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Pew: "Science Knowledge Varies by Race and Ethnicity in U.S."
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From Pew Research Center:

Science knowledge varies by race and ethnicity in U.S.
BY BRIAN KENNEDY AND SARA ATSKE

U.S. racial and ethnic groups vary significantly in their knowledge of science-related issues, according to a new Pew Research Center survey that quizzed Americans about subjects ranging from life and physical sciences to numeracy and chart reading.

About half of whites (48%) got at least nine of 11 questions correct. In comparison, much smaller shares of Hispanics (23%) and blacks (9%) correctly answered at least nine of the questions.

On average, whites got 7.6 questions correct while Hispanics got 5.1 and blacks 3.7. English-speaking Asians got an average of 7.0 correct answers, but it’s important to note the survey was only conducted in English and Spanish. (Asians are less likely than whites and blacks, but not Hispanics, to be proficient in English.)

Interestingly the rank order of whites>Hispanics>blacks were seen on each of the eleven questions.

I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972. In general, this is why cognitive statistics aren’t as interesting as baseball statistics. Sports statistics change over time and pop up surprises, but education related stats are quite repetitive.

 
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  1. Anonymous[201] • Disclaimer says:

    Is this surprising to anyone, on the left or the right? Yet another example of American society’s institutionalized racism.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Anonymous

    Step it up. We already have tiny duck, we don't need generic sjw platitudes that are correctly spelled.

  2. It’s interesting that Pew thinks (apparently) that the Asian score is limited by English language proficiency. This certainly didn’t stop any of the Asian kids in my son’s high school; almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian, and the knowledge base questions are in English.

  3. Anonymous[151] • Disclaimer says:

    Very depressing graph

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @res
    @Anonymous


    Very depressing graph
     
    Which part? I found the average for Hispanics with college degrees to be better than I would have expected given the other numbers.

    Yes, those numbers are still depressing on the whole, but that's what we get as college becomes the new high school.
    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    So whites with some or no college score better than blacks with college degrees? Sounds about right.

    Also, it's really misleading to include Hispanics as a category since they there's a wide range of possible European/AmerIndian admixture, but I'm just preaching to the choir...

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Anonymous

    It’s pretty alarming that only 16% overall answered all 11 questions correctly. I consider myself barely intelligent enough to function and yet found the quiz absurdly easy, something I would have scored 100% on in 8th grade (noting one of the questions was borrowed from a Florida assessment test for 8th graders).

    What this informs me is that roughly 84% of the population must be sterilized for our species to have any hope of advancement.

    And yes, that is depressing as hell.

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    What is depressing about it?

  4. I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972.

    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    Friends played Strat-O-Matic and I watched them play, but I don't recall getting into it myself.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H


    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s
     
    .

    I had the 1969 Seattle Pilots set. Unfortunately, the next spring I crossed out "Pilots" and wrote "Milwaukee Brewers" in instead. I wonder what they'd be worth today had I not.
    , @Known Fact
    @Daniel H

    I played APBA with friends and solitaire into my 30s. We would make expansion teams of all our favorite mediocre players. Imagine a key moment and up to bat steps .... Ivan Murrell!

    I think Rotisserie baseball and then the internet took the steam out of Strat-O and APBA

  5. What are ‘science related issues?’ If the questions are about global warming, humans creating hurricanes by not carpooling in rural Nebraska or the ‘science’ that sex is not permanent, I give credit to the POCs for not falling for that nonsense. The Asians just probably didn’t understand the questions.

    • Replies: @res
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The questions were described in the article graphic. They seemed pretty reasonable. The tilt of the Earth as relates to the seasons made an appearance. I do wonder about "The main components of antacids and bases." That wording sounds confusing to me and whites only averaged 46% correct on that question.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @James Speaks

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I just took the quiz - it was linked in the original article. Pretty simple (11/11!) but the questions were all legit: no phony stuff as you feared.

    Check it out. I bet the average score for I-Steve readers is 11/11.

    Which ought to interest certain potential advertisers in Steve's blog.

    Replies: @keypusher

    , @International Jew
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Fortunately for me, the quiz didn't cover warmism or gender bs. If it had, and knowing what Pew would think are the correct answers, I'd have flunked.

  6. Lot says:

    “education related stats are quite repetitive”

    Well, whites do better than Asians for once.

    Not sure what the composition of the Asian sample is though.

    “almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian”

    And national spelling bee winners are 80% Indian 20% home school evangelicals. That doesn’t tell us much compared to actual stats of mass standardized testing.

    I’m curious about second generation NE v South Asian stats. From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    • Replies: @Ray Huffman
    @Lot

    There are Asians and then there are Asians. Some groups, such as Hmong and Filipinos, have made little of themselves and show little promise. Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average.

    Replies: @gate666, @Wilkey

    , @gate666
    @Lot

    you are full of shit.

    , @International Jew
    @Lot


    From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.
     
    From what I've seen, and I don't claim to scientific rigor, the children often outdo the parents. The kids grow up healthier, attend better schools, and of course their mastery of English opens many opportunities closed to their parents.
    , @Anonymous Jew
    @Lot

    I'm pretty sure I've seen second generation S. Asian children in the US reported at IQ 110. That would make them the highest IQ group in the country. Note regression to the mean would theoretically stop at the second generation, meaning this new group will now regress to 110. I would put the real S. Asian IQ (with first world nutrition) at about 95. Even with regression to the mean, these numbers are about what you'd expect - ie 120-125 IQ parents from a 95 IQ group. (The differing IQs of ethnic groups within India is another variable to consider).

    Unfortunately, they're still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic. And from my experience they're at least as leftist as Jews. But at least they won't mug you!

    Replies: @Anonymous

  7. @Daniel H
    I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972.

    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Known Fact

    Friends played Strat-O-Matic and I watched them play, but I don’t recall getting into it myself.

  8. @Anonymous
    Very depressing graph

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/FT_19.03.28_ScienceKnowledgeRace_Amongthecollegeeducated.png

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous, @Stan d Mute, @Anonymous

    Very depressing graph

    Which part? I found the average for Hispanics with college degrees to be better than I would have expected given the other numbers.

    Yes, those numbers are still depressing on the whole, but that’s what we get as college becomes the new high school.

  9. res says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose
    What are 'science related issues?' If the questions are about global warming, humans creating hurricanes by not carpooling in rural Nebraska or the 'science' that sex is not permanent, I give credit to the POCs for not falling for that nonsense. The Asians just probably didn't understand the questions.

    Replies: @res, @Paul Jolliffe, @International Jew

    The questions were described in the article graphic. They seemed pretty reasonable. The tilt of the Earth as relates to the seasons made an appearance. I do wonder about “The main components of antacids and bases.” That wording sounds confusing to me and whites only averaged 46% correct on that question.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @res

    I took the quiz; it's not very difficult, and looks for broad, not-very-political science knowledge.

    The question you mention was perhaps worded awkwardly, but if you know that acids and bases are opposites, it's pretty easy.

    The only time I hesitated was on the question that required reading some temperature graphs, which could have been misinterpreted if you just gave them a quick glance.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    , @James Speaks
    @res

    Only one out of three blacks could relate the tilt of the earth's axis of rotation to seasons. This is really something everyone who gets out of sixth grade should know. Thus, 2/3 of the black electorate are below that level.

    Two out of five blacks knew what fossil fuels were. Three out of five did not, yet, they vote.

    Replies: @res

  10. @res
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The questions were described in the article graphic. They seemed pretty reasonable. The tilt of the Earth as relates to the seasons made an appearance. I do wonder about "The main components of antacids and bases." That wording sounds confusing to me and whites only averaged 46% correct on that question.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @James Speaks

    I took the quiz; it’s not very difficult, and looks for broad, not-very-political science knowledge.

    The question you mention was perhaps worded awkwardly, but if you know that acids and bases are opposites, it’s pretty easy.

    The only time I hesitated was on the question that required reading some temperature graphs, which could have been misinterpreted if you just gave them a quick glance.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    At the very end of the quiz they broke down the demographics as to each question.

    I noticed that men seemed to score at least 10% higher on each question, except one. For some reason, women understood the need for a control group better than any other item relative to men.

    It might have been somewhat more interesting if they had broken out the results by both race and gender. For example, does a "gender gap" exist within all ethnic groups.

  11. @Daniel H
    I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972.

    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Known Fact

    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s

    .

    I had the 1969 Seattle Pilots set. Unfortunately, the next spring I crossed out “Pilots” and wrote “Milwaukee Brewers” in instead. I wonder what they’d be worth today had I not.

  12. It was a multiple choice test with four options for each of 11 questions. So you should get a score of 2.75 on average from just guessing.

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Hypnotoad666

    Have you ever interacted with many blacks who didn't go to college? I had a about a year stint where I was interacting with a lot of people in that category - the fact that their average would suggest most of them were just guessing and really had no ides is not at all surprising.

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Hypnotoad666


    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

     

    Why? Did you not already know? How could you have missed noticing something so glaringly obvious?

    Far more depressing to me was that only 73% of post-grads know the difference between acids and bases or that only 70% of college grads know what a hypothesis is.

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Read the actual multiple choice questions and contemplate the fact that only 63% of whites could correctly answer the question on genetic engineering. At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Hypnotoad666, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Known Fact
    @Hypnotoad666

    And I doubt they really dug down deep enough to get a true sampling of that particular population

    , @International Jew
    @Hypnotoad666

    Yep, and in fact it's worse because at least one question only had three choices.

    I'll bet a lot of people don't read well enough to understand the questions in the first place.

    There's probably a significant population that won't sit still long enough to complete the quiz.

  13. Getting nine out of eleven questions right seems a strange threshold.

    My favourite question: “A car travelling at 40 mph travels 30 miles in 45 minutes”

    Some citizens found that one hard.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Hugh

    Citizen Talking Barbie did.

  14. OT: Mayor of Baltimore caught in ‘cartoonish corruption’ scandal over her books. She’s taken a leave of absence.

    https://www.philly.com/news/nation-world/baltimore-mayor-catherine-pugh-book-scandal-leave-absence-healthy-holly-20190401.html

    Those who are trying to make black Democratic politicians look as clean and honest as possible are having a tough time of it.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Anon

    Wait a second, Maryland has a Republican governor? That reminds me of when NYC voters got so desperate that they elected Giuliani. How bad must things have gotten in Baltimore that suburban and rural GoodWhites state-wide went overwhelmingly for a Republican?

    Replies: @anon, @Nosferatu Zodd

  15. Anonymous[201] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Very depressing graph

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/FT_19.03.28_ScienceKnowledgeRace_Amongthecollegeeducated.png

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous, @Stan d Mute, @Anonymous

    So whites with some or no college score better than blacks with college degrees? Sounds about right.

    Also, it’s really misleading to include Hispanics as a category since they there’s a wide range of possible European/AmerIndian admixture, but I’m just preaching to the choir…

  16. Eleven multiple choice questions, each with four possible answers. So the average score from just random guessing would be…2.75? The average black score is just 0.45 points better than random guessing. The average white score is 3.95 points better than random guessing.

    So am I wrong in saying that the average white score is actually almost 9 times higher than the average black score?

  17. @Lot
    “education related stats are quite repetitive”

    Well, whites do better than Asians for once.

    Not sure what the composition of the Asian sample is though.

    “almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian”

    And national spelling bee winners are 80% Indian 20% home school evangelicals. That doesn’t tell us much compared to actual stats of mass standardized testing.

    I’m curious about second generation NE v South Asian stats. From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    Replies: @Ray Huffman, @gate666, @International Jew, @Anonymous Jew

    There are Asians and then there are Asians. Some groups, such as Hmong and Filipinos, have made little of themselves and show little promise. Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average.

    • Replies: @gate666
    @Ray Huffman

    filipinos in america have high iq.

    , @Wilkey
    @Ray Huffman

    "Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average."

    Because they are Asians. According to Brian Sykes (iirc) they trace their ancestry back to aboriginal Taiwanese.

    I'm still more shocked by the fact that the average score for blacks, 3.2, is barely above the chance of random answers. There's the future of your Democratic Party, and of America.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous Jew

  18. What is surprising is that the scores of those with college degrees were so low. The graph question could have been misinterpreted if you were reading too fast, and I think there was another that seemed to have a wording issue, but having been to college, and therefore, having probably taken a bunch of tests with tricky wording that wouldn’t have been an issue.

    But…11 out of 11! Liberal arts degree. I rock!!!!

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @South Texas Guy

    Yeah,me too! But I would question one answer. It said if ya cut down a bunch of trees,you get? The answer was soil erosion.
    But another was "colder weather."
    Did any of yous see the story on 60 Minutes about the guy who wants to cut down all the trees in Siberia and let grazing animals run around churning up the land to expose it to colder air and keep it from thawing and releasing CO2?

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    , @Redneck farmer
    @South Texas Guy

    A true liberal arts degree would prepare you for such things. What gets called a liberal arts degree, or worse yet, a fine arts degree, wouldn't.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    , @George Taylor
    @South Texas Guy

    11 of 11. No you don't rock, your not special etc. An entirely predictable result for the average White guy who reads unz.com.

  19. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @res

    I took the quiz; it's not very difficult, and looks for broad, not-very-political science knowledge.

    The question you mention was perhaps worded awkwardly, but if you know that acids and bases are opposites, it's pretty easy.

    The only time I hesitated was on the question that required reading some temperature graphs, which could have been misinterpreted if you just gave them a quick glance.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    At the very end of the quiz they broke down the demographics as to each question.

    I noticed that men seemed to score at least 10% higher on each question, except one. For some reason, women understood the need for a control group better than any other item relative to men.

    It might have been somewhat more interesting if they had broken out the results by both race and gender. For example, does a “gender gap” exist within all ethnic groups.

  20. As an addendum, I was expecting a few math-related questions. Maybe something like balancing a single replaceplacement chemical reaction, maybe a lever or pulley question, or something about circles.

    Like I said above, I can see flubbing one or two for taking the test too quickly, not reading carefully enough, and the gene one could have been a curve ball for some. But really, this should be common knowledge. As others have said here, the graph is scary. Even at 9.3 the college educated whites portion is on the low side. But the black and hispanic numbers verify even a very moderate race realist’s most dim views.

  21. OT: Joe Biden accused of rubbing noses with another woman:

    https://www.redstate.com/sister-toldjah/2019/04/01/breaking-another-woman-accuses-joe-biden-grabbing-inappropriately-campaign-event/

    Yep. Nose-rubbing. I dare say this is a classic microaggression. I guess it’s worse if his breath stinks.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Anon

    Given all the pics floating around of his borderline pedo behavior, I'm surprised they are still trotting out these sexual microassaults. One fairly mainstream article hinting at his behavior with underage girls would completely destroy him.

    Replies: @onetwothree

    , @Macumazahn
    @Anon

    Among the Esquimaux, that's a kiss... and as we all know (well, except for Kubrat Pulev, but he's learning) an unsolicited kiss is hardly a microaggression - it's a sexual assault!

  22. jon says:
    @Hypnotoad666
    It was a multiple choice test with four options for each of 11 questions. So you should get a score of 2.75 on average from just guessing.

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    Replies: @jon, @Stan d Mute, @Known Fact, @International Jew

    Have you ever interacted with many blacks who didn’t go to college? I had a about a year stint where I was interacting with a lot of people in that category – the fact that their average would suggest most of them were just guessing and really had no ides is not at all surprising.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @jon

    Right. But don't let them know that you know that they know nothing. Nothing pisses a black guy off more than to be made to look like he's anything but in total command of every situation. And if you persist and call him a bullshitter, watch out. Fur will fly.

    Especially in front of any women, a black man cannot take feedback that calls his competence into question. This is the primary reason that integrated workplaces which combine white women with black and white men, cannot achieve good results. Every project will be a boondoggle. Likely a violent one.

    Replies: @Fun

  23. @South Texas Guy
    What is surprising is that the scores of those with college degrees were so low. The graph question could have been misinterpreted if you were reading too fast, and I think there was another that seemed to have a wording issue, but having been to college, and therefore, having probably taken a bunch of tests with tricky wording that wouldn't have been an issue.

    But...11 out of 11! Liberal arts degree. I rock!!!!

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Redneck farmer, @George Taylor

    Yeah,me too! But I would question one answer. It said if ya cut down a bunch of trees,you get? The answer was soil erosion.
    But another was “colder weather.”
    Did any of yous see the story on 60 Minutes about the guy who wants to cut down all the trees in Siberia and let grazing animals run around churning up the land to expose it to colder air and keep it from thawing and releasing CO2?

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @Father O'Hara

    What you would get is a field of stumps. Unless of course you dig them out.

    I would have missed that question. My mind is too literal. None of the answers logically follow. They're all conditional. You don't get soil erosion if it doesn't rain immediately or if you were careful when you cut the trees to avoid disturbing the underbrush. For example, when trees are cut down in an orchard there's no erosion because grass grows between the rows. This is a literal, real-life example that is true, just plain true.

    I would have left the answer blank and my score would have (and did) reflected that. I recall that numerous questions on SAT's and such were ambiguous and left me scratching my head. None of the answers were absolutely correct. And this left me in a quandary. Should I answer them with what I thought the test maker wanted to hear even though none of the answers was logically, exactly correct?

    Doing so would have meant that I would have to guess what their biases were. But supposedly the test, if the results were to be accurate, should not have reflected or expressed the author's biases. But clearly it did, since none of the answers were correct. Hmmmm.

    This, trying to unravel the test-question creator's intentions, took up a lot of my time on the reading comprehension portion of those tests. I came to look at some questions as traps. They provided answers that were close, but none that were logically binding or unequivocally, empirically certain. So they were testing me at a level doubly removed, trying to see whether I were clever enough to avoid falling into logical or experiential errors.

    In hindsight, I think that I gave the test makers far too much credit. The math portion was simpler.

    Replies: @anon

  24. jon says:

    Since everyone is listing their favorite depressing statistic from the study, here’s mine:

    If you take the test all the way through, at the end they give you a breakdown by single attribute variable (e.g. gender, age, education and race). For every single test question, the overall black % who answered correctly is significantly below all other categories, even the “H. S. or less” education category.

  25. @Anon
    OT: Joe Biden accused of rubbing noses with another woman:

    https://www.redstate.com/sister-toldjah/2019/04/01/breaking-another-woman-accuses-joe-biden-grabbing-inappropriately-campaign-event/

    Yep. Nose-rubbing. I dare say this is a classic microaggression. I guess it's worse if his breath stinks.

    Replies: @jon, @Macumazahn

    Given all the pics floating around of his borderline pedo behavior, I’m surprised they are still trotting out these sexual microassaults. One fairly mainstream article hinting at his behavior with underage girls would completely destroy him.

    • Replies: @onetwothree
    @jon

    What's weird is, from my perspective, the whole internet's been laughing at "Uncle Joe" and his busy hands all over little girls for years now. Are there people unaware of this...?

    Why yes--probably 98 percent of media consumers are unaware of his weird habit. Maybe the media is protecting him, but more likely they are just extra careful with such dire insinuations. Truth is, he probably isn't a pedo at all, just a mindless creeper.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  26. Oh,BTW,dont you just love this Nipsey Hussle story?
    Nipsey Hussle! Whats next,Flip Killson?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Phyllis Killer

    Replies: @Anon, @Father O'Hara

    , @Macumazahn
    @Father O'Hara

    Fiddy Carlisle
    Tom Postal
    Piggy Cass
    Gnarls Nelson Really

  27. Where’s obigweynong to tell us how this is racist nonsense because he once met a white guy who struggled with algebra?

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  28. @Father O'Hara
    Oh,BTW,dont you just love this Nipsey Hussle story?
    Nipsey Hussle! Whats next,Flip Killson?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Macumazahn

    Phyllis Killer

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Lionel Tiger

    , @Father O'Hara
    @Steve Sailer

    Phyllis Killer: No joke,that is genius!😉
    Now its getting crazy. They found the guy that shot Nipsey. It is Eric Holder!!
    Has Tina ChaChing been notified?

  29. @Anon
    OT: Joe Biden accused of rubbing noses with another woman:

    https://www.redstate.com/sister-toldjah/2019/04/01/breaking-another-woman-accuses-joe-biden-grabbing-inappropriately-campaign-event/

    Yep. Nose-rubbing. I dare say this is a classic microaggression. I guess it's worse if his breath stinks.

    Replies: @jon, @Macumazahn

    Among the Esquimaux, that’s a kiss… and as we all know (well, except for Kubrat Pulev, but he’s learning) an unsolicited kiss is hardly a microaggression – it’s a sexual assault!

  30. @Father O'Hara
    Oh,BTW,dont you just love this Nipsey Hussle story?
    Nipsey Hussle! Whats next,Flip Killson?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Macumazahn

    Fiddy Carlisle
    Tom Postal
    Piggy Cass
    Gnarls Nelson Really

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Phyllis Killer

    Replies: @Anon, @Father O'Hara

    Lionel Tiger

  32. OT, but relating to the current social, not scientific, diffence currently afflicting blacks vs. whites. It’s nothing earth-shattering, but I like long form interviews, and this one struck as being fairly good.

    That’s Nick DiPaulo from the The Rubin Report. A somewhat conservative comedian talking, mostly in the last half of the hour, about political correctness. He made a couple of interesting statements I’ll paraphrase, neither original, but somewhat courageous in that he relies on a paying audience for his livelihood.

    * ‘What we’re seeing now is the result of the past fifty years of progressives taking over the culture. (Like I said, not original but it’s a start.)

    * ‘I talk about race a lot in my act. People talk to me about needing to be balanced, and I’m like what? You don’t have a TV? You don’t see the way white guys are treated? I’ve been talking about this since 1994.’

  33. @Hugh
    Getting nine out of eleven questions right seems a strange threshold.

    My favourite question: “A car travelling at 40 mph travels 30 miles in 45 minutes”

    Some citizens found that one hard.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Citizen Talking Barbie did.

  34. @South Texas Guy
    What is surprising is that the scores of those with college degrees were so low. The graph question could have been misinterpreted if you were reading too fast, and I think there was another that seemed to have a wording issue, but having been to college, and therefore, having probably taken a bunch of tests with tricky wording that wouldn't have been an issue.

    But...11 out of 11! Liberal arts degree. I rock!!!!

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Redneck farmer, @George Taylor

    A true liberal arts degree would prepare you for such things. What gets called a liberal arts degree, or worse yet, a fine arts degree, wouldn’t.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Redneck farmer

    My liberal arts degree required two semesters of science and some math (I was a math major so I don’t recall what the minimum requirement was).

  35. The test could be used to filter out who is allowed to post on UR, it would get rid of all the nutcases posting about Zionist banksters and boomers.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @jim jones

    A couple of verbal analogies to answer before submitting a comment would be good (akin to CAPTCHA). A filter that would allow readers to view comments based on a submitter's performance on verbal analogies would be a nice feature.

    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Jus' Sayin'...

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Phyllis Killer

    Replies: @Anon, @Father O'Hara

    Phyllis Killer: No joke,that is genius!😉
    Now its getting crazy. They found the guy that shot Nipsey. It is Eric Holder!!
    Has Tina ChaChing been notified?

  37. I was having a casual conversation with a white guy the other day; we got on the topic of bird watching and he launched into a discussion of the locals beyond what I knew.

    I’m wondering: is bird watching pretty much a White thing, or does it cross the racial divide? For that matter, it seems mostly an English, Anglo-Saxon thing, from my experience.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @bomag


    I’m wondering: is bird watching pretty much a White thing, or does it cross the racial divide? For that matter, it seems mostly an English, Anglo-Saxon thing, from my experience.
     
    Given the existence of my father-in-law, a 100% high-WASP out of Concord MA, Groton School and Harvard; Emeritus Prof. of biochemistry at Rutgers, and lifelong avid birder: Yes, emphatically. Even if there are Congolese birders out there somewhere, his participation more than cancels theirs out.
    , @Anonymous
    @bomag

    It's likely that bird-watching grew out of bird-hunting.

  38. @jon
    @Anon

    Given all the pics floating around of his borderline pedo behavior, I'm surprised they are still trotting out these sexual microassaults. One fairly mainstream article hinting at his behavior with underage girls would completely destroy him.

    Replies: @onetwothree

    What’s weird is, from my perspective, the whole internet’s been laughing at “Uncle Joe” and his busy hands all over little girls for years now. Are there people unaware of this…?

    Why yes–probably 98 percent of media consumers are unaware of his weird habit. Maybe the media is protecting him, but more likely they are just extra careful with such dire insinuations. Truth is, he probably isn’t a pedo at all, just a mindless creeper.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @onetwothree

    Protecting Joe is probably a kneejerk (non)reaction leftover from the years when Joe was VP and the press worked to keep everyone in the Obama administration appearing to be above reproach despite the reality being vastly otherwise. They are only just now shaking off their self-imposed slumber, and only with regard to this one stale pale male they had formerly kept in their special circle of protection. Back then, to protect Joe was to protect Holy Obama. Today, Joe stands in the way of another sacred minority getting to the White House. He must be destroyed. He will be destroyed. And fortunately for the Press, he will help them.

  39. @Anonymous
    Very depressing graph

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/FT_19.03.28_ScienceKnowledgeRace_Amongthecollegeeducated.png

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous, @Stan d Mute, @Anonymous

    It’s pretty alarming that only 16% overall answered all 11 questions correctly. I consider myself barely intelligent enough to function and yet found the quiz absurdly easy, something I would have scored 100% on in 8th grade (noting one of the questions was borrowed from a Florida assessment test for 8th graders).

    What this informs me is that roughly 84% of the population must be sterilized for our species to have any hope of advancement.

    And yes, that is depressing as hell.

  40. I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972.

    One has value to society….the other is interesting

  41. Well whadya expect, as Joe Biden almost said, Enlightenment Science is the White Man’s Culture!

    (Model minorities FTW!)

  42. @Hypnotoad666
    It was a multiple choice test with four options for each of 11 questions. So you should get a score of 2.75 on average from just guessing.

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    Replies: @jon, @Stan d Mute, @Known Fact, @International Jew

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    Why? Did you not already know? How could you have missed noticing something so glaringly obvious?

    Far more depressing to me was that only 73% of post-grads know the difference between acids and bases or that only 70% of college grads know what a hypothesis is.

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Read the actual multiple choice questions and contemplate the fact that only 63% of whites could correctly answer the question on genetic engineering. At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @Stan d Mute


    At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.
     
    Clearly I’m in that camp ... 37%.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Stan d Mute


    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?
     
    It's weird to think about the fact that the majority of educated people walking around really have no clue about how the physical world they interact with actually works.

    They may know about Third Wave Feminism or Critical Race Theory, and that Climate Change is Real. But they don't know that F = MA, or how a pulley works, or the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Many years ago I was working with a young female attorney from an elite law school who was at an elite law firm. We were in an office that overlooked San Francisco Bay and a large container ship was going by. Her comment was: "It's amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel."

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Stan d Mute


    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?
     
    Perhaps, but the term "base" seems to have gone out of fashion. I vaguely remember hearing about bases in school fifty years or more ago, but if you asked me nowadays I would have said that the opposite of acid was alkaline. I can't remember the last time I heard anyone use the word base in that sense.
  43. @jim jones
    The test could be used to filter out who is allowed to post on UR, it would get rid of all the nutcases posting about Zionist banksters and boomers.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    A couple of verbal analogies to answer before submitting a comment would be good (akin to CAPTCHA). A filter that would allow readers to view comments based on a submitter’s performance on verbal analogies would be a nice feature.

    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Coemgen


    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.
     
    Ah, back to the days of poll taxes and literacy tests. But first, we need a few decades of better voting outcomes to ensure the success of the poll tax and literacy laws.

    It's really easy. We know that the colored folk tend to favor easy, nice sounding phrases and oppose technical sounding phrases. If we use this bit of insight:

    Imagine a law that makes it a felony to leave the rest room without washing your hands. The wording to be like this:

    [ ] Check this box if you favor nice, sweet smelling, clean things.
    [ ] Check this box if you oppose nice, sweet smelling, clean things.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Coemgen


    "...A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives..."
     
    Unfortunately, the Supreme Court banned anything like this, i.e. literacy tests, over a half-century ago.

    My observation has been that most people are too lazy, ignorant and/or stupid to vote for the best candidates or even to vote for the candidates whom they perceive as being the best. A few years ago, my sister and I went through the set of contentious policy issues facing the schools in her city. It turned out that one candidate for the available position on the school board disagreed with her on every issue, several agreed with her on some and disagreed on others, and one agreed with her on all. She wound up voting for the one that disagreed with her on all positions because "she was a nice lady" and a dimocrat. All the candidates had sterling reputations so my sister was unable even to clarify what being "a nice lady" meant in this context. BTW, what makes this even more concerning is that my sister is highly educated professional, with an IQ at least one and more probably two SDs above the mean, and works as a librarian, specializing in the more technical, computer-related aspects of that field.

    In my ideal system candidates would have to clearly articulate their stands on several issues and individuals would only be allowed to vote if they passed a test of their ability to link candidates to issues. It wouldn't matter if candidates kept their promises. At least the system would select for voters who knew something about the political situation.

    Even better, voters could be presented with profiles of candidates' positions on important issues rather than candidates' names and vote for the profile rather than the candidate.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  44. @Stan d Mute
    @Hypnotoad666


    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

     

    Why? Did you not already know? How could you have missed noticing something so glaringly obvious?

    Far more depressing to me was that only 73% of post-grads know the difference between acids and bases or that only 70% of college grads know what a hypothesis is.

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Read the actual multiple choice questions and contemplate the fact that only 63% of whites could correctly answer the question on genetic engineering. At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Hypnotoad666, @Jonathan Mason

    At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    Clearly I’m in that camp … 37%.

  45. @onetwothree
    @jon

    What's weird is, from my perspective, the whole internet's been laughing at "Uncle Joe" and his busy hands all over little girls for years now. Are there people unaware of this...?

    Why yes--probably 98 percent of media consumers are unaware of his weird habit. Maybe the media is protecting him, but more likely they are just extra careful with such dire insinuations. Truth is, he probably isn't a pedo at all, just a mindless creeper.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Protecting Joe is probably a kneejerk (non)reaction leftover from the years when Joe was VP and the press worked to keep everyone in the Obama administration appearing to be above reproach despite the reality being vastly otherwise. They are only just now shaking off their self-imposed slumber, and only with regard to this one stale pale male they had formerly kept in their special circle of protection. Back then, to protect Joe was to protect Holy Obama. Today, Joe stands in the way of another sacred minority getting to the White House. He must be destroyed. He will be destroyed. And fortunately for the Press, he will help them.

  46. Anonymous[423] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Very depressing graph

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/FT_19.03.28_ScienceKnowledgeRace_Amongthecollegeeducated.png

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous, @Stan d Mute, @Anonymous

    What is depressing about it?

  47. I found it amazing that a random selection of black Americans knew as much as this one did about science. So I read up a little on the methodology. Pew recruits a panel of candidates by dialing random digits or mailing letters to random addresses. Only 5.6% reply at all. Less agree to be on the panel.

    This is a survey of a subset of that less than 5.6%. There is likely a big knowledge gap between this group and the other 94.4%.

    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    @David


    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.
     
    Which must be why I had such a hard time buying some flooring last fall. I measured the room, figured how many boxes would cover the area, added 3 to account for damaged pieces and tried to get a store to take my money. They tried to insist that the installers come out and measure. The flooring was a special order and I was on a deadline. I had to get a manager to override the salesperson to place the order and the installers still had to come measure. The installer's numbers and mine were the same, but he only specified 2 extra boxes.


    This test was amazingly easy. I got 11 out of 11. This was middle school level stuff. I would expect my 7th grade daughter to get at least 9 of them right.
    , @bomag
    @David


    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.
     
    Reminds me of an internet blurb where they polled a cross section of US and Chinese math teachers:

    1) Divide 3 1/2 by 1/2. (All the Chinese teacher could do it, 1/2 of the US teachers could.)

    2) Give an example from daily life where this calculation could be useful. (Half the Chinese teachers could give an example; none of the US teachers could.)

    Replies: @South Texas Guy, @Known Fact, @Logan

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @David


    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

     

    Here in Hong Kong, given the insane property market, it seems like everybody learns to do calculations involving layout/square footage when they're still gestating.
  48. @jon
    @Hypnotoad666

    Have you ever interacted with many blacks who didn't go to college? I had a about a year stint where I was interacting with a lot of people in that category - the fact that their average would suggest most of them were just guessing and really had no ides is not at all surprising.

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    Right. But don’t let them know that you know that they know nothing. Nothing pisses a black guy off more than to be made to look like he’s anything but in total command of every situation. And if you persist and call him a bullshitter, watch out. Fur will fly.

    Especially in front of any women, a black man cannot take feedback that calls his competence into question. This is the primary reason that integrated workplaces which combine white women with black and white men, cannot achieve good results. Every project will be a boondoggle. Likely a violent one.

    • Replies: @Fun
    @ThreeCranes


    This is the primary reason that integrated workplaces which combine white women with black and white men, cannot achieve good results. Every project will be a boondoggle. Likely a violent one.
     
    Now are you speaking from personal experience, or just "bullshitting"?
  49. The aggregate batting average of pitchers is consistently a SD or three lower than that of position players.

  50. Demographic trends insure that pretty soon America will be free of White thought.

    Free at last! Free at last! Thank God almighty free at last!

  51. @Father O'Hara
    @South Texas Guy

    Yeah,me too! But I would question one answer. It said if ya cut down a bunch of trees,you get? The answer was soil erosion.
    But another was "colder weather."
    Did any of yous see the story on 60 Minutes about the guy who wants to cut down all the trees in Siberia and let grazing animals run around churning up the land to expose it to colder air and keep it from thawing and releasing CO2?

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    What you would get is a field of stumps. Unless of course you dig them out.

    I would have missed that question. My mind is too literal. None of the answers logically follow. They’re all conditional. You don’t get soil erosion if it doesn’t rain immediately or if you were careful when you cut the trees to avoid disturbing the underbrush. For example, when trees are cut down in an orchard there’s no erosion because grass grows between the rows. This is a literal, real-life example that is true, just plain true.

    I would have left the answer blank and my score would have (and did) reflected that. I recall that numerous questions on SAT’s and such were ambiguous and left me scratching my head. None of the answers were absolutely correct. And this left me in a quandary. Should I answer them with what I thought the test maker wanted to hear even though none of the answers was logically, exactly correct?

    Doing so would have meant that I would have to guess what their biases were. But supposedly the test, if the results were to be accurate, should not have reflected or expressed the author’s biases. But clearly it did, since none of the answers were correct. Hmmmm.

    This, trying to unravel the test-question creator’s intentions, took up a lot of my time on the reading comprehension portion of those tests. I came to look at some questions as traps. They provided answers that were close, but none that were logically binding or unequivocally, empirically certain. So they were testing me at a level doubly removed, trying to see whether I were clever enough to avoid falling into logical or experiential errors.

    In hindsight, I think that I gave the test makers far too much credit. The math portion was simpler.

    • Replies: @anon
    @ThreeCranes

    It's well known that some SAT questions are traps, with lures to catch the less intelligent or those in a hurry. Also, some are just bad questions. They usually test those out in an experimental section that isn't included in your score, but some make it through to the real sections.

  52. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, why is speaking English such an insuperable guild barrier for boat-borne newbie E. Asians? (Or anyway, South Asians aren’t struggling with it.) Is it the hindrance of having grown up with ideographic writing or the phonemical esoterica that’s stopping them? Obviously their home governments should immediately change the instruction and are NOT allow native tongue bad influence, to increase innovate global competition technology

  53. @res
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The questions were described in the article graphic. They seemed pretty reasonable. The tilt of the Earth as relates to the seasons made an appearance. I do wonder about "The main components of antacids and bases." That wording sounds confusing to me and whites only averaged 46% correct on that question.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @James Speaks

    Only one out of three blacks could relate the tilt of the earth’s axis of rotation to seasons. This is really something everyone who gets out of sixth grade should know. Thus, 2/3 of the black electorate are below that level.

    Two out of five blacks knew what fossil fuels were. Three out of five did not, yet, they vote.

    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @res
    @James Speaks

    Well, one of the reasons I mentioned seasons and tilt was because I think of it as an iSteve favorite based on this post (see first video): https://www.unz.com/isteve/harvard-university-will-begin-gene-editing-sperm/
    and the associated comments. Turns out a fair number of Harvard students did not know that.

    Replies: @James Speaks

  54. @bomag
    I was having a casual conversation with a white guy the other day; we got on the topic of bird watching and he launched into a discussion of the locals beyond what I knew.

    I'm wondering: is bird watching pretty much a White thing, or does it cross the racial divide? For that matter, it seems mostly an English, Anglo-Saxon thing, from my experience.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Anonymous

    I’m wondering: is bird watching pretty much a White thing, or does it cross the racial divide? For that matter, it seems mostly an English, Anglo-Saxon thing, from my experience.

    Given the existence of my father-in-law, a 100% high-WASP out of Concord MA, Groton School and Harvard; Emeritus Prof. of biochemistry at Rutgers, and lifelong avid birder: Yes, emphatically. Even if there are Congolese birders out there somewhere, his participation more than cancels theirs out.

  55. I got them all right, but partly because I know what they wanted answered as the conventional wisdom. On multiple questions, you could easily propose an alternative answer was more accurate, or at least plausible.

    Oil, natural gas and coal are examples of …

    Fossil fuels = test answer
    Renewable resources = there is certainly speculation that oil may be continually generating. I have never looked closely into this.

    The time a computer takes to start has increased dramatically. One possible explanation for this is that the computer is running out of memory.

    This explanation is a scientific …

    hypothesis = test answer
    observation = what if I was monitoring the memory usage of the computer over time, because I’m a nerd, and I “observed” that memory was running out?

    An antacid relieves an overly acidic stomach because the main components of antacids are …

    bases = test answer
    But there is a school of thought that “overly acidic stomach” is, in fact, caused by TOO LOW stomach acid, causing acid reflux (the stomach is SUPPOSED to be acidic and you only “feel” an acidic stomach when it pushes into the esophagus, which happens when acid levels are too low). One might argue antacid’s don’t work at all, and certainly things like Prilosec are disastrous frauds, and many cases of “stomach acid” can be cured by cutting carbs out of your diet.

    Which of these is a major concern about the overuse of antibiotics

    It can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria = test answer
    Antibiotics will get into the water system = is this not also a serious problem?

    If you are open to ideas outside the Conventional Wisdom, the test becomes very questionable.

    • Replies: @res
    @peterike

    Most of those look like you are trying too hard to justify bad answers. But I kind of agree with you about the antibiotics one, even if I think the test answer is the better choice.

    For example: https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/drugs-in-the-water

    Replies: @Grace Jones

    , @Jack D
    @peterike

    You are clearly overthinking these questions. This is a survey so it makes no difference if you answer right or wrong, but many high stakes tests have similar questions. If you want to get into college or whatever, you can't be a stubborn ass even if you don't agree with their "right" answers. Just give them the damn answers that you know that they want and move on. If you put down a "wrong" answer because you think you are smarter than the people who constructed the test, it will be marked just as wrong as if you were a stupid idiot who didn't comprehend the question at all. Tests are not the place to have arguments with the universe. People end up sabotaging themselves when they start to think like you.

    Replies: @Ibound1

  56. Asians always do well on tests of known information. Inventing stuff, not so much.

  57. @Coemgen
    @jim jones

    A couple of verbal analogies to answer before submitting a comment would be good (akin to CAPTCHA). A filter that would allow readers to view comments based on a submitter's performance on verbal analogies would be a nice feature.

    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Jus' Sayin'...

    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.

    Ah, back to the days of poll taxes and literacy tests. But first, we need a few decades of better voting outcomes to ensure the success of the poll tax and literacy laws.

    It’s really easy. We know that the colored folk tend to favor easy, nice sounding phrases and oppose technical sounding phrases. If we use this bit of insight:

    Imagine a law that makes it a felony to leave the rest room without washing your hands. The wording to be like this:

    [ ] Check this box if you favor nice, sweet smelling, clean things.
    [ ] Check this box if you oppose nice, sweet smelling, clean things.

  58. @ThreeCranes
    @jon

    Right. But don't let them know that you know that they know nothing. Nothing pisses a black guy off more than to be made to look like he's anything but in total command of every situation. And if you persist and call him a bullshitter, watch out. Fur will fly.

    Especially in front of any women, a black man cannot take feedback that calls his competence into question. This is the primary reason that integrated workplaces which combine white women with black and white men, cannot achieve good results. Every project will be a boondoggle. Likely a violent one.

    Replies: @Fun

    This is the primary reason that integrated workplaces which combine white women with black and white men, cannot achieve good results. Every project will be a boondoggle. Likely a violent one.

    Now are you speaking from personal experience, or just “bullshitting”?

  59. anon[181] • Disclaimer says:

    An underdiscussed related topic is that a disproportionate number of flat-earthers are black or hispanic. Watch the recent Netflix documentary. The demographics at their flat-earth events stand out. Still majority white. But compare it to the demographic breakdown of an amateur astronomy meetup and the difference is apparent.

    In the Netflix documentary, I cannot recall a single Asian. The whites tended to be kooky conspiracy-types. The blacks and hispanics (and mixed race White-hispanics) tend to be sincere 97 IQ types, who maybe picked up some vocabulary from highschool/community-college science classes but still missed the point entirely.

    Suspect as we allow more lower IQ immigrants into the country, while simultaneously pushing more people into watered-down colleges, you will see more movements like this, couched in academic, non-woo-woo language.

    “Hold up your light, Enrique”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Hispanics attend Flat Earth society events? We've finally found a cause that can overcome Latino Apathy!

    Replies: @JimB, @anon

    , @Anonymous
    @anon

    This is associated with certain fundamentalist Christian churches.

  60. @anon
    An underdiscussed related topic is that a disproportionate number of flat-earthers are black or hispanic. Watch the recent Netflix documentary. The demographics at their flat-earth events stand out. Still majority white. But compare it to the demographic breakdown of an amateur astronomy meetup and the difference is apparent.

    In the Netflix documentary, I cannot recall a single Asian. The whites tended to be kooky conspiracy-types. The blacks and hispanics (and mixed race White-hispanics) tend to be sincere 97 IQ types, who maybe picked up some vocabulary from highschool/community-college science classes but still missed the point entirely.

    Suspect as we allow more lower IQ immigrants into the country, while simultaneously pushing more people into watered-down colleges, you will see more movements like this, couched in academic, non-woo-woo language.

    "Hold up your light, Enrique"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMjDAzUFxX0

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Hispanics attend Flat Earth society events? We’ve finally found a cause that can overcome Latino Apathy!

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Steve Sailer

    Trump should build an easily breached fence around the edge of the earth and say there is an abundance of low wage jobs, food stamps, free health care, and Target stores in the abyss.

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    I can't find an exact racial breakdown on flat-earthers. But anecdotal evidence online points towards religious minorities and conspiracy-oriented whites.

    There was a questionnaire by YouGov that showed breakdown by political affiliation, etc. Race was excluded, of course. But it points towards flat-earthism leaning towards a combination of non-Republicans, youth, females (slightly), and the very religious.

    https://today.yougov.com/topics/philosophy/articles-reports/2018/04/02/most-flat-earthers-consider-themselves-religious

    In 2019, this guy would probably be a flat-earther...



    https://jonathanturley.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/cvpattgukaalmg1-e1449747130325.jpg?w=700

  61. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    What are 'science related issues?' If the questions are about global warming, humans creating hurricanes by not carpooling in rural Nebraska or the 'science' that sex is not permanent, I give credit to the POCs for not falling for that nonsense. The Asians just probably didn't understand the questions.

    Replies: @res, @Paul Jolliffe, @International Jew

    I just took the quiz – it was linked in the original article. Pretty simple (11/11!) but the questions were all legit: no phony stuff as you feared.

    Check it out. I bet the average score for I-Steve readers is 11/11.

    Which ought to interest certain potential advertisers in Steve’s blog.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    @Paul Jolliffe

    Isn't advertising to smart people supposed to be a waste of money? Anyway, the traffic on this site couldn't possibly justify the potential aggravation.

    Slavoj Žižek would be clueless about most questions. The same with Churchill or Putin or Jurgen Habermas or Sartre or any Roosevelt or most scientists outside of those areas (I am not kidding- most mathematicians don’t bother to know anything about life-sciences or anything similar. So, it’s not just words people, it is numbers people, too, who frequently lack basic scientific literacy on many areas. Not because they’re dumb; it’s because they don’t care).

    Horseshit. I don't know when the term fossil fuels came into vogue, so maybe that would trip up some of the older people on your list, but otherwise...people like Sherlock Holmes who are brilliant at what they do but are unaware that the earth goes around the sun pretty much don't exist outside of fiction. As we've seen on this thread, "words people" and "numbers people" who are far short of brilliant have no difficulty answering these questions.

  62. In general, this is why cognitive statistics aren’t as interesting as baseball statistics. Sports statistics change over time and pop up surprises, but education related stats are quite repetitive.

    But Steve, somewhere there is a dwarf, black, lesbian Rocket Surgeon!

    We have to find every one of them and give them a chance to prove we are not racist, sexist, dwarfist homophobes!

  63. @David
    I found it amazing that a random selection of black Americans knew as much as this one did about science. So I read up a little on the methodology. Pew recruits a panel of candidates by dialing random digits or mailing letters to random addresses. Only 5.6% reply at all. Less agree to be on the panel.

    This is a survey of a subset of that less than 5.6%. There is likely a big knowledge gap between this group and the other 94.4%.

    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory, @bomag, @The Last Real Calvinist

    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Which must be why I had such a hard time buying some flooring last fall. I measured the room, figured how many boxes would cover the area, added 3 to account for damaged pieces and tried to get a store to take my money. They tried to insist that the installers come out and measure. The flooring was a special order and I was on a deadline. I had to get a manager to override the salesperson to place the order and the installers still had to come measure. The installer’s numbers and mine were the same, but he only specified 2 extra boxes.

    This test was amazingly easy. I got 11 out of 11. This was middle school level stuff. I would expect my 7th grade daughter to get at least 9 of them right.

  64. What’s so new or important about this? Slavoj Žižek would be clueless about most questions. The same with Churchill or Putin or Jurgen Habermas or Sartre or any Roosevelt or most scientists outside of those areas (I am not kidding- most mathematicians don’t bother to know anything about life-sciences or anything similar. So, it’s not just words people, it is numbers people, too, who frequently lack basic scientific literacy on many areas. Not because they’re dumb; it’s because they don’t care).

    • Replies: @Logan
    @Bardon Kaldian

    In one of the BBC Sherlock episodes, Watson finds out the Sherlock doesn't realize the earth goes around the sun, not the other way around.

    Sherlock is not embarrassed in the least, since it's information he doesn't consider important or interesting. Why clutter his brain with such?

  65. @Anon
    OT: Mayor of Baltimore caught in 'cartoonish corruption' scandal over her books. She's taken a leave of absence.

    https://www.philly.com/news/nation-world/baltimore-mayor-catherine-pugh-book-scandal-leave-absence-healthy-holly-20190401.html

    Those who are trying to make black Democratic politicians look as clean and honest as possible are having a tough time of it.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    Wait a second, Maryland has a Republican governor? That reminds me of when NYC voters got so desperate that they elected Giuliani. How bad must things have gotten in Baltimore that suburban and rural GoodWhites state-wide went overwhelmingly for a Republican?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alfa158

    Mass, the most left-wing state, has a nominally Repub governor as well. Obviously, he's a RINO's RINO and tears up a lot on camera. He's also always very "disappointed" with Trump, but for entirely different reasons than most folks here.

    , @Nosferatu Zodd
    @Alfa158

    Hogan was elected before the riots, in large part because of his photogenic Korean step-daughters. Also, his public battle with cancer has given him a huge amount of personal popularity.

  66. have you noticed some trends in online games? it’s very non-kosher white goyim, like emocore.

    all the big teams are huhwhite and east-asian

  67. @Lot
    “education related stats are quite repetitive”

    Well, whites do better than Asians for once.

    Not sure what the composition of the Asian sample is though.

    “almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian”

    And national spelling bee winners are 80% Indian 20% home school evangelicals. That doesn’t tell us much compared to actual stats of mass standardized testing.

    I’m curious about second generation NE v South Asian stats. From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    Replies: @Ray Huffman, @gate666, @International Jew, @Anonymous Jew

    you are full of shit.

  68. @Ray Huffman
    @Lot

    There are Asians and then there are Asians. Some groups, such as Hmong and Filipinos, have made little of themselves and show little promise. Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average.

    Replies: @gate666, @Wilkey

    filipinos in america have high iq.

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Hispanics attend Flat Earth society events? We've finally found a cause that can overcome Latino Apathy!

    Replies: @JimB, @anon

    Trump should build an easily breached fence around the edge of the earth and say there is an abundance of low wage jobs, food stamps, free health care, and Target stores in the abyss.

  70. anon[181] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Hispanics attend Flat Earth society events? We've finally found a cause that can overcome Latino Apathy!

    Replies: @JimB, @anon

    I can’t find an exact racial breakdown on flat-earthers. But anecdotal evidence online points towards religious minorities and conspiracy-oriented whites.

    There was a questionnaire by YouGov that showed breakdown by political affiliation, etc. Race was excluded, of course. But it points towards flat-earthism leaning towards a combination of non-Republicans, youth, females (slightly), and the very religious.

    https://today.yougov.com/topics/philosophy/articles-reports/2018/04/02/most-flat-earthers-consider-themselves-religious

    In 2019, this guy would probably be a flat-earther…

    [MORE]

  71. Oh, I don’t know, Sport. I wouldn’t say it varies that much…

    https://www.unz.com/article/the-moon-landing-a-giant-hoax-for-mankind/

  72. @James Speaks
    @res

    Only one out of three blacks could relate the tilt of the earth's axis of rotation to seasons. This is really something everyone who gets out of sixth grade should know. Thus, 2/3 of the black electorate are below that level.

    Two out of five blacks knew what fossil fuels were. Three out of five did not, yet, they vote.

    Replies: @res

    Well, one of the reasons I mentioned seasons and tilt was because I think of it as an iSteve favorite based on this post (see first video): https://www.unz.com/isteve/harvard-university-will-begin-gene-editing-sperm/
    and the associated comments. Turns out a fair number of Harvard students did not know that.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @res


    Turns out a fair number of Harvard students did not know that.
     
    Knowing that seasons result from the tilt of the earth's axis affecting the amount of sunlight reaching the surface (insolation IIRC) in northern and summer hemispheres is one of those basic pieces of knowledge we expect all functional adults to have, and that is why we teach it in grade school. If 60% graduate from the sixth grade without knowing that, then we have failure in the educational system, and seriously, should these people be allowed to vote?

    Voting is a right, but so is my right to not be demagogued into irrelevance by tribal mechanics. We do not let minors vote. I think it can be determined that functional minors (meme alert) do not make voting decisions based on reason. I do not think functional minors should be allowed to vote.

    This might be racist, but if so, it is racism without animus.

    If a fair number of Harvard students do not understand the seasons, then Harvard isn't a very good school.
  73. @peterike
    I got them all right, but partly because I know what they wanted answered as the conventional wisdom. On multiple questions, you could easily propose an alternative answer was more accurate, or at least plausible.

    Oil, natural gas and coal are examples of …

    Fossil fuels = test answer
    Renewable resources = there is certainly speculation that oil may be continually generating. I have never looked closely into this.

    The time a computer takes to start has increased dramatically. One possible explanation for this is that the computer is running out of memory.

    This explanation is a scientific …

    hypothesis = test answer
    observation = what if I was monitoring the memory usage of the computer over time, because I'm a nerd, and I "observed" that memory was running out?

    An antacid relieves an overly acidic stomach because the main components of antacids are …

    bases = test answer
    But there is a school of thought that "overly acidic stomach" is, in fact, caused by TOO LOW stomach acid, causing acid reflux (the stomach is SUPPOSED to be acidic and you only "feel" an acidic stomach when it pushes into the esophagus, which happens when acid levels are too low). One might argue antacid's don't work at all, and certainly things like Prilosec are disastrous frauds, and many cases of "stomach acid" can be cured by cutting carbs out of your diet.

    Which of these is a major concern about the overuse of antibiotics

    It can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria = test answer
    Antibiotics will get into the water system = is this not also a serious problem?

    If you are open to ideas outside the Conventional Wisdom, the test becomes very questionable.

    Replies: @res, @Jack D

    Most of those look like you are trying too hard to justify bad answers. But I kind of agree with you about the antibiotics one, even if I think the test answer is the better choice.

    For example: https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/drugs-in-the-water

    • Replies: @Grace Jones
    @res

    Antibiotic-resistant microbes date back to 450 million years ago, well before the age of dinosaurs
    https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2017/05/antibiotic-resistant-microbes-date-back.html

    Microbiomes in ancient Incans and 15th century Italians carried resistance genes
    http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASMMicrobe/58660

  74. When I took anatomy back in the olden days. It was acid alkaline not acid base but it’s easy to figure out that base is the current term for alkaloid

    Length x width equals area is taught in 5 th and 6th grade but everyone forgets till they need to use it 20 years later when they buy a house or become landlords. A life long renter who never worked in construction or a store that sold flooring would have no need whatsoever to estimate area.

    Contractors tell customers they need so many sq ft for their living room and use the left over 122 sq ft for another clients bedroom

  75. @Coemgen
    @jim jones

    A couple of verbal analogies to answer before submitting a comment would be good (akin to CAPTCHA). A filter that would allow readers to view comments based on a submitter's performance on verbal analogies would be a nice feature.

    A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives would also be good for determining whether or not the voter has the competence necessary to have an informed vote.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Jus' Sayin'...

    “…A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives…”

    Unfortunately, the Supreme Court banned anything like this, i.e. literacy tests, over a half-century ago.

    My observation has been that most people are too lazy, ignorant and/or stupid to vote for the best candidates or even to vote for the candidates whom they perceive as being the best. A few years ago, my sister and I went through the set of contentious policy issues facing the schools in her city. It turned out that one candidate for the available position on the school board disagreed with her on every issue, several agreed with her on some and disagreed on others, and one agreed with her on all. She wound up voting for the one that disagreed with her on all positions because “she was a nice lady” and a dimocrat. All the candidates had sterling reputations so my sister was unable even to clarify what being “a nice lady” meant in this context. BTW, what makes this even more concerning is that my sister is highly educated professional, with an IQ at least one and more probably two SDs above the mean, and works as a librarian, specializing in the more technical, computer-related aspects of that field.

    In my ideal system candidates would have to clearly articulate their stands on several issues and individuals would only be allowed to vote if they passed a test of their ability to link candidates to issues. It wouldn’t matter if candidates kept their promises. At least the system would select for voters who knew something about the political situation.

    Even better, voters could be presented with profiles of candidates’ positions on important issues rather than candidates’ names and vote for the profile rather than the candidate.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    librarian, specializing in the more technical, computer-related aspects of that field.
     
    Progressivism is a parasite on nerd lack of savvy.
  76. Rob Noheart
    Sam Killingson

  77. but education related stats are quite repetitive.

    It’s almost as if there is some single attribute (let’s call it “g”) that underlies people’s ability to succeed at academic tasks.

    The era of modern intelligence testing began when it was observed that kids who were good at one subject in school tended to do well in all subjects – it was therefore concluded that there was some underlying factor that accounted for their success related to their ability to retain, process and apply knowledge of any kind. Most academic measures (and things like surveys of scientific knowledge) are highly correlated with intelligence (and we also know that there are differences between the average intelligence of different races or “populations”) so that when you breathlessly report the finding of some study like this, you needn’t have bothered – all you are doing is measuring a proxy for average intelligence and since we already know what this is, you could have saved yourself the effort.

  78. @peterike
    I got them all right, but partly because I know what they wanted answered as the conventional wisdom. On multiple questions, you could easily propose an alternative answer was more accurate, or at least plausible.

    Oil, natural gas and coal are examples of …

    Fossil fuels = test answer
    Renewable resources = there is certainly speculation that oil may be continually generating. I have never looked closely into this.

    The time a computer takes to start has increased dramatically. One possible explanation for this is that the computer is running out of memory.

    This explanation is a scientific …

    hypothesis = test answer
    observation = what if I was monitoring the memory usage of the computer over time, because I'm a nerd, and I "observed" that memory was running out?

    An antacid relieves an overly acidic stomach because the main components of antacids are …

    bases = test answer
    But there is a school of thought that "overly acidic stomach" is, in fact, caused by TOO LOW stomach acid, causing acid reflux (the stomach is SUPPOSED to be acidic and you only "feel" an acidic stomach when it pushes into the esophagus, which happens when acid levels are too low). One might argue antacid's don't work at all, and certainly things like Prilosec are disastrous frauds, and many cases of "stomach acid" can be cured by cutting carbs out of your diet.

    Which of these is a major concern about the overuse of antibiotics

    It can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria = test answer
    Antibiotics will get into the water system = is this not also a serious problem?

    If you are open to ideas outside the Conventional Wisdom, the test becomes very questionable.

    Replies: @res, @Jack D

    You are clearly overthinking these questions. This is a survey so it makes no difference if you answer right or wrong, but many high stakes tests have similar questions. If you want to get into college or whatever, you can’t be a stubborn ass even if you don’t agree with their “right” answers. Just give them the damn answers that you know that they want and move on. If you put down a “wrong” answer because you think you are smarter than the people who constructed the test, it will be marked just as wrong as if you were a stupid idiot who didn’t comprehend the question at all. Tests are not the place to have arguments with the universe. People end up sabotaging themselves when they start to think like you.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke, fish
    • Replies: @Ibound1
    @Jack D

    It took my son midway through high school to learn this lesson.
    My daughter figured it out by, say, third grade
    Don’t challenge the teacher. Tell the teacher what he/she wants to hear.
    This is why girls do better than boys until college or grad school. Unfortunately telling the professor only what they want to hear has spread to the university system as well - outside of the hard sciences.

    Replies: @L Woods

  79. @Ray Huffman
    @Lot

    There are Asians and then there are Asians. Some groups, such as Hmong and Filipinos, have made little of themselves and show little promise. Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average.

    Replies: @gate666, @Wilkey

    “Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average.”

    Because they are Asians. According to Brian Sykes (iirc) they trace their ancestry back to aboriginal Taiwanese.

    I’m still more shocked by the fact that the average score for blacks, 3.2, is barely above the chance of random answers. There’s the future of your Democratic Party, and of America.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Wilkey

    Damn fool ornithologists usually lump rheas in with birds, too, dragging down the average ability of birds to fly. Lunacy!

    Mr. Huffman is probably one of those guys who also reckons North America ends at Texas, rather than Panama. I've noticed that despite the tendency for intelligence, many of Mr. Sailer's readers are either ignorant of geography or use their own arbitrary decisions about it, much like Humpty Dumpty, to make terms with established and objective meanings instead mean whatever they desire them to mean, usually by taking some trait which is not the defining criterion for classification and imposing their prerogative that that trait somehow is – thus, for them, Indians and Arabs are not Asians because they don't have epicanthic folds, much as bats are birds and ostriches not, because of something to do with flight....

    , @Anonymous Jew
    @Wilkey

    Many/most Pacific Islanders are also part Austroloid. That's like calling Mexican's White because most are about half. (Or calling Ashkenazi Jews White...).

  80. FWIW, 9% is 1.3 SD lower than 48% on a normal curve.

  81. @Paul Jolliffe
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I just took the quiz - it was linked in the original article. Pretty simple (11/11!) but the questions were all legit: no phony stuff as you feared.

    Check it out. I bet the average score for I-Steve readers is 11/11.

    Which ought to interest certain potential advertisers in Steve's blog.

    Replies: @keypusher

    Isn’t advertising to smart people supposed to be a waste of money? Anyway, the traffic on this site couldn’t possibly justify the potential aggravation.

    Slavoj Žižek would be clueless about most questions. The same with Churchill or Putin or Jurgen Habermas or Sartre or any Roosevelt or most scientists outside of those areas (I am not kidding- most mathematicians don’t bother to know anything about life-sciences or anything similar. So, it’s not just words people, it is numbers people, too, who frequently lack basic scientific literacy on many areas. Not because they’re dumb; it’s because they don’t care).

    Horseshit. I don’t know when the term fossil fuels came into vogue, so maybe that would trip up some of the older people on your list, but otherwise…people like Sherlock Holmes who are brilliant at what they do but are unaware that the earth goes around the sun pretty much don’t exist outside of fiction. As we’ve seen on this thread, “words people” and “numbers people” who are far short of brilliant have no difficulty answering these questions.

  82. anon[247] • Disclaimer says:
    @ThreeCranes
    @Father O'Hara

    What you would get is a field of stumps. Unless of course you dig them out.

    I would have missed that question. My mind is too literal. None of the answers logically follow. They're all conditional. You don't get soil erosion if it doesn't rain immediately or if you were careful when you cut the trees to avoid disturbing the underbrush. For example, when trees are cut down in an orchard there's no erosion because grass grows between the rows. This is a literal, real-life example that is true, just plain true.

    I would have left the answer blank and my score would have (and did) reflected that. I recall that numerous questions on SAT's and such were ambiguous and left me scratching my head. None of the answers were absolutely correct. And this left me in a quandary. Should I answer them with what I thought the test maker wanted to hear even though none of the answers was logically, exactly correct?

    Doing so would have meant that I would have to guess what their biases were. But supposedly the test, if the results were to be accurate, should not have reflected or expressed the author's biases. But clearly it did, since none of the answers were correct. Hmmmm.

    This, trying to unravel the test-question creator's intentions, took up a lot of my time on the reading comprehension portion of those tests. I came to look at some questions as traps. They provided answers that were close, but none that were logically binding or unequivocally, empirically certain. So they were testing me at a level doubly removed, trying to see whether I were clever enough to avoid falling into logical or experiential errors.

    In hindsight, I think that I gave the test makers far too much credit. The math portion was simpler.

    Replies: @anon

    It’s well known that some SAT questions are traps, with lures to catch the less intelligent or those in a hurry. Also, some are just bad questions. They usually test those out in an experimental section that isn’t included in your score, but some make it through to the real sections.

  83. @Alfa158
    @Anon

    Wait a second, Maryland has a Republican governor? That reminds me of when NYC voters got so desperate that they elected Giuliani. How bad must things have gotten in Baltimore that suburban and rural GoodWhites state-wide went overwhelmingly for a Republican?

    Replies: @anon, @Nosferatu Zodd

    Mass, the most left-wing state, has a nominally Repub governor as well. Obviously, he’s a RINO’s RINO and tears up a lot on camera. He’s also always very “disappointed” with Trump, but for entirely different reasons than most folks here.

  84. @Alfa158
    @Anon

    Wait a second, Maryland has a Republican governor? That reminds me of when NYC voters got so desperate that they elected Giuliani. How bad must things have gotten in Baltimore that suburban and rural GoodWhites state-wide went overwhelmingly for a Republican?

    Replies: @anon, @Nosferatu Zodd

    Hogan was elected before the riots, in large part because of his photogenic Korean step-daughters. Also, his public battle with cancer has given him a huge amount of personal popularity.

  85. @Jack D
    @peterike

    You are clearly overthinking these questions. This is a survey so it makes no difference if you answer right or wrong, but many high stakes tests have similar questions. If you want to get into college or whatever, you can't be a stubborn ass even if you don't agree with their "right" answers. Just give them the damn answers that you know that they want and move on. If you put down a "wrong" answer because you think you are smarter than the people who constructed the test, it will be marked just as wrong as if you were a stupid idiot who didn't comprehend the question at all. Tests are not the place to have arguments with the universe. People end up sabotaging themselves when they start to think like you.

    Replies: @Ibound1

    It took my son midway through high school to learn this lesson.
    My daughter figured it out by, say, third grade
    Don’t challenge the teacher. Tell the teacher what he/she wants to hear.
    This is why girls do better than boys until college or grad school. Unfortunately telling the professor only what they want to hear has spread to the university system as well – outside of the hard sciences.

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @Ibound1

    I’m not sure what you think changes in college or grad school, but this reality continues there too.

    Replies: @Ibound1

  86. @Stan d Mute
    @Hypnotoad666


    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

     

    Why? Did you not already know? How could you have missed noticing something so glaringly obvious?

    Far more depressing to me was that only 73% of post-grads know the difference between acids and bases or that only 70% of college grads know what a hypothesis is.

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Read the actual multiple choice questions and contemplate the fact that only 63% of whites could correctly answer the question on genetic engineering. At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Hypnotoad666, @Jonathan Mason

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    It’s weird to think about the fact that the majority of educated people walking around really have no clue about how the physical world they interact with actually works.

    They may know about Third Wave Feminism or Critical Race Theory, and that Climate Change is Real. But they don’t know that F = MA, or how a pulley works, or the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Many years ago I was working with a young female attorney from an elite law school who was at an elite law firm. We were in an office that overlooked San Francisco Bay and a large container ship was going by. Her comment was: “It’s amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel.”

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Hypnotoad666


    “It’s amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel.”
     
    I'm familiar with Archimedes' principle but I still think it's amazing.

    Replies: @Ibound1

  87. @res
    @James Speaks

    Well, one of the reasons I mentioned seasons and tilt was because I think of it as an iSteve favorite based on this post (see first video): https://www.unz.com/isteve/harvard-university-will-begin-gene-editing-sperm/
    and the associated comments. Turns out a fair number of Harvard students did not know that.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    Turns out a fair number of Harvard students did not know that.

    Knowing that seasons result from the tilt of the earth’s axis affecting the amount of sunlight reaching the surface (insolation IIRC) in northern and summer hemispheres is one of those basic pieces of knowledge we expect all functional adults to have, and that is why we teach it in grade school. If 60% graduate from the sixth grade without knowing that, then we have failure in the educational system, and seriously, should these people be allowed to vote?

    Voting is a right, but so is my right to not be demagogued into irrelevance by tribal mechanics. We do not let minors vote. I think it can be determined that functional minors (meme alert) do not make voting decisions based on reason. I do not think functional minors should be allowed to vote.

    This might be racist, but if so, it is racism without animus.

    If a fair number of Harvard students do not understand the seasons, then Harvard isn’t a very good school.

  88. @David
    I found it amazing that a random selection of black Americans knew as much as this one did about science. So I read up a little on the methodology. Pew recruits a panel of candidates by dialing random digits or mailing letters to random addresses. Only 5.6% reply at all. Less agree to be on the panel.

    This is a survey of a subset of that less than 5.6%. There is likely a big knowledge gap between this group and the other 94.4%.

    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory, @bomag, @The Last Real Calvinist

    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Reminds me of an internet blurb where they polled a cross section of US and Chinese math teachers:

    1) Divide 3 1/2 by 1/2. (All the Chinese teacher could do it, 1/2 of the US teachers could.)

    2) Give an example from daily life where this calculation could be useful. (Half the Chinese teachers could give an example; none of the US teachers could.)

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    @bomag

    I can believe it. I think much of it stems from Americans being used to everything being reduced to decimals. Like most can spout off 3.14 as pi, but not know it's 22/7, a ratio based on the circumference of a circle, and 3.14 is what you get by dividing 7 into 22.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Known Fact
    @bomag

    Your horse just paid $3.50 to place, but you only had it for one buck, not two. How much are you getting back? All kids (and apparently their teachers, too) should go to the track, with the form, to learn some basic math and prob/stats

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Logan
    @bomag

    Second one is funny for me. I spent much of my life earning my living off the square feet of rooms. Can do it standing on my head.

  89. @Daniel H
    I’ve been following baseball stats since 1965 and social science statistics since 1972.

    Steve, did you play Strat-O-Matic baseball back in the day? I knew a few guys who were very much into it back in the 70s.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Known Fact

    I played APBA with friends and solitaire into my 30s. We would make expansion teams of all our favorite mediocre players. Imagine a key moment and up to bat steps …. Ivan Murrell!

    I think Rotisserie baseball and then the internet took the steam out of Strat-O and APBA

  90. @Hypnotoad666
    It was a multiple choice test with four options for each of 11 questions. So you should get a score of 2.75 on average from just guessing.

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    Replies: @jon, @Stan d Mute, @Known Fact, @International Jew

    And I doubt they really dug down deep enough to get a true sampling of that particular population

  91. @bomag
    @David


    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.
     
    Reminds me of an internet blurb where they polled a cross section of US and Chinese math teachers:

    1) Divide 3 1/2 by 1/2. (All the Chinese teacher could do it, 1/2 of the US teachers could.)

    2) Give an example from daily life where this calculation could be useful. (Half the Chinese teachers could give an example; none of the US teachers could.)

    Replies: @South Texas Guy, @Known Fact, @Logan

    I can believe it. I think much of it stems from Americans being used to everything being reduced to decimals. Like most can spout off 3.14 as pi, but not know it’s 22/7, a ratio based on the circumference of a circle, and 3.14 is what you get by dividing 7 into 22.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @South Texas Guy

    It's not exactly 22/7.

    In fact there is no way to express π as a fraction. You can't even express π as the root of any polynomial. π is what's known in the business as a transcendental number.

    If you're interested in the subject, you'd enjoy learning the proof that π is irrational. Proving it's not just irrational but transcendental is a good deal more technical.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  92. @bomag
    @David


    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.
     
    Reminds me of an internet blurb where they polled a cross section of US and Chinese math teachers:

    1) Divide 3 1/2 by 1/2. (All the Chinese teacher could do it, 1/2 of the US teachers could.)

    2) Give an example from daily life where this calculation could be useful. (Half the Chinese teachers could give an example; none of the US teachers could.)

    Replies: @South Texas Guy, @Known Fact, @Logan

    Your horse just paid $3.50 to place, but you only had it for one buck, not two. How much are you getting back? All kids (and apparently their teachers, too) should go to the track, with the form, to learn some basic math and prob/stats

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Known Fact


    should go to the track...basic math and prob/stats
     
    And economics. The odds adjusting to equalize the amount of money bet for and against an event is an example of a price adjusting to clear a market.

    I once took a graduate monetary economics seminar on a field trip to a track. We did a lot of talking and not much betting, but a good time was had by all. I think someone wrote a paper about it.
  93. Oil, natural gas and coal are examples of …

    The answer is of course supposed to be fossil fuels.

    But these supposedly have biological origins, so are they biofuels?

    Some think they aren’t biological, that they are (at least some of them) formed by abiogenic processes far down in the earth’s mantle, and that they are constantly regenerated by these processes. So would that make them renewable, even if very slowly? Since peat bogs are the first step in formation of coal, this means coal is presently in the process of forming. Is coal renewable?

  94. @bomag
    @David


    a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.
     
    Reminds me of an internet blurb where they polled a cross section of US and Chinese math teachers:

    1) Divide 3 1/2 by 1/2. (All the Chinese teacher could do it, 1/2 of the US teachers could.)

    2) Give an example from daily life where this calculation could be useful. (Half the Chinese teachers could give an example; none of the US teachers could.)

    Replies: @South Texas Guy, @Known Fact, @Logan

    Second one is funny for me. I spent much of my life earning my living off the square feet of rooms. Can do it standing on my head.

  95. @Bardon Kaldian
    What's so new or important about this? Slavoj Žižek would be clueless about most questions. The same with Churchill or Putin or Jurgen Habermas or Sartre or any Roosevelt or most scientists outside of those areas (I am not kidding- most mathematicians don't bother to know anything about life-sciences or anything similar. So, it's not just words people, it is numbers people, too, who frequently lack basic scientific literacy on many areas. Not because they're dumb; it's because they don't care).

    Replies: @Logan

    In one of the BBC Sherlock episodes, Watson finds out the Sherlock doesn’t realize the earth goes around the sun, not the other way around.

    Sherlock is not embarrassed in the least, since it’s information he doesn’t consider important or interesting. Why clutter his brain with such?

  96. @Hypnotoad666
    It was a multiple choice test with four options for each of 11 questions. So you should get a score of 2.75 on average from just guessing.

    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

    Replies: @jon, @Stan d Mute, @Known Fact, @International Jew

    Yep, and in fact it’s worse because at least one question only had three choices.

    I’ll bet a lot of people don’t read well enough to understand the questions in the first place.

    There’s probably a significant population that won’t sit still long enough to complete the quiz.

  97. @Hypnotoad666
    @Stan d Mute


    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?
     
    It's weird to think about the fact that the majority of educated people walking around really have no clue about how the physical world they interact with actually works.

    They may know about Third Wave Feminism or Critical Race Theory, and that Climate Change is Real. But they don't know that F = MA, or how a pulley works, or the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Many years ago I was working with a young female attorney from an elite law school who was at an elite law firm. We were in an office that overlooked San Francisco Bay and a large container ship was going by. Her comment was: "It's amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel."

    Replies: @International Jew

    “It’s amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel.”

    I’m familiar with Archimedes’ principle but I still think it’s amazing.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    @International Jew

    I’m familiar with gravity; I still think skyscrapers are amazing.

  98. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    What are 'science related issues?' If the questions are about global warming, humans creating hurricanes by not carpooling in rural Nebraska or the 'science' that sex is not permanent, I give credit to the POCs for not falling for that nonsense. The Asians just probably didn't understand the questions.

    Replies: @res, @Paul Jolliffe, @International Jew

    Fortunately for me, the quiz didn’t cover warmism or gender bs. If it had, and knowing what Pew would think are the correct answers, I’d have flunked.

  99. @Lot
    “education related stats are quite repetitive”

    Well, whites do better than Asians for once.

    Not sure what the composition of the Asian sample is though.

    “almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian”

    And national spelling bee winners are 80% Indian 20% home school evangelicals. That doesn’t tell us much compared to actual stats of mass standardized testing.

    I’m curious about second generation NE v South Asian stats. From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    Replies: @Ray Huffman, @gate666, @International Jew, @Anonymous Jew

    From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    From what I’ve seen, and I don’t claim to scientific rigor, the children often outdo the parents. The kids grow up healthier, attend better schools, and of course their mastery of English opens many opportunities closed to their parents.

  100. We all have our own ideas about what an educated person should know. I’m well-educated by traditional standards. But to a recent college grad, my unfamiliarity with giants such as the results of a Google search of “American scientists”, or with the sjw-driven canon of today’s high school literature courses, I’m an ignorant hick.

    One of my neighbors is a prominent black studies scholar. As a side to his already-well-paid professor job, he picks up nice fees for introducing industry groups to his racialist bs. He said to me, after a speech he gave at a recent computer industry convention, “These people don’t know anything about race.” And I thought, ok, maybe so for fresh-off-the-boat Chinese. But anyone who grew up in America, in or near a city, actually knows a great deal about blacks. None of it, of course, effable in polite company.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    @International Jew

    A clear indication that you probably don't much about blacks in general outside your agenda. every time I engage in the discussion I am usually forced to learn something I did not know by virtue of the fact in the US the history of blacks is as old and older than the continent we know.


    I had no idea that blacks are recorded as visitors to the continent long before the Spaniards. I had no idea that US black troops were forced serve under the French. It has taken me a while to comprehend the level of self control and wisdom that southern blacks engaged in as the south upheld traitors to the country as heroes -- and bit their tongues on the matter -- 'political correctness' -- or black service members being forced to take the worst seats in theaters behind German prisoners of war.

    I had no real comprehension. I suspect that you don't half of what you think you know and the half you know as with me is probably deeply flawed.

    , @Desiderius
    @International Jew

    If he dealt crack he’d do less damage.

  101. Science Knowledge varies by race and ethnicity. in U.S.

    What do they teach in schools these days, anyway? #ExtraneousQualifiers

    As has been noted, neither is the substance of the observation a discovery; it’s bene common knowledge for all human history. #ClownWorld

  102. >We weren’t better able to test Asians lacking English fluency or verbal acuity because there is no way to evaluate scientific knowledge without using words
    This story does not add up.

  103. @Wilkey
    @Ray Huffman

    "Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average."

    Because they are Asians. According to Brian Sykes (iirc) they trace their ancestry back to aboriginal Taiwanese.

    I'm still more shocked by the fact that the average score for blacks, 3.2, is barely above the chance of random answers. There's the future of your Democratic Party, and of America.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous Jew

    Damn fool ornithologists usually lump rheas in with birds, too, dragging down the average ability of birds to fly. Lunacy!

    Mr. Huffman is probably one of those guys who also reckons North America ends at Texas, rather than Panama. I’ve noticed that despite the tendency for intelligence, many of Mr. Sailer’s readers are either ignorant of geography or use their own arbitrary decisions about it, much like Humpty Dumpty, to make terms with established and objective meanings instead mean whatever they desire them to mean, usually by taking some trait which is not the defining criterion for classification and imposing their prerogative that that trait somehow is – thus, for them, Indians and Arabs are not Asians because they don’t have epicanthic folds, much as bats are birds and ostriches not, because of something to do with flight….

  104. @Ibound1
    @Jack D

    It took my son midway through high school to learn this lesson.
    My daughter figured it out by, say, third grade
    Don’t challenge the teacher. Tell the teacher what he/she wants to hear.
    This is why girls do better than boys until college or grad school. Unfortunately telling the professor only what they want to hear has spread to the university system as well - outside of the hard sciences.

    Replies: @L Woods

    I’m not sure what you think changes in college or grad school, but this reality continues there too.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    @L Woods

    My son tells me you are absolutely correct in all areas of the liberal arts. If it were not for university requirements, he would avoid these classes entirely. However he does say his hard hard science professors are more open.

  105. I have to admit to be a tad bit embarrassed I only got nine correct.

    That’s humiliating.

  106. @South Texas Guy
    What is surprising is that the scores of those with college degrees were so low. The graph question could have been misinterpreted if you were reading too fast, and I think there was another that seemed to have a wording issue, but having been to college, and therefore, having probably taken a bunch of tests with tricky wording that wouldn't have been an issue.

    But...11 out of 11! Liberal arts degree. I rock!!!!

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Redneck farmer, @George Taylor

    11 of 11. No you don’t rock, your not special etc. An entirely predictable result for the average White guy who reads unz.com.

  107. @International Jew
    We all have our own ideas about what an educated person should know. I'm well-educated by traditional standards. But to a recent college grad, my unfamiliarity with giants such as the results of a Google search of "American scientists", or with the sjw-driven canon of today's high school literature courses, I'm an ignorant hick.

    One of my neighbors is a prominent black studies scholar. As a side to his already-well-paid professor job, he picks up nice fees for introducing industry groups to his racialist bs. He said to me, after a speech he gave at a recent computer industry convention, "These people don't know anything about race." And I thought, ok, maybe so for fresh-off-the-boat Chinese. But anyone who grew up in America, in or near a city, actually knows a great deal about blacks. None of it, of course, effable in polite company.

    Replies: @EliteCommInc., @Desiderius

    A clear indication that you probably don’t much about blacks in general outside your agenda. every time I engage in the discussion I am usually forced to learn something I did not know by virtue of the fact in the US the history of blacks is as old and older than the continent we know.

    I had no idea that blacks are recorded as visitors to the continent long before the Spaniards. I had no idea that US black troops were forced serve under the French. It has taken me a while to comprehend the level of self control and wisdom that southern blacks engaged in as the south upheld traitors to the country as heroes — and bit their tongues on the matter — ‘political correctness’ — or black service members being forced to take the worst seats in theaters behind German prisoners of war.

    I had no real comprehension. I suspect that you don’t half of what you think you know and the half you know as with me is probably deeply flawed.

  108. “Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?”

    Ohhh good grief,

    No it’s not. Most people buy antacids at the local market and rarely do more than check the ingredients or the instructions, rarely both.

    Most of these questions have very little value in what most people do every day. These questions don’t reflect an ounce about most people save some knowledge deficit, most of which is useless to what they do in their every day lives. No. That is why we have people with certain expertise, I change the oil in my car, change a tire, but figuring out the timing or replacing a carberator. None of these questions are going to lead to humanities fall out because x number of people don’t know shdgt. What would matter is if certain people in specific fields did not know. If I chemist got the acid base question incorrect, one would be concerned. But that Joe the computer programmer got it incorrect — shrug.

    hence

    someone makes rolaids

    someone works in agriculture

    someone works in microbiology developing vaccines

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @EliteCommInc.



    Most people buy antacids at the local market and rarely do more than check the ingredients or the instructions, rarely both.

     

    Don't antacids kill the tiny ants that hide in your food and bite your stomach walls?


    Most of these questions have very little value in what most people do every day. ... useless to what they do in their every day lives

     

    Ok, fair enough. But why do we have to spend 10 grand a year schooling them though.
  109. Given the history of education socialization in the US, it should be of some concern that most whites did not score higher. But civilization is not going to collapse because x people got the answers incorrect and certainly civilization is not saved by the whites who scored 100% points.

    But I am depressed nonetheless.

    Laugh – really depressed.

  110. @Wilkey
    @Ray Huffman

    "Also, Pacific Islanders are usually lumped in with the Asians and they also drag down the average."

    Because they are Asians. According to Brian Sykes (iirc) they trace their ancestry back to aboriginal Taiwanese.

    I'm still more shocked by the fact that the average score for blacks, 3.2, is barely above the chance of random answers. There's the future of your Democratic Party, and of America.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous Jew

    Many/most Pacific Islanders are also part Austroloid. That’s like calling Mexican’s White because most are about half. (Or calling Ashkenazi Jews White…).

  111. @International Jew
    @Hypnotoad666


    “It’s amazing how those things can float when they are made out of such heavy steel.”
     
    I'm familiar with Archimedes' principle but I still think it's amazing.

    Replies: @Ibound1

    I’m familiar with gravity; I still think skyscrapers are amazing.

  112. @Lot
    “education related stats are quite repetitive”

    Well, whites do better than Asians for once.

    Not sure what the composition of the Asian sample is though.

    “almost all of the Science Olympiad kids were Asian”

    And national spelling bee winners are 80% Indian 20% home school evangelicals. That doesn’t tell us much compared to actual stats of mass standardized testing.

    I’m curious about second generation NE v South Asian stats. From what I’ve seem, there is a lot of serious regression downward of children of S Asians elite job immigrants, but not NE Asians.

    Replies: @Ray Huffman, @gate666, @International Jew, @Anonymous Jew

    I’m pretty sure I’ve seen second generation S. Asian children in the US reported at IQ 110. That would make them the highest IQ group in the country. Note regression to the mean would theoretically stop at the second generation, meaning this new group will now regress to 110. I would put the real S. Asian IQ (with first world nutrition) at about 95. Even with regression to the mean, these numbers are about what you’d expect – ie 120-125 IQ parents from a 95 IQ group. (The differing IQs of ethnic groups within India is another variable to consider).

    Unfortunately, they’re still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic. And from my experience they’re at least as leftist as Jews. But at least they won’t mug you!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous Jew


    Unfortunately, they’re still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic.
     
    And those reasons are what?

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

  113. Speaking of knowledge and testing, I just got back from a compliance seminar and one of the quiz questions was the how much women earn for the same work as men. I can’t remember how they snuck that one in there. I selected 100% and my answer was wrong, of course. The “correct” answer was 80-point-something. The seminar was led by three female laywers: an Asian, a Hispanic and an obvious White lesbian. C’est la San Francisco…

  114. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Coemgen


    "...A few civics question to answer when voting for legislators and executives..."
     
    Unfortunately, the Supreme Court banned anything like this, i.e. literacy tests, over a half-century ago.

    My observation has been that most people are too lazy, ignorant and/or stupid to vote for the best candidates or even to vote for the candidates whom they perceive as being the best. A few years ago, my sister and I went through the set of contentious policy issues facing the schools in her city. It turned out that one candidate for the available position on the school board disagreed with her on every issue, several agreed with her on some and disagreed on others, and one agreed with her on all. She wound up voting for the one that disagreed with her on all positions because "she was a nice lady" and a dimocrat. All the candidates had sterling reputations so my sister was unable even to clarify what being "a nice lady" meant in this context. BTW, what makes this even more concerning is that my sister is highly educated professional, with an IQ at least one and more probably two SDs above the mean, and works as a librarian, specializing in the more technical, computer-related aspects of that field.

    In my ideal system candidates would have to clearly articulate their stands on several issues and individuals would only be allowed to vote if they passed a test of their ability to link candidates to issues. It wouldn't matter if candidates kept their promises. At least the system would select for voters who knew something about the political situation.

    Even better, voters could be presented with profiles of candidates' positions on important issues rather than candidates' names and vote for the profile rather than the candidate.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    librarian, specializing in the more technical, computer-related aspects of that field.

    Progressivism is a parasite on nerd lack of savvy.

  115. @International Jew
    We all have our own ideas about what an educated person should know. I'm well-educated by traditional standards. But to a recent college grad, my unfamiliarity with giants such as the results of a Google search of "American scientists", or with the sjw-driven canon of today's high school literature courses, I'm an ignorant hick.

    One of my neighbors is a prominent black studies scholar. As a side to his already-well-paid professor job, he picks up nice fees for introducing industry groups to his racialist bs. He said to me, after a speech he gave at a recent computer industry convention, "These people don't know anything about race." And I thought, ok, maybe so for fresh-off-the-boat Chinese. But anyone who grew up in America, in or near a city, actually knows a great deal about blacks. None of it, of course, effable in polite company.

    Replies: @EliteCommInc., @Desiderius

    If he dealt crack he’d do less damage.

  116. @Anonymous
    Is this surprising to anyone, on the left or the right? Yet another example of American society's institutionalized racism.

    Replies: @TWS

    Step it up. We already have tiny duck, we don’t need generic sjw platitudes that are correctly spelled.

  117. @res
    @peterike

    Most of those look like you are trying too hard to justify bad answers. But I kind of agree with you about the antibiotics one, even if I think the test answer is the better choice.

    For example: https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/drugs-in-the-water

    Replies: @Grace Jones

    Antibiotic-resistant microbes date back to 450 million years ago, well before the age of dinosaurs
    https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2017/05/antibiotic-resistant-microbes-date-back.html

    Microbiomes in ancient Incans and 15th century Italians carried resistance genes
    http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ASMMicrobe/58660

  118. @Stan d Mute
    @Hypnotoad666


    The non-college black score was 3.2. So less than half an answer better than pure guessing. That part is pretty depressing.

     

    Why? Did you not already know? How could you have missed noticing something so glaringly obvious?

    Far more depressing to me was that only 73% of post-grads know the difference between acids and bases or that only 70% of college grads know what a hypothesis is.

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Read the actual multiple choice questions and contemplate the fact that only 63% of whites could correctly answer the question on genetic engineering. At least 47% of us are fundamentally too stupid to be permitted to reproduce.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Hypnotoad666, @Jonathan Mason

    Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?

    Perhaps, but the term “base” seems to have gone out of fashion. I vaguely remember hearing about bases in school fifty years or more ago, but if you asked me nowadays I would have said that the opposite of acid was alkaline. I can’t remember the last time I heard anyone use the word base in that sense.

  119. @David
    I found it amazing that a random selection of black Americans knew as much as this one did about science. So I read up a little on the methodology. Pew recruits a panel of candidates by dialing random digits or mailing letters to random addresses. Only 5.6% reply at all. Less agree to be on the panel.

    This is a survey of a subset of that less than 5.6%. There is likely a big knowledge gap between this group and the other 94.4%.

    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory, @bomag, @The Last Real Calvinist

    I think it was Anatoly Karlin that linked a while ago to a study showing that only 4% of white Americans can calculate the area of a room and apply a per square foot price to find the cost of carpeting it.

    Here in Hong Kong, given the insane property market, it seems like everybody learns to do calculations involving layout/square footage when they’re still gestating.

  120. @Redneck farmer
    @South Texas Guy

    A true liberal arts degree would prepare you for such things. What gets called a liberal arts degree, or worse yet, a fine arts degree, wouldn't.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    My liberal arts degree required two semesters of science and some math (I was a math major so I don’t recall what the minimum requirement was).

  121. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous Jew
    @Lot

    I'm pretty sure I've seen second generation S. Asian children in the US reported at IQ 110. That would make them the highest IQ group in the country. Note regression to the mean would theoretically stop at the second generation, meaning this new group will now regress to 110. I would put the real S. Asian IQ (with first world nutrition) at about 95. Even with regression to the mean, these numbers are about what you'd expect - ie 120-125 IQ parents from a 95 IQ group. (The differing IQs of ethnic groups within India is another variable to consider).

    Unfortunately, they're still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic. And from my experience they're at least as leftist as Jews. But at least they won't mug you!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Unfortunately, they’re still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic.

    And those reasons are what?

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @Anonymous

    Like all non-White immigrants that don't want to assimilate into Anglo America, they contribute to a balkanized (sorry, "diverse") society - more conflict, lower social capital, etc. They are also, in my experience, very leftist. As I've noted on here before, I meet more right-of-center Jews than dot Indians.

    Didn't Indians learn their lesson from what happens when you have different religions/races/languages sharing the same country?

  122. @EliteCommInc.
    "Re acids vs bases, only 46% of whites know the difference and only one in three women. That is catastrophically dangerously stupid. Who gets through K-12 without at least an introduction to chemistry?"


    Ohhh good grief,

    No it's not. Most people buy antacids at the local market and rarely do more than check the ingredients or the instructions, rarely both.


    Most of these questions have very little value in what most people do every day. These questions don't reflect an ounce about most people save some knowledge deficit, most of which is useless to what they do in their every day lives. No. That is why we have people with certain expertise, I change the oil in my car, change a tire, but figuring out the timing or replacing a carberator. None of these questions are going to lead to humanities fall out because x number of people don't know shdgt. What would matter is if certain people in specific fields did not know. If I chemist got the acid base question incorrect, one would be concerned. But that Joe the computer programmer got it incorrect -- shrug.


    hence

    someone makes rolaids

    someone works in agriculture

    someone works in microbiology developing vaccines

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    Most people buy antacids at the local market and rarely do more than check the ingredients or the instructions, rarely both.

    Don’t antacids kill the tiny ants that hide in your food and bite your stomach walls?

    Most of these questions have very little value in what most people do every day. … useless to what they do in their every day lives

    Ok, fair enough. But why do we have to spend 10 grand a year schooling them though.

    • LOL: Trevor H.
  123. @L Woods
    @Ibound1

    I’m not sure what you think changes in college or grad school, but this reality continues there too.

    Replies: @Ibound1

    My son tells me you are absolutely correct in all areas of the liberal arts. If it were not for university requirements, he would avoid these classes entirely. However he does say his hard hard science professors are more open.

  124. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous Jew


    Unfortunately, they’re still problematic for the same reasons any foreign group is problematic.
     
    And those reasons are what?

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Like all non-White immigrants that don’t want to assimilate into Anglo America, they contribute to a balkanized (sorry, “diverse”) society – more conflict, lower social capital, etc. They are also, in my experience, very leftist. As I’ve noted on here before, I meet more right-of-center Jews than dot Indians.

    Didn’t Indians learn their lesson from what happens when you have different religions/races/languages sharing the same country?

  125. @South Texas Guy
    @bomag

    I can believe it. I think much of it stems from Americans being used to everything being reduced to decimals. Like most can spout off 3.14 as pi, but not know it's 22/7, a ratio based on the circumference of a circle, and 3.14 is what you get by dividing 7 into 22.

    Replies: @International Jew

    It’s not exactly 22/7.

    In fact there is no way to express π as a fraction. You can’t even express π as the root of any polynomial. π is what’s known in the business as a transcendental number.

    If you’re interested in the subject, you’d enjoy learning the proof that π is irrational. Proving it’s not just irrational but transcendental is a good deal more technical.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @International Jew

    If you use continued fractions, you can get bizarrely close on the fourth iteration.

  126. @Known Fact
    @bomag

    Your horse just paid $3.50 to place, but you only had it for one buck, not two. How much are you getting back? All kids (and apparently their teachers, too) should go to the track, with the form, to learn some basic math and prob/stats

    Replies: @International Jew

    should go to the track…basic math and prob/stats

    And economics. The odds adjusting to equalize the amount of money bet for and against an event is an example of a price adjusting to clear a market.

    I once took a graduate monetary economics seminar on a field trip to a track. We did a lot of talking and not much betting, but a good time was had by all. I think someone wrote a paper about it.

  127. @International Jew
    @South Texas Guy

    It's not exactly 22/7.

    In fact there is no way to express π as a fraction. You can't even express π as the root of any polynomial. π is what's known in the business as a transcendental number.

    If you're interested in the subject, you'd enjoy learning the proof that π is irrational. Proving it's not just irrational but transcendental is a good deal more technical.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    If you use continued fractions, you can get bizarrely close on the fourth iteration.

  128. I keep coming back to this post in my mind. The results for black test-takers are barely better than random guessing. That means their knowledge is nil. Effectively zero. And that’s the average. Half are worse!

    Of course, I need hardly explain to people here that it’s not really possible to do much worse on a multiple choice test than random. This tells us something significant about the distribution.

    Frankly this doesn’t even seem possible, but there it is. I’m sorta surprised that Pew Research is permitted to publish results like these.

  129. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @bomag
    I was having a casual conversation with a white guy the other day; we got on the topic of bird watching and he launched into a discussion of the locals beyond what I knew.

    I'm wondering: is bird watching pretty much a White thing, or does it cross the racial divide? For that matter, it seems mostly an English, Anglo-Saxon thing, from my experience.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Anonymous

    It’s likely that bird-watching grew out of bird-hunting.

  130. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    An underdiscussed related topic is that a disproportionate number of flat-earthers are black or hispanic. Watch the recent Netflix documentary. The demographics at their flat-earth events stand out. Still majority white. But compare it to the demographic breakdown of an amateur astronomy meetup and the difference is apparent.

    In the Netflix documentary, I cannot recall a single Asian. The whites tended to be kooky conspiracy-types. The blacks and hispanics (and mixed race White-hispanics) tend to be sincere 97 IQ types, who maybe picked up some vocabulary from highschool/community-college science classes but still missed the point entirely.

    Suspect as we allow more lower IQ immigrants into the country, while simultaneously pushing more people into watered-down colleges, you will see more movements like this, couched in academic, non-woo-woo language.

    "Hold up your light, Enrique"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMjDAzUFxX0

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    This is associated with certain fundamentalist Christian churches.

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