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From the New York Times news section:

Amazon Quietly Tweaks Logo Some Say Resembled Hitler’s Mustache
The app icon, which shows a blue patch above Amazon’s signature smile-shaped arrow, was given smoother edges and a folded corner after claims that it bore a resemblance to the German dictator.

And from the Washington Post news section:

As CPAC dismisses claims that its stage resembled a Nazi insignia, Hyatt calls hate symbols ‘abhorrent’

Here’s a picture:

By Jaclyn Peiser
March 1, 2021 at 2:49 a.m. PST

For four days at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Orlando, speakers at the Conservative Political Action Conference shared a number of contentious views, from echoing false claims about election fraud to undermining the seriousness of a pandemic that has killed more than 512,000 Americans.

But some critics also took aim at a seemingly more mundane detail: the shape of the conference stage.

Images of the CPAC stage went viral this weekend as many noted a resemblance to the Odal or Othala Rune, a symbol emblazoned on some Nazi uniforms. The Anti-Defamation League has classified the insignia as a hate symbol that has been adopted by modern day white supremacists.

CPAC’s organizers vehemently denied any link between the stage design and the Nazi symbology, calling the criticism “outrageous and slanderous.”

“We have a long standing commitment to the Jewish community,” Matt Schlapp, chair of the American Conservative Union, said on Saturday in a tweet. “Cancel culture extremists must address antisemitism within their own ranks. CPAC proudly stands with our Jewish allies, including those speaking from this stage.”

As the controversy continued on Sunday, Hyatt Hotels said in a statement that it had addressed the concerns with the conference and denounced any use of hate symbols.

“We take the concern raised about the prospect of symbols of hate being included in the stage design at CPAC 2021 very seriously as all such symbols are abhorrent and unequivocally counter to our values as a company,” said Hyatt, which had faced pointed criticism for hosting the event.

The hotel noted it allowed the event to continue after organizers “told us that any resemblance to a symbol of hate is unintentional.”

The blowback comes after CPAC organizers disinvited a scheduled speaker, social media figure Young Pharaoh, after liberal media watchdog Media Matters for America reported he had made antisemitic comments on Twitter. Pharaoh tweeted that Judaism is a “complete lie” and “made up for political gain,” and said Jews are “thieving.”

Not surprisingly, the Post failed to include a photo of Mr. Young Pharaoh.

Also not surprisingly, the firm that designed the stage, Design Foundry, is very liberal and has ties to the Democratic Party.

The larger point is that as science recedes along with the repute of the kind of people who invented science, white men, we are increasingly living in an age of superstition haunted by white male demons.

 
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  1. Sometimes white science doesn’t seem to cut the mustard in today’s world:

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Cortes

    Pretty cool home project, I must say.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAI7Lu4UFi4

  2. Some people are insane.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @PhysicistDave

    Regardless, CPAC comes off looking weak here by accepting the frame that Germanic runes are bad if intentionally used or shared.

    , @Joseph Doaks
    @PhysicistDave

    "Some people are insane."

    A great many, I'm afraid. It seems to be contagious.

    Replies: @anon

  3. … from echoing false claims about election fraud to undermining the seriousness of a pandemic that has killed more than 512,000 Americans.

    I admire how the reporter quickly establishes her objectivity regarding the CPAC event.

    BTW someone (in jest I hope) also noted that the black swoosh atop a version of the UPS logo somewhat resembles Hitler’s hair.

    https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/4375385/logo_ups_icon

  4. I am outraged that Amazon uses a “rising” penis as its symbol. It’s mysoginistic, demeaning and disgusting.

    It’s especially bad for children who see that pornagraphic symbol.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  5. This is like looking for satanic symbols in rock albums.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Half Canadian

    Or like trying to find evidence that Paul McCartney died in 1966 and was replaced by an imposter:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_is_dead

    I actually dropped the needle on The White Album and used a pencil eraser to spin the vinyl backwards on "Revolution 9."

    Sure enough, the words "number 9" clearly say "turn me on dead man" when played backwards. Try it yourself at home!

  6. The Anti-Defamation League has classified the insignia entire world as a hate symbol that has been adopted by modern day white supremacists.

    In a sane world, the ADL and SPLC would have no credibility. We really have to push back against these extremist hate groups every chance we get.

  7. Amazon Quietly Tweaks Logo Some Say Resembled Hitler’s Mustache
    The app icon, which shows a blue patch above Amazon’s signature smile-shaped arrow, was given smoother edges and a folded corner after claims that it bore a resemblance to the German dictator.


    Actually, it kinda looks like a serrated blade falling on a penis.

    In which case it’s the perfect logo for the current trans-gendered year.

  8. Here is an actual photo of a member of the US Congress shamelessly participating in an event held at a venue that is bedecked with fascist symbols:

    Quick, somebody inform the ADL.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    Glenn Beck made that claim without any irony.

    , @Aardvark
    @Mr. Anon

    I believe I read somewhere that the when the Romans marched upon a new village, they would plant a Fasces (bundle of rods with an ax), that said "look f*ckers - we're in charge now". 2000 years later, Richard Armitage describes State department diplomacy towards other countries as "Look f*cker you do what we want".
    My, how far we have come.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @sayless
    @Mr. Anon

    Inform the ADL, and melt down all of the Mercury dimes.

    , @Currahee
    @Mr. Anon

    I thought that Michael Jackson died!

  9. It sounds like Design Foundry was trying to make CPAC look bad – like that photographer did with John McCain for The Atlantic back in 2008.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Gilbert Ratchet

    It occurred to me. See Steve's prior post on how Papa John's ad agency sabotaged their own client. The Woke are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the Party above loyalty to a client - they answer to a Higher Calling.

    The shape of the stage did not make any sense in that the two little wings at the back (under the CPAC signs) don't lead anywhere. Unless you were trying to draw a secret Nazi rune and then call up some reporters and point out to them that CPAC's stage was in the shape of a Nazi emblem.

    There is a lot of sabotaging going on. In order to destroy Les Moonves's career, CBS and its law firm promised anonymity to actress Bobbie Phillips, who then told a lurid tale of being pressured into oral sex by Moonves - 'Be my girlfriend and I’ll put you on any show.', he supposedly said. [Do humans actually talk like this?] Very soon after, Phillips's story, with her name attached to it, was printed in the NY Times. The law firms and CBS have now reportedly paid Phillips millions for the breach of confidentiality.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9321449/CBS-forced-pay-millions-actress-lawyers-leaked-Les-Moonves-allegations.html

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stan Adams

  10. Is nothing sacred? I can’t take this shite anymore!

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/dr-seuss-books-canceled-notebook/2021/03/02/b3496b98-7b55-11eb-a976-c028a4215c78_story.html

    Anyway, are we sure about this?

    The larger point is that as science recedes along with the repute of the kind of people who invented science, white men,

    Science isn’t really an “invention” is it? I’ll grant it’s not my area of expertise, but to use an analogy to something I know a little more about, I don’t think philosophy is an invention, either. It’s a spontaneous human enterprise that children begin to do when very young.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247234746_Preschool_Children’s_Conceptions_of_Moral_and_Social_Rules

    https://evolutionnews.org/2014/08/more_studies_sh/

    The accomplishments of White men are numerous and extraordinary. There’s no need to exaggerate, nor to suggest that common sense trial and error never occurred to anyone else.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Rosie

    Obviously performing trial and error to learn how things work isn't exclusive to humans, let alone white men, but the scientific method, which has developed over centuries, combined with publishing your findings and letting others peer review and replicate, is a lot more efficient in the long term than just letting everyone try to reinvent the wheel.

  11. @PhysicistDave
    Some people are insane.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Joseph Doaks

    Regardless, CPAC comes off looking weak here by accepting the frame that Germanic runes are bad if intentionally used or shared.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks, donut, sayless
  12. There’s no need to exaggerate, nor to suggest that common sense trial and error never occurred to anyone else.

    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Paperback Writer


    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.
     
    Yes, that's true, and I think the reason is White antiauthoritarianism. The scientific method is profoundly equalizing. Whoever has the data wins. The powers that be can put a thumb on the scale, but there is always a danger that this will be noticed.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @Rosie
    @Paperback Writer


    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.
     
    Yes, that's true, and I think the reason is White antiauthoritarianism. The scientific method is profoundly equalizing. Whoever has the data wins. The powers that be can put a thumb on the scale, but there is always a danger that this will be noticed.
  13. As the saying goes, the demand for Nazis today far exceeds the supply.

    • LOL: Joseph Doaks
  14. Hitler was actually a pretty nice guy.

    Okay, I just said that to get a rise out the woke, if any be lurking.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @James Speaks

    Vegetarian, dog-lover, made a treaty with the USSR, hated the US Military...

  15. Why haven’t Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley been cancelled for their band logo? Surely someone will notice the lightning bolts in the name KISS.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Beavertales

    They were Jewish boys from the outer boroughs (Gene Simmons was born Chaim Vitz; Paul Stanley was Stanley Eisen) who just wanted to get rich, famous and laid a lot. It was irony.

    Besides, Simmons was cast out of what passes for "polite society" long ago. Look up his legendary, if not infamous, 2002 radio interview with Terry Gross of NPR's "Fresh Air."

  16. Hirohito sported a stash too, but a bit curvier than Hitler’s and more like the Amazon logo. How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan? Unit 731?

    Hello Kitty! Cultures can change rapidly. This preoccupation with Hitler leaves us blindsided to other incoming evils, including our own.

    • Replies: @anon
    @e.272

    How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan?

    Hopefully none, since "Europe First" was official policy before Pearl Harbor.

    Replies: @e.272, @Hibernian

  17. Our Demon-Haunted Current Year

    The dropping of the classic Crusader image from the logo of King Arthur Flour (now King Arthur Baking Company) in 2020 is another ‘current year’ anti-White exorcism.

    https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/king-arthur-flour-rebrand-baking-pandemic-trend

    [Rik] Haslam believes that the old logo wouldn’t continue to cut it in 2020 because it does not appeal to a diverse audience of bakers. “The image of a white knight astride a horse felt very masculine, European and old fashioned. Though intended to symbolize King Arthur, the figure actually felt more like a medieval crusader,” Haslam said. “The cross on the flag further emphasized this religious crusader symbol and would alienate many consumers.” In contrast, the new brand removes hints of militarism or religious affiliation, while retaining the connection to the company’s heritage and the name King Arthur.

    ‘Surprised face’ ad man Rik Haslam:

    https://www.brandpie.com/people/rik-haslam

    Hi-res recent versions of the classic logo:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    “The image of a white knight astride a horse felt very masculine, European and old fashioned.
     
    Good God, a triple bogey! How offensive can you get?
  18. Remember 15 years ago when Burger King or Wendy’s changed the logo on their shake because it too closely resembled the word Allah spelled in Arabic.

    Amazon also now had grocery stores. Grocery Stores. Bezos really thinks he can take it all with him.

  19. Amazon Quietly Tweaks Logo Some Say Resembled Hitler’s Mustache

    Don’t be silly. It’s obviously Jonathan Mason’s drinking buddy down in Guayaquil:

  20. @Rosie
    Is nothing sacred? I can't take this shite anymore!

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/dr-seuss-books-canceled-notebook/2021/03/02/b3496b98-7b55-11eb-a976-c028a4215c78_story.html

    Anyway, are we sure about this?


    The larger point is that as science recedes along with the repute of the kind of people who invented science, white men,
     
    Science isn't really an "invention" is it? I'll grant it's not my area of expertise, but to use an analogy to something I know a little more about, I don’t think philosophy is an invention, either. It's a spontaneous human enterprise that children begin to do when very young.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247234746_Preschool_Children's_Conceptions_of_Moral_and_Social_Rules

    https://evolutionnews.org/2014/08/more_studies_sh/

    The accomplishments of White men are numerous and extraordinary. There's no need to exaggerate, nor to suggest that common sense trial and error never occurred to anyone else.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Obviously performing trial and error to learn how things work isn’t exclusive to humans, let alone white men, but the scientific method, which has developed over centuries, combined with publishing your findings and letting others peer review and replicate, is a lot more efficient in the long term than just letting everyone try to reinvent the wheel.

  21. Hyatt’s own logo may represent Adolf holding up YT:
    Their Regency logo may have a hidden swastika in it:
    Again, this is old territory. Steve probably remembers when the Proctor & Gamble logo was satanic:

    Didn’t he do some marketing research for them? Hmm…

    .

  22. @Cortes
    Sometimes white science doesn’t seem to cut the mustard in today’s world:

    https://youtu.be/UIUdyBG_DT0

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Pretty cool home project, I must say.

  23. That’s not just really biased “news” reporting; it’s misleading to the point of flat out lying.

    “Some people on Twitter saw a shape of something NAZI… They denied it (but these NAZI always deny they are NAZIS… But they originally invited an ANTI-SEMITE… Who we all know must have been a white NAZI.”

    Got it, dear reader? CPAC was “embroiled in a controversy” over NAZIS, NAZIS, NAZIS…

    It’s like when Trump supporters get assaulted leaving one of his rallies: “Violence erupted yet again after one of Trump’s rallies…” Basically lying but not quite.

    This is the sort of stuff you do when you’re selling motor oil or time shares or trying to get people to invest in precious metals. When you combine non-stop salesmanship with “Democracy Dies in Darkness” self-righteousness, it’s an insult to our intelligence to call yourself a “news” outlet.

  24. @Gilbert Ratchet
    It sounds like Design Foundry was trying to make CPAC look bad - like that photographer did with John McCain for The Atlantic back in 2008.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It occurred to me. See Steve’s prior post on how Papa John’s ad agency sabotaged their own client. The Woke are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the Party above loyalty to a client – they answer to a Higher Calling.

    The shape of the stage did not make any sense in that the two little wings at the back (under the CPAC signs) don’t lead anywhere. Unless you were trying to draw a secret Nazi rune and then call up some reporters and point out to them that CPAC’s stage was in the shape of a Nazi emblem.

    There is a lot of sabotaging going on. In order to destroy Les Moonves’s career, CBS and its law firm promised anonymity to actress Bobbie Phillips, who then told a lurid tale of being pressured into oral sex by Moonves – ‘Be my girlfriend and I’ll put you on any show.’, he supposedly said. [Do humans actually talk like this?] Very soon after, Phillips’s story, with her name attached to it, was printed in the NY Times. The law firms and CBS have now reportedly paid Phillips millions for the breach of confidentiality.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9321449/CBS-forced-pay-millions-actress-lawyers-leaked-Les-Moonves-allegations.html

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    It occurred to me. See Steve’s prior post on how Papa John’s ad agency sabotaged their own client. The [____] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [____] above loyalty to a [_____] – they answer to a Higher Calling.
     
    Try Mad Libs. It's fun.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Stan Adams
    @Jack D

    Shari Redstone wins one for the sisterhood!

    It may or may not be worth noting that Moonves' current wife, Julie Chen, was once one of his employees.

    For some reason, Chen - a pleasant but bland personality with no particular star quality - rose out of obscurity in the late '90s and was given a succession of plum assignments. Then she ended up dating and eventually marrying the head honcho of the entire network. Coincidence?

    She started out in the news division, anchoring a program that aired at 4:30 in the morning. Then she was selected to host the American version of Big Brother, which debuted around the same time as Survivor in the summer of 2000.

    Unlike Survivor, which was a smash hit that ushered in the age of reality shows in America, the U.S. incarnation of Big Brother did not draw a huge audience. But the show stayed on the air year after year, becoming a CBS summer staple, and Chen remained its host. In an unusual arrangement, she was permitted to continue her duties as a newscaster, despite a network prohibition against allowing journalists to work on entertainment shows.

    In fact, she was even given a big promotion, eventually becoming one of several hosts of the network's two-hour morning program. After she married Moonves, he had an entire studio built in Los Angeles so she could live with him on the West Coast while still doing the New York-based show.

    CBS has never enjoyed great success in the morning, and the situation during Chen's tenure was no different. A succession of co-hosts came and went. But Chen stayed on for the better part of a decade, despite the fact that she never did anything especially interesting or memorable. Unlike, say, Katie Couric, she never established a reputation as a good interviewer. She just showed up and read the teleprompter.

    Then, about 10 years ago, she was given another high-profile assignment - co-hosting The Talk (a daily daytime gabfest). That is the job she continues to hold to this day.

    When The Talk debuted, it drew lower ratings than the soap opera it replaced (As the World Turns). But the network ended up making more money because a talk show is cheaper to produce than a scripted drama.

    So how is it that someone with no real talent or charisma has done so well in the cutthroat world of television? Could it be that she has cultivated relationships with powerful men who helped her career? Nah, that's impossible.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  25. That doesn’t even look like Charlie Chaplin! Haunted, forsooth!

  26. @e.272
    Hirohito sported a stash too, but a bit curvier than Hitler's and more like the Amazon logo. How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan? Unit 731?

    Hello Kitty! Cultures can change rapidly. This preoccupation with Hitler leaves us blindsided to other incoming evils, including our own.

    Replies: @anon

    How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan?

    Hopefully none, since “Europe First” was official policy before Pearl Harbor.

    • Replies: @e.272
    @anon

    You are welcome to rebut me, but I haven't the foggiest idea of what that sentence means.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz

    , @Hibernian
    @anon


    Hopefully none, since “Europe First” was official policy before Pearl Harbor.
     
    And after. At least in 1942.
  27. Where does this worship of dementia come from? Critical, self-respecting thinking is being (in the examples given: has been) replaced by a slavery to feelings that were induced through clever undermining of the adult brain and symbolic actions. This has all the hallmarks of a mass-hysterical behavior.

  28. @PhysicistDave
    Some people are insane.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Joseph Doaks

    “Some people are insane.”

    A great many, I’m afraid. It seems to be contagious.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Joseph Doaks

    It seems to be contagious.


    Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one.

    - Charles MacKay in Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds
     

  29. @Jack D
    @Gilbert Ratchet

    It occurred to me. See Steve's prior post on how Papa John's ad agency sabotaged their own client. The Woke are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the Party above loyalty to a client - they answer to a Higher Calling.

    The shape of the stage did not make any sense in that the two little wings at the back (under the CPAC signs) don't lead anywhere. Unless you were trying to draw a secret Nazi rune and then call up some reporters and point out to them that CPAC's stage was in the shape of a Nazi emblem.

    There is a lot of sabotaging going on. In order to destroy Les Moonves's career, CBS and its law firm promised anonymity to actress Bobbie Phillips, who then told a lurid tale of being pressured into oral sex by Moonves - 'Be my girlfriend and I’ll put you on any show.', he supposedly said. [Do humans actually talk like this?] Very soon after, Phillips's story, with her name attached to it, was printed in the NY Times. The law firms and CBS have now reportedly paid Phillips millions for the breach of confidentiality.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9321449/CBS-forced-pay-millions-actress-lawyers-leaked-Les-Moonves-allegations.html

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stan Adams

    It occurred to me. See Steve’s prior post on how Papa John’s ad agency sabotaged their own client. The [____] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [____] above loyalty to a [_____] – they answer to a Higher Calling.

    Try Mad Libs. It’s fun.

    • LOL: JMcG
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    The [___1_] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [___2_] above loyalty to a [__3___] – they answer to a Higher Calling.
     
    I see what you did there. I'm not anti-Catholic myself, but I'm guessing you wanted me to fill in:

    1. Catholics
    2. Pope
    3. heretic

    Sorry, I'm not going to take that bait.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  30. The resemblance is startling. The question now is how Amazon got away with it for so long.

  31. @anon
    @e.272

    How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan?

    Hopefully none, since "Europe First" was official policy before Pearl Harbor.

    Replies: @e.272, @Hibernian

    You are welcome to rebut me, but I haven’t the foggiest idea of what that sentence means.

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
    @e.272

    The policy was called 'Germany first', i.e., the allies prioritized the defeat of Germany (and Italy) over the defeat of Japan, meaning the majority of resources went to the European Theater of Operations (ETO).
    That said, quite a number of long-lead items like aircraft carriers and battleships used primarily in the PTO had been funded and were under construction before the US actually entered the war.

  32. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joseph Doaks
    @PhysicistDave

    "Some people are insane."

    A great many, I'm afraid. It seems to be contagious.

    Replies: @anon

    It seems to be contagious.

    Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one.

    – Charles MacKay in Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

  33. Pharaoh tweeted that Judaism is a “complete lie” and “made up for political gain,” and said Jews are “thieving.”

    Is it true that the purpose of Judaism is political gain?

  34. The larger point is that as science recedes along with the repute of the kind of people who invented science, white men, we are increasingly living in an age of superstition haunted by white male demons.

    And just who pushed these changes? It was those who brought “intellectual dynamism” to the campuses back in the 60s in the form of postmodernism.

    And the Ivy League crowd who threw other Whites under the bus to get their own set-aside deal. And now they are shocked to find chickens coming home to roost.

    And the Nice Guy Whites who didn’t think “race all that important” and wanted to move forward into the modern world (i.e. forced integration, affirmative action, etc).

  35. Don’t forget the deep offense of the Norwegian flag.

    https://www.breitbart.com/the-media/2018/02/22/seattle-author-tips-reporter-mistaking-norwegian-flag-confederate-flag/

    https://nypost.com/2020/07/29/norwegian-flag-removed-from-inn-after-its-mistaken-for-confederate-flag/

    I keep getting this feeling that America’s cosmopolitan elite isn’t so knowledgeable about the rest of the world…

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Altai

    But they took an overseas trip, unlike you!
    Once.

    , @anon
    @Altai

    I keep getting this feeling that America’s cosmopolitan elite isn’t so knowledgeable about the rest of the world… anything.

    FIFY.

  36. @Half Canadian
    This is like looking for satanic symbols in rock albums.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    Or like trying to find evidence that Paul McCartney died in 1966 and was replaced by an imposter:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_is_dead

    I actually dropped the needle on The White Album and used a pencil eraser to spin the vinyl backwards on “Revolution 9.”

    Sure enough, the words “number 9” clearly say “turn me on dead man” when played backwards. Try it yourself at home!

  37. @Altai
    Don't forget the deep offense of the Norwegian flag.

    https://www.breitbart.com/the-media/2018/02/22/seattle-author-tips-reporter-mistaking-norwegian-flag-confederate-flag/

    https://nypost.com/2020/07/29/norwegian-flag-removed-from-inn-after-its-mistaken-for-confederate-flag/

    I keep getting this feeling that America's cosmopolitan elite isn't so knowledgeable about the rest of the world...

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @anon

    But they took an overseas trip, unlike you!
    Once.

  38. @Altai
    Don't forget the deep offense of the Norwegian flag.

    https://www.breitbart.com/the-media/2018/02/22/seattle-author-tips-reporter-mistaking-norwegian-flag-confederate-flag/

    https://nypost.com/2020/07/29/norwegian-flag-removed-from-inn-after-its-mistaken-for-confederate-flag/

    I keep getting this feeling that America's cosmopolitan elite isn't so knowledgeable about the rest of the world...

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @anon

    I keep getting this feeling that America’s cosmopolitan elite isn’t so knowledgeable about the rest of the world… anything.

    FIFY.

  39. @Paperback Writer

    There’s no need to exaggerate, nor to suggest that common sense trial and error never occurred to anyone else.
     
    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.

    Replies: @Rosie, @Rosie

    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.

    Yes, that’s true, and I think the reason is White antiauthoritarianism. The scientific method is profoundly equalizing. Whoever has the data wins. The powers that be can put a thumb on the scale, but there is always a danger that this will be noticed.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Rosie

    Think again, Rosie. First of all, "science" didn't pop out until the 18th century, in England and Germany during period of anti-Authoritarianism.

    Look up Galileo.

  40. @Paperback Writer

    There’s no need to exaggerate, nor to suggest that common sense trial and error never occurred to anyone else.
     
    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.

    Replies: @Rosie, @Rosie

    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.

    Yes, that’s true, and I think the reason is White antiauthoritarianism. The scientific method is profoundly equalizing. Whoever has the data wins. The powers that be can put a thumb on the scale, but there is always a danger that this will be noticed.

  41. Can we go back to when people like this would see the Virgin Mary in a piece of burnt toast? Because I liked that world better.

    • LOL: Rosie
  42. @Beavertales
    Why haven't Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley been cancelled for their band logo? Surely someone will notice the lightning bolts in the name KISS.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    They were Jewish boys from the outer boroughs (Gene Simmons was born Chaim Vitz; Paul Stanley was Stanley Eisen) who just wanted to get rich, famous and laid a lot. It was irony.

    Besides, Simmons was cast out of what passes for “polite society” long ago. Look up his legendary, if not infamous, 2002 radio interview with Terry Gross of NPR’s “Fresh Air.”

  43. @Jack D
    @Gilbert Ratchet

    It occurred to me. See Steve's prior post on how Papa John's ad agency sabotaged their own client. The Woke are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the Party above loyalty to a client - they answer to a Higher Calling.

    The shape of the stage did not make any sense in that the two little wings at the back (under the CPAC signs) don't lead anywhere. Unless you were trying to draw a secret Nazi rune and then call up some reporters and point out to them that CPAC's stage was in the shape of a Nazi emblem.

    There is a lot of sabotaging going on. In order to destroy Les Moonves's career, CBS and its law firm promised anonymity to actress Bobbie Phillips, who then told a lurid tale of being pressured into oral sex by Moonves - 'Be my girlfriend and I’ll put you on any show.', he supposedly said. [Do humans actually talk like this?] Very soon after, Phillips's story, with her name attached to it, was printed in the NY Times. The law firms and CBS have now reportedly paid Phillips millions for the breach of confidentiality.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9321449/CBS-forced-pay-millions-actress-lawyers-leaked-Les-Moonves-allegations.html

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stan Adams

    Shari Redstone wins one for the sisterhood!

    It may or may not be worth noting that Moonves’ current wife, Julie Chen, was once one of his employees.

    For some reason, Chen – a pleasant but bland personality with no particular star quality – rose out of obscurity in the late ’90s and was given a succession of plum assignments. Then she ended up dating and eventually marrying the head honcho of the entire network. Coincidence?

    She started out in the news division, anchoring a program that aired at 4:30 in the morning. Then she was selected to host the American version of Big Brother, which debuted around the same time as Survivor in the summer of 2000.

    Unlike Survivor, which was a smash hit that ushered in the age of reality shows in America, the U.S. incarnation of Big Brother did not draw a huge audience. But the show stayed on the air year after year, becoming a CBS summer staple, and Chen remained its host. In an unusual arrangement, she was permitted to continue her duties as a newscaster, despite a network prohibition against allowing journalists to work on entertainment shows.

    In fact, she was even given a big promotion, eventually becoming one of several hosts of the network’s two-hour morning program. After she married Moonves, he had an entire studio built in Los Angeles so she could live with him on the West Coast while still doing the New York-based show.

    CBS has never enjoyed great success in the morning, and the situation during Chen’s tenure was no different. A succession of co-hosts came and went. But Chen stayed on for the better part of a decade, despite the fact that she never did anything especially interesting or memorable. Unlike, say, Katie Couric, she never established a reputation as a good interviewer. She just showed up and read the teleprompter.

    Then, about 10 years ago, she was given another high-profile assignment – co-hosting The Talk (a daily daytime gabfest). That is the job she continues to hold to this day.

    When The Talk debuted, it drew lower ratings than the soap opera it replaced (As the World Turns). But the network ended up making more money because a talk show is cheaper to produce than a scripted drama.

    So how is it that someone with no real talent or charisma has done so well in the cutthroat world of television? Could it be that she has cultivated relationships with powerful men who helped her career? Nah, that’s impossible.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Stan Adams

    Correction:

    She left The Talk after Moonves was forced out. But she's still the host of Big Brother.

  44. If you imagine the lower loop of the B is an o, this logo seems to include a derogatory name for a Polish person. But who cares, Polacks have white skin!

  45. @Stan Adams
    @Jack D

    Shari Redstone wins one for the sisterhood!

    It may or may not be worth noting that Moonves' current wife, Julie Chen, was once one of his employees.

    For some reason, Chen - a pleasant but bland personality with no particular star quality - rose out of obscurity in the late '90s and was given a succession of plum assignments. Then she ended up dating and eventually marrying the head honcho of the entire network. Coincidence?

    She started out in the news division, anchoring a program that aired at 4:30 in the morning. Then she was selected to host the American version of Big Brother, which debuted around the same time as Survivor in the summer of 2000.

    Unlike Survivor, which was a smash hit that ushered in the age of reality shows in America, the U.S. incarnation of Big Brother did not draw a huge audience. But the show stayed on the air year after year, becoming a CBS summer staple, and Chen remained its host. In an unusual arrangement, she was permitted to continue her duties as a newscaster, despite a network prohibition against allowing journalists to work on entertainment shows.

    In fact, she was even given a big promotion, eventually becoming one of several hosts of the network's two-hour morning program. After she married Moonves, he had an entire studio built in Los Angeles so she could live with him on the West Coast while still doing the New York-based show.

    CBS has never enjoyed great success in the morning, and the situation during Chen's tenure was no different. A succession of co-hosts came and went. But Chen stayed on for the better part of a decade, despite the fact that she never did anything especially interesting or memorable. Unlike, say, Katie Couric, she never established a reputation as a good interviewer. She just showed up and read the teleprompter.

    Then, about 10 years ago, she was given another high-profile assignment - co-hosting The Talk (a daily daytime gabfest). That is the job she continues to hold to this day.

    When The Talk debuted, it drew lower ratings than the soap opera it replaced (As the World Turns). But the network ended up making more money because a talk show is cheaper to produce than a scripted drama.

    So how is it that someone with no real talent or charisma has done so well in the cutthroat world of television? Could it be that she has cultivated relationships with powerful men who helped her career? Nah, that's impossible.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Correction:

    She left The Talk after Moonves was forced out. But she’s still the host of Big Brother.

  46. I have never been able to get out of my mind the uncanny resemblance of the Amazon ‘swoosh’ to a penis fairly rampant with a large bell end. As their mission creeps to divining what is allowable for us to read, they are becoming their logo.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @TyRade

    Me too. It’s embarrassing watching with kids and wondering when they’ll figure it out.

  47. The larger point is that as science recedes along with the repute of the kind of people who invented science, white men, we are increasingly living in an age of superstition haunted by white male demons.

    Well, we know for a fact that all the whining and reasoning and attempts at appeasement in the world won’t change a thing when there’s a lynch mob out to get you.

    So, to paraphrase another notorious white man, if we be demons, let’s make the most of it.

    BTW the scientific establishment has been nothing but a tool and weapon of the globalists and “woke” for decades now. To still bemoan lost “science” is merely to stroke a gravestone.

  48. When Hitler is everywhere, then Hitler is nowhere.

  49. “We are increasingly living in an age of superstition haunted by white male demons.”

    Or more prosaically, one where people pay attention to loonies.

  50. Every day is like April 1st now.

    I’m trying to think how long it’s been since the last time that upon seeing stories like these, I would have been certain that they were satire.

    Still not quite certain that I won’t wake-up at any time to discover that this was all just a bizarre dream…

  51. @Mr. Anon
    Here is an actual photo of a member of the US Congress shamelessly participating in an event held at a venue that is bedecked with fascist symbols:

    https://www.staradvertiser.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/web1_9429363-996e8016bd0f49fa8974aee0c0c937f8.jpg


    Quick, somebody inform the ADL.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Aardvark, @sayless, @Currahee

    Glenn Beck made that claim without any irony.

  52. @Mr. Anon
    Here is an actual photo of a member of the US Congress shamelessly participating in an event held at a venue that is bedecked with fascist symbols:

    https://www.staradvertiser.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/web1_9429363-996e8016bd0f49fa8974aee0c0c937f8.jpg


    Quick, somebody inform the ADL.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Aardvark, @sayless, @Currahee

    I believe I read somewhere that the when the Romans marched upon a new village, they would plant a Fasces (bundle of rods with an ax), that said “look f*ckers – we’re in charge now”. 2000 years later, Richard Armitage describes State department diplomacy towards other countries as “Look f*cker you do what we want”.
    My, how far we have come.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Aardvark

    Indeed. We are Rome now. But more depraved and with crappier architecture.

  53. The same Washington Post writer managed to report recently on the Oklahoma cannibal (Black) who ate his neighbor’s (white) heart without mentioning the race of either of them.

  54. @e.272
    @anon

    You are welcome to rebut me, but I haven't the foggiest idea of what that sentence means.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz

    The policy was called ‘Germany first’, i.e., the allies prioritized the defeat of Germany (and Italy) over the defeat of Japan, meaning the majority of resources went to the European Theater of Operations (ETO).
    That said, quite a number of long-lead items like aircraft carriers and battleships used primarily in the PTO had been funded and were under construction before the US actually entered the war.

  55. Not surprisingly, the Post failed to include a photo of Mr. Young Pharaoh.

    With that name, the photo is superfluous.

  56. @anon
    @e.272

    How many college students would know that most of the US war effort was directed against imperial Japan?

    Hopefully none, since "Europe First" was official policy before Pearl Harbor.

    Replies: @e.272, @Hibernian

    Hopefully none, since “Europe First” was official policy before Pearl Harbor.

    And after. At least in 1942.

  57. @Rosie
    @Paperback Writer


    Of course it did, but it was never systematized the way Europeans did.
     
    Yes, that's true, and I think the reason is White antiauthoritarianism. The scientific method is profoundly equalizing. Whoever has the data wins. The powers that be can put a thumb on the scale, but there is always a danger that this will be noticed.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Think again, Rosie. First of all, “science” didn’t pop out until the 18th century, in England and Germany during period of anti-Authoritarianism.

    Look up Galileo.

  58. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    It occurred to me. See Steve’s prior post on how Papa John’s ad agency sabotaged their own client. The [____] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [____] above loyalty to a [_____] – they answer to a Higher Calling.
     
    Try Mad Libs. It's fun.

    Replies: @Jack D

    The [___1_] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [___2_] above loyalty to a [__3___] – they answer to a Higher Calling.

    I see what you did there. I’m not anti-Catholic myself, but I’m guessing you wanted me to fill in:

    1. Catholics
    2. Pope
    3. heretic

    Sorry, I’m not going to take that bait.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    You are so much fun to play with.

    Thanks.

    I don't much care for the whole Catholic thing either, but it only stinks as much as your shit does. Hey! Maybe I'm just trapped in some kind of clown reality that exists between Catholics and Jews! Ha ha! I've figured it out.

    Now, how do I escape?!

    Oh, BTW, your little, Talmudic trick doesn't work here. Since the Catholics stink as much as you do, what difference does it make to me, a non-never-in-a-million-years Catholic? You have a problem on your hands now, Master. I hold you and them in the same, dirty hand.

    Replies: @Jack D

  59. @James Speaks

    Hitler was actually a pretty nice guy.
     
    Okay, I just said that to get a rise out the woke, if any be lurking.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Vegetarian, dog-lover, made a treaty with the USSR, hated the US Military…

  60. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    The [___1_] are not above doing this because they put loyalty to the [___2_] above loyalty to a [__3___] – they answer to a Higher Calling.
     
    I see what you did there. I'm not anti-Catholic myself, but I'm guessing you wanted me to fill in:

    1. Catholics
    2. Pope
    3. heretic

    Sorry, I'm not going to take that bait.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    You are so much fun to play with.

    Thanks.

    I don’t much care for the whole Catholic thing either, but it only stinks as much as your shit does. Hey! Maybe I’m just trapped in some kind of clown reality that exists between Catholics and Jews! Ha ha! I’ve figured it out.

    Now, how do I escape?!

    Oh, BTW, your little, Talmudic trick doesn’t work here. Since the Catholics stink as much as you do, what difference does it make to me, a non-never-in-a-million-years Catholic? You have a problem on your hands now, Master. I hold you and them in the same, dirty hand.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    your little, Talmudic trick
     
    https://youtu.be/vAvGKfaO3os?t=22

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  61. It’s a motif from folk art and it’s found all over the world. Goes back centuries.

  62. @Mr. Anon
    Here is an actual photo of a member of the US Congress shamelessly participating in an event held at a venue that is bedecked with fascist symbols:

    https://www.staradvertiser.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/web1_9429363-996e8016bd0f49fa8974aee0c0c937f8.jpg


    Quick, somebody inform the ADL.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Aardvark, @sayless, @Currahee

    Inform the ADL, and melt down all of the Mercury dimes.

  63. “as science recedes”

    As Science supplants science the technocracy attains monarchial status.

    “white men”

    White men are great. But lately they seem adrift which makes them susceptible to cults: Trump, Proud gay Boys, Science, anti-racism, iSteve. Steve is quite the guy; but he’s a crappy cult leader.

    “we are … living in an age of superstition haunted by white demons.

    One can hope: I like the the idea of living in a land of spooky graveyards and haunted castles. Life on the set of a black and white Universal monster movie is the life for me. Especially if I’m the monster.

  64. @Aardvark
    @Mr. Anon

    I believe I read somewhere that the when the Romans marched upon a new village, they would plant a Fasces (bundle of rods with an ax), that said "look f*ckers - we're in charge now". 2000 years later, Richard Armitage describes State department diplomacy towards other countries as "Look f*cker you do what we want".
    My, how far we have come.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Indeed. We are Rome now. But more depraved and with crappier architecture.

  65. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    You are so much fun to play with.

    Thanks.

    I don't much care for the whole Catholic thing either, but it only stinks as much as your shit does. Hey! Maybe I'm just trapped in some kind of clown reality that exists between Catholics and Jews! Ha ha! I've figured it out.

    Now, how do I escape?!

    Oh, BTW, your little, Talmudic trick doesn't work here. Since the Catholics stink as much as you do, what difference does it make to me, a non-never-in-a-million-years Catholic? You have a problem on your hands now, Master. I hold you and them in the same, dirty hand.

    Replies: @Jack D

    your little, Talmudic trick

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    That Star Wars character isn't a derogatory stereotype at all, is he? How did George Lucas get away with that? And those goofy Jamaicans?

    https://media.giphy.com/media/3owzWgfjON3M6BOEEM/giphy.gif

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz

  66. S says:

    Also not surprisingly, the firm that designed the stage, Design Foundry, is very liberal and has ties to the Democratic Party.

    Well, then, it appears likely to have been a set up. On the Republicans part, don’t they do even the most basic vetting of their contractors? [Don’t answer that!] And on the radical left’s part, can’t they see when they are being trolled and manipulated themselves? [Don’t answer that!]

    Relatedly, I’ll come out and say it. The phone calls Trump made, the one to the Ukraine that got him impeached, and the second one to the Georgia governor that brought calls for his impeachment, we’re also set ups. Set ups either by an untrustworthy adviser, or , perhaps less likely, by Trump himself, who wanted that reaction.

    Trump as an individual may be competent enough, but he’s a soft touch, and he made very poor choices as to staff, many of whom didn’t seem particularly loyal. Trump also would seem to be an emotionally needy sort who craves approval, thus perhaps making him an easy mark to manipulate.

    This CPAC stage fiasco, combined with the phone calls, the Jan 6 ‘capital insurrection, and numerous other Trump political ‘gaffes’ which appear at a generally shallow level at times to tie him to ‘white nationalism’, but with some plausible deniability attached, strain credulity that these are all just ‘honest mistakes’, either on his part, or perhaps more likely, corrupt ‘advisers’.

    What next will we see: a supposed Trump supporter giving a German shepherd to Trump that is named ‘Blondi’, and an ‘innocent’ staffer arranging a photo shoot of Trump playing with the dog at Key Lago?

    This all just reinforces my long held belief that Trump is (at best) controlled opposition.

    I don’t believe in him for the same reason I don’t believe that the Cold War was ultimately real, seeing the repeated (and often ridiculous) failures of U.S. leadership in the purported ‘struggle’ against Communism also strain credulity.

    Nobody is that consistently stupid without it being deliberate.

  67. @Jack D
    @Buzz Mohawk


    your little, Talmudic trick
     
    https://youtu.be/vAvGKfaO3os?t=22

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    That Star Wars character isn’t a derogatory stereotype at all, is he? How did George Lucas get away with that? And those goofy Jamaicans?

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
    @Buzz Mohawk

    He did not. He sold to Disney which, apart from the money, must feel like a most severe punishment.

  68. Doesn’t ADL and the rest of the Jew hysterics know that Hyatt Hotels is owned by one of the wealthiest ultra left most powerful Jewish families in the country, the Pritzkers ? They were the money behind Obama.

    Or are the Enemies of Whites now eating their own?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Alden


    Doesn’t ADL and the rest of the Jew hysterics know that Hyatt Hotels is owned by one of the wealthiest ultra left most powerful Jewish families in the country, the Pritzkers ? They were the money behind Obama.
     
    Is Fred Hiatt of the Washington Post jewish?
  69. @TyRade
    I have never been able to get out of my mind the uncanny resemblance of the Amazon 'swoosh' to a penis fairly rampant with a large bell end. As their mission creeps to divining what is allowable for us to read, they are becoming their logo.

    Replies: @Alden

    Me too. It’s embarrassing watching with kids and wondering when they’ll figure it out.

  70. TCM will soon feature intense idiot intellectual discussions of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Gone With The Wind and Psycho by those two pale beige black fools with PHDs in film.

    GWTW obvious why liberals don’t like it. Breakfast because of the Japanese upstairs who used to yell at Holly. Now children, can anyone guess why the liberals don’t like Psycho anymore? It’s not because the big scene is porno sadism ; stabbing a woman while she’s naked in a shower.

    It’s because it’s disrespectful towards transgenders and cross dressers.

    Dot Indian women have entered hair WW3 . But it’s not about the hair in their heads. It’s about peach fuzz on their faces. I’ve never noticed. But Indian woman claim they have noticeable mustaches. And that eeeeevvvvvviiiiillllll standards of White beauty force then to shave their facial hair and get razor burns and cuts.

  71. @Mr. Anon
    Here is an actual photo of a member of the US Congress shamelessly participating in an event held at a venue that is bedecked with fascist symbols:

    https://www.staradvertiser.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/web1_9429363-996e8016bd0f49fa8974aee0c0c937f8.jpg


    Quick, somebody inform the ADL.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Aardvark, @sayless, @Currahee

    I thought that Michael Jackson died!

  72. I thought that Michael Jackson died!

    Hah!

    Like that old joke: America is a great country – where a poor black boy from the ghetto can grow up to be a rich white lady.

  73. @Alden
    Doesn’t ADL and the rest of the Jew hysterics know that Hyatt Hotels is owned by one of the wealthiest ultra left most powerful Jewish families in the country, the Pritzkers ? They were the money behind Obama.

    Or are the Enemies of Whites now eating their own?

    Replies: @Anon

    Doesn’t ADL and the rest of the Jew hysterics know that Hyatt Hotels is owned by one of the wealthiest ultra left most powerful Jewish families in the country, the Pritzkers ? They were the money behind Obama.

    Is Fred Hiatt of the Washington Post jewish?

  74. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    That Star Wars character isn't a derogatory stereotype at all, is he? How did George Lucas get away with that? And those goofy Jamaicans?

    https://media.giphy.com/media/3owzWgfjON3M6BOEEM/giphy.gif

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz

    He did not. He sold to Disney which, apart from the money, must feel like a most severe punishment.

  75. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Our Demon-Haunted Current Year
     
    The dropping of the classic Crusader image from the logo of King Arthur Flour (now King Arthur Baking Company) in 2020 is another ‘current year’ anti-White exorcism.


    https://www.adweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/king-arthur-logo-redesign-content-2020.gif


    https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/king-arthur-flour-rebrand-baking-pandemic-trend


    [Rik] Haslam believes that the old logo wouldn’t continue to cut it in 2020 because it does not appeal to a diverse audience of bakers. “The image of a white knight astride a horse felt very masculine, European and old fashioned. Though intended to symbolize King Arthur, the figure actually felt more like a medieval crusader,” Haslam said. “The cross on the flag further emphasized this religious crusader symbol and would alienate many consumers.” In contrast, the new brand removes hints of militarism or religious affiliation, while retaining the connection to the company’s heritage and the name King Arthur.
     
    ‘Surprised face’ ad man Rik Haslam:

    https://www.brandpie.com/people/rik-haslam

    Hi-res recent versions of the classic logo:

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91U66RGjVoL.jpg

    https://abbeygroup.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/King-Arthur-Flour-Logo.png

    Replies: @Polistra

    “The image of a white knight astride a horse felt very masculine, European and old fashioned.

    Good God, a triple bogey! How offensive can you get?

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