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Personality Profiles of Rival Movies, Such as Forrest Gump vs. Pulp Fiction
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Adding on to my new column in Taki’s Magazine, here are comparisons of the personality profiles of admirers of various movies that are often contrasted to each other, perhaps because they were Oscar contenders or because they came out the same year. In general, hit movies, and all of these ranged from “solid” to “spectacular” in box office returns, tend to fall in the broad middle ranges of psychological appeal.

For example, Robert Zemeckis’s Forrest Gump won Best Picture for 1994 over Pulp Fiction. Tarantino’s movie appealed to fans who ranked higher on Openness and lower on Agreeableness.

Harvey Weinstein-produced Shakespeare In Love, with a script by, among others, Top Stoppard, beat Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan for Best Picture. Shakespeare did much better on Openness, due to the remote period setting and difficulty of language, whereas WWII is probably the most easily comprehensible period for a period piece, requiring the least stretching from the viewer. In general, war movies score low on Neuroticism, in contrast to horror movies. People who identify with Rambo, say, tend to be pretty confident individuals:

Some movies are pretty similar in who they appeal to. Even though they are quite different in tone and tempo, the gangster classics The Godfather and Goodfellas appeal to similar audiences, with only moderate divergences. Godfather 2 tends to fall in between the original and Scorsese’s movie.

Similarly, Ridley Scott’s Alien and James Cameron’s sequel Aliens, while rather different to expert fans, are, in the big picture, similar in the type of audience they appeal to:

And here are two pairs of movies from the same year: the 1986 war movies Platoon and Top Gun, followed by Spielberg’s 1993 annus mirabilis pair Schindler’s List and Jurassic Park:

Top Gun is a pretty good example of a conservative military movie, appealing most to less open viewers, the highly conscientious, the extraverted, the agreeable, and the not very neurotic (despite having 55% female fans: women score much higher on Neuroticism). Platoon reflects Oliver Stone’s unusual personality, who volunteered for combat in Vietnam, where he was wounded twice. It ranks almost as high on Conscientiousness as the gung ho Top Gun, but low on Agreeableness.

Interestingly, Jurassic Park, despite being a monster smash, has a number of the hallmarks of a sci-fi movie, which it is, like low Extraversion.

The two 2007 Best Picture rivals, Paul Thomas Anderson’s There Will Be Blood with Daniel Day-Lewis, and the Coen Brothers’ No Country for Old Men, with Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, and Tommy Lee Jones, have somewhat different profiles, with There Will Be Blood being more extreme on all five personality dimensions:

 
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  1. For some people, going to the movies is “performative”:

  2. OT but amusing: there was a major bust of a birth tourism racket yesterday in Suffolk County NY, where I live. Six people were charged in a scheme that brought more than 100 preggo women from Turkey to the US on tourist or business visas to give birth, with the children getting US citizenship and Medicaid benefits. In the three years the scheme was running it resulted $2.1 million in Medicaid benefits and netted $750,000 in fees from the women.
    Where it gets amusing is in the five names released (one defendant hasn’t been named): Ibrahim Aksakal, Enes Burak Cakiroglu, Sarah Kaplan, Fiordalisa Marte and Edgar Rodriguez. Only two Turks in this scheme involving Turkish woman, plus a Jewish woman and two Hispanics.

    https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/six-indicted-in-long-island-birth-tourism-money-laundering-scheme-feds/2757394/

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @prosa123

    They should all be [redacted] along with anyone who even supports the idea of birthright citizenship

    , @TelfoedJohn
    @prosa123

    Kaplan is a common Turkish name:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaplan_(surname)

    https://www.allinlondon.co.uk/images/venues/images_all/10675268.jpg

    , @njguy73
    @prosa123

    Yes, and I'm positive that the writers of the Fourteenth Amendment wrote it so anyone could give birth here and have their kid be a citizen.

  3. Steve: In the AFPP charts you cited, C, E, and A seem to be highly correlated.

    Perhaps, in the future, the five factor model will be replaced by the three factor model.

    The MBTI, which has four factors, seems to have a few combinations that are very unlikely. The core types (according to some Jungians) seem to be four in number: SP, SJ, NT, and NF, with extroverted & introverted subtypes, making 8 types. This would indicate that there should really be 3 factors, since 2x2x2 = 8.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Not Raul

    "In the AFPP charts you cited, C, E, and A seem to be highly correlated."

    Steve's attempt to ruin movies is now morphing into a Robert McKee seminar.

  4. No Country For Old Men was a very good movie IMO. And I don’t say that about many movies post 1970s. “Call it.”

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Trinity


    No Country For Old Men was a very good movie IMO. And I don’t say that about many movies post 1970s. “Call it.”
     
    Agree. It had me from the first minute of the pronghorn hunt - the first really convincing hunting scene I've ever seen in a movie.

    (don't get me started on Robert De Niro sprinting around some Appalachian mountain chasing elk)

    Replies: @JMcG

  5. There Will be Blood is my favorite kind of movie. But there were some very unpleasant weird things in it. It’s the story of the California oil man Dougherty.

    Pulp Fiction I liked. Forrest Gump was a horrible mawkish soap opera Life Time Hallmark channel type movie. Shakespeare in Love was great. Best part was the girl married the man her parents arranged unsteady of running off with young Shakespeare to live happily ever after.

    Worst movie Hitchcock ever made Vertigo. Best movie he made was Shadow of a Doubt.

    I really like gangster and caper movies. Obviously I long to escape my humdrum life, steal gazillions and live happily ever after. Bank Job, in which a secret government agency hires Jason Stratham to rob a safe deposit box with pictures of Princess Margaret with a black revolutionary is one of the best.

    Most disliked movies; anything with Sydney Poiter, Morgan Freeman Denzel Washington Will Smith or any other saintly heroic black characters. Any movie that has a black woman in it. That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Alden

    Say what you will about Hallmark movies, but they're wholesome and relatively light on diversity. I know people who watch them mainly for that reason.

    One of the Hallmark channels (there are several) plays nothing but Christmas movies this time of year. The typical protagonist is a pretty white girl who meets a handsome white guy, flirts around with him for a while, goes through the usual romantic-comedy contortions, realizes that he is The One(TM), and ends up marrying him and living happily ever after. The same actors, including many veterans of daytime soap operas, keep popping up again and again.

    As cinema, these flicks are pretty thin gruel, but as background noise, they're not too bad. Only a couple of the movies in the regular rotation feature interracial romance, and only one of them (AFAIK) features a gay couple.

    , @Catdog
    @Alden

    "That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off."
    The streaming services push globohomo hard. They KNOW my preferences, yet choose to prominently feature "black voices" and Amazon Prime video has started autoplaying a trailer at the top of each page and before each episode that begins with two men kissing. I looked but couldn't find a way to disable it.

    I sent a message to Amazon asking them not to push gays on me anymore, and I expect that they will fix the problem immediately.

    Replies: @Alden

  6. I never could watch Forrest Gump! On the other hand, I made everyone I knew watch Pulp Fiction, even my mom. She politely informed me, afterward, that she didn’t find it as funny as I did. I think that the Marcellus Wallace rape scene was a bit too much for her. Terry Gross, of NPR, interviewed Christopher Plummer and was asking him about his daughter, Amanda. She, like I, loved Pulp Fiction and thought that Christopher must be so proud of Amanda’s performance in it. Of course, he was quite old, and, no doubt, even less impressed than my mom. He politely, responded that he was proud of all of his daughter’s performances.

  7. I’ve always thought that “The Hunt for Red October” was a really great movie. I watch it all the time.

    Likewise, “Master and Commander”.

    My wife and I definitely love to watch movies like “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”.

    I also love “The Verdict” with Paul Newman. Good one from the early 80s.

    I’ll have to say: “Heathers” is one of the most loathesome movies I have ever watched.

    I hate everyone involved. What a horrible, detestable movie. I hope every last person involved burns in hell.

    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @BostonJoe

    Master and Commander is one of my top ten favorites.

  8. Has a single human woman ever once viewed The Cannonball Run?

    • LOL: Captain Tripps
  9. I thought the funniest scene in Pulp Fiction was when Christopher Walken, playing a tortured Vietnam War vet, walked into the room where the young Butch was watching one of those cheap Clutch Cargo cartoons on tv. Walken’s graphic explanation to Butch about how he saved Butch’s father’s ring while a POW made me lol.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    @John Up North

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it sure-as-sh*t wasn't a ring that Captain Koons saved for Butch.

    Replies: @John Up North, @MEH 0910

  10. I’m surprised that so many women like Pulp Fiction.

    Some things I just don’t want to see in a movie. At least one of those things was in Pulp Fiction.

    • Agree: Kent Nationalist
  11. This may be based on my own unrepresentative personal experience, but does the data support the generalization that men are more likely to be into older movies, whereas women (at least until a certain age) are more into what is current and trendy? With Mrs. Abe, who is still quite young-at-heart, I have been through several iterations of ingenue- Drew Barrymore, Jennifer Lopez, Anne Hathaway, Emma Stone, etc., etc. Basically it’s watching the same rom-com but with an entirely new cast every 6-8 years. There are a few imprinted classics she loves (e.g. WIZARD OF OZ), but in general I skew way more towards older films while for her movies are a much more disposable commodity- something to be enjoyed in the moment, but not obsessed over or even really remembered after the fact. And I would think that outside of the (though not insubstantial) minority of female hipsters and Greta Gerwig-wannabes, this is not atypical.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Abe

    Depends on the age of the men. Supposedly young men enjoy the summer block buster type movies. And the explosion car chase fights on top of subway trains type movies attract a huge base of young men customers.

  12. There Will Be Blood is the most polarizing movie of any I’ve ever known of. People have visceral reactions, either adoring or loathing it. I personally love the movie and think it’s probably one of the top five of all time. But a lot of people whose opinion I respect have thought it’s trash.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hockamaw

    A friend of mine had a minor role in "There Will Be Blood" and got to ride around from the motel to the set with Daniel Day-Lewis in character, which was a memorable experience. Day-Lewis is both extremely demanding (e.g., when he played a paraplegic in My Left Foot he made the crew carry him around the set for two months) and extremely gracious at the same time.

    I said that "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men" were clearly the two dominant movies of 2007. He said, yeah, but when he was ten minutes into watching "No Country," he said to himself, oh, well, no Best Picture Oscar for the movie I was in.

    , @Alden
    @Hockamaw

    There Will Be Blood is the kind of movie I like. It’s long, great production values, interesting sub plots, hero triumphs at last. But I can see that some of the weirdness turns people off. One great touch, he kept the baby in a box instead of a cradle. Over all great movie.

    Had the movie been made long ago, Day Lewis would have been totally ethical and honest. The only struggle would have been a dishonest oil man. This movie was very realistic. No one was all good or all bad. It was good about all the problems of finding out, drilling refining etc.

  13. I would be really interested in seeing the differences between movies that seem similar, but are in fact vastly different. Do superficialities draw in similar crowds, but then underlying differences then push the movies to different audiences? I’ve also observed that movies that you would think have similar appeals often get very different reactions from the same people. For example, my family were always very big into the Coen brothers. They HATE Wes Anderson.

    I can’t really explain it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Nathan

    Coen brothers at their quirkiest are showing The Quirky World but from a very officially adult perspective, whereas Anderson is doing that as a perpetual Very Bright Twelve Year Old.

  14. Movies have gotten worse since women have been relieved of the burden of being villains. Or should I say, been denied the opportunities to play complex, interesting characters. I think woke Hollywood thinks it’s doing women big favors by portraying them as ass-kicking superheroes and plucky single moms but it’s actually harming them.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia, dfordoom, Travis
  15. I never had thought of movies in these kinds of categories, they seem sort of odd. ‘Agreeableness’? Well, I guess that’s The Sound of Music because it was the freak sales phenomenon. I watched it again a few years ago to see if I hated it less, and that it might be better than I had originally meanly judged. It wasn’t. Even the score is thoroughly inferior.

    Love both of The Godfather movies, which are, I think, usually now strung together. Godfather III was awful, and Pacino and others are in WaPo or NYT today talking about it, but I didn’t read it yet. They weren’t perfect, though, with Diane Keaton always going “MIIIIIII-chael”–or maybe she was properly drear. I love Pacino, though, throughout his career. Much less de Niro.

    I’m at the other end of the world with There Will Be Blood, which I despised, especially Day-Lewis, whom I find insufferable–he always publicizes his ‘research’ and in this case came up with John Huston, and everybody could hear it. So I won’t say much, except I guess, if I cared about the Oscars, I’d be glad No Country for Old Men won, because I thought it was very good, and I’ve liked a number of Cormac McCarthy’s novels a great deal. The trilogy is beautiful.

    Pulp Fiction, when it came out, was one of the trendiest moments in world history, and I found it sickening like all of Tarantino’s other work–including all the silly articles about it, making this little runt seem like he was Fellini or Orson Welles or something. There’s one for neuroticism, I guess. Someone said they thought Vertigo was Hitchcock’s worst, but I thought it was one of his best, but the Shower Scene in Psycho is peerless. Not generally ever a fan of horror, and agree it’s perfectly paired with neuroticism–but Hitchcock and Janet Leigh were a genius combination.

    Best films are, for me, Chinatown, Dressed to Kill, Les Enfants du Paradis, Last Year at Marienbad, Touch of Evil, La Dolce Vita, D. W. Griffith’s Intolerance, The Birth of a Nation, Romance of Happy Valley, others.

    I haven’t seen most of those giant things by Spielberg, nothing since Close Encounters.

    Interesting what you say about Oliver Stone. He’s definitely prime Disagreeable material, but I remember how brilliant that 1993 miniseries was he and Bruce Wagner did with Angie Dickinson and the others. It’s the only thing I ever saw that made me so paranoid I couldn’t watch most of it. Later got it on vhs and thought it was masterful.

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Left out name of the 1993 miniseries: It was called Wild Palms and set in 2007, which itself is long gone, as we all know.

  16. OT-Steve, I kind of infer you may have Netflix now, but do you have a 4K/UHD big screen TV (and if not can we fundraise you one)? Got one for “the family” (really myself :-/ last Christmas and then just recently discovered the old Xbox can play UHD discs and have been having a blast rewatching some classics in ultra-high def.

    The thing is, though, that perhaps man was not meant to watch movies at that resolution and screen-size, as the merits- or lack thereof- of the cinematography become unavoidable.

    For example, watched a bit of DAYS OF THUNDER, and though the video transfer is not that great to begin with, the switching between different cameras and lenses and rigs is a bit distracting. Here’s a medium frame shot of Cruise and Duvall standing around and talking in dreary amber lighting; here’s a shot of a car racing around the track from a camera rigged to a car in front of it. Here’s an extreme shot from almost half a mile away of the car on the track, looking like one of those pictures taken with a cellphone using software zoom. The point is, the stitching together of different camera sources which I did not notice while watching in the theater or at HD resolution are glaring at UHD.

    On the other hand, CASINO is drop dead gorgeous looking at 4K, revelatory even, but this is not without its drawbacks either. As soon as Di Nero is on screen I can’t stop staring at the disgusting, infected-looking tip of his cheek mole. And as soon as Sharon Stone smiles for the first time- well, if at the time of the making of BASIC INSTINCT she may as well have been dropped here from Venus encased in her own shimmering effervescence of estrogen, by the time of her serious actress turn in CASINO no amount of world-class makeup artistry can hide the fact she has definitely hit wall.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Abe

    I bought a 55" screen in 2015 with whatever was the standard resolution then: below UHD I thinkm(2700x1600? maybe). It seems extremely fine.

    , @Nathan
    @Abe

    In regard to Sharon Stone in Casino, she's playing a character that hits the wall (hard) during the time frame of the movie. I think she was robbed of the Academy award. She goes from radiant in the beginning, to being a hysterical abuse victim, to OD'ing. And it physically comes across on screen. She's much better than De Niro. In fact, De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.

    Replies: @Sean

    , @Alden
    @Abe

    I thought she looked a lot better better in Casino than Basic Instinct. Maybe it was the clothes. She is an absolute beauty

    , @Stan Adams
    @Abe

    Stone was already in her mid-30s when she made Basic Instinct.

    Her follow-up to Instinct was Sliver, yet another turgid "erotic thriller" that played to empty theaters.

    http://www.scoopy.com/sliver.htm


    Basic Instinct is filled with really hot sex scenes and plenty of clear nudity. The sex in Sliver is not as hot, not as prolific, and is either very dark or seen on a black and white TV screen within the film. The oblique, dark approach was taken out of necessity because Sharon Stone had gotten out of shape. Producer Robert Evans noted, after viewing the dailies, "You can't even shoot her ass anymore. It's too spongy. She's over already. Who'd want to fuck her anymore? Who's gonna buy their popcorn and come watching her?" He wasn't the only one aware of Sharon's flabby bum. Stone herself told Joe Eszterhas, "My ass hangs halfway to my knees. I'm pushing forty. Why didn't you write this script twenty years ago?" These two collages from Silver (1, 2) illustrate the problems Sharon was then having with her behind. (The quotes come from Eszterhaz's tell-all, Hollywood Animal, pages 338-341 in the hardcover edition, which is linked above.)
     
    We see more of Billy Baldwin's rump in Sliver than we do of Sharon Stone's.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Alden

  17. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    I never had thought of movies in these kinds of categories, they seem sort of odd. 'Agreeableness'? Well, I guess that's The Sound of Music because it was the freak sales phenomenon. I watched it again a few years ago to see if I hated it less, and that it might be better than I had originally meanly judged. It wasn't. Even the score is thoroughly inferior.

    Love both of The Godfather movies, which are, I think, usually now strung together. Godfather III was awful, and Pacino and others are in WaPo or NYT today talking about it, but I didn't read it yet. They weren't perfect, though, with Diane Keaton always going "MIIIIIII-chael"--or maybe she was properly drear. I love Pacino, though, throughout his career. Much less de Niro.

    I'm at the other end of the world with There Will Be Blood, which I despised, especially Day-Lewis, whom I find insufferable--he always publicizes his 'research' and in this case came up with John Huston, and everybody could hear it. So I won't say much, except I guess, if I cared about the Oscars, I'd be glad No Country for Old Men won, because I thought it was very good, and I've liked a number of Cormac McCarthy's novels a great deal. The trilogy is beautiful.

    Pulp Fiction, when it came out, was one of the trendiest moments in world history, and I found it sickening like all of Tarantino's other work--including all the silly articles about it, making this little runt seem like he was Fellini or Orson Welles or something. There's one for neuroticism, I guess. Someone said they thought Vertigo was Hitchcock's worst, but I thought it was one of his best, but the Shower Scene in Psycho is peerless. Not generally ever a fan of horror, and agree it's perfectly paired with neuroticism--but Hitchcock and Janet Leigh were a genius combination.

    Best films are, for me, Chinatown, Dressed to Kill, Les Enfants du Paradis, Last Year at Marienbad, Touch of Evil, La Dolce Vita, D. W. Griffith's Intolerance, The Birth of a Nation, Romance of Happy Valley, others.

    I haven't seen most of those giant things by Spielberg, nothing since Close Encounters.

    Interesting what you say about Oliver Stone. He's definitely prime Disagreeable material, but I remember how brilliant that 1993 miniseries was he and Bruce Wagner did with Angie Dickinson and the others. It's the only thing I ever saw that made me so paranoid I couldn't watch most of it. Later got it on vhs and thought it was masterful.

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Left out name of the 1993 miniseries: It was called Wild Palms and set in 2007, which itself is long gone, as we all know.

  18. Forrest Gump and Pulp Fiction both suck so the people who watch them suck.

  19. Anonymous[211] • Disclaimer says:

    How about the movie preferences of cynics and “rivet counters,” as my dad calls them — those of us who can’t help noticing all the details. So the recent “Midway” was ruined for me because the insignia on the American dive bombers during the Makin Island raid was not what it was in February, 1942, but as it was after May of that year. Most viewers wouldn’t notice and those I pointed it out to didn’t care. But it really bugged me. I spent most of the rest of the movie muttering to myself things like, “Yeah, right, like that would happen,” and “How come there aren’t any American fighter planes in this stupid movie?” while my seat mates kept loudly whispering back at me “Will you just shut up!”
    I didn’t like “Saving Private Sad Sack” (as my brothers called it) because the premise of the movie was stupid. Command could have just sent out a radio message ordering him out of the line. If for some reason there was no radio contact, they could have sent an L-5 over and dropped a message, a pretty common thing, or even had one land and pick the guy up. One of the most famous men (in later life) to be plucked out of a perilous situation by an L-5 was Dan Rowen of Rowen and Martin’s “Laugh-In,” a c.1970 TV show. He was rescued from a sandbar in the Markham River, New Guinea, next to a Japanese outpost, after he force-landed his P-40. No need to send out an infantry patrol.
    I can ignore incongruities to enjoy a film if I decide it’s pure fantasy, like “Forest Gump,” even though I know he would have gotten people killed in Viet Nam and himself killed as well. Ditto for “Being There”: I liked it even though I know that when he stepped out of his house into a black ghetto he would have been beaten, robbed and probably murdered.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    How about the movie preferences of cynics and “rivet counters,” as my dad calls them

    Count the rivets on the PBY's and the Fletcher-class destroyer. From a book by C.S. Forester. A sleeper of the SARS-2 year.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyzxu26-Wqk

    , @flyingtiger
    @Anonymous

    It real life it only took Father Samson 4 hours to find the guy and bring him back.

  20. Forrest Gump blows dead dogs.

    I like going to the movies (which may now be a thing of the past), but it is one of only two movies I have ever considered walking out on. The other is Becoming Jane.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    Forrest Gump 🎷 dead dogs.
     
    For the yellow matter custard?

    OT, but Walter Williams has passed on:


    https://www.ocregister.com/2020/12/02/never-forget-the-great-walter-e-williams/

    I'll never forget his golden marital advice, offered while sitting in for Rush. The secret to staying together is laziness. He could find someone better, as could his wife. But they were both too lazy to try.

    There is probably some economic theory with a highfalutin name involving sunk funds of which this is an example. Or maybe physics-- inertia.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    , @Lurker
    @Jim Don Bob

    Look Who's Talking Too is the only one I've walked out of. Gf and I marched out after about five minutes. We hadn't really wanted to see it, just everything else was sold out that night and we thought we'd risk it.

    Replies: @theMann

    , @Marty
    @Jim Don Bob

    Amos & Andrew.

  21. @Abe
    OT-Steve, I kind of infer you may have Netflix now, but do you have a 4K/UHD big screen TV (and if not can we fundraise you one)? Got one for “the family” (really myself :-/ last Christmas and then just recently discovered the old Xbox can play UHD discs and have been having a blast rewatching some classics in ultra-high def.

    The thing is, though, that perhaps man was not meant to watch movies at that resolution and screen-size, as the merits- or lack thereof- of the cinematography become unavoidable.

    For example, watched a bit of DAYS OF THUNDER, and though the video transfer is not that great to begin with, the switching between different cameras and lenses and rigs is a bit distracting. Here’s a medium frame shot of Cruise and Duvall standing around and talking in dreary amber lighting; here’s a shot of a car racing around the track from a camera rigged to a car in front of it. Here’s an extreme shot from almost half a mile away of the car on the track, looking like one of those pictures taken with a cellphone using software zoom. The point is, the stitching together of different camera sources which I did not notice while watching in the theater or at HD resolution are glaring at UHD.

    On the other hand, CASINO is drop dead gorgeous looking at 4K, revelatory even, but this is not without its drawbacks either. As soon as Di Nero is on screen I can’t stop staring at the disgusting, infected-looking tip of his cheek mole. And as soon as Sharon Stone smiles for the first time- well, if at the time of the making of BASIC INSTINCT she may as well have been dropped here from Venus encased in her own shimmering effervescence of estrogen, by the time of her serious actress turn in CASINO no amount of world-class makeup artistry can hide the fact she has definitely hit wall.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nathan, @Alden, @Stan Adams

    I bought a 55″ screen in 2015 with whatever was the standard resolution then: below UHD I thinkm(2700×1600? maybe). It seems extremely fine.

  22. @Abe
    OT-Steve, I kind of infer you may have Netflix now, but do you have a 4K/UHD big screen TV (and if not can we fundraise you one)? Got one for “the family” (really myself :-/ last Christmas and then just recently discovered the old Xbox can play UHD discs and have been having a blast rewatching some classics in ultra-high def.

    The thing is, though, that perhaps man was not meant to watch movies at that resolution and screen-size, as the merits- or lack thereof- of the cinematography become unavoidable.

    For example, watched a bit of DAYS OF THUNDER, and though the video transfer is not that great to begin with, the switching between different cameras and lenses and rigs is a bit distracting. Here’s a medium frame shot of Cruise and Duvall standing around and talking in dreary amber lighting; here’s a shot of a car racing around the track from a camera rigged to a car in front of it. Here’s an extreme shot from almost half a mile away of the car on the track, looking like one of those pictures taken with a cellphone using software zoom. The point is, the stitching together of different camera sources which I did not notice while watching in the theater or at HD resolution are glaring at UHD.

    On the other hand, CASINO is drop dead gorgeous looking at 4K, revelatory even, but this is not without its drawbacks either. As soon as Di Nero is on screen I can’t stop staring at the disgusting, infected-looking tip of his cheek mole. And as soon as Sharon Stone smiles for the first time- well, if at the time of the making of BASIC INSTINCT she may as well have been dropped here from Venus encased in her own shimmering effervescence of estrogen, by the time of her serious actress turn in CASINO no amount of world-class makeup artistry can hide the fact she has definitely hit wall.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nathan, @Alden, @Stan Adams

    In regard to Sharon Stone in Casino, she’s playing a character that hits the wall (hard) during the time frame of the movie. I think she was robbed of the Academy award. She goes from radiant in the beginning, to being a hysterical abuse victim, to OD’ing. And it physically comes across on screen. She’s much better than De Niro. In fact, De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Nathan

    As I recall they gave her a hot shot, she didn't OD. To me Stone's breakthrough role in Basic Instinct was perfect for her, because she completely lacked a vulnerable quality. DeNiro wanted Traci Lords for Stone's part. Lords's sometime porno co star Helga Sven had in her younger days been the original owner/ licensee of Circus Circus Casino in Vegas and appeared in the floor show that involved an elephant(!) she was married to the real proprietor, an organised crime figure.


    De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.
     
    Is Joe Pesci in Casino good at playing a character based on Tony Spilotro because he was uglier than Spilotro? Sammy Gravano sort of looked like an actor playing a gangster.

    Replies: @Nathan

  23. I have never “identified” with a fictional character in my entire life. I find the entire concept absurd. I think the colossal failure of high school attempts to teach literature stems from a desperate attempt by teachers to find characters the students can “identify” with.

    It’s a gigantic failure of imagination for all concerned.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Peterike

    I’ve probably identified with historical figures more often than literary characters.

    Literary characters are extremely dull, with a new notable exceptions. Usually the higher prestige the book, the duller the character.

    , @J.Ross
    @Peterike

    This plus (following Sartre? Following the Surrealists' obsession with Malodoror?) there is a big thing in the twentieth century to make the protagonist as freakishly criminal and inhuman as possible.

  24. @Jim Don Bob
    Forrest Gump blows dead dogs.

    I like going to the movies (which may now be a thing of the past), but it is one of only two movies I have ever considered walking out on. The other is Becoming Jane.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lurker, @Marty

    Forrest Gump 🎷 dead dogs.

    For the yellow matter custard?

    OT, but Walter Williams has passed on:

    https://www.ocregister.com/2020/12/02/never-forget-the-great-walter-e-williams/

    I’ll never forget his golden marital advice, offered while sitting in for Rush. The secret to staying together is laziness. He could find someone better, as could his wife. But they were both too lazy to try.

    There is probably some economic theory with a highfalutin name involving sunk funds of which this is an example. Or maybe physics– inertia.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Reg Cæsar

    I heard a WW interviewer ask “What would you say to Obama?”

    “Goodbye”

    He then explained that Barak, being a lot richer and more successful, neither needed his advice nor would consider it if offered. Typically incisive and honest and self aware Walter Williams comment.

  25. @Anonymous
    How about the movie preferences of cynics and "rivet counters," as my dad calls them -- those of us who can't help noticing all the details. So the recent "Midway" was ruined for me because the insignia on the American dive bombers during the Makin Island raid was not what it was in February, 1942, but as it was after May of that year. Most viewers wouldn't notice and those I pointed it out to didn't care. But it really bugged me. I spent most of the rest of the movie muttering to myself things like, "Yeah, right, like that would happen," and "How come there aren't any American fighter planes in this stupid movie?" while my seat mates kept loudly whispering back at me "Will you just shut up!"
    I didn't like "Saving Private Sad Sack" (as my brothers called it) because the premise of the movie was stupid. Command could have just sent out a radio message ordering him out of the line. If for some reason there was no radio contact, they could have sent an L-5 over and dropped a message, a pretty common thing, or even had one land and pick the guy up. One of the most famous men (in later life) to be plucked out of a perilous situation by an L-5 was Dan Rowen of Rowen and Martin's "Laugh-In," a c.1970 TV show. He was rescued from a sandbar in the Markham River, New Guinea, next to a Japanese outpost, after he force-landed his P-40. No need to send out an infantry patrol.
    I can ignore incongruities to enjoy a film if I decide it's pure fantasy, like "Forest Gump," even though I know he would have gotten people killed in Viet Nam and himself killed as well. Ditto for "Being There": I liked it even though I know that when he stepped out of his house into a black ghetto he would have been beaten, robbed and probably murdered.

    Replies: @anon, @flyingtiger

    How about the movie preferences of cynics and “rivet counters,” as my dad calls them

    Count the rivets on the PBY’s and the Fletcher-class destroyer. From a book by C.S. Forester. A sleeper of the SARS-2 year.

  26. @Peterike
    I have never “identified” with a fictional character in my entire life. I find the entire concept absurd. I think the colossal failure of high school attempts to teach literature stems from a desperate attempt by teachers to find characters the students can “identify” with.

    It’s a gigantic failure of imagination for all concerned.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @J.Ross

    I’ve probably identified with historical figures more often than literary characters.

    Literary characters are extremely dull, with a new notable exceptions. Usually the higher prestige the book, the duller the character.

  27. @prosa123
    OT but amusing: there was a major bust of a birth tourism racket yesterday in Suffolk County NY, where I live. Six people were charged in a scheme that brought more than 100 preggo women from Turkey to the US on tourist or business visas to give birth, with the children getting US citizenship and Medicaid benefits. In the three years the scheme was running it resulted $2.1 million in Medicaid benefits and netted $750,000 in fees from the women.
    Where it gets amusing is in the five names released (one defendant hasn't been named): Ibrahim Aksakal, Enes Burak Cakiroglu, Sarah Kaplan, Fiordalisa Marte and Edgar Rodriguez. Only two Turks in this scheme involving Turkish woman, plus a Jewish woman and two Hispanics.

    https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/six-indicted-in-long-island-birth-tourism-money-laundering-scheme-feds/2757394/

    Replies: @AndrewR, @TelfoedJohn, @njguy73

    They should all be [redacted] along with anyone who even supports the idea of birthright citizenship

  28. What about the greatest film of the 1990s?

    Gump Fiction: here

    “I’m going to have to get medieval on your buttocks.”

    Come on. In some alternate universe this movie was made. And was outstanding.

    • LOL: Trinity
    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Whiskey

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-9012987/Chrishell-Stause-goes-glam-cozies-DWTS-costar-Keo-Motsepe-breaking-sweat-gym.html

    Whiskey....the Kardashian virus is accelerating.....

  29. Did Steve intentionally call him *Top* Stoppard?

  30. I’ll never forget his golden marital advice, offered while sitting in for Rush. The secret to staying together is laziness. He could find someone better, as could his wife. But they were both too lazy to try.

    There is probably some economic theory with a highfalutin name involving sunk funds of which this is an example. Or maybe physics– inertia.

    Double Coincidence of Wants

  31. Steve Sailer:

    I presume there are romance novel brands for black women that feature handsome black wealthy record producers or star athletes as the Mr. Darcy. In general, most black women really like black men for romance.

    Interestingly enough, White man-Black woman (WMBW/BWWM) is pretty popular. Russian mobsters seem to have a certain appeal for Black gals:

    SERGEI: BWWM Russian Mafia Romance (Red Bratva Billionaires)

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas Remote
    @syonredux

    Didn't Stacy Abrams write a series of Romance novels, the themes of which are rich, hardbodied black ex-NFL superstar turned international businessman headquartered in Atlanta courts slightly older black woman, falling in love with her generous proportions and independent spirit?

    , @MEH 0910
    @syonredux

    https://twitter.com/ELLEmagazine/status/1324832755734188039

    https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/authors/selena-montgomery

    https://selenamontgomery.com/

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  32. • Replies: @anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    The original Mad Max was terrifying but I'm pretty sure it was inspired by aggressive ,need for speed, young men living in a mid-70's gasoline/petrol shortage and was not an actual reflection of a violent crime-wave in Australia.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Steve Sailer

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @MEH 0910

    If you wore the thing on the right with tubes coming out beneath a nasal mask, nobody at Costco would harass you about facediapers. Because it's all about dehumanizing and humiliating you.

  33. Well there has to be something to this personality profile thingie, in view if the unsolicited hatred of Forrest Gump alone. It is fine not to like F G., to consider it amiable garbage, or dislike its sly commentaries on American Culture, such as it is. But it does have a point of view, great cinematography and acting, so it is not exactly garbage. Pulp Fiction, for all of its oh so clever cleverness, is just as saturated with a truly evil world view as any other Tarantino POS. But my, oh my, it does have its defenders, doesn’t it?

    So…..
    “Up” is the best film since Seven Samurai, and it hadn’t even been mentioned. If I remember, Hurt Locker and District 9 were the same year, also not mentioned. OTOH, the gigantic borefest Shakespeare in Love, which bought it’s best picture award, is pretty popular. It should be packaged with The English Patient and Titanic as the euthanasia trilogy.

    Also not mentioned, any films by Zhang Yimou. Maybe start with House of Flying Daggers as an antidote to Hollywood’s garbage.

    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @theMann

    I remember being stunned at how bad The English Patient was. It was as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy, but in a different way altogether.

    Replies: @syonredux, @jamie b.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @theMann


    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.
     
    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Romance novels are trash; most- not all comics- are trash; most popular music, for instance, rockabilly is trash; rap is trash; commercials are trash; pulp novels are trash; pole dancers are trash; US Congress is trash; most bestsellers are trash; soaps are trash; manosphere is trash; NBA is trash; everything about vampires is trash; fast food is trash; drug culture is trash; stand up comedy is trash; quiz shows are trash; Las Vegas is trash; foodies are trash; self-help books are trash; Hamburger Christianity is trash; current Western ethics is trash; Oscars are trash; Japanese popular music is.... not trash, just weird.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @jamie b., @Ray P

  34. @prosa123
    OT but amusing: there was a major bust of a birth tourism racket yesterday in Suffolk County NY, where I live. Six people were charged in a scheme that brought more than 100 preggo women from Turkey to the US on tourist or business visas to give birth, with the children getting US citizenship and Medicaid benefits. In the three years the scheme was running it resulted $2.1 million in Medicaid benefits and netted $750,000 in fees from the women.
    Where it gets amusing is in the five names released (one defendant hasn't been named): Ibrahim Aksakal, Enes Burak Cakiroglu, Sarah Kaplan, Fiordalisa Marte and Edgar Rodriguez. Only two Turks in this scheme involving Turkish woman, plus a Jewish woman and two Hispanics.

    https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/six-indicted-in-long-island-birth-tourism-money-laundering-scheme-feds/2757394/

    Replies: @AndrewR, @TelfoedJohn, @njguy73

    Kaplan is a common Turkish name:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaplan_(surname)

  35. anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    I must be shamefully confused. How could women prefer Alien to Aliens ? I love both movies equally but the characters in Aliens are much more likeable .

    Maybe the women who are/were even aware of these movies in the age of FaceBook could/can identify more with a woman risking her life to save a cat as opposed to a nine year old girl ?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @anonymous

    "How could women prefer Alien to Aliens?"

    Alien is a gothic horror monster movie. Aliens is a guns a blazin' action monster movie. Women like horror movies because they are always looking for opportunities to cuddle.

  36. @Trinity
    No Country For Old Men was a very good movie IMO. And I don't say that about many movies post 1970s. "Call it."

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    No Country For Old Men was a very good movie IMO. And I don’t say that about many movies post 1970s. “Call it.”

    Agree. It had me from the first minute of the pronghorn hunt – the first really convincing hunting scene I’ve ever seen in a movie.

    (don’t get me started on Robert De Niro sprinting around some Appalachian mountain chasing elk)

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Mr Mox

    The Deer Hunter was set in western PA, but I believe the hunting scene was filmed in the Cascade mountains. Pennsylvania has a sizeable elk herd, but they weren’t legal to hunt during the war in Vietnam. They are now, to a very limited extent. Tags are distributed by lottery.

  37. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/edgarwright/status/1334200226236788740

    Replies: @anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    The original Mad Max was terrifying but I’m pretty sure it was inspired by aggressive ,need for speed, young men living in a mid-70’s gasoline/petrol shortage and was not an actual reflection of a violent crime-wave in Australia.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @anonymous

    Toecutter just died. I never realized he was the bad guy in the Fury Road sequel. Didn’t see it, actually.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    Mad Max director George Miller was an emergency room doctor who always wanted to direct. So he got to meet the kind of Australians who drive like it's the end of the world.

  38. Anonymous[417] • Disclaimer says:

    I am not sure how many others know where they stand on the five factor model, but this is pretty interesting. It seems like my strong personality traits are good predictors of which movies I will like more based on the above.

    Godfather 2, Platoon, both make sense as they fall closer to my personality. And with the popular movies I don’t like, it has explanatory value. There Will Be Blood for example, I am conscientious and not neurotic, and that movie strikes me as quite pointless. Yes, I can see it is artistic. But the fact it is so polar opposite to me is probably why it appeals to some a lot, but not me.

    Same with Forrest Gump. It is something that Agreeable, non-Conscientious, not particularly Open people like. And I’m also mildly Introvert.

    I would like to see the FFM averages for ethnicity. I don’t have the evidence other than Woody Allen, but I basically work on Neurotic = Jews OR mentally ill. So no surprise that Schindler’s List is high on Neuroticism.

    One thing I didn’t note about your other thread is the word list for non-neurotics. It is basically almost all related to uses of firearms, violent conflict, war etc. I wasn’t expecting that. However, knowing that, it makes sense that the war movies you’ve listed are all low to very low on N. Lowest N movies included movies like We Were Soldiers and Mission Impossible. Maybe violent armed conflict is the essence of the Goy, while the Jewish approach is to use deception to wage war (i.e. get others to do the heavy lifting).

    I would like to see where the Big Lebowski fits into this. My guess is that the reason I dislike it is that my personality doesn’t fit. I bet it’s low Conscientious, and that’s why it irritates me. Maybe also more Neurotic.

  39. YT channel Blackpilled sums up the nihilistic anti-white cess pool that is the movie Forest Gump:

  40. I really enjoyed Shakespeare in Love and detested Ryan so much I walked out.

  41. The film that I was most surprised that I liked: Moulin Rouge. It seemed like it would be an over the top, camp melodrama, and the fact that it is set in the early 1900’s yet has a modern pop soundtrack seemed like it would be horribly anachronistic–and all of these things are true. Yet when I watched it, I was completely won over by the style, humour, ingenious plot, and frantic ending. It just works.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @al gore rhythms

    Baz Luhrmann's "Moulin Rouge" is a pretty original movie. Luhrmann's idea was to take a sophisticated sounding idea and make it unsophisticated, as obvious as a Bollywood movie for the masses of Uttar Pradesh. The plot is lifted from La Boheme and Camille, not because those are high culture but because you already know what's going to happen, even if you've never seen them.

    I've never seen John Huston's "Moulin Rouge."

  42. @syonredux
    Steve Sailer:

    I presume there are romance novel brands for black women that feature handsome black wealthy record producers or star athletes as the Mr. Darcy. In general, most black women really like black men for romance.
     
    Interestingly enough, White man-Black woman (WMBW/BWWM) is pretty popular. Russian mobsters seem to have a certain appeal for Black gals:


    SERGEI: BWWM Russian Mafia Romance (Red Bratva Billionaires)

    https://www.amazon.com/SERGEI-Russian-Romance-Bratva-Billionaires/dp/1072968339


    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1334237406434717697

    Replies: @Alec Leamas Remote, @MEH 0910

    Didn’t Stacy Abrams write a series of Romance novels, the themes of which are rich, hardbodied black ex-NFL superstar turned international businessman headquartered in Atlanta courts slightly older black woman, falling in love with her generous proportions and independent spirit?

  43. Some notable actors and their best work IMO.

    Marlon Brando : “One-Eyed Jacks” for me, even though it didn’t score high with the (((critics.)))

    Paul Newman: Close one between, “Cool Hand Luke” and “The Hustler.”

    Clint Eastwood: With all due respect to the Man With No Name character and Dirty Harry, I choose, “The Outlaw Josey Wales.”

    Al Pacino: The guy made a lot of great films but “And Justice For All ” take this one.

    Robert DeNiro: Taxi Driver

    Jack Nicholson: I am probably the only one that would chose “Five Easy Pieces” over “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest but it is just my preference. Both great movies.

    Steve McQueen: Papillon for me.

    Charles Bronson: My favorite Charlie movie isn’t the original “Death Wish” but “Hard Times” were Charlie is a street fighter in New Orleans.

    They don’t make films like this anymore. All they make is total crap, comic book movies, remakes of remakes, and sequels to movies that were not good enough to have a sequel in the first place.

  44. @syonredux
    Steve Sailer:

    I presume there are romance novel brands for black women that feature handsome black wealthy record producers or star athletes as the Mr. Darcy. In general, most black women really like black men for romance.
     
    Interestingly enough, White man-Black woman (WMBW/BWWM) is pretty popular. Russian mobsters seem to have a certain appeal for Black gals:


    SERGEI: BWWM Russian Mafia Romance (Red Bratva Billionaires)

    https://www.amazon.com/SERGEI-Russian-Romance-Bratva-Billionaires/dp/1072968339


    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1334237406434717697

    Replies: @Alec Leamas Remote, @MEH 0910

    https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/authors/selena-montgomery

    https://selenamontgomery.com/

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1334228364891189256

  45. @MEH 0910
    @syonredux

    https://twitter.com/ELLEmagazine/status/1324832755734188039

    https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/authors/selena-montgomery

    https://selenamontgomery.com/

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  46. I can understand the diagreement over Vertigo. I thought the firat half was gripping, then there was some break in the story and the second half never regained the momentum. Much like Gone With the Wind. For a pretty much forgotten late-Hitchcock movie I enjoyed Frenzy.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Known Fact

    3 problems with Vertigo. First no reason for husband to kill wife. Second nothing about how Judy and husband planned the split second coordination needed for husband to throw wife out the window as Judy slipped into hiding. Third why did Judy go back to work in the store instead of husband sending her out of town for good?

    Plus Vertigo isn’t some emotional PTSD. It’s a physical disorder of the bones in the inner ear that control balance.

    Hitchcock made similar movie about the same time. Husband had a good reason to kill wife. She planned to leave him along with her Money. Husband had an old college friend who became a criminal. Husband blackmailed and paid friend turned criminal to kill wife.

    Spousal murder for money lust for another anger violence is a common real life murder. Thousands of books stories movies and TV shows are about spousal murder.

    Fargo was good. Husband ran a big car dealership. One employee had a criminal record. Husband asked employee if he might know someone who knew someone. That’s realistic. Poisoning, contrived car accidents robberies & burglaries deaths in a fire are all realistic means of murder.

    But Vertigo, no reason to kill wife and the impossible way it was done.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Seth Largo

  47. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/edgarwright/status/1334200226236788740

    Replies: @anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    If you wore the thing on the right with tubes coming out beneath a nasal mask, nobody at Costco would harass you about facediapers. Because it’s all about dehumanizing and humiliating you.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  48. @Peterike
    I have never “identified” with a fictional character in my entire life. I find the entire concept absurd. I think the colossal failure of high school attempts to teach literature stems from a desperate attempt by teachers to find characters the students can “identify” with.

    It’s a gigantic failure of imagination for all concerned.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @J.Ross

    This plus (following Sartre? Following the Surrealists’ obsession with Malodoror?) there is a big thing in the twentieth century to make the protagonist as freakishly criminal and inhuman as possible.

  49. @Nathan
    I would be really interested in seeing the differences between movies that seem similar, but are in fact vastly different. Do superficialities draw in similar crowds, but then underlying differences then push the movies to different audiences? I've also observed that movies that you would think have similar appeals often get very different reactions from the same people. For example, my family were always very big into the Coen brothers. They HATE Wes Anderson.

    I can't really explain it.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Coen brothers at their quirkiest are showing The Quirky World but from a very officially adult perspective, whereas Anderson is doing that as a perpetual Very Bright Twelve Year Old.

  50. @prosa123
    OT but amusing: there was a major bust of a birth tourism racket yesterday in Suffolk County NY, where I live. Six people were charged in a scheme that brought more than 100 preggo women from Turkey to the US on tourist or business visas to give birth, with the children getting US citizenship and Medicaid benefits. In the three years the scheme was running it resulted $2.1 million in Medicaid benefits and netted $750,000 in fees from the women.
    Where it gets amusing is in the five names released (one defendant hasn't been named): Ibrahim Aksakal, Enes Burak Cakiroglu, Sarah Kaplan, Fiordalisa Marte and Edgar Rodriguez. Only two Turks in this scheme involving Turkish woman, plus a Jewish woman and two Hispanics.

    https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/six-indicted-in-long-island-birth-tourism-money-laundering-scheme-feds/2757394/

    Replies: @AndrewR, @TelfoedJohn, @njguy73

    Yes, and I’m positive that the writers of the Fourteenth Amendment wrote it so anyone could give birth here and have their kid be a citizen.

  51. My number one favorite movie of all time is, Little Big Man.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    @Michelle

    So...

    You are above average on Openness, fairly Conscientious, not at all Extraverted, highly Agreeable, and about as un-Neurotic as it gets?

    Am I close?

    Replies: @Michelle

  52. I liked Gump only because I like comedy action with story-telling better than just insanity. But I did like Kill Bill both of them, better than Gump. I liked Travolta in From Paris with Love.

  53. @Alden
    There Will be Blood is my favorite kind of movie. But there were some very unpleasant weird things in it. It’s the story of the California oil man Dougherty.

    Pulp Fiction I liked. Forrest Gump was a horrible mawkish soap opera Life Time Hallmark channel type movie. Shakespeare in Love was great. Best part was the girl married the man her parents arranged unsteady of running off with young Shakespeare to live happily ever after.

    Worst movie Hitchcock ever made Vertigo. Best movie he made was Shadow of a Doubt.

    I really like gangster and caper movies. Obviously I long to escape my humdrum life, steal gazillions and live happily ever after. Bank Job, in which a secret government agency hires Jason Stratham to rob a safe deposit box with pictures of Princess Margaret with a black revolutionary is one of the best.

    Most disliked movies; anything with Sydney Poiter, Morgan Freeman Denzel Washington Will Smith or any other saintly heroic black characters. Any movie that has a black woman in it. That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Catdog

    Say what you will about Hallmark movies, but they’re wholesome and relatively light on diversity. I know people who watch them mainly for that reason.

    One of the Hallmark channels (there are several) plays nothing but Christmas movies this time of year. The typical protagonist is a pretty white girl who meets a handsome white guy, flirts around with him for a while, goes through the usual romantic-comedy contortions, realizes that he is The One(TM), and ends up marrying him and living happily ever after. The same actors, including many veterans of daytime soap operas, keep popping up again and again.

    As cinema, these flicks are pretty thin gruel, but as background noise, they’re not too bad. Only a couple of the movies in the regular rotation feature interracial romance, and only one of them (AFAIK) features a gay couple.

  54. @Jim Don Bob
    Forrest Gump blows dead dogs.

    I like going to the movies (which may now be a thing of the past), but it is one of only two movies I have ever considered walking out on. The other is Becoming Jane.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lurker, @Marty

    Look Who’s Talking Too is the only one I’ve walked out of. Gf and I marched out after about five minutes. We hadn’t really wanted to see it, just everything else was sold out that night and we thought we’d risk it.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @Lurker

    First film I ever walked out of was Pink Flamingos, which is an excellent film to walk out of. Vacated on many films since, language and insulting Catholics being the biggest reasons. One reason I like the 14 screen cinemas is that if you somehow get sucked in to see a dog you can shop the other screens for something better. Doesn’t bother me in the least - it is not the theaters fault if a film is garbage, but if I paid a ticket, I will “shop” if necessary.

    I can’t remember the last film I walked out of, but the film I walked into was Premium Rush, which was a perfectly good two hours of silly fun to watch. And btw, I will let theater owners know if a film is anti: white \ Catholic\ American\male, since they should know about the “objectionable content “ of a film NOT covered by the MPAA.

  55. @Lurker
    @Jim Don Bob

    Look Who's Talking Too is the only one I've walked out of. Gf and I marched out after about five minutes. We hadn't really wanted to see it, just everything else was sold out that night and we thought we'd risk it.

    Replies: @theMann

    First film I ever walked out of was Pink Flamingos, which is an excellent film to walk out of. Vacated on many films since, language and insulting Catholics being the biggest reasons. One reason I like the 14 screen cinemas is that if you somehow get sucked in to see a dog you can shop the other screens for something better. Doesn’t bother me in the least – it is not the theaters fault if a film is garbage, but if I paid a ticket, I will “shop” if necessary.

    I can’t remember the last film I walked out of, but the film I walked into was Premium Rush, which was a perfectly good two hours of silly fun to watch. And btw, I will let theater owners know if a film is anti: white \ Catholic\ American\male, since they should know about the “objectionable content “ of a film NOT covered by the MPAA.

  56. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    Forrest Gump 🎷 dead dogs.
     
    For the yellow matter custard?

    OT, but Walter Williams has passed on:


    https://www.ocregister.com/2020/12/02/never-forget-the-great-walter-e-williams/

    I'll never forget his golden marital advice, offered while sitting in for Rush. The secret to staying together is laziness. He could find someone better, as could his wife. But they were both too lazy to try.

    There is probably some economic theory with a highfalutin name involving sunk funds of which this is an example. Or maybe physics-- inertia.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    I heard a WW interviewer ask “What would you say to Obama?”

    “Goodbye”

    He then explained that Barak, being a lot richer and more successful, neither needed his advice nor would consider it if offered. Typically incisive and honest and self aware Walter Williams comment.

  57. @Alden
    There Will be Blood is my favorite kind of movie. But there were some very unpleasant weird things in it. It’s the story of the California oil man Dougherty.

    Pulp Fiction I liked. Forrest Gump was a horrible mawkish soap opera Life Time Hallmark channel type movie. Shakespeare in Love was great. Best part was the girl married the man her parents arranged unsteady of running off with young Shakespeare to live happily ever after.

    Worst movie Hitchcock ever made Vertigo. Best movie he made was Shadow of a Doubt.

    I really like gangster and caper movies. Obviously I long to escape my humdrum life, steal gazillions and live happily ever after. Bank Job, in which a secret government agency hires Jason Stratham to rob a safe deposit box with pictures of Princess Margaret with a black revolutionary is one of the best.

    Most disliked movies; anything with Sydney Poiter, Morgan Freeman Denzel Washington Will Smith or any other saintly heroic black characters. Any movie that has a black woman in it. That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Catdog

    “That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off.”
    The streaming services push globohomo hard. They KNOW my preferences, yet choose to prominently feature “black voices” and Amazon Prime video has started autoplaying a trailer at the top of each page and before each episode that begins with two men kissing. I looked but couldn’t find a way to disable it.

    I sent a message to Amazon asking them not to push gays on me anymore, and I expect that they will fix the problem immediately.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Catdog

    They do push black gay, not feminazi much any more. I just ignore them and watch what I want.

    When you find a movie you prefer, under neath the begin movie bar is a list of similar movies. Since I avoid gay black liberal movies I stay on that list.

  58. @Jim Don Bob
    Forrest Gump blows dead dogs.

    I like going to the movies (which may now be a thing of the past), but it is one of only two movies I have ever considered walking out on. The other is Becoming Jane.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lurker, @Marty

    Amos & Andrew.

  59. There Will Be Blood sucked. A bunch of pretentious nonsense, it was a pain to get through. And this is coming from a hyper neurotic British cigarette. PT Anderson is overrated as hell, if you want a sensitive white guy auteur Spike Jonze is a much better choice. If you want stylish white guy auteur then David Fincher is superior. If you want brainy and ambitious white guy auteur then Darren Aronofsky can actually tell a story without getting bogged down with showing how much of an obsessive nerd he is.

  60. @BostonJoe
    I’ve always thought that “The Hunt for Red October” was a really great movie. I watch it all the time.

    Likewise, “Master and Commander”.

    My wife and I definitely love to watch movies like “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”.

    I also love “The Verdict” with Paul Newman. Good one from the early 80s.

    I’ll have to say: “Heathers” is one of the most loathesome movies I have ever watched.

    I hate everyone involved. What a horrible, detestable movie. I hope every last person involved burns in hell.

    Replies: @jamie b.

    Master and Commander is one of my top ten favorites.

  61. Any data on Ghost Ship?

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Stick

    The 1 that came out in 2002 is horrible....but it did have a good topless scene of some Italian chick.

  62. @Whiskey
    What about the greatest film of the 1990s?

    Gump Fiction: here

    "I'm going to have to get medieval on your buttocks."

    Come on. In some alternate universe this movie was made. And was outstanding.

    Replies: @Neoconned

  63. @Stick
    Any data on Ghost Ship?

    Replies: @Neoconned

    The 1 that came out in 2002 is horrible….but it did have a good topless scene of some Italian chick.

  64. @Catdog
    @Alden

    "That’s why I like the streaming services. First hint of any feminazi, minority gay black environmental any liberal propaganda I can turn it off."
    The streaming services push globohomo hard. They KNOW my preferences, yet choose to prominently feature "black voices" and Amazon Prime video has started autoplaying a trailer at the top of each page and before each episode that begins with two men kissing. I looked but couldn't find a way to disable it.

    I sent a message to Amazon asking them not to push gays on me anymore, and I expect that they will fix the problem immediately.

    Replies: @Alden

    They do push black gay, not feminazi much any more. I just ignore them and watch what I want.

    When you find a movie you prefer, under neath the begin movie bar is a list of similar movies. Since I avoid gay black liberal movies I stay on that list.

  65. @Abe
    OT-Steve, I kind of infer you may have Netflix now, but do you have a 4K/UHD big screen TV (and if not can we fundraise you one)? Got one for “the family” (really myself :-/ last Christmas and then just recently discovered the old Xbox can play UHD discs and have been having a blast rewatching some classics in ultra-high def.

    The thing is, though, that perhaps man was not meant to watch movies at that resolution and screen-size, as the merits- or lack thereof- of the cinematography become unavoidable.

    For example, watched a bit of DAYS OF THUNDER, and though the video transfer is not that great to begin with, the switching between different cameras and lenses and rigs is a bit distracting. Here’s a medium frame shot of Cruise and Duvall standing around and talking in dreary amber lighting; here’s a shot of a car racing around the track from a camera rigged to a car in front of it. Here’s an extreme shot from almost half a mile away of the car on the track, looking like one of those pictures taken with a cellphone using software zoom. The point is, the stitching together of different camera sources which I did not notice while watching in the theater or at HD resolution are glaring at UHD.

    On the other hand, CASINO is drop dead gorgeous looking at 4K, revelatory even, but this is not without its drawbacks either. As soon as Di Nero is on screen I can’t stop staring at the disgusting, infected-looking tip of his cheek mole. And as soon as Sharon Stone smiles for the first time- well, if at the time of the making of BASIC INSTINCT she may as well have been dropped here from Venus encased in her own shimmering effervescence of estrogen, by the time of her serious actress turn in CASINO no amount of world-class makeup artistry can hide the fact she has definitely hit wall.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nathan, @Alden, @Stan Adams

    I thought she looked a lot better better in Casino than Basic Instinct. Maybe it was the clothes. She is an absolute beauty

  66. @Known Fact
    I can understand the diagreement over Vertigo. I thought the firat half was gripping, then there was some break in the story and the second half never regained the momentum. Much like Gone With the Wind. For a pretty much forgotten late-Hitchcock movie I enjoyed Frenzy.

    Replies: @Alden

    3 problems with Vertigo. First no reason for husband to kill wife. Second nothing about how Judy and husband planned the split second coordination needed for husband to throw wife out the window as Judy slipped into hiding. Third why did Judy go back to work in the store instead of husband sending her out of town for good?

    Plus Vertigo isn’t some emotional PTSD. It’s a physical disorder of the bones in the inner ear that control balance.

    Hitchcock made similar movie about the same time. Husband had a good reason to kill wife. She planned to leave him along with her Money. Husband had an old college friend who became a criminal. Husband blackmailed and paid friend turned criminal to kill wife.

    Spousal murder for money lust for another anger violence is a common real life murder. Thousands of books stories movies and TV shows are about spousal murder.

    Fargo was good. Husband ran a big car dealership. One employee had a criminal record. Husband asked employee if he might know someone who knew someone. That’s realistic. Poisoning, contrived car accidents robberies & burglaries deaths in a fire are all realistic means of murder.

    But Vertigo, no reason to kill wife and the impossible way it was done.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Alden

    I thought the husband was one of those misogynists like the Men of Unz you complain of. He told Jimmy Stewart that he missed the old San Francisco when men had absolute power over women and he was bored and dissatisfied with his current life where he was ultimately beholden to his wife because the shipping business belonged to her.

    I otherwise agree that the murder plot from Judy's point of view makes no sense. Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn't going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy's mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don't see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Alden

    , @Seth Largo
    @Alden

    Watched as a murder mystery, Vertigo is indeed subpar. Watched as psychological romance, it's beautiful. It's a Hitchcockian inversion of "The Great Gatsby," where Gatsby ends up getting Daisy killed instead of vice versa. Like Gatsby, it's about the folly of trying to relive the past. The murder caper stuff is, unlike in most of Hitch's movies, an afterthought.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

  67. Steve, you should start a thread of “films everybody else liked but I hated” as long as people can be specific in their dislike.

    I will start: Casablanca.

    Wow do I loathe that film. As an exercise, start with reading out loud any chunk of dialogue with a significant other. Proof they toked up in the 40’s – the entire script sounds like it was written by a stoner frat group trying to be funny. Add in paper mache airplanes and the worlds first successful transgender “actress” you know the Swede of whom I speak, plus Bogart’s usual scenery chewing excess, and you have a film so bad it smells.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @theMann

    Now, now, some women really are that that big boned and broad shouldered, especially N Europeans . It was basic Jew WW 2 propaganda. Did you get the lines about how Rick smuggled stolen guns to the Spanish Civil War communists? And how he’d be arrested for that if he went back to the US? Another communist hero.

    I never liked Bergman’s looks. She’s just too big to be an actress, especially in those days. Fat actresses like Melissa McCarthy are fine. They look like real women.

    Replies: @theMann

  68. @Nathan
    @Abe

    In regard to Sharon Stone in Casino, she's playing a character that hits the wall (hard) during the time frame of the movie. I think she was robbed of the Academy award. She goes from radiant in the beginning, to being a hysterical abuse victim, to OD'ing. And it physically comes across on screen. She's much better than De Niro. In fact, De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.

    Replies: @Sean

    As I recall they gave her a hot shot, she didn’t OD. To me Stone’s breakthrough role in Basic Instinct was perfect for her, because she completely lacked a vulnerable quality. DeNiro wanted Traci Lords for Stone’s part. Lords’s sometime porno co star Helga Sven had in her younger days been the original owner/ licensee of Circus Circus Casino in Vegas and appeared in the floor show that involved an elephant(!) she was married to the real proprietor, an organised crime figure.

    De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.

    Is Joe Pesci in Casino good at playing a character based on Tony Spilotro because he was uglier than Spilotro? Sammy Gravano sort of looked like an actor playing a gangster.

    • Replies: @Nathan
    @Sean

    I uh... didn't know that about Traci Lords or her co-stars.

    I just didn't buy De Niro as the Jewish brain power behind the casino's operation. In fact, I found some of the lines downright baffling. He refers to the local nepotism hires as "dumb white guys" but come on, it's Robert Dr Niro, the ultimate dumb, violent, white guy actor. Pesci looked and acted the part of an Italian gangster, the same as every other role he's had.

  69. Casablanca… a film so bad it smells.

    Yeah, but they were punching Nazis!

  70. @theMann
    Steve, you should start a thread of "films everybody else liked but I hated" as long as people can be specific in their dislike.

    I will start: Casablanca.

    Wow do I loathe that film. As an exercise, start with reading out loud any chunk of dialogue with a significant other. Proof they toked up in the 40's - the entire script sounds like it was written by a stoner frat group trying to be funny. Add in paper mache airplanes and the worlds first successful transgender "actress" you know the Swede of whom I speak, plus Bogart's usual scenery chewing excess, and you have a film so bad it smells.

    Replies: @Alden

    Now, now, some women really are that that big boned and broad shouldered, especially N Europeans . It was basic Jew WW 2 propaganda. Did you get the lines about how Rick smuggled stolen guns to the Spanish Civil War communists? And how he’d be arrested for that if he went back to the US? Another communist hero.

    I never liked Bergman’s looks. She’s just too big to be an actress, especially in those days. Fat actresses like Melissa McCarthy are fine. They look like real women.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @Alden

    I am pretty sure Jenna Elfman and Karen Gillan are both slightly taller than Bergman was. Somehow they both come across as very attractive, Bergman was just so.....mannish. I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40's, but they were not a group of major beauties. somehow the 50's exploded out with Sophia Loren, Bibi Andersson, Arlene Dahl, Rhonda Fleming, Marilyn Monroe and about a million others.


    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it, and as a rule, they could act, at least ok. Clearly, there was a sea change in casting from roughly 1949 to 1959. I would guess that Hollywood thought the movie-going public had a major shift from overwhelmingly married women to a hefty percentage of teenage boys. Even so, I never cease to be amazed at Hollywood's persistence at trying to pass off unattractive women as attractive women. I wonder if it has some connection to Hollywood being a gigantic Queer Town and people making casting decisions just can't tell.......

    Replies: @Alden, @jamie b., @dfordoom

  71. I am an avid reader of our host. I read all this stuff about personality and movies and did not get it, I mean who cares?

    But there is important insight I just blundered into.

    People generally like people who are like them. And if personality is a reliable indicator of the arts that you like having someone as girlfriend/spouse with similar interests in arts helps to match like to like.

    My taste in music was always quirky to dark. I was always wondering why the nice sorority girls I was seeing didn’t like Joy Division. Well, maybe those girls had different personalities than me.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Hodag

    "People generally like people who are like them."

    People generally like people who are like me.

  72. @Alden
    @Known Fact

    3 problems with Vertigo. First no reason for husband to kill wife. Second nothing about how Judy and husband planned the split second coordination needed for husband to throw wife out the window as Judy slipped into hiding. Third why did Judy go back to work in the store instead of husband sending her out of town for good?

    Plus Vertigo isn’t some emotional PTSD. It’s a physical disorder of the bones in the inner ear that control balance.

    Hitchcock made similar movie about the same time. Husband had a good reason to kill wife. She planned to leave him along with her Money. Husband had an old college friend who became a criminal. Husband blackmailed and paid friend turned criminal to kill wife.

    Spousal murder for money lust for another anger violence is a common real life murder. Thousands of books stories movies and TV shows are about spousal murder.

    Fargo was good. Husband ran a big car dealership. One employee had a criminal record. Husband asked employee if he might know someone who knew someone. That’s realistic. Poisoning, contrived car accidents robberies & burglaries deaths in a fire are all realistic means of murder.

    But Vertigo, no reason to kill wife and the impossible way it was done.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Seth Largo

    I thought the husband was one of those misogynists like the Men of Unz you complain of. He told Jimmy Stewart that he missed the old San Francisco when men had absolute power over women and he was bored and dissatisfied with his current life where he was ultimately beholden to his wife because the shipping business belonged to her.

    I otherwise agree that the murder plot from Judy’s point of view makes no sense. Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn’t going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy’s mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don’t see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Ray P


    Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn’t going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy’s mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don’t see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

     

    I can see that as a possibility. I'm pretty familiar with Vertigo at the moment, because Daughter C studied it as part of her high school exit exam curriculum earlier this year. We watched it at least five times.

    If you see Jimmy's interactions with Barbara BG (i.e. Midge in the movie) as his anchors to reality, then you're right that the scene where Midge visits him in the sanitarium has a note of finality to it. Maybe the doctor who says Scottie needs a year to recover is wrong, and instead Scottie is 'gone' at that point. Then what happens thereafter seems more plausible if he's just trying to work out a resolution deep in his mind.

    But then why the tragic ending? Why not a happy resolution for Scottie and Judy, once he realizes the truth? Maybe justice had to be done?

    , @Alden
    @Ray P

    Thanks. I must have missed the line of dialogue when husband explains his motivation. Dial M for murder the husband explains motivation several times.

  73. @Not Raul
    Steve: In the AFPP charts you cited, C, E, and A seem to be highly correlated.

    Perhaps, in the future, the five factor model will be replaced by the three factor model.

    The MBTI, which has four factors, seems to have a few combinations that are very unlikely. The core types (according to some Jungians) seem to be four in number: SP, SJ, NT, and NF, with extroverted & introverted subtypes, making 8 types. This would indicate that there should really be 3 factors, since 2x2x2 = 8.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “In the AFPP charts you cited, C, E, and A seem to be highly correlated.”

    Steve’s attempt to ruin movies is now morphing into a Robert McKee seminar.

    • LOL: Not Raul
  74. @Hodag
    I am an avid reader of our host. I read all this stuff about personality and movies and did not get it, I mean who cares?

    But there is important insight I just blundered into.

    People generally like people who are like them. And if personality is a reliable indicator of the arts that you like having someone as girlfriend/spouse with similar interests in arts helps to match like to like.

    My taste in music was always quirky to dark. I was always wondering why the nice sorority girls I was seeing didn't like Joy Division. Well, maybe those girls had different personalities than me.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “People generally like people who are like them.”

    People generally like people who are like me.

  75. @anonymous
    I must be shamefully confused. How could women prefer Alien to Aliens ? I love both movies equally but the characters in Aliens are much more likeable .

    Maybe the women who are/were even aware of these movies in the age of FaceBook could/can identify more with a woman risking her life to save a cat as opposed to a nine year old girl ?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “How could women prefer Alien to Aliens?”

    Alien is a gothic horror monster movie. Aliens is a guns a blazin’ action monster movie. Women like horror movies because they are always looking for opportunities to cuddle.

  76. @theMann
    Well there has to be something to this personality profile thingie, in view if the unsolicited hatred of Forrest Gump alone. It is fine not to like F G., to consider it amiable garbage, or dislike its sly commentaries on American Culture, such as it is. But it does have a point of view, great cinematography and acting, so it is not exactly garbage. Pulp Fiction, for all of its oh so clever cleverness, is just as saturated with a truly evil world view as any other Tarantino POS. But my, oh my, it does have its defenders, doesn't it?

    So.....
    "Up" is the best film since Seven Samurai, and it hadn't even been mentioned. If I remember, Hurt Locker and District 9 were the same year, also not mentioned. OTOH, the gigantic borefest Shakespeare in Love, which bought it's best picture award, is pretty popular. It should be packaged with The English Patient and Titanic as the euthanasia trilogy.

    Also not mentioned, any films by Zhang Yimou. Maybe start with House of Flying Daggers as an antidote to Hollywood's garbage.

    In the meantime. ....... film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Bardon Kaldian

    I remember being stunned at how bad The English Patient was. It was as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy, but in a different way altogether.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @JMcG

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B57bOy2Dzjg

    , @jamie b.
    @JMcG


    ...as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy...
     
    Didn't like Cabin Boy? You must be one of them Fancy Lads...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPGSLiLm43E

    Replies: @JMcG

  77. @Mr Mox
    @Trinity


    No Country For Old Men was a very good movie IMO. And I don’t say that about many movies post 1970s. “Call it.”
     
    Agree. It had me from the first minute of the pronghorn hunt - the first really convincing hunting scene I've ever seen in a movie.

    (don't get me started on Robert De Niro sprinting around some Appalachian mountain chasing elk)

    Replies: @JMcG

    The Deer Hunter was set in western PA, but I believe the hunting scene was filmed in the Cascade mountains. Pennsylvania has a sizeable elk herd, but they weren’t legal to hunt during the war in Vietnam. They are now, to a very limited extent. Tags are distributed by lottery.

  78. @anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    The original Mad Max was terrifying but I'm pretty sure it was inspired by aggressive ,need for speed, young men living in a mid-70's gasoline/petrol shortage and was not an actual reflection of a violent crime-wave in Australia.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Steve Sailer

    Toecutter just died. I never realized he was the bad guy in the Fury Road sequel. Didn’t see it, actually.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @JMcG

    You're not missing anything.

    Fury Road is woke trash.

  79. @JMcG
    @anonymous

    Toecutter just died. I never realized he was the bad guy in the Fury Road sequel. Didn’t see it, actually.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    You’re not missing anything.

    Fury Road is woke trash.

  80. @John Up North
    I thought the funniest scene in Pulp Fiction was when Christopher Walken, playing a tortured Vietnam War vet, walked into the room where the young Butch was watching one of those cheap Clutch Cargo cartoons on tv. Walken's graphic explanation to Butch about how he saved Butch's father's ring while a POW made me lol.

    Replies: @Macumazahn

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it sure-as-sh*t wasn’t a ring that Captain Koons saved for Butch.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Macumazahn

    Thanks

    , @MEH 0910
    @Macumazahn

    The Gold Watch - Pulp Fiction (7/12) Movie CLIP (1994) HD
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFtHjV4c4uw


    Butch (Bruce Willis) dreams of the story Captain Koons (Christopher Walken) told him as a young boy about his family heirloom, a gold watch.
     
  81. I tried to download the data base by following the link but simply couldn’t find it. Can someone provide a direct link?

    Very curious about the specs for Apocalypse Now.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Kgaard

    Data is at:

    https://osf.io/72rsp/

    You'd need to download both the zip file (which has most of the data) and the Excel spreadsheet (which contains the movie names).

  82. @Anonymous
    How about the movie preferences of cynics and "rivet counters," as my dad calls them -- those of us who can't help noticing all the details. So the recent "Midway" was ruined for me because the insignia on the American dive bombers during the Makin Island raid was not what it was in February, 1942, but as it was after May of that year. Most viewers wouldn't notice and those I pointed it out to didn't care. But it really bugged me. I spent most of the rest of the movie muttering to myself things like, "Yeah, right, like that would happen," and "How come there aren't any American fighter planes in this stupid movie?" while my seat mates kept loudly whispering back at me "Will you just shut up!"
    I didn't like "Saving Private Sad Sack" (as my brothers called it) because the premise of the movie was stupid. Command could have just sent out a radio message ordering him out of the line. If for some reason there was no radio contact, they could have sent an L-5 over and dropped a message, a pretty common thing, or even had one land and pick the guy up. One of the most famous men (in later life) to be plucked out of a perilous situation by an L-5 was Dan Rowen of Rowen and Martin's "Laugh-In," a c.1970 TV show. He was rescued from a sandbar in the Markham River, New Guinea, next to a Japanese outpost, after he force-landed his P-40. No need to send out an infantry patrol.
    I can ignore incongruities to enjoy a film if I decide it's pure fantasy, like "Forest Gump," even though I know he would have gotten people killed in Viet Nam and himself killed as well. Ditto for "Being There": I liked it even though I know that when he stepped out of his house into a black ghetto he would have been beaten, robbed and probably murdered.

    Replies: @anon, @flyingtiger

    It real life it only took Father Samson 4 hours to find the guy and bring him back.

  83. @Alden
    @theMann

    Now, now, some women really are that that big boned and broad shouldered, especially N Europeans . It was basic Jew WW 2 propaganda. Did you get the lines about how Rick smuggled stolen guns to the Spanish Civil War communists? And how he’d be arrested for that if he went back to the US? Another communist hero.

    I never liked Bergman’s looks. She’s just too big to be an actress, especially in those days. Fat actresses like Melissa McCarthy are fine. They look like real women.

    Replies: @theMann

    I am pretty sure Jenna Elfman and Karen Gillan are both slightly taller than Bergman was. Somehow they both come across as very attractive, Bergman was just so…..mannish. I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40’s, but they were not a group of major beauties. somehow the 50’s exploded out with Sophia Loren, Bibi Andersson, Arlene Dahl, Rhonda Fleming, Marilyn Monroe and about a million others.

    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it, and as a rule, they could act, at least ok. Clearly, there was a sea change in casting from roughly 1949 to 1959. I would guess that Hollywood thought the movie-going public had a major shift from overwhelmingly married women to a hefty percentage of teenage boys. Even so, I never cease to be amazed at Hollywood’s persistence at trying to pass off unattractive women as attractive women. I wonder if it has some connection to Hollywood being a gigantic Queer Town and people making casting decisions just can’t tell…….

    • Replies: @Alden
    @theMann

    I didn’t mean Bergman was tall. She was unusually broad shouldered and big boned. Short or tall she was just too hulking. I remember her dancing in a strapless dress with Jimmy Stewart, Fonda, some skinny actor. The camera was on his face most of the time. Even though he wore a suit, her shoulders blocked his out.

    , @jamie b.
    @theMann


    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it...
     
    Indeed. In particular, I can remember watching Forbidden Planet for the first time and being absolutely stunned by Anne Fancis' angelic beauty.
    , @dfordoom
    @theMann


    I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40’s, but they were not a group of major beauties.
     
    You don't think Gene Tierney was beautiful? Or Hedy Lamarr?

    Replies: @JMcG

  84. @JMcG
    @theMann

    I remember being stunned at how bad The English Patient was. It was as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy, but in a different way altogether.

    Replies: @syonredux, @jamie b.

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  85. @Ray P
    @Alden

    I thought the husband was one of those misogynists like the Men of Unz you complain of. He told Jimmy Stewart that he missed the old San Francisco when men had absolute power over women and he was bored and dissatisfied with his current life where he was ultimately beholden to his wife because the shipping business belonged to her.

    I otherwise agree that the murder plot from Judy's point of view makes no sense. Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn't going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy's mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don't see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Alden

    Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn’t going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy’s mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don’t see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

    I can see that as a possibility. I’m pretty familiar with Vertigo at the moment, because Daughter C studied it as part of her high school exit exam curriculum earlier this year. We watched it at least five times.

    If you see Jimmy’s interactions with Barbara BG (i.e. Midge in the movie) as his anchors to reality, then you’re right that the scene where Midge visits him in the sanitarium has a note of finality to it. Maybe the doctor who says Scottie needs a year to recover is wrong, and instead Scottie is ‘gone’ at that point. Then what happens thereafter seems more plausible if he’s just trying to work out a resolution deep in his mind.

    But then why the tragic ending? Why not a happy resolution for Scottie and Judy, once he realizes the truth? Maybe justice had to be done?

  86. @theMann
    @Alden

    I am pretty sure Jenna Elfman and Karen Gillan are both slightly taller than Bergman was. Somehow they both come across as very attractive, Bergman was just so.....mannish. I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40's, but they were not a group of major beauties. somehow the 50's exploded out with Sophia Loren, Bibi Andersson, Arlene Dahl, Rhonda Fleming, Marilyn Monroe and about a million others.


    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it, and as a rule, they could act, at least ok. Clearly, there was a sea change in casting from roughly 1949 to 1959. I would guess that Hollywood thought the movie-going public had a major shift from overwhelmingly married women to a hefty percentage of teenage boys. Even so, I never cease to be amazed at Hollywood's persistence at trying to pass off unattractive women as attractive women. I wonder if it has some connection to Hollywood being a gigantic Queer Town and people making casting decisions just can't tell.......

    Replies: @Alden, @jamie b., @dfordoom

    I didn’t mean Bergman was tall. She was unusually broad shouldered and big boned. Short or tall she was just too hulking. I remember her dancing in a strapless dress with Jimmy Stewart, Fonda, some skinny actor. The camera was on his face most of the time. Even though he wore a suit, her shoulders blocked his out.

  87. @Ray P
    @Alden

    I thought the husband was one of those misogynists like the Men of Unz you complain of. He told Jimmy Stewart that he missed the old San Francisco when men had absolute power over women and he was bored and dissatisfied with his current life where he was ultimately beholden to his wife because the shipping business belonged to her.

    I otherwise agree that the murder plot from Judy's point of view makes no sense. Personally, I think that the second half of the film (after John-o goes to the sanitarium and Barbara Bel Geddes sadly concludes that Mozart isn't going to cure him) is a fantasy playing in Jimmy's mind. As Barbara said he never leaves the room she leaves him in. We don't see her at all after he goes there and yet he had confided in her a lot earlier in the film. Alternatively, he could simply have moved on from her because of his obsession.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Alden

    Thanks. I must have missed the line of dialogue when husband explains his motivation. Dial M for murder the husband explains motivation several times.

  88. @Abe
    OT-Steve, I kind of infer you may have Netflix now, but do you have a 4K/UHD big screen TV (and if not can we fundraise you one)? Got one for “the family” (really myself :-/ last Christmas and then just recently discovered the old Xbox can play UHD discs and have been having a blast rewatching some classics in ultra-high def.

    The thing is, though, that perhaps man was not meant to watch movies at that resolution and screen-size, as the merits- or lack thereof- of the cinematography become unavoidable.

    For example, watched a bit of DAYS OF THUNDER, and though the video transfer is not that great to begin with, the switching between different cameras and lenses and rigs is a bit distracting. Here’s a medium frame shot of Cruise and Duvall standing around and talking in dreary amber lighting; here’s a shot of a car racing around the track from a camera rigged to a car in front of it. Here’s an extreme shot from almost half a mile away of the car on the track, looking like one of those pictures taken with a cellphone using software zoom. The point is, the stitching together of different camera sources which I did not notice while watching in the theater or at HD resolution are glaring at UHD.

    On the other hand, CASINO is drop dead gorgeous looking at 4K, revelatory even, but this is not without its drawbacks either. As soon as Di Nero is on screen I can’t stop staring at the disgusting, infected-looking tip of his cheek mole. And as soon as Sharon Stone smiles for the first time- well, if at the time of the making of BASIC INSTINCT she may as well have been dropped here from Venus encased in her own shimmering effervescence of estrogen, by the time of her serious actress turn in CASINO no amount of world-class makeup artistry can hide the fact she has definitely hit wall.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nathan, @Alden, @Stan Adams

    Stone was already in her mid-30s when she made Basic Instinct.

    Her follow-up to Instinct was Sliver, yet another turgid “erotic thriller” that played to empty theaters.

    http://www.scoopy.com/sliver.htm

    Basic Instinct is filled with really hot sex scenes and plenty of clear nudity. The sex in Sliver is not as hot, not as prolific, and is either very dark or seen on a black and white TV screen within the film. The oblique, dark approach was taken out of necessity because Sharon Stone had gotten out of shape. Producer Robert Evans noted, after viewing the dailies, “You can’t even shoot her ass anymore. It’s too spongy. She’s over already. Who’d want to fuck her anymore? Who’s gonna buy their popcorn and come watching her?” He wasn’t the only one aware of Sharon’s flabby bum. Stone herself told Joe Eszterhas, “My ass hangs halfway to my knees. I’m pushing forty. Why didn’t you write this script twenty years ago?” These two collages from Silver (1, 2) illustrate the problems Sharon was then having with her behind. (The quotes come from Eszterhaz’s tell-all, Hollywood Animal, pages 338-341 in the hardcover edition, which is linked above.)

    We see more of Billy Baldwin’s rump in Sliver than we do of Sharon Stone’s.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Stan Adams

    Why no body (non-) double?

    , @Alden
    @Stan Adams

    Baldwin’s behind was probably that if a body double. Most of the streaming services feature dorsal nudity. It’s all butt doubles. Notice all the butts are either shot from behind it below the waist.

    I enjoy noticing how expensive or cheap the production values are, is the actress wearing hair extensions, are her black pants and big fluffy white top designed to make her hips slim and bust bigger, which actor is walking along a platform to make him look normal height instead of 5’4, which actresses insist on being covered from knee to shoulder in sex scenes, how the camera cuts back and forth, how the cameraman and editors coordinate the shots of stunt, fight and dance doubles with the actors faces, are the soldiers real or computer generated, lighting, in general what the directors costumers, cameramen and editors are doing.

    If Sharon Stone had been old enough to work in the 1920-1970 era when facial beauty was important in actresses, she’d have been a great star. But she entered the business when they were looking for plainer actresses. She was considered too bland, too WASP stereotype, a bland Barbie doll as the jews were pushing plain actresses like Debra Winger, Karen Allen types.

    She’s in an amazon prime movie, “ A Different Loyalty” . Black hair, frumpy clothes but still that beautiful face and a great acting job.

  89. @Michelle
    My number one favorite movie of all time is, Little Big Man.

    Replies: @James Braxton

    So…

    You are above average on Openness, fairly Conscientious, not at all Extraverted, highly Agreeable, and about as un-Neurotic as it gets?

    Am I close?

    • Replies: @Michelle
    @James Braxton

    My head is spinning!! Can I possibly be all of those things at once? And who can determine such things? I leave it to the "Experts".

  90. @Hockamaw
    There Will Be Blood is the most polarizing movie of any I've ever known of. People have visceral reactions, either adoring or loathing it. I personally love the movie and think it's probably one of the top five of all time. But a lot of people whose opinion I respect have thought it's trash.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden

    A friend of mine had a minor role in “There Will Be Blood” and got to ride around from the motel to the set with Daniel Day-Lewis in character, which was a memorable experience. Day-Lewis is both extremely demanding (e.g., when he played a paraplegic in My Left Foot he made the crew carry him around the set for two months) and extremely gracious at the same time.

    I said that “There Will Be Blood” and “No Country for Old Men” were clearly the two dominant movies of 2007. He said, yeah, but when he was ten minutes into watching “No Country,” he said to himself, oh, well, no Best Picture Oscar for the movie I was in.

  91. @anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    The original Mad Max was terrifying but I'm pretty sure it was inspired by aggressive ,need for speed, young men living in a mid-70's gasoline/petrol shortage and was not an actual reflection of a violent crime-wave in Australia.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Steve Sailer

    Mad Max director George Miller was an emergency room doctor who always wanted to direct. So he got to meet the kind of Australians who drive like it’s the end of the world.

  92. @al gore rhythms
    The film that I was most surprised that I liked: Moulin Rouge. It seemed like it would be an over the top, camp melodrama, and the fact that it is set in the early 1900's yet has a modern pop soundtrack seemed like it would be horribly anachronistic--and all of these things are true. Yet when I watched it, I was completely won over by the style, humour, ingenious plot, and frantic ending. It just works.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Baz Luhrmann’s “Moulin Rouge” is a pretty original movie. Luhrmann’s idea was to take a sophisticated sounding idea and make it unsophisticated, as obvious as a Bollywood movie for the masses of Uttar Pradesh. The plot is lifted from La Boheme and Camille, not because those are high culture but because you already know what’s going to happen, even if you’ve never seen them.

    I’ve never seen John Huston’s “Moulin Rouge.”

  93. @Kgaard
    I tried to download the data base by following the link but simply couldn't find it. Can someone provide a direct link?

    Very curious about the specs for Apocalypse Now.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Data is at:

    https://osf.io/72rsp/

    You’d need to download both the zip file (which has most of the data) and the Excel spreadsheet (which contains the movie names).

  94. @Macumazahn
    @John Up North

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it sure-as-sh*t wasn't a ring that Captain Koons saved for Butch.

    Replies: @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    Thanks

  95. Who likes the Godfather? Lawyers.

  96. @Stan Adams
    @Abe

    Stone was already in her mid-30s when she made Basic Instinct.

    Her follow-up to Instinct was Sliver, yet another turgid "erotic thriller" that played to empty theaters.

    http://www.scoopy.com/sliver.htm


    Basic Instinct is filled with really hot sex scenes and plenty of clear nudity. The sex in Sliver is not as hot, not as prolific, and is either very dark or seen on a black and white TV screen within the film. The oblique, dark approach was taken out of necessity because Sharon Stone had gotten out of shape. Producer Robert Evans noted, after viewing the dailies, "You can't even shoot her ass anymore. It's too spongy. She's over already. Who'd want to fuck her anymore? Who's gonna buy their popcorn and come watching her?" He wasn't the only one aware of Sharon's flabby bum. Stone herself told Joe Eszterhas, "My ass hangs halfway to my knees. I'm pushing forty. Why didn't you write this script twenty years ago?" These two collages from Silver (1, 2) illustrate the problems Sharon was then having with her behind. (The quotes come from Eszterhaz's tell-all, Hollywood Animal, pages 338-341 in the hardcover edition, which is linked above.)
     
    We see more of Billy Baldwin's rump in Sliver than we do of Sharon Stone's.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Alden

    Why no body (non-) double?

  97. @Stan Adams
    @Abe

    Stone was already in her mid-30s when she made Basic Instinct.

    Her follow-up to Instinct was Sliver, yet another turgid "erotic thriller" that played to empty theaters.

    http://www.scoopy.com/sliver.htm


    Basic Instinct is filled with really hot sex scenes and plenty of clear nudity. The sex in Sliver is not as hot, not as prolific, and is either very dark or seen on a black and white TV screen within the film. The oblique, dark approach was taken out of necessity because Sharon Stone had gotten out of shape. Producer Robert Evans noted, after viewing the dailies, "You can't even shoot her ass anymore. It's too spongy. She's over already. Who'd want to fuck her anymore? Who's gonna buy their popcorn and come watching her?" He wasn't the only one aware of Sharon's flabby bum. Stone herself told Joe Eszterhas, "My ass hangs halfway to my knees. I'm pushing forty. Why didn't you write this script twenty years ago?" These two collages from Silver (1, 2) illustrate the problems Sharon was then having with her behind. (The quotes come from Eszterhaz's tell-all, Hollywood Animal, pages 338-341 in the hardcover edition, which is linked above.)
     
    We see more of Billy Baldwin's rump in Sliver than we do of Sharon Stone's.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Alden

    Baldwin’s behind was probably that if a body double. Most of the streaming services feature dorsal nudity. It’s all butt doubles. Notice all the butts are either shot from behind it below the waist.

    I enjoy noticing how expensive or cheap the production values are, is the actress wearing hair extensions, are her black pants and big fluffy white top designed to make her hips slim and bust bigger, which actor is walking along a platform to make him look normal height instead of 5’4, which actresses insist on being covered from knee to shoulder in sex scenes, how the camera cuts back and forth, how the cameraman and editors coordinate the shots of stunt, fight and dance doubles with the actors faces, are the soldiers real or computer generated, lighting, in general what the directors costumers, cameramen and editors are doing.

    If Sharon Stone had been old enough to work in the 1920-1970 era when facial beauty was important in actresses, she’d have been a great star. But she entered the business when they were looking for plainer actresses. She was considered too bland, too WASP stereotype, a bland Barbie doll as the jews were pushing plain actresses like Debra Winger, Karen Allen types.

    She’s in an amazon prime movie, “ A Different Loyalty” . Black hair, frumpy clothes but still that beautiful face and a great acting job.

  98. @Macumazahn
    @John Up North

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it sure-as-sh*t wasn't a ring that Captain Koons saved for Butch.

    Replies: @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    The Gold Watch – Pulp Fiction (7/12) Movie CLIP (1994) HD

    Butch (Bruce Willis) dreams of the story Captain Koons (Christopher Walken) told him as a young boy about his family heirloom, a gold watch.

  99. @Abe
    This may be based on my own unrepresentative personal experience, but does the data support the generalization that men are more likely to be into older movies, whereas women (at least until a certain age) are more into what is current and trendy? With Mrs. Abe, who is still quite young-at-heart, I have been through several iterations of ingenue- Drew Barrymore, Jennifer Lopez, Anne Hathaway, Emma Stone, etc., etc. Basically it’s watching the same rom-com but with an entirely new cast every 6-8 years. There are a few imprinted classics she loves (e.g. WIZARD OF OZ), but in general I skew way more towards older films while for her movies are a much more disposable commodity- something to be enjoyed in the moment, but not obsessed over or even really remembered after the fact. And I would think that outside of the (though not insubstantial) minority of female hipsters and Greta Gerwig-wannabes, this is not atypical.

    Replies: @Alden

    Depends on the age of the men. Supposedly young men enjoy the summer block buster type movies. And the explosion car chase fights on top of subway trains type movies attract a huge base of young men customers.

  100. @JMcG
    @theMann

    I remember being stunned at how bad The English Patient was. It was as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy, but in a different way altogether.

    Replies: @syonredux, @jamie b.

    …as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy…

    Didn’t like Cabin Boy? You must be one of them Fancy Lads…

    • Agree: Nathan
    • LOL: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @jamie b.

    Now what did you have to go and do that for?

  101. @theMann
    @Alden

    I am pretty sure Jenna Elfman and Karen Gillan are both slightly taller than Bergman was. Somehow they both come across as very attractive, Bergman was just so.....mannish. I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40's, but they were not a group of major beauties. somehow the 50's exploded out with Sophia Loren, Bibi Andersson, Arlene Dahl, Rhonda Fleming, Marilyn Monroe and about a million others.


    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it, and as a rule, they could act, at least ok. Clearly, there was a sea change in casting from roughly 1949 to 1959. I would guess that Hollywood thought the movie-going public had a major shift from overwhelmingly married women to a hefty percentage of teenage boys. Even so, I never cease to be amazed at Hollywood's persistence at trying to pass off unattractive women as attractive women. I wonder if it has some connection to Hollywood being a gigantic Queer Town and people making casting decisions just can't tell.......

    Replies: @Alden, @jamie b., @dfordoom

    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it…

    Indeed. In particular, I can remember watching Forbidden Planet for the first time and being absolutely stunned by Anne Fancis’ angelic beauty.

  102. @Hockamaw
    There Will Be Blood is the most polarizing movie of any I've ever known of. People have visceral reactions, either adoring or loathing it. I personally love the movie and think it's probably one of the top five of all time. But a lot of people whose opinion I respect have thought it's trash.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden

    There Will Be Blood is the kind of movie I like. It’s long, great production values, interesting sub plots, hero triumphs at last. But I can see that some of the weirdness turns people off. One great touch, he kept the baby in a box instead of a cradle. Over all great movie.

    Had the movie been made long ago, Day Lewis would have been totally ethical and honest. The only struggle would have been a dishonest oil man. This movie was very realistic. No one was all good or all bad. It was good about all the problems of finding out, drilling refining etc.

  103. This thread hasn’t devolved into a David Lynch fest. Am disappoint.

  104. @Alden
    @Known Fact

    3 problems with Vertigo. First no reason for husband to kill wife. Second nothing about how Judy and husband planned the split second coordination needed for husband to throw wife out the window as Judy slipped into hiding. Third why did Judy go back to work in the store instead of husband sending her out of town for good?

    Plus Vertigo isn’t some emotional PTSD. It’s a physical disorder of the bones in the inner ear that control balance.

    Hitchcock made similar movie about the same time. Husband had a good reason to kill wife. She planned to leave him along with her Money. Husband had an old college friend who became a criminal. Husband blackmailed and paid friend turned criminal to kill wife.

    Spousal murder for money lust for another anger violence is a common real life murder. Thousands of books stories movies and TV shows are about spousal murder.

    Fargo was good. Husband ran a big car dealership. One employee had a criminal record. Husband asked employee if he might know someone who knew someone. That’s realistic. Poisoning, contrived car accidents robberies & burglaries deaths in a fire are all realistic means of murder.

    But Vertigo, no reason to kill wife and the impossible way it was done.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Seth Largo

    Watched as a murder mystery, Vertigo is indeed subpar. Watched as psychological romance, it’s beautiful. It’s a Hitchcockian inversion of “The Great Gatsby,” where Gatsby ends up getting Daisy killed instead of vice versa. Like Gatsby, it’s about the folly of trying to relive the past. The murder caper stuff is, unlike in most of Hitch’s movies, an afterthought.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Seth Largo

    Maybe the theaters should have provided a libretto to explain what was going on, like foreign language operas.

    , @Alden
    @Seth Largo

    So a middle aged man who’s never been married at a time when almost everyone, including gays was married, rejects a nice woman, Midge, falls in love with a tall tale and follows a woman around town. Oookay

    Thanks for the explanation.

  105. @theMann
    @Alden

    I am pretty sure Jenna Elfman and Karen Gillan are both slightly taller than Bergman was. Somehow they both come across as very attractive, Bergman was just so.....mannish. I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40's, but they were not a group of major beauties. somehow the 50's exploded out with Sophia Loren, Bibi Andersson, Arlene Dahl, Rhonda Fleming, Marilyn Monroe and about a million others.


    Every SciFi B film of the Fifties had a major beauty in it, and as a rule, they could act, at least ok. Clearly, there was a sea change in casting from roughly 1949 to 1959. I would guess that Hollywood thought the movie-going public had a major shift from overwhelmingly married women to a hefty percentage of teenage boys. Even so, I never cease to be amazed at Hollywood's persistence at trying to pass off unattractive women as attractive women. I wonder if it has some connection to Hollywood being a gigantic Queer Town and people making casting decisions just can't tell.......

    Replies: @Alden, @jamie b., @dfordoom

    I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40’s, but they were not a group of major beauties.

    You don’t think Gene Tierney was beautiful? Or Hedy Lamarr?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @dfordoom

    Erm, that’s HEADLEY Lamarr!

  106. @theMann
    Well there has to be something to this personality profile thingie, in view if the unsolicited hatred of Forrest Gump alone. It is fine not to like F G., to consider it amiable garbage, or dislike its sly commentaries on American Culture, such as it is. But it does have a point of view, great cinematography and acting, so it is not exactly garbage. Pulp Fiction, for all of its oh so clever cleverness, is just as saturated with a truly evil world view as any other Tarantino POS. But my, oh my, it does have its defenders, doesn't it?

    So.....
    "Up" is the best film since Seven Samurai, and it hadn't even been mentioned. If I remember, Hurt Locker and District 9 were the same year, also not mentioned. OTOH, the gigantic borefest Shakespeare in Love, which bought it's best picture award, is pretty popular. It should be packaged with The English Patient and Titanic as the euthanasia trilogy.

    Also not mentioned, any films by Zhang Yimou. Maybe start with House of Flying Daggers as an antidote to Hollywood's garbage.

    In the meantime. ....... film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Bardon Kaldian

    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.

    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Romance novels are trash; most- not all comics- are trash; most popular music, for instance, rockabilly is trash; rap is trash; commercials are trash; pulp novels are trash; pole dancers are trash; US Congress is trash; most bestsellers are trash; soaps are trash; manosphere is trash; NBA is trash; everything about vampires is trash; fast food is trash; drug culture is trash; stand up comedy is trash; quiz shows are trash; Las Vegas is trash; foodies are trash; self-help books are trash; Hamburger Christianity is trash; current Western ethics is trash; Oscars are trash; Japanese popular music is…. not trash, just weird.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.
     
    Trash culture is a term that means "culture that I personally dislike."

    Most "high" culture of the past century (poetry, painting, "serious" music, "literary fiction") is much more worthless, degraded, infantile, offensive and incompetently executed than most pop culture of the past century.

    But "high culture" is popular with intellectuals and people with college degrees so it doesn't get called trash culture. Only the stuff that ordinary people enjoy (including, horror of horrors, people without college degrees) gets labelled as trash culture.

    The term "trash culture" is a weapon that is used to denigrate anything that ordinary people enjoy.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon, I agree with all of that completely, except for quiz shows, as I used to like Jeopardy.

    , @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Internet comments are trash.

    "99% of everything is crap." -- Theodore Sturgeon

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  107. Excalibur (1981) is my favorite. I just can’t figure out why it has never been popular on reruns like, say, Predator (1987).

    Other puzzlingly underrated and possibly shadow-banned movies, in my opinion: The Right Stuff (1983), Hard Times (1975, with Charles Bronson), and Dogs of War, 1980

    Single worst movie I have ever paid to go see: Steal Big Steal Little (1995, starring Andy Garcia). Just thinking about that…experience….makes me want to send my fist through a wall, again…….(sigh), excuse me.

  108. @Bardon Kaldian
    @theMann


    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.
     
    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Romance novels are trash; most- not all comics- are trash; most popular music, for instance, rockabilly is trash; rap is trash; commercials are trash; pulp novels are trash; pole dancers are trash; US Congress is trash; most bestsellers are trash; soaps are trash; manosphere is trash; NBA is trash; everything about vampires is trash; fast food is trash; drug culture is trash; stand up comedy is trash; quiz shows are trash; Las Vegas is trash; foodies are trash; self-help books are trash; Hamburger Christianity is trash; current Western ethics is trash; Oscars are trash; Japanese popular music is.... not trash, just weird.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @jamie b., @Ray P

    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Trash culture is a term that means “culture that I personally dislike.”

    Most “high” culture of the past century (poetry, painting, “serious” music, “literary fiction”) is much more worthless, degraded, infantile, offensive and incompetently executed than most pop culture of the past century.

    But “high culture” is popular with intellectuals and people with college degrees so it doesn’t get called trash culture. Only the stuff that ordinary people enjoy (including, horror of horrors, people without college degrees) gets labelled as trash culture.

    The term “trash culture” is a weapon that is used to denigrate anything that ordinary people enjoy.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @dfordoom

    Most “high” culture of the past century (poetry, painting, “serious” music, “literary fiction”) is much more worthless, degraded, infantile, offensive and incompetently executed than most pop culture of the past century.

    Would agree with you in re the visual arts, except for photography. Poetry isn't read anymore outside of classes in literature or written by anyone who could make a living from it; slam poetry is junk, though sometimes entertaining. There's been ugly and bizarre academic music composed, but I don't think that's the whole shebang. I'm not seeing the problem with imaginative literature as a form (as opposed to the worldview of some of it's producers).

  109. @Bardon Kaldian
    @theMann


    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.
     
    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Romance novels are trash; most- not all comics- are trash; most popular music, for instance, rockabilly is trash; rap is trash; commercials are trash; pulp novels are trash; pole dancers are trash; US Congress is trash; most bestsellers are trash; soaps are trash; manosphere is trash; NBA is trash; everything about vampires is trash; fast food is trash; drug culture is trash; stand up comedy is trash; quiz shows are trash; Las Vegas is trash; foodies are trash; self-help books are trash; Hamburger Christianity is trash; current Western ethics is trash; Oscars are trash; Japanese popular music is.... not trash, just weird.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @jamie b., @Ray P

    Bardon, I agree with all of that completely, except for quiz shows, as I used to like Jeopardy.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  110. @dfordoom
    @theMann


    I am not sure what was going on with Actresses in the 40’s, but they were not a group of major beauties.
     
    You don't think Gene Tierney was beautiful? Or Hedy Lamarr?

    Replies: @JMcG

    Erm, that’s HEADLEY Lamarr!

  111. @jamie b.
    @JMcG


    ...as bad as Chris Elliott’s Cabin Boy...
     
    Didn't like Cabin Boy? You must be one of them Fancy Lads...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPGSLiLm43E

    Replies: @JMcG

    Now what did you have to go and do that for?

  112. @dfordoom
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.
     
    Trash culture is a term that means "culture that I personally dislike."

    Most "high" culture of the past century (poetry, painting, "serious" music, "literary fiction") is much more worthless, degraded, infantile, offensive and incompetently executed than most pop culture of the past century.

    But "high culture" is popular with intellectuals and people with college degrees so it doesn't get called trash culture. Only the stuff that ordinary people enjoy (including, horror of horrors, people without college degrees) gets labelled as trash culture.

    The term "trash culture" is a weapon that is used to denigrate anything that ordinary people enjoy.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Most “high” culture of the past century (poetry, painting, “serious” music, “literary fiction”) is much more worthless, degraded, infantile, offensive and incompetently executed than most pop culture of the past century.

    Would agree with you in re the visual arts, except for photography. Poetry isn’t read anymore outside of classes in literature or written by anyone who could make a living from it; slam poetry is junk, though sometimes entertaining. There’s been ugly and bizarre academic music composed, but I don’t think that’s the whole shebang. I’m not seeing the problem with imaginative literature as a form (as opposed to the worldview of some of it’s producers).

  113. @Bardon Kaldian
    @theMann


    In the meantime. ……. film is trash culture. Stop taking it so seriously.
     
    Dunno. Film entertainment/art may be limited, but I would n0t call it trash culture.

    Romance novels are trash; most- not all comics- are trash; most popular music, for instance, rockabilly is trash; rap is trash; commercials are trash; pulp novels are trash; pole dancers are trash; US Congress is trash; most bestsellers are trash; soaps are trash; manosphere is trash; NBA is trash; everything about vampires is trash; fast food is trash; drug culture is trash; stand up comedy is trash; quiz shows are trash; Las Vegas is trash; foodies are trash; self-help books are trash; Hamburger Christianity is trash; current Western ethics is trash; Oscars are trash; Japanese popular music is.... not trash, just weird.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @jamie b., @Ray P

    Internet comments are trash.

    “99% of everything is crap.” — Theodore Sturgeon

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Ray P

    Internet comments are trash, but..... physics is not trash; mathematics is not trash; most of ancient Greek literature, visual arts & philosophy is not trash; the Renaissance & Baroque arts are not trash; canonical Western 19th C novels are not trash; Taj Mahal is not trash; Western musical instruments (organ, violin, piano,..) are not trash; Tarkovsky is not trash; ....

    ....

    Theodore Sturgeon is trash.

  114. @Seth Largo
    @Alden

    Watched as a murder mystery, Vertigo is indeed subpar. Watched as psychological romance, it's beautiful. It's a Hitchcockian inversion of "The Great Gatsby," where Gatsby ends up getting Daisy killed instead of vice versa. Like Gatsby, it's about the folly of trying to relive the past. The murder caper stuff is, unlike in most of Hitch's movies, an afterthought.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    Maybe the theaters should have provided a libretto to explain what was going on, like foreign language operas.

  115. @Seth Largo
    @Alden

    Watched as a murder mystery, Vertigo is indeed subpar. Watched as psychological romance, it's beautiful. It's a Hitchcockian inversion of "The Great Gatsby," where Gatsby ends up getting Daisy killed instead of vice versa. Like Gatsby, it's about the folly of trying to relive the past. The murder caper stuff is, unlike in most of Hitch's movies, an afterthought.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    So a middle aged man who’s never been married at a time when almost everyone, including gays was married, rejects a nice woman, Midge, falls in love with a tall tale and follows a woman around town. Oookay

    Thanks for the explanation.

  116. @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Internet comments are trash.

    "99% of everything is crap." -- Theodore Sturgeon

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Internet comments are trash, but….. physics is not trash; mathematics is not trash; most of ancient Greek literature, visual arts & philosophy is not trash; the Renaissance & Baroque arts are not trash; canonical Western 19th C novels are not trash; Taj Mahal is not trash; Western musical instruments (organ, violin, piano,..) are not trash; Tarkovsky is not trash; ….

    ….

    Theodore Sturgeon is trash.

  117. @James Braxton
    @Michelle

    So...

    You are above average on Openness, fairly Conscientious, not at all Extraverted, highly Agreeable, and about as un-Neurotic as it gets?

    Am I close?

    Replies: @Michelle

    My head is spinning!! Can I possibly be all of those things at once? And who can determine such things? I leave it to the “Experts”.

  118. @Sean
    @Nathan

    As I recall they gave her a hot shot, she didn't OD. To me Stone's breakthrough role in Basic Instinct was perfect for her, because she completely lacked a vulnerable quality. DeNiro wanted Traci Lords for Stone's part. Lords's sometime porno co star Helga Sven had in her younger days been the original owner/ licensee of Circus Circus Casino in Vegas and appeared in the floor show that involved an elephant(!) she was married to the real proprietor, an organised crime figure.


    De Niro is actually the worst actor in the picture.
     
    Is Joe Pesci in Casino good at playing a character based on Tony Spilotro because he was uglier than Spilotro? Sammy Gravano sort of looked like an actor playing a gangster.

    Replies: @Nathan

    I uh… didn’t know that about Traci Lords or her co-stars.

    I just didn’t buy De Niro as the Jewish brain power behind the casino’s operation. In fact, I found some of the lines downright baffling. He refers to the local nepotism hires as “dumb white guys” but come on, it’s Robert Dr Niro, the ultimate dumb, violent, white guy actor. Pesci looked and acted the part of an Italian gangster, the same as every other role he’s had.

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