin or loss in the sense of the Battle of Kharkov. I'm talking about economies, empires and independence.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  136. Phil once commented on Sarah Ferguson’s living quarters

    ‘It looks like a tart’s boudoir”

  137. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Nice to have as a memento.

    Are you sure about the dates? The pink colored transfer ware tower pattern for export to the United States started around 1923, although production of the pattern in various different colors actually started in 1814.

    This stuff was made when the Spode company was under the ownership of the Copeland family, and many pieces were dated in this manner:

    F
    25

    The letter indicated the month so this piece would have been made in February. Pieces made in August had the letter T since the A was already reserved for April.

    The two numbers indicated the year, so this piece would have been made in February 1925.

    Usually the dates were stamps into flat pieces like saucers, but would not be found in shaped pieces like cups.

    The pattern is based on a representation of a fortified bridge near Rome, which I believe is still standing.

    (My father was a dealer in antiques, and I spent much of my teens in auction rooms looking at this kind of stuff.)

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I just looked. They are two-digit numbers, “10” on many I just looked at, “13” on some others, and “23” as I remember on still others.

    Each also has:

    “Copeland
    Spode’s Tower
    England”

    inside an oval.

  138. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Ah, that was not his point.

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined. Its American "allies" (documented in other articles on this and other sites) even went so far as during the war to force it into terrible bankruptcy and sell the Empire. They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war, but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    I don't pity them, of course. They had their time in the sun, and like all peoples committed great goods and great evils. There is a price and a consequence for all things, and some saying about he who is first will become the last, etc.

    Or, in short, Karma aside, if you don't want your empire to get ruthlessly taken advantage of, like you took advantage of others, don't fight two worlds wars.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war,

    No, they didn’t. Britain was not in 1945 a humiliated occupied country. Quit talking rot.

    but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    Japan’s per capita income did not surpass Britain’s until 1973. Britain’s surpassed Japan’s in terms of puchasing-power-parity in 2001 and has remained ahead ever since. It surpassed Japan’s in nominal terms in 2004 and has remained ahead 3 years out of 4 since then. Britain’s total fertility rate surpassed Japan’s in 1983 and has been higher ever since (currently 26% higher). Britain’s military is capable of distant deployments, and always has been; Japan’s is confined to its home islands.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Japan got off a lot better because it didn't fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there's a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    Your other points are correct though. How much of that TFR is Anglo though?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  139. @Art Deco
    @RAZ

    Britain came close to defaulting on some notes in 1976 (and borrowed from the IMF) and imposed an involuntary hair-cut on bondholders in 1932. That's the closest it has been to bankrupt.

    What's odd about the British Empire was not that it was relinquished, but that it was built in the first place. That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes. In the 1950s, they faced insurgencies in Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus and disorders elsewhere as the local political classes built a following. Ultimately, you ask yourself if you can make a business case for the grief you're getting. (Compare residual French holdings with residual British holdings and you can make the case that the British were too thorough; still, who wants Tanganyika?).

    Note also, Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically. They needed to concentrate their attention on improving domestic productivity. They didn't get around to it until Mrs. T took the helm.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @PiltdownMan

    “Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically.”

    Socialism and punitive taxation will do that quickly, but their relative position began to decline well before WW I. Germany getting knocked to its knees 3 times in 30 years did delay it.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Ralph L

    All quite true. Now, you'd expect them as the world's leading economy to lose relative standing after a time as others began to prosper making use of technologies already developed, something which can be done more readily than advancing the technological frontier. See the U.S. v. the peripheral Far East. The thing is, Britain continued to suffer relative decline after they'd been displaced by the United States, a relative decline which persisted as one European country after another surpassed them.

  140. @Bragadocious
    It's amazing how low the standards are for the British royals. Show up, dress nice, don't screw little kids and the public will say how lovely these people are. How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you're too dim for that, giving back to the people your country brutalized. (And no, jetting in for a photo op isn't giving back) Of course we get the usual eejits on this forum who plug the royals into their "white identity" algorithm and take offense at any criticism. All Brits, I should imagine.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    It’s amazing how low the standards are for the British royals. Show up, dress nice, don’t screw little kids and the public will say how lovely these people are. How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that, giving back to the people your country brutalized. (And no, jetting in for a photo op isn’t giving back) Of course we get the usual eejits on this forum who plug the royals into their “white identity” algorithm and take offense at any criticism. All Brits, I should imagine.

    Just who did they brutalize? And who did they brutalize more severely and thoroughly than what’s been the norm among local elites?

    How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that

    It’ll be amusing to see how you move the goalposts around in this discussion. Two of Prince Philip’s sons and two of his grandsons have had military service, with 45 man-year’s in service total. Two of the Queen’s (royal) 1st cousins were career military, a 3d was in the diplomatic corps, and a fourth was an architect. Prince Charles has a hat full of properties to manage, restoration projects, and real-estate developments in addition to his philanthropic promotions. Princess Margaret’s son founded a handsome business. Princess Anne and her daughter have been Olympic class equestriennes.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    @Art Deco

    I love when Brits play dumb about their history. Or maybe you really are that dumb. No I'm not going to educate you. Remember, ctrl + alt + white!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

  141. @Ralph L
    @Art Deco

    "Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically."

    Socialism and punitive taxation will do that quickly, but their relative position began to decline well before WW I. Germany getting knocked to its knees 3 times in 30 years did delay it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    All quite true. Now, you’d expect them as the world’s leading economy to lose relative standing after a time as others began to prosper making use of technologies already developed, something which can be done more readily than advancing the technological frontier. See the U.S. v. the peripheral Far East. The thing is, Britain continued to suffer relative decline after they’d been displaced by the United States, a relative decline which persisted as one European country after another surpassed them.

  142. @Art Deco
    @Bragadocious

    It’s amazing how low the standards are for the British royals. Show up, dress nice, don’t screw little kids and the public will say how lovely these people are. How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that, giving back to the people your country brutalized. (And no, jetting in for a photo op isn’t giving back) Of course we get the usual eejits on this forum who plug the royals into their “white identity” algorithm and take offense at any criticism. All Brits, I should imagine.

    Just who did they brutalize? And who did they brutalize more severely and thoroughly than what's been the norm among local elites?


    How about actually doing something important and interesting with your life, or if you’re too dim for that

    It'll be amusing to see how you move the goalposts around in this discussion. Two of Prince Philip's sons and two of his grandsons have had military service, with 45 man-year's in service total. Two of the Queen's (royal) 1st cousins were career military, a 3d was in the diplomatic corps, and a fourth was an architect. Prince Charles has a hat full of properties to manage, restoration projects, and real-estate developments in addition to his philanthropic promotions. Princess Margaret's son founded a handsome business. Princess Anne and her daughter have been Olympic class equestriennes.

    Replies: @Bragadocious

    I love when Brits play dumb about their history. Or maybe you really are that dumb. No I’m not going to educate you. Remember, ctrl + alt + white!

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bragadocious

    IOW, you haven't a clue.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Bragadocious

    You have angered the ridiculous and foolish pedant known as "Art Deco".

  143. @Bragadocious
    @Art Deco

    I love when Brits play dumb about their history. Or maybe you really are that dumb. No I'm not going to educate you. Remember, ctrl + alt + white!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    IOW, you haven’t a clue.

    • LOL: Bragadocious
  144. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    We had a revolution so that I don’t have to care about these inbred dullards.

    1. The Queen has six adult grandchildren, all of whom took blindly graded O-level and A-level examinations. Four of the six had perfectly respectable scores (three A-levels with middling marks), two were under par (two A-levels with a middling mark and a low pass). Each of the Queen's children and Princess Margaret's children took O-level and A-level examinations as well and all passed at least one A-level. If they're 'dullards', north of 2/3 of the population of Britain qualifies as 'dullards'.

    2. The term 'in-bred' doesn't mean what you fancy it means. The Queen and Prince Philip were 3d cousins. Prince Margaret and her husband were unrelated. All of their children and grandchildren have married unrelated persons. George VI and his wife were unrelated. Three of his siblings married unrelated persons, the fourth married a 2d cousin. George V married a 2d cousin. Edward Vii married an unrelated person. Victoria actually did marry a 1st cousin. That's four generations back.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Mr. Anon

    Interesting.

    Fun fact:

    26 states in the U.S. allow 1st cousin marriages–19 without conditions and 7 under certain restrictions.

    Even more interesting:

    For those who traffic in stereotypes, it’s noteworthy that 1st cousin marriage is prohibited in Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is legal, with no restrictions, in California, New York, and Washington DC.

    • Replies: @res
    @AceDeuce


    For those who traffic in stereotypes, it’s noteworthy that 1st cousin marriage is prohibited in Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is legal, with no restrictions, in California, New York, and Washington DC.
     
    Thanks. Have to remember that for the next time I hear a "Goodthinker" break out one of those stereotypes. Though it is worth noting that another big block of states where cousin marriage is legal is the old South.

    Does anyone have a handle on the reasons for the distribution of the laws? Is it immigrants and/or Orthodox Jewish desires or is it more complicated?

    BTW, first cousin marriage is legal in most of the world. The US (along with China) being a notable exception.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage#Legal_status
  145. @Art Deco
    @RAZ

    Britain came close to defaulting on some notes in 1976 (and borrowed from the IMF) and imposed an involuntary hair-cut on bondholders in 1932. That's the closest it has been to bankrupt.

    What's odd about the British Empire was not that it was relinquished, but that it was built in the first place. That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes. In the 1950s, they faced insurgencies in Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus and disorders elsewhere as the local political classes built a following. Ultimately, you ask yourself if you can make a business case for the grief you're getting. (Compare residual French holdings with residual British holdings and you can make the case that the British were too thorough; still, who wants Tanganyika?).

    Note also, Britain was falling behind continental Europe and the United States economically. They needed to concentrate their attention on improving domestic productivity. They didn't get around to it until Mrs. T took the helm.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @PiltdownMan

    That a country with shy of 50 million people held the Indian subcontinent, much of tropical Africa, the Malay peninsula, and insular and coastal territories scattered all over the globe is what amazes.

    An Indian professor of economic history at the London School of Economics has a measured and insightful take on the British Empire in India. It’s a must read for anyone interested in the topic—and perhaps not what one would expect.

    https://tirthankarroyblog.wordpress.com/category/uncategorized/

  146. @Anonymous
    @Flip


    Rumors are that ... Andrew is from Lord Porchester ...
     
    Porchester died 9/11/2001.

    Replies: @Canadian Observer

    NHL player Nick Robertson was born on 9/11/2001.

  147. @Art Deco
    @Johann Ricke

    with even less real power than Japan’s Emperors,

    Not true. Members of Japan's royal family are actually prisoners of the Imperial Household Agency. The current Empress appears to have been on some sort of strike for the last 20 years, refusing to make public appearances.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Not true. Members of Japan’s royal family are actually prisoners of the Imperial Household Agency. The current Empress appears to have been on some sort of strike for the last 20 years, refusing to make public appearances.

    I should have qualified my comment by stating that it did not apply to the era following Japan’s unconditional surrender.

  148. This is very late in the comment thread, but Philip, in the personage of his words, as quoted, was really a man I would have enjoyed talking with. I absolutely love the quotes.

    Our world used to be free enough for a man to say such things. They weren’t taken as massive judgements or reflections on one’s entire life and soul. Freedom of expression. Salutations to the memory of Philip, one cool guy.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, AKAHorace
  149. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Art Deco

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco, @Ali Choudhury, @dfordoom

    Reputational?

  150. @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    AP had race riots in the 60's but I didn't know it then. My wife's family did. AP has changed a lot since I first knew the area in the early 80's. Stayed way down into the 90's. At least for by the boardwalk area you can picture Bruce Springsteens' "Tunnel of Love" video. At the time the neighboring town Ocean Grove would shut the small bridges to AP at nite. Maybe it still does.

    An at first gay led revival (hey, this is closer and cheaper than going to Fire Island) brought the area back from Main Street to the Boardwalk, with restaurants, bars, shops and condos. Good luck now parking on a Saturday nite in the Summer. Asbury Ocean Club residence has units for sales for close to $2M.

    But different if you have school age kids. White families in neighboring towns whose kids would normally attend AP High School still heavily send their kids to Catholic or other private schools to avoid AP HS.

    Replies: @Prosa123, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes

    And even I must (reluctantly) give gays credit for being the first wave of urban pioneers reclaiming Asbury Park from the perditions of local bros!

  151. @Anon
    @Dan Hayes

    AP had race riots in the 60's but I didn't know it then. My wife's family did. AP has changed a lot since I first knew the area in the early 80's. Stayed way down into the 90's. At least for by the boardwalk area you can picture Bruce Springsteens' "Tunnel of Love" video. At the time the neighboring town Ocean Grove would shut the small bridges to AP at nite. Maybe it still does.

    An at first gay led revival (hey, this is closer and cheaper than going to Fire Island) brought the area back from Main Street to the Boardwalk, with restaurants, bars, shops and condos. Good luck now parking on a Saturday nite in the Summer. Asbury Ocean Club residence has units for sales for close to $2M.

    But different if you have school age kids. White families in neighboring towns whose kids would normally attend AP High School still heavily send their kids to Catholic or other private schools to avoid AP HS.

    Replies: @Prosa123, @Dan Hayes, @Dan Hayes

    And even I must (reluctantly) give gays credit for being the first wave of urban pioneers reclaiming Asbury Park from the perditions of local bros!

  152. @Art Deco
    @Liza

    No, British women can't cook. Deal with it.

    Replies: @Liza

    OK. So he got one thing correct. Just about all those other statements are outright mean, apparently because he just enjoys being this way and no one dares hammering him in his ugly face.

    Re British women’s cooking, I guess he tasted too many of his wife’s meals. Actually, the biddy never did cook. They say she just chows down on the corn flakes every morning.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Liza

    Personally, I think you'd benefit from a sense of humor, but that's just me. Pro-tip: complaining that other people are big meanies while referring to a congenial woman of 94 as 'the biddy' suggests you're unclear on the concept.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    , @RSDB
    @Liza

    At one point she had a Swedish cook, Alma McKee, who wrote up a book of mostly rather bland recipes based on her experience as royal chef.

  153. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9456511/Remote-South-Pacific-tribe-shocked-hear-god-Prince-Philip-died.html

    The closest the Duke came to the island was during a trip to the capital Port Vila in 1974. Back then Vanuatu was an Anglo-French colony named New Hebrides.

    During the royal visit a warrior from Tanna named Chief Jack Naiva, and others, paddled 240km (150 miles) in a canoe to the capital to greet Prince Phillip as he disembarked the royal yacht Britannia.

    From there, the Prince’s godlike status became even more cemented after Chief Naiva became convinced the Duke was sent from the heavens to protect the island and bring its people good fortune.

    Inhabitants even speculated the divine intervention of Prince Philip helped to get Barack Obama – a black man – elected President of the United States in 2008, author Matthew Baylis revealed in his book about the Yaohnanen.

    They also praised him for keeping cyclones away.

    • LOL: Liza
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @YetAnotherAnon

    " Number One Big Fella Him belong to Missus Queen".

  154. @AceDeuce
    @Art Deco

    Interesting.

    Fun fact:

    26 states in the U.S. allow 1st cousin marriages--19 without conditions and 7 under certain restrictions.

    Even more interesting:

    For those who traffic in stereotypes, it's noteworthy that 1st cousin marriage is prohibited in Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is legal, with no restrictions, in California, New York, and Washington DC.

    Replies: @res

    For those who traffic in stereotypes, it’s noteworthy that 1st cousin marriage is prohibited in Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and is legal, with no restrictions, in California, New York, and Washington DC.

    Thanks. Have to remember that for the next time I hear a “Goodthinker” break out one of those stereotypes. Though it is worth noting that another big block of states where cousin marriage is legal is the old South.

    Does anyone have a handle on the reasons for the distribution of the laws? Is it immigrants and/or Orthodox Jewish desires or is it more complicated?

    BTW, first cousin marriage is legal in most of the world. The US (along with China) being a notable exception.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage#Legal_status

  155. @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    His point was that, where the US saw unmitigated triumph and the birth of its Global Empire, and the Soviet Union at least made territorial gains and had a very powerful military, the British Empire was ruined.

    You and he are wrong about the 1st point and the 3d point.

    1. We had no 'Global Empire', just a mess of military and naval bases. On average, about 22% of our military manpower was deployed abroad, the bulk in western Germany, Japan, and south Korea.

    2. Britain wasn't ruined by the war, though it was injured by the war. War or no war, their position abroad was untenable. The same observation applies to France, the Netherlands, &c. Portugal also had to liquidate its overseas territories, even though it suffered no war damage and it was experiencing rapid growth for much of the post-war period.

    3. Britain had the world's 3d largest Navy in 1982. The country was still capable at that date of operating on its own. So was France at that time.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    That isn’t ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else’s alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Not that the empires were good, of course, just, instead of an organic process of liberation, etc. It was an often chaotic and violent separating, brought about of course by the chaos of the world wars and the crises and blunders and scrabbling that followed post war.

    I’m not talking about ruin or loss in the sense of the Battle of Kharkov. I’m talking about economies, empires and independence.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    That isn’t ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else’s alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Britain and France never stopped being independent forces, something Argentina discovered the hard way in 1982 and something the political class in West Africa understood very well at that time. France ceased to participate in NATO's military component in 1967, by the way. Both countries had their own nuclear forces, too.

    And, no, the war wasn't decisive. Britain was overextended in 1914, overextended in 1939, overextended in 1954. They stopped being overextended in 1965. As for France, their overseas dependencies consisted largely of impoverished African territories with whom their volume of trade hardly exceeded that they had with Belgium. They fought hard to hold onto Indo-China and Algeria. They gave up because it just wasn't worth the candle to suppress an armed and mobilized local population, not because the Germans smashed through the Maginot Line in 1940.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  156. @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    They lost the war in almost the same sense Japan lost the war,

    No, they didn't. Britain was not in 1945 a humiliated occupied country. Quit talking rot.



    but ironically, Japan got off a lot better for it.

    Japan's per capita income did not surpass Britain's until 1973. Britain's surpassed Japan's in terms of puchasing-power-parity in 2001 and has remained ahead ever since. It surpassed Japan's in nominal terms in 2004 and has remained ahead 3 years out of 4 since then. Britain's total fertility rate surpassed Japan's in 1983 and has been higher ever since (currently 26% higher). Britain's military is capable of distant deployments, and always has been; Japan's is confined to its home islands.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    Japan got off a lot better because it didn’t fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there’s a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    Your other points are correct though. How much of that TFR is Anglo though?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    It didn't. They have a (single-digit) Caribbean and Pakistani population because they have a witless political class, not because they won the war. (The Caribbean population isn't much of a challenge; the Pakistani population is).


    Japan got off a lot better because it didn’t fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there’s a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Counter-factual speculation is real cogent.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  157. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    We had a revolution so that I don’t have to care about these inbred dullards.

    1. The Queen has six adult grandchildren, all of whom took blindly graded O-level and A-level examinations. Four of the six had perfectly respectable scores (three A-levels with middling marks), two were under par (two A-levels with a middling mark and a low pass). Each of the Queen's children and Princess Margaret's children took O-level and A-level examinations as well and all passed at least one A-level. If they're 'dullards', north of 2/3 of the population of Britain qualifies as 'dullards'.

    2. The term 'in-bred' doesn't mean what you fancy it means. The Queen and Prince Philip were 3d cousins. Prince Margaret and her husband were unrelated. All of their children and grandchildren have married unrelated persons. George VI and his wife were unrelated. Three of his siblings married unrelated persons, the fourth married a 2d cousin. George V married a 2d cousin. Edward Vii married an unrelated person. Victoria actually did marry a 1st cousin. That's four generations back.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Mr. Anon

    Leave it to an odious popinjay like “Art Deco” to put in a good word for Britain’s odious royal family.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Because it's just 'odious' to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  158. @Bragadocious
    @Art Deco

    I love when Brits play dumb about their history. Or maybe you really are that dumb. No I'm not going to educate you. Remember, ctrl + alt + white!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    You have angered the ridiculous and foolish pedant known as “Art Deco”.

  159. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    That isn't ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else's alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Not that the empires were good, of course, just, instead of an organic process of liberation, etc. It was an often chaotic and violent separating, brought about of course by the chaos of the world wars and the crises and blunders and scrabbling that followed post war.

    I'm not talking about ruin or loss in the sense of the Battle of Kharkov. I'm talking about economies, empires and independence.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    That isn’t ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else’s alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Britain and France never stopped being independent forces, something Argentina discovered the hard way in 1982 and something the political class in West Africa understood very well at that time. France ceased to participate in NATO’s military component in 1967, by the way. Both countries had their own nuclear forces, too.

    And, no, the war wasn’t decisive. Britain was overextended in 1914, overextended in 1939, overextended in 1954. They stopped being overextended in 1965. As for France, their overseas dependencies consisted largely of impoverished African territories with whom their volume of trade hardly exceeded that they had with Belgium. They fought hard to hold onto Indo-China and Algeria. They gave up because it just wasn’t worth the candle to suppress an armed and mobilized local population, not because the Germans smashed through the Maginot Line in 1940.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital. The Empires were absolutely draining, and they do have independence to an extent. They just would have been better taking care if the issue themselves rather than going through a second world war and having America destroy the Sterling Zone.

    Ah, good on France there. They'll have an interesting future ahead of them if they take genuine joint control of the EU. The return of a Continental Power.

    As for the UK, they might be able to become a genuinely nice Albion again, so long as they stay out of anything that doesn't involve making money or protecting islands they own.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  160. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Japan got off a lot better because it didn't fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there's a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    Your other points are correct though. How much of that TFR is Anglo though?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    It didn’t. They have a (single-digit) Caribbean and Pakistani population because they have a witless political class, not because they won the war. (The Caribbean population isn’t much of a challenge; the Pakistani population is).

    Japan got off a lot better because it didn’t fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there’s a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Counter-factual speculation is real cogent.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Yes, the witless class is the one that did it (worse yet, they probably had their wits about them, but were being evil or ideological fanatics), but had they the Empire, I don't think the effects would have been what they are now.

    Japan's loss worked out for it in that regard, though as an Empire they might not have had those consequences. Defeat in this case meant no one was moving to Japan. Britain's victory in the war set the grounds for the witless class to import what it imported, and for Britain to become junior partner in the Atlantic Empire. Hardly an improvement on the British Empire.

    I mean, do you feel it is? Are you British? I was acquaintances with a devoted Mosleyite (Punjabi descent) who had some wonderfully interesting views on a united Republic. Anything but the current sad state.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  161. While we’re at it, war casualties in Britain and in France amounted to about 1% of the pre-war population in each country. The usual estimates bandied about have it that about 10% of the pre-war Soviet population perished.

  162. Anonymous[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    @Jiminy


    I was just looking at early photos of Princess Anne, and there was a black and white cover shot for the magazine Vanity Fair.
     
    Amazing what a great portrait photographer can do for you.

    She was photographed in 1969 for Vanity Fair by Lord Snowdon, previously known as Anthony Armstrong-Jones, who was the top portrait and fashion photographer in Britain's Swinging Sixties. He got the title when he married Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth's sister and Princess Anne's maternal aunt.


    https://i.imgur.com/wZWTp8E.jpg


    Here's another picture of her from that time.

    https://i.imgur.com/GW3cjaw.jpg?1

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    Every woman has her day.

    I was surprised recently to see old pictures of an ugly woman I’ve only ever known since she was middle aged. She used to be pretty! It was hard to believe. For a brief few years she actually looked good, but it was gone by her mid-20s.

  163. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    Leave it to an odious popinjay like "Art Deco" to put in a good word for Britain's odious royal family.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Because it’s just ‘odious’ to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Because it’s just ‘odious’ to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.
     
    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal's luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their "sovereigns".

    Replies: @Art Deco

  164. @Liza
    @Art Deco

    OK. So he got one thing correct. Just about all those other statements are outright mean, apparently because he just enjoys being this way and no one dares hammering him in his ugly face.

    Re British women's cooking, I guess he tasted too many of his wife's meals. Actually, the biddy never did cook. They say she just chows down on the corn flakes every morning.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @RSDB

    Personally, I think you’d benefit from a sense of humor, but that’s just me. Pro-tip: complaining that other people are big meanies while referring to a congenial woman of 94 as ‘the biddy’ suggests you’re unclear on the concept.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Personally, I think you’d benefit from a sense of humor, but that’s just me.
     
    Funny, we all think that of you, you ridiculous twit.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    Really? You're going to criticize someone else for a lack of sense of humor? You are a pedantic drone who has never said a single funny thing, you smug nincompoop.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  165. @Art Deco
    @Liza

    Personally, I think you'd benefit from a sense of humor, but that's just me. Pro-tip: complaining that other people are big meanies while referring to a congenial woman of 94 as 'the biddy' suggests you're unclear on the concept.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    Personally, I think you’d benefit from a sense of humor, but that’s just me.

    Funny, we all think that of you, you ridiculous twit.

    • Disagree: JMcG
  166. You don’t think Prince Philip is rude? The kinds of things he says, I know people who say the same things, but quietly, among their friends. He’s supposed to be a prince, a public figure, the consort of a Queen, but I’d say his behavior isn’t princely at all.

    Why the admiration for Elizabeth anyway? What’s she done for “her” people? Your admiration for these two is strange – to me, anyway.

    As usual – have the last word!

  167. @Liza
    @Art Deco

    OK. So he got one thing correct. Just about all those other statements are outright mean, apparently because he just enjoys being this way and no one dares hammering him in his ugly face.

    Re British women's cooking, I guess he tasted too many of his wife's meals. Actually, the biddy never did cook. They say she just chows down on the corn flakes every morning.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @RSDB

    At one point she had a Swedish cook, Alma McKee, who wrote up a book of mostly rather bland recipes based on her experience as royal chef.

    • Thanks: Liza
  168. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Art Deco

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco, @Ali Choudhury, @dfordoom

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won. The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    The US was also the only winner in the First World War.

    The British Empire was doomed from the moment Britain entered the First World War. After that Britain could not afford the Empire.

    Chamberlain tried to avoid war because he knew it would be the end of Britain as a Great Power.

  169. @Art Deco
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.

    You mean you've conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?


    The damage the British suffered fighting Germany, mostly economic and reputational, proved impossible to overcome.

    Point already refuted.


    Try growing a brain.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @dfordoom

    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.

    You mean you’ve conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?

    The British lost WW2 in the sense that they were much worse off after fighting the war. Chamberlain was morally right in making the decision to fight Hitler but for Britain the war was all loss and no gain.

    For the US WW2 was all gain and no loss.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @dfordoom

    The British lost WW2 in the sense that they were much worse off after fighting the war. Chamberlain was morally right in making the decision to fight Hitler but for Britain the war was all loss and no gain.

    Except for avoiding subjugation by Nazi Germany, yes no gain.

  170. @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    Britain lost the Empire, but somehow got all of its inhabitants still.

    It didn't. They have a (single-digit) Caribbean and Pakistani population because they have a witless political class, not because they won the war. (The Caribbean population isn't much of a challenge; the Pakistani population is).


    Japan got off a lot better because it didn’t fill up with migrants from across the world. Had it won, there’s a good chance Japan would be full of Malays and Burmans.

    Counter-factual speculation is real cogent.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    Yes, the witless class is the one that did it (worse yet, they probably had their wits about them, but were being evil or ideological fanatics), but had they the Empire, I don’t think the effects would have been what they are now.

    Japan’s loss worked out for it in that regard, though as an Empire they might not have had those consequences. Defeat in this case meant no one was moving to Japan. Britain’s victory in the war set the grounds for the witless class to import what it imported, and for Britain to become junior partner in the Atlantic Empire. Hardly an improvement on the British Empire.

    I mean, do you feel it is? Are you British? I was acquaintances with a devoted Mosleyite (Punjabi descent) who had some wonderfully interesting views on a united Republic. Anything but the current sad state.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    You just repeated what you said above. Repetition of invalid points does not make them valid points.

  171. @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    That isn’t ruin to you? All of those countries went from powerful, independent forces to simply parts of someone else’s alliance and economic zone. Influential parts, but parts. France does habe the CFA of course.

    Britain and France never stopped being independent forces, something Argentina discovered the hard way in 1982 and something the political class in West Africa understood very well at that time. France ceased to participate in NATO's military component in 1967, by the way. Both countries had their own nuclear forces, too.

    And, no, the war wasn't decisive. Britain was overextended in 1914, overextended in 1939, overextended in 1954. They stopped being overextended in 1965. As for France, their overseas dependencies consisted largely of impoverished African territories with whom their volume of trade hardly exceeded that they had with Belgium. They fought hard to hold onto Indo-China and Algeria. They gave up because it just wasn't worth the candle to suppress an armed and mobilized local population, not because the Germans smashed through the Maginot Line in 1940.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital. The Empires were absolutely draining, and they do have independence to an extent. They just would have been better taking care if the issue themselves rather than going through a second world war and having America destroy the Sterling Zone.

    Ah, good on France there. They’ll have an interesting future ahead of them if they take genuine joint control of the EU. The return of a Continental Power.

    As for the UK, they might be able to become a genuinely nice Albion again, so long as they stay out of anything that doesn’t involve making money or protecting islands they own.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital.

    Neither was vital, made perfectly manifest after they lost them. It was harsh for the pieds noirs (who were loyal to France but not typically ethnic French); the most feasible alternative to what did happen would have been for the pieds noirs to retreat to those areas where they had a critical mass of settlers sufficient to make a local majority. (That would have been the area around Bone and Oran, perhaps a section of greater Algiers).



    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    I think of the male population of Britain and Ireland born during the years running from 1870 to 1900, about 6% died in the war. I doubt that was going to cripple for lack of manpower the civil administration in the colonies. (Natives were employed in the Indian Civil Service before the war, btw). Britain wasn't suffering 'chaos' during the inter-war period, economic or otherwise (the 1926 general strike notwithstanding). They were suffering from bad monetary policy, an affliction to be found all over the occidental world.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  172. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9456511/Remote-South-Pacific-tribe-shocked-hear-god-Prince-Philip-died.html

    The closest the Duke came to the island was during a trip to the capital Port Vila in 1974. Back then Vanuatu was an Anglo-French colony named New Hebrides.

    During the royal visit a warrior from Tanna named Chief Jack Naiva, and others, paddled 240km (150 miles) in a canoe to the capital to greet Prince Phillip as he disembarked the royal yacht Britannia.

    From there, the Prince's godlike status became even more cemented after Chief Naiva became convinced the Duke was sent from the heavens to protect the island and bring its people good fortune.

    Inhabitants even speculated the divine intervention of Prince Philip helped to get Barack Obama - a black man - elected President of the United States in 2008, author Matthew Baylis revealed in his book about the Yaohnanen.

    They also praised him for keeping cyclones away.
     

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/04/11/05/41569290-9456511-Livestock_including_pigs_bullocks_and_chickens_will_be_slaughter-a-69_1618113661398.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous

    ” Number One Big Fella Him belong to Missus Queen”.

  173. @dfordoom
    @Art Deco



    Yes. A poorly understood fact of history is that the British Empire did not actually win WWII. The US and USSR won.
     
    You mean you’ve conducted an expert analysis and concluded that the British forces made no significant contribution?
     
    The British lost WW2 in the sense that they were much worse off after fighting the war. Chamberlain was morally right in making the decision to fight Hitler but for Britain the war was all loss and no gain.

    For the US WW2 was all gain and no loss.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The British lost WW2 in the sense that they were much worse off after fighting the war. Chamberlain was morally right in making the decision to fight Hitler but for Britain the war was all loss and no gain.

    Except for avoiding subjugation by Nazi Germany, yes no gain.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  174. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Yes, the witless class is the one that did it (worse yet, they probably had their wits about them, but were being evil or ideological fanatics), but had they the Empire, I don't think the effects would have been what they are now.

    Japan's loss worked out for it in that regard, though as an Empire they might not have had those consequences. Defeat in this case meant no one was moving to Japan. Britain's victory in the war set the grounds for the witless class to import what it imported, and for Britain to become junior partner in the Atlantic Empire. Hardly an improvement on the British Empire.

    I mean, do you feel it is? Are you British? I was acquaintances with a devoted Mosleyite (Punjabi descent) who had some wonderfully interesting views on a united Republic. Anything but the current sad state.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You just repeated what you said above. Repetition of invalid points does not make them valid points.

  175. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital. The Empires were absolutely draining, and they do have independence to an extent. They just would have been better taking care if the issue themselves rather than going through a second world war and having America destroy the Sterling Zone.

    Ah, good on France there. They'll have an interesting future ahead of them if they take genuine joint control of the EU. The return of a Continental Power.

    As for the UK, they might be able to become a genuinely nice Albion again, so long as they stay out of anything that doesn't involve making money or protecting islands they own.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital.

    Neither was vital, made perfectly manifest after they lost them. It was harsh for the pieds noirs (who were loyal to France but not typically ethnic French); the most feasible alternative to what did happen would have been for the pieds noirs to retreat to those areas where they had a critical mass of settlers sufficient to make a local majority. (That would have been the area around Bone and Oran, perhaps a section of greater Algiers).

    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    I think of the male population of Britain and Ireland born during the years running from 1870 to 1900, about 6% died in the war. I doubt that was going to cripple for lack of manpower the civil administration in the colonies. (Natives were employed in the Indian Civil Service before the war, btw). Britain wasn’t suffering ‘chaos’ during the inter-war period, economic or otherwise (the 1926 general strike notwithstanding). They were suffering from bad monetary policy, an affliction to be found all over the occidental world.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Hmm, well, if they are invalid to you, then they are invalid to you. So it is then.

    Correct me then if I am wrong, but I believe there were very large structural colonial changes after WWI, especially as much of that 6% were top % one didn't one dying. Native participation in the Civil Service saw a vast expansion during that era. So the whole global industrial depression that followed WWI wasn't a real issue, or America's monstrous financial dominance after both wars?

    Well, I agree nothing in the empire was ultimately vital to either, as they didn't need them to begin with. They were entirely competent countries on their own (though France did need to destroy the pirates of the Mediterranean). Being freed of them was a great weight off of their chests, even if it had initially propelled them to "Global Power."

    Still, Britain being an independent Global Empire with the Sterling Zone and Britain being an independent Britain are both different beasts than Britain being dragged into the EEC and into a US-led NATO.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  176. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Because it's just 'odious' to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Because it’s just ‘odious’ to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.

    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal’s luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their “sovereigns”.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal’s luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their “sovereigns”.

    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted. They're fairly cheap compared to the American president. The Queen's royal cousins once received a grace-and-favour residence gratis but no cash. As of now, the Queen kicks back a sum from her personal income for them. Four (now five) of her six adult grandchildren receive no Crown Estate or Duchy revenue. Forty years ago, the rules did not allow the Queen's close relatives to have business or professional employment; that rule's now relaxed.

    The public isn't dissatisfied with the royal family per se. That sort of thing in Britain tends to be limited to the chattering classes and combox louts.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  177. @Art Deco
    @Liza

    Personally, I think you'd benefit from a sense of humor, but that's just me. Pro-tip: complaining that other people are big meanies while referring to a congenial woman of 94 as 'the biddy' suggests you're unclear on the concept.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    Really? You’re going to criticize someone else for a lack of sense of humor? You are a pedantic drone who has never said a single funny thing, you smug nincompoop.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Waal, you know, Mr. Anon, we often don't see ourselves as others do. Happy trails.

  178. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Because it’s just ‘odious’ to go about reviewing reams of correspondence, promoting philanthropic projects, serving in the military, restoring derelict properties, and amusing yourself with hunting, fishing, and polo.
     
    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal's luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their "sovereigns".

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal’s luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their “sovereigns”.

    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted. They’re fairly cheap compared to the American president. The Queen’s royal cousins once received a grace-and-favour residence gratis but no cash. As of now, the Queen kicks back a sum from her personal income for them. Four (now five) of her six adult grandchildren receive no Crown Estate or Duchy revenue. Forty years ago, the rules did not allow the Queen’s close relatives to have business or professional employment; that rule’s now relaxed.

    The public isn’t dissatisfied with the royal family per se. That sort of thing in Britain tends to be limited to the chattering classes and combox louts.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted.
     
    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  179. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    Really? You're going to criticize someone else for a lack of sense of humor? You are a pedantic drone who has never said a single funny thing, you smug nincompoop.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Waal, you know, Mr. Anon, we often don’t see ourselves as others do. Happy trails.

  180. @Anonymous
    @JMcG

    Yes, they restored the lighted sign a decade or so ago. If ot wasn’t the State Capitol it would be worse than Camden.

    Replies: @Polistra

  181. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, it is. When the people who pay for the Royal’s luxurious lifestyle were never asked if they wanted to pay for it or if they wanted this pack of elite snobs to lord over them as their “sovereigns”.

    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted. They're fairly cheap compared to the American president. The Queen's royal cousins once received a grace-and-favour residence gratis but no cash. As of now, the Queen kicks back a sum from her personal income for them. Four (now five) of her six adult grandchildren receive no Crown Estate or Duchy revenue. Forty years ago, the rules did not allow the Queen's close relatives to have business or professional employment; that rule's now relaxed.

    The public isn't dissatisfied with the royal family per se. That sort of thing in Britain tends to be limited to the chattering classes and combox louts.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted.

    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    You've now painted yourself into the corner of objecting to 300 year old property titles. Cheers.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  182. @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    True, for France, only Indochina and North Africa were really vital.

    Neither was vital, made perfectly manifest after they lost them. It was harsh for the pieds noirs (who were loyal to France but not typically ethnic French); the most feasible alternative to what did happen would have been for the pieds noirs to retreat to those areas where they had a critical mass of settlers sufficient to make a local majority. (That would have been the area around Bone and Oran, perhaps a section of greater Algiers).



    The Empires were doomed the moment they sent their future administrators to die by their hundreds of thousands in trenches, and ran terrible debts, forcing them to both employ natives and bring about chaos through bad economic affects.

    I think of the male population of Britain and Ireland born during the years running from 1870 to 1900, about 6% died in the war. I doubt that was going to cripple for lack of manpower the civil administration in the colonies. (Natives were employed in the Indian Civil Service before the war, btw). Britain wasn't suffering 'chaos' during the inter-war period, economic or otherwise (the 1926 general strike notwithstanding). They were suffering from bad monetary policy, an affliction to be found all over the occidental world.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    Hmm, well, if they are invalid to you, then they are invalid to you. So it is then.

    Correct me then if I am wrong, but I believe there were very large structural colonial changes after WWI, especially as much of that 6% were top % one didn’t one dying. Native participation in the Civil Service saw a vast expansion during that era. So the whole global industrial depression that followed WWI wasn’t a real issue, or America’s monstrous financial dominance after both wars?

    Well, I agree nothing in the empire was ultimately vital to either, as they didn’t need them to begin with. They were entirely competent countries on their own (though France did need to destroy the pirates of the Mediterranean). Being freed of them was a great weight off of their chests, even if it had initially propelled them to “Global Power.”

    Still, Britain being an independent Global Empire with the Sterling Zone and Britain being an independent Britain are both different beasts than Britain being dragged into the EEC and into a US-led NATO.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Boomthorkell

    Britain wasn't dragged into either. Again, France left the military component of NATO in 1967. Norway, Switzerland, and Austria elected not to join the EEC.

  183. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    The royal family is supported out of Crown Estate revenue, revenue from the Duchy of Lancaster, and their private income, not out of tax revenues, security costs excepted.
     
    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    You’ve now painted yourself into the corner of objecting to 300 year old property titles. Cheers.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    There isn't any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    Perhaps that explains your affinity for them.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  184. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Oh, and I suppose their family has held those lands as a direct grant from God since just after the flood.

    You've now painted yourself into the corner of objecting to 300 year old property titles. Cheers.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There isn’t any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    Perhaps that explains your affinity for them.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    There isn’t any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    I hate to break this to you Mr. Anon, but every other county in the world has a head of state. You can fume about their official residences one by one at your leisure, after you're done stewing over the unfair allocation of advice columnist gigs.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  185. Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @128

    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    Plenty of data on the distribution of value-added between sectors in Britain, courtesy the World Bank and the Office for National Statistics in London. (Luxury goods will almost certainly be a small sliver in any economy in a country with more than a six-digit population).

    Replies: @128

    , @Mr. Anon
    @128


    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy?
     
    Tyranny and Oppression. They're World-beaters in that.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  186. @Boomthorkell
    @Art Deco

    Hmm, well, if they are invalid to you, then they are invalid to you. So it is then.

    Correct me then if I am wrong, but I believe there were very large structural colonial changes after WWI, especially as much of that 6% were top % one didn't one dying. Native participation in the Civil Service saw a vast expansion during that era. So the whole global industrial depression that followed WWI wasn't a real issue, or America's monstrous financial dominance after both wars?

    Well, I agree nothing in the empire was ultimately vital to either, as they didn't need them to begin with. They were entirely competent countries on their own (though France did need to destroy the pirates of the Mediterranean). Being freed of them was a great weight off of their chests, even if it had initially propelled them to "Global Power."

    Still, Britain being an independent Global Empire with the Sterling Zone and Britain being an independent Britain are both different beasts than Britain being dragged into the EEC and into a US-led NATO.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Britain wasn’t dragged into either. Again, France left the military component of NATO in 1967. Norway, Switzerland, and Austria elected not to join the EEC.

  187. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    There isn't any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    Perhaps that explains your affinity for them.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    There isn’t any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    I hate to break this to you Mr. Anon, but every other county in the world has a head of state. You can fume about their official residences one by one at your leisure, after you’re done stewing over the unfair allocation of advice columnist gigs.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    I hate to break this to you Mr. Anon, but every other county in the world has a head of state.
     
    Yes, but mostly not hereditary ones who hold their post because of their useless ancestors going back hundreds of years.

    You can fume about their official residences one by one at your leisure, after you’re done stewing over the unfair allocation of advice columnist gigs.
     
    And what outlet do you write for, you stupid, smug, insignificant little nobody?
  188. @128
    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    Plenty of data on the distribution of value-added between sectors in Britain, courtesy the World Bank and the Office for National Statistics in London. (Luxury goods will almost certainly be a small sliver in any economy in a country with more than a six-digit population).

    • Replies: @128
    @Art Deco

    I mean what can they do at competitive prices outside the EU? For example their coal reserves are priced out of the market, and their heavy industry is nowhere Germany's.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  189. @128
    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy?

    Tyranny and Oppression. They’re World-beaters in that.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Tyranny and Oppression. They’re World-beaters in that.

    Former British colonies generally have electoral systems and open public debate. They're not more likely than others to have looter governments, either. As for Britain itself, it was the one territorial state in Europe that never eliminated its medieval assemblies. Hereditary subjection in Britain also dissipated before it ever did on the continent.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  190. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    There isn’t any way to color it other than it is. They are useless parasites.

    I hate to break this to you Mr. Anon, but every other county in the world has a head of state. You can fume about their official residences one by one at your leisure, after you're done stewing over the unfair allocation of advice columnist gigs.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I hate to break this to you Mr. Anon, but every other county in the world has a head of state.

    Yes, but mostly not hereditary ones who hold their post because of their useless ancestors going back hundreds of years.

    You can fume about their official residences one by one at your leisure, after you’re done stewing over the unfair allocation of advice columnist gigs.

    And what outlet do you write for, you stupid, smug, insignificant little nobody?

  191. @Mr. Anon
    @128


    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy?
     
    Tyranny and Oppression. They're World-beaters in that.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Tyranny and Oppression. They’re World-beaters in that.

    Former British colonies generally have electoral systems and open public debate. They’re not more likely than others to have looter governments, either. As for Britain itself, it was the one territorial state in Europe that never eliminated its medieval assemblies. Hereditary subjection in Britain also dissipated before it ever did on the continent.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    a.) I really don't care what you have to say on just about anything.

    b.) Are you paying attention to what is going on in Britain NOW and for the last twenty years? It is descending into a full-on police-state.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  192. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Tyranny and Oppression. They’re World-beaters in that.

    Former British colonies generally have electoral systems and open public debate. They're not more likely than others to have looter governments, either. As for Britain itself, it was the one territorial state in Europe that never eliminated its medieval assemblies. Hereditary subjection in Britain also dissipated before it ever did on the continent.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    a.) I really don’t care what you have to say on just about anything.

    b.) Are you paying attention to what is going on in Britain NOW and for the last twenty years? It is descending into a full-on police-state.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    a.) I really don’t care what you have to say on just about anything.


    You offer gassy replies to about 1/2 my posts because you don't care. Sounds about right.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  193. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    a.) I really don't care what you have to say on just about anything.

    b.) Are you paying attention to what is going on in Britain NOW and for the last twenty years? It is descending into a full-on police-state.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    a.) I really don’t care what you have to say on just about anything.

    You offer gassy replies to about 1/2 my posts because you don’t care. Sounds about right.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    I hardly reply to half your posts. Like all your weird little obsessions, you won’t let this topic go, and I see no reason to let you have the last word.

    You’re an insufferable prig who thinks he’s always right. You aren’t. You’re a smug, stupid, contemptible little nobody.

  194. @Art Deco
    @128

    Aside from banking and real estate, what else does Britain have as a basis for an economy? The French and Italians otudo the British in luxury goods, it does not have much mineral resources at competitive prices, and as a manufacturing hub Germany or even France makes more sense.

    Plenty of data on the distribution of value-added between sectors in Britain, courtesy the World Bank and the Office for National Statistics in London. (Luxury goods will almost certainly be a small sliver in any economy in a country with more than a six-digit population).

    Replies: @128

    I mean what can they do at competitive prices outside the EU? For example their coal reserves are priced out of the market, and their heavy industry is nowhere Germany’s.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @128

    I mean what can they do at competitive prices outside the EU? For example their coal reserves are priced out of the market, and their heavy industry is nowhere Germany’s.

    You can have a look at the direction of trade statistics. That tells you what they export and to where.

  195. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    a.) I really don’t care what you have to say on just about anything.


    You offer gassy replies to about 1/2 my posts because you don't care. Sounds about right.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I hardly reply to half your posts. Like all your weird little obsessions, you won’t let this topic go, and I see no reason to let you have the last word.

    You’re an insufferable prig who thinks he’s always right. You aren’t. You’re a smug, stupid, contemptible little nobody.

  196. @128
    @Art Deco

    I mean what can they do at competitive prices outside the EU? For example their coal reserves are priced out of the market, and their heavy industry is nowhere Germany's.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I mean what can they do at competitive prices outside the EU? For example their coal reserves are priced out of the market, and their heavy industry is nowhere Germany’s.

    You can have a look at the direction of trade statistics. That tells you what they export and to where.

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