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From CNN:

To help save the planet, cut back to a hamburger and a half per week

By Jen Christensen, CNN, July 17, 2019

(CNN) Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%, for the world to continue to feed the 10 billion people expected to live on this planet in 2050, according to a new report.

That means each person could have about a burger and a half each week.

This calculation comes from the World Resources Institute, a global research nonprofit that supports better use of natural resources to sustain a growing population. Its research looks at agriculture, the climate crisis, poverty and gender, among other topics.

Its final “Creating a Sustainable Food Future” report released Wednesday takes a closer look at the gaps in food production and global demand and makes several concrete recommendations on how to prevent a catastrophe.
Eating less beef is one such suggestion in the 568-page report.

About 9.8 billion people will live on the planet by 2050, that’s up from 7 billion people in 2010. Demand for food is projected to outpace population growth, increasing by more than 50% as people’s incomes in the developing world are expected to increase, according to the report.

The demand for meat and dairy is expected to rise even faster, by nearly 70%. The global demand for ruminant meat, meaning beef, sheep and goat, is expected to be even higher, at 88%.

But to keep up with food demands overall, the report predicts farmers are going to have to produce 56% more crop calories than in 2010 — and that means that land nearly twice the size of India will be needed.

Closing these gaps is “harder than often recognized,” according to the report.
The authors suggest there are several ways to keep people from starving and to keep the climate crisis at bay, but the most impactful way to do this may be to cut the consumption of ruminant meat.

Not from CNN: the new World’s Most Important Graph:

 
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  1. JimB says:

    Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%, for the world to continue to feed the 10 billion people expected to live on this planet in 2050, according to a new report.

    How about just eating the surplus human population?

  2. Feeding your cover crops to ruminants is the cheapest way to make them pay. Also, a large part of the world’s land is best used for grazing.

  3. How ’bout Africans stop having 8 kids each? Do they have any suggestions for the the world’s basket cases or nah?

  4. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    The media never talks about “peak oil” anymore. I guess “peak burger” is the talking point now.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Hypnotoad666
  5. Johnny789 says:

    I’ve been back in LA from visiting family for 8 days now and have had a Double-Double from In-and-Out every day so far. This inspires me to keep on going.

    • LOL: Laurence Whelk, TWS
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  6. Anonymous[336] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/01/09/would-you-toss-roasted-insects-into-your-meal-this-health-app-is-betting-yes/

  7. tyrone says:

    So if I eat three cheese burgers a week africans will starve??………boy,that’s going to be easier than I thought.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Laurence Whelk
  8. Anonymous[275] • Disclaimer says:

    Who needs real ruminant meat when we have impossible ruminant meat?

    https://ancestral-nutrition.com/impossible-burger-unhealthy-bad-environment/

  9. Clyde says:

    Jen Christensen….all I need to see are her bing images. Clown. Never heard of her.

  10. Lot says:


    My low carb ground beef salad for 4 recipe:

    In frying pan #1 cook 2 chopped onions, 2 carrots, 2 diced tomatoes, 1 head of garlic

    In frying pan #2 brown 1.5 to 2 lbs of lean ground beef, 90 or 93% lean is best. When 75% done pour in 1/3 bottle of Heinz chili sauce, a little mustard, and one bunch of parsley or cilantro. Then mix in the onions etc from the other pan.

    When cooked put over salad greens. To make it “Thai” add chopped lemongrass and ginger to the beef while it cooks and basil to the salad greens.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  11. Should be no problem to get 300 million plus people to all voluntarily do something, especially when it involves eating less tasty food. I mean, people already have no problem cutting back on food consumption for vanity reasons; that’s why no one is ever obese anymore.

    To be fair, these kind of broad sweeps in culture do happen occasionally, such as declining family size in much of the world. But as the graph notes, Sub-Saharan Africa has been a trickier case.

  12. J.Ross says:

    In a healthy society the elite have materially better stuff because of some degree of meritocracy. In our society elites summon forth fake experts, who voltron into fake committees, who attempt to effect the same result, but backwards — people must be tricked into doing without. The elites aren’t truly better through success but they’ve now got relatively more. To trick people it is necessary to constantly remind them of boogeymen. This makes our media puritanical, not in the sense of prudery, but in the sense of fearing witchcraft.
    ———-
    Today’s All Things Considered on NPR advertised two media products bearing this out. The questions the female interviewer asked were informational and interchangeable, each less an interview question and more a universal prompt for the next segment of a predetermined speech.
    One item was Copperhead, a new novel conflating Christianity and white supremacism, by a person claiming that Neo-Nazis (of unspecified faith) bombed his house twice. Everything discussed was in this haze of factless shibboleths and undoubtable reassurances (“we need to ask these questions,” “white people aren’t comfortable talking about race”). At one point the author appeared to not know what a story moral was (“this is not a novel about how we’re such good people”), which would be a great thing to catch a book writer out on, but the interviewer couldn’t exploit it because that would require a substantive question. Of course they brought up Heather Heyer, who they think was “murdered.”
    The other thing sounds like it would be cool if it wasn’t yet another part of the project to generate hatred for white people. It’s a children’s show set in an Alaskan Indian reservation. The major excerpt they played was about evil white people destroying native culture:

    –Why did [offscreen character] give you his drum if he loved to sing?
    –At the school we weren’t allowed to sing the songs of our people. It was forbidden. We had to sing new songs — their songs.

    But they have other stereotypes. A black girl from Texas moves to town (because her parents are in the military?) and the natives try to make her feel at home by blundering with stereotypes. Bizarrely enough the stereotypes they arrive at are about Texas and not, you know, the other thing, which is funny because Texans often embrace their stereotypes.

    • Agree: Lurker
    • Replies: @Thea
  13. KL says:

    Please do this graph with Sub Saharan Africa – South Africa vs. rest-of-world.

  14. @JimB

    How about just eating the surplus human population?

    Most of it will be disease ridden.

    • Replies: @BB753
  15. So are they saying Malthus was basically right, now? (I think he was but he does get shit on in the press a lot these days, especially when he is lumped in with Ehrlich.)

    I’m just going to keep eating burgers and hope more Borlaugs come along.

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
  16. Ibound1 says:

    Meat will be grown in labs, hamburger and steak chicken and fish. A quick Google search reveals dozens of articles – the scientists are far along.

    This hamburger a week nonsense is no more than the usual Left demand to set up the “Ministry of Plenty”. By the way, while you are having your one hamburger, the Kennedys and Clinton’s and Bushes will be enjoying filet mignon every day.

    But as I say, the scientists are far along and we will be growing meat soon enough.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/14/worlds-first-lab-grown-beef-steak-revealed-but-the-taste-needs-work

  17. White people are already doing their part by gradually reducing our population. Maybe CNN could recommend that vibrant populations stop popping out kids they can’t feed.

    Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%, for the world to continue to feed the 10 billion people expected to live on this planet in 2050, according to a new report.

    “Americans” don’t “need” to do any such thing and “the world” doesn’t feed anyone – America feeds a good portion of it from surplus above our needs.

    The “10 billion people” problem can be solved by preventing our government, NGOs, Bill Gates, well-meaning but stupid Christians, and various others from propping up Sub-Saharan populations through money, medicine, and other aid. Let them grow their own food, create their own medicines, and run their own sh$$hole countries. My guess is we’d see a pretty dramatic population decrease on the “Dark Continent” very quickly.

    • Agree: Kylie
  18. @tyrone

    So if I eat three cheese burgers a week africans will starve??………boy,that’s going to be easier than I thought.

    Love it!!!

  19. Americans are some of the world’s most gluttonous people. They feel they’re entitled to suburban McMansions, huge gas-guzzling SUVs, loads of stuff from WalMart, triple patty whoppers, 32 ounce colas, and a latte-serving Starbucks in every grocery store.

    Are they really going to cut back on all this to feed the starving people of Africa? I really doubt it.

    Americans aren’t even used to sacrificing for their own country. They’re supposed to cut down on their gluttony to help peasants in Africa? LOL. Not happening. Are lardbutt Americans going to stop cramming their mouths with Big Macs to help hut dwellers in Djibouti?

    Conservatives were apopletic after Mayor Bloomberg banned big gulp sodas. Sarah Palin (remember her?) gave a speech about this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebRyYrqMrXU

    Anytime any attempt is made at restricting any sort of consumption or output (especially related to corporations), the Republican party throws down the gauntlet. This is just not a culture that emphasizes sobriety in any way.

    By the way, it’s not just Americans who are like this. When all these hordes of immigrants (Mexicans, Central Americans, Chinese, Filipinos, Indians, Africans, Russians) come here, it’s not because they’re idealists looking for “freedom” and “democracy.” It’s because they’re money grubbers who aspire to experience the hyper gluttony of America. They want to drive an Escalade, live in a 3500 square foot house, and emit lots of carbon.

    The next time you’re at Wal Mart, just look at how disgustingly fat everybody looks. Then look at how everybody’s shopping cart is crammed to the brim with loads of food, snacks, candy, and plastic stuff. America is one huge orgy of multi-racial consumerism.

    While people of all races are consumeristic gluttonous, there’s one group who particularly stands out.

    Blacks.

    Here’s a video of Black Friday fights. You’ll see people of all races involved, but Blacks (more than any other race) truly stand out for their classless gluttony.

    I suppose one reason why so many Africans want to migrate here is because they want to live like the black rappers they see in all the Youtube music videos.

  20. @JimB

    We just need to convince the Chinese that Africans are the new “rhino horn”.

    • LOL: ThreeCranes
  21. Jen Christensen…

    ..looks like she needs to cut back on at least 1-2 hamburgers a week, and maybe even the fish:

    https://www.nlgja.org/about/board-of-directors/

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  22. Tony says:

    Start planting those soy crops.

  23. And the mixt multitude that was among them fell a lusting: and the children of Israel also wept again, and said, “Who shall give us flesh to eat? We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick: but now our soul is dried away: there is nothing at all, beside this manna, before our eyes.”

    And the LORD said unto Moses, … “say thou unto the people, ‘Sanctify yourselves against to morrow, and ye shall eat flesh: for ye have wept in the ears of the LORD, saying, “Who shall give us flesh to eat? for it was well with us in Egypt”: therefore the LORD will give you flesh, and ye shall eat. Ye shall not eat one day, nor two days, nor five days, neither ten days, nor twenty days; but even a whole month, until it come out at your nostrils, and it be loathsome unto you: because that ye have despised the LORD which is among you, and have wept before him, saying, “Why came we forth out of Egypt?”‘”

    And there went forth a wind from the LORD, and brought quails from the sea, and let them fall by the camp, as it were a day’s journey on this side, and as it were a day’s journey on the other side, round about the camp, and as it were two cubits high upon the face of the earth. And the people stood up all that day, and all that night, and all the next day, and they gathered the quails: he that gathered least gathered ten homers: and they spread them all abroad for themselves round about the camp. And while the flesh was yet between their teeth, ere it was chewed, the wrath of the LORD was kindled against the people, and the LORD smote the people with a very great plague. And he called the name of that place Kibroth-hattaavah [Graves of the Craving]: because there they buried the people that lusted.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  24. anon[338] • Disclaimer says:

    Grain prices have been low for years and trending lower. https://www.darrinqualman.com/wheat-price/

    Ask the farmers. In the future, grain will be virtually free, if trends hold.

  25. How many African Africans could be fed if every African American cut back to a diet consistent with maintaining a normal weight?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @JimB
  26. pyrrhus says:

    I think that building a wall around Africa and sinking the ships will be much easier and cheaper…

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  27. I think I’ll just eat as many or as few hamburgers as I damn well please, Jen, because that’s “my thing”.

  28. @Anonymous

    “Peak youth” was in 1972.

  29. Good news, Citizens! Hamburger rations have been increased from two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun, to one and half per week*.

    Cut back on hamburger, and ramp up on long pig.

    .

    * I want the half with the meat and pickles.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  30. @Anonymous

    Humans will eat maggot sausages as a meat alternative: scientists

    They’ll need a new name. “Maggot” is too close to a certain micro macro hyper petaaggression.

    (Oops. Did I say “peta-“? Trademark infringement!)

  31. BB753 says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    Why not levy anually 10 million persons from the first world to be fed to the teeming masses of the third world?
    It’ll be a lottery and we can call it the Hunger Games!

  32. @International Jew

    How many African Africans could be fed if every African American cut back to a diet consistent with maintaining a normal weight?

  33. SFG says:
    @JimB

    There’s already a supplement called ‘Soylent’. It was made by techies who didn’t want to bother with food.

  34. @Anonymous

    Would you eat insects to save the planet?

    Yes. Absolutely, I might. I would eat mosquitoes and fleas, if could catch the mofo’s, not in order to save the planet, but to save me from itching. Can they be sautéed or stir-fried?

    • Replies: @Alden
  35. @Johnny789

    I love me that In-And-Out Bu urge r.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  36. anon[397] • Disclaimer says:

    Closing these gaps is “harder than often recognized,” according to the report.
    The authors suggest there are several ways to keep people from starving and to keep the climate crisis at bay, but the most impactful way to do this may be to cut the consumption of ruminant meat.

    Cutting production of African children just might be even more impactful. But ZPG for thee, but not for diversity.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @JimB
    , @HammerJack
  37. @JimB

    Soylent Green is People!

  38. JimB says:

    Soylent Green is People!

    POC will mean Protein of Color.

    • LOL: fish
  39. If half of the starving people would eat a starving person, there would only be half as many and they all would have just had a good meal. Lather, rinse, repeat.

  40. JimB says:
    @anon

    The authors suggest there are several ways to keep people from starving and to keep the climate crisis at bay, but the most impactful way to do this may be to cut the consumption of ruminant meat.

    Or reduce the birth rate of ruminant people.

  41. @Jokah Macpherson

    No need to hope more Borlaugs come along. Humanity could easily feed 10 billion people with modern technology, just applied more intensively. That’s why we yawned when the Earth’s population passed 5 billion, then 6 billion, 7 billion, ect.

  42. JimB says:
    @International Jew

    How many African Africans could be fed if every African American cut back to a diet consistent with maintaining a normal weight?

    What happened to Olestra? Anal leakage seems like a small price to pay to look good in designer jeans.

  43. @Redneck farmer

    Agree.

    “the World Resources Institute, a global research nonprofit that supports better use of natural resources to sustain a growing population.”

    There are loads of these “nonprofit” “NGOs”, all located in major coastal blue cities, none of whose staff have ever done a lick of farming, fishing, mining, lumbering, ranching or any of the other essential activities they purport to explicate, direct and advise on behalf of the “world”. They are all useless eaters, who in a real resource crunch would be among the first to succumb to their own uselessness.

    As Redneck farmer avers, there is probably more land on earth that is suitable for raising cattle but not for growing crops than there is good cropland. If the World Resources Institute were actually interested in maximizing calorie production, they would recommend maximum cattle stocking of these steppes, hills, and savanna. These healthful grass fed cattle would be a boon to mankind’s nutrition. The animals’ droppings would gradually increase soil fertility too.

    But World Resources Institute is in reality just an expensive sinecure for the Jen Chritensens of the world, from which platform they try scold their betters into living like the peons they wish them to be.

    • Agree: Alden
  44. @Anonymous

    For some reason, people are programmed to believe that a foregone burger will somehow magically appear as food on someone else’s plate somewhere else in the world. Maybe it’s because their mothers told them to clean their plate to help starving kids in Africa. But it doesn’t work that way.

    Food is a commodity like cars or smart phones or anything else. The calories can be produced as long as someone is willing and able to pay the price. Local wars and bad government policies can obviously keep food from getting to people. But the bigger issue is never really the maximum possible production level, but rather whether some people are so poor and unproductive that they can’t afford the price of food.

    And BTW, apparently, ruminant grazing is actually the ecologically best ways to preserve top soils and prevent desertification.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-livestock-grazing-stop-desertification/

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Desiderius
  45. @Big Daddy Amin

    I think Jonathan Swift modestly proposed something like that way back in the Irish famine.

  46. @Hippopotamusdrome

    It’s people. Chuck Heston was really good in this one.

  47. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t want to eat maggots but beetle larvae looks pretty appetizing. Plump and juicy.

  48. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:

    Chances are they’ll come up with a way to lab meat. That way, animals won’t have to be killed anymore.

  49. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:

    Doesn’t Sub-Saharan Africa have the most unexploited arable land of any place on Earth? Of course getting those acres firing on all cylinders will probably require an influx of whites, Indians or Chinese to keep everything running smoothly.

  50. Whiskey says: • Website

    The whole point White man is to make you eat bugs while big Man Blacks eat steak.

    Know your place White man!

    • Replies: @istevefan
  51. @JohnnyWalker123

    Are they really going to cut back on all this to feed the starving people of Africa?

    No, but soon the starving hordes of Africa will be here, not in Africa, and we collectively lack the will to stop them. I expect they’ll eat everything in sight and then eat us.

  52. @MikeatMikedotMike

    This is a stern test for the First Law of Journalism — would Jen really seem hotter if we all eat less beef?

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @JimB
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
  53. HA says:
    @Redneck farmer

    “Feeding your cover crops to ruminants is the cheapest way to make them pay. Also, a large part of the world’s land is best used for grazing.”

    I think the problem is that much of the crops that ARE suitable for human consumption are nonetheless used in feedlots to finish cattle before slaughter, rather than being fed directly to humans. Clearly, that is economically viable under current market conditions (and current government subsidies), or they wouldn’t do it, but it’s inefficient from a pure acres-to-calories or acres-to-protein basis, not to mention the large amounts of extra water and methane production such practices entail.

    I can’t vouch for the accuracy of this site, but I’ve seen similar claims elsewhere:

    Did you know that 90 percent of the soybeans grown worldwide, 50 percent of the grain, and 40 percent of the fish caught are fed to livestock?

    (I realize a lot of the “grain” is not particularly marketable, and many of the fish are likewise not going to command high prices at the local Whole Foods, but I’m pretty sure this is the kind of thing that rankles the diet-for-a-small-planet types.)

  54. @pyrrhus

    building a wall around Africa and sinking the ships

    Africa would be able to build ships?

  55. newrouter says:

    >methane production such practices entail.<

    Farting animals aren't a problem: lunatic humans are a problem for all animals.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  56. Mr. Anon says:

    About 9.8 billion people will live on the planet by 2050, that’s up from 7 billion people in 2010. Demand for food is projected to outpace population growth, increasing by more than 50% as people’s incomes in the developing world are expected to increase, according to the report.

    The demand for meat and dairy is expected to rise even faster, by nearly 70%. The global demand for ruminant meat, meaning beef, sheep and goat, is expected to be even higher, at 88%.

    Higher still is the projected demand for ammunition, baseball bats, and machetes.

  57. Mr. Anon says:

    (CNN) Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%, for the world to continue to feed the 10 billion people expected to live on this planet in 2050, according to a new report.

    No need to worry. There are enterprising hipsters on the job:

    https://soylent.com/

    This is for real. I s**t you not.

    Millenials – marinated in irony, and – yet – irony impaired.

  58. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    it ued to be de rigeur in the days of jackmobiles ( two door heavy American cars with the ass end jacked up and big tires protruding from the wheelwells, with the rear end sometimes painted and/or extra lights put on) to get the In-N-Out sticker and cut the B and R off the “burger” on the bottom.

    The owners are fundies and changed the sticker to make this impossible.

    • Replies: @Johnny789
  59. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @HA

    (I realize a lot of the “grain” is not particularly marketable, and many of the fish are likewise not going to command high prices at the local Whole Foods, but I’m pretty sure this is the kind of thing that rankles the diet-for-a-small-planet types.)

    Let them eat quadrotriticale before the Tribbles eat it all up.

  60. JimB says:
    @Known Fact

    This is a stern test for the First Law of Journalism — would Jen really seem hotter if we all eat less beef?

    Somebody should introduce Jen Christiansen to Jenny Craig.

  61. There’s this doctor named Shawn Baker who’s currently promoting an all-meat diet. The incongruousness of having a country where one group of people is saying we need to stop eating meat for economic reasons while another group is suggesting everyone ditch sugars and grains and increase meat consumption is where the anti-immigration patriots and iSteve are failing. CrossFit/Paleo/keto/LC/Starting Strength/Weston Price Foundation/etc–these people should all be politicized. Instead of having the immigration issue be about racism, it should be about these very practical quality of life issues.

  62. The Chinese are the real racists!

    Chinese consumers ignore calls to eat less beef.

    “Data published by the customs authorities in January put total beef imports for 2018 at one million tonnes, up from just 23,700 tonnes in 2010. A Ministry of Agriculture report predicts a sustained rise in beef and lamb consumption in the coming decade, with beef imports continuing to grow.”

  63. So, pork belly futures, looking good?

  64. istevefan says:
    @Whiskey

    My guess is you will comply.

  65. @JimB

    Jonathan Swift already covered this issue.

  66. istevefan says:

    Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%,

    First, I would bet that by Americans and Europeans they are actually referring to people who have been traditionally called Americans and Europeans, i.e. Whites.

    Second, if we need to cut beef consumption by reducing our intake of burgers, does this mean we need to reduce our intake of tacos, kebabs and the like?

    Third, you would be wise to continue to eat beef. Eat steak especially. It is good for you. Check out PD Mangan for some good dietary advice.

  67. Anonymous[210] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I have no idea why CNN’s ratings continue to falter. No idea whatsoever.

  68. Well, thank God the Trump administration has reimposed the “gag” rule preventing any US funding for birth control efforts in Africa. Do American evangelicals really think they are going to convert all those future Sub-Saharan Africans into tithe paying Megachurch attendees?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @Alden
  69. Speaking of cows…

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Alden
  70. Johnny789 says:
    @Anonymous

    Did fundies get rid of the “Ass, Grass, or Gas. Nobody rides for free.” stickers that were popular back then, too?

  71. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Do American evangelicals really think they are going to convert all those future Sub-Saharan Africans into tithe paying Megachurch attendees?

    Yeah, I suspect they really do think that.

    • Agree: bomag
  72. @Anonymous

    Doesn’t Sub-Saharan Africa have the most unexploited arable land of any place on Earth?

    I have a friend who spent a couple of years trying to design and implement an agricultural products logistics scheme in Tanzania. He’s an Iowa boy like me, and he remarked again and again that he could not believe the amount of good farmland in Tanzania that was just left lying fallow.

    • Replies: @Corn
    , @fish
  73. Alden says:

    I don’t eat hamburger, but I do eat pounds of steak and tri tip and beef stew every week. I love ❤️ meat. Favorite is pork. I love 💗 it all including liver

    And eating meat irritates liberals. They eat carbs to save the earth and get fat.

  74. Alden says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    The animals fertilize the fields. Most seeds aren’t digested and just come out intact with the fertilizer. Lots of ranchers put hay seed in the feed and the animals drop the seeds out with the fertilizer.

  75. Alden says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Too small best way to eat them would be in a smoothie. Or stirred into gravy or curry sauce.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  76. Alden says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    She needs eggs and low calorie meat like liver and low fat ham and fish. Really works The pork farmers have produced 3o calorie an ounce ham. It tastes delicious.

  77. Anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:

    …. and I always thought that poor old Paul Ehrlich was ‘officially repudiated’.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  78. Alden says:

    What about rabbit? They reproduce like Somalians and are east to kill, gut and skin. One medium size one feeds 4. They have mild taste and can be cooked in many ways. Rabbit was very popular in France for a long time. People raised them in little cages even in cities.

    You’re right about these NGO parasites who’ve never seen a farm or any animal other than pet dogs and cats.
    What save the world from starvation person doesn’t know about easy to raise and good to eat rabbits??

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  79. @anon

    Agreed, but when did the useful word “effective” morph into the clunky neologism “impactful”?

  80. Alden says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    Behold the typical vegetarian.

  81. Alden says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I thought it was just defunding abortions not all birth control?

    Has anyone read Evelyn Waugh’s Black Mischief? It’s about an African Emperor trying to modernize his country. He tries to introduce birth control. The locals love ❤️ it because they think the devices are fertility jujus.

    That should be tried in Africa. Let me stick this magic device inside you or implant a little blob of magic in your arm and you will have a handsome lover, many children and wealth and happiness

    Should work.

  82. Anonymous[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @newrouter

    As the ancient Arab proverb goes:

    ” ‘Tis better to endure the wind of a thousand flatulent camels than to read a single line of The Economist”.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  83. You’ll get used to eating bugs. Wait … what?

    What’s the point of all those purty little nukes if we can’t use them to deal with the real problem, overcrowding in third-world shitholes that can’t sustain themselves? There, I’ve got your sustainability for you.

  84. @Alden

    Thank you for the recipe ideas, Alden.

    (See, people! This is why we need to keep our women contributors in the comments here.)

    ;-}

    • Agree: Desiderius
  85. Blubb says:

    THE WAR ON MEAT! It’s the next big thing.

    For entertainment value, look for “vegan deterioration” on YouTube.

    Meat is a must for humans to be healthy. Many of the vitamins we need are good in their animal form, but poisonous in their plant form (Vit A). Veg is a filler, not a primary food. Native groups eat 60% animal foods (incl eggs, yogurt, etc), 30% fruit and veg, 10% carbs. Brain works better on low carb diet. Etc.

  86. RobUK says:

    (CNN) Americans will need to cut their average consumption of beef by about 40% and Europeans by 22%

    Americans eat Europeans?!!

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  87. El Dato says:


    Big neocortex coupled with whitey mentality for full exploitation => success.

    But we have to cut back!

  88. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Of course getting those acres firing on all cylinders will probably require an influx of whites, Indians or Chinese to keep everything running smoothly.

    Indians?

  89. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    What about rabbit? They reproduce like Somalians and are east to kill, gut and skin. One medium size one feeds 4.

    It takes more calories to digest them than they return in calories. Net negative.

  90. @HA

    The Danes, bless ’em, send trawlers into the North Sea to hoover up sand eels, which are then fed to pigs in their industrial and evil farms.

    Sand eels are near the bottom of the marine food chain, so now the seabirds are starving.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/puffins-starve-as-danes-grab-uk-sand-eels-srwrfgdrs

  91. Dark says:

    I will continue to eat massive amounts of meat. The peasants can live on rice and beans.

    • Agree: Macumazahn
  92. @RobUK

    This American used to, regularly. I recommend the Germans….

  93. @Known Fact

    She’s definitely get better looking if we all started eating more Glaucomole.

  94. @HA

    You get a better return on Turkey or Chicken, about 1 lb of protein for every 2lbs of grain protein, versus 1 for 4 on pork and 1 for 8 on beef.

    redneckFarmer is correct: we farm a lot of land that should be intensively grazed. There is that
    YouTube video of the guy who restores land from desert conditions by introducing grazing animals to it. If you’ve not seen it, it’s worth a watch.

    • Replies: @HA
  95. I am already in compliance as I eat less than one hamburger per week.

    It really is a small price to pay to save the planet. President Trump could easily do this with a quick executive order via Twitter banning the importation of all Argentinian and Canadian beef and dairy products, and all New Zealand lamb for good measure, plus a secondary ban on the importation of anything made with leather, wool, or horn.

    This would lead to increases in the price of beef, and people would buy less. Planet saved, job done. Told you it was easy.

  96. @Alden

    One of the tragedies of modern life is that people’s tastes have been perverted. Low-calorie pork is not more delicious. That is your rational (but misled) function overriding your preferences. It took me a while after I came to Japan, but I now understand fatty meat. The Japanese overdo it and choose meats just based on softness, which is a mistake. However, the meat in the US is far gone the other way. Mostly, it is barely edible.

    Consider: there is a reason that dishes like veal were preferred in the past. People unencumbered by food ideology chose tender meats. Also consider: fois gras. People chose fatty meats. Also consider: the or igin of slow -cooked stews is in the attempt to make tastey but tough cuts edible.

    Lean meats are not delicious or healthy. Only believing makes them so. Listen to your body. first, then analyize with your mind. This is the same as ” racism”– notice/listen first, then seek understanding.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    , @J.Ross
  97. Thea says:

    If this is what it takes to help with our obesity problem, then ok. Make people feel guilty about hurting the planet in order to get them to finally lose 150 lbs . go for it!

  98. Thea says:
    @J.Ross

    Stereotypes are fun! Seeing yourself or your group through other people’s eyes is actually interesting and often surprising. It’s only the no-fun ever squad of SJWs that doesn’t want people thinking about stereotypes.

  99. J1234 says:

    Congolese cannibals can eat other central Africans. Problem solved.

  100. @JohnnyWalker123

    Working awfully hard to maintain that snobbery there, JW. You don’t have to live like that. Come over to the MAGA-side.

  101. @Anonymous

    Which officials one is talking about makes all the difference.

  102. @Redneck farmer

    Probably half the land in the islands of Britain and Ireland looks like this, even at midsummer (difficult to see it at all in the winter).
    Does Jen the Wise have any suggestions what to do with it all? Mango trees? Rice paddies? Grapevines? You can’t even grow potatoes in it with any degree of happiness, as everybody found out a while ago.
    Wait, I know, how about Christmas trees! Even better, surplus Africans in tent cities.

    The white dots on the left are sheep. Which hardly need artificial feeding at all, some swedes and cake in winter. They eat all that weird green stuff coating the hills, Jen, all day long, which is just as well as we can’t.

  103. @Hypnotoad666

    Their shit prevents desertification and their farts thaw the tundra. No wonder dot Indians worship them.

  104. Dave2 says:

    Alden, rabbits are great until one tiny germ gets into the colony and they all drop dead because they have no immunity. We occasionally had a chicken get sick and die, but with rabbits it’s a 100% wipeout that leaves your cages permanently contaminated.

    This may expain why chicken costs $0.89/lb while rabbit is not available for any price.

  105. @Pope Gregory I

    Quail is quite delicious and if it’s on the menu at a restaurant, I always order it. I can’t get it in a supermarket.

    The problem with the Israelites was the complaining. If manna starts falling from Heaven around here, I’ll happily dispense with beef.

    • Replies: @Pope Gregory I
  106. @Alden

    The pork roast I buy at Costco claims to be 120 calories per 4 ounce serving. I have my doubts, but I put it into my calorie counter anyway. It sure is delicious when you slow cook it with plenty of spices and sugar.

    I’m waiting for some genius to devise a home mass spectrometer, or whatever, that people can use to determine the exact nutritional content of their home cooking. You know, carve out a section of your favorite lasagna, weigh it, blend it, filter it, then have the special device tell you exactly how much you’re eating of what per gram.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  107. @Big Daddy Amin

    If half of the starving people would eat a starving person, there would only be half as many and they all would have just had a good meal. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    I think there may be some evolutionary value to cannibalism in limited environments.

    For example, the people of the Pacific Islands were known to engage in cannibalism from time to time. You imagine that from an evolutionary perspective it is useful to eat the excess human population when it exceeds the carrying capacity of your island. If you don’t, and as a consequence the whole Island gets denuded (like Rapa Nui/Easter Island) then the whole population starves and dies out.

  108. Nah. I love eating meat, especially burgers and all that. Am not planning to slow down anytime soon,

  109. @Anonymous

    What about rabbit? They reproduce like Somalians and are east to kill, gut and skin. One medium size one feeds 4.

    It takes more calories to digest them than they return in calories. Net negative.

    Rabbit starvation is only a problem when there is no consumption of additional fat in the diet, which could easily be supplied by plant sources like olive oil.

  110. @Dave2

    Alden, rabbits are great until one tiny germ gets into the colony and they all drop dead because they have no immunity. We occasionally had a chicken get sick and die, but with rabbits it’s a 100% wipeout that leaves your cages permanently contaminated.

    This may expain why chicken costs $0.89/lb while rabbit is not available for any price.

    I’ve seen rabbit available from time to time at my local supermarket (a bit of an upscale neighborhood, but still).

    It’s hard to determine what the effect of rabbit sensitivity to pathogens on its price is because I just don’t think there’s much or consistent demand for it relegating it to specialty status.

    Query: is the issue only that of domestic rabbits having no resistance?

  111. HA says:
    @TomSchmidt

    “There is that YouTube video of the guy who restores land from desert conditions by introducing grazing animals to it. If you’ve not seen it, it’s worth a watch.

    Again, this consists of allowing cows to feed on pasture, which is what they’ve evolved for. (And the guy in question actually insists on cows, not just any “grazing animals”– goats and sheep are not heavy enough to crush the leftover detritus into the soil as needed.) Most US cows are, prior to slaughter, taken to feedlots where they are fed soy and grain and a whole bunch of other stuff that requires a lot of additional farming to produce, and that’s the problem. (Some of the feedlot produce is presumably discarded foodstuffs that ruminants and pigs can eat but we ourselves don’t have much use for, e.g. potato and orange peels, as well as the stuff that’s left behind when oil is extracted from corn and rapeseed, etc., — but some of it is actual grain.)

    In any case, there’s a conspicuous lack of consistency in some of the arguments here. Farming and agribusiness has been a major driver of importing cheap labor (less so today, but it is still significant) increasing government subsidies, and making sure that Mideast oil is as plentiful as possible, all of which has drawbacks that readers of this site should be familiar with. To the extent that people now want to start carving out exceptions for “muh burgers”, it’s the same kind of I-want-mine mentality that underlies the demands for more cheap labor and subsidies.

    Yes, I realize that many of the venture capitalist efforts to address this need to scale up sustainability (to the point where it isn’t just a bunch of elite self-congratulating virtue-signallers who are rich enough to afford organic meats and who demand yet another opportunity to feel good about themselves) are a scam, but that’s true of most venture capitalist efforts. Virtually all of what passes by a venture capitalist’s pitch desk are just various Ponzi schemes of one sort or another. That doesn’t mean the underlying goal is not worth pursuing, and that there won’t be one, or some combination thereof, that does make some difference.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    , @J.Ross
    , @Jack D
    , @bomag
  112. Corn says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I’ve read that Angola alone could feed all of sub-Saharan Africa if farmers were better trained and had first world technology.

  113. ATBOTL says:

    The establishment is pushing this eat insects garbage so hard lately. Is there any pushback outside of alt-right circles?

  114. TWS says:

    So more steaks, ribs, chicken, and pork. I guess in doomed to suffer for my people.

  115. @HA

    I follow Nassim Taleb on this: if an item has enough profit in it to be advertised on TV, it’s likely feed, not food. And yes, the agriculture industry has been at the heart of cutting corners in the USA from near the start, when desire for cheap sugar to rot the teeth of Europe (and undercut the church monopoly on honey) encouraged the purchase and slave laboring of Africans in Caribbean sugar plantations.

    Feedlot grain turns the cattle into machines to turn cheap grain into a semblance of protein. Ugh. I won’t eat it anymore, and if the higher cost of real, grazed beef makes me eat less of it, well, that’s ok.

    At base, the goal for any group ought not to be turned into a commodity. The working class has experienced this with the mass labor inflow. Some of that was paid for with cheap “food,” which has led to an obesity crisis. It’s time to deal with the source of the issue.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  116. J.Ross says:
    @HA

    There’s no hypocrisy in rejecting a demand to eat less from a guy, who’s not giving up any of his multiple jets or houses, who wants your diet modified because he had a dream about a green woman.

    • Replies: @HA
  117. Ibound1 says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Totally agree. Coffee with skim milk isn’t the same as coffee with cream. Butter isn’t the same as margarine. Sugar is better than saccharine. Fat gives flavor to meat. All the ersatz we are given and you forget what food is supposed to taste like. It’s really unbelievable that anyone pays attention to anything the health industry says about diet – as they change their advice radically every few years. How they have any credibility is beyond me.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  118. fish says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    He’s an Iowa boy like me, and he remarked again and again that he could not believe the amount of good farmland in Tanzania that was just left lying fallow.

    Africa wins again…….

  119. fish says:
    @Anonymous

    It takes more calories to digest them than they return in calories. Net negative.

    So a win-win for Jen Christiansen?

  120. When the public schools graduate functional illiterates, folks just shrug their shoulders.

    But when the school cafeteria doesn’t offer a good selection of tofu, bean sprouts, and non-GMO milk, wow!

    People sure do get upset.

  121. bomag says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Agree.

    Plus, all this feel-goodness about announcing the end of cattle for the sake of more people doesn’t deal with what happens when the world blows through 10 billion people on its way to infinity and beyond. Far better to deal with population now and have a higher per cap standard of living than cram everyone into matrix tubs for the sake of not hurting anyone’s feelings at this moment.

  122. @Anonymous

    It takes more calories to digest them than they return in calories. Net negative.

    There may actually be some animals like that, but not rabbits (or any other mammal).

  123. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    Pardon me, but this sounds gross. Please stick to politics and stay away from recipes.

    1/3 bottle of Heinz chili sauce

    Only in America can you have a chili sauce that doesn’t contain any chili.

    • Replies: @Lot
  124. Jack D says:
    @HA

    Farming and agribusiness has been a major driver of importing cheap labor

    The production of corn for cattle feed is highly automated. The big impetus for imported farm labor is for labor intensive crops like delicate vegetables and fruits that have to be hand picked. If you want to improve the immigration situation, force everyone to eat an all meat diet and ban fruit and veg.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @HA
  125. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    In the period in which Americans have become incredibly fat, beef consumption has declined by about 50%, so that can’t be what is making us fat. A working hypothesis is that what is making us fat is LACK of fat. Fat (as found in grain fed beef) sends a signal to your brain that you are full and can stop eating but you can eat tons of corn (in the form of high fructose corn syrup) as if you yourself were a feedlot animal and your brain never gets the signal so you end up morbidly obese instead of the steer that you should have been eating.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  126. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    If you want to improve the immigration situation, force everyone to eat an all meat diet and ban fruit and veg.

    If you want to improve the immigration situation, shut down immigration. But you don’t want to end immigration, do you?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  127. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    Snowpiercer, here we come!

  128. Jack D says:
    @stillCARealist

    You don’t need a mass spectrometer. You just take the nutritional content of all the ingredients and add them together – the pasta has so many calories and such and such vitamins, the tomatoes have so and so many, the cheese has this many.. these are all present in published sources or on the packaging of the ingredients. For people who write cookbooks, etc. there is software that does this. They don’t actually perform an analysis every time.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  129. @stillCARealist

    Manna is falling from heaven. Non-beef food is cheap and plentiful. This post and and 99% of this thread is complaining about being asked to refrain from the capital sin of gluttony, which is worse than the capital sin of lust (which is what overproduction of children would be, if that is even considered to be a sin). That is why Dante puts the lusters in the second circle of Hell, and the gluttons in the third.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  130. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    End all immigration? No, I think that’s stupid. I think it’s to our advantage to recruit selected smart and talented people to play for Team America. I don’t think the NHL could exist without immigrants, for example. End illegal immigration = yes, absolutely.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @J.Ross
  131. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    End all immigration? No, I think that’s stupid. I think it’s to our advantage to recruit selected smart and talented people to play for Team America.

    How many people are we talking about? And how do you propose we “select” and “recruit” them?

    • Agree: bomag
  132. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    Perhaps if you are a hunter and you are living off of ultra-lean wild rabbits as 100% of your diet. But domestic rabbits cooked in a delicious cream sauce – they will fatten you up no problem, same as chicken breasts. “Rabbit starvation” was always very rare and found only in survival type situations where rabbit was absolutely the only food available – even the Native Americans knew the importance of fat in their diet and would take pains to mix fat with lean meat as in pemmican.

  133. HA says:
    @Jack D

    “The production of corn for cattle feed is highly automated.”

    No one says it isn’t. But there’s much more to raising cattle than corn, and based on what I’ve seen in all the time I’ve spent in ranchland USA the men hired to haul and bale hay and dig and repair fenceposts and all the countless other definitely NOT automated jobs that keep a ranch going were disproportionately brown-skinned, and if you focus solely on those under 40, the brown proportion was a good bit higher. Yes, I suspect it’s even higher among strawberry pickers, but that’s just passing the buck.

    • Replies: @bomag
  134. HA says:
    @J.Ross

    “There’s no hypocrisy in rejecting a demand to eat less from a guy, who’s not giving up any of his multiple jets or houses,”

    It is if you simultaneously complain about industries that positioned themselves to live or die on cheap labor, government subsidies and cheap and plentiful oil. Visions of green women aren’t part of that equation.

  135. bomag says:
    @HA

    In any case, there’s a conspicuous lack of consistency in some of the arguments here. Farming and agribusiness has been a major driver of importing cheap labor (less so today, but it is still significant) increasing government subsidies, and making sure that Mideast oil is as plentiful as possible, all of which has drawbacks that readers of this site should be familiar with. To the extent that people now want to start carving out exceptions for “muh burgers”, it’s the same kind of I-want-mine mentality that underlies the demands for more cheap labor and subsidies.

    I don’t know anyone here who gives farming and agribusiness a pass for their cheap labor policies; is a particular fan of farm subsidies; or who advocates “blood for oil” in the Middle East.

    Exceptions for “muh burgers” is more of an acknowledgement that we aren’t obligated to accommodate all the bodies on the planet we’re technically capable of raising up and feeding.

    I’m fully willing to examine the feasibility of a high input lifestyle, but this needs to include an ultimate number of people we should expect the planet to support and the attendant nice things they can enjoy.

    • Replies: @HA
  136. bomag says:
    @HA

    There’s not that many people in production agriculture; hundreds of thousands, maybe a million or two if you count them a certain way. Hired immigrants much fewer than those numbers.

    Yet we import millions each year, mostly to stock our urban areas.

    • Replies: @HA
  137. @Jack D

    Well, there’s fat and then there’s fat. Animals grazing on green grass with a lot of chlorophyll will have fat profiles high in Omega-3 fats. Animals denied access to green foods will have fat higher in Omega-6. The latter serves as a signal to the human body that we are entering a time of winter, and so will slow the human metabolism. That we eat non-grass-fed meat year-round has contributed somewhat to the obesity epidemic. Still, even omega-6-rich fatty meat from diseased cattle is better than high fructose corn syrup, and most of the grains and easy carbs of commodity agriculture.

  138. @Pope Gregory I

    Non-beef food is cheap and plentiful. This post and and 99% of this thread is complaining about being asked to refrain from the capital sin of gluttony …

    No, it’s expressing this disgust at this leftist nonsense of telling us we can’t eat the–normal and healthy–food we want and enjoy because foreigners have not checked their population growth. It is objection to theft, much like our reaction to similar leftist demands “must take immigrants”.

    American gluttony is real and obvious–like the authoress of the piece–but is a different issue.

    • Replies: @Pope Gregory I
  139. @HA

    I think the problem is that much of the crops that ARE suitable for human consumption are nonetheless used in feedlots to finish cattle before slaughter, rather than being fed directly to humans.

    That’s in no sense–other than whiny leftists’ imaginations–a “problem”.

    I like bacon. Iowa hogs–Iowa’s far an away the #1 pork producer–consume lots of Iowa’s corn (perhaps behind ethanol production, not sure)–pigs aren’t ruminants. I’m willing to pay for my bacon which includes the cost of corn (and all it’s inputs), the processing, shipping, rents, taxes, etc.

    The Iowa’s farmer’s corn is … owned by the Iowa farm. Neither his corn nor his land is the property of “the world” nor some asshole in Nigeria who refuses to use birth-control.

    (I realize a lot of the “grain” is not particularly marketable, and many of the fish are likewise not going to command high prices at the local Whole Foods, but I’m pretty sure this is the kind of thing that rankles the diet-for-a-small-planet types.)

    Annoying these “diet for a small planet” church lady types is a feature. These people are in a word–“assholes”.

    If you care about “the planet” then, work to control population growth in the world. Which involves:
    a) stopping population growth in the 3rd world, particularly Africa
    b) stopping immigration into the 1st world, which is the only thing driving up populations there.

    That done, there is basically no problem supporting our population at our burger munching best. Americans munch burgers–way more than we need–and are still a major exporter of food. We and our agriculture and burgers are not the problem. Steve’s “world’s most important graph” along with the “nation of immigrants” and “racist!” people are “the problem”–the people screwing up the world.

    • Replies: @HA
  140. @Almost Missouri

    There are loads of these “nonprofit” “NGOs”, all located in major coastal blue cities, none of whose staff have ever done a lick of farming, fishing, mining, lumbering, ranching or any of the other essential activities they purport to explicate, direct and advise on behalf of the “world”. They are all useless eaters, who in a real resource crunch would be among the first to succumb to their own uselessness

    .

    Solid gold, AM. Solid gold.

  141. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    But what about legal immigrants from culturally incompatible regions consistently polling hostility to the Bill of Rights?

  142. Dube says:

    I’ve learned here why rabbit is gone as a practical option, and I’d been wondering about it. Next: frog legs. There’s one place 700 miles from here that is, or perhaps was, proud to serve them.

  143. @AnotherDad

    The amount of beef Americans consume is not normal and healthy, and it is worse than overreproduction of children, because gluttony is worse than lust. If you don’t consume an abnormal and unhealthy amount of beef than you have nothing to worry about.

    • Replies: @bomag
  144. J.Ross says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Alton Brown’s answer to excessively lean meat is to marinate with (among other things) vinegar.

  145. @Jack D

    Yeah, I know, but I don’t really trust the published stats all that much. Not that it matters, as long as we’re relatively close and all using the same measurements, whether an ounce of pork is 40 calories or 50 is immaterial.

    But I want to know for my own inquisitive accounting and for the fact that I don’t want to weigh and measure when I cook. That’s why I want the home test kit to tell me how many grams of protein and fat are really in my casseroles and stews.

    Are you an inventor or marketer? Come up with something affordable for all of us who are counting macros and obsessing over numbers.

  146. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    “Pardon me, but this sounds gross.”

    I’ve made this for at least 10 different people and nobody has failed to eat it all.

    “Only in America can you have a chili sauce that doesn’t contain any chili.”

  147. @Anonymous

    Here’s a fun little report from the United Nations that I call “Let Them Eat Bugs.”

    http://www.fao.org/3/i3253e/i3253e.pdf

  148. HA says:
    @bomag

    “There’s not that many people in production agriculture”

    Again, if your reply to the officer is “I don’t deserve this ticket, because I know I saw a bunch of other guys who were going even faster”, I suspect it’s not going to go over well.

    And if it’s no big deal, why they plethora of “crops rotting in the field” posts wherein agribusiness is rightly reviled as trying to put one over on us? If you dismiss out one industry as “not that many”, the rest will just subdivide themselves until they, too, can claim the not-that-many exemption, and I guarantee you, all those not-that-many loopholes are going to add up to very many indeed.

    And lastly, the government subsidies and thirst for oil that underlies feedlot-overkill is not exactly insignificant. I know that’s probably not a pressing matter here, because let’s face it, it’s the Jews are going to get blamed for that, no matter who else is involved, even though it’s pretty clear there are other factors and other blind spots to consider.

    • Replies: @bomag
  149. HA says:
    @AnotherDad

    That’s in no sense–other than whiny leftists’ imaginations–a “problem”.

    As mentioned earlier, tell that to Steve Sailer the next time he posts a “crops rotting in the field” article.

    “I like bacon.”

    Swell for you. Did I or anyone tell you that you can’t have bacon? When those on the other side of an argument have to resort to strawmen to make their case, it’s a pretty clear sign they’ve got nothing.

    stopping population growth in the 3rd world, particularly Africa

    Actually, the diet-for-a-small-planet types may well be useful allies if addressing population growth is ever going to happen — Tanton, described elsewhere in these articles as a wise patriot, certainly thought so. Just because the Sierra club and other such outfits have been bought out for now doesn’t mean that’s a done deal. Sure, there’s plenty of love-to-lose mopers around here who think every single institution the right has lost will be lost to them forever, be it the media, the churches, or the universities, but if you actually wanted to win instead of just weeping and bewailing into the echo chamber as you chow down on your BLT, you’d start thinking of ways to reach out to those types.

  150. HA says:
    @bomag

    “I don’t know anyone here who gives farming and agribusiness a pass for their cheap labor policies; is a particular fan of farm subsidies; or who advocates “blood for oil” in the Middle East.

    We must be reading different posts then. If you’re going to give a pass to farmers that grow the bacon, it’s going to be difficult to argue against the farmers whose tomatoes and lettuce — that also go on that BLT’s — are supposedly rotting in the field. The whole “just let a few more in to service MY pet cause” mentality is what gets us into these messes in the first place.

    Not to mention the fact, as Tom Schmidt has correctly noted, the feedlot beef that supplies your burgers and the genetic Frankenswine that supply your bacon are yet another way you’re being scammed. The meat just isn’t as good.

    Ultimately — as with people — there’s more to cows and pigs than just numbers on a spreadsheet, even though there are plenty in this world who want to reduce us all to just that. What a shocker.

    • Replies: @bomag
  151. bomag says:
    @Pope Gregory I

    Speaking very roughly, per capita beef consumption today is half of what it was circa 1977.

    • Replies: @Pope Gregory I
  152. @bomag

    And beef consumption is vastly greater than it was in bliblical, late antique, and medieval times, when doctrines about the sin of gluttony were formulated. But I agree, let’s hope that progress continues (though it looks like there’s been a slow reversal since around 2014).

    • Replies: @bomag
  153. bomag says:
    @HA

    I’m no fan of today’s big agribusiness.

    Cut out their subsidies; cut out their immigration.

    As a direct comparison, the Amish have similar crop yields as their corporate neighbors without the oil/immigration footprint.

    But let’s not pretend that if we quit eating meat we’re going to be using less fuel/have less immigration/emit fewer greenhouse gasses. These things are a receding horizon. Our central authorities occasionally discover math and start multiplying numbers together in service to wonderful future that will show up if we just make a bunch of sacrifices; these promised futures don’t arrive for all the usual reasons.

  154. bomag says:
    @HA

    …rotting in the field

    Are we on the same page? We make fun of this nostrum because it is used to justify vast amounts of immigration with no connection to agriculture.

    We probably use 100,000 immigrant farm laborers. With a 20 year career, we could import 100,000 people every 20 years and get the crops off the field.

    It’s also been stated here many times that if we didn’t import people, the locals could spool up the mojo to get the country fed.

    And, it would be far better to import the food rather than import the people.

    I hear you telling me that if I want to eat a hamburger, I have to throw in with the corporate food, open borders crowd. They are orthogonal issues.

    • Replies: @HA
  155. HA says:
    @bomag

    “I hear you telling me that if I want to eat a hamburger, I have to throw in with the corporate food, open borders crowd.”

    No, I’m saying that getting big beef and big pork to downsize its current strategy over-reliance on cheap gas and plentiful subsidies and quasi-slave labor is not a bad deal — and that’s true even if Al Gore or some soy boy happens to be the one making the argument. Bacon is great unless you have to live downwind of one of those Idaho hog manufacturers mentioned above, or have to handle and breathe in the pesticides that go into or get dusted on the corn that feeds those hogs. I’ve seen first-hand the results of the latter, and it was pretty disturbing. So, even if downsizing the ag-sector does not do much for greenhouse gases, or Mideast wars, it’s still worth it if it leads to less of any of that pathology.

    Moreover, consistency matters. To the extent that you or anyone else here demands an “I like bacon” carve-out, someone else will demand a carve=out for the grapes in her nightly glass of Chardonnay, or for the blueberries that Junior likes in his waffles, and so on. Which just leads us back to business as usual.

    • Replies: @bomag
  156. bomag says:
    @HA

    I mainly agree.

    We can grow bacon ethically, which should be the goal. We shouldn’t ban the stuff under the pretense that perfection can’t be achieved; or to indulge those who want to dictate a restricted diet that’s part of their narrative.

  157. bomag says:
    @Pope Gregory I

    beef consumption is vastly greater than it was in biblical, late antique, and medieval times…

    Well, there are groups; Eskimos and such; that eat mainly meat.

    Gluttony speaks to something other than general dietary restrictions.

    • Replies: @Pope Gregory I
  158. @bomag

    Very strange that you think the objection is to meat consumption per se or even to meat consumption as a high proportion of one’s diet, rather than to consuming a high absolute quantity of high quality and delicious meat (or anything) at frequent intervals, often with a ravenous eagerness.

    • Replies: @bomag
  159. bomag says:
    @Pope Gregory I

    ???

    You’re the one who announced: The amount of beef Americans consume is not normal and healthy which sure sounds like an objection to meat consumption per se and meat consumption as a high proportion of one’s diet.

    • Replies: @Pope Gregory I
  160. @bomag

    The absolute amount of beef americans consume is not normal and healthy. Nor is it’s high quality and deliciousness. Nor is the frequency and eagerness with which Americans eat it. Is that more clear now?

  161. bomag says:

    You come off as an anxious scold.

    For a commodity product, American beef is exceptional for taste. Beef at current consumption levels can be part of a healthy diet. I don’t think we should regret people the pleasant eating experience of beef.

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