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Harry Baldwin riffs on informed consent and TV commercials for pharmaceutical products:

Tired of the lack of vibrancy in your neighborhood? Economy in a slump? Like to grow the GDP? Ask your representative about OpenBorders. OpenBorders is the solution recommended by the Chambers of Commerce, the Wall Street Journal, war hero John McCain, the Democratic Party, the entire mainstream media, the Catholic Church, and every billionaire except Donald Trump.

[FAST VOICEOVER] Be sure to consult Ann Coulter, Steve Sailer, and VDare-dot-com before voting for OpenBorders. OpenBorders has been known to cause social fragmentation and lower PISA scores. OpenBorders also contributes to graffiti, littering, high unemployment, teenaged pregnancy, lack of academic achievement, increased crime, loud annoying music, and spread of hitherto-unknown diseases. Open Borders has also been shown to increase likelihood of domestic terrorism. OpenBorders accelerates depletion of limited resources. Open Borders has been shown to increase strain of the social safety net, occasionally resulting in municipal and state bankruptcy. Other known side effects include increased irritability, fatigue, and inability to communicate with your fellow citizens. Contact your representative if your high unemployment lasts more than seven years. He will instruct you to seek job retraining.[END FAST VOICEOVER]

Ask your representative if OpenBorders is right for you!

 
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  1. If you have an erection lasting more than 4 hours after taking OpenBorders, go f yourself.

  2. LOL!

    OpenBorders, it’s a dessert topping, and a floor wax!

  3. The accumulating evidence is that immigration does nothing for economic growth; it is largely a net negative. Yet our authorities insist on slapping that leech on every sucking chest wound in sight. Some habits die hard.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    If you want some flavor of how immigration is treated in some parts of EU academia, here is a link. The dog that didn't bark was out rounding up the social impacts.

    http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2015/08/the-labor-market-effect-of-opening-the-border-to-immigrant-workers.html

    Some excerpts:


    The effects of immigration restrictions on the inflow of immigrants and, in turn, on native workers’ employment outcomes are prominently discussed among policymakers. In spite of high sounding statement about the need of ‘pulling up the draw-bridge’ to avoid a flood of immigrants who can take away jobs, there is little direct evidence in the economic literature on how more open immigration policies affect immigration flows and, in turn, native labor market outcomes. Existing studies have analyzed the effects of immigration flows, comparing regions that receive more or fewer immigrants within a country, and interpreting the differences in outcomes as driven by immigration. However, examples in which different policies were adopted in otherwise similar regions – allowing a causal analysis of immigration policies on flows and on native labor markets – are rare.
     

    Our findings add to the existing evidence on the effects of immigration on native workers.

    First, by directly tackling immigration policies, we see that fully opening the border to neighbor countries increased immigrants only by 4 percentage points of the labor force over eight years.
    Second, we find that such an increased inflow did not have significant aggregate effects. Some groups of workers, however, experienced wage benefits while other experienced employment losses.

     

    , @Wilkey
    The accumulating evidence is that immigration does nothing for economic growth; it is largely a net negative."

    Indeed. The economies of the US and Europe have been in a 7-year funk despite immigration rates that are, by historical comparison, absolutely massive.
  4. Hey Twinkie,

    Remember how you said that my political stance, an immigration moratorium, isn’t politically possible?

    Oh yeah?

    Quote:

    “On marijuana, the single most popular position was full legalization. On immigration, it was “the immediate roundup and deportation of all undocumented immigrants and an outright moratorium on all immigration until the border is proven secure.”

    http://www.vox.com/2015/8/15/9159117/donald-trump-moderate

    • Replies: @res
    That's a fascinating article/paper. The paper divides 13 policies into a 7 point survey scale (positions in the appendix) where 1 is most liberal, 7 most conservative, and 3/5 represent mainstream party positions. They surveyed citizens and derived positions for senators based on public statements. (an interesting thought experiment is how the senators' personal views relate to their public views)

    They talk about the heterogeneity of moderates, but it would have been interesting to see a clustering analysis (for both citizens and politicans) to see just how heterogeneous moderates are and if there positions which would fit the voters better than the existing party lines.

    I wish they had presented an analog of figure 9 (citizen issue opinions) for politicians of each party. It would be interesting to see how spread of positions varies by issue.

    From page 28 of the paper:


    For example, the Democratic Party appears to represent citizens’ preferences on issues of social welfare and economic fairness: on Medicare, Social Security, and taxes, a majority of respondents placed themselves at scale points 2 or 3, implying that the party’s delegation to Congress represents citizens well on these issues. By contrast, the Republican Party appears to represent the views of at least a clear plurality of citizens on other issues, namely abortion and the policies regulating labor unions.
    ...
    Most citizens would be pleased if the range of policies that political elites debated moved to the left on issues like taxes, marijuana, Social Security, and Medicare, while on immigration and abortion citizens tend to think the entire range of elite policy debate is too far to the left.
     
    It would be interesting to hear Steve's take on the paper:
    Does Polarization Imply Poor Representation? A New Perspective on the “Disconnect” Between Politicians and Voters
    http://stanford.edu/~dbroock/papers/ahler_broockman_ideological_innocence.pdf
    , @Anonym
    That Vox article has something of the flavor of that newspaper in France when Napoleon was about a quarter of the way back to Paris after the first exile.
  5. Amazing marketing fact, happy accident dept., #1:

    Cialis, which faced impossible odds against Viagra, was surely the first product whose FDA warning led to an explosion in sales. Something about the words “four hours or longer” got people talking… and talking… and talking…

    Amazing marketing fact, happy accident dept., #2:

    Viagra itself was originally intended as a treatment for angina. But tests showed it was no better than what was already on the market, and it was almost abandoned.

    Until those elderly test subjects kept coming back for more… and more… and more…

  6. Does this appear at youtube, etc.?

  7. “OpenBorders accelerates depletion of limited resources.”

    I’m here in California doing my best to limit my water consumption. I wonder how many vibrants are being as conscientious as I am?

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    I wonder how many vibrants are being as conscientious as I am? Very conscientious: If you use the agricultural fields as a bathroom, you save on water wastage because there's no need to flush.
  8. @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    "OpenBorders accelerates depletion of limited resources."

    I'm here in California doing my best to limit my water consumption. I wonder how many vibrants are being as conscientious as I am?

    I wonder how many vibrants are being as conscientious as I am? Very conscientious: If you use the agricultural fields as a bathroom, you save on water wastage because there’s no need to flush.

  9. @JSM
    Hey Twinkie,

    Remember how you said that my political stance, an immigration moratorium, isn't politically possible?

    Oh yeah?

    Quote:

    "On marijuana, the single most popular position was full legalization. On immigration, it was "the immediate roundup and deportation of all undocumented immigrants and an outright moratorium on all immigration until the border is proven secure."

    http://www.vox.com/2015/8/15/9159117/donald-trump-moderate

    That’s a fascinating article/paper. The paper divides 13 policies into a 7 point survey scale (positions in the appendix) where 1 is most liberal, 7 most conservative, and 3/5 represent mainstream party positions. They surveyed citizens and derived positions for senators based on public statements. (an interesting thought experiment is how the senators’ personal views relate to their public views)

    They talk about the heterogeneity of moderates, but it would have been interesting to see a clustering analysis (for both citizens and politicans) to see just how heterogeneous moderates are and if there positions which would fit the voters better than the existing party lines.

    I wish they had presented an analog of figure 9 (citizen issue opinions) for politicians of each party. It would be interesting to see how spread of positions varies by issue.

    From page 28 of the paper:

    For example, the Democratic Party appears to represent citizens’ preferences on issues of social welfare and economic fairness: on Medicare, Social Security, and taxes, a majority of respondents placed themselves at scale points 2 or 3, implying that the party’s delegation to Congress represents citizens well on these issues. By contrast, the Republican Party appears to represent the views of at least a clear plurality of citizens on other issues, namely abortion and the policies regulating labor unions.

    Most citizens would be pleased if the range of policies that political elites debated moved to the left on issues like taxes, marijuana, Social Security, and Medicare, while on immigration and abortion citizens tend to think the entire range of elite policy debate is too far to the left.

    It would be interesting to hear Steve’s take on the paper:
    Does Polarization Imply Poor Representation? A New Perspective on the “Disconnect” Between Politicians and Voters
    http://stanford.edu/~dbroock/papers/ahler_broockman_ideological_innocence.pdf

  10. @bomag
    The accumulating evidence is that immigration does nothing for economic growth; it is largely a net negative. Yet our authorities insist on slapping that leech on every sucking chest wound in sight. Some habits die hard.

    If you want some flavor of how immigration is treated in some parts of EU academia, here is a link. The dog that didn’t bark was out rounding up the social impacts.

    http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2015/08/the-labor-market-effect-of-opening-the-border-to-immigrant-workers.html

    Some excerpts:

    The effects of immigration restrictions on the inflow of immigrants and, in turn, on native workers’ employment outcomes are prominently discussed among policymakers. In spite of high sounding statement about the need of ‘pulling up the draw-bridge’ to avoid a flood of immigrants who can take away jobs, there is little direct evidence in the economic literature on how more open immigration policies affect immigration flows and, in turn, native labor market outcomes. Existing studies have analyzed the effects of immigration flows, comparing regions that receive more or fewer immigrants within a country, and interpreting the differences in outcomes as driven by immigration. However, examples in which different policies were adopted in otherwise similar regions – allowing a causal analysis of immigration policies on flows and on native labor markets – are rare.

    Our findings add to the existing evidence on the effects of immigration on native workers.

    First, by directly tackling immigration policies, we see that fully opening the border to neighbor countries increased immigrants only by 4 percentage points of the labor force over eight years.
    Second, we find that such an increased inflow did not have significant aggregate effects. Some groups of workers, however, experienced wage benefits while other experienced employment losses.

  11. And … “unaffordable housing”.

    There’s a certain sort of mindless short term thinker–the trader mentality–who thinks high housing prices is a *good* thing, because you tend to get higher housing prices in areas with a booming economy. But it’s the good economy causing the housing prices not the other way around!

    Sure, i’ll be perfectly happy to eventually sell off my house–if one of the kids doesn’t want it–for a dime or two. But unless you’re a childless real estate speculator … that’s not in your long term interest. I still want *low* housing prices because i want my kids to be able to afford houses and start families–“affordable family formation”.

    If we care about the future we want *low* housing prices. That used to be a US strength–cheap land, expensive labor. Immigration has been making housing way way more expensive. Directly and in “escape from diversity”.

    • Agree: Travis, carol
  12. Why isn’t this a Donald Trump TV commercial yet?

  13. @JSM
    Hey Twinkie,

    Remember how you said that my political stance, an immigration moratorium, isn't politically possible?

    Oh yeah?

    Quote:

    "On marijuana, the single most popular position was full legalization. On immigration, it was "the immediate roundup and deportation of all undocumented immigrants and an outright moratorium on all immigration until the border is proven secure."

    http://www.vox.com/2015/8/15/9159117/donald-trump-moderate

    That Vox article has something of the flavor of that newspaper in France when Napoleon was about a quarter of the way back to Paris after the first exile.

  14. “Like to grow the GDP?”

    This claim for open borders is made a lot. Someone’s going to have to prove it. Britain and America have opened their immigration spigots pretty wide since the late 90s and, excepting the disastrous bubble of 2003-2008, their economies have been in a funk ever since.

    Nations certainly need respectable population growth in order for their economies to grow, but mass immigration seems is akin to pumping up yourself with steroids. Eventually it catches up to you – testicle shrinkage and all.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    GDP is the only thing those supporting increased immigration have and so it is endlessly trumpeted but it is bogus and meaningless in the real world. When I buy a Chinese made TV the GDP goes up because the retail operation makes a profit. What kind of nonsense makes this a good thing?

    The issues that are relevant to a society are quality of life issues which one number cannot quantify. Do we have schools at the world class level? Do we have a lot of social dysfunction? Do we have a world class health system.

    This is the joke of GDP. According to GDP, Japan is in a funk but in what category that matters is Japan anywhere but close to the top as compared to the rest of the world.
    , @bomag
    Nations certainly need respectable population growth in order for their economies to grow

    I'm starting to question even this.

    What we have needed is productivity growth. We used to get this from population growth, but now the productivity growth is from tech and machines. The game has changed.

    Pretty much today most jobs are make-work. The future is people-as-pets, and that is what immigration is: the importation of pets.
  15. @bomag
    The accumulating evidence is that immigration does nothing for economic growth; it is largely a net negative. Yet our authorities insist on slapping that leech on every sucking chest wound in sight. Some habits die hard.

    The accumulating evidence is that immigration does nothing for economic growth; it is largely a net negative.”

    Indeed. The economies of the US and Europe have been in a 7-year funk despite immigration rates that are, by historical comparison, absolutely massive.

  16. @Wilkey
    "Like to grow the GDP?"

    This claim for open borders is made a lot. Someone's going to have to prove it. Britain and America have opened their immigration spigots pretty wide since the late 90s and, excepting the disastrous bubble of 2003-2008, their economies have been in a funk ever since.

    Nations certainly need respectable population growth in order for their economies to grow, but mass immigration seems is akin to pumping up yourself with steroids. Eventually it catches up to you - testicle shrinkage and all.

    GDP is the only thing those supporting increased immigration have and so it is endlessly trumpeted but it is bogus and meaningless in the real world. When I buy a Chinese made TV the GDP goes up because the retail operation makes a profit. What kind of nonsense makes this a good thing?

    The issues that are relevant to a society are quality of life issues which one number cannot quantify. Do we have schools at the world class level? Do we have a lot of social dysfunction? Do we have a world class health system.

    This is the joke of GDP. According to GDP, Japan is in a funk but in what category that matters is Japan anywhere but close to the top as compared to the rest of the world.

  17. @Wilkey
    "Like to grow the GDP?"

    This claim for open borders is made a lot. Someone's going to have to prove it. Britain and America have opened their immigration spigots pretty wide since the late 90s and, excepting the disastrous bubble of 2003-2008, their economies have been in a funk ever since.

    Nations certainly need respectable population growth in order for their economies to grow, but mass immigration seems is akin to pumping up yourself with steroids. Eventually it catches up to you - testicle shrinkage and all.

    Nations certainly need respectable population growth in order for their economies to grow

    I’m starting to question even this.

    What we have needed is productivity growth. We used to get this from population growth, but now the productivity growth is from tech and machines. The game has changed.

    Pretty much today most jobs are make-work. The future is people-as-pets, and that is what immigration is: the importation of pets.

  18. There’sa public service announcement I often hear on the Limbaugh show promoting immigration and diversity in a way that sounds almost like a spoof. I can’t find it on-line, but it features a little girl walking around her neighborhood with her grandfather. In a strong Spanish accent, she says, “I love walking around the neighborhood, grandfather–it’s just like walking around the world!” Then, in celebratory fashion, she identifies all the Third World countries their neighbors are from in celebratory fashion.

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