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Pfizer Rescued Biden by Shutting Down Its Vaccine Trial Until the Day After Election, But Biden Stabs Them in the Back Anyway
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From the New York Times news section yesterday:

Taking ‘Extraordinary Measures,’ Biden Backs Suspending Patents on Vaccines

The Biden administration, siding with some world leaders over the U.S. pharmaceutical industry, came out in favor of waiving intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines.

By Thomas Kaplan, Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Rebecca Robbins
Published May 5, 2021

Seems like this wouldn’t do much good at boosting supply in the short run for reasons Alex Tabarrok outlines at Marginal Revolution,

It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults.

And it sure sounds like this decision would do harm in the long run by setting the precedent that if you invent something effective and fast to solve a huge problem, the government will take it away from you, so why bother trying? Here’s Pfizer’s stock price. And Moderna’s dropped from $177.50 on Wednesday at 2:30 pm to $148 at opening on Thursday.

Maybe it would help in the medium term?

But an amusing irony is that Pfizer likely kept Trump from eking out a 269-269 win in the House by deciding in late October to shut down processing of lab samples from its vaccine clinical trial. As Matthew Herper reported in STAT on November 9, 2020 in a jaw-dropping revelation that almost nobody noticed at the time:

Gruber [Pfizer’s SVP for vaccine R&D] said that Pfizer and BioNTech had decided in late October that they wanted to drop the 32-case interim analysis. At that time, the companies decided to stop having their lab confirm cases of Covid-19 in the study, instead leaving samples in storage. The FDA was aware of this decision. Discussions between the agency and the companies concluded, and testing began this past Wednesday. When the samples were tested, there were 94 cases of Covid in the trial. The DSMB met on Sunday.

This means that the statistical strength of the result is likely far stronger than was initially expected. It also means that if Pfizer had held to the original plan, the data would likely have been available in October, as its CEO, Albert Bourla, had initially predicted.

Pfizer didn’t resume checking swabs again until November 4, the day after Election Day, by which point it had blown past not only its first 32 case checkpoint but also its second 62 case checkpoint, and wound up exceeding even its third 92 case checkpoint.

My best guess is that instead of Pfizer reporting on Monday, November 9 its success based on 94 cases, it would have reported success based on its planned 62 case checkpoint on Monday, November 2 if not for shutting down its lab. As I wrote on November 11:

But the corporations weren’t in the mood to follow their own protocol and Trump’s FDA let them get away with stalling on telling voters and investors what had been achieved.

From a political and financial standpoint, the firms likely made the self-interested right decision to delay. Even giant pharmaceutical companies don’t want to wind up on blacklists for vengeance by Democrats. But from a scientific and ethical perspective, it was highly questionable.

The funny thing is the Biden Administration still stabbed the mRNA makers in the back.

I’m guessing Biden can’t remember when he and Kamala were the anti-vaxxers sowing Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt about the rushed Trump Vaccine that The Science showed wouldn’t arrive for a long time.

After all, that’s crazy talk! We Democrats have always been at war with Trump’s anti-vaxx strategy.

 
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  1. Karma is a bitch.

    • LOL: Ed
    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Joe Walker

    Karma's a cargo cult-mentality fantasy, but if it were a measurable thing, then not-Pres. Quid Pro Joe and big pharma would both be in chin-deep sheep dip for millennia of soul-cleansing reincarnations.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @dearieme

    , @Stan Adams
    @Joe Walker

    At first glance I thought you wrote Kamala instead of Karma. I was rushing to hit the Agree button.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Neoconned
    @Joe Walker

    As they said in Kill Bill....they had it coming...

    Glenn Beck was going on about this yesterday morning. I did agree with him that if Biden allows this then the corporate types will clam up even more & become even more distrustful than they are now....

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Joe Walker

    Joe, you misspelled Kamala.

    , @Prester John
    @Joe Walker

    Karma is also a politician. Politicians are liars and can never be trusted, which means she is a liar and cannot be trusted, just like her putative boss who has over four decades of practice in the field of deception, deviousness and outright lying. Just like their party as well as the nominal "loyal opposition."

    The problem is that most people know all this, and yet they continue to buy into the manure being spread by the DC manure spreaders. Which is why, as Mencken wrote, we deserve to get it good and hard.

  2. Long, and totally unrelated, but of interest:
    https://status451.com/2017/01/20/days-of-rage/

    Don’t bother posting if you have posted about it before.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AKAHorace

    You are right, it's long. I read the book review part, to see if "Sara Jane", the church lady up the hill, made an appearance, and she did. She founded the "Bay Area Research Collective", which calls to mind the "Institute for Historical Review".

    For a fun read exposing the leftist cleavages of the 1970s, read the manifestos of the New World Liberation Front (pp. 2-4) and Weatherman Underground Organization (pp. 5-7), in which they make some very good points, and BARC's unsigned reply (likely by SJO herself) in which they try to paper differences over:

    Dragon (June 1976): New World Liberation Front on Feminism and Homosexuality (PDF)

    As for the remainder of the piece, he was off by three years. His 2017 came in 2020.

    Replies: @ganderson

  3. Leftists, including Democrats, don’t understand “incentives”–except for themselves. This is small potatoes compared to their efforts with “criminal justice” or “welfare” or the “Soviet Union”.

    If you want to be doing good works doing … just pay.

    Pay for the patents and donate them to “the world” or pay for these folks to setup more vax production and donate the vax to friendly nations, gratis.

    Given the scale of “money printer go brrr”, this is small beer.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @AnotherDad

    OTOH, vaxx manufacturers are shielded from product liability in the US, so they should get all the upside and none of the downside?

  4. TG says:

    “It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults.”

    Just remember: most of the high-tech vaccine production capability is no longer in the US, it’s in China and a surprising amount in low-wage places like India.

    Even if a lot of final production is still nominally in the West, if all of the supply chains and reagent manufacturing and specialized equipment etc. is overseas, how long before the rest of it follows?

    So yes, India and places like India probably have plenty of technical capacity to churn out mRNA vaccines, and they likely even already have the secret Coke recipes, they just don’t have the legal permission to use them.

    Yet.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @TG

    You are fucking stupid. The vaccine manufacturing takes place in the West and all of the equipment is manufactured in the west, as well.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Rob
    @TG

    I don’t know about Indian biotech specifically, but it is not quite the same as the small molecule drug industry. When it comes to small molecules, India’s law is that you can patent a way of producing a chemical, but you cannot patent the chemical itself. So as long as you are not producing Wellbutrin with the patented series of reactions, you are good to go.

    I think American pharma got into the same ‘own the peak, let the rest of the mountain go’ that other American sectors fell into. Like steel mills and mini-mills. At first, mini-mills could only produce the lowest grade steel, rebar. The top end, sheet steel, was selling like mad, so the big steel producers did not care that they were losing low end markets. Plenty of room at the top! Then mini-mills figured out how to produce a grade up, then another... pretty soon they could do sheet steel, and ate the integrated mills’ lunch. Clay Christensen discussed that and other industries in the Innovator’s Dilemma, a very good book.

    Now, pharma is not steel, and there may be a lot of mountain above today’s peak. But why bet your company on it? Let generic manufacturers make yesterday’s drug. Make a branded generic and sell it for twice (or 5-10 times, generics are cheap) the price. Don’t let competitor’s get their foot in the door.

    Companies are betting the American economy on third world companies never being competitive at the top. That they can’t do the peak. Problem is, as Boeing showed us, with financialization and outsourcing, we cannot do the peak either. I still have hoes that a rising tide lifts lots of boats. That when China reaches first world status, they will consume like a first world country. But, are they there, already? Are they soon going to be ahead of us? How many years have half our hard science grad students been Chinese? That is expertise that was a long time in the making. We won’t be able to just get it back. When the American profs are too old or too dead to teach, it might as well never have been here.

    Contra what I thought, America is not the First Nation to go from first to not first world status. Argentina used to be a high income country. I do not know about their fall, like, was it actually a fall, or was it like India’s ‘fall’, which just consisted of the British doing the Industrial Revolution while the Indians just sat there. Will read up on it.

  5. @Joe Walker
    Karma is a bitch.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Stan Adams, @Neoconned, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John

    Karma’s a cargo cult-mentality fantasy, but if it were a measurable thing, then not-Pres. Quid Pro Joe and big pharma would both be in chin-deep sheep dip for millennia of soul-cleansing reincarnations.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Yeah, screw that “cause and effect” “equal and opposite reaction” airy fairy crap.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @dearieme
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Quid Pro Joe: hats off, sir.

    It's an even better joke in the UK where "quid" is slang for a pound sterling.

  6. A disease so serious and a vaccine so safe that people have to be threatened and coerced to take it

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Caspar von Everec

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    Replies: @anon, @Caspar von Everec, @Mr. Anon, @adreadline

    , @Exiled off mainstreet
    @Caspar von Everec

    This is the real nub of the issue. I am sure that the real issue will end up being a tsunami of side effects which, over a few years, more than equal the deaths from the disease, though they may not be provable. I know that they have given them a hold harmless on liability, but my guess is that they can come up with a rationale to say that the hold harmless was based on fraudulent representations by the companies.
    Unless the legal system completes its collapse, which is possible and even likely, I see the litigation over the damages caused by these "vaccines" could be unprecedented in its scope and the liability could spread to any agency or institution which used coercion to encourage people against their sound judgement to submit to this gene altering poison. Oh, and by the way, the hold-back as part of the campaign against Trump may insulate him from some of the damages for this likely monumental failure.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Forbes
    @Caspar von Everec

    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002--unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization--might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Travis
    @Caspar von Everec

    No coercion was required to get 83% of those over the age of 64 vaccinated and 60% of adults over the age of 25 have been vaccinated already. Most Americans are already vaccinated. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

    it does surprise me that people who have recovered from COVID are getting the vaccine. One reason I will not be getting the vaccine, my immune system already defeated this virus last year. Not sure why people who are immune would bother getting vaccinated.

  7. Could the Serum Institute even manufacture an mRNA vaccine? I would think probably not, or at least not quickly enough or in large enough quantities to make much difference. The main problems of rolling out COVID mRNA vaccines were not scientific, i.e. what to encode in mRNA was fairly obvious to experts in the field right away. It was two fold: doing the clinical trial to show that the strategy actually worked and then figuring out the process development for manufacturing and deploying literal tons of mRNA.

    My question is does this apply in the future to all subsequent IP? Moderna’s new E484K escape mutation booster vaccine will probably account for much of the new revenue by the time any generic manufacturers of the original formula can boot up.

    • Replies: @Vishwas
    @415 reasons

    Gennova in Pune, India is already in Phase I/II trials for its mRNA vaccine, HGCO19.
    Here is the announcement: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/national/hgco19-vaccine-candidate-gennova-starts-enrolment-for-phase-12-human-clinical-trials/article34309383.ece

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  8. anon[216] • Disclaimer says:

    Pfizer is scum. They are extorting large sums from poor countries that can’t afford their vaccine, shaking down South American countries for their national assets in exchange for the vax. Albert Bourla the CEO is a self-proclaimed “son of Holocaust survivor”, a lot of sympathy he has for his fellow sufferers. They could easily license the technology to other producers like J&J, Merck etc. The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road, and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing. Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    • Agree: Dutch Boy
    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Deadite
    @anon

    So? The mRNA costa 10 bucks a dose. We just spent 4 trillion dollars. Let the feds spend 160 billion and build factories here in the us and supply the world.

    And all these primitive counties could cough up the money to buy them. But they are too busy lining their pockets

    So screw them. Few will die anyway.

    , @Marquis
    @anon

    No... Steve is totally being consistent and thoughtful. On one hand he has dozens of articles about how these pharmaceutical companies maliciously pushed pain killers for profit and helped destroy parts of white America. On the other hand, the pharmaceutical companies would never publish geared up partial data to exploit a crisis for billions of dollars in immediate profit. But he is claiming that they played politics with their data help Dementia Joe win.

    See.... it all makes complete sense. Now where’s the line for my 3rd booster shot?

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @anon


    The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road,
     
    Maybe; both BioNTech and Moderna and I assume everyone else trying this has abjectly failed, and there are good reasons to believe "a cancer vaccine" is a particularly hard target, since cancers are deranged versions of normal cells.

    and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing
     
    Well, yes, they aren't a charity. See the AZ/Oxford clown show for what can happen when you try to remove eeeeevil profit from the equation.

    Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.
     
    That family in two cycles, benzodiazepines and the opiod oxycodone pushed addictive drugs, in the latter example claiming they'd found a way around the addiction problem. This is very far from spending a lot of money out of their pocket to help a small biotech firm test and then mass manufacture and distribute a life saving vaccine. And see @Deadite's comment on the issues of trying to do business with Third World countries.
    , @Muggles
    @anon


    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.
     
    Yes, living in the 3rd World is hazardous to your health. Did you just figure that out? Have you ever left the confines of the USA?

    You seem to have forgotten all of the heaps of praise about the Shithole countries who initially reported far lower COVID rates than the USA or Europe. The Fake News you seem to love was all about bashing Trump over "our failure" to emulate places now rife with disease. This was an artifact of fake or poor health reporting from said nations. No one leaves the First World to improve their health outcomes. Of course you love to Blame America First for everyone else's failings.

    You're late on the take. Biden just "waived" the patent protections for the American vaxes.

    Also, despite you tear jerking, US vaxes are not the only ones out there. China and Russia have been selling these abroad, as well as Europe.

    But don't get off your Greedy American Capitalist high horse. That's probably the only one you have enough brain cells to ride.
  9. WHO COULD HAVE FORESEEN THAT RESIDENT BIDET WOULD [email protected]%# UP?!!!!

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  10. @Joe Walker
    Karma is a bitch.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Stan Adams, @Neoconned, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John

    At first glance I thought you wrote Kamala instead of Karma. I was rushing to hit the Agree button.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Stan Adams

    Haha, exactly the same for me, Stan. Both ways work.

  11. @Caspar von Everec
    A disease so serious and a vaccine so safe that people have to be threatened and coerced to take it

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Exiled off mainstreet, @Forbes, @Travis

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    Holy shit has Steve's blog ever become cucked. Are these Ron Unz paid trolls?

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew, @Alexander Turok, @anon

    , @Caspar von Everec
    @Alexander Turok

    Oh yes, we all recoil in horror in memory of the black death which killed .1% of the population of Europe. God pray how do we achieve salvation from a disease that killed 3.26 million out of 8 billion people.

    Which calculates to give a 3.26/8000(millions) = .04075% death rate.

    How do we escape this calamity? God help us

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Alexander Turok


    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.
     
    I'm all for refusing association with the carriers of that plague known as totalitarianism.............people like you.
    , @adreadline
    @Alexander Turok


    people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers
     
    Nice Who? Whom? Us vs. them dehumanization, bro. Right to refuse association, you say. Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race? If not, why not? Not to mention, on which basis you claim that someone is a "plague carrier'' merely because they are unvaccinated? If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

  12. Still pushing this dumb meme that real votes mattered in the 2020 election. Give it up already.

    I’m going to float a different theory: Pfizer got a tip that the fix was in, so they waited until Biden was “elected” in order to get favorable treatment and media coverage on their mostly-untested, likely ineffective and possibly dangerous not-vaccine. Maybe Trump was hitting the brakes on it because he knew it was a bigger risk than muh Covid but that half the country still wouldn’t understand or care.

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Michael S

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he's only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I've heard this before...

    Replies: @anon, @Thorfinnsson, @TomSchmidt, @Jonathan Mason

  13. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    How much did American taxpayers lay out for the development 0f these mRNA vaccines?

    The U.S. government’s “Operation Warp Speed” cost upwards of $28 billion.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Charon
    @Anonymous

    And that was back when $28 billion was real money

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Anonymous


    How much did American taxpayers lay out for the development 0f these mRNA vaccines?

    The U.S. government’s “Operation Warp Speed” cost upwards of $28 billion.
     
    The US government paid nothing up front for Pfizer/BioNTech, although the former's inability to produce at the volumes promised resulted in their belatedly accepting help from the BAD ORANGE MAN's Operation Warp Speed (OWS).

    Now we get to the definition of "development;" based on a lot of work in mRNA deployment technology, I'm sure some government funded and of course there's the basic research it depends on, and more than a decade into safe SARS like coronavirus vaccines, after the first genetic sequences from the PRC were published, Moderna had their vaccine candidate finished in a weekend. Testing on the other hand cost a lot, and they got OWS help and money up front for that, and plenty of money to set up manufacturing.

    Which also included a lot spent on raw materials, supplies, glass suitable for frozen vaccine vials, etc. The Wayback Machine has the top line account of all this after "Biden" memory holed it.
  14. Shouldn’t that be “Biden jabs them in the back” ?

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon


    Biden jabs them in the back
     
    "pfizer stung in the behind"?
    Biden to Pfizer: "ever been in a turkish prison?"
  15. Who knew vaccinating the world could be so complicated? About 11 billion doses are needed and so far only 1 billion administered.

    We need an epidemiology and health expert and statesman like Trump at the helm in a time like this to coordinate efforts to get the world vaccinated and distribute bleach. It can’t be left to amateurs

    The drug companies are saying that their manufacturing processes are so complex that they cannot be duplicated by generic manufacturers and that in any case the shortage of vaccines is due to a worldwide shortage of materials like chemicals and glass vials and bio-bags to grow viruses in.

    But then I remember Amazon saying that it would be impossible to charge sales tax to customers, because every county in the US has different tax rates, and trying to implement this would bring their computers to a standstill. But in the end they figured it out. Well done, Amazon.

    I remember the cell phone companies saying that it was impossible to transfer numbers from the phone of one company to another, but eventually they figured out how to do it. Well done, T-Mobile.

    But why is AstraZeneca selling its vaccines at cost, and other companies at a much higher price? Are there no economies of scale?

    And what about SinoPharm, Sinovac, and Gamaleya, makers of the Спутник V vaccine? Shouldn’t they be asked to share their vaccines with the world? They already are? Damn commies spoiling it for everyone!

    And why is Russia turning to factories in Taiwan for quicker roll-out of Спутник V?

    In recent years, Chinese vaccine companies have turned from largely making products for use domestically to supplying the global market, with individual firms gaining WHO preapproval for specific vaccines — seen as a seal of quality. With the pandemic, Chinese vaccine companies have exported hundreds of millions of doses abroad.

    Chinese vaccine makers have been quick to expand capacity and say they can meet China’s domestic need by the end of the year.

    Ah, but America has a lot more people than China, right?

    And why are Lionel Messi and the rest of the Argentinian national soccer squad getting the Chinese Sinovac vaccine (the same one I had)? What happened to the Monroe Doctrine that what happens in the Americas stays in the Americas.

    It is all so damn complicated, but it seems to me that making vaccines is a growth industry, even if for a relatively short time, a bit like building stadiums for an Olympic Games, that should employ millions of vaccine makers and givers for four years and that fortunes will be made by those who are the first to figure out how to make billions of doses.

    Trump may no longer be in office, but he should certainly get some credit for getting the pandemic off the ground and helping to create all these jobs.

    Why should we not have expensive boutique vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna, as well as cheaper public options like AstraZeneca and Sinovac? They can compete with each other in TV commercials and by sponsoring sports events and Tucker Carlson. We can have vaccine teams at US international airports welcoming travelers and offering them vaccination on the spot.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read
    @Jonathan Mason

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/0b83af114f0b464d78e46d2a40c3dc22/tumblr_n3s9r5GRkM1rlt1nto1_400.gif

  16. @TG
    "It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults."

    Just remember: most of the high-tech vaccine production capability is no longer in the US, it's in China and a surprising amount in low-wage places like India.

    Even if a lot of final production is still nominally in the West, if all of the supply chains and reagent manufacturing and specialized equipment etc. is overseas, how long before the rest of it follows?

    So yes, India and places like India probably have plenty of technical capacity to churn out mRNA vaccines, and they likely even already have the secret Coke recipes, they just don't have the legal permission to use them.

    Yet.

    Replies: @Anon, @Rob

    You are fucking stupid. The vaccine manufacturing takes place in the West and all of the equipment is manufactured in the west, as well.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    India manufactures a lot of generic pharmaceuticals.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @That Would Be Telling

  17. @Michael S
    Still pushing this dumb meme that real votes mattered in the 2020 election. Give it up already.

    I'm going to float a different theory: Pfizer got a tip that the fix was in, so they waited until Biden was "elected" in order to get favorable treatment and media coverage on their mostly-untested, likely ineffective and possibly dangerous not-vaccine. Maybe Trump was hitting the brakes on it because he knew it was a bigger risk than muh Covid but that half the country still wouldn't understand or care.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he’s only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I’ve heard this before…

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories...

    https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/aedb0975-570a-4032-9549-d63a52dabdf3_1.7c2c9afa11a2c3cb7d66d20d36522331.jpeg

    , @Thorfinnsson
    @Alexander Turok

    https://comic-watch.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/turok-4-cover.jpg

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Alexander Turok

    Incompetent do-nothing is probably the best description of Trump. Saboteur of populist movement seems more likely. Still, incompetent do-nothingism is a step up from active malevolence.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Alexander Turok


    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories
     
    LOL! On my cell phone an advertisement for crockpots appeared underneath your post!
  18. @anon
    Pfizer is scum. They are extorting large sums from poor countries that can't afford their vaccine, shaking down South American countries for their national assets in exchange for the vax. Albert Bourla the CEO is a self-proclaimed "son of Holocaust survivor", a lot of sympathy he has for his fellow sufferers. They could easily license the technology to other producers like J&J, Merck etc. The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road, and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing. Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    Replies: @Deadite, @Marquis, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    So? The mRNA costa 10 bucks a dose. We just spent 4 trillion dollars. Let the feds spend 160 billion and build factories here in the us and supply the world.

    And all these primitive counties could cough up the money to buy them. But they are too busy lining their pockets

    So screw them. Few will die anyway.

  19. I think there is a question as to if the vaccines can even be made at the 12 billion doses needed. There is a lot of precursors that need to be manufactured and I have heard that the manufacturing lines aren’t available.

  20. @Alexander Turok
    @Caspar von Everec

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    Replies: @anon, @Caspar von Everec, @Mr. Anon, @adreadline

    Holy shit has Steve’s blog ever become cucked. Are these Ron Unz paid trolls?

    • Agree: Forbes
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
    @anon

    Lol hope they demanded payment up front.

    , @Alexander Turok
    @anon

    If Ron wanted to, he could just kick the InfoWars contingent off the website. No need to hire paid trolls.

    , @anon
    @anon

    Perhaps some of Unz's friends in silly-con valley are field testing their 'bots.

    That would explain at least some of the trolls that have rolled in since 2016.t

  21. @Jonathan Mason
    Who knew vaccinating the world could be so complicated? About 11 billion doses are needed and so far only 1 billion administered.

    We need an epidemiology and health expert and statesman like Trump at the helm in a time like this to coordinate efforts to get the world vaccinated and distribute bleach. It can't be left to amateurs

    The drug companies are saying that their manufacturing processes are so complex that they cannot be duplicated by generic manufacturers and that in any case the shortage of vaccines is due to a worldwide shortage of materials like chemicals and glass vials and bio-bags to grow viruses in.

    But then I remember Amazon saying that it would be impossible to charge sales tax to customers, because every county in the US has different tax rates, and trying to implement this would bring their computers to a standstill. But in the end they figured it out. Well done, Amazon.

    I remember the cell phone companies saying that it was impossible to transfer numbers from the phone of one company to another, but eventually they figured out how to do it. Well done, T-Mobile.

    But why is AstraZeneca selling its vaccines at cost, and other companies at a much higher price? Are there no economies of scale?

    And what about SinoPharm, Sinovac, and Gamaleya, makers of the Спутник V vaccine? Shouldn't they be asked to share their vaccines with the world? They already are? Damn commies spoiling it for everyone!

    And why is Russia turning to factories in Taiwan for quicker roll-out of Спутник V?

    In recent years, Chinese vaccine companies have turned from largely making products for use domestically to supplying the global market, with individual firms gaining WHO preapproval for specific vaccines — seen as a seal of quality. With the pandemic, Chinese vaccine companies have exported hundreds of millions of doses abroad.

    Chinese vaccine makers have been quick to expand capacity and say they can meet China’s domestic need by the end of the year.

    Ah, but America has a lot more people than China, right?

    And why are Lionel Messi and the rest of the Argentinian national soccer squad getting the Chinese Sinovac vaccine (the same one I had)? What happened to the Monroe Doctrine that what happens in the Americas stays in the Americas.

    It is all so damn complicated, but it seems to me that making vaccines is a growth industry, even if for a relatively short time, a bit like building stadiums for an Olympic Games, that should employ millions of vaccine makers and givers for four years and that fortunes will be made by those who are the first to figure out how to make billions of doses.

    Trump may no longer be in office, but he should certainly get some credit for getting the pandemic off the ground and helping to create all these jobs.

    Why should we not have expensive boutique vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna, as well as cheaper public options like AstraZeneca and Sinovac? They can compete with each other in TV commercials and by sponsoring sports events and Tucker Carlson. We can have vaccine teams at US international airports welcoming travelers and offering them vaccination on the spot.

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read

    • Agree: Charon
  22. Fascist is as fascist does. Pfizer should be glad Uncle Joe isn’t nationalizing the industry.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  23. @Anon
    @TG

    You are fucking stupid. The vaccine manufacturing takes place in the West and all of the equipment is manufactured in the west, as well.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    India manufactures a lot of generic pharmaceuticals.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @Steve Sailer

    One of the consequences of globalism and offshoring is that many of these pharmaceuticals are spurious or adulterated and readily find their way to other countries, including America. Here's a refreshingly honest Indian account of the problem.
    https://yourstory.com/2017/06/india-fake-drugs

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Steve Sailer

    The question is how many Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) India makes to the package into pills or sterile vials etc. Not many years ago a lot of their factories for that either got shut down by the FDA or shut out of the US market.

    But we have the Serum Institute of India (SII) which despite what its name might imply is a private firm that does churn out mass quantities of vaccines, even on its own dime increased their production capacity by I think it was a billion doses a year to gear up for COVID-19 vaccines. The Government of India which seems to be referred to as GoI by many natives until very recently had no interest in helping them and little in buying their product for internal use, officially they'd solved the problem, so 2/3rds of the nation's COVID-19 vaccine output was exported.

    As I recall the SII even stopped vaccine production at one point after they ran out of warehouse space (requires fridges).... After the latest wave exploded the CEO was also forced to flee the country to the U.K. after getting very specific threats from too many powerful Indian figures and some politicians have talked about seizing their firm or something like that in the nation's traditional socialist way, and he's has said he's looking into manufacturing vaccines in the U.K.....

    The SII was BTW aggressive enough to score enough raw materials including those 2,000L sterile bags to for cell culture production for their licensed version of the Oxford vaccines which has the brand name Covishield, Vaxzevria is the brand name in the EU and perhaps elsewhere. His recent pleas were for three months of supplies was so the SII could ramp up production of the Novavax vaccine, which is also cell culture grown but to yield a single protein instead of a virus. That one looks very promising but I'm getting increasingly worried about the U.K. not giving it emergency approval.

    To close out this non-mRNA vaccine discussion, the US sending the SII etc. cell culture supplies is probably mostly "robbing" production of those sorts of vaccines in the US. Janssen was forced to use Emergent BioSolutions in Baltimore (long bipartisan corruption story there), and if you really wanted to safely make vaccines in that factory you'd need to fire every employ in it, strip it down to bare concrete etc. and repaint it with good paint, and start everything from scratch. If we don't take such drastic steps, I don't recommend taking any Janssen doses made there. I believe all our current doses are coming from the Netherlands, but Merck is going to make it here at some point.

    After the Oxford virus was found in 15 million Janssen doses in that factory AZ/Oxford production was stopped there to avoid future cross contamination, and they're looking for another factory. Novavax contracted with a Fujifilm unit both in the U.K. and the US to make their's. The only other cell culture grown vaccine of note right now is Sputnik V, and obviously that's not going to be accepted by our ruling trash. So unless cell culture production needs stuff like filters that are also needed for mRNA vaccine production, it doesn't matter much if we're sending supplies to India.

  24. @415 reasons
    Could the Serum Institute even manufacture an mRNA vaccine? I would think probably not, or at least not quickly enough or in large enough quantities to make much difference. The main problems of rolling out COVID mRNA vaccines were not scientific, i.e. what to encode in mRNA was fairly obvious to experts in the field right away. It was two fold: doing the clinical trial to show that the strategy actually worked and then figuring out the process development for manufacturing and deploying literal tons of mRNA.

    My question is does this apply in the future to all subsequent IP? Moderna’s new E484K escape mutation booster vaccine will probably account for much of the new revenue by the time any generic manufacturers of the original formula can boot up.

    Replies: @Vishwas

    Gennova in Pune, India is already in Phase I/II trials for its mRNA vaccine, HGCO19.
    Here is the announcement: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/national/hgco19-vaccine-candidate-gennova-starts-enrolment-for-phase-12-human-clinical-trials/article34309383.ece

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Vishwas


    Gennova in Pune, India is already in Phase I/II trials for its mRNA vaccine
     
    That's great (seriously), but a blended Phase I/II trial if US FDA strength only needs about a thousand doses, those are going to be made "in the lab" like Moderna for example did. Phase III if FDA strength needs only 15-23 thousand. So this doesn't answer the question of if, or more likely when India can make hundreds of millions to billions of mRNA doses. Note also pretty much every effort in the West has talked shit about ramping up production, it's always harder and slower than the near universal optimistic estimates made by institutions which don't allow time for inevitable problems. India will also have to score some microfluidic devices to mix the mRNA and lipids which from rumor level reports can only be made by one firm in the world, and it's obviously booked solid for a long time.
  25. Sean says:

    I’m guessing Biden can’t remember when he and Kamala were the anti-vaxxers sowing Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt about the rushed Trump Vaccine that The Science showed wouldn’t arrive for a long time. After all, that’s crazy talk! We Democrats have always been at war with Trump’s anti-vaxx strategy.

    You have details on this? I’d like to read them, though it probably will get you banned from social media.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sean

    Second Presidential Debate, for one:

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/donald-trump-joe-biden-final-presidential-debate-transcript-2020

    Replies: @Sean, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Sean

    Second Presidential Debate, for one:

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/donald-trump-joe-biden-final-presidential-debate-transcript-2020

  26. @Alexander Turok
    @Michael S

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he's only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I've heard this before...

    Replies: @anon, @Thorfinnsson, @TomSchmidt, @Jonathan Mason

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories…

  27. @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Joe Walker

    Karma's a cargo cult-mentality fantasy, but if it were a measurable thing, then not-Pres. Quid Pro Joe and big pharma would both be in chin-deep sheep dip for millennia of soul-cleansing reincarnations.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @dearieme

    Yeah, screw that “cause and effect” “equal and opposite reaction” airy fairy crap.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Peter D. Bredon

    I'm not seeing how karma has come back to bite Dubya or Cheney or Rummy or Condy or Lower Intestine or any of the war criminals from a generation ago. Often, the bad guys stay winning and the good guys stay holding Ls. I don't believe in hell but it would be nice if it existed, because the worst people often don't pay for their crimes while alive.

  28. @Stan Adams
    @Joe Walker

    At first glance I thought you wrote Kamala instead of Karma. I was rushing to hit the Agree button.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Haha, exactly the same for me, Stan. Both ways work.

  29. Huh, imagine that. F**k Big Pharma as a general rule, but they were in a no-win situation. If Pfizer had released (or whatever it’s called) the vaccine before the election, the media-socialmedia-Deep-State, etc. anti-Trump establishment would have deep-sixed it as rushed and unsafe. For instance, Kamala was on the record saying she wouldn’t take a vaccine that would benefit Trump. So… whatever.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @JimDandy

    You would only have to change a small number of votes in a few states, enough to get to the House, the mainstream media might not have made a difference in that case.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  30. I am so sick and tired of mandatory vaxxers who declare that women control their own bodies.

    Men control their own heads. Abolish motorcycle helmet laws.

    Kids control their own heads. Abolish ..

    The DEMs are “pro-choice” on exactly one issue.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  31. The elites who run Pfizer don’t give a shit about patents. Don’t you get it by now? They will be rewarded and promoted by the System based on what they do for it. Their future success has nothing to do with corporate profits or effective products, but lies in fidelity to their class and its social and political interests. So there is no “stab in the back” – except for the poleaxe implanted in America’s viscera.

    • Agree: Peterike
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer's stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern's stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday's opening.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MattinLA

    , @Steve Sailer
    @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer's stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern's stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday's opening.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @EdwardM
    @MattinLA

    Can the government just rescind the patent by executive fiat? Or a law passed by Congress? What about the Fifth Amendment's takings clause?

    But I agree with you that Pfizer could probably be convinced to voluntarily forego its patent in the name of virtue-signaling. It's pretty pathetic that the socialist Europeans are pushing back on this.
    One more example of the merger of big business, government, and leftist cultural hegemony as America cedes its commercial leadership.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  32. @MattinLA
    The elites who run Pfizer don't give a shit about patents. Don't you get it by now? They will be rewarded and promoted by the System based on what they do for it. Their future success has nothing to do with corporate profits or effective products, but lies in fidelity to their class and its social and political interests. So there is no "stab in the back" - except for the poleaxe implanted in America's viscera.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern’s stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday’s opening.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.
     

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” -- IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” --Pfizer Chairman
     
    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?


    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times:

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics

    Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Forbes

    , @MattinLA
    @Steve Sailer

    The Pfizer officers don't care about the stock price either. They will be covered either way...

  33. @MattinLA
    The elites who run Pfizer don't give a shit about patents. Don't you get it by now? They will be rewarded and promoted by the System based on what they do for it. Their future success has nothing to do with corporate profits or effective products, but lies in fidelity to their class and its social and political interests. So there is no "stab in the back" - except for the poleaxe implanted in America's viscera.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern’s stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday’s opening.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.
     

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” -- IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” --Pfizer Chairman
     

    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?


    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times-- Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics


    USA Weightlifting spokesman Kevin Farley told Reuters that the group has no issue with Hubbard competing in the Tokyo games, despite efforts in multiple states to prevent transgender athletes from competing in girls and women's sports.
     

    No, it's not that Kevin Farley, though his late brother would have made a great weightlifting coach, on screen.

    Replies: @Cortes

  34. @Sean

    I’m guessing Biden can’t remember when he and Kamala were the anti-vaxxers sowing Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt about the rushed Trump Vaccine that The Science showed wouldn’t arrive for a long time. After all, that’s crazy talk! We Democrats have always been at war with Trump’s anti-vaxx strategy.
     
    You have details on this? I'd like to read them, though it probably will get you banned from social media.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Steve Sailer


    Joe Biden: (14:26)
    Make sure it’s totally transparent. Have the scientists of the world see it, know it, look at it, go through all the processes. And by the way, this is the same fellow who told you, “This is going to end by Easter” last time. This is the same fellow who told you that, “Don’t worry, we’re going to end this by the summer.” We’re about to go into a dark winter, a dark winter and he has no clear plan. And there’s no prospect that there’s going to be a vaccine available for the majority of the American people before the middle of next year.
     
    Yes, the tenor of what Biden said is as you suggest. Nevertheless, somewhat difficult to pin down with the meaning of the word "available" open to more than one interpretation. What Pfizer did is transparent now.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Biden said that he didn't believe that vaccines would be available for the majority of Americans until mid 2021.

    He didn't say that he was opposed to the use of vaccines, but he did say that he believed that masks (and presumably hand washing and social distancing) should be maintained in the meanwhile.

    And that is what is going on. For example Social Security offices in the United States are still closed. Would Trump have opened them by now?

    In that debate Trump also said that the military were going to be involved in a fast rollout of the vaccines and that 100 million vaccines were expected to be available for fast distribution before the end of 2020, which did not happen.

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Replies: @Anon7, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

  35. The funny thing is the Biden Administration still stabbed the mRNA makers in the back.

    Stick’s always more effective than carrot.

  36. @Sean

    I’m guessing Biden can’t remember when he and Kamala were the anti-vaxxers sowing Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt about the rushed Trump Vaccine that The Science showed wouldn’t arrive for a long time. After all, that’s crazy talk! We Democrats have always been at war with Trump’s anti-vaxx strategy.
     
    You have details on this? I'd like to read them, though it probably will get you banned from social media.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

  37. @Caspar von Everec
    A disease so serious and a vaccine so safe that people have to be threatened and coerced to take it

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Exiled off mainstreet, @Forbes, @Travis

    This is the real nub of the issue. I am sure that the real issue will end up being a tsunami of side effects which, over a few years, more than equal the deaths from the disease, though they may not be provable. I know that they have given them a hold harmless on liability, but my guess is that they can come up with a rationale to say that the hold harmless was based on fraudulent representations by the companies.
    Unless the legal system completes its collapse, which is possible and even likely, I see the litigation over the damages caused by these “vaccines” could be unprecedented in its scope and the liability could spread to any agency or institution which used coercion to encourage people against their sound judgement to submit to this gene altering poison. Oh, and by the way, the hold-back as part of the campaign against Trump may insulate him from some of the damages for this likely monumental failure.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Exiled off mainstreet

    Were you injured by the defective and deadly Covid vaccines of 2021-22? Call Shlabotnick and Shlabotnick, Injury Attorneys -- 1 800 BAD SHOT. Free consultation -- We'll fight for you!

    Replies: @J.Ross

  38. glib says:

    I read this move as an attempt to counter Sputnik’s increasing popularity (due to combined price and effectiveness) worldwide. They can not fight over effectiveness, so here is the coming price war (aided by arm twisting by the local US embassy).

    The ramifications are negative. This administration is so hell bent on waging war to Russia it is stabbing dear friends in the back as the title says. Russia knows this, and remains closed while the rest of the world is opening up, no doubt to avoid a biological attack, with little if any chance it will reopen before the elections (September). If financial war is not working, info war even less, what else is left to a country with 29 biological labs?

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @glib

    Maybe elements of Biden's administration are paid agents or spies for India or the Chi Coms.......maybe this is them activating their operatives to steal intellectual property.....

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Matt Buckalew
    @glib

    (OK Ron)

    , @JR Ewing
    @glib

    In my (limited) research, I've been very intrigued by Sputnik. But there is hardly any way for a normal American citizen to get it.

    I mentioned this to an acquaintance who is a Vaccine True Believer (+ Covid + Biden etc) and he was like, "How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards? You don't know what's in it!"

    I just shrugged.

    Replies: @glib, @Reg Cæsar

  39. Dumbo says:

    “It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults.”

    It goes both ways. Given that (at least according to the owner of this site himself) the virus or disease was man-made and created by basically the same people of the “West” that are now pushing the solution in the form of mRNA vaccines (create a problem, sell the solution, the oldest trick in the book), then why should anyone be so thankful to them.

    The lockdown reaction to the pandemic (that crushed the poor and middle-class and enriched a few zillionaires) was certainly man-made.

    Anyway, it’s one of the few cases in which “Biden” or whoever speaks for him is right. If Bill Gates and Bourla and all the others are really working on humanitarian grounds and nor just for profit, then take their supposedly “humanitarian” creed at face value. No patent profits for them.

    But, I fear that this is really just kabuki theatre – as is the whole “more taxes for the rich” promise. Pfizer and Big Tech need not fear that the “government will stab them on the back”, because basically THEY ARE THE GOVERNMENT.

    Your tax money goes to them, anyway, one way or another. Your information goes to them, one way or another. They’ll get their billions, patent or not patent.

    Big Government and Big Tech / Big Pharma are essentially the same thing or the same people.

    Don’t you get it?

    • Agree: Ben tillman, Yancey Ward
    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Dumbo

    You make some good points, Dumbo. Actually, when one really looks at the fundamentals, what we have is the union of State and Corporations (large ones), as in Mussolini's classic configuration of Fascism, with this union hyperempowered by information and government's ability and willingness to conjure up "money" when needed. Making their own realities (which we will judiciously study), as Karl Rove infamously stated.

    This works until it no longer does, and then look out below.

  40. @JimDandy
    Huh, imagine that. F**k Big Pharma as a general rule, but they were in a no-win situation. If Pfizer had released (or whatever it's called) the vaccine before the election, the media-socialmedia-Deep-State, etc. anti-Trump establishment would have deep-sixed it as rushed and unsafe. For instance, Kamala was on the record saying she wouldn't take a vaccine that would benefit Trump. So... whatever.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    You would only have to change a small number of votes in a few states, enough to get to the House, the mainstream media might not have made a difference in that case.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Unladen Swallow

    The second mouse gets the cheese, as they say. If Pfizer released it before the election it's sales would have been ruined by the Anti-Trump establishment--99 percent of the msm news about it would have been negative--and the first competing vaccine to be released after the election would have been anointed.

  41. Related:

  42. @AKAHorace
    Long, and totally unrelated, but of interest:
    https://status451.com/2017/01/20/days-of-rage/

    Don't bother posting if you have posted about it before.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You are right, it’s long. I read the book review part, to see if “Sara Jane”, the church lady up the hill, made an appearance, and she did. She founded the “Bay Area Research Collective”, which calls to mind the “Institute for Historical Review”.

    For a fun read exposing the leftist cleavages of the 1970s, read the manifestos of the New World Liberation Front (pp. 2-4) and Weatherman Underground Organization (pp. 5-7), in which they make some very good points, and BARC’s unsigned reply (likely by SJO herself) in which they try to paper differences over:

    Dragon (June 1976): New World Liberation Front on Feminism and Homosexuality (PDF)

    As for the remainder of the piece, he was off by three years. His 2017 came in 2020.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    She still in the klink? I know a bunch of Twin Cities theater types who knew her- lefties, every man jack of them, who were stunned when her case came to light.

  43. @Anonymous
    How much did American taxpayers lay out for the development 0f these mRNA vaccines?

    The U.S. government’s “Operation Warp Speed” cost upwards of $28 billion.

    Replies: @Charon, @That Would Be Telling

    And that was back when $28 billion was real money

  44. @anon
    Shouldn't that be "Biden jabs them in the back" ?

    Replies: @anon

    Biden jabs them in the back

    “pfizer stung in the behind”?
    Biden to Pfizer: “ever been in a turkish prison?”

  45. @Alexander Turok
    @Caspar von Everec

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    Replies: @anon, @Caspar von Everec, @Mr. Anon, @adreadline

    Oh yes, we all recoil in horror in memory of the black death which killed .1% of the population of Europe. God pray how do we achieve salvation from a disease that killed 3.26 million out of 8 billion people.

    Which calculates to give a 3.26/8000(millions) = .04075% death rate.

    How do we escape this calamity? God help us

  46. @Steve Sailer
    @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer's stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern's stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday's opening.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” — IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” –Pfizer Chairman

    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?

    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times:

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics

    Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah I've read that rubbers are openly available at the Olympics. I oppose this for two reasons: one, it encourages fornication. Two, anyone with Olympic-tier genes and work ethic SHOULD be reproducing. Ideally it would be with a spouse but these people need to be breeding regardless.

    Replies: @anon, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Forbes
    @Reg Cæsar

    Because healthy and young athletes need be inoculated against a virus that affects the old and/or overweight, with suppressed/compromised immune systems due to co-morbidities.

    But The Narrative...

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer's stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern's stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday's opening.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” — IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” –Pfizer Chairman

    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?

    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times– Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics

    USA Weightlifting spokesman Kevin Farley told Reuters that the group has no issue with Hubbard competing in the Tokyo games, despite efforts in multiple states to prevent transgender athletes from competing in girls and women’s sports.

    No, it’s not that Kevin Farley, though his late brother would have made a great weightlifting coach, on screen.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Reg Cæsar

    We should know more about the wee-wee when the results of the snatch and the clean and jerk come in.

  48. Here’s Pfizer’s stock price. And Moderna’s dropped from $177.50 on Wednesday at 2:30 pm to $148 at opening on Thursday.

    Get Woke. Go Broke.

    Hah! F**k ’em.

  49. @Unladen Swallow
    @JimDandy

    You would only have to change a small number of votes in a few states, enough to get to the House, the mainstream media might not have made a difference in that case.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    The second mouse gets the cheese, as they say. If Pfizer released it before the election it’s sales would have been ruined by the Anti-Trump establishment–99 percent of the msm news about it would have been negative–and the first competing vaccine to be released after the election would have been anointed.

    • Agree: Travis
  50. @Alexander Turok
    @Caspar von Everec

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    Replies: @anon, @Caspar von Everec, @Mr. Anon, @adreadline

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    I’m all for refusing association with the carriers of that plague known as totalitarianism………….people like you.

  51. I remember when liberals used to mistrust and villify chemical companies. Companies like Dow, which produced Napalm, and Dow, Monsanto, and Diamond Shamrock, which produced Agent Orange. Or Union Carbide, who accidentally killed over a thousand people in India.

    To those liberals, I would say this: Guess what a pharmaceutical company is?

    That’s right…………it’s a chemical company. Except the chemicals it produces, instead of being sown in the ground as fertilizer, or sprayed on your food as pesticide, or put in your gas tank as a fuel additive, are injested by you, or injected directly into your veins.

    Feel better now?

    Hey…………….better living through chemistry.

  52. @Joe Walker
    Karma is a bitch.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Stan Adams, @Neoconned, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John

    As they said in Kill Bill….they had it coming…

    Glenn Beck was going on about this yesterday morning. I did agree with him that if Biden allows this then the corporate types will clam up even more & become even more distrustful than they are now….

  53. @glib
    I read this move as an attempt to counter Sputnik's increasing popularity (due to combined price and effectiveness) worldwide. They can not fight over effectiveness, so here is the coming price war (aided by arm twisting by the local US embassy).

    The ramifications are negative. This administration is so hell bent on waging war to Russia it is stabbing dear friends in the back as the title says. Russia knows this, and remains closed while the rest of the world is opening up, no doubt to avoid a biological attack, with little if any chance it will reopen before the elections (September). If financial war is not working, info war even less, what else is left to a country with 29 biological labs?

    Replies: @Neoconned, @Matt Buckalew, @JR Ewing

    Maybe elements of Biden’s administration are paid agents or spies for India or the Chi Coms…….maybe this is them activating their operatives to steal intellectual property…..

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Neoconned


    Maybe elements of Biden’s administration are paid agents or spies for India or the Chi Coms…….maybe this is them activating their operatives to steal intellectual property…..
     
    Pretty sure that leading "Maybe" is generous. But this sort of effort, unless "Biden" can coerce these companies into creating Technical Data Packages, would be aimed at for example getting unredacted and never to be released data submitted to the FDA

    Patents? They're public documents, disclosure is one of the justifications for their absolute but limited in time monopolies, to avoid having information locked up forever as trade secrets. Also allows companies to quickly figure out improvements, after which they can swap patent rights to the original and the improvement. That was really big in the development of Silicon Valley back when it did made real stuff.
  54. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.
     

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” -- IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” --Pfizer Chairman
     

    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?


    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times-- Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics


    USA Weightlifting spokesman Kevin Farley told Reuters that the group has no issue with Hubbard competing in the Tokyo games, despite efforts in multiple states to prevent transgender athletes from competing in girls and women's sports.
     

    No, it's not that Kevin Farley, though his late brother would have made a great weightlifting coach, on screen.

    Replies: @Cortes

    We should know more about the wee-wee when the results of the snatch and the clean and jerk come in.

  55. I’m amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you’d pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year’s income, maybe more.

    • Replies: @Marquis
    @International Jew

    In a free market with no government advertising of a “deadly plague” and intervention?

    The vaccine would’ve never been invented, because you wouldn’t have noticed that any new particular virus was around. This is almost certainly the case when covid-19 swept through Japan and Australia last year.

    , @Johnny Rico
    @International Jew

    How long have you been collecting unemployment?

    , @Dcthrowback
    @International Jew

    $19/ea, and you’re the guinea pig. I would not cry too much for PFE, they see the ‘durability’ of the revenue stream as you will require yearly boosters. A full year of your income after you got it for free, truly …. International imo

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew

    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.

    Development of their Oxford vaccine was financed over 97% by British and overseas taxpayer money and scientists.

    It is free advertising, though.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @George
    @International Jew

    The low price reflects:

    The anticipated volume into the billions of doses.

    The oligarchic US covid vaccine market with 3 producers and only mRNA vaccines were permitted. In particular the Chinese are producing an old fashioned vaccine from inactivated covid viruses, which should be available in the 'free market' US too.

    the vaccine is worth more to the people who were willing to pay extra to jump the queue for the first doses. As time passes the vaccine becomes less valuable so it must be sold for less.

    Since the price was going to drop anyway Biden wanted to take credit for helping the poor, outside the US, but Germany's Chancellor Merkle would have none of it and refused to cooperate and allow Biden to take the credit.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    India manufactures a lot of generic pharmaceuticals.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @That Would Be Telling

    One of the consequences of globalism and offshoring is that many of these pharmaceuticals are spurious or adulterated and readily find their way to other countries, including America. Here’s a refreshingly honest Indian account of the problem.
    https://yourstory.com/2017/06/india-fake-drugs

  57. Sean says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Sean

    Second Presidential Debate, for one:

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/donald-trump-joe-biden-final-presidential-debate-transcript-2020

    Replies: @Sean, @Jonathan Mason

    Joe Biden: (14:26)
    Make sure it’s totally transparent. Have the scientists of the world see it, know it, look at it, go through all the processes. And by the way, this is the same fellow who told you, “This is going to end by Easter” last time. This is the same fellow who told you that, “Don’t worry, we’re going to end this by the summer.” We’re about to go into a dark winter, a dark winter and he has no clear plan. And there’s no prospect that there’s going to be a vaccine available for the majority of the American people before the middle of next year.

    Yes, the tenor of what Biden said is as you suggest. Nevertheless, somewhat difficult to pin down with the meaning of the word “available” open to more than one interpretation. What Pfizer did is transparent now.

  58. @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    Holy shit has Steve's blog ever become cucked. Are these Ron Unz paid trolls?

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew, @Alexander Turok, @anon

    Lol hope they demanded payment up front.

  59. Pfizer fudged its early efficacy data by manipulating reports on volunteers who were jabbed and then got virus symptoms — but just happened to not test positive. Imagine that.

    Meanwhile over 3,000 deaths have been reported as adverse events after immunization. And those are just the ones we know about.

    What’s the going rate on a patent for a medical intervention that not only doesn’t work as promised but also kills people?

  60. @glib
    I read this move as an attempt to counter Sputnik's increasing popularity (due to combined price and effectiveness) worldwide. They can not fight over effectiveness, so here is the coming price war (aided by arm twisting by the local US embassy).

    The ramifications are negative. This administration is so hell bent on waging war to Russia it is stabbing dear friends in the back as the title says. Russia knows this, and remains closed while the rest of the world is opening up, no doubt to avoid a biological attack, with little if any chance it will reopen before the elections (September). If financial war is not working, info war even less, what else is left to a country with 29 biological labs?

    Replies: @Neoconned, @Matt Buckalew, @JR Ewing

    (OK Ron)

  61. I’m sure if there were other labs around the globe capable of making the vaccines, the drug makers would have used them to produce the vaccines on their behalf. They have no incentive to limit the supply.

  62. @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Joe Walker

    Karma's a cargo cult-mentality fantasy, but if it were a measurable thing, then not-Pres. Quid Pro Joe and big pharma would both be in chin-deep sheep dip for millennia of soul-cleansing reincarnations.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @dearieme

    Quid Pro Joe: hats off, sir.

    It’s an even better joke in the UK where “quid” is slang for a pound sterling.

  63. @anon
    Pfizer is scum. They are extorting large sums from poor countries that can't afford their vaccine, shaking down South American countries for their national assets in exchange for the vax. Albert Bourla the CEO is a self-proclaimed "son of Holocaust survivor", a lot of sympathy he has for his fellow sufferers. They could easily license the technology to other producers like J&J, Merck etc. The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road, and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing. Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    Replies: @Deadite, @Marquis, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    No… Steve is totally being consistent and thoughtful. On one hand he has dozens of articles about how these pharmaceutical companies maliciously pushed pain killers for profit and helped destroy parts of white America. On the other hand, the pharmaceutical companies would never publish geared up partial data to exploit a crisis for billions of dollars in immediate profit. But he is claiming that they played politics with their data help Dementia Joe win.

    See…. it all makes complete sense. Now where’s the line for my 3rd booster shot?

  64. @International Jew
    I'm amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you'd pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year's income, maybe more.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Johnny Rico, @Dcthrowback, @Jonathan Mason, @George

    In a free market with no government advertising of a “deadly plague” and intervention?

    The vaccine would’ve never been invented, because you wouldn’t have noticed that any new particular virus was around. This is almost certainly the case when covid-19 swept through Japan and Australia last year.

  65. “A cured patent is a lost customer” Big Pharma

  66. @International Jew
    I'm amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you'd pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year's income, maybe more.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Johnny Rico, @Dcthrowback, @Jonathan Mason, @George

    How long have you been collecting unemployment?

  67. Moderation much?

  68. @International Jew
    I'm amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you'd pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year's income, maybe more.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Johnny Rico, @Dcthrowback, @Jonathan Mason, @George

    $19/ea, and you’re the guinea pig. I would not cry too much for PFE, they see the ‘durability’ of the revenue stream as you will require yearly boosters. A full year of your income after you got it for free, truly …. International imo

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Dcthrowback

    you will require yearly boosters

    ----------------

    I just don't get it. I mean, I get why the drug companies want that, but I don't get why even average normal people would buy into that and agree to the premise at all.

    What the hell are people so scared of? A lot of people within a very well-defined demographic caught covid and died. Many many more people caught it and survived and are now immune.

    The only people who need these "vaccines" are those who are at a high risk of dying (old, obese, diabetic, immunocompromised in some other way). Everyone else either has already caught it once or will eventually catch it once and that will be that. For the vast majority of people there's no need for these stupid shots.

    I was eager for my older parents and relatives to get vaccinated, but my wife and I aren't doing it and I damn sure am not going to allow my teenage sons to get it and risk infertility and blood clots and heart attacks - and whatever else - to protect them from a virus that is of no threat to them at all beyond a brief common cold.

    Why is covid still a thing? Why are these fears still so prevalent? There might be another deadly pandemic some day, but it's not going to be covid.

    Covid is over, America. The Looming Covid Terror has been over since last May. It took another 9 months to burn itself out among vulnerable populations, but the "pandemic" is freaking over. Let go of the fear and get on with life. The fear mongering and propaganda is so utterly transparent. Let it go. What the hell is wrong with these people?

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  69. @Alexander Turok
    @Michael S

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he's only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I've heard this before...

    Replies: @anon, @Thorfinnsson, @TomSchmidt, @Jonathan Mason

  70. Trial lawyers are a big blue team constituency.

  71. You need safe effective vaccine protection everywhere people travel. All such vaccines should not be patented. Most patentable research is paid for with tax dollars and should never be owned by a private company.They belong to mankind, as Jonas Salk declared for his polio vaccine.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @bayviking


    Most patentable research is paid for with tax dollars and should never be owned by a private company.

     

    A "work for hire"?

    They belong to mankind, as Jonas Salk declared for his polio vaccine.
     
    Salk was roundly criticized for not sharing credit with his colleagues. It hurt his reputation. Was this statement damage control? Guilt?
  72. The Pfizer vaxxes are just as deadly as J&J, if not more. The Biden administration might be doing them a favour.

  73. @Reg Cæsar
    @AKAHorace

    You are right, it's long. I read the book review part, to see if "Sara Jane", the church lady up the hill, made an appearance, and she did. She founded the "Bay Area Research Collective", which calls to mind the "Institute for Historical Review".

    For a fun read exposing the leftist cleavages of the 1970s, read the manifestos of the New World Liberation Front (pp. 2-4) and Weatherman Underground Organization (pp. 5-7), in which they make some very good points, and BARC's unsigned reply (likely by SJO herself) in which they try to paper differences over:

    Dragon (June 1976): New World Liberation Front on Feminism and Homosexuality (PDF)

    As for the remainder of the piece, he was off by three years. His 2017 came in 2020.

    Replies: @ganderson

    She still in the klink? I know a bunch of Twin Cities theater types who knew her- lefties, every man jack of them, who were stunned when her case came to light.

  74. @Steve Sailer
    @Sean

    Second Presidential Debate, for one:

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/donald-trump-joe-biden-final-presidential-debate-transcript-2020

    Replies: @Sean, @Jonathan Mason

    Biden said that he didn’t believe that vaccines would be available for the majority of Americans until mid 2021.

    He didn’t say that he was opposed to the use of vaccines, but he did say that he believed that masks (and presumably hand washing and social distancing) should be maintained in the meanwhile.

    And that is what is going on. For example Social Security offices in the United States are still closed. Would Trump have opened them by now?

    In that debate Trump also said that the military were going to be involved in a fast rollout of the vaccines and that 100 million vaccines were expected to be available for fast distribution before the end of 2020, which did not happen.

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Jonathan Mason

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=240DMmhgp4M

    Pretty amazing piece of journalism, I'm surprised it made it onto American TV.

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason

    The failure to ship 100 million vaccines before the end of 2020 comes down to two things, how long it took for them to get Emergency Use Authorizations, December 11th and 18th, which might have been delayed for political reasons by a month for Moderna (the Pfizer efficacy testing trick did not delay authorization because required safety data took longer for both companies), and the companies being too optimistic about how quickly they could ramp up mass production.

    Pfizer in particular, which absolutely refused to have anything to do with Operation Warp Speed (OWS) except sign a contract for 100 million doses. Then in mid-December they announced out of the blue they'd miss all their delivery promises by 50%. Not all that long afterwords they started accepting real help from OWS....


    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?
     
    Because OWS has been memory holed and then formally ended by "Biden." The science advisor was purged by "Biden," and he reported "Biden's" constant trashing of his people's fantastic efforts was doing what you'd expect to morale.

    However still in essentially the same position is full general Gustave F. Perna, who'd previously spent four years commanding the United States Army Materiel Command. While he earned his jump wings etc., per Wikipedia it looks like pretty much all his experience in the Army is logistics, and the Army has the primary responsibility for the entire US military's logistics (inquire as to their inventory of barges, for example). And of course don't forget the "... professional discuss logistics" maxim.
    , @Muggles
    @Jonathan Mason


    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?
     
    Mail from our military outpost in Thule Greenland can be pretty slow.
  75. @AnotherDad
    Leftists, including Democrats, don't understand "incentives"--except for themselves. This is small potatoes compared to their efforts with "criminal justice" or "welfare" or the "Soviet Union".

    If you want to be doing good works doing ... just pay.

    Pay for the patents and donate them to "the world" or pay for these folks to setup more vax production and donate the vax to friendly nations, gratis.

    Given the scale of "money printer go brrr", this is small beer.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    OTOH, vaxx manufacturers are shielded from product liability in the US, so they should get all the upside and none of the downside?

  76. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Yeah, screw that “cause and effect” “equal and opposite reaction” airy fairy crap.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    I’m not seeing how karma has come back to bite Dubya or Cheney or Rummy or Condy or Lower Intestine or any of the war criminals from a generation ago. Often, the bad guys stay winning and the good guys stay holding Ls. I don’t believe in hell but it would be nice if it existed, because the worst people often don’t pay for their crimes while alive.

  77. Will Biden do this, or is this just a backhanded demand for more campaign donations? Or perhaps this was done on the behest of Pelosi so her husband could either short Pfizer, or buy the stock a tad cheaper? I really don’t care if Biden goes ahead and does this, but old enough to know he won’t.

  78. @Alexander Turok
    @Michael S

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he's only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I've heard this before...

    Replies: @anon, @Thorfinnsson, @TomSchmidt, @Jonathan Mason

    Incompetent do-nothing is probably the best description of Trump. Saboteur of populist movement seems more likely. Still, incompetent do-nothingism is a step up from active malevolence.

  79. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Biden said that he didn't believe that vaccines would be available for the majority of Americans until mid 2021.

    He didn't say that he was opposed to the use of vaccines, but he did say that he believed that masks (and presumably hand washing and social distancing) should be maintained in the meanwhile.

    And that is what is going on. For example Social Security offices in the United States are still closed. Would Trump have opened them by now?

    In that debate Trump also said that the military were going to be involved in a fast rollout of the vaccines and that 100 million vaccines were expected to be available for fast distribution before the end of 2020, which did not happen.

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Replies: @Anon7, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    Pretty amazing piece of journalism, I’m surprised it made it onto American TV.

  80. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.
     

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” -- IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” --Pfizer Chairman
     
    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?


    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times:

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics

    Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Forbes

    Yeah I’ve read that rubbers are openly available at the Olympics. I oppose this for two reasons: one, it encourages fornication. Two, anyone with Olympic-tier genes and work ethic SHOULD be reproducing. Ideally it would be with a spouse but these people need to be breeding regardless.

    • Replies: @anon
    @AndrewR

    I oppose this

    Have you notified the IOC of your opposition? Did they reply?

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @AndrewR

    I would imagine that a lot of the female athletes would be on the pill or a depot injection, as they would not want a menstrual period interfering with their athletic feats, so the condoms would probably be more for protection against diseases.

    I would think that from the athlete's point of view half the POINT of qualifying for the Olympics is to get a medal in Olympic standard sex in the athlete's village.

  81. @glib
    I read this move as an attempt to counter Sputnik's increasing popularity (due to combined price and effectiveness) worldwide. They can not fight over effectiveness, so here is the coming price war (aided by arm twisting by the local US embassy).

    The ramifications are negative. This administration is so hell bent on waging war to Russia it is stabbing dear friends in the back as the title says. Russia knows this, and remains closed while the rest of the world is opening up, no doubt to avoid a biological attack, with little if any chance it will reopen before the elections (September). If financial war is not working, info war even less, what else is left to a country with 29 biological labs?

    Replies: @Neoconned, @Matt Buckalew, @JR Ewing

    In my (limited) research, I’ve been very intrigued by Sputnik. But there is hardly any way for a normal American citizen to get it.

    I mentioned this to an acquaintance who is a Vaccine True Believer (+ Covid + Biden etc) and he was like, “How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards? You don’t know what’s in it!”

    I just shrugged.

    • Replies: @glib
    @JR Ewing

    Incredible, isn't it? I am a motive fundamentalist (cui bono). Whereas the Western elites have every motive to depopulate, for Russia the opposite is true.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JR Ewing


    “How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards?”
     
    https://s.inyourpocket.com/gallery/253437.jpg

    https://www.foodbev.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Russian-Standard-2.jpg

    https://duckysalwayshungry.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/662.jpg

    " You don’t know what’s in it!"

     

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/vlEAAOSwHptY-TcA/s-l500.jpg
  82. This whole vaccine deal is a joke. It smacks of trying to make a vaccine for the common cold virus. And being this Wuhan chyna virus is as well engineered from gain of function research – largely funded by fascist fauci and the CDC with their chicom buddies doing the dirty work…… does any thinking person really think these “vaccines” work ?.
    As this virus morphs like the common cold/flu ….. which as a virus this is expected , it should also be expected that these vaccines by the big pharma overlords would be ineffective in short order. Why else do the mask Nazi’s demand keeping their precious mask mandate going , their goofy social distancing deals , their oppressive lockdowns. We all know al large part of this is control…. control over the people and economy(s) they would not ordinarily be able to have let alone wield .
    As well what are the true number f deaths from these vaccines ?. How many have been crippled , severely injured ?. Lord darth baizou biden of chyna even in his non senile moments does not want the sheeple to know these numbers. Baizou biden is a puppet for the swamp. He will simply be the puppet popping off with the deep state fist squarely up his arse spouting whatever they put on the teleprompter or index cards for him before it’s nappy time.

  83. @Dcthrowback
    @International Jew

    $19/ea, and you’re the guinea pig. I would not cry too much for PFE, they see the ‘durability’ of the revenue stream as you will require yearly boosters. A full year of your income after you got it for free, truly …. International imo

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    you will require yearly boosters

    —————-

    I just don’t get it. I mean, I get why the drug companies want that, but I don’t get why even average normal people would buy into that and agree to the premise at all.

    What the hell are people so scared of? A lot of people within a very well-defined demographic caught covid and died. Many many more people caught it and survived and are now immune.

    The only people who need these “vaccines” are those who are at a high risk of dying (old, obese, diabetic, immunocompromised in some other way). Everyone else either has already caught it once or will eventually catch it once and that will be that. For the vast majority of people there’s no need for these stupid shots.

    I was eager for my older parents and relatives to get vaccinated, but my wife and I aren’t doing it and I damn sure am not going to allow my teenage sons to get it and risk infertility and blood clots and heart attacks – and whatever else – to protect them from a virus that is of no threat to them at all beyond a brief common cold.

    Why is covid still a thing? Why are these fears still so prevalent? There might be another deadly pandemic some day, but it’s not going to be covid.

    Covid is over, America. The Looming Covid Terror has been over since last May. It took another 9 months to burn itself out among vulnerable populations, but the “pandemic” is freaking over. Let go of the fear and get on with life. The fear mongering and propaganda is so utterly transparent. Let it go. What the hell is wrong with these people?

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @JR Ewing

    "Why is covid still a thing? Why are these fears still so prevalent?"

    Covid 19 is a religion, it is never going away. Covidians love facediaper theatre and they will get a fresh prick every six months or however often their high priests at the Covid Disinformation Centers order them to. Bank.

  84. @International Jew
    I'm amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you'd pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year's income, maybe more.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Johnny Rico, @Dcthrowback, @Jonathan Mason, @George

    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.

    Development of their Oxford vaccine was financed over 97% by British and overseas taxpayer money and scientists.

    It is free advertising, though.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.
     
    That's because its a contractual obligation Oxford's strong women insisted on as part of gifting the world their grifting vaccine (the platform had failed for 8 years). All of a piece of most of the clown show this vaccine has been from the start, except for anything having to do with the EU and their ruling trash trying to shift blame from their pathetic procurement polity to a partly U.K. company while they're still furious about Brexit.

    Word has it Merck was the only other Big Pharma company that was willing to sign up to such a bad deal (they never tried hard to create their own vaccine, at last count have for example agreed to help make the Janssen one), but the U.K. wanted a U.K. company to do it, even if it had no experience with vaccines. I bet now AZ is really regretting having anything to do with this mess.

    Replies: @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  85. On his show on Wednesday, Tucker Carlson reported that according to the CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS), nearly 4000 Americans have already died from the vaccine.

    From their website;

    Over 245 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were administered in the United States from December 14, 2020, through May 3, 2021. During this time, VAERS received 4,178 reports of death (0.0017%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine.

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html

    True or not true?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Johnny Smoggins


    On his show on Wednesday, Tucker Carlson reported that according to the CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS), nearly 4000 Americans have already died from the vaccine.

    [About their website, and I add it's easy to use, they even wrote a good tutorial with accurate screen shots, to extract data at a max of 10,000 records at a time.]

    True or not true?
     
    So blatantly false I've lost any possible respect I had for the man and the people who research and write for him. I don't do video so I've never seen more than a few seconds of him, but have read some of the monologues including skimming this one, you can find a full transcript here.

    Which is not to say these three vaccines haven't killed anyone, just that you can't jump from an Adverse Event like death that's correlated with a vaccine injection to axiomatic causation, "correlation does not imply causation" as shown for example in a study the Brits did finding elevated cancer rates near their nuclear power plants. Including sites that were merely planned as future locations.

    What makes this particularly vile is the extremely intense targeting of the elderly; you don't need to be a formal actuary to know these people die at high rates. Heck, see all the COVID-19 truthers, some going as far as celebrating the death of people "with one foot in the grave." I think some of this is Boomer hate, but they're at most 75 years old this year, so it's really doing a number on Silents. So for a rough estimate without examining individual cases you would grab as much data about these people as you can and figure out how many deaths were expected, vaccine or no vaccine. Dig deeper and compare apparent top line causes like heart failure or stroke compared those you'd expect.

    And no one should question the general principle that drugs and vaccines given to hundreds of millions people will main and kill some of them. So you must do cost/benefit analysis, compare likely vaccine caused deaths to how readily COVID-19 kills these people.

    Top Men are examining each serious case and trying to figure out the real causes, and that's going to be part of the data submitted to the FDA for the Biologics License Applications the mRNA vaccine companies submitted Wednesday and Friday. These are called "rolling" submissions because new data will be submitted as it's generated.
    , @Deadite
    @Johnny Smoggins

    Deaths to the elderly have some uncertainty.

    The important deaths are to the under 29 crowd. Under 18 deaths by vaccine are (extrapolating) twice the deaths from covid. 18-29 vaccine deaths (again, extrapolated, but by a lot less) are a quarter of covid deaths.

    Combine this with future unknowns and giving the vaccine to anyone under 39 is an abomination.

  86. @MattinLA
    The elites who run Pfizer don't give a shit about patents. Don't you get it by now? They will be rewarded and promoted by the System based on what they do for it. Their future success has nothing to do with corporate profits or effective products, but lies in fidelity to their class and its social and political interests. So there is no "stab in the back" - except for the poleaxe implanted in America's viscera.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

    Can the government just rescind the patent by executive fiat? Or a law passed by Congress? What about the Fifth Amendment’s takings clause?

    But I agree with you that Pfizer could probably be convinced to voluntarily forego its patent in the name of virtue-signaling. It’s pretty pathetic that the socialist Europeans are pushing back on this.
    One more example of the merger of big business, government, and leftist cultural hegemony as America cedes its commercial leadership.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @EdwardM

    For your first points, you tell me if the Rule of Law is still operative in the US....


    It’s pretty pathetic that the socialist Europeans are pushing back on this.
     
    With a few minutes searching in English just now, it's reported five are, but I could only confirm France and Germany. The latter of course being the home of BioNTech, and I keep forgetting the other mRNA vaccine company CureVac which has been very late to get anything working and to the market. Could be they're a more political than science company, they were the ones that scored government money by claiming Trump had offered to buy the whole company and move it to the US.

    France's Sanofi Pasteur is a vaccine giant, although they abjectly failed with their bug cell grown protein V1.0 vaccine using a GSK adjuvant (they bought Protein Sciences a while ago), they might have a V2.0 approved by the end of this year.

    Despite the Official platitudes, (vaccine) nationalism is alive and well in the EU....
  87. @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew

    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.

    Development of their Oxford vaccine was financed over 97% by British and overseas taxpayer money and scientists.

    It is free advertising, though.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.

    That’s because its a contractual obligation Oxford’s strong women insisted on as part of gifting the world their grifting vaccine (the platform had failed for 8 years). All of a piece of most of the clown show this vaccine has been from the start, except for anything having to do with the EU and their ruling trash trying to shift blame from their pathetic procurement polity to a partly U.K. company while they’re still furious about Brexit.

    Word has it Merck was the only other Big Pharma company that was willing to sign up to such a bad deal (they never tried hard to create their own vaccine, at last count have for example agreed to help make the Janssen one), but the U.K. wanted a U.K. company to do it, even if it had no experience with vaccines. I bet now AZ is really regretting having anything to do with this mess.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @anon
    @That Would Be Telling

    UK government announced today they won't be administering the AstraZenica to anyone under 40, because of the blood clot issue.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/coronavirus/covid-people-under-40-in-uk-to-get-alternative-to-astrazeneca-jab/ar-BB1gsRI4

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @That Would Be Telling

    "That’s because its a contractual obli" blah blah blah blah blah vomitous loggorhea snipped, you're very welcome.

    It's so weird how people are still discussing the sniffles like it's an interesting subject. I get it, That Would Be Shilling is on the Pfizer payroll and is compensated by the word, but why is anyone else with an IQ supra 26 discussing the common cold? And how can a politician declare that a plague ends on June 15, 2021, as Governor Douch'em has in California? Is it because CoronaHoax is a human invention and thus, like all human inventions, can end at an arbitrary time, like baseball ends after nine innings?

    Holla back, my facediapered Covimbeciles!

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  88. Altai says:

    I don’t know, telling Pfizer to go spin in order to bring all this to a close sooner and talking about ending sanctions against Iran are pretty good advertisements for the Democrat party and Joe Biden.

    There’s a lot to criticise the modern Dem party for, ‘betraying’ Pfizer isn’t one of them.

  89. @Dumbo

    “It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults.”
     
    It goes both ways. Given that (at least according to the owner of this site himself) the virus or disease was man-made and created by basically the same people of the "West" that are now pushing the solution in the form of mRNA vaccines (create a problem, sell the solution, the oldest trick in the book), then why should anyone be so thankful to them.

    The lockdown reaction to the pandemic (that crushed the poor and middle-class and enriched a few zillionaires) was certainly man-made.

    Anyway, it's one of the few cases in which "Biden" or whoever speaks for him is right. If Bill Gates and Bourla and all the others are really working on humanitarian grounds and nor just for profit, then take their supposedly "humanitarian" creed at face value. No patent profits for them.

    But, I fear that this is really just kabuki theatre - as is the whole "more taxes for the rich" promise. Pfizer and Big Tech need not fear that the "government will stab them on the back", because basically THEY ARE THE GOVERNMENT.

    Your tax money goes to them, anyway, one way or another. Your information goes to them, one way or another. They'll get their billions, patent or not patent.

    Big Government and Big Tech / Big Pharma are essentially the same thing or the same people.

    Don't you get it?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    You make some good points, Dumbo. Actually, when one really looks at the fundamentals, what we have is the union of State and Corporations (large ones), as in Mussolini’s classic configuration of Fascism, with this union hyperempowered by information and government’s ability and willingness to conjure up “money” when needed. Making their own realities (which we will judiciously study), as Karl Rove infamously stated.

    This works until it no longer does, and then look out below.

  90. @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    Holy shit has Steve's blog ever become cucked. Are these Ron Unz paid trolls?

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew, @Alexander Turok, @anon

    If Ron wanted to, he could just kick the InfoWars contingent off the website. No need to hire paid trolls.

  91. @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.
     
    That's because its a contractual obligation Oxford's strong women insisted on as part of gifting the world their grifting vaccine (the platform had failed for 8 years). All of a piece of most of the clown show this vaccine has been from the start, except for anything having to do with the EU and their ruling trash trying to shift blame from their pathetic procurement polity to a partly U.K. company while they're still furious about Brexit.

    Word has it Merck was the only other Big Pharma company that was willing to sign up to such a bad deal (they never tried hard to create their own vaccine, at last count have for example agreed to help make the Janssen one), but the U.K. wanted a U.K. company to do it, even if it had no experience with vaccines. I bet now AZ is really regretting having anything to do with this mess.

    Replies: @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    UK government announced today they won’t be administering the AstraZenica to anyone under 40, because of the blood clot issue.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/coronavirus/covid-people-under-40-in-uk-to-get-alternative-to-astrazeneca-jab/ar-BB1gsRI4

  92. @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    AstraZeneca has pledged to sell their Covid-19 vaccine at production cost for the duration of the pandemic.
     
    That's because its a contractual obligation Oxford's strong women insisted on as part of gifting the world their grifting vaccine (the platform had failed for 8 years). All of a piece of most of the clown show this vaccine has been from the start, except for anything having to do with the EU and their ruling trash trying to shift blame from their pathetic procurement polity to a partly U.K. company while they're still furious about Brexit.

    Word has it Merck was the only other Big Pharma company that was willing to sign up to such a bad deal (they never tried hard to create their own vaccine, at last count have for example agreed to help make the Janssen one), but the U.K. wanted a U.K. company to do it, even if it had no experience with vaccines. I bet now AZ is really regretting having anything to do with this mess.

    Replies: @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “That’s because its a contractual obli” blah blah blah blah blah vomitous loggorhea snipped, you’re very welcome.

    It’s so weird how people are still discussing the sniffles like it’s an interesting subject. I get it, That Would Be Shilling is on the Pfizer payroll and is compensated by the word, but why is anyone else with an IQ supra 26 discussing the common cold? And how can a politician declare that a plague ends on June 15, 2021, as Governor Douch’em has in California? Is it because CoronaHoax is a human invention and thus, like all human inventions, can end at an arbitrary time, like baseball ends after nine innings?

    Holla back, my facediapered Covimbeciles!

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  93. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    India manufactures a lot of generic pharmaceuticals.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @That Would Be Telling

    The question is how many Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) India makes to the package into pills or sterile vials etc. Not many years ago a lot of their factories for that either got shut down by the FDA or shut out of the US market.

    But we have the Serum Institute of India (SII) which despite what its name might imply is a private firm that does churn out mass quantities of vaccines, even on its own dime increased their production capacity by I think it was a billion doses a year to gear up for COVID-19 vaccines. The Government of India which seems to be referred to as GoI by many natives until very recently had no interest in helping them and little in buying their product for internal use, officially they’d solved the problem, so 2/3rds of the nation’s COVID-19 vaccine output was exported.

    As I recall the SII even stopped vaccine production at one point after they ran out of warehouse space (requires fridges)…. After the latest wave exploded the CEO was also forced to flee the country to the U.K. after getting very specific threats from too many powerful Indian figures and some politicians have talked about seizing their firm or something like that in the nation’s traditional socialist way, and he’s has said he’s looking into manufacturing vaccines in the U.K…..

    The SII was BTW aggressive enough to score enough raw materials including those 2,000L sterile bags to for cell culture production for their licensed version of the Oxford vaccines which has the brand name Covishield, Vaxzevria is the brand name in the EU and perhaps elsewhere. His recent pleas were for three months of supplies was so the SII could ramp up production of the Novavax vaccine, which is also cell culture grown but to yield a single protein instead of a virus. That one looks very promising but I’m getting increasingly worried about the U.K. not giving it emergency approval.

    To close out this non-mRNA vaccine discussion, the US sending the SII etc. cell culture supplies is probably mostly “robbing” production of those sorts of vaccines in the US. Janssen was forced to use Emergent BioSolutions in Baltimore (long bipartisan corruption story there), and if you really wanted to safely make vaccines in that factory you’d need to fire every employ in it, strip it down to bare concrete etc. and repaint it with good paint, and start everything from scratch. If we don’t take such drastic steps, I don’t recommend taking any Janssen doses made there. I believe all our current doses are coming from the Netherlands, but Merck is going to make it here at some point.

    After the Oxford virus was found in 15 million Janssen doses in that factory AZ/Oxford production was stopped there to avoid future cross contamination, and they’re looking for another factory. Novavax contracted with a Fujifilm unit both in the U.K. and the US to make their’s. The only other cell culture grown vaccine of note right now is Sputnik V, and obviously that’s not going to be accepted by our ruling trash. So unless cell culture production needs stuff like filters that are also needed for mRNA vaccine production, it doesn’t matter much if we’re sending supplies to India.

  94. Today the truth surfaced. Today, with the new vaccines that stopped the disease (at almost the same time of the year as in 2020), Trump has been vindicated. Billions across the planet now recognize his very stable genius. He will ascend to Heavens, like a prophet. In his place, as a first caliph, Americans will choose between His IQ Highness Jared and Her IQ Highness Kizzmikia.

    It’s also amusing to claim that “the world lacks ability to make mRNA vaccines”. I don’t think Moderna had any capacity, including making their own experimental RNA drugs, until maybe 6 months ago. They were ordering from outside providers, whcih have provided labs with artisanal products for the last 2-3 decades.

    Also, since the RNA vaccines are now stored at minus 20 Celsius (as opposed to classical minus 78), and since there is no antibody test to prove you are vaccinated (in contrast to hep B or MMR), you can rest assured NO ONE has any mRNA manufacturing capacity.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    Also, since the RNA vaccines are now stored at minus 20 Celsius (as opposed to classical minus 78), and since there is no antibody test to prove you are vaccinated (in contrast to hep B or MMR), you can rest assured NO ONE has any mRNA manufacturing capacity.
     
    I'm really not sure at all what you're trying to say here, but we most certainly have serological tests for prior exposure and likely immunity to COVID-19, have for a year or so. They're inherently not super accurate, though.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  95. @Vishwas
    @415 reasons

    Gennova in Pune, India is already in Phase I/II trials for its mRNA vaccine, HGCO19.
    Here is the announcement: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/national/hgco19-vaccine-candidate-gennova-starts-enrolment-for-phase-12-human-clinical-trials/article34309383.ece

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Gennova in Pune, India is already in Phase I/II trials for its mRNA vaccine

    That’s great (seriously), but a blended Phase I/II trial if US FDA strength only needs about a thousand doses, those are going to be made “in the lab” like Moderna for example did. Phase III if FDA strength needs only 15-23 thousand. So this doesn’t answer the question of if, or more likely when India can make hundreds of millions to billions of mRNA doses. Note also pretty much every effort in the West has talked shit about ramping up production, it’s always harder and slower than the near universal optimistic estimates made by institutions which don’t allow time for inevitable problems. India will also have to score some microfluidic devices to mix the mRNA and lipids which from rumor level reports can only be made by one firm in the world, and it’s obviously booked solid for a long time.

  96. Is this Pfizer’s IP to steal? This is a vaccine developed by a “Prussian Turk” and her born in Turkey husband at their company BioNTech in Germany, that country strangely enough not signing on to this IP theft scheme. Fosun of China also has a piece of the action due to an early March 2020 investment in BioNTech, a month before Pfizer joined the game.

    The next problem is that IP in terms of patents are only licenses to sue and to get your country’s customs unit to seize counterfeit materials at the border. What’s needed for anything complicated like a novel vaccine is what’s called in the military gun procurement world a Technical Data Package (TDP) that details everything that’s obvious about making a gun or a vaccine.

    And since every step but the first and the last of making mRNA vaccines is new in bulk and therefore state of the art, you need experienced personal to help with the tiny tweaks and such that are needed to get high, or perhaps even any yield from your production lines. And Moderna for one says they absolutely don’t have anyone to spare right now, not sure about how they might be expanding production in the US, but a Swiss plant is very new and I’m sure still coming up to speed. Needless to say an outright theft of IP incurs no obligation on the part of the injured company to limit its own production by sending its experts to wherever to enthusiastically help a company steal from them.

    Steps in short: ferment E. Coli to make plasmids of DNA including a section coding for the spike protein. Clip out just that section, not sure how new that is in bulk, and now we get to the new stuff: make mRNA accurately in mass quantities and there are all sorts of purification steps through this point, and mix it just right with lipids to protect it and get it inside cells. Oh, are you going to try to steal the microfluidics know how to make those mixing machines, which per rumor only one company can do?

    Then fill and finish, and while that’s not state of the art, it took two months for Moderna to prove to itself and the FDA that increasing the amount in a vial by 50% wouldn’t ruin the vaccine. The NYT explains it well including illustrations, pictures, and videos I haven’t watched here.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @That Would Be Telling

    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli? That is going to carry nonhuman changes to the nitric bases (methylations, glycosilations, what have you). Nonhuman RNA activates TLRs, which are part of the innate immunity.

    E coli RNA will be destroyed with a vengeance by human cells, rather than being used as template for proteins.

    I am vomit.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  97. @anon
    Pfizer is scum. They are extorting large sums from poor countries that can't afford their vaccine, shaking down South American countries for their national assets in exchange for the vax. Albert Bourla the CEO is a self-proclaimed "son of Holocaust survivor", a lot of sympathy he has for his fellow sufferers. They could easily license the technology to other producers like J&J, Merck etc. The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road, and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing. Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    Replies: @Deadite, @Marquis, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road,

    Maybe; both BioNTech and Moderna and I assume everyone else trying this has abjectly failed, and there are good reasons to believe “a cancer vaccine” is a particularly hard target, since cancers are deranged versions of normal cells.

    and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing

    Well, yes, they aren’t a charity. See the AZ/Oxford clown show for what can happen when you try to remove eeeeevil profit from the equation.

    Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    That family in two cycles, benzodiazepines and the opiod oxycodone pushed addictive drugs, in the latter example claiming they’d found a way around the addiction problem. This is very far from spending a lot of money out of their pocket to help a small biotech firm test and then mass manufacture and distribute a life saving vaccine. And see ’s comment on the issues of trying to do business with Third World countries.

  98. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Biden said that he didn't believe that vaccines would be available for the majority of Americans until mid 2021.

    He didn't say that he was opposed to the use of vaccines, but he did say that he believed that masks (and presumably hand washing and social distancing) should be maintained in the meanwhile.

    And that is what is going on. For example Social Security offices in the United States are still closed. Would Trump have opened them by now?

    In that debate Trump also said that the military were going to be involved in a fast rollout of the vaccines and that 100 million vaccines were expected to be available for fast distribution before the end of 2020, which did not happen.

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Replies: @Anon7, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    The failure to ship 100 million vaccines before the end of 2020 comes down to two things, how long it took for them to get Emergency Use Authorizations, December 11th and 18th, which might have been delayed for political reasons by a month for Moderna (the Pfizer efficacy testing trick did not delay authorization because required safety data took longer for both companies), and the companies being too optimistic about how quickly they could ramp up mass production.

    Pfizer in particular, which absolutely refused to have anything to do with Operation Warp Speed (OWS) except sign a contract for 100 million doses. Then in mid-December they announced out of the blue they’d miss all their delivery promises by 50%. Not all that long afterwords they started accepting real help from OWS….

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Because OWS has been memory holed and then formally ended by “Biden.” The science advisor was purged by “Biden,” and he reported “Biden’s” constant trashing of his people’s fantastic efforts was doing what you’d expect to morale.

    However still in essentially the same position is full general Gustave F. Perna, who’d previously spent four years commanding the United States Army Materiel Command. While he earned his jump wings etc., per Wikipedia it looks like pretty much all his experience in the Army is logistics, and the Army has the primary responsibility for the entire US military’s logistics (inquire as to their inventory of barges, for example). And of course don’t forget the “… professional discuss logistics” maxim.

  99. @International Jew
    I'm amazed at how low the vaccine has been priced, even under patent protection. Pfizer has been charging about $15 per dose, Astra-Zeneca just $4. Those prices must already reflect a fear of the US government stepping in and dictating prices.

    Think how much you'd pay to get vaccinated, in a free market free-for-all! I would have shelled out a year's income, maybe more.

    Replies: @Marquis, @Johnny Rico, @Dcthrowback, @Jonathan Mason, @George

    The low price reflects:

    The anticipated volume into the billions of doses.

    The oligarchic US covid vaccine market with 3 producers and only mRNA vaccines were permitted. In particular the Chinese are producing an old fashioned vaccine from inactivated covid viruses, which should be available in the ‘free market’ US too.

    the vaccine is worth more to the people who were willing to pay extra to jump the queue for the first doses. As time passes the vaccine becomes less valuable so it must be sold for less.

    Since the price was going to drop anyway Biden wanted to take credit for helping the poor, outside the US, but Germany’s Chancellor Merkle would have none of it and refused to cooperate and allow Biden to take the credit.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @George


    The oligarchic US covid vaccine market with 3 producers and only mRNA vaccines were permitted. In particular the Chinese are producing an old fashioned vaccine from inactivated covid viruses, which should be available in the ‘free market’ US too.
     
    No "free market" in drugs and biologics prior to getting regulatory approval. Most of what you say is just plain wrong, including your claim Janssen's DNA virus vector vaccine is a mRNA one. As for the Chinese, they'd have to spend a lot of money to get a vaccine approved in the US when they generally aren't targeting the First World at all (any exceptions?), and their actions so far in the Third World are often highly secretive, which won't fly at all with the FDA. Which can and will protect trade secrets, but insists on getting everything, inspecting all factories (one place where Sputnik V fails hard), etc.

    Given that while their vaccines of this type which are their first ones to market do appear to pass the minimum FDA threshold of 50% efficacy, the fact that they're officially admitting they're not very good and even contemplating combining the two can fully explain why they aren't trying in the US, especially now that we've got three very high for their various goals efficacy vaccines (Janssen one jab doesn't have the same objectives as the mRNA ones; two jabs, we'll see).
  100. @Alexander Turok
    @Caspar von Everec

    Threats and coercion i.e. people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers.

    Replies: @anon, @Caspar von Everec, @Mr. Anon, @adreadline

    people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers

    Nice Who? Whom? Us vs. them dehumanization, bro. Right to refuse association, you say. Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race? If not, why not? Not to mention, on which basis you claim that someone is a “plague carrier” merely because they are unvaccinated? If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @adreadline


    Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race?
     
    Yes.

    If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?
     
    COVID tests are not instant, so a negative COVID test is doesn't tell you for certain that someone's not a carrier.

    My proposal is a system of special badges. The badges themselves contain symbols, one of if you've had covid, another for if you've had the vaccine, and another for if you've signed up to continue to be subject to social distancing and mask restrictions, which thereafter become optional for everyone else. So if you've had the vaccine, had COVID, and want continue to be made to follow social distancing regulations, you'd wear a badge with all three symbols. Badge impersonation becomes a criminal offense.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  101. This is the sort of thing that happens a lot in life in general, and healthcare in particular, but I just want to spell it out:

    If Pfizer had, instead of investing in making a lifesaving vaccine, invested in making pills that give you enhanced erections, no one would be clamoring for them to release the patent to Erector (TM), regardless of how much money was being made.

    However, if you make or do something that actually is important and lifesaving, people will demand that everyone get access to it for humanitarian reasons. Unfortunately, one way or another, a lot of people can’t or won’t pay, so the only way they can get access to it is if you give it to them for free. Third parties will demand that you give it away for free and will paint you as the bad guy for not doing so, even though you are the person who made this thing available in the first place and no one would have it at all without your efforts! Somehow you are now morally beneath the people who just sat on the couch.

    In healthcare, surgeons who operate on cancers make significantly less than surgeons who do breast augmentations. Obstetricians who manage high risk deliveries make less than orthopedists who do knee arthroscopies on healthy young people. Why? It’s not because knee arthroscopies or boob jobs are terribly difficult. It’s because if you can’t pay what the surgeon demands for the boob job, the surgeon can tell you to get lost without it being a breach of ethics. On the other hand, if you show up in the ED pregnant and no ability to pay for anything (e.g. undocumented immigrant) whoever is staff in that hospital is legally obligated to deliver your baby, but will get paid nothing (or some token amount from medicaid that doesn’t cover overhead.)

    Thus there is an inverse correlation between the importance of something to human health and the amount the people involved earn. Pfizer will make far, far less money on this than they made on Viagra.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @SimpleSong

    Don't feel too sorry for them ...

    https://www.barrons.com/news/pfizer-sees-covid-19-as-durable-revenue-stream-as-profits-rise-01620150614

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong


    On the other hand, if you show up in the ED pregnant and no ability to pay for anything (e.g. undocumented immigrant) whoever is staff in that hospital is legally obligated to deliver your baby, but will get paid nothing (or some token amount from medicaid that doesn’t cover overhead.)
     
    Nobody knows exactly how much Medicaid pays per childbirth, because these numbers vary wildly between states and there are no national numbers available.

    The amount that Medicaid spends per birth on mother and child is not something the federal government and states report.

    For 2010, the Guttmacher Institute estimated $12,777 for pre-natal, delivery, post-partum, and infant care in the first 12 months.Using this approach produces an estimate of $5.3 billion in taxpayer money going to fund births to immigrants in 2014, $2.35 billion of which is for illegal immigrant births... While this estimate provides insight into the likely costs of births to illegal immigrants each year, it is only a rough estimate given the data limitations.

    However 48% of all births in the US are paid for by Medicaid. About 23% of births in the US are to mothers who are immigrants, legal or illegal. Births to illegal immigrant mothers are about 7.5% of the total number of births in the US, costing the taxpayer approximately $2.5 billion annually.

    Illegal immigrants are not eligible for Medicaid, but Medicaid picks up the tab for delivery and postpartum care for at least the first few months, so the hospitals do get paid.

    The largest number of illegal immigrant births are in California, Texas, and Florida.

    Generally the states have contracts with providers for these services which are reimbursed both on a per procedure basis and via supplemental block payments. Supplemental payments to hospitals account for about 27% of total Medicaid payments to hospitals, so can turn red into black.

    All in all Medicaid accounts for 9.5% of the federal budget, so nothing to sneeze at if you happen to own a hospital or two and don't mind some scruffy-looking patients and visitors sitting around in your corporate-chic lobby, sacrificing fried chickens, and talking in some foreign tongue.

  102. @Alexander Turok
    @Michael S

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories and is secretly working to blow the lid on the conspiracy while he's only pretending to be an incompetent do-nothing in public. Could swear I've heard this before...

    Replies: @anon, @Thorfinnsson, @TomSchmidt, @Jonathan Mason

    Maybe Trump secretly believes in my crazy crockpot theories

    LOL! On my cell phone an advertisement for crockpots appeared underneath your post!

  103. @Anonymous
    How much did American taxpayers lay out for the development 0f these mRNA vaccines?

    The U.S. government’s “Operation Warp Speed” cost upwards of $28 billion.

    Replies: @Charon, @That Would Be Telling

    How much did American taxpayers lay out for the development 0f these mRNA vaccines?

    The U.S. government’s “Operation Warp Speed” cost upwards of $28 billion.

    The US government paid nothing up front for Pfizer/BioNTech, although the former’s inability to produce at the volumes promised resulted in their belatedly accepting help from the BAD ORANGE MAN’s Operation Warp Speed (OWS).

    Now we get to the definition of “development;” based on a lot of work in mRNA deployment technology, I’m sure some government funded and of course there’s the basic research it depends on, and more than a decade into safe SARS like coronavirus vaccines, after the first genetic sequences from the PRC were published, Moderna had their vaccine candidate finished in a weekend. Testing on the other hand cost a lot, and they got OWS help and money up front for that, and plenty of money to set up manufacturing.

    Which also included a lot spent on raw materials, supplies, glass suitable for frozen vaccine vials, etc. The Wayback Machine has the top line account of all this after “Biden” memory holed it.

  104. @Caspar von Everec
    A disease so serious and a vaccine so safe that people have to be threatened and coerced to take it

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Exiled off mainstreet, @Forbes, @Travis

    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002–unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization–might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Forbes


    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002–unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization–might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?
     
    Only notable for their lack of success CureVac was even in existence when SARS(-CoV-1) showed up, and I would expect the MERS market is way too tiny for BioNTech and Moderna to bother with. But Oxford did happen to start a Phase I trial in Saudi Arabia for a MERS vaccine in the middle of December 2019, which is one of the ways they bamboozled so many governments into giving them and AZ so much money, advanced orders etc., for a vaccine platform which had never gone past Phase I in eight years.

    As for your second point, you should add the world morbidity to your vocabulary, including delayed deaths. Excess all cause mortality in the US also indicates ... why bother, you're willing to write off 33 million fellow Americans or however many is 1% of your country. For some strange reason, those of us who aren't sociopaths are not.

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.
     
    Moderna used their long in development vaccine platform and the results of half a century worth of vaccine research to pull off that feat. They've made a patent pledge for the duration of the pandemic, but as extensively discussed here that's worthless anytime soon.

    Replies: @Forbes

  105. @SimpleSong
    This is the sort of thing that happens a lot in life in general, and healthcare in particular, but I just want to spell it out:

    If Pfizer had, instead of investing in making a lifesaving vaccine, invested in making pills that give you enhanced erections, no one would be clamoring for them to release the patent to Erector (TM), regardless of how much money was being made.

    However, if you make or do something that actually is important and lifesaving, people will demand that everyone get access to it for humanitarian reasons. Unfortunately, one way or another, a lot of people can't or won't pay, so the only way they can get access to it is if you give it to them for free. Third parties will demand that you give it away for free and will paint you as the bad guy for not doing so, even though you are the person who made this thing available in the first place and no one would have it at all without your efforts! Somehow you are now morally beneath the people who just sat on the couch.

    In healthcare, surgeons who operate on cancers make significantly less than surgeons who do breast augmentations. Obstetricians who manage high risk deliveries make less than orthopedists who do knee arthroscopies on healthy young people. Why? It's not because knee arthroscopies or boob jobs are terribly difficult. It's because if you can't pay what the surgeon demands for the boob job, the surgeon can tell you to get lost without it being a breach of ethics. On the other hand, if you show up in the ED pregnant and no ability to pay for anything (e.g. undocumented immigrant) whoever is staff in that hospital is legally obligated to deliver your baby, but will get paid nothing (or some token amount from medicaid that doesn't cover overhead.)

    Thus there is an inverse correlation between the importance of something to human health and the amount the people involved earn. Pfizer will make far, far less money on this than they made on Viagra.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Jonathan Mason

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @Known Fact

    True, true, but if I'm reading that article correctly they got an extra 3.5 billion in revenue from the vaccine, which they think may continue but who knows at this point. Booster shots may turn out to be unnecessary, their patents may get seized by the government, they might get strong armed into lower prices, people may just be unwilling to get the booster. Viagra made them about 2 billion a year in 1990s dollars, so probably about the same per year after adjusting for inflation, and did so year after year while the patent was in force (about 10-15 years). I'm pretty confident that inflation adjusted they'll have made more off Viagra, possibly a lot more, when all is said and done, and there was never any talk of seizing the Viagra patents.

    Anyway I'm happy they're making money off this. Facebook and Google and Apple make that much in what, like three days? Pfizer earned its money IMHO.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  106. @Exiled off mainstreet
    @Caspar von Everec

    This is the real nub of the issue. I am sure that the real issue will end up being a tsunami of side effects which, over a few years, more than equal the deaths from the disease, though they may not be provable. I know that they have given them a hold harmless on liability, but my guess is that they can come up with a rationale to say that the hold harmless was based on fraudulent representations by the companies.
    Unless the legal system completes its collapse, which is possible and even likely, I see the litigation over the damages caused by these "vaccines" could be unprecedented in its scope and the liability could spread to any agency or institution which used coercion to encourage people against their sound judgement to submit to this gene altering poison. Oh, and by the way, the hold-back as part of the campaign against Trump may insulate him from some of the damages for this likely monumental failure.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Were you injured by the defective and deadly Covid vaccines of 2021-22? Call Shlabotnick and Shlabotnick, Injury Attorneys — 1 800 BAD SHOT. Free consultation — We’ll fight for you!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Known Fact

    The unquestionably good vaccines enjoy special legal protections. No suing even if they would normally justify a lawsuit. We've got no time to learn about side effects, we've got to save the dying 96 year olds.

  107. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Looks like Pfizer’s stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit.
     

    Pfizer to donate vaccines for athletes at Olympics

    “We are inviting the athletes and participating delegations of the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games to lead by example and accept the vaccine where and when possible.

    “By taking the vaccine, they can send a powerful message that vaccination is not only about personal health, but also about solidarity and consideration of the wellbeing of others in their communities.” -- IOC President

    “The return of the Olympic and Paralympic Games represents a monumental moment of world unity and peace after a grueling year of isolation and devastation. We are proud to play a role in providing vaccines to athletes and national Olympic delegations.” --Pfizer Chairman
     
    A recurring problem at the Olympics has been pollution caused by discarded used condoms. 👁️💩🐑🎀. Will Trojan™ be giving out biodegradable product, too?


    Looks like Pfizer is up with the times:

    Weightlifter set to become the first openly transgender athlete to compete at Olympics

    Does this Kiwi have a wee-wee?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Forbes

    Because healthy and young athletes need be inoculated against a virus that affects the old and/or overweight, with suppressed/compromised immune systems due to co-morbidities.

    But The Narrative…

  108. @SimpleSong
    This is the sort of thing that happens a lot in life in general, and healthcare in particular, but I just want to spell it out:

    If Pfizer had, instead of investing in making a lifesaving vaccine, invested in making pills that give you enhanced erections, no one would be clamoring for them to release the patent to Erector (TM), regardless of how much money was being made.

    However, if you make or do something that actually is important and lifesaving, people will demand that everyone get access to it for humanitarian reasons. Unfortunately, one way or another, a lot of people can't or won't pay, so the only way they can get access to it is if you give it to them for free. Third parties will demand that you give it away for free and will paint you as the bad guy for not doing so, even though you are the person who made this thing available in the first place and no one would have it at all without your efforts! Somehow you are now morally beneath the people who just sat on the couch.

    In healthcare, surgeons who operate on cancers make significantly less than surgeons who do breast augmentations. Obstetricians who manage high risk deliveries make less than orthopedists who do knee arthroscopies on healthy young people. Why? It's not because knee arthroscopies or boob jobs are terribly difficult. It's because if you can't pay what the surgeon demands for the boob job, the surgeon can tell you to get lost without it being a breach of ethics. On the other hand, if you show up in the ED pregnant and no ability to pay for anything (e.g. undocumented immigrant) whoever is staff in that hospital is legally obligated to deliver your baby, but will get paid nothing (or some token amount from medicaid that doesn't cover overhead.)

    Thus there is an inverse correlation between the importance of something to human health and the amount the people involved earn. Pfizer will make far, far less money on this than they made on Viagra.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Jonathan Mason

    On the other hand, if you show up in the ED pregnant and no ability to pay for anything (e.g. undocumented immigrant) whoever is staff in that hospital is legally obligated to deliver your baby, but will get paid nothing (or some token amount from medicaid that doesn’t cover overhead.)

    Nobody knows exactly how much Medicaid pays per childbirth, because these numbers vary wildly between states and there are no national numbers available.

    The amount that Medicaid spends per birth on mother and child is not something the federal government and states report.

    For 2010, the Guttmacher Institute estimated $12,777 for pre-natal, delivery, post-partum, and infant care in the first 12 months.Using this approach produces an estimate of $5.3 billion in taxpayer money going to fund births to immigrants in 2014, $2.35 billion of which is for illegal immigrant births… While this estimate provides insight into the likely costs of births to illegal immigrants each year, it is only a rough estimate given the data limitations.

    However 48% of all births in the US are paid for by Medicaid. About 23% of births in the US are to mothers who are immigrants, legal or illegal. Births to illegal immigrant mothers are about 7.5% of the total number of births in the US, costing the taxpayer approximately $2.5 billion annually.

    Illegal immigrants are not eligible for Medicaid, but Medicaid picks up the tab for delivery and postpartum care for at least the first few months, so the hospitals do get paid.

    The largest number of illegal immigrant births are in California, Texas, and Florida.

    Generally the states have contracts with providers for these services which are reimbursed both on a per procedure basis and via supplemental block payments. Supplemental payments to hospitals account for about 27% of total Medicaid payments to hospitals, so can turn red into black.

    All in all Medicaid accounts for 9.5% of the federal budget, so nothing to sneeze at if you happen to own a hospital or two and don’t mind some scruffy-looking patients and visitors sitting around in your corporate-chic lobby, sacrificing fried chickens, and talking in some foreign tongue.

  109. @anon
    Pfizer is scum. They are extorting large sums from poor countries that can't afford their vaccine, shaking down South American countries for their national assets in exchange for the vax. Albert Bourla the CEO is a self-proclaimed "son of Holocaust survivor", a lot of sympathy he has for his fellow sufferers. They could easily license the technology to other producers like J&J, Merck etc. The reason they are unwilling is because mRNA has big potential to be a cure for cancer down the road, and they are also anticipating more coronavirus down the road so more of their vax will be needed.

    Who cares how many will die while they make a killing. Makes you think of the Sacklers right away. These people are all the same.

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    Replies: @Deadite, @Marquis, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    WSJ reported today that infections and deaths in Asia, Latin America and Africa are surging. Since we are not shutting down international air travels but are in fact starting it back up, eventually this will ricochet back to us as new variants, which our vaccines will prove useless against, so we go into another lock down, round and round it goes.

    Yes, living in the 3rd World is hazardous to your health. Did you just figure that out? Have you ever left the confines of the USA?

    You seem to have forgotten all of the heaps of praise about the Shithole countries who initially reported far lower COVID rates than the USA or Europe. The Fake News you seem to love was all about bashing Trump over “our failure” to emulate places now rife with disease. This was an artifact of fake or poor health reporting from said nations. No one leaves the First World to improve their health outcomes. Of course you love to Blame America First for everyone else’s failings.

    You’re late on the take. Biden just “waived” the patent protections for the American vaxes.

    Also, despite you tear jerking, US vaxes are not the only ones out there. China and Russia have been selling these abroad, as well as Europe.

    But don’t get off your Greedy American Capitalist high horse. That’s probably the only one you have enough brain cells to ride.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
  110. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Biden said that he didn't believe that vaccines would be available for the majority of Americans until mid 2021.

    He didn't say that he was opposed to the use of vaccines, but he did say that he believed that masks (and presumably hand washing and social distancing) should be maintained in the meanwhile.

    And that is what is going on. For example Social Security offices in the United States are still closed. Would Trump have opened them by now?

    In that debate Trump also said that the military were going to be involved in a fast rollout of the vaccines and that 100 million vaccines were expected to be available for fast distribution before the end of 2020, which did not happen.

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Replies: @Anon7, @That Would Be Telling, @Muggles

    Anyway who was the military general who Trump appointed to oversee the 2020 rollout, and why do we never hear anything about him now?

    Mail from our military outpost in Thule Greenland can be pretty slow.

  111. @Joe Walker
    Karma is a bitch.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Stan Adams, @Neoconned, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John

    Joe, you misspelled Kamala.

  112. Lots of comments but I remember reading a favorite a while ago. Listen to the words of John Lennon’s “Imagine.’ And then if you had a chance ask Lennon if it would be alright for some one else to use his melody or lyrics or not pay him royalties. You can’t ask biden, your writen words are his to borrow.

  113. @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    Holy shit has Steve's blog ever become cucked. Are these Ron Unz paid trolls?

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew, @Alexander Turok, @anon

    Perhaps some of Unz’s friends in silly-con valley are field testing their ‘bots.

    That would explain at least some of the trolls that have rolled in since 2016.t

  114. 30 years of RNA vaccine research transferred for free to China. who, it has to be noted, could possibly have been responsible for covid in the first place.

    covid worked like a charm to hurt America and europe and help China. it was a huge win win win for China. got rid of Trump, the only western leader confronting them, and crashed western economies.

    this move gives China more technology to create ‘better’ viruses to just do the same thing all over again, whether China was deliberately responsible for the first covid or not.

    coming in 2031, right around the time the US Navy has to decide whether to confront China or not. Covid-31, specifically designed to attack europeans and have no known RNA vaccine cure – but all Chinese citizens are pre-vaccinated before China releases the virus on the west. outbreaks are reported on all US carriers and subs, woke US military in huge jam whether to recall all vessels or confront China will half their sailors out of action. President Harris is paralyzed with indecision as the Chinese navy sweeps over the Pacific.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  115. @Johnny Smoggins
    On his show on Wednesday, Tucker Carlson reported that according to the CDC's Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS), nearly 4000 Americans have already died from the vaccine.

    From their website;

    Over 245 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were administered in the United States from December 14, 2020, through May 3, 2021. During this time, VAERS received 4,178 reports of death (0.0017%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine.

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html

    True or not true?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Deadite

    On his show on Wednesday, Tucker Carlson reported that according to the CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS), nearly 4000 Americans have already died from the vaccine.

    [About their website, and I add it’s easy to use, they even wrote a good tutorial with accurate screen shots, to extract data at a max of 10,000 records at a time.]

    True or not true?

    So blatantly false I’ve lost any possible respect I had for the man and the people who research and write for him. I don’t do video so I’ve never seen more than a few seconds of him, but have read some of the monologues including skimming this one, you can find a full transcript here.

    Which is not to say these three vaccines haven’t killed anyone, just that you can’t jump from an Adverse Event like death that’s correlated with a vaccine injection to axiomatic causation, “correlation does not imply causation” as shown for example in a study the Brits did finding elevated cancer rates near their nuclear power plants. Including sites that were merely planned as future locations.

    What makes this particularly vile is the extremely intense targeting of the elderly; you don’t need to be a formal actuary to know these people die at high rates. Heck, see all the COVID-19 truthers, some going as far as celebrating the death of people “with one foot in the grave.” I think some of this is Boomer hate, but they’re at most 75 years old this year, so it’s really doing a number on Silents. So for a rough estimate without examining individual cases you would grab as much data about these people as you can and figure out how many deaths were expected, vaccine or no vaccine. Dig deeper and compare apparent top line causes like heart failure or stroke compared those you’d expect.

    And no one should question the general principle that drugs and vaccines given to hundreds of millions people will main and kill some of them. So you must do cost/benefit analysis, compare likely vaccine caused deaths to how readily COVID-19 kills these people.

    Top Men are examining each serious case and trying to figure out the real causes, and that’s going to be part of the data submitted to the FDA for the Biologics License Applications the mRNA vaccine companies submitted Wednesday and Friday. These are called “rolling” submissions because new data will be submitted as it’s generated.

    • Agree: Dissident
  116. @EdwardM
    @MattinLA

    Can the government just rescind the patent by executive fiat? Or a law passed by Congress? What about the Fifth Amendment's takings clause?

    But I agree with you that Pfizer could probably be convinced to voluntarily forego its patent in the name of virtue-signaling. It's pretty pathetic that the socialist Europeans are pushing back on this.
    One more example of the merger of big business, government, and leftist cultural hegemony as America cedes its commercial leadership.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    For your first points, you tell me if the Rule of Law is still operative in the US….

    It’s pretty pathetic that the socialist Europeans are pushing back on this.

    With a few minutes searching in English just now, it’s reported five are, but I could only confirm France and Germany. The latter of course being the home of BioNTech, and I keep forgetting the other mRNA vaccine company CureVac which has been very late to get anything working and to the market. Could be they’re a more political than science company, they were the ones that scored government money by claiming Trump had offered to buy the whole company and move it to the US.

    France’s Sanofi Pasteur is a vaccine giant, although they abjectly failed with their bug cell grown protein V1.0 vaccine using a GSK adjuvant (they bought Protein Sciences a while ago), they might have a V2.0 approved by the end of this year.

    Despite the Official platitudes, (vaccine) nationalism is alive and well in the EU….

  117. @George
    @International Jew

    The low price reflects:

    The anticipated volume into the billions of doses.

    The oligarchic US covid vaccine market with 3 producers and only mRNA vaccines were permitted. In particular the Chinese are producing an old fashioned vaccine from inactivated covid viruses, which should be available in the 'free market' US too.

    the vaccine is worth more to the people who were willing to pay extra to jump the queue for the first doses. As time passes the vaccine becomes less valuable so it must be sold for less.

    Since the price was going to drop anyway Biden wanted to take credit for helping the poor, outside the US, but Germany's Chancellor Merkle would have none of it and refused to cooperate and allow Biden to take the credit.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    The oligarchic US covid vaccine market with 3 producers and only mRNA vaccines were permitted. In particular the Chinese are producing an old fashioned vaccine from inactivated covid viruses, which should be available in the ‘free market’ US too.

    No “free market” in drugs and biologics prior to getting regulatory approval. Most of what you say is just plain wrong, including your claim Janssen’s DNA virus vector vaccine is a mRNA one. As for the Chinese, they’d have to spend a lot of money to get a vaccine approved in the US when they generally aren’t targeting the First World at all (any exceptions?), and their actions so far in the Third World are often highly secretive, which won’t fly at all with the FDA. Which can and will protect trade secrets, but insists on getting everything, inspecting all factories (one place where Sputnik V fails hard), etc.

    Given that while their vaccines of this type which are their first ones to market do appear to pass the minimum FDA threshold of 50% efficacy, the fact that they’re officially admitting they’re not very good and even contemplating combining the two can fully explain why they aren’t trying in the US, especially now that we’ve got three very high for their various goals efficacy vaccines (Janssen one jab doesn’t have the same objectives as the mRNA ones; two jabs, we’ll see).

  118. @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah I've read that rubbers are openly available at the Olympics. I oppose this for two reasons: one, it encourages fornication. Two, anyone with Olympic-tier genes and work ethic SHOULD be reproducing. Ideally it would be with a spouse but these people need to be breeding regardless.

    Replies: @anon, @Jonathan Mason

    I oppose this

    Have you notified the IOC of your opposition? Did they reply?

  119. @bayviking
    You need safe effective vaccine protection everywhere people travel. All such vaccines should not be patented. Most patentable research is paid for with tax dollars and should never be owned by a private company.They belong to mankind, as Jonas Salk declared for his polio vaccine.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Most patentable research is paid for with tax dollars and should never be owned by a private company.

    A “work for hire”?

    They belong to mankind, as Jonas Salk declared for his polio vaccine.

    Salk was roundly criticized for not sharing credit with his colleagues. It hurt his reputation. Was this statement damage control? Guilt?

  120. @Known Fact
    @Exiled off mainstreet

    Were you injured by the defective and deadly Covid vaccines of 2021-22? Call Shlabotnick and Shlabotnick, Injury Attorneys -- 1 800 BAD SHOT. Free consultation -- We'll fight for you!

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The unquestionably good vaccines enjoy special legal protections. No suing even if they would normally justify a lawsuit. We’ve got no time to learn about side effects, we’ve got to save the dying 96 year olds.

  121. @adreadline
    @Alexander Turok


    people exercising their right to refuse association with plague carriers
     
    Nice Who? Whom? Us vs. them dehumanization, bro. Right to refuse association, you say. Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race? If not, why not? Not to mention, on which basis you claim that someone is a "plague carrier'' merely because they are unvaccinated? If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race?

    Yes.

    If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?

    COVID tests are not instant, so a negative COVID test is doesn’t tell you for certain that someone’s not a carrier.

    My proposal is a system of special badges. The badges themselves contain symbols, one of if you’ve had covid, another for if you’ve had the vaccine, and another for if you’ve signed up to continue to be subject to social distancing and mask restrictions, which thereafter become optional for everyone else. So if you’ve had the vaccine, had COVID, and want continue to be made to follow social distancing regulations, you’d wear a badge with all three symbols. Badge impersonation becomes a criminal offense.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Alexander Turok


    My proposal is a system of special badges.
     
    My badge is gonna say FOAD.

    Replies: @anon

  122. @Forbes
    @Caspar von Everec

    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002--unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization--might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002–unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization–might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?

    Only notable for their lack of success CureVac was even in existence when SARS(-CoV-1) showed up, and I would expect the MERS market is way too tiny for BioNTech and Moderna to bother with. But Oxford did happen to start a Phase I trial in Saudi Arabia for a MERS vaccine in the middle of December 2019, which is one of the ways they bamboozled so many governments into giving them and AZ so much money, advanced orders etc., for a vaccine platform which had never gone past Phase I in eight years.

    As for your second point, you should add the world morbidity to your vocabulary, including delayed deaths. Excess all cause mortality in the US also indicates … why bother, you’re willing to write off 33 million fellow Americans or however many is 1% of your country. For some strange reason, those of us who aren’t sociopaths are not.

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.

    Moderna used their long in development vaccine platform and the results of half a century worth of vaccine research to pull off that feat. They’ve made a patent pledge for the duration of the pandemic, but as extensively discussed here that’s worthless anytime soon.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @That Would Be Telling


    willing to write off 33 million fellow Americans
     
    I see, policy by forecast model. How's the forecast model track record, to date? I guess bigger numbers are needed to scare the public into panic.

    Delayed death? What, you expected to live forever?

    What else qualifies for disrupting everyone's lives under such criteria??
  123. @Dacian Julien Soros
    Today the truth surfaced. Today, with the new vaccines that stopped the disease (at almost the same time of the year as in 2020), Trump has been vindicated. Billions across the planet now recognize his very stable genius. He will ascend to Heavens, like a prophet. In his place, as a first caliph, Americans will choose between His IQ Highness Jared and Her IQ Highness Kizzmikia.

    It's also amusing to claim that "the world lacks ability to make mRNA vaccines". I don't think Moderna had any capacity, including making their own experimental RNA drugs, until maybe 6 months ago. They were ordering from outside providers, whcih have provided labs with artisanal products for the last 2-3 decades.

    Also, since the RNA vaccines are now stored at minus 20 Celsius (as opposed to classical minus 78), and since there is no antibody test to prove you are vaccinated (in contrast to hep B or MMR), you can rest assured NO ONE has any mRNA manufacturing capacity.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Also, since the RNA vaccines are now stored at minus 20 Celsius (as opposed to classical minus 78), and since there is no antibody test to prove you are vaccinated (in contrast to hep B or MMR), you can rest assured NO ONE has any mRNA manufacturing capacity.

    I’m really not sure at all what you’re trying to say here, but we most certainly have serological tests for prior exposure and likely immunity to COVID-19, have for a year or so. They’re inherently not super accurate, though.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @That Would Be Telling


    we most certainly have serological tests for prior exposure and likely immunity to COVID-19, have for a year or so. They’re inherently not super accurate, though.
     
    Surely, we "have" antibody tests for covid, just as we seem to have "vaccines". The problem is, if I may put your words in plain English, we don't really have them. We have various stuff to buy, but none gives any decent result.

    Why would there be a need for a vaccination passport, if we could verify vaccination somehow?

    Why is there no valid antibody test, but all Fauci's fans claim the vaccine gives you immunity? Shouldn't that immunity be measured? or does it exist beyond objective measurements, like a bad juju?

    At least one of the test and the vaccine is not doing its job. Based on the fanaticism of their supporters, I can easily believe both are ineffective.

  124. @JR Ewing
    @Dcthrowback

    you will require yearly boosters

    ----------------

    I just don't get it. I mean, I get why the drug companies want that, but I don't get why even average normal people would buy into that and agree to the premise at all.

    What the hell are people so scared of? A lot of people within a very well-defined demographic caught covid and died. Many many more people caught it and survived and are now immune.

    The only people who need these "vaccines" are those who are at a high risk of dying (old, obese, diabetic, immunocompromised in some other way). Everyone else either has already caught it once or will eventually catch it once and that will be that. For the vast majority of people there's no need for these stupid shots.

    I was eager for my older parents and relatives to get vaccinated, but my wife and I aren't doing it and I damn sure am not going to allow my teenage sons to get it and risk infertility and blood clots and heart attacks - and whatever else - to protect them from a virus that is of no threat to them at all beyond a brief common cold.

    Why is covid still a thing? Why are these fears still so prevalent? There might be another deadly pandemic some day, but it's not going to be covid.

    Covid is over, America. The Looming Covid Terror has been over since last May. It took another 9 months to burn itself out among vulnerable populations, but the "pandemic" is freaking over. Let go of the fear and get on with life. The fear mongering and propaganda is so utterly transparent. Let it go. What the hell is wrong with these people?

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Why is covid still a thing? Why are these fears still so prevalent?”

    Covid 19 is a religion, it is never going away. Covidians love facediaper theatre and they will get a fresh prick every six months or however often their high priests at the Covid Disinformation Centers order them to. Bank.

  125. @Joe Walker
    Karma is a bitch.

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Stan Adams, @Neoconned, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John

    Karma is also a politician. Politicians are liars and can never be trusted, which means she is a liar and cannot be trusted, just like her putative boss who has over four decades of practice in the field of deception, deviousness and outright lying. Just like their party as well as the nominal “loyal opposition.”

    The problem is that most people know all this, and yet they continue to buy into the manure being spread by the DC manure spreaders. Which is why, as Mencken wrote, we deserve to get it good and hard.

  126. @Neoconned
    @glib

    Maybe elements of Biden's administration are paid agents or spies for India or the Chi Coms.......maybe this is them activating their operatives to steal intellectual property.....

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Maybe elements of Biden’s administration are paid agents or spies for India or the Chi Coms…….maybe this is them activating their operatives to steal intellectual property…..

    Pretty sure that leading “Maybe” is generous. But this sort of effort, unless “Biden” can coerce these companies into creating Technical Data Packages, would be aimed at for example getting unredacted and never to be released data submitted to the FDA

    Patents? They’re public documents, disclosure is one of the justifications for their absolute but limited in time monopolies, to avoid having information locked up forever as trade secrets. Also allows companies to quickly figure out improvements, after which they can swap patent rights to the original and the improvement. That was really big in the development of Silicon Valley back when it did made real stuff.

  127. @Known Fact
    @SimpleSong

    Don't feel too sorry for them ...

    https://www.barrons.com/news/pfizer-sees-covid-19-as-durable-revenue-stream-as-profits-rise-01620150614

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    True, true, but if I’m reading that article correctly they got an extra 3.5 billion in revenue from the vaccine, which they think may continue but who knows at this point. Booster shots may turn out to be unnecessary, their patents may get seized by the government, they might get strong armed into lower prices, people may just be unwilling to get the booster. Viagra made them about 2 billion a year in 1990s dollars, so probably about the same per year after adjusting for inflation, and did so year after year while the patent was in force (about 10-15 years). I’m pretty confident that inflation adjusted they’ll have made more off Viagra, possibly a lot more, when all is said and done, and there was never any talk of seizing the Viagra patents.

    Anyway I’m happy they’re making money off this. Facebook and Google and Apple make that much in what, like three days? Pfizer earned its money IMHO.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    Ok


    ... seizing the Viagra patents....
     
    Why bother? Sildenafil citrate which is the active ingredient in Viagra is now widely available all over the world as a generic, the patent having expired long ago, and never having been recognized in India which is always made generic versions.

    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound. They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.

    For example Bob Dole appeared on TV to explain how he kept Elizabeth Dole happy.

    Pfizer still has the very famous brand name of Viagra, and of course they are able to market it in new formats such as quick gels or whatever, and charge double the price for the privilege of the characteristically-shaped blue pill with the Pfizer emblem stamped on it, which I guess is a status symbol.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @SimpleSong

  128. @SimpleSong
    @Known Fact

    True, true, but if I'm reading that article correctly they got an extra 3.5 billion in revenue from the vaccine, which they think may continue but who knows at this point. Booster shots may turn out to be unnecessary, their patents may get seized by the government, they might get strong armed into lower prices, people may just be unwilling to get the booster. Viagra made them about 2 billion a year in 1990s dollars, so probably about the same per year after adjusting for inflation, and did so year after year while the patent was in force (about 10-15 years). I'm pretty confident that inflation adjusted they'll have made more off Viagra, possibly a lot more, when all is said and done, and there was never any talk of seizing the Viagra patents.

    Anyway I'm happy they're making money off this. Facebook and Google and Apple make that much in what, like three days? Pfizer earned its money IMHO.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Ok

    … seizing the Viagra patents….

    Why bother? Sildenafil citrate which is the active ingredient in Viagra is now widely available all over the world as a generic, the patent having expired long ago, and never having been recognized in India which is always made generic versions.

    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound. They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.

    For example Bob Dole appeared on TV to explain how he kept Elizabeth Dole happy.

    Pfizer still has the very famous brand name of Viagra, and of course they are able to market it in new formats such as quick gels or whatever, and charge double the price for the privilege of the characteristically-shaped blue pill with the Pfizer emblem stamped on it, which I guess is a status symbol.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound.
     
    Which per Wikipedia and maybe my vague memory turns out not to be the case, it was synthesized at Pfizer's Sandwich, Kent, U.K. research facility.

    They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.
     
    You left out the whole very expensive "prove it's safe and effective" clinical trials part of bringing a drug to market. Here again leaning on Wikipedia but it matches much more clear memory, in their Phase I trial it failed to control angina, but the male trial participants just happened to notice an interesting side effect....

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    I mean seizing the patents when they were still in force, not now. Obviously there would be no point in seizing the patent for sildenafil now, since that patent is long expired so there's nothing to seize--it's in the public domain and anybody is allowed to make it. But when the patent was in force from the mid '90s to the mid aughts or so there wasn't any grassroots movement to make Pfizer give up its sildenafil patent, unlike the situation with the vaccine. Bill Clinton wasn't calling for humanitarian Viagra for developing countries.

    I am just pointing out the paradox that when a company makes a lifestyle drug that people can live without, their intellectual property is secure, they basically get left alone, enjoy the full term of the patent and make lots of money. On the other hand when they make a lifesaving drug that is truly needed by society, their intellectual property is at risk of seizure and they make less money. Naively one would hope that the greater good a person or a company does for society, the more richly they are rewarded, but not only does that not happen, the opposite tends to happen.

    For the same reasons, which I outlined above, plastic surgeons will almost always make more than oncologic surgeons. It's just the way the world works, and a reminder of why one should never conflate an individual's wealth with their value to society (as Americans often do.)

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  129. @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    Ok


    ... seizing the Viagra patents....
     
    Why bother? Sildenafil citrate which is the active ingredient in Viagra is now widely available all over the world as a generic, the patent having expired long ago, and never having been recognized in India which is always made generic versions.

    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound. They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.

    For example Bob Dole appeared on TV to explain how he kept Elizabeth Dole happy.

    Pfizer still has the very famous brand name of Viagra, and of course they are able to market it in new formats such as quick gels or whatever, and charge double the price for the privilege of the characteristically-shaped blue pill with the Pfizer emblem stamped on it, which I guess is a status symbol.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @SimpleSong

    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound.

    Which per Wikipedia and maybe my vague memory turns out not to be the case, it was synthesized at Pfizer’s Sandwich, Kent, U.K. research facility.

    They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.

    You left out the whole very expensive “prove it’s safe and effective” clinical trials part of bringing a drug to market. Here again leaning on Wikipedia but it matches much more clear memory, in their Phase I trial it failed to control angina, but the male trial participants just happened to notice an interesting side effect….

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @That Would Be Telling

    You are right. My memory was a little off, but the truth is that under Indian law, only manufacturing processes, not the products themselves, are covered by patents.

    So Indian drug companies can legally reverse-engineer best-selling drugs and sell copies cheaply. So the Indians claim--at least--that they figured out how to make the compound themselves and did not steal the Pfizer process.

    Seems reasonable, like selling oatmeal breakfast cereal, but not calling it Quaker Oats.

    But, as you say, the Indians have not gone through the incredibly expensive process of running trials and getting FDA approval. So Pfizer charges the earth and makes a good profit too, and the Indian makers supply the world at a reasonable price. Win-win.

  130. @JR Ewing
    @glib

    In my (limited) research, I've been very intrigued by Sputnik. But there is hardly any way for a normal American citizen to get it.

    I mentioned this to an acquaintance who is a Vaccine True Believer (+ Covid + Biden etc) and he was like, "How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards? You don't know what's in it!"

    I just shrugged.

    Replies: @glib, @Reg Cæsar

    Incredible, isn’t it? I am a motive fundamentalist (cui bono). Whereas the Western elites have every motive to depopulate, for Russia the opposite is true.

  131. @Johnny Smoggins
    On his show on Wednesday, Tucker Carlson reported that according to the CDC's Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS), nearly 4000 Americans have already died from the vaccine.

    From their website;

    Over 245 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were administered in the United States from December 14, 2020, through May 3, 2021. During this time, VAERS received 4,178 reports of death (0.0017%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine.

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html

    True or not true?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Deadite

    Deaths to the elderly have some uncertainty.

    The important deaths are to the under 29 crowd. Under 18 deaths by vaccine are (extrapolating) twice the deaths from covid. 18-29 vaccine deaths (again, extrapolated, but by a lot less) are a quarter of covid deaths.

    Combine this with future unknowns and giving the vaccine to anyone under 39 is an abomination.

  132. @JR Ewing
    @glib

    In my (limited) research, I've been very intrigued by Sputnik. But there is hardly any way for a normal American citizen to get it.

    I mentioned this to an acquaintance who is a Vaccine True Believer (+ Covid + Biden etc) and he was like, "How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards? You don't know what's in it!"

    I just shrugged.

    Replies: @glib, @Reg Cæsar

    “How could you say that? You would trust putting something in your body from Russia? With no safeguards?”

    ” You don’t know what’s in it!”

  133. @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound.
     
    Which per Wikipedia and maybe my vague memory turns out not to be the case, it was synthesized at Pfizer's Sandwich, Kent, U.K. research facility.

    They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.
     
    You left out the whole very expensive "prove it's safe and effective" clinical trials part of bringing a drug to market. Here again leaning on Wikipedia but it matches much more clear memory, in their Phase I trial it failed to control angina, but the male trial participants just happened to notice an interesting side effect....

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    You are right. My memory was a little off, but the truth is that under Indian law, only manufacturing processes, not the products themselves, are covered by patents.

    So Indian drug companies can legally reverse-engineer best-selling drugs and sell copies cheaply. So the Indians claim–at least–that they figured out how to make the compound themselves and did not steal the Pfizer process.

    Seems reasonable, like selling oatmeal breakfast cereal, but not calling it Quaker Oats.

    But, as you say, the Indians have not gone through the incredibly expensive process of running trials and getting FDA approval. So Pfizer charges the earth and makes a good profit too, and the Indian makers supply the world at a reasonable price. Win-win.

  134. @Caspar von Everec
    A disease so serious and a vaccine so safe that people have to be threatened and coerced to take it

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Exiled off mainstreet, @Forbes, @Travis

    No coercion was required to get 83% of those over the age of 64 vaccinated and 60% of adults over the age of 25 have been vaccinated already. Most Americans are already vaccinated. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

    it does surprise me that people who have recovered from COVID are getting the vaccine. One reason I will not be getting the vaccine, my immune system already defeated this virus last year. Not sure why people who are immune would bother getting vaccinated.

  135. @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    Ok


    ... seizing the Viagra patents....
     
    Why bother? Sildenafil citrate which is the active ingredient in Viagra is now widely available all over the world as a generic, the patent having expired long ago, and never having been recognized in India which is always made generic versions.

    My understanding is that India did not recognize the patent because Pfizer did not actually invent or develop the chemical compound. They just found that a known chemical compound had certain properties that were of interest to many people and then marketed it as a marital aid.

    For example Bob Dole appeared on TV to explain how he kept Elizabeth Dole happy.

    Pfizer still has the very famous brand name of Viagra, and of course they are able to market it in new formats such as quick gels or whatever, and charge double the price for the privilege of the characteristically-shaped blue pill with the Pfizer emblem stamped on it, which I guess is a status symbol.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @SimpleSong

    I mean seizing the patents when they were still in force, not now. Obviously there would be no point in seizing the patent for sildenafil now, since that patent is long expired so there’s nothing to seize–it’s in the public domain and anybody is allowed to make it. But when the patent was in force from the mid ’90s to the mid aughts or so there wasn’t any grassroots movement to make Pfizer give up its sildenafil patent, unlike the situation with the vaccine. Bill Clinton wasn’t calling for humanitarian Viagra for developing countries.

    I am just pointing out the paradox that when a company makes a lifestyle drug that people can live without, their intellectual property is secure, they basically get left alone, enjoy the full term of the patent and make lots of money. On the other hand when they make a lifesaving drug that is truly needed by society, their intellectual property is at risk of seizure and they make less money. Naively one would hope that the greater good a person or a company does for society, the more richly they are rewarded, but not only does that not happen, the opposite tends to happen.

    For the same reasons, which I outlined above, plastic surgeons will almost always make more than oncologic surgeons. It’s just the way the world works, and a reminder of why one should never conflate an individual’s wealth with their value to society (as Americans often do.)

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    People have often done things which were immensely beneficial for society without particularly enriching themselves.

    Microsoft has over the years claimed to have lost billions of dollars of royalties due to forgery of its operating system, but that hasn't stopped the founders of Microsoft from becoming immensely rich, or thousands of other people who have worked for Microsoft from earning a very good living.

    On the other hand relatively few people have become wealthy via the free open source Linux operating system, which for most users can do the same things most people use computers for like Web browsing, word processing, e-mail, playing poker, online shopping, banking, paying bills, sending money, Xoom, etc.

    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  136. Rob says:

    The left always accuses the right of looking for leaders to solve all our problems, but they have the same problem. Whether it was knowing Slick Willy’s slick willy would keep abortion legal, looking for the Mulatto Messiah to stop the oceans’ rise, or ‘Dr. Fauci will rescue us from COVID! Save us, you big, powerful man!’ Looking for a savior is just as much a problem on the left. They can say that we looked to Trump, but that is different. If you are an American patriot, Trump was the only game in town. Literally every other Primary candidate from both parties had the motto, ‘You know how bad things are? I will make it get worse twice as fast.’ Most people who voted for Trump thought he was scum.

  137. @That Would Be Telling
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    Also, since the RNA vaccines are now stored at minus 20 Celsius (as opposed to classical minus 78), and since there is no antibody test to prove you are vaccinated (in contrast to hep B or MMR), you can rest assured NO ONE has any mRNA manufacturing capacity.
     
    I'm really not sure at all what you're trying to say here, but we most certainly have serological tests for prior exposure and likely immunity to COVID-19, have for a year or so. They're inherently not super accurate, though.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    we most certainly have serological tests for prior exposure and likely immunity to COVID-19, have for a year or so. They’re inherently not super accurate, though.

    Surely, we “have” antibody tests for covid, just as we seem to have “vaccines”. The problem is, if I may put your words in plain English, we don’t really have them. We have various stuff to buy, but none gives any decent result.

    Why would there be a need for a vaccination passport, if we could verify vaccination somehow?

    Why is there no valid antibody test, but all Fauci’s fans claim the vaccine gives you immunity? Shouldn’t that immunity be measured? or does it exist beyond objective measurements, like a bad juju?

    At least one of the test and the vaccine is not doing its job. Based on the fanaticism of their supporters, I can easily believe both are ineffective.

  138. Rob says:
    @TG
    "It’s not like the whole world has lots of practice at how to churn out mRNA vaccines at mass scale and all that’s keeping them from doing that are the secret Coke recipes hidden in the Pfizer and Moderna vaults."

    Just remember: most of the high-tech vaccine production capability is no longer in the US, it's in China and a surprising amount in low-wage places like India.

    Even if a lot of final production is still nominally in the West, if all of the supply chains and reagent manufacturing and specialized equipment etc. is overseas, how long before the rest of it follows?

    So yes, India and places like India probably have plenty of technical capacity to churn out mRNA vaccines, and they likely even already have the secret Coke recipes, they just don't have the legal permission to use them.

    Yet.

    Replies: @Anon, @Rob

    I don’t know about Indian biotech specifically, but it is not quite the same as the small molecule drug industry. When it comes to small molecules, India’s law is that you can patent a way of producing a chemical, but you cannot patent the chemical itself. So as long as you are not producing Wellbutrin with the patented series of reactions, you are good to go.

    I think American pharma got into the same ‘own the peak, let the rest of the mountain go’ that other American sectors fell into. Like steel mills and mini-mills. At first, mini-mills could only produce the lowest grade steel, rebar. The top end, sheet steel, was selling like mad, so the big steel producers did not care that they were losing low end markets. Plenty of room at the top! Then mini-mills figured out how to produce a grade up, then another… pretty soon they could do sheet steel, and ate the integrated mills’ lunch. Clay Christensen discussed that and other industries in the Innovator’s Dilemma, a very good book.

    Now, pharma is not steel, and there may be a lot of mountain above today’s peak. But why bet your company on it? Let generic manufacturers make yesterday’s drug. Make a branded generic and sell it for twice (or 5-10 times, generics are cheap) the price. Don’t let competitor’s get their foot in the door.

    Companies are betting the American economy on third world companies never being competitive at the top. That they can’t do the peak. Problem is, as Boeing showed us, with financialization and outsourcing, we cannot do the peak either. I still have hoes that a rising tide lifts lots of boats. That when China reaches first world status, they will consume like a first world country. But, are they there, already? Are they soon going to be ahead of us? How many years have half our hard science grad students been Chinese? That is expertise that was a long time in the making. We won’t be able to just get it back. When the American profs are too old or too dead to teach, it might as well never have been here.

    Contra what I thought, America is not the First Nation to go from first to not first world status. Argentina used to be a high income country. I do not know about their fall, like, was it actually a fall, or was it like India’s ‘fall’, which just consisted of the British doing the Industrial Revolution while the Indians just sat there. Will read up on it.

  139. @Steve Sailer
    @MattinLA

    Looks like Pfizer's stock price fell 3.8% the moment this new story hit. Modern's stock fell from 177.50 at 2:30pm Wednesday afternoon to 148 at Thursday's opening.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MattinLA

    The Pfizer officers don’t care about the stock price either. They will be covered either way…

  140. “Pfizer Rescued Biden by Shutting Down Its Vaccine Trial Until the Day After Election”

    LOL, I see you tapped your shoes three times like Dorothy, iSteve. Just because you think it is the truth does not mean in reality it is the truth.

    Hat Tip –> Richard Of Melbourne

    If the vaccine’s success had been announced before election day, it would forever be tainted with the suspicion that it was rushed out for Trump’s benefit.

  141. Steve, I agree that patents should not be made accessible to anyone by executive fiat. But, the question is, who is the patent holder?

    If Jones works for ABC Widget, Inc. as a developer and develops a patentable widget design while employed, the patent, usually, belongs to the company. If the U.S. government pays a company to develop a new, patentable, drug it should belong to the U.S. government. In other words, US. Thus, it should be free to anyone to make what is patented, at least in the U.S.

    This is why I object to the CDC and other GovCo agencies holding patents. WE the taxpayers paid the researchers so WE should own it. Or, not have people such as Fauci being patent holders as they are now via their GovCo employment.

    Bottom line, whoever pays for the development should hold the patent. Pfizer, et al, took money from GovCo so they can’t benefit from the research paid for by the U.S. taxpayer.

  142. @SimpleSong
    @Jonathan Mason

    I mean seizing the patents when they were still in force, not now. Obviously there would be no point in seizing the patent for sildenafil now, since that patent is long expired so there's nothing to seize--it's in the public domain and anybody is allowed to make it. But when the patent was in force from the mid '90s to the mid aughts or so there wasn't any grassroots movement to make Pfizer give up its sildenafil patent, unlike the situation with the vaccine. Bill Clinton wasn't calling for humanitarian Viagra for developing countries.

    I am just pointing out the paradox that when a company makes a lifestyle drug that people can live without, their intellectual property is secure, they basically get left alone, enjoy the full term of the patent and make lots of money. On the other hand when they make a lifesaving drug that is truly needed by society, their intellectual property is at risk of seizure and they make less money. Naively one would hope that the greater good a person or a company does for society, the more richly they are rewarded, but not only does that not happen, the opposite tends to happen.

    For the same reasons, which I outlined above, plastic surgeons will almost always make more than oncologic surgeons. It's just the way the world works, and a reminder of why one should never conflate an individual's wealth with their value to society (as Americans often do.)

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    People have often done things which were immensely beneficial for society without particularly enriching themselves.

    Microsoft has over the years claimed to have lost billions of dollars of royalties due to forgery of its operating system, but that hasn’t stopped the founders of Microsoft from becoming immensely rich, or thousands of other people who have worked for Microsoft from earning a very good living.

    On the other hand relatively few people have become wealthy via the free open source Linux operating system, which for most users can do the same things most people use computers for like Web browsing, word processing, e-mail, playing poker, online shopping, banking, paying bills, sending money, Xoom, etc.

    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.
     
    STEM work is also very interesting and attractive for those who like it. Just about has to be, biotech is notorious for low pay for the worker bees, there was an oversupply of them before the powers that be decided in the mid-late 1980s they were paying too much for scientific labor and really started stuffing the pipeline, including with a lot of 3rd Worlders for whom the pay is much more than they'd get back home.

    There's also a degree of self-interest in a lot of drug development. Here we have a nasty novel pathogen with a lot of morbidity for survivors, and a potential for variants that will make more people more contagious like the British B.1.1.7 one which is displacing "classic coronavirus" without being dramatically more lethal or escaping classic immunity, natural or vaccine.

    So for example kids are an obvious ecological niche where as far as I know the current variants still result in most of them having asymptomatic or nearly so cases (and we sincerely hope no unnoticed morbidity), thus not so effective at transmission. That and the potential for more deadly variants for them is one good reason to do Phase III trials and get EUAs for them, we might really need that down the road.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  143. @That Would Be Telling
    @Forbes


    A gene therapy treatment (mRNA) being researched since at least the SARS CoV 1.0 outbreak in 2002–unsuccessfully until an Emergency Use Authorization–might not be very valuable, upon closer scrutiny. A 95% relative risk reduction for a 1% absolute risk, is how valuable?
     
    Only notable for their lack of success CureVac was even in existence when SARS(-CoV-1) showed up, and I would expect the MERS market is way too tiny for BioNTech and Moderna to bother with. But Oxford did happen to start a Phase I trial in Saudi Arabia for a MERS vaccine in the middle of December 2019, which is one of the ways they bamboozled so many governments into giving them and AZ so much money, advanced orders etc., for a vaccine platform which had never gone past Phase I in eight years.

    As for your second point, you should add the world morbidity to your vocabulary, including delayed deaths. Excess all cause mortality in the US also indicates ... why bother, you're willing to write off 33 million fellow Americans or however many is 1% of your country. For some strange reason, those of us who aren't sociopaths are not.

    As it is, Moderna developed the formula over a weekend in January 2020, while previously forfeiting its intellectual property rights.
     
    Moderna used their long in development vaccine platform and the results of half a century worth of vaccine research to pull off that feat. They've made a patent pledge for the duration of the pandemic, but as extensively discussed here that's worthless anytime soon.

    Replies: @Forbes

    willing to write off 33 million fellow Americans

    I see, policy by forecast model. How’s the forecast model track record, to date? I guess bigger numbers are needed to scare the public into panic.

    Delayed death? What, you expected to live forever?

    What else qualifies for disrupting everyone’s lives under such criteria??

  144. @Jonathan Mason
    @SimpleSong

    People have often done things which were immensely beneficial for society without particularly enriching themselves.

    Microsoft has over the years claimed to have lost billions of dollars of royalties due to forgery of its operating system, but that hasn't stopped the founders of Microsoft from becoming immensely rich, or thousands of other people who have worked for Microsoft from earning a very good living.

    On the other hand relatively few people have become wealthy via the free open source Linux operating system, which for most users can do the same things most people use computers for like Web browsing, word processing, e-mail, playing poker, online shopping, banking, paying bills, sending money, Xoom, etc.

    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.

    STEM work is also very interesting and attractive for those who like it. Just about has to be, biotech is notorious for low pay for the worker bees, there was an oversupply of them before the powers that be decided in the mid-late 1980s they were paying too much for scientific labor and really started stuffing the pipeline, including with a lot of 3rd Worlders for whom the pay is much more than they’d get back home.

    There’s also a degree of self-interest in a lot of drug development. Here we have a nasty novel pathogen with a lot of morbidity for survivors, and a potential for variants that will make more people more contagious like the British B.1.1.7 one which is displacing “classic coronavirus” without being dramatically more lethal or escaping classic immunity, natural or vaccine.

    So for example kids are an obvious ecological niche where as far as I know the current variants still result in most of them having asymptomatic or nearly so cases (and we sincerely hope no unnoticed morbidity), thus not so effective at transmission. That and the potential for more deadly variants for them is one good reason to do Phase III trials and get EUAs for them, we might really need that down the road.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @That Would Be Telling

    Interesting that Pfizer had the largest drug research center outside of the US at Sandwich in England, where the blockbuster drug Viagra (Sildenafil) was discovered, which made the company billions of dollars.

    In spite of this, the whole research center was suddenly closed down as was not producing any new blockbuster drugs, and thousands of people lost their jobs. Naturally this had a powerful impact on the local economy for some time.


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2624751/The-corner-England-betrayed-U-S-pharmaceutical-giant-three-years-ago-How-Pfizer-handed-army-brilliant-British-minds-P45s.html

    Although major drug companies claim to spend a vast amount on research and development, I suspect that a more common model is for startup publicly floated research companies or funded by venture capitalists, to try to develop promising drugs, and then go back to the stock market or investors for more funds when they run out of money, and continue until either they can't continue, or they do get a good drug in which case the whole company is bought out lock and barrel by major pharma companies like Pfizer and J&J, financing the purchase with their own stock.

    In any case, it is interesting that it now costs billions of dollars to bring a new drug to market in the US. Clearly that has not always been the case, and this process is a human invention that could be uninvented if it became a real hindrance to medical progress.

    Case in point is that accelerated permissions for the use of Covid-19 vaccines have been implemented worldwide with no serious political opposition that I can discern.

    Obviously we don't want a repeat of thalidomide, but it still seems a bit excessive.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  145. KenH says:

    But an amusing irony is that Pfizer likely kept Trump from eking out a 269-269 win in the House by deciding in late October to shut down processing of lab samples from its vaccine clinical trial.

    Pfizer CEO is Sephardic Jew Albert Bourla. Every. Single. Time.

    It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality that a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ

    Other source have around 4% of Biden voters saying they would have voted for Trump or not voted had they known about the Hunter Biden laptop scandal. That along with other swing voters who would have voted Trump instead of Biden due to the vaccine would have flipped Pennsylvania for Trump.

    Just more examples of how the 2020 election was “fortified”.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @KenH

    "It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality..."

    Which are Fake News.

    "a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ."

    As I stated 12/6/2020...


    Mr. Sailer is assuming here:

    1. there was a subset of voters who were awaiting news about a potential vaccine under Trump’s watch, and were ready to change their mind the moment there was an announcement;

    2. there was a subset of voters who up until the election day were uncertain who they were going to vote for, and needed “good news”, in particular on the vaccine front, and decided not to vote for Trump because he failed to deliver.

    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls. More than likely, people had already made up their mind about who they were going to vote for.

    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways? Besides, let us NOTICE that Pfizer notably did not accept government money to develop, test, or expand manufacturing capacity under Trump’s Operation Warp Speed initiative to quickly find a vaccine. Pfizer had partnered with the vaccine’s original developer, Germany’s BioNTech, in March 2020. The White House announced Operation Warp Speed in May 2020.
     
    Hat Tip --> Guy De Champlagne

    Overall I and I’m pretty sure Steve have no idea what is and isn’t typical in in drug trials. It’s kind of absurd to say that the delay (if there even was a delay) was definitely because of one thing or another without some kind of real smoking gun (e.g. an email laying out intent, not what Steve calls a smoking gun). The argument Steve is making is ultimately a probabilistic one that has to be built on a very deep foundation of background knowledge about the process...Trump is absolutely enough of an authoritarian strongman to do this**, it’s just that his administration was not competent and loyal enough. Trying to paint Trump defeat as rooted in his nobility and principles is really really absurd. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re trying to say but others have.

    **he would have done something about this, such as, at minimum, dispatch his SEC to warn Pfizer that if they don’t disclose results according to their published protocol, they will be sued.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @KenH

  146. @Alexander Turok
    @adreadline


    Would you support such a right for someone of a given race to refuse to associate with someone of another race?
     
    Yes.

    If shown evidence they do not, in fact, have the WuFlu, will you change your mind, or is your judgement preordained and dogmatically unyielding regarding all of those who are unvaccinated/refuse to be vaccinated?
     
    COVID tests are not instant, so a negative COVID test is doesn't tell you for certain that someone's not a carrier.

    My proposal is a system of special badges. The badges themselves contain symbols, one of if you've had covid, another for if you've had the vaccine, and another for if you've signed up to continue to be subject to social distancing and mask restrictions, which thereafter become optional for everyone else. So if you've had the vaccine, had COVID, and want continue to be made to follow social distancing regulations, you'd wear a badge with all three symbols. Badge impersonation becomes a criminal offense.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    My proposal is a system of special badges.

    My badge is gonna say FOAD.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Badges? Badges?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT8hE7_8BCY

  147. @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason


    The vast majority of people in the world are perfectly happy as long as they have a job and a family, and are not particularly concerned about accumulating wealth beyond their immediate needs. I imagine this also includes people who work on developing drugs.
     
    STEM work is also very interesting and attractive for those who like it. Just about has to be, biotech is notorious for low pay for the worker bees, there was an oversupply of them before the powers that be decided in the mid-late 1980s they were paying too much for scientific labor and really started stuffing the pipeline, including with a lot of 3rd Worlders for whom the pay is much more than they'd get back home.

    There's also a degree of self-interest in a lot of drug development. Here we have a nasty novel pathogen with a lot of morbidity for survivors, and a potential for variants that will make more people more contagious like the British B.1.1.7 one which is displacing "classic coronavirus" without being dramatically more lethal or escaping classic immunity, natural or vaccine.

    So for example kids are an obvious ecological niche where as far as I know the current variants still result in most of them having asymptomatic or nearly so cases (and we sincerely hope no unnoticed morbidity), thus not so effective at transmission. That and the potential for more deadly variants for them is one good reason to do Phase III trials and get EUAs for them, we might really need that down the road.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Interesting that Pfizer had the largest drug research center outside of the US at Sandwich in England, where the blockbuster drug Viagra (Sildenafil) was discovered, which made the company billions of dollars.

    In spite of this, the whole research center was suddenly closed down as was not producing any new blockbuster drugs, and thousands of people lost their jobs. Naturally this had a powerful impact on the local economy for some time.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2624751/The-corner-England-betrayed-U-S-pharmaceutical-giant-three-years-ago-How-Pfizer-handed-army-brilliant-British-minds-P45s.html

    Although major drug companies claim to spend a vast amount on research and development, I suspect that a more common model is for startup publicly floated research companies or funded by venture capitalists, to try to develop promising drugs, and then go back to the stock market or investors for more funds when they run out of money, and continue until either they can’t continue, or they do get a good drug in which case the whole company is bought out lock and barrel by major pharma companies like Pfizer and J&J, financing the purchase with their own stock.

    In any case, it is interesting that it now costs billions of dollars to bring a new drug to market in the US. Clearly that has not always been the case, and this process is a human invention that could be uninvented if it became a real hindrance to medical progress.

    Case in point is that accelerated permissions for the use of Covid-19 vaccines have been implemented worldwide with no serious political opposition that I can discern.

    Obviously we don’t want a repeat of thalidomide, but it still seems a bit excessive.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Jonathan Mason

    You've got a generally correct take on the situation; some old In the Pipeline columns of Derek "Things I Won't Work With" Lowe address the drug discovery issue, he's a synthetic chemist who's lucky to still have a job in the industry (except he likely accomplished that by creating that excellent blog). The TL;DR is that all the low hanging and I'm pretty sure medium hanging fruit has been picked. The days of automated testing of a target against a host of small molecules, many made by those formerly employees by Big Pharma synthetic chemists, are largely over.

    So they pick a few of the most promising things, stuff where they think what expertise they've retained might make a difference, and otherwise make deals of all sorts with small and medium biotech companies. See vaccine giant Sanofi Pasteur buying Protein Solutions, in this case after the latter got their bug cell culture instead of egg membrane protein grown flu protein vaccine approved by the FDA. If Sanofi can get their V2.0 vaccine to work for everyone, it'll use the same technology, which is the same as Novavax's, pretty old method by now, and like mRNA ideal for making new vaccines very quickly.

    I don't follow this closely, but that seems to be the general pattern in the industry. Additional factors might include the FDA getting more strict with pre-declaring clinical trial goals, and everyone in the industry, I'm sure large and small, realizing current academic biomedical research is at least half garbage. That will always include crazy things straight out of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions near total failure and stasis subfield problems like with Alzheimer's, you simply won't get funded unless you pretend well enough that you're addressing the amyloid hypothesis, or so I've read. One way to make sure you make no progress for decades, although the disease feels to me to likely be a generally very hard problem.

    To finish: one apparent counter to the expense of doing clinical trials is that you can now do a lot of the expensive with humans high touch part of following subjects by smartphone. I would also note vaccines are easy in some respects, a jab or two and you're done, really bad side effects almost always show up in a month and a half so two months was used (was already established??) as the safety data threshold for an FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). I've been reading that now that Biologics License Applications have been made by the mRNA companies due to their having six months of (good) safety data, the normal very best if through the normal expedited process decision making will take another six months, non-expedited is ten.

  148. @Jonathan Mason
    @That Would Be Telling

    Interesting that Pfizer had the largest drug research center outside of the US at Sandwich in England, where the blockbuster drug Viagra (Sildenafil) was discovered, which made the company billions of dollars.

    In spite of this, the whole research center was suddenly closed down as was not producing any new blockbuster drugs, and thousands of people lost their jobs. Naturally this had a powerful impact on the local economy for some time.


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2624751/The-corner-England-betrayed-U-S-pharmaceutical-giant-three-years-ago-How-Pfizer-handed-army-brilliant-British-minds-P45s.html

    Although major drug companies claim to spend a vast amount on research and development, I suspect that a more common model is for startup publicly floated research companies or funded by venture capitalists, to try to develop promising drugs, and then go back to the stock market or investors for more funds when they run out of money, and continue until either they can't continue, or they do get a good drug in which case the whole company is bought out lock and barrel by major pharma companies like Pfizer and J&J, financing the purchase with their own stock.

    In any case, it is interesting that it now costs billions of dollars to bring a new drug to market in the US. Clearly that has not always been the case, and this process is a human invention that could be uninvented if it became a real hindrance to medical progress.

    Case in point is that accelerated permissions for the use of Covid-19 vaccines have been implemented worldwide with no serious political opposition that I can discern.

    Obviously we don't want a repeat of thalidomide, but it still seems a bit excessive.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    You’ve got a generally correct take on the situation; some old In the Pipeline columns of Derek “Things I Won’t Work With” Lowe address the drug discovery issue, he’s a synthetic chemist who’s lucky to still have a job in the industry (except he likely accomplished that by creating that excellent blog). The TL;DR is that all the low hanging and I’m pretty sure medium hanging fruit has been picked. The days of automated testing of a target against a host of small molecules, many made by those formerly employees by Big Pharma synthetic chemists, are largely over.

    So they pick a few of the most promising things, stuff where they think what expertise they’ve retained might make a difference, and otherwise make deals of all sorts with small and medium biotech companies. See vaccine giant Sanofi Pasteur buying Protein Solutions, in this case after the latter got their bug cell culture instead of egg membrane protein grown flu protein vaccine approved by the FDA. If Sanofi can get their V2.0 vaccine to work for everyone, it’ll use the same technology, which is the same as Novavax’s, pretty old method by now, and like mRNA ideal for making new vaccines very quickly.

    I don’t follow this closely, but that seems to be the general pattern in the industry. Additional factors might include the FDA getting more strict with pre-declaring clinical trial goals, and everyone in the industry, I’m sure large and small, realizing current academic biomedical research is at least half garbage. That will always include crazy things straight out of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions near total failure and stasis subfield problems like with Alzheimer’s, you simply won’t get funded unless you pretend well enough that you’re addressing the amyloid hypothesis, or so I’ve read. One way to make sure you make no progress for decades, although the disease feels to me to likely be a generally very hard problem.

    To finish: one apparent counter to the expense of doing clinical trials is that you can now do a lot of the expensive with humans high touch part of following subjects by smartphone. I would also note vaccines are easy in some respects, a jab or two and you’re done, really bad side effects almost always show up in a month and a half so two months was used (was already established??) as the safety data threshold for an FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). I’ve been reading that now that Biologics License Applications have been made by the mRNA companies due to their having six months of (good) safety data, the normal very best if through the normal expedited process decision making will take another six months, non-expedited is ten.

  149. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @That Would Be Telling

    "That’s because its a contractual obli" blah blah blah blah blah vomitous loggorhea snipped, you're very welcome.

    It's so weird how people are still discussing the sniffles like it's an interesting subject. I get it, That Would Be Shilling is on the Pfizer payroll and is compensated by the word, but why is anyone else with an IQ supra 26 discussing the common cold? And how can a politician declare that a plague ends on June 15, 2021, as Governor Douch'em has in California? Is it because CoronaHoax is a human invention and thus, like all human inventions, can end at an arbitrary time, like baseball ends after nine innings?

    Holla back, my facediapered Covimbeciles!

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    "Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?"

    Speaking of poison, make sure to get your triple-penetration "full house" Pricks. Every Covidiot I know got sick from the double-penetration Prick - so that "full house" Prick this September is gonna be a doozy 🤒🤢☠

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  150. @That Would Be Telling
    Is this Pfizer's IP to steal? This is a vaccine developed by a "Prussian Turk" and her born in Turkey husband at their company BioNTech in Germany, that country strangely enough not signing on to this IP theft scheme. Fosun of China also has a piece of the action due to an early March 2020 investment in BioNTech, a month before Pfizer joined the game.

    The next problem is that IP in terms of patents are only licenses to sue and to get your country's customs unit to seize counterfeit materials at the border. What's needed for anything complicated like a novel vaccine is what's called in the military gun procurement world a Technical Data Package (TDP) that details everything that's obvious about making a gun or a vaccine.

    And since every step but the first and the last of making mRNA vaccines is new in bulk and therefore state of the art, you need experienced personal to help with the tiny tweaks and such that are needed to get high, or perhaps even any yield from your production lines. And Moderna for one says they absolutely don't have anyone to spare right now, not sure about how they might be expanding production in the US, but a Swiss plant is very new and I'm sure still coming up to speed. Needless to say an outright theft of IP incurs no obligation on the part of the injured company to limit its own production by sending its experts to wherever to enthusiastically help a company steal from them.

    Steps in short: ferment E. Coli to make plasmids of DNA including a section coding for the spike protein. Clip out just that section, not sure how new that is in bulk, and now we get to the new stuff: make mRNA accurately in mass quantities and there are all sorts of purification steps through this point, and mix it just right with lipids to protect it and get it inside cells. Oh, are you going to try to steal the microfluidics know how to make those mixing machines, which per rumor only one company can do?

    Then fill and finish, and while that's not state of the art, it took two months for Moderna to prove to itself and the FDA that increasing the amount in a vial by 50% wouldn't ruin the vaccine. The NYT explains it well including illustrations, pictures, and videos I haven't watched here.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli? That is going to carry nonhuman changes to the nitric bases (methylations, glycosilations, what have you). Nonhuman RNA activates TLRs, which are part of the innate immunity.

    E coli RNA will be destroyed with a vengeance by human cells, rather than being used as template for proteins.

    I am vomit.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli?
     
    Nope, I just left out or assumed a lot of the steps, see the linked NYT article for the details including photos of lots of the machinery in which this is performed by Pfizer. After the E. Coli has done its job, it's harvested (lysed) after which every step is "artificial," no organisms involved, starting with filtering out the plasmids containing the spike protein segment.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  151. @KenH

    But an amusing irony is that Pfizer likely kept Trump from eking out a 269-269 win in the House by deciding in late October to shut down processing of lab samples from its vaccine clinical trial.
     
    Pfizer CEO is Sephardic Jew Albert Bourla. Every. Single. Time.

    It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality that a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ

    Other source have around 4% of Biden voters saying they would have voted for Trump or not voted had they known about the Hunter Biden laptop scandal. That along with other swing voters who would have voted Trump instead of Biden due to the vaccine would have flipped Pennsylvania for Trump.

    Just more examples of how the 2020 election was "fortified".

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality…”

    Which are Fake News.

    “a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ.”

    As I stated 12/6/2020…

    Mr. Sailer is assuming here:

    1. there was a subset of voters who were awaiting news about a potential vaccine under Trump’s watch, and were ready to change their mind the moment there was an announcement;

    2. there was a subset of voters who up until the election day were uncertain who they were going to vote for, and needed “good news”, in particular on the vaccine front, and decided not to vote for Trump because he failed to deliver.

    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls. More than likely, people had already made up their mind about who they were going to vote for.

    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways? Besides, let us NOTICE that Pfizer notably did not accept government money to develop, test, or expand manufacturing capacity under Trump’s Operation Warp Speed initiative to quickly find a vaccine. Pfizer had partnered with the vaccine’s original developer, Germany’s BioNTech, in March 2020. The White House announced Operation Warp Speed in May 2020.

    Hat Tip –> Guy De Champlagne

    Overall I and I’m pretty sure Steve have no idea what is and isn’t typical in in drug trials. It’s kind of absurd to say that the delay (if there even was a delay) was definitely because of one thing or another without some kind of real smoking gun (e.g. an email laying out intent, not what Steve calls a smoking gun). The argument Steve is making is ultimately a probabilistic one that has to be built on a very deep foundation of background knowledge about the process…Trump is absolutely enough of an authoritarian strongman to do this**, it’s just that his administration was not competent and loyal enough. Trying to paint Trump defeat as rooted in his nobility and principles is really really absurd. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re trying to say but others have.

    **he would have done something about this, such as, at minimum, dispatch his SEC to warn Pfizer that if they don’t disclose results according to their published protocol, they will be sued.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Corvinus


    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways?
     
    Quite so, and isn't that what Boris Johnson and Vladimir Putin also did in their own ways? But the real question is whether Trump showed global leadership in determining what contribution each nation could make to vaccine development to make the planet safe for homo sapiens.

    And when Trump announced the withdrawal of the US from the World Health Organization did he have plans to replace it with something that would serve the world better?
    , @KenH
    @Corvinus


    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls.
     
    Tens of millions also voted on election day and the margin of victory was so small in WI, GA, and AZ that enough of those swing voters could have changed their mind by an announcement of vaccine availability just before the election.

    In the weeks before the election the Jewish media was screaming that Trump was a liar for claiming that a vaccine would be available by the end of 2020 (or possibly sooner). NYT, CNN & MSNBC, etc., trotted out their "experts" to dispel that claim and remind their viewers and readers that orange man was lying to win the election and at best a vaccine might be available later in 2021.

    If it wasn't for the dishonest and yellow journalism of various left leaning news outlets it's also possible enough voters using mail in ballots would have voted differently. That was a big reason Democrats pushed for mail in votes so that no "October surprises" or even election eve surprises could sway people to vote for Trump as in 2016 with Hildabeast's e-mail scandal.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  152. @Jim Don Bob
    @Alexander Turok


    My proposal is a system of special badges.
     
    My badge is gonna say FOAD.

    Replies: @anon

    Badges? Badges?

  153. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?”

    Speaking of poison, make sure to get your triple-penetration “full house” Pricks. Every Covidiot I know got sick from the double-penetration Prick – so that “full house” Prick this September is gonna be a doozy 🤒🤢☠

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Yeah, I felt sick after each dose. That detergent that they put in the RNA is pure poison.

    But guess who is going to holiday in Greece and return to work without missing a day for self-quarantine purposes? Well, definitely not you, since your US passport is now blocking you from every other country on the planet, and your refusal to collaborate with Biden into calling the farce over merely prolongs the blockade.

  154. @Corvinus
    @KenH

    "It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality..."

    Which are Fake News.

    "a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ."

    As I stated 12/6/2020...


    Mr. Sailer is assuming here:

    1. there was a subset of voters who were awaiting news about a potential vaccine under Trump’s watch, and were ready to change their mind the moment there was an announcement;

    2. there was a subset of voters who up until the election day were uncertain who they were going to vote for, and needed “good news”, in particular on the vaccine front, and decided not to vote for Trump because he failed to deliver.

    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls. More than likely, people had already made up their mind about who they were going to vote for.

    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways? Besides, let us NOTICE that Pfizer notably did not accept government money to develop, test, or expand manufacturing capacity under Trump’s Operation Warp Speed initiative to quickly find a vaccine. Pfizer had partnered with the vaccine’s original developer, Germany’s BioNTech, in March 2020. The White House announced Operation Warp Speed in May 2020.
     
    Hat Tip --> Guy De Champlagne

    Overall I and I’m pretty sure Steve have no idea what is and isn’t typical in in drug trials. It’s kind of absurd to say that the delay (if there even was a delay) was definitely because of one thing or another without some kind of real smoking gun (e.g. an email laying out intent, not what Steve calls a smoking gun). The argument Steve is making is ultimately a probabilistic one that has to be built on a very deep foundation of background knowledge about the process...Trump is absolutely enough of an authoritarian strongman to do this**, it’s just that his administration was not competent and loyal enough. Trying to paint Trump defeat as rooted in his nobility and principles is really really absurd. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re trying to say but others have.

    **he would have done something about this, such as, at minimum, dispatch his SEC to warn Pfizer that if they don’t disclose results according to their published protocol, they will be sued.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @KenH

    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways?

    Quite so, and isn’t that what Boris Johnson and Vladimir Putin also did in their own ways? But the real question is whether Trump showed global leadership in determining what contribution each nation could make to vaccine development to make the planet safe for homo sapiens.

    And when Trump announced the withdrawal of the US from the World Health Organization did he have plans to replace it with something that would serve the world better?

  155. KenH says:
    @Corvinus
    @KenH

    "It is very likely that even with all the election irregularities and illegality..."

    Which are Fake News.

    "a Pfizer announcement the day before the election would have likely resulted in a close Trump victory in WI, GA, and AZ."

    As I stated 12/6/2020...


    Mr. Sailer is assuming here:

    1. there was a subset of voters who were awaiting news about a potential vaccine under Trump’s watch, and were ready to change their mind the moment there was an announcement;

    2. there was a subset of voters who up until the election day were uncertain who they were going to vote for, and needed “good news”, in particular on the vaccine front, and decided not to vote for Trump because he failed to deliver.

    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls. More than likely, people had already made up their mind about who they were going to vote for.

    Of course, while we should give Trump for authorizing Operation: Warp Speed to find a vaccine for a global scourge, is that not what a president should be doing anyways? Besides, let us NOTICE that Pfizer notably did not accept government money to develop, test, or expand manufacturing capacity under Trump’s Operation Warp Speed initiative to quickly find a vaccine. Pfizer had partnered with the vaccine’s original developer, Germany’s BioNTech, in March 2020. The White House announced Operation Warp Speed in May 2020.
     
    Hat Tip --> Guy De Champlagne

    Overall I and I’m pretty sure Steve have no idea what is and isn’t typical in in drug trials. It’s kind of absurd to say that the delay (if there even was a delay) was definitely because of one thing or another without some kind of real smoking gun (e.g. an email laying out intent, not what Steve calls a smoking gun). The argument Steve is making is ultimately a probabilistic one that has to be built on a very deep foundation of background knowledge about the process...Trump is absolutely enough of an authoritarian strongman to do this**, it’s just that his administration was not competent and loyal enough. Trying to paint Trump defeat as rooted in his nobility and principles is really really absurd. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re trying to say but others have.

    **he would have done something about this, such as, at minimum, dispatch his SEC to warn Pfizer that if they don’t disclose results according to their published protocol, they will be sued.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @KenH

    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls.

    Tens of millions also voted on election day and the margin of victory was so small in WI, GA, and AZ that enough of those swing voters could have changed their mind by an announcement of vaccine availability just before the election.

    In the weeks before the election the Jewish media was screaming that Trump was a liar for claiming that a vaccine would be available by the end of 2020 (or possibly sooner). NYT, CNN & MSNBC, etc., trotted out their “experts” to dispel that claim and remind their viewers and readers that orange man was lying to win the election and at best a vaccine might be available later in 2021.

    If it wasn’t for the dishonest and yellow journalism of various left leaning news outlets it’s also possible enough voters using mail in ballots would have voted differently. That was a big reason Democrats pushed for mail in votes so that no “October surprises” or even election eve surprises could sway people to vote for Trump as in 2016 with Hildabeast’s e-mail scandal.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @KenH

    “Tens of millions also voted on election day and the margin of victory was so small in WI, GA, and AZ that enough of those swing voters could have changed their mind by an announcement of vaccine availability just before the election.”

    COULD, not WOULD. And you honestly believe the announcement would have made that difference prior, considering the vaccine was going to be available anyways regardless of who was elected, and the credit primarily goes to the medical and pharmaceutical communities. Besides, Trump was taking credit for it anyways, so those fence sitters need not have been swayed if an announcement didn’t come out before November 3.

    “In the weeks before the election the Jewish media was screaming that Trump was a liar for claiming that a vaccine would be available...”

    You mean the media was correctly doubting that an effective vaccine could be trotted out that went through protocols, rather than be rushed by Trump for political expediency.

    “If it wasn’t for the dishonest and yellow journalism of various left leaning news outlets it’s also possible enough voters using mail in ballots would have voted differently.”

    Trump lost. At least Epstein didn’t kill himself.

  156. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @That Would Be Telling

    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli? That is going to carry nonhuman changes to the nitric bases (methylations, glycosilations, what have you). Nonhuman RNA activates TLRs, which are part of the innate immunity.

    E coli RNA will be destroyed with a vengeance by human cells, rather than being used as template for proteins.

    I am vomit.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli?

    Nope, I just left out or assumed a lot of the steps, see the linked NYT article for the details including photos of lots of the machinery in which this is performed by Pfizer. After the E. Coli has done its job, it’s harvested (lysed) after which every step is “artificial,” no organisms involved, starting with filtering out the plasmids containing the spike protein segment.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @That Would Be Telling

    I see not that the RNA is made by mixing inert DNA with inert RNA polymerase. Nothing is alive there. This is good for safety, but I think such RNA would lack posttranscriptional modifications which make it attractive to ribosomes (namely, capping and tail addition, if anyone is interested).

    I am not vomit anymore, but I given there's no protein made, I would quote Weihan again: look this fool.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  157. @KenH
    @Corvinus


    The problem with Sailer’s peddling of this vaccine political conspiracy theory, while possible, is that there had been tens of millions of mail-in votes already casted before Pfizers alleged malfeasance, and thus they would have been unaffected compared to those going in person to the polls.
     
    Tens of millions also voted on election day and the margin of victory was so small in WI, GA, and AZ that enough of those swing voters could have changed their mind by an announcement of vaccine availability just before the election.

    In the weeks before the election the Jewish media was screaming that Trump was a liar for claiming that a vaccine would be available by the end of 2020 (or possibly sooner). NYT, CNN & MSNBC, etc., trotted out their "experts" to dispel that claim and remind their viewers and readers that orange man was lying to win the election and at best a vaccine might be available later in 2021.

    If it wasn't for the dishonest and yellow journalism of various left leaning news outlets it's also possible enough voters using mail in ballots would have voted differently. That was a big reason Democrats pushed for mail in votes so that no "October surprises" or even election eve surprises could sway people to vote for Trump as in 2016 with Hildabeast's e-mail scandal.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Tens of millions also voted on election day and the margin of victory was so small in WI, GA, and AZ that enough of those swing voters could have changed their mind by an announcement of vaccine availability just before the election.”

    COULD, not WOULD. And you honestly believe the announcement would have made that difference prior, considering the vaccine was going to be available anyways regardless of who was elected, and the credit primarily goes to the medical and pharmaceutical communities. Besides, Trump was taking credit for it anyways, so those fence sitters need not have been swayed if an announcement didn’t come out before November 3.

    “In the weeks before the election the Jewish media was screaming that Trump was a liar for claiming that a vaccine would be available…”

    You mean the media was correctly doubting that an effective vaccine could be trotted out that went through protocols, rather than be rushed by Trump for political expediency.

    “If it wasn’t for the dishonest and yellow journalism of various left leaning news outlets it’s also possible enough voters using mail in ballots would have voted differently.”

    Trump lost. At least Epstein didn’t kill himself.

  158. @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah I've read that rubbers are openly available at the Olympics. I oppose this for two reasons: one, it encourages fornication. Two, anyone with Olympic-tier genes and work ethic SHOULD be reproducing. Ideally it would be with a spouse but these people need to be breeding regardless.

    Replies: @anon, @Jonathan Mason

    I would imagine that a lot of the female athletes would be on the pill or a depot injection, as they would not want a menstrual period interfering with their athletic feats, so the condoms would probably be more for protection against diseases.

    I would think that from the athlete’s point of view half the POINT of qualifying for the Olympics is to get a medal in Olympic standard sex in the athlete’s village.

  159. @That Would Be Telling
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    Are you serios that they make the RNA in E coli?
     
    Nope, I just left out or assumed a lot of the steps, see the linked NYT article for the details including photos of lots of the machinery in which this is performed by Pfizer. After the E. Coli has done its job, it's harvested (lysed) after which every step is "artificial," no organisms involved, starting with filtering out the plasmids containing the spike protein segment.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    I see not that the RNA is made by mixing inert DNA with inert RNA polymerase. Nothing is alive there. This is good for safety, but I think such RNA would lack posttranscriptional modifications which make it attractive to ribosomes (namely, capping and tail addition, if anyone is interested).

    I am not vomit anymore, but I given there’s no protein made, I would quote Weihan again: look this fool.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    I see not that the RNA is made by mixing inert DNA with inert RNA polymerase. Nothing is alive there. This is good for safety
     
    Also good for manufacturing! Which I believe is one reason the mRNA vaccines are stomping the competition. We understand how to efficiently and safely ferment lots of bacteria like the E. Coli which make the DNA plasmids, but human cells outside of the body are another thing altogether. Not "designed" to function just by themselves, easy to contaminate, etc. etc.

    but I think such RNA would lack posttranscriptional modifications which make it attractive to ribosomes (namely, capping and tail addition, if anyone is interested).
     
    Those steps are of course done, but the NYT article doesn't go into that level of details. The best for that is this blog posting focusing on supply chains. For what you brought up, without including its links or footnotes:

    To protect the “beginning” of the mRNA statement, a 5’ cap is added. This can be done co-transcriptionally, in the same process step as when the rest of the mRNA is assembled, or post-transcriptionally, in a separate process step. To do so co-transcriptionally, a 5’ cap analog is added to the reaction mixture and incorporated by the polymerase when it reads a specific initiator sequence. There is only one vendor for this analog: TriLink and its partner tebu-bio for the European market. Post-transcriptionally it can be done using a mRNA Cap 2′-O-Methyltransferase and the vaccinia capping enzyme (VCE). The co-transcriptional method is generally more suitable for industrial processes as there is no need for an additional post-purification and it is faster since it works in one step. In their July 2020 investor update BioNTech refers to usings TriLinks trinucleotide cap and hence this is likely part of the production method of the approved vaccine. Ultimately, the cap analogue or the VCE can drive cost and present bottlenecks if production is not increased accordingly.

    To protect the end of the mRNA we add a poly(A) tail to the message either by encoding it in the DNA template or using a Poly(A)Polymerase. Both BioNTech and Moderna are using the faster and convenient DNA template approach.
     
    Back to you:

    I am not vomit anymore, but I given there’s no protein made, I would quote Weihan again: look this fool.

     

    So, yes, the stabilized unless it's AZ/Oxford or maybe Sputnik V non-functional protein is made by these "active" vaccines including the mRNA ones. But the latter don't make them for very long; how long were you vomiting after each dose and when did it start? That's a noted although not "serious" side effect and one I'm very glad I didn't get! Although I had a bit of nausea a few times less than a week after my second Pfizer/BioNTech dose but there was another more likely explanation.

    Glad to hear you're over that! You should truly be well protected by now I would expect.
  160. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    "Hey, I remember you,. You are the tough guy who dines out with the wife dressed in dirty scrubs. Any interesting stories from the food poisoning scene?"

    Speaking of poison, make sure to get your triple-penetration "full house" Pricks. Every Covidiot I know got sick from the double-penetration Prick - so that "full house" Prick this September is gonna be a doozy 🤒🤢☠

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Yeah, I felt sick after each dose. That detergent that they put in the RNA is pure poison.

    But guess who is going to holiday in Greece and return to work without missing a day for self-quarantine purposes? Well, definitely not you, since your US passport is now blocking you from every other country on the planet, and your refusal to collaborate with Biden into calling the farce over merely prolongs the blockade.

  161. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @That Would Be Telling

    I see not that the RNA is made by mixing inert DNA with inert RNA polymerase. Nothing is alive there. This is good for safety, but I think such RNA would lack posttranscriptional modifications which make it attractive to ribosomes (namely, capping and tail addition, if anyone is interested).

    I am not vomit anymore, but I given there's no protein made, I would quote Weihan again: look this fool.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I see not that the RNA is made by mixing inert DNA with inert RNA polymerase. Nothing is alive there. This is good for safety

    Also good for manufacturing! Which I believe is one reason the mRNA vaccines are stomping the competition. We understand how to efficiently and safely ferment lots of bacteria like the E. Coli which make the DNA plasmids, but human cells outside of the body are another thing altogether. Not “designed” to function just by themselves, easy to contaminate, etc. etc.

    but I think such RNA would lack posttranscriptional modifications which make it attractive to ribosomes (namely, capping and tail addition, if anyone is interested).

    Those steps are of course done, but the NYT article doesn’t go into that level of details. The best for that is this blog posting focusing on supply chains. For what you brought up, without including its links or footnotes:

    To protect the “beginning” of the mRNA statement, a 5’ cap is added. This can be done co-transcriptionally, in the same process step as when the rest of the mRNA is assembled, or post-transcriptionally, in a separate process step. To do so co-transcriptionally, a 5’ cap analog is added to the reaction mixture and incorporated by the polymerase when it reads a specific initiator sequence. There is only one vendor for this analog: TriLink and its partner tebu-bio for the European market. Post-transcriptionally it can be done using a mRNA Cap 2′-O-Methyltransferase and the vaccinia capping enzyme (VCE). The co-transcriptional method is generally more suitable for industrial processes as there is no need for an additional post-purification and it is faster since it works in one step. In their July 2020 investor update BioNTech refers to usings TriLinks trinucleotide cap and hence this is likely part of the production method of the approved vaccine. Ultimately, the cap analogue or the VCE can drive cost and present bottlenecks if production is not increased accordingly.

    To protect the end of the mRNA we add a poly(A) tail to the message either by encoding it in the DNA template or using a Poly(A)Polymerase. Both BioNTech and Moderna are using the faster and convenient DNA template approach.

    Back to you:

    I am not vomit anymore, but I given there’s no protein made, I would quote Weihan again: look this fool.

    So, yes, the stabilized unless it’s AZ/Oxford or maybe Sputnik V non-functional protein is made by these “active” vaccines including the mRNA ones. But the latter don’t make them for very long; how long were you vomiting after each dose and when did it start? That’s a noted although not “serious” side effect and one I’m very glad I didn’t get! Although I had a bit of nausea a few times less than a week after my second Pfizer/BioNTech dose but there was another more likely explanation.

    Glad to hear you’re over that! You should truly be well protected by now I would expect.

  162. Since taxpayers’ money was used in the development, advertising, and promotion of the vaccine, it should not be protected by patents; all information related to the vaccine should be in the public domain. This is a well established principle of “one dollar of federal money equals one hundred percent federal control.”

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