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A commenter calls attention to this New Yorker article:

A Hotter Planet Takes Another Toll on Human Health: A new hypothesis about heat waves, redlining, and kidney stones.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/a-hotter-planet-takes-another-toll-on-human-health

For reasons that remain unclear, kidney stones have traditionally been more common among white people, but, in recent years, doctors have noted huge increases among Black Americans and a significant rise in Latino communities. The authors of the new article looked to the past for a possible explanation—particularly to the nineteen-thirties, when a federal agency, the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, graded all of America’s neighborhoods and deemed some of them “hazardous” for investment, essentially because they were home to large minority communities. This grading system (from A for “best” and B for “still desirable” to C for “declining” and D for “hazardous”) underlay what came to be known as redlining. The grading system led to “chronic disinvestment” in the lower-rated neighborhoods, resulting, over time, in less of everything from parks and green spaces to street trees and air-conditioning in homes.

Now the results can be measured with a thermometer: in Portland, Oregon, the authors report, neighborhoods that were graded A in the nineteen-thirties now “average 8 degrees Fahrenheit lower than the city’s mean temperature, while D-graded neighborhoods average 4.8 Fahrenheit degrees warmer.” Actually, you don’t need a thermometer—that’s a thirteen-degree gap that anyone can feel just by walking across town. No one has carefully studied the incidence of kidney stones among these different neighborhoods, but the authors, in their hypothesis, point to research now under way. Similar work on asthma, another heat-related disease, has shown emergency-room visits are 2.4 times higher in redlined tracts.

Portland is notoriously sweltering, with an average high downtown of 82 in August, the hottest month, and an average low of 59. In June, the averages are 74 and 47.

In general, while neighborhoods where white people live and have seen homeowners plant and maintain more trees, and whites tend to live in the parts of individual cities that are coolest, the question of who lives in the cooler parts of the metro area is not obvious. For example, the historically black neighborhoods of the Los Angeles metro area in the central basin are much more bathed in cool ocean breezes than are the more white suburban San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys. In Chicago, while the whiter North Side of the city is somewhat cooler than the blacker South Side, both are near the Lake and thus cooler than the inland suburban white areas like Schaumburg.

In general, the old “inner city” tends to be located near a major body of water, which often have moderating effects on temperature.

In other Portland news, climate change is driving blacks and homeless dudes into a frenzy of gun violence. From The Oregonian:

Portland’s 101 homicides in 2022 set new record: ‘At some point, we have to be tired of burying our children’
Updated: Jan. 17, 2023, 10:28 a.m.|Published: Jan. 09, 2023, 8:00 a.m.

By Maxine Bernstein | The Oregonian/OregonLive

… Her 18-year-old son was one of 101 people killed in Portland in 2022, making it the deadliest year in the city’s history.

It surpassed the record of 92 homicides set only the year before. Both 2022 and 2021 far exceeded the previous peak of 70 people who died in homicides in Portland in 1987.

The unceasing toll has left a trail of grief, devastating families and frustrating police and city leaders. Their effort to stem the violence hasn’t slowed it, though Mayor Ted Wheeler and the city’s new public safety director said they have plans to do more this year.

Who died in Portland homicides in 2022

Extra money the city provided last summer for grassroots groups to help interrupt the shootings was short-lived. A special police Focused Intervention Team quickly became overwhelmed, including having seven of its officers placed on standard leave at different times after they were involved in one fatal and two nonfatal shootings. …

Nationally, gun-related injuries became the leading cause of death for young people from ages 1 to 19 in 2020, fueled by an increase in gun homicides, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While murder counts began to taper off last year in almost two-thirds of the country’s major cities that had recorded increases since 2019, Portland bucked that trend.

Both retaliatory gang shootings and shootings involving people living on the street drove up the killings here, police said. …

Other killings stemmed from slights on social media, drug disputes, robberies, domestic violence and random violence, according to investigators. …

More than half of Portland’s homicide victims in 2022 were people of color, mostly Black men – the same breakdown as the year before. That’s far disproportionate to the 6% of Multnomah County’s population that identifies as Black and 3% who identify as Black men.

Also as in 2021, dozens of spent bullet casings of multiple calibers were left behind at many of the crime scenes, suggesting the involvement of multiple shooters, police said.

At least 15 people killed were experiencing homelessness, according to an analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive. The Police Bureau, tracking homelessness-related homicides for the first time, estimated that roughly a third of 2022′s killings involved homeless people — both as victims and perpetrators — but police wouldn’t identify the specific cases because of ongoing investigations.

Many of those killings involved guns, Hughes said. It’s a departure from the past when knives and beatings often resolved disputes between those living on the street and guns were treated as a commodity to trade for drugs or other things, she said.

It’s hard to know why Portland’s homicide count has continued to increase while it has dropped in other cities — and if or when the pace of the killings will slow, said city officials, police and criminal justice experts.

Even in the cities where homicides are falling, the numbers are still significantly higher than before the pandemic, according to Jeff Asher, a crime analyst based in New Orleans and co-founder of AH Datalytics, a data consulting firm.

“It’s something that’s not fully understood just yet,” Asher said. “It’s usually a complex set of factors that affects various cities.”

Portland’s soaring murder rate might have something to do with the 100+ BLM/Antifa Mostly Peaceful Protests in Portland in 2020.

But, nah, forget that. I’m sure the difference in the murder rate in Portland between the 2010s and the 2020s is due to climate change. Or redlining. Maybe Emmett Till. But it couldn’t possibly be anything that happened in 2020. Except covid. Covid can explain anything.

 
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  1. the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, graded all of America’s neighborhoods and deemed some of them “hazardous” for investment, essentially because they were home to large minority communities.

    That word essentially. It means “what follows is essentially a lie, but only nazis would question this lie because it’s being told for noble purposes!”

    Redlining was NEVER racist, it had to do with financial RISK. And yes, some neighborhoods were and are riskier than others. Will there be disparities? Um, yeah, that’s pretty much the nature of the beast. How could there not be?

    BTW, it’s also inaccurate to say that the HOLC graded “all” of America’s neighborhoods. Not even close, but whatever.

    • Agree: mc23
  2. ‘Now the results can be measured with a thermometer: in Portland, Oregon, the authors report, neighborhoods that were graded A in the nineteen-thirties now “average 8 degrees Fahrenheit lower than the city’s mean temperature, while D-graded neighborhoods average 4.8 Fahrenheit degrees warmer.”’

    That strikes me as wildly improbable. There’s a 12.8 degree difference between Portland’s ‘ghetto’ (such as it is) and the better neighborhoods in Portland?

    Definite bullshit — I promise.

    How can people cite ‘statistics’ like this without thinking about them critically?

  3. For reasons that remain unclear, kidney stones have traditionally been more common among white people, but, in recent years, doctors have noted huge increases among Black Americans and a significant rise in Latino communities. The authors of the new article looked to the past for a possible explanation—particularly to the nineteen-thirties, when a federal agency, the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, graded …

    Best laugh of the day. (Sorry commenters, not one’s been particularly funny today–or I just missed it.)

    Seriously how do the authors write this shit with a straight face?

    • Agree: Kylie, Bubba
  4. 82 degrees Fahrenheit – 27.8 degrees Celsius – is “sweltering”.
    Really??! That’s just a nice, normal summer’s day, mate!

    But re: your column: it’s a real shame that the discriminated-against 13% were not allowed to plant shade-giving TREES in their deplorably redlined neighborhoods 🙂

  5. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:

    Covid can explain anything.

    Here’s my Covid theory. Covid was a Fort Detrick-created mild flu virus made into a deadly pandemic through the world’s greatest psyops with the purpose of redistributing cognitive assets away from cognitive clusters in Cambridge, Boston’s 128 corridor, Maryland’s I-270 corridor, Loudoun/NoVA, Bay Area, Boulder, et al. Buildings which once held thousands of bustling STEM workers lie vacant as they work from home. They are no longer clustered and vulnerable in the planned nuclear decapitation strike on Russia and possible nuclear war coming very soon.

    But don’t worry, the mathematicians at MITRE, Lincoln Labs, and Sandia have gamed this out and it’s eminently winnable. Don’t worry, they got this. Buckle up boys and girls.

    • Replies: @Cato
  6. Dmon says:

    “…kidney stones have traditionally been more common among white people, but, in recent years, doctors have noted huge increases among Black Americans and a significant rise in Latino communities.”

    Are they sure it’s not because of the milk from all the free lunches? Milk is white, you know.

    https://oregonhunger.org/free-school-meals/

    “Children can receive free school meals if their households receive benefits, regardless of the amount, from:
    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP),
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), or
    Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR)
    Immigration status is not considered when applying for free school meals”

  7. @Colin Wright

    I suppose you can get such differences if, say, you put one thermometer next to hot pavement in direct sunlight and the other across town under some shade trees in somebody’s back yard. Of course, people will say those two locations typify the neighborhoods.

    BTW, My hometown in Colorado just got a reported two feet of snow, but I notice that the part of town I actually lived in got three feet. Differences like that happen all the time, and I’m not talking about snow drifts. I didn’t live in a better or worse part of town because we got more snow. Did I mention I like snow?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  8. More than half of Portland’s homicide victims in 2022 were people of color, mostly Black men – the same breakdown as the year before. That’s far disproportionate to the 6% of Multnomah County’s population that identifies as Black and 3% who identify as Black men.

    At least 15 people killed were experiencing homelessness,

    It’s hard to know why Portland’s homicide count has continued to increase while it has dropped in other cities — and if or when the pace of the killings will slow, said city officials, police and criminal justice experts.

    Miss Berstein’s article is a reminder of an AnotherDad standard:

    Separate nations.

    Blacks shooting each other or homeless people causing trouble are standards. But they are issues competent republican government–government by the productive responsible men of a community–can and does suppress.

    But the rainbow people do not even believe in doing that. They enable homelessness and homeless bums causing public disorder. And they positively encourage–cheer on–black grievance and black resistance to law-and-order.

    And then they throw up there hands! “We don’t know what to do.” “We don’t know when it will just get better.” How effing pathetic. Government pathetique. Pathetic but expensive.

    Civilization is not rocket science. We have a set of traditional norms. Civilization is simply civilized men enforcing those civilized norms. We should not, must not allow ourselves to be dragged down by these bozos who do not understand that.

    • Agree: mc23, Redneck farmer
  9. @AnotherDad

    ‘Seriously how do the authors write this shit with a straight face?’

    I genuinely think they are really, really stupid.

    Look: if you’re on the Left, it’s all scripted for you; the articles involve about as much thought as executing one of those old ‘paint by the numbers’ kits. You can produce the Mona Lisa!

    On the other hand, if you’re on the right, you have to think for yourself. If you are an idiot, you’ll come out with nonsense like ‘Angela Merkel was Hitler’s daughter’ or ‘Hillary Clinton was controlled by the PLO’ (both examples drawn from actual experience).

    But if you’re a Lefty? Just pick up your paint by the numbers kit. You too can write for The New Yorker.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
  10. Covid can explain anything.

    Don’t you meant “everything”?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  11. @AnotherDad

    …Civilization is not rocket science. We have a set of traditional norms. Civilization is simply civilized men enforcing those civilized norms. We should not, must not allow ourselves to be dragged down by these bozos who do not understand that.

    Actually, it is rocket science. Those so cheerfully dismantling our civilization should reflect that we really have very little idea of how it all works; why our behavior can be distinguished from that of Australian Aborigines.

    Sometimes I compare it to working on a modern car. Do I open the hood of my Toyota and decide I can’t see what purposes those wires serve — so I’ll rip them out?

    No — I don’t. I tread very carefully. I make sure I know what I’m looking at and make a point of remembering where it went before I f___ with it.

    That’s because I’m cognizant of the fact that I don’t know what I’m doing. I wish the people so boldly remaking our civilization would emulate me.

  12. mc23 says:

    the authors report, neighborhoods that were graded A in the nineteen-thirties now “average 8 degrees Fahrenheit lower than the city’s mean temperature, while D-graded neighborhoods average 4.8 Fahrenheit degrees warmer.”

    With modern appliances the D neighborhoods are luxurious compared to how they were in 1930.

    The neighborhoods graded D, in the 1930s were at that time filled with working class European Americans. My parents grew up in such neighborhoods in the 30’s when residential air-conditioning was non-existent. Even fans were relatively rare. My mother recalled they had one small tabletop fan used in her parent’s bedroom.

    When there were heatwaves. The children slept in the small cement backyard. People slept on fire escapes public benches, anywhere they could escape the heat. Entire families decamped to the city parks where crowded with climate refugees they bedded down alongside complete strangers. It was all considered perfectly safe. Despite the heat and hot tempers, little crime, no shootings. Simply unimaginable today.

    • Replies: @New Dealer
  13. @AnotherDad

    Civilization is simply civilized men enforcing those civilized norms. We should not, must not allow ourselves to be dragged down by these bozos who do not understand that.

    TOO LATE

    • Replies: @James J. O'Meara
  14. Portland’s 101 homicides in 2022 set new record: ‘At some point, we have to be tired of burying our children’

    I won’t be holding my breath. Though one day there might be BLM riots because systemic white supremacy fails to prevent blacks from shooting other blacks.

    At least 15 people killed were experiencing homelessness, according to an analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive.

    The euphemism treadmill has taken us from “the homeless” to “homeless people” to “people experiencing homelessness”. Somehow this has not stopped homelessness getting worse.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
  15. Mike Tre says:
    @Hans Tholstrup

    You’ll see negroes in coats and hats on a cloudy 80 degree day.

  16. For reasons that remain unclear, kidney stones have traditionally been more common among white people, but, in recent years, doctors have noted huge increases among Black Americans and a significant rise in Latino communities.

    The writer is probably referring to the study by Kasian in 2016 that showed a 15% faster rate of increase (HUGE!!1!) in kidney stone incidence in blacks, but that same study showed a raw incidence of 4.2% for whites versus 1.4% for blacks. So the white incidence is 300% (not huge, stop looking here, what about redlining) of the black incidence.

  17. @Colin Wright

    That strikes me as wildly improbable. There’s a 12.8 degree difference between Portland’s ‘ghetto’ (such as it is) and the better neighborhoods in Portland?

    Yeah, if there’s really that much temperature variability — caused by human activity — in just one city with a famously moderate climate, then we can safely assume that all of the temperature records that the climate change narrative are based on are totally, comprehensively untrustworthy, since the great majority of such records are taken from areas in which humans, you know, live.

  18. This level of variance in temperature in a place like Portland, if scientifically valid, invalidates, all by itself, the entire corpus of climate change hysteria based on temperature readings. So, there is a big pile of bullshit somewhere.

  19. Portland still has a long way to go if it wants to catch up with Baltimore. 12 siblings …12 that they know about anyway.

    Thank God we don’t have any eugenic policies in place. They also shouldn’t be permitted to own dogs.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  20. @Buzz Mohawk

    ‘I suppose you can get such differences if, say, you put one thermometer next to hot pavement in direct sunlight and the other across town under some shade trees in somebody’s back yard. Of course, people will say those two locations typify the neighborhoods.’

    That’s the kicker: I’ve been in Portland’s dread black ghetto: it’s actually perhaps the least intimidating black neighborhood I’ve ever walked around in.

    It’s maybe twelve blocks — and about like the rest of Portland: unpretentious wood-frame houses on tree-lined streets.

    There is no — but no — reason the temperature there should differ significantly from the rest of the city. I’m quite certain that in fact it doesn’t.

    Portland’s not even like LA or San Francisco — it doesn’t lie on a cool sea, that will modify temperatures along the shoreline. It’s a river town — no frigging plausible explanation for such a variation at all.

    One degree? Sure. 12.8 degrees? No — I promise.

    • Thanks: mc23
    • Replies: @Jack D
  21. Carol says:
    @Hans Tholstrup

    Just more iSteve drollery…

  22. epebble says:

    My guess is (as a resident of Portland), the violence may be related to the housing crisis we have been having after 2010. With a strict urban growth boundary and all the foreclosed homes being bought by investors and put out as rentals, there is a shortage of affordable homes and that has pushed many people into homelessness. Plus, the rise in addiction in the last decade. Net result, lot of people outside of homes becoming attractive targets for evil minds for easy shoot and scoot. Since many victims are marginal anyway, there is considerably less pressure on law enforcement to resolve the crimes. Honestly, how many tears will be shed if a homeless addict is killed in a shootout? Some people may even sigh good riddance.

  23. The entire premise of these klauns is nonsense on its face.

    If you’ve ever been to Portland, it’s a very small, very walkable city, which is part of what used to make it so pleasant. It is so small and so blended that these sorts of distinctions would be impossible to create: you can be walking down a totally nice, pleasant, peaceful wypipo street, turn the corner, and suddenly find yourself in Funky Town. Then cross the street again and you’re back in Whitopia. It’s rather jarring.

    Also there’s a very nice river that cuts through the center of town, cooling everything, and because of all the rainfall, there are great big public fountains all over the place.

    These people just go around imagining problems for the sake of it. My parents both experienced very tragic, privation-driven childhoods, so they both knew from experience what hard times were, and they were determined to give us kids good times instead, which they did. As a little kid, whenever I cried, my parents would say, “Oh, don’t cry over that — what the hell would you do if something REALLY bad ever happened to you?”

    People who complain about racist weather in Portland have never seen anything really bad happen to them. I imagine that some time rather soon, they will.

  24. Cato says:
    @Anonymous

    A more sensible COVID theory would be that it was a US Deep State operation, to shift attention away from the terrific Trump economy before the 2020 election. A particularly attractive operation, because it also messed seriously with Deep State enemy China. I’ve forgotten where I heard this one. Maybe on RT?

  25. George says:

    “In general, the old “inner city” tends to be located near a major body of water, which often have moderating effects on temperature.”

    The poor areas were near the docks. When cities were industrial centers factories needed to be near the water to dump industrial waste. So on the water front was a crummy place to live.

  26. Well, David Crosby has died.

    Crosby, Sills, and Nash on Max Yasgur’s farm, 1969:

    Steve often mentions RIP stories like this, and that’s a beautiful song. I’m no fan of Woodstock hippies or the mentality, but hey, it’s music and it’s news.

  27. B36 says:

    Franklin Roosevelt causes nephrolithiasis in People of Color.

  28. @Buzz Mohawk

    David Gilmour plays David Crosby off into the firmament:

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
  29. Arclight says:

    This is an unsurprising result of the left’s bizarre conception of White Man’s Burden: lower social norms and conventions to a level that they feel is appropriate for marginalized (which always really means blacks) and gladly suffer the cultural and economic consequences that flow from that without complaint.

    We’ve been ruining major cities since the early 60s this way, and there is no sign to me that the most powerful elements of our society intend to stop. There is obviously some awakening that elites are waging war on the middle by leveraging the bottom, but not enough to change things anytime soon.

  30. Ian Smith says:

    Which city has more retarded leftists: Portland or San Francisco? Seriously, to have a messed up city without that many blacks is quite an accomplishment!

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @HammerJack
  31. Wilkey says:

    In 2018 Portland had 33 total homicides. So homicides in Portland tripled in just four years. I think society’s increasingly lax attitude towards drug abuse is at least part of the explanation for why all these social metrics seem to be getting worse. And Portland seems to be more laid back about drug abuse than pretty much anywhere.

    Fwiw, Portland (pop. 652,000) now has about as many homicides annually as the entire state of Utah (pop. 3.3 million), which had 95 homicides in 2021 and 103 in 2020.

  32. @Mike Tre

    Here in Hong Kong, we have a short winter. It’s mild and generally pleasant — average highs in the upper 60s F, lows in the upper 50s. But there are days when it gets well into the 70s to around 80, and the sun is powerful, as we’re actually in the tropics.

    We had a couple warms days like that last week. I was out for my lunchtime walk along the harborfront, where I encountered many — I’m talking dozens — of people out in puffer jackets, some of Arctic-ready poofiness.

    Not everyone dresses like that, of course, but a sizable proportion of the population here bundles up like it’s January in Fairbanks when the temperature drops below 80.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  33. @Colin Wright

    Those so cheerfully dismantling our civilization should reflect that we really have very little idea of how it all works; why our behavior can be distinguished from that of Australian Aborigines.

    That’s because I’m cognizant of the fact that I don’t know what I’m doing. I wish the people so boldly remaking our civilization would emulate me.

    Great comment Colin. And yeah, was not trying to imply the civilization itself is simple. My way of thinking about what you said, is that it is “organic”. Organically evolved. A long process of gene-culture co-evolution. All the threads of which we do not understand.

    And like you said, people should approach civilization with humility and conservative good sense. “No you don’t know what you’re doing” should be ethic that is kept in mind.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @Jim Don Bob
  34. J.Ross says:

    … wait, so not diet? Wouldn’t diet be cause #1 of kidney stones?
    ————
    OT — But wow.

    I am investigative reporter, for about the last fifteen years, and I basically have been investigating what I call medical fascism which I believe is the mechanism by which people are going to be dragged into Brave New World if that is the outcome that we unfortunately end up with. That issue is not decided, but because the medical world has such great authority with people, they believe so much in doctors and experts, they are going to try to make that move … they are going to try to bring people to heel under the aegis of medicine … they are going to try to say that they know science, and therefore you have to listen to what they say, and if they say take a drug, or you are suffering from a germ, there is no questioning that. If they say you are detained or quarantined, there is no questioning that … I see that as being something that is coming around here.

    https://archive.is/3xPiQ

  35. @Colin Wright

    Definite bullshit — I promise.

    They’re scamming their readers. They are talking about indoor temps and just calculating who has air conditioning.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  36. Cato says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Thanks. The video and lyrics made me remember those days, how we were so accepting of each other, and how that made us all feel like part of the same group, even when we were really all so different. The late 1960s and early 1970s were a great time to be a teenager.

    But the music — so much progress has been made since then! Spend some time on SoundCloud, or on Spotify or Apple Music — electronic music is so incredibly versatile, so many sounds are possible, so many ways to put those sounds together. We are fortunate to have lived until this time.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
  37. @AnotherDad

    And like you said, people should approach civilization with humility and conservative good sense. “No you don’t know what you’re doing” should be ethic that is kept in mind.

    This is basically Hayek’s central insight about New Class planning and knowledge problems. Nobody knows exactly how it works so you uproot long established norms at your peril.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Mark G.
    , @Colin Wright
  38. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    These people just go around imagining problems for the sake of it. My parents both experienced very tragic, privation-driven childhoods, so they both knew from experience what hard times were, and they were determined to give us kids good times instead, which they did. As a little kid, whenever I cried, my parents would say, “Oh, don’t cry over that — what the hell would you do if something REALLY bad ever happened to you?”

    Well said. I find myself thinking the same these days. I’m always fully aware of how much better my life is, as compared to my parents and grandparents.

    The default state of life is hardship, suffering and pain IMHO. Remediation is what it’s all about… I don’t trust anyone who cannot take a punch to the face.

    And please don’t punch me in the face, because that’s why I consider that important. It hurts and I don’t like seeing blood…

  39. @Hans Tholstrup

    Steve was being sarcastic regarding the “sweltering” 82 F weather, Hans.

    As for trees, when you plant trees you end up having to rake leaves. Raking reminds black people of slavery, because slavery reminds them of work, which they don’t much like.

  40. @John Henry

    English is weird in some ways. “You can’t say anything” can have 2 totally different meanings.

    See 20 sec into this The Office clip. (The rest is funny as hell, so you’ll want to watch the whole thing.)

  41. Moses says:
    @Colin Wright

    Journalists do not care about truth.

    It’s all narrative all the time. Lies are means to an end. Truth totally irrelevant.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
  42. both are near the Lake and thus cooler than the inland suburban white areas like Schaumburg.

    Recent demographic data for Schaumburg: The racial makeup of the village was 57.55% White, 4.28% African American, 0.43% Native American, 26.46% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 4.26% from other races, and 7.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.50% of the population.

  43. Tony Tea says:

    In Melbourne (and across other cities in Australia, but Melbourne is near where I’m at) developers have been let loose on whole swathes of the city and city edges, and the most salient aspect of these developments is a lack of trees, which have been ignored in favour of fence-to-fence housing. Making matters worse, is that in the established suburbs, which gave Victoria its tag of The Garden State, and many suburbs tagged “leafy green”, trees have been chopped down as renovators and rebuilders have flattened existing houses and build said fence-to-fence McMansions, usually mock Georgian eyesores. Councils have contributed to the problem as they run scared of public liability payouts so the chop down problematic trees in public spaces. I’m not aware of any experiments having been done on Melbourne as a heat island, but there’s a chance city temperatures may be trending upwards.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  44. Mr. Anon says:

    ….the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, graded all of America’s neighborhoods and deemed some of them “hazardous” for investment, essentially because they were home to large minority communities.

    They graded them “hazardous” for investment, because a lender was a lot less likely to get their money back.

    This grading system (from A for “best” and B for “still desirable” to C for “declining” and D for “hazardous”) underlay what came to be known as redlining. The grading system led to “chronic disinvestment” in the lower-rated neighborhoods,…………

    Wow! It’s almost as if lenders are in business to make money and are disinclined to loan money to people who might not pay it back. What won’t economists find out next?

    Now the results can be measured with a thermometer: in Portland, Oregon, the authors report, neighborhoods that were graded A in the nineteen-thirties now “average 8 degrees Fahrenheit lower than the city’s mean temperature, while D-graded neighborhoods average 4.8 Fahrenheit degrees warmer.”

    Does Redlining lead to Climate Change or does Climate Change lead to Redlining? I’m having a hard time keeping up.

  45. Mr. Anon says:
    @AnotherDad

    At least 15 people killed were experiencing homelessness,…………..

    Now they are persons experiencing lifelessness.

  46. @Colin Wright

    Do I open the hood of my Toyota and decide I can’t see what purposes those wires serve — so I’ll rip them out?

    To paraphrase the old saw about fences: Never eliminate a nation’s borders until you know why they were created in the first place.

    • Agree: Colin Wright, mc23, Renard
  47. @Ian Smith

    Which city has more retarded leftists: Portland or San Francisco?

    It’s not hard to imagine a bidding war: SF promises $5 million each to every negro, plus lifetime annuities etc; well, to maintain its self-respect Portland will have to match that at the very least.

    Then, at some point, the cities which actually had slavery will get involved. Surely their liability will greatly exceed that of the west coast towns.

    And of course, to be fair, the whole business should pertain to states, not cities. But some states may drag their heels. That’s what the federal government is for, right? Future’s gonna be lit.

  48. Mark G. says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    All those sixties Boomer musical idols like Jeff Beck and David Crosby are going to start passing away one right after another. We were such a large generation that huge volumes of music were created just for us. People in their twenties now would only vaguely be aware who any of those musical artists were just as Boomers were only vaguely aware of who someone like Benny Goodman was. This is music their grandparents listened to. I once told a female coworker in her twenties that the Beatles were my favorite band. She asked me if any of them were still alive and looked surprised when I said two were.

  49. @Tony Tea

    The San Fernando Valley has much less tree coverage than when I was a kid, which is odd because most of it was devoid of trees in, say, 1950 when it was 90% agricultural. Peak shade was some time in the last three decades of the 20th Century.

    • Replies: @LP5
  50. Mark G. says:
    @kaganovitch

    This is basically Hayek’s central insight about New Class planning and knowledge problems. Nobody knows exactly how it works so you uproot long established norms at your peril.

    A good insight. Edmund Burke came up with a similar insight while watching the French Revolution spin out of control. This seems to be part of the Anglo political tradition. The American Revolution didn’t end up like the French one because the Americans were more influenced by the less radical Locke and Scottish Enlightenment figures rather than French thinkers like Rousseau.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  51. @kaganovitch

    Nobody knows exactly how it works so you uproot long established norms at your peril.

    Indeed. Of course, presumably we don’t want to retreat into a state of paralytic refusal to change; as the Ottoman and the Ch’ing involuntarily demonstrated, that doesn’t work out either.

    At the same time we should proceed with caution, and particularly if something has been the practice since the Neolithic, don’t assume that suddenly we know better than the five hundred generations that preceded us. If it works, don’t fix it.

    We actually are seeing a catastrophic collapse of many cultural patterns and the functional society they made possible. Consider ‘rebellious teens.’ Those don’t seem to have existed in the past. It wasn’t the norm for marriages to fail. Etc. We could at least be aware of this and think about how to proceed from this point. We have — half-unaware of the fact — created a failed society. For a start, we need to realize that.

  52. Mr Mox says:
    @Colin Wright

    But if you’re a Lefty? Just pick up your paint by the numbers kit. You too can write for The New Yorker.

    The adage used to be “a solution in search of a problem” – now it’s “a problem in search of a minority”

    A google search of ’causes of kidney stones’ points to large amounts of cola and salt-laden foods as the main culprit.

    The authors could have done that search and then lectured the oppressed minorities to eat more healthy and quench their global warming-driven thirst with water instead of carbonated soft drinks… nahh, who am I kidding; the article was meant to cause guilt in white people®

  53. @kaganovitch

    ‘They’re scamming their readers. They are talking about indoor temps and just calculating who has air conditioning.’

    Even that I doubt. For one, even assuming all affluent whites have air conditioning and no poor blacks do ( extremely unlikely) look up the average outside temperatures in Portland and then estimate the resulting indoor temperature; you won’t get a difference of 12.8 degrees from the average air-conditioned home.

    Portland’s got a rather mild climate. I live in a city with somewhat more extreme weather than Portland; A/C’s nice, but there’s only about one month in the year where you’ll actually be miserable without it. That doesn’t work out to an average 12.8 degree difference over the course of the year.

  54. EdwardM says:

    A Hotter Planet Takes Another Toll on Human Health: A new hypothesis about heat waves, redlining, and kidney stones.

    Another great iSteve mad libs result.

    • LOL: Daniel Williams
  55. Mr Mox says:
    @Cato

    But the music — so much progress has been made since then! Spend some time on SoundCloud, or on Spotify or Apple Music — electronic music is so incredibly versatile, so many sounds are possible, so many ways to put those sounds together. We are fortunate to have lived until this time.

    We need a “I see what you did there” button…

    95% of the music I’m listening to nowadays is from the sixties to the eighties – with a few more contemporary exceptions thrown in. Thank God for usenet and a.b.mp3

  56. @Colin Wright

    How can people cite ‘statistics’ like this without thinking about them critically?

    Perhaps the shade from all the blue and yellow flags keep the rest of Portland cool?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  57. @Colin Wright

    How can people cite ‘statistics’ like this without thinking about them critically?

    Here’s what happens when the wrong people do think critically about statistics- They rig the system. But don’t worry, no Roma were harmed, they sure as shit didn’t get jabbed,

    Even before the surveys were rolled out in December 2020 after the first vaccines were authorized, the CDC knew that myocarditis—a form of heart inflammation since confirmed as being caused by the Pfizer and Moderna shots—and other serious adverse events were of “special interest” when it came to the vaccines, according to a newly disclosed version of the protocol for the survey system.

    The Nov. 19, 2020, protocol (pdf) for V-safe, the survey system, lists myocarditis, stroke, death, and a dozen “prespecified medical conditions.” The protocol was obtained by the Informed Consent Action Network (ICAN), a nonprofit that seeks transparency around health information. All of the conditions can cause severe symptoms.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/cdc-knowingly-left-serious-adverse-events-post-vaccination-surveys-documents-show

  58. @Bill Jones

    Perhaps the shade from all the blue and yellow flags keep the rest of Portland cool?

    Are they into that up there? Down here (Trump’s Oregon) I’ve seen no flags, three bumper stickers…only one of which was on a car with Oregon plates.

  59. G. Poulin says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I liked some of their music. As human beings, they were complete trash.

  60. It’s hard to know why Portland’s homicide count has continued to increase while it has dropped in other cities — and if or when the pace of the killings will slow, said city officials, police and criminal justice experts.

    Some kind of goddam mystery, I tell ya!

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
  61. @Colin Wright

    There’s a 12.8 degree difference between Portland’s ‘ghetto’ (such as it is) and the better neighborhoods in Portland?

    It could be a case of not bothering to take readings in the shade. But if Portland is anything like the San Francisco Bay Area, there are “microclimates” that exhibit a 12° difference between them and even more. Most of the summer, you’ve got than kind of differential just inside the city of San Francisco between the Outer Sunset and Hunter’s Point. Go twenty miles further east (Orinda say) and it’s another 20°F warmer.

    As it happens, Hunter’s Point is 50% black and the Outer Sunset about 0.01% black. But Orinda is ethnically a lot like the Outer Sunset so the relationship is not monotonic.

    Over time you could say that blacks have moved to warmer parts of the Bay Area. They’ve left cool San Francisco and ok Oakland for blazing hot (in summer) Antioch and Fairfield.

  62. @Colin Wright

    Do I open the hood of my Toyota and decide I can’t see what purposes those wires serve — so I’ll rip them out?

    Haha, that’s great! I’m gonna borrow it…

    While eyeing those wires, just don’t get the idea of disrupting the positive/negative electric binary.

  63. AceDeuce says:

    #FreeEmmettTill!

    • Replies: @Gordo
  64. Goddard says:
    @Colin Wright

    Consider ‘rebellious teens.’ Those don’t seem to have existed in the past.

    Rebellious teens aren’t even universal today. Chinese teens for example don’t experience teen angst. American teens drink and smoke to rebel; in China, it’s the adult men who drink and smoke, and they do it not to rebel but to conform.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
  65. Whenever white people white-flight from an area, they should announce to the neighbourhood ‘we are leaving, and we’re taking our magic dirt with us’.

    It might actually work.

  66. anonymous[195] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble

    there is a shortage of affordable homes and that has pushed many people into homelessness.

    no

    Plus, the rise in addiction in the last decade

    yes

    While there is an affordable housing problem, it has nothing to do with the homeless problem. Portland is one of the places, along with SF, Seattle, LA, Denver, etc., where a ton of bums from out of town and out of state have moved, drawn by the de-facto legalization of drugs, petty theft, loitering, camping in public parks, and all of the things that used to be able to deter them. I recall a study recently that showed that most of the homeless people in Seattle are from somewhere else, and I can’t imagine Portland would be much different.

    The fact that homeless people are choosing to move, by the thousands, to the very places with the highest cost of housing indicates that housing costs have nothing to do with the vagrancy crisis.

    • Replies: @epebble
    , @Colin Wright
  67. PeterIke says:
    @epebble

    and all the foreclosed homes being bought by investors and put out as rentals, there is a shortage of affordable homes and that has pushed many people into homelessness.

    Wouldn’t an increase in rentals result in LESS homelessness?

    • Replies: @epebble
  68. PeterIke says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, David Crosby has died.

    In the pantheon of rock talent, Crosby ranks around 10,000th. A career-long mediocrity, he was responsible for a few decent songs beloved by nostalgic Boomers, and that’s about it. He mostly got lucky in picking people to work with. He has been completely irrelevant for 50 years, yet he lingered around like a bad penny. A life-long enemy of his country, he was a drug addled human train wreck. His own degeneracy resulted in his needing a live transplant, an organ that should have gone to someone more deserving.

    The only proper response to his death is “good riddance.”

    • Agree: Mike Tre, Jim Don Bob
    • LOL: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  69. theMann says:

    Oh no! 82 degrees during the month of August? Try Texas some time – after your 90th consecutive day of 100 degree weather, you will have a better appreciation of what hot feels like.

    Helpful tip : you can dissolve kidney stones with two tablespoons of lemon juice each morning and evening. It is a subset of the interesting question of how PH relates to health.

  70. Gordo says:
    @AceDeuce

    #FreeEmmettTill!

    Not seen it, how do they mention or not that Till Senior was a murderer and rapist by sheer coincidence.

  71. Anon[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    My backyard in the afternoon can be 20 degrees hotter than the front yard. If I wanted to know the temperature of “my yard” on any given day, I could just throw out any old number and be truthful.

  72. @Colin Wright

    Sounds crazy, but just the other day I was at the Fred Meyer on NE Glisan, and I had to put on a parka just to cross into the sporting goods section.

    I guess the redlining or whatever it is must be drawn thru the middle of the store?

  73. @mc23

    The neighborhoods graded D, in the 1930s were at that time filled with working class European Americans.

    Yes, yes, yes. There are almost no blacks in Oregon. Most are in Portland, 5.8% of its population. They came in WWII to work in the shipyards and otherwise to supplement the absent labor force. Oregon historically was Yankee in the more populated Willamette Valley (includes Portland) and Dixie to the south and east. Both Yankees and Dixies were not welcoming to blacks. The first black exclusion law was passed in 1844.

    In the 1930s, all Portland neighborhoods would have been white.

    During World War II the incentive of shipyard jobs caused a boom in the African American population. Portland’s African American population grew from 2,565 in 1940 to 25,000 in 1944.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_Oregon

    Colin Wright:

    That’s the kicker: I’ve been in Portland’s dread black ghetto: it’s actually perhaps the least intimidating black neighborhood I’ve ever walked around in.

    It’s maybe twelve blocks — and about like the rest of Portland: unpretentious wood-frame houses on tree-lined streets.

    There is no — but no — reason the temperature there should differ significantly from the rest of the city. I’m quite certain that in fact it doesn’t.

    Correct! Although there was a week-long riot there in 1967. I was in high school and had a job in the inaptly named Albina neighborhood and was ordered to stay away for two weeks.

    Oregonian:

    It’s hard to know why Portland’s homicide count has continued to increase while it has dropped in other cities — and if or when the pace of the killings will slow, said city officials, police and criminal justice experts.

    Ridiculous. Most normies there, right, center, or left (I know a few noncrazy lefties there), knows it results from crybaby mayor Wheeler’s policies, especially purposely failing to enforce the law. Wheeler is from a business family who were Republicans back to the 19th century. His character was ruined by Ivy League education.

    Homelessness in Portland. Primary: mass foreign immigration, legal and illegal with national effects; large internal migration of fleeing and retiring Californians from higher-income labor markets (see Bandon, OR — an earlier blue-collar population now outpriced and transitioning to renting and servant roles, development blocks of all-Californian upper-middle-class retirees); informal and formal toleration of drug abuse; subsidization and decriminalization of homeless. Also: Fed inflation of asset prices; rivers of foreign investments; hedge funds buying up housing; maybe Oregon land use planning. Given open borders and capital flows, homelessness will only increase year by year into the future, resulting in large dystopian zones.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Corpse Tooth
  74. LP5 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve writes:

    The San Fernando Valley has much less tree coverage than when I was a kid, which is odd because most of it was devoid of trees in, say, 1950 when it was 90% agricultural. Peak shade was some time in the last three decades of the 20th Century.

    You may be on the leading edge of the burgeoning environmental intersectionality trend. Too many thirsty trees stealing water from the locals? How many Pokémon points per tree? Will someone consider the birds and insects making a living there? And shade is racist, anyway.

  75. @Colin Wright

    We used to regard teenagers as younger versions of adults on the cusp of genuine adult status. Now they’re just older children being prepared for the next four years (or longer) of schooling.

    This extended childhood is bad for the human species. Look at the neotenous features of school shooters and the infantile, manic behavior of antifa.

    • Agree: Kylie, Renard, Mike Tre
    • Replies: @New Dealer
    , @Corvinus
  76. Anon[271] • Disclaimer says:

    Eat less oxalate-rich foods is the general advice to have less kidney stone (calcium-oxalate) formation. Chocolate, peanuts, tofu, several vegetables, watermelon, cherries, avocado, grape, navy beans, spinach, coco powder are all high in oxalate and calcium is in milk.
    Perhaps an increase in these foods along with milk, rather than environmental changes in the weather might be behind this small increase. The NYT and Wapo are now so intellectually dishonest as to be insulting.

  77. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I recall you talking a while back about looking for colleges for Daughter Calvinist. What did you decide on if you don’t mind me asking?

  78. @AnotherDad

    “Don’t ever take a fence down until you know the reason it was put up.” ― G. K. Chesterson

    • Agree: Colin Wright, AceDeuce
  79. This might be of interest to you, Steve:

    I don’t see “keep them from walking around carrying their guns” as one of these promising measures.

  80. I saw that Blattman tweet at Marginal Revolution.

  81. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    perhaps the least intimidating black neighborhood I’ve ever walked around in.

    It’s maybe twelve blocks — and about like the rest of Portland: unpretentious wood-frame houses on tree-lined streets.

    There’s no rule that every ghetto neighborhood has to look like Harlem or N. Philly. In LA the ghetto has palm trees and little green lawns. If you look real close you might see bars on the windows but other than that it looks like any other part of LA. Generally speaking ghettos were not built as ghettos – they were built for white people and then blacks take over the area.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  82. @The Anti-Gnostic

    Agree. And what are the effects of being segregated in same-age groups for up to 26 years, shaped first by peers, second by corporate marketing, third by a homogeneous caste of teachers, and fourth by family?

    As compared to the spontaneous default of living in an all-ages group, learning by modeling of or instruction from older children and a variety of adults.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  83. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    In this cross-sectional study, predominantlyWhite neighborhoods overall had fewer dilapidated buildings, fewer non–single family homes, fewer single-lane roads, and more green space compared with neighborhoods with residents of multiple races and ethnicities, predominantly Black residents, and predominantly minoritized racial or ethnic group residents other than Black.
    Racist policies (such as redlining) create inequities in the built environment, producing racially and ethnically segregated communities, poor housing conditions, unwalkable neighborhoods, and general disadvantage.

    Abstract from a study by Yukun Yang, Ahyoung Cho and Quynh Nguyen of Boston University School of Public Health and the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2800557

  84. Anon[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble

    Homeless people have nothing worth stealing. It makes no sense to create a criminal gang that targets people who own nothing worthwhile. The gangs are targeting people who have money.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  85. ic1000 says:
    @Colin Wright

    > We have — half-unaware of the fact — created a failed society. For a start, we need to realize that.

    Public intellectual Rob Henderson’s recent Substack essay Nobody is a Prisoner of Their IQ touched on the points you make in this thread. In the “Telling you what you already know” department, here is an excerpt:

    If you live in a developed country, studies indicate that there is a simple and highly effective formula for avoiding poverty:

    1. Finish high school.
    2. Get a full-time job once you finish school.
    3. Get married before you have children.

    This has come to be known as “the success sequence.” Ninety-seven percent of people who follow these steps do not live in poverty. In contrast, seventy-six percent of those who do not adhere to any of these steps are poor.

    Life is undeniably harder for the less talented. Still, all you have to do to avoid poverty is stick to a few simple steps. People with average or below-average academic ability are the most likely to benefit from these kind of straightforward rules and clear guidance. This helps them navigate the challenges they face as they experience life’s complexities. Norms and rules are especially helpful in an environment of abundance, with quick and easy access to junk food, drugs, casual sex, online porn, and other avenues to self-sabotaging behavior.

    [MORE]

    The overemphasis on the limits imposed by the relative immutability of intelligence is misguided. The majority of your human ancestors were dumber than you. Yet they endured unimaginable hardships. Social norms were a major reason for this—tried and true patterns of behavior that reliably lead, on average, to a decent life.

    Today, honesty, restraint, reliability, integrity, thrift, and decency are behaviors that are good for both individuals and their communities. And nearly everyone is capable of them.

    Stable two-parent families, too, are something people are capable of forming. But in a society in which there are no clear norms, it is unsurprising that such families are prevalent among the affluent and educated, but not among the poor and working class.

    In a society in which decent norms have been undermined (primarily by the luxury belief class who themselves have benefited from such norms), prosperous and smart people are better equipped to navigate difficult questions such as “What behaviors will lead to happiness and fulfillment?” And “What family structure will ensure that my children have the best possible life?”

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  86. @epebble

    I have lived in Portland; I have a couple of friends who live in Portland. Portland still has a lot going for it — namely its position within wonderful geography that features forested and beautiful coastlines, healthy rivers and streams, the Cascades to the east, and the fertile and verdant Willamette Valley to the south.

    When I lived in Portland, there were times when you had to step over young junkies whilst navigating the central city. Rose City has been a magnet for aimless, drifting, suicide-inclined white youth from across the country since the Grunge 1990s. But now it’s worse: the current young whites are more psychologically damaged and violent than the mostly passive junkies. Their heads are filled with poison courtesy of the culture, education establishment, and sometimes their parents. And this subset of white youth are more inclined to spread destabilization, and inflict physical damage on others rather than themselves. They are extreme narcissists.

    Portland’s got a people problem. Once residents figure out they need to clean house within city leadership, and make the streets unsafe for the terroristic antifa scum, then Portland can begin climbing out of its period of darkness.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    , @Colin Wright
  87. @New Dealer

    “hedge funds buying up housing”

    BlackRock. Investing in the future. Where you will own nothing and be happy.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  88. Tim says:

    It just constantly amazes me the lengths people will go to to deny the obvious. They’re blaming dysfunctional black behavior on climate change and redlining?

    It’s just incredible.

    • Replies: @Renard
  89. @Colin Wright

    Actually, it is rocket science. Those so cheerfully dismantling our civilization should reflect that we really have very little idea of how it all works; why our behavior can be distinguished from that of Australian Aborigines.

    Yes, perverse consequences.

    Sometimes I compare it to working on a modern car. Do I open the hood of my Toyota and decide I can’t see what purposes those wires serve — so I’ll rip them out?

    There’s an old saying that you should never tear a fence down until you understand why it was put up.

    No — I don’t. I tread very carefully. I make sure I know what I’m looking at and make a point of remembering where it went before I f___ with it.

    Just yesterday, i was thinking to myself that, while Christianity is obvious bullshit (What god would sacrifice himself, to himself, to get around a rule he made himself?), the rapid de-Christianization of our society by our elites in recent decades has had disastrous effects on out society, similar to dragging all the people in Plato’s cave out into the light all at once.

  90. @Jack D

    There’s no rule that every ghetto neighborhood has to look like Harlem or N. Philly. In LA the ghetto has palm trees and little green lawns. If you look real close you might see bars on the windows but other than that it looks like any other part of LA. Generally speaking ghettos were not built as ghettos – they were built for white people and then blacks take over the area.

    No, but this misses the point — that there’s no way the average temperature there is 12.8 degrees higher than in the more affluent parts of the city. That just isn’t possible.

    In any case — based on my subjective and occasional experience — the difference between Portland’s ‘ghetto’ and that of Los Angeles et al isn’t just appearance.

    I’ve walked around South Central. It doesn’t feel safe. Ditto for certain parts of Richmond, Ca — I wouldn’t try walking around some areas. Now I did wind up walking around Portland’s ‘ghetto’ — about twenty five years ago, I believe. I forget why, but there I was.

    It felt perfectly safe.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jack D
  91. anon[167] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Please note that the article is written by Bill McKibben. Anyone who follows the global warming debates knows he is a radical environmentalist and often makes wild predictions of doom. A true believer doesn’t need to ask “Does this make any sense?”

    • Thanks: Colin Wright
  92. FR says:

    The best neighborhood in Portland is the West Hills, which has a considerably higher elevation than most of the rest of the city.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  93. Jay Fink says:
    @James N. Kennett

    Similar to drug abusers, the less we judge and the more we see them as victims the more we get.

  94. @Colin Wright

    No, but this misses the point — that there’s no way the average temperature there is 12.8 degrees higher than in the more affluent parts of the city. That just isn’t possible.

    But the media tell us it is, so it must be true. Richard Onania Hanania says so!!

    Portland certainly looks hotter today than in Beezus and Ramona’s day:

  95. Kohler’s magic dirt?

    On the upswing: UW-Stout golf management program supports growing state industry

    Wisconsin has long been known for its great cheese, cranberries, beer and sausage, but in the past couple of decades it has become a destination for something else: great golf.

    In 2021, the state had seven of the top 50 public courses, best in the U.S., drawing tourists from around the country and world.

    Who’da thunk it? A good way for an aging population to work off all that beer and cheese.

  96. tyrone says:
    @International Jew

    What kind of puppy?

    …….what’s the favorite dog breed in the hood………hint ,it ain’t the toy poodle.

  97. Renard says:
    @Tim

    In case you’re wondering what’s next, it’ll be sites like this one, and contributors like you and me (not to mention the paid writers).

    Just in the past 48 hours, consider the Sheila Jackson Lee bill in Congress, and the MSM’s assault on VDare. Just a couple examples out of many.

    If we don’t call it war, it’s mainly because only one side is fighting. So far.

    https://www.unz.com/article/the-leading-against-white-supremacy-act-of-2023/

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/hanania-why-the-media-is-honest-and-good/#comment-5769921

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  98. @Anon

    Homeless people have nothing worth stealing.

    This might not be true of those new to the condition, who might be carrying items of value to them and to others. Devices, keepsakes, etc. Homeless families often live in cars, and anything could be in the trunk.

    • Replies: @epebble
  99. Bernard says:
    @Corpse Tooth

    But now it’s worse: the current young whites are more psychologically damaged and violent than the mostly passive junkies.

    Much of the psychosis you’re seeing is attributable to methamphetamine use solely, or as an adjunct to opiates. Fentanyl gets a lot of press because of its deadliness, but of the two, Meth is much more damaging to the human mind.

    • Replies: @epebble
  100. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    I agree, the temperature part is pure BS. They are just paying homage to the climate god and glossing over that they got a lot of black people killed by promoting the Racial Reckoning. A win-win.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  101. @Jack D

    I agree, the temperature part is pure BS. They are just paying homage to the climate god and glossing over that they got a lot of black people killed by promoting the Racial Reckoning. A win-win.

    They can pay homage to the climate god. That’s fine with me.

    What I can’t stand is the willingness to subscribe to the most obviously spurious ‘facts.’ And if you can make it a ‘statistic’ it’s right up there with the earth rotating around the sun. Received truth.

    We don’t get anywhere. Hell, people used to be more skeptical. The Pope would make some pronouncement, and people wouldn’t go all heretical and shit — but they’d have their reservations.

    But now? Make it a statistic, and people will lap it up. I could probably claim the average American woman first gives birth at 7.3 years of age, and if I just wrapped it in enough pseudo-scientific folderol, somebody would believe it.

  102. @FR

    ‘The best neighborhood in Portland is the West Hills, which has a considerably higher elevation than most of the rest of the city.’

    I have a vague idea where you’re talking about. First, was that even inhabited in the Thirties, when these areas were defined? Second, even if they were, the average difference over the course of a year might be two degrees at the outside — and not necessarily in the desired direction.

    There’s actually an irony here. Thanks to the peculiar dynamics of the evolution of American cities. blacks often wind up inhabiting what is the climatologically most desirable real estate. Hunters Point and West Oakland have much nicer weather than either Blackhawk or the Sunset District, for example. North Richmond or San Rafael? North Richmond — definitely.

  103. Jay Fink says:
    @Goddard

    Teens don’t smoke these days, if anything they vape. Their drinking rates are low too, mostly because they stay home playing on their phone or video games instead of out socializing.

  104. Anon[479] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    I have three indoor-outdoor thermometers and three surveillance cameras that also sends temperature data to my iPhone. I checked their calibration by putting them all on my desk in my office and verified they were all showing them same number, plus or minus a degree.

    The simultaneous differences can be wild. A second floor office with windows facing east and west, each with a sensor hanging out the window, can show a 10-degree difference at the same time even with no direct sunlight hitting the sensors. The cameras, all in shade, consistently show a 5-degree difference in temperature north and south.

    So the positioning and number of sensors would make a huge difference. This is a big issue in historical climate research where a station may start out at the perimeter of a city and then get engulfed by city growth, which makes things hotter at that point.

    For me availability of heating and air conditioning, home insulation, and car air conditioning are more important than exterior temperature, since I rarely am outside for long. So the solution is cheaper electricity and nuclear power plants in every city!

  105. epebble says:
    @anonymous

    It is not all bums. There are many people in economic distress living in vehicles, depending on shelters etc., They all become easy targets for crazies. I live in a nice neighborhood on the West side but will absolutely hesitate to go to the east side unless essential. Never after dark. This was not the case 12 years back when we went out for so many concerts etc.,

  106. epebble says:
    @PeterIke

    There is a steep rise in rents all over the place, including in the Northwest. Even very lower middle-class neighborhood 1-bedroom apartments cost more than $1,600 per month. A family needs to be making at least $75,000 a year to have a rental place of their own.

  107. epebble says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is not just stealing. There is a tragic rise in wanton violence on strangers. May be due to drugs. Senseless violence on total strangers for no reason at all. The perpetrators don’t take anything from the victim. It makes the crimes harder to crack as the crime doesn’t make any sense even to the police to investigate.

  108. @anonymous

    ‘…The fact that homeless people are choosing to move, by the thousands, to the very places with the highest cost of housing indicates that housing costs have nothing to do with the vagrancy crisis…’

    I agree with you in principle, but housing has gone up proportional to income. I was unemployed in 1982 — but at the time, my rent was $165.00 a month. I could make that with a few days casual labor, even with what wages were back then. And in fact that’s what I did. If a place wasn’t hiring, I’d ask if anyone was out sick today. I got by until I got something regular — but it would have been a different story if my rent had been $800.

    There are a lot of mentally marginal people. Certainly giving them housing isn’t the answer — but at the same time, that housing costs so much doesn’t help. Personally, I suspect that we make it too comfortable to be a vagrant — and so we get a lot of vagrants. If we focused on making it easy to have a crap job and a room somewhere, maybe we’d get more of that.

    We get what we pay for, in a sense. Pay to feed and care for the homeless, and you’ll get lots of homeless. Do what you can to make it possible to be on the next rung up, and you’ll get more people there. The Nazis used to put anyone who couldn’t find employment elsewhere to work building roads. We could do the same.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  109. @Corpse Tooth

    …Portland’s got a people problem. Once residents figure out they need to clean house within city leadership, and make the streets unsafe for the terroristic antifa scum, then Portland can begin climbing out of its period of darkness.

    Pending that, could they let the rest of us have our state back?

  110. J.Ross says:
    @Colin Wright

    They also built people new houses (which in fairness they then got the British to destroy, it would be a good idea to skip that step) and considered the house 25% paid off if the woman had a child (fully paid off if the woman bore four). Our society rewards childlessness and asks why no one is having children.

    • Agree: Corn, Colin Wright
    • Replies: @epebble
  111. J.Ross says:
    @Renard

    It’s been clear they’re going to destroy the internet (that has been advancing steadily for a while now, with a big naked purge in triumph after the 2020 election). They want the internet to be a combination of cable TV and a shopping mall. A major part of it will be the elimination of privacy and free speech, by requiring a digital ID (already partially implemented in several places) and the huge ramping-up of those ridiculous, self-defeating “trusted experts say” policies.
    Whites without free speech will lose to Asians every time or should. Our only natural advantage over them is understanding that the map is not the territory. After the absolutely incoherent lockdown chaos in China, it is to be hoped that a generation of young Chinese, snapped rudely from unprecedented prosperity into undeserved humiliation, have learned something. But the Chinese are really good at not learning things.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Renard
  112. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    The Woke are always going to favor more censorship of opposing POV since they can’t win in the marketplace of ideas, but I think that the sale of Twitter marked a turning point for internet censorship. And with the contraction in tech, Facebook can’t afford to hire endless armies of censors like the Chinese do. The internet was designed to route around blockages and this is true at all scales. Even the Great Firewall of China is not impenetrable.

    Recently the Feds, at the behest of the book publishers, seized the domains of Z-library (where copyrighted ebooks were available for free) and had some of the people involved arrested. If you go to their old domains you get a “Seized by the FBI” screen instead of free books. So that killed Z-library, right? Nope. You go to https://z-lib.is/ (Iceland not Israel – Israel is .il) and there it is. If they seize that one, there will be another domain up in a few days. The whole database must be a handful of hard disks and if they seize that, there are probably 20 other copies somewhere in the cloud and on physical media. Meanwhile, Library Genesis, which was the same database with a less slick front end, was never touched at all.

    It’s not all peaches and cream and it requires endless struggle, but in the end, the censors are never going to win.

    • Thanks: Rob
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Rob
  113. Renard says:
    @J.Ross

    Thank you and yes, they don’t actually have to scrub “offending” material from the net; all they have to do is to make it difficult to find. Bertrand Russell has a famous quote about that.

    It’s essentially like shadow banning, and it’ll make for plausible deniability when and if they’re caught out.

  114. epebble says:
    @J.Ross

    Our society rewards childlessness

    How? I see child tax credits, Earned income credit for families, tax deductions based on number of children, Childrens Health Insurance Program, Women, Infants and Children program. Free primary and secondary education, near free community colleges and state universities. I think we are fairly compensating large families. One sees fewer large families now because people don’t want to do the hard work involved in raising large families and the lower standard of living and comforts that come with large families. It is a private cost/benefit decision rather than lack of public incentives.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  115. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    Generally, I want to believe; however, for that link, I thank you fifty times.

  116. epebble says:
    @Bernard

    I think there is way too much meth use in this area. When I first moved from San Diego in 2005, I was surprised to see so many old white women in rural Oregon being arrested for Meth possession, dealing, making etc., I had the notion that this is a Mexican/Hispanic issue.

  117. Corvinus says:
    @New Dealer

    “And what are the effects of being segregated in same-age groups for up to 26 years, shaped first by peers, second by corporate marketing, third by a homogeneous caste of teachers, and fourth by family?”

    Replace “segregated” with “integrated” and “homogenous” with “heterogenous” and you would be accurate.

    “As compared to the spontaneous default of living in an all-ages group, learning by modeling of or instruction from older children and a variety of adults.”

    Which happens now.

    • Replies: @New Dealer
  118. Corvinus says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    “We used to regard teenagers as younger versions of adults on the cusp of genuine adult status.”

    YOU don’t. WE still do.

    “Now they’re just older children being prepared for the next four years (or longer) of schooling.”

    This paternalistic and elitist attitude is exactly why Generation Z hates your kind, and the reason your daughter ended you having a vibrant child.

  119. @Corvinus

    You seem to to think that the word segregation must always be about race in America. In the contemporary school system, students are segregated by age: 6 year olds in the first grade, 7 years old in the second grade, etc. In contrast to the one-room schoolhouse in old rural America, or growing up in the typical premodern village. You say that instead that they are integrated by age. What the heck would that mean?

    The new generation of teachers are heterogenous in terms of affirmative-action categories, but appallingly homogeneous in ideology. The Marxist-Leninist indoctrinator might be a Finn, a Lett, or a Jew, but they are identical in speech and action.

    Please study the following and apply the lessons learned before you comment on another of my posts:

    https://www.wikihow.life/Tackle-Difficult-Reading-Material
    https://www.revolutionprep.com/blog/8-strategies-for-reading-difficult-material/
    https://www.introtohonors.com/blog/how-to-read-a-difficult-article

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  120. @PeterIke

    I would have expected David Crosby to pass on years ago. If Keith Richards ever dies, though, I will know the world is coming to an end.


    He and his wife, Patti Hansen, sent them to public school near me. I have it on good authority that he showed up at parent-teacher conferences. What a good father.

  121. @AnotherDad

    always sucks when housing discrimination 90 years ago causes you to get kidney stones all of a sudden

  122. @AnotherDad

    Seriously how do the authors write this shit with a straight face?

    Let’s ask The Good Doctor himself:

    “The press is a gang of cruel faggots. Journalism is not a profession or a trade. It is a cheap catch-all for fuckoffs and misfits—a false doorway to the backside of life, a filthy piss-ridden little hole nailed off by the building inspector, but just deep enough for a wino to curl up from the sidewalk and masturbate like a chimp in a zoo-cage.”

    ― Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

  123. @Colin Wright

    After Jack’s done fixing the Snow Cat, he can get to work improving the radio.

  124. @Buzz Mohawk

    I recall reading somewhere that his sperm was for some reason popular with lesbian couples looking for a donor. I think Miles Mathis used this as (more) evidence for Dave being a spook from one of this old elite families. If so, there’s likely to be lots of um, deposits on ice for future kids to unknowingly care on his legacy.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  125. @Moses

    It’s all narrative all the time. Lies are means to an end. Truth totally irrelevant.

    Don’t worry, once the Dissident Right takes power, the insights of those intellectual giants Nietzsche and Heidegger will be used to reconstruct the White Utopia.

    [Actually reads Nietzsche and Heidegger…. shuffle pages, pages….]

    Oh, shit…

  126. @Colin Wright

    We actually are seeing a catastrophic collapse of many cultural patterns and the functional society they made possible.

    How could this happen? Could someone be responsible?

    Within one year of the November Revolution and the establishment of the Weimar Republic:

    One year.

  127. @James J. O'Meara

    His friend Melissa Etheridge had two children by his sperm. I know that because yesterday I saw her on TV talking about it, and I learn everything I know from TV.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  128. AceDeuce says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    His friend Melissa Etheridge had two children by his sperm. I know that because yesterday I saw her on TV talking about it, and I learn everything I know from TV.

    Based on the looks of the “parents”, those kids probably have to wear a pork chop around their necks to get the dog to play with them.

    For a real “treat”, check out Jamie Lee Curtis’s tranny kid. Oy Gevalt!. I mean, I feel bad ragging on a mentally ill kid, but still….

  129. @ic1000

    Well said. And in the past, the upper class tried to lead by example and exhort their inferiors to live decently. Yes, I know there was hypocrisy, but at least they tried.

    All standards of decent behavior have been abandoned, and we now celebrate people for their diversity points regardless of their ability. The black lesbian dumbass WH spokesman is a prime example.

  130. @Corpse Tooth

    BlackRock. Investing in the future. Where you will own nothing and be happy.

    BlackRock’s devotion to ESG has caused it to lose several bi$$ions in managed assets as states such as Texas and West Virginia have pulled retirement funds, so maybe they will get the message.

    On second thought, Nah.

  131. Corvinus says:
    @New Dealer

    “You seem to to think that the word segregation must always be about race in America.”

    That’s you and Me, Sailer, ma’am.

    “In the contemporary school system, students are segregated by age: 6 year olds in the first grade, 7 years old in the second grade, etc.”

    They are integrated skill wise.

    “The new generation of teachers are heterogenous in terms of affirmative-action categories, but appallingly homogeneous in ideology.”

    No, they are heterogenous in terms of current pedagogy, which typically does not include Marxist-Leninist or critical race theory.

    The indoctrination comes from you gulping up what you learn here and from Fox News.

    • Replies: @New Dealer
  132. epebble says:
    @Colin Wright

    We actually are seeing a catastrophic collapse of many cultural patterns and the functional society they made possible.

    If I had not seen these pictures and video, I would have thought they are from some other galaxy.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11655809/Philadelphias-Kensington-neighborhood-looks-like-scene-WALKING-DEAD.html

    Best way to describe this would be a musical I went 23 years back.

  133. @Corvinus

    You failed to heed my advice on improving reading comprehension.

    You seem to have high priors that you randomly paste into a fog of confusion about material that you are unable to follow.

    Terminate engagement.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  134. Corvinus says:
    @New Dealer

    It wasn’t advice on your part. It was virtue signaling.

    Let me know when you want to engage in honest discourse rather than shill Sailer’s tin cup narratives.

  135. J.Ross says:
    @epebble

    You have been reported to human resources.

  136. Rob says:
    @Jack D

    Jack, does it let you get books? I could not.

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