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  1. I think Rubio lied enough to fool the rubes.

    ¡Yeb! is toast.

    Kasich drinks too much before these things.

    Cruz probably did enough to remain the Trump fall back option.

    Trump is always Trump.

    Farina evaporated.

    Carson has low grade narcolepsy.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @The Z Blog

    "Fiorina evaporated."

    What, did someone pour a bucket of water over her?

    Replies: @EriK

    , @JSM
    @The Z Blog

    Carson has low grade narcolepsy.

    Or, more likely, since we all like Occam's Razor here, a handful of low-grade quaaludes.

  2. I could only put up with it for about 20 minutes then put it back on near the end.

    Rubio’s smackdown of the MSM operating as a Super PAC for the Dems will probably excite the base. Maybe he’s this debate’s Carly Fiorina i.e., instant winner who will fade in about two weeks.

    Trump sounded like he was looking for Hispanic votes, especially during the interview after the debate. Or perhaps he thinks CNBC’s business oriented audience will like his softer stance on immigration.

    John Kasich made it sound like we should all be moving to Ohio.

    Ben Carson sounded both sane and awake this time. He handled well that weird comment by the Mexicanish moderator.

    I hardly heard any of the others speak.

  3. Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his. Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad.

    He lost my vote tonight.

    • Replies: @jackmcg
    @International Jew

    I've come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump. If one shaky debate answer changes that for you, he never had your vote to begin with.

    Replies: @tsotha

    , @penguinchip
    @International Jew

    Give him time, Sir. He's not a full time politician (yet). He remains our hope. Give him time.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @International Jew

    "Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his."

    That is disappointing. He should know better. While most Republicans are fed-up with illegal immigration, H1-Bs are more likely to take the job away from the kind of middle-class guy who is likely to vote in a primary election. It's a big issue to some people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

  4. Trump gave a very weak answer on the H1B question. I was disappointed on that.

    • Replies: @Matra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Not only that but he changed the subject to something else as if he didn't want to talk about immigration. I thought he might've been playing to the CNBC audience.

  5. Republicans scored some points against the most incompetent biased “moderators” I’ve ever seen in an national debate.

    Carson despite running 1st or 2nd got less time to speak then Kasich who he out polls by 20 points in Iowa. Yeb was invisible as was Huckleberry and Paul.

    Trump is still the obvious leader and towers over everyone else.

  6. He’s got no shot, but Christie embraced his wheelhouse as loudmouth bulldog tonight. He’ll probably get a couple percent increase.

    Kasich got murdered onstage by Trump. That was cool to watch.

    • Replies: @e
    @jackmcg

    I'm too disappointed in Christie's politics to vote for him, but he would DESTROY Clinton in a debate.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  7. @International Jew
    Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his. Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad.

    He lost my vote tonight.

    Replies: @jackmcg, @penguinchip, @Mr. Anon

    I’ve come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump. If one shaky debate answer changes that for you, he never had your vote to begin with.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen, EriK
    • Replies: @tsotha
    @jackmcg

    I’ve come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump.

    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.

    Replies: @snorlax, @jackmcg

  8. Trump doesn’t know much about specifics. Is it possible he doesn’t even know what an H1B visa is?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Matra

    That's my sense. He just doesn't know anything about the program.

    , @map
    @Matra

    To be charitable to Trump, he was not being asked about the H1B program. He was asked about a disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg that Trump admits does not exist.

    Trump said he agreed that if a brilliant foreign student is studying at Harvard and graduates with all kinds of honors, that everything should be done to keep that foreign student here instead of him going back to his own country. This is a slice of the immigration issue that touches on the "best and brightest" mantra that Trump believes is a benefit to the United States. I don't think Trump was really addressing the H1B issue.

    It was Rubio that criticized a gaming of the H1B system, claiming that he would want companies barred from the program for such abuses.

    Replies: @Matra

  9. I think “who cares?” Barring some strange deus ex machina, if I vote, it will only be for Trump, and then he will betray me. He’s going to be a heart-breaker…

  10. @JohnnyWalker123
    Trump gave a very weak answer on the H1B question. I was disappointed on that.

    Replies: @Matra

    Not only that but he changed the subject to something else as if he didn’t want to talk about immigration. I thought he might’ve been playing to the CNBC audience.

  11. Trump’s problem is that he seems not to understand much about the H1b visa. I think his position paper was probably written by Jeff Sessions, who he consulted with before issuing the paper. Trump himself seemed to have no understanding of how the program works, other than to say he believes people should come here “legally” and people who attend top universities (Yale, etc.) should be allowed to stay.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The best guy on the issue (Norm Mattloff) thinks the US government may have gotten to Trump with all that swill about letting them stay. The US government actually thinks we are "stealing" their best talent. That is where Trump probably got this. I hated the way he backed off the "Zuckerberg's personal Senator" crack. I sent the Trump campaign an e-mail telling them what I thought of Trump becoming another corporate a--licking Rubio.

    Rubio was a clown talking about how those "abusing" the program should be thrown out. Nobody is abusing it. It was intended to screw Americans and it is doing a damn good job.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @JohnnyWalker123

  12. @Matra
    Trump doesn't know much about specifics. Is it possible he doesn't even know what an H1B visa is?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @map

    That’s my sense. He just doesn’t know anything about the program.

  13. ” Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad.”

    I agree. However, Trump has always said he wanted more skilled immigration. His policy paper was pretty obviously written by someone else.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

  14. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Christie was very good and entertaining.
    Fiorina fell flat. She’s done.
    Rubio was good and was very good in attacks against him (moderators and Jeb).
    Carson is lackluster. Not very Presidential.
    Jeb threw a half-dozen interceptions. Looks worse then going in.
    Trump didn’t get much time. Was solid.
    Cruz performed well but his used car salesman-ish style if off-putting.
    Rand Paul didn’t get much time but was the most solid in policy.
    Huckabee was very good and likable.
    Kasich was made to look silly early on by Trump. He looks frazzled and frustrated. He’s done.

    Winner: Christie
    Loser: Bush
    My candidate: Trump

  15. I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Father O'Hara

    Those brutal questions and follow up attacks by the moderators was crushing. Fiorina's question on her role at HP was brutal. Rubio did a good job standing up to his brutal moderator attack. Bush fumbled around on the Fantasy Football gambling question.

    , @tbraton
    @Father O'Hara

    "I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera, ripped open her blouse, stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!” "

    Damn! I missed that. It must have happened when I went to the kitchen to get a glass of water. Judging from her face, I would bet that she has had a job done on those "girls" to firm them up.

    What I found interesting about the "debate," apart from the blatant partisanship of the debate "moderators," was that a number of the candidates made good impressions in various ways. For example, Carly Fiorina, the one who apparently bared her tits to a national audience (apparently in an attempt to show she had nothing to hide), made a very good response on the complexity of the tax code. (Ironically, I was making the very same point to a friend on the telephone a few days earlier. Even more ironic, this retired woman friend was studying for a test to qualify her for preparing other people's tax returns, something she needs to do to supplement her retirement income. I was arguing that tax code is so complicated that most people have to hire someone else to prepare their tax returns, which is a complete waste of resources.) Even though she is not my favorite and stands little chance of securing the nomination, I must admit she has a rare ability to analyze and explain a complicated issue in pretty simple language that most people can understand. Mike Huckabee was another who finally showed the talent he has as a politician. He is still the most natural politician in that large group, but I fail to see that he has a compelling message that will allow him to catch fire and take Iowa the way he did in 2008. Christie did well. Cruz did well. I thought Kasich did much better last night than previously. Trump was Trump, still the most dominant candidate in the field and a commanding presence on the stage.

    The problem is that the so many of the large field had good moments that no one stood out above the rest, in comparison to the two earlier debates. If all you had to go on was last night's debate, it would be hard to make a choice. Bush was the exception. I don't see how he helped his candidacy with last night's performance. And Carson continues to mystify me. I fail to see why he is doing so well in the polls, based on what I have seen at the debates and what I know of his background.

    Replies: @carol, @Vendetta

    , @EriK
    @Father O'Hara


    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!”

     

    Get a grip
    From wikipedia
    In February 2009, Fiorina was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy[188][341] at Stanford Hospital in March 2009, followed by chemotherapy, which caused her to temporarily lose her hair, and later radiation therapy.[342]

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Vendetta

  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    Trump's problem is that he seems not to understand much about the H1b visa. I think his position paper was probably written by Jeff Sessions, who he consulted with before issuing the paper. Trump himself seemed to have no understanding of how the program works, other than to say he believes people should come here "legally" and people who attend top universities (Yale, etc.) should be allowed to stay.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    The best guy on the issue (Norm Mattloff) thinks the US government may have gotten to Trump with all that swill about letting them stay. The US government actually thinks we are “stealing” their best talent. That is where Trump probably got this. I hated the way he backed off the “Zuckerberg’s personal Senator” crack. I sent the Trump campaign an e-mail telling them what I thought of Trump becoming another corporate a–licking Rubio.

    Rubio was a clown talking about how those “abusing” the program should be thrown out. Nobody is abusing it. It was intended to screw Americans and it is doing a damn good job.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @MarkinLA

    It could be, that as another commenter mentioned above, Trump was trying to play to the CNBC business crowd (why, I don't know - he doesn't need their donations, and their % of the vote is small). If so, that would explain why he didn't hang the immigration bill around Rubio's neck and choke him out with it.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @MarkinLA

    Here is what Norm Matloff said:

    https://normsaysno.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/more-on-trump-and-foreign-students/


    I have been assured privately by two well-connected people that Trump actually did not reverse himself
     
    I think it's important to distinguish the large majority of H1b recipients (65,000 per year) from the foreign-student H1bs (20,000 per year). Trump seems to disfavor the former and favor the latter. He hasn't even said he wants all the foreign students to say - in his statements, he's mentioned that he wants immigrants from the top universities (Ivy league, etc.) to stay.

    I'm not surprised, as Trump (Wharton graduate) has always praised graduates of elite schools. He's someone who thinks highly of anyone with an Ivy degree.

    The real question is what he thinks about the non-elite foreign graduates and non-graduate foreign workers. The overwhelming majority of H1bs are in these categories. It seems like he's against these days, but it's tough to parse his statements. My sense is that Trump is not fully informed on the H1b issue.

    The good news is that, as Steve Sailer frequently says, "personnel is policy." If Trump is asking men like Jeff Sessions to help write his specific immigration policies, that's a good sign. Most candidates don't even write the specifics of their policies (immigration, taxes, trade), instead delegating that work to their suboordinates. Most likely, whoever workers for Trump will decide the H1b policy. If that's Sessions or someone picked by Sessions, then we may yet win.

    I'm not giving up on Trump just yet.

  17. Kasich was the first one to be asked the “what’s your biggest weakness” question and I think he’s the only one who didn’t even respond to it at all.

    It seems his handlers told him he needed to be more aggressive. He certainly seemed less passive than in past debates. But he’s still a joke.

    I had a hard time paying attention to Fiorina’s rhetoric because I was so transfixed by her eyes blinking three times a second.

    Christie sounded like an idiot, unsurprisingly.

    As for Trump… I think we all need to stop expecting miracles with him. But he is the best candidate on immigration, even if he doesn’t grasp a lot of the policy nuances. At the very least he has moved the Overton Window and for that we owe him a lot of gratitude.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @AndrewR


    I had a hard time paying attention to Fiorina’s rhetoric because I was so transfixed by her eyes blinking three times a second
     
    The face that wants to sink a thousand ships.
  18. @education realist
    " Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad."

    I agree. However, Trump has always said he wanted more skilled immigration. His policy paper was pretty obviously written by someone else.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He’s a nationalist.

    2) He’s a pragmatist.

    3) He’s smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there’s a good chance that, in office – maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs – Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Dave Pinsen

    Exactly. After all, successful businesspeople tend to be pragmatists; they like to go with what works and hire the experts to help flesh out the fine points/details of the actions that they initially take.

    For candidate Trump, if there's some details that he doesn't exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he'll simply ask the "right people" and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that's pretty good overall.

    Just finished reading thru Ann Coulter's Twitter feed for the debate. It's quite good and as always, the immigration issue is on her mind and in her tweets.

    Hi, Ann!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Chrisnonymous

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dave Pinsen

    Hopefully, but I'd prefer assurances.

    I've learned my lesson about trusting politicians.

    It's always a good sign though when Trump is consulting with Jeff Sessions.

    , @JLoHo
    @Dave Pinsen

    How can you be smart and not know about the H1B problem?

    How stupid are you?

    , @SFG
    @Dave Pinsen

    I'll buy 2) and 3), but as for 1), after watching Trump reel in and cheat people with more money than sense for two decades, I kind of wonder.

    , @NOTA
    @Dave Pinsen

    Or maybe it means he's saying what he thinks will benefit him now without worrying much over what he will really do if he gets into office. Lack of relevant knowledge doesn't strike me as a great qualification for being president. (Though to be fair, it's not exactly a rare thing in a president, either.)

  19. @Father O'Hara
    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,"You know you want these girls in the White House!"

    Replies: @Anonymous, @tbraton, @EriK

    Those brutal questions and follow up attacks by the moderators was crushing. Fiorina’s question on her role at HP was brutal. Rubio did a good job standing up to his brutal moderator attack. Bush fumbled around on the Fantasy Football gambling question.

  20. @MarkinLA
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The best guy on the issue (Norm Mattloff) thinks the US government may have gotten to Trump with all that swill about letting them stay. The US government actually thinks we are "stealing" their best talent. That is where Trump probably got this. I hated the way he backed off the "Zuckerberg's personal Senator" crack. I sent the Trump campaign an e-mail telling them what I thought of Trump becoming another corporate a--licking Rubio.

    Rubio was a clown talking about how those "abusing" the program should be thrown out. Nobody is abusing it. It was intended to screw Americans and it is doing a damn good job.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @JohnnyWalker123

    It could be, that as another commenter mentioned above, Trump was trying to play to the CNBC business crowd (why, I don’t know – he doesn’t need their donations, and their % of the vote is small). If so, that would explain why he didn’t hang the immigration bill around Rubio’s neck and choke him out with it.

  21. Trump lost a lot of points in my book with the H1B flip-flop. Although I suppose, if not Trump, then who else? And in what future election?

    It’s clear that he’s neither a true believer on immigration nor someone with a deep understanding of the issue, but at least he’ll know that’s what put him into office. I’d take a 40% chance of a decent immigration policy over a 0% chance, which is what’s on offer from everyone else.

    I guess we’ll have to see whether that position paper gets quietly edited to remove the H1B language.

  22. Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Mike1

    Who cares about those not so bright Americans losing their crap jobs? We've got an economy to think about.

    , @Big Bill
    @Mike1

    If an H1b is taking your job, you are not that cheap.

    The Indian equivalent of Harvard Law School grads were earning $27K two or three years ago. Second string grads (University of Michigan) were making about $22K. Third string grads were making about $15K.

    , @Lagertha
    @Mike1

    No, the reality is: the CEO/owner of a private company: "I don't care about where you went to college, where you are from, but you are not producing, are not bright ( you have failed at my company) nor creative- you are fired. "

    EVERYONE is on their own. H1B people are just a "discount worker" until it may becomes obvious that they are dead wood just picking up a pay check, like anyone else who you say is not that bright. Real talent costs a lot...wherever they come from.

    My parents got their Green Cards in 24 hours...they were bona fide bright people; so not a risk. They had all the fancy degrees from Europe and the US. H1B workers, today, are really just discount workers, like "Walmart automaton" workers. These are not your father's trailblazers that he admired back in the day. This is not Bell Labs or Shockley's early SV days full of wonderful H1B dudes from India or wherever. "Gandhi" the movie with Ben Kingsley, or the Jewel in the Crown was all the US knew about India those days.

    , @Former Darfur
    @Mike1

    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Anyone saying that is either very misinformed or themselves "not that bright". Or, more likely, both.

    Very few (and very probably no) H-1Bs are as skilled or as experienced as the Americans they replace. They are brought in because they are indentured servants and because they will work in places like Silicon Valley for wages Americans will accept only in low cost southeastern and midwestern towns.

    And their general lack of imagination and initiative is a feature, not a bug, for corporate department heads, because they figure they won't be trying to take over. Of course, they do anyway. Usually sooner or later an Indian gets a position from which he can run out all the non-Indians, then he runs out all the Indians from other regions or the wrong caste. I've seen it happen.

    Replies: @NOTA

    , @MarkinLA
    @Mike1

    Your comment shows that you know absolutely nothing about H-1Bs and what goes on in that scam.

    Nobody is losing their job because the H-1Bs are smarter. They are losing their jobs because H-1Bs are indentured servants who can be worked 60 hours for less than 40 hours pay. They drive wages down for everybody in the field. Older workers with families and mortgages to pay are laid off so that the company can hire younger H-1Bs at half the wage.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Dave
    @Mike1

    So what if we're not bright? We're still Americans. We're still being displaced politically by massive legal immigration.

    , @Daniel Williams
    @Mike1


    ... if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.
     
    Drop dead. My ancestors have been living and dying on this soil for hundreds of years. It's our country. If some foreigner, talented or otherwise, is taking my job, it's because a traitor or an interloper sold me out.

    Replies: @Mike1

    , @AnAnon
    @Mike1

    "Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright." - but please train your replacement.

    , @asdf
    @Mike1


    Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.
     
    Any facts to go along with that? All those IT workers not bright enough? Maybe it's just easier to get indentured servants.

    (Also, half the US population is going to be on the left of the bell curve. What do you suggest we do with them?)

    The only people immune from being H1B'ed are the columnists at WSJ and the Times.

    You have been well trained indeed. Go get your pat on the head.
  23. @International Jew
    Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his. Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad.

    He lost my vote tonight.

    Replies: @jackmcg, @penguinchip, @Mr. Anon

    Give him time, Sir. He’s not a full time politician (yet). He remains our hope. Give him time.

  24. David Frum on Jeb’s debate performance:

  25. I wonder if Trump isn’t just getting bored with the whole thing.

    • Replies: @e
    @Peterike

    No, he actually pointed this way the other day--said he might tone down his insults. After the debate, said the same thing. I think he realizes that Iowans don't like insults. He's sitting back, biding his time, but his sitting back did give Cruz the spotlight.

    Cruz's take down of the media was great.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Peterike


    I wonder if Trump isn’t just getting bored with the whole thing.

     

    That was the case with Jesse Ventura. But he had a few years to go on his term when it happened. At least Sarah Palin resigned.
  26. Jeb Bush once said he was willing to lose the primaries in order to win the general. After tonight I think he can safely say that he’s halfway there.

  27. @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

    Exactly. After all, successful businesspeople tend to be pragmatists; they like to go with what works and hire the experts to help flesh out the fine points/details of the actions that they initially take.

    For candidate Trump, if there’s some details that he doesn’t exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he’ll simply ask the “right people” and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that’s pretty good overall.

    Just finished reading thru Ann Coulter’s Twitter feed for the debate. It’s quite good and as always, the immigration issue is on her mind and in her tweets.

    Hi, Ann!

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ann Coulter is excellent, as always.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    candidate Trump, if there’s some details that he doesn’t exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he’ll simply ask the “right people” and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that’s pretty good overall.
     
    Yea, like Schwarzenegger surrounding himself...

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  28. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Trump and Rand Paul are the only two candidates running for President that have not pledged to confront Russia, declare a no-fly zone in Syria, and support jihadists. Trump is the only one to say he’d work with Putin and Russia for our own mutual benefit. The other Republicans want corporate oligarchy and actively work for policies which make our country less white and stop Russia from attack jihadis and terrorists who are slaughtering Christians.

  29. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    Who cares about those not so bright Americans losing their crap jobs? We’ve got an economy to think about.

    • Agree: Harold
  30. @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

    Hopefully, but I’d prefer assurances.

    I’ve learned my lesson about trusting politicians.

    It’s always a good sign though when Trump is consulting with Jeff Sessions.

  31. Dave, I don’t disagree. I’m not against the guy. I was just disappointed he didn’t stick it to Rubio on immigration.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    That would have been a real cage match. Imagine if right after Rubio close-lined his former mentor Jeb, Trump had slammed the folding chair of immigration truth on Rubio's head.

    , @CogitoErgoSum
    @education realist

    Debate was about financial and economic issues, not domestic/social issues that are not finance/economic related.

  32. @jackmcg
    He's got no shot, but Christie embraced his wheelhouse as loudmouth bulldog tonight. He'll probably get a couple percent increase.

    Kasich got murdered onstage by Trump. That was cool to watch.

    Replies: @e

    I’m too disappointed in Christie’s politics to vote for him, but he would DESTROY Clinton in a debate.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @e

    I can't agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l'il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don't count for much for many--perhaps most--people.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  33. @Peterike
    I wonder if Trump isn't just getting bored with the whole thing.

    Replies: @e, @Reg Cæsar

    No, he actually pointed this way the other day–said he might tone down his insults. After the debate, said the same thing. I think he realizes that Iowans don’t like insults. He’s sitting back, biding his time, but his sitting back did give Cruz the spotlight.

    Cruz’s take down of the media was great.

  34. Also disappointed in Trump’s answer on H1B visas. I agree with some people above that he doesn’t really understand the H1B program … or, possibly, he didn’t really understand that’s what the question was about. As I recall, the question used the term “guest permits” or something like that. Of course, if Trump had done even a basic degree of study (even read his own website carefully), he would have understood.

    Either way, I’m still behind Trump, as he at least has the balls to stand up and talk about limiting immigration at all, which makes him better than anyone else. Anyway, H1B visas are nowhere close to the biggest immigration-related threat. Starting with the 1986 amnesty, Mexican and Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants came in and took over all the roofing and carpentry jobs. What did the computer nerds do when roofers and carpenters complained? Laughed about it and called them racist. “Uh-HAAAH! Yeah, they TERK YER JOBS, didn’t they? Racist!” Maybe the tech boys need to eat it for a few years, and they’ll understand.

    If you work in tech or software and you’re now going to say “not me, I was ALWAYS against open immigration,” then … bullshit, you liar.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @MKP

    If you work in tech or software and you’re now going to say “not me, I was ALWAYS against open immigration,” then … bullshit, you liar.

    I wasn't always against it, but when as a vendor I saw all the Americans, white and black, who were at least able to feed a family doing roofing despite being not very smart or having been in the slam, I figured even then replacing them with fast breeding mestizos was a bad idea. It wasn't a question of us having white trashers and black underclass but still working underclass OR mestizos, it was having them AND the mestizos.

    Also, the white trashers were usually pretty good carpenters and roofers. Few of the blacks were particularly good carpenters, but they did relatively well at roofing. The mestizos are occasionally pretty good, but the sheer incompetence and work habits (they really are prone to building boxes to crap in so they don't have to walk to the porta-johnny) of many of them is astonishing.

  35. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Dave Pinsen

    Exactly. After all, successful businesspeople tend to be pragmatists; they like to go with what works and hire the experts to help flesh out the fine points/details of the actions that they initially take.

    For candidate Trump, if there's some details that he doesn't exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he'll simply ask the "right people" and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that's pretty good overall.

    Just finished reading thru Ann Coulter's Twitter feed for the debate. It's quite good and as always, the immigration issue is on her mind and in her tweets.

    Hi, Ann!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Chrisnonymous

    Ann Coulter is excellent, as always.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Here is what Norm Matloff said:

    https://normsaysno.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/more-on-trump-and-foreign-students/


    I have been assured privately by two well-connected people that Trump actually did not reverse himself
     
    I think it's important to distinguish the large majority of H1b recipients (65,000 per year) from the foreign-student H1bs (20,000 per year). Trump seems to disfavor the former and favor the latter. He hasn't even said he wants all the foreign students to say - in his statements, he's mentioned that he wants immigrants from the top universities (Ivy league, etc.) to stay.

    I'm not surprised, as Trump (Wharton graduate) has always praised graduates of elite schools. He's someone who thinks highly of anyone with an Ivy degree.

    The real question is what he thinks about the non-elite foreign graduates and non-graduate foreign workers. The overwhelming majority of H1bs are in these categories. It seems like he's against these days, but it's tough to parse his statements. My sense is that Trump is not fully informed on the H1b issue.

    The good news is that, as Steve Sailer frequently says, "personnel is policy." If Trump is asking men like Jeff Sessions to help write his specific immigration policies, that's a good sign. Most candidates don't even write the specifics of their policies (immigration, taxes, trade), instead delegating that work to their suboordinates. Most likely, whoever workers for Trump will decide the H1b policy. If that's Sessions or someone pi
  36. It seems to me that Trump feels like he has the anti-immigration vote locked up at this point, so he’s not pushing as hard on it, at least at the debate tonight.

  37. It looked like Trump was trying to appear more in control of himself and presidential. He also looked like he has lost weight – getting shape for the job?

    Jeb is a bumbling fool trying and failing to even smoothly repeat his memorized talking points.

    Marco seems like he is in such a hurry to get it out- he reminds me of my pet chihuahua who gets so excited when she sees people. any people

    Carson – too sedate and reasonable

    Kasich – WTF – OK OK I get it – your the Gov of Ohio.

    Fiorina appears menopausal. so stern. so strong. I think I’m attracted to her.

    Cruz I like but can he overcome all the bad press he gets and will get?

    Rand Paul’s delivery and voice and hair is somewhat strange.

    Christy – the passion for the common man seems fake

    Huckabee? America will never have a Pres. named Huckabee. Never. Its ridiculous

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @mind gorilla

    Rand Paul’s delivery and voice and hair is somewhat strange.

    Rand Paul reminds me of Jimmy Olsen, cub reporter, on the old Superman TV show.

  38. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    If an H1b is taking your job, you are not that cheap.

    The Indian equivalent of Harvard Law School grads were earning $27K two or three years ago. Second string grads (University of Michigan) were making about $22K. Third string grads were making about $15K.

  39. @MarkinLA
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The best guy on the issue (Norm Mattloff) thinks the US government may have gotten to Trump with all that swill about letting them stay. The US government actually thinks we are "stealing" their best talent. That is where Trump probably got this. I hated the way he backed off the "Zuckerberg's personal Senator" crack. I sent the Trump campaign an e-mail telling them what I thought of Trump becoming another corporate a--licking Rubio.

    Rubio was a clown talking about how those "abusing" the program should be thrown out. Nobody is abusing it. It was intended to screw Americans and it is doing a damn good job.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @JohnnyWalker123

    Here is what Norm Matloff said:

    https://normsaysno.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/more-on-trump-and-foreign-students/

    I have been assured privately by two well-connected people that Trump actually did not reverse himself

    I think it’s important to distinguish the large majority of H1b recipients (65,000 per year) from the foreign-student H1bs (20,000 per year). Trump seems to disfavor the former and favor the latter. He hasn’t even said he wants all the foreign students to say – in his statements, he’s mentioned that he wants immigrants from the top universities (Ivy league, etc.) to stay.

    I’m not surprised, as Trump (Wharton graduate) has always praised graduates of elite schools. He’s someone who thinks highly of anyone with an Ivy degree.

    The real question is what he thinks about the non-elite foreign graduates and non-graduate foreign workers. The overwhelming majority of H1bs are in these categories. It seems like he’s against these days, but it’s tough to parse his statements. My sense is that Trump is not fully informed on the H1b issue.

    The good news is that, as Steve Sailer frequently says, “personnel is policy.” If Trump is asking men like Jeff Sessions to help write his specific immigration policies, that’s a good sign. Most candidates don’t even write the specifics of their policies (immigration, taxes, trade), instead delegating that work to their suboordinates. Most likely, whoever workers for Trump will decide the H1b policy. If that’s Sessions or someone picked by Sessions, then we may yet win.

    I’m not giving up on Trump just yet.

  40. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ann Coulter is excellent, as always.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Here is what Norm Matloff said:

    https://normsaysno.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/more-on-trump-and-foreign-students/

    I have been assured privately by two well-connected people that Trump actually did not reverse himself

    I think it’s important to distinguish the large majority of H1b recipients (65,000 per year) from the foreign-student H1bs (20,000 per year). Trump seems to disfavor the former and favor the latter. He hasn’t even said he wants all the foreign students to say – in his statements, he’s mentioned that he wants immigrants from the top universities (Ivy league, etc.) to stay.

    I’m not surprised, as Trump (Wharton graduate) has always praised graduates of elite schools. He’s someone who thinks highly of anyone with an Ivy degree.

    The real question is what he thinks about the non-elite foreign graduates and non-graduate foreign workers. The overwhelming majority of H1bs are in these categories. It seems like he’s against these days, but it’s tough to parse his statements. My sense is that Trump is not fully informed on the H1b issue.

    The good news is that, as Steve Sailer frequently says, “personnel is policy.” If Trump is asking men like Jeff Sessions to help write his specific immigration policies, that’s a good sign. Most candidates don’t even write the specifics of their policies (immigration, taxes, trade), instead delegating that work to their suboordinates. Most likely, whoever workers for Trump will decide the H1b policy. If that’s Sessions or someone pi

  41. @The Z Blog
    I think Rubio lied enough to fool the rubes.

    ¡Yeb! is toast.

    Kasich drinks too much before these things.

    Cruz probably did enough to remain the Trump fall back option.

    Trump is always Trump.

    Farina evaporated.

    Carson has low grade narcolepsy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @JSM

    “Fiorina evaporated.”

    What, did someone pour a bucket of water over her?

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Mr. Anon

    Now that's funny. Unlike that nitwit commenting on her "girls."

  42. @International Jew
    Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his. Like a lot of people here, I was thrilled about that position paper. Too bad.

    He lost my vote tonight.

    Replies: @jackmcg, @penguinchip, @Mr. Anon

    “Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his.”

    That is disappointing. He should know better. While most Republicans are fed-up with illegal immigration, H1-Bs are more likely to take the job away from the kind of middle-class guy who is likely to vote in a primary election. It’s a big issue to some people.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    The New York Times was surprised to discover that it's story about Disney employees being forced to train their H-1B replacements was a huge hit with its readers.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    The New York Times was surprised to discover that it's story about Disney employees being forced to train their H-1B replacements was a huge hit with its readers.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    Again, most candidates don't take much interest in the minutiae of their policies. Trump's immigration policies likely will be crafted by his advisors. Given who wrote his previous position paper, it seems like he's delegated immigration policy to Jeff Sessions.

    Trump has a way of reversing himself frequently. For example, he was for bringing in Syrian refugees, but he's strongly against it now. My guess is that he has some strongly positive feelings towards graduates of elite universities and wants them to stay, but his general views on immigration are vague because he hasn't studied the issue enough.

    Trump's long-term immigration position will depend heavily on who continues to advise him. Hopefully, that continues to be Sessions.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  43. @jackmcg
    @International Jew

    I've come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump. If one shaky debate answer changes that for you, he never had your vote to begin with.

    Replies: @tsotha

    I’ve come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump.

    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @tsotha


    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.
     
    Seems to be a common personality trait among business types (Mitt Romney, many of those whom I know personally).
    , @jackmcg
    @tsotha

    Whatever. Trump has been publicly anti-immigration since 1999. He's for real. He bungled one detail and now we're going to get a weeks worth of concern trolling about it which is just irritating.

  44. @tsotha
    @jackmcg

    I’ve come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump.

    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.

    Replies: @snorlax, @jackmcg

    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.

    Seems to be a common personality trait among business types (Mitt Romney, many of those whom I know personally).

    • Agree: Stephen R. Diamond
  45. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    No, the reality is: the CEO/owner of a private company: “I don’t care about where you went to college, where you are from, but you are not producing, are not bright ( you have failed at my company) nor creative- you are fired. ”

    EVERYONE is on their own. H1B people are just a “discount worker” until it may becomes obvious that they are dead wood just picking up a pay check, like anyone else who you say is not that bright. Real talent costs a lot…wherever they come from.

    My parents got their Green Cards in 24 hours…they were bona fide bright people; so not a risk. They had all the fancy degrees from Europe and the US. H1B workers, today, are really just discount workers, like “Walmart automaton” workers. These are not your father’s trailblazers that he admired back in the day. This is not Bell Labs or Shockley’s early SV days full of wonderful H1B dudes from India or wherever. “Gandhi” the movie with Ben Kingsley, or the Jewel in the Crown was all the US knew about India those days.

  46. @Mr. Anon
    @International Jew

    "Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his."

    That is disappointing. He should know better. While most Republicans are fed-up with illegal immigration, H1-Bs are more likely to take the job away from the kind of middle-class guy who is likely to vote in a primary election. It's a big issue to some people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

    The New York Times was surprised to discover that it’s story about Disney employees being forced to train their H-1B replacements was a huge hit with its readers.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    I have a friend who has an advanced degree in biotech, used to teach chemistry to med students, and after getting downsized due to a merger, went looking for work where he lives (Seattle). This guy was a staff scientist at Merck and then at a biotech startup. Also, speaks 4 languages including English (native speaker). The only job he found in his field was a contract work that paid less than cost of daycare (his wife's an amazon who works at Amazon). So he's a stay-at-home dad.

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up "retraining" as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @yaqub the mad scientist

  47. @Mr. Anon
    @International Jew

    "Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his."

    That is disappointing. He should know better. While most Republicans are fed-up with illegal immigration, H1-Bs are more likely to take the job away from the kind of middle-class guy who is likely to vote in a primary election. It's a big issue to some people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

    The New York Times was surprised to discover that it’s story about Disney employees being forced to train their H-1B replacements was a huge hit with its readers.

  48. For years Steve has been saying blacks see their politicians as entertainers more than leaders. When you know they all lie to you anyway, why not pick the entertaining liars? Enough whites now expect all Republican politicians to lie about race and immigration and anything important that we might as well vote Trump.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Bruce

    Conventional liberal and Los Angeles-based venture capitalist Mark Suster tweeted about the debate, so I asked him if his entrepreneur-in-residence, Liz Lemon's favorite rapper, was on the Trump train. His response:
    https://twitter.com/msuster/status/659596488956186624

  49. Last thought for the day: why all the talk about “the gold standard” tonight? whaaaa? Some candidates shocking this corpse to live again? Not too long ago, some guys , friends, that are wayyyy smarter than me tried once again to sell me on Bitcoins – gotta admit, Bitcoins make much more sense than recreating Fort Knox. But gold, armed guards, surveillance systems, air conditioning million dollar rooms for those gold bullion bricks?….really? a jobs program? Why gold, it sounds so Roman, Egyptian, Greek, Trojan, Mesopotamian…

  50. @tsotha
    @jackmcg

    I’ve come to the conclusion that if you care at all about any aspect of immigration, there is no other option besides Trump.

    Only if you believe Trump actually means anything he says. All you need to do to get him to change his position is ask the question a different way.

    Replies: @snorlax, @jackmcg

    Whatever. Trump has been publicly anti-immigration since 1999. He’s for real. He bungled one detail and now we’re going to get a weeks worth of concern trolling about it which is just irritating.

  51. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Anyone saying that is either very misinformed or themselves “not that bright”. Or, more likely, both.

    Very few (and very probably no) H-1Bs are as skilled or as experienced as the Americans they replace. They are brought in because they are indentured servants and because they will work in places like Silicon Valley for wages Americans will accept only in low cost southeastern and midwestern towns.

    And their general lack of imagination and initiative is a feature, not a bug, for corporate department heads, because they figure they won’t be trying to take over. Of course, they do anyway. Usually sooner or later an Indian gets a position from which he can run out all the non-Indians, then he runs out all the Indians from other regions or the wrong caste. I’ve seen it happen.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Former Darfur

    Yeah. I'm all for allowing very bright, productive people to immigrate, but not as serfs bound to one employer, as ordinary resident aliens with work permits.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  52. @education realist
    Dave, I don't disagree. I'm not against the guy. I was just disappointed he didn't stick it to Rubio on immigration.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @CogitoErgoSum

    That would have been a real cage match. Imagine if right after Rubio close-lined his former mentor Jeb, Trump had slammed the folding chair of immigration truth on Rubio’s head.

  53. @Mr. Anon
    @International Jew

    "Trump was asked about H1B and he seemed to forget everything from that position paper of his."

    That is disappointing. He should know better. While most Republicans are fed-up with illegal immigration, H1-Bs are more likely to take the job away from the kind of middle-class guy who is likely to vote in a primary election. It's a big issue to some people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

    Again, most candidates don’t take much interest in the minutiae of their policies. Trump’s immigration policies likely will be crafted by his advisors. Given who wrote his previous position paper, it seems like he’s delegated immigration policy to Jeff Sessions.

    Trump has a way of reversing himself frequently. For example, he was for bringing in Syrian refugees, but he’s strongly against it now. My guess is that he has some strongly positive feelings towards graduates of elite universities and wants them to stay, but his general views on immigration are vague because he hasn’t studied the issue enough.

    Trump’s long-term immigration position will depend heavily on who continues to advise him. Hopefully, that continues to be Sessions.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "Trump’s long-term immigration position will depend heavily on who continues to advise him. Hopefully, that continues to be Sessions."

    Let's hope so.

  54. @Matra
    Trump doesn't know much about specifics. Is it possible he doesn't even know what an H1B visa is?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @map

    To be charitable to Trump, he was not being asked about the H1B program. He was asked about a disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg that Trump admits does not exist.

    Trump said he agreed that if a brilliant foreign student is studying at Harvard and graduates with all kinds of honors, that everything should be done to keep that foreign student here instead of him going back to his own country. This is a slice of the immigration issue that touches on the “best and brightest” mantra that Trump believes is a benefit to the United States. I don’t think Trump was really addressing the H1B issue.

    It was Rubio that criticized a gaming of the H1B system, claiming that he would want companies barred from the program for such abuses.

    • Replies: @Matra
    @map


    To be charitable to Trump, he was not being asked about the H1B program. He was asked about a disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg that Trump admits does not exist
     
    He did however mock Rubio as Zuckerberg's "personal senator". IIRC that was because of Rubio's plan to increase the number of H1B visas.
  55. @Bruce
    For years Steve has been saying blacks see their politicians as entertainers more than leaders. When you know they all lie to you anyway, why not pick the entertaining liars? Enough whites now expect all Republican politicians to lie about race and immigration and anything important that we might as well vote Trump.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Conventional liberal and Los Angeles-based venture capitalist Mark Suster tweeted about the debate, so I asked him if his entrepreneur-in-residence, Liz Lemon’s favorite rapper, was on the Trump train. His response:
    https://twitter.com/msuster/status/659596488956186624

  56. @MKP
    Also disappointed in Trump's answer on H1B visas. I agree with some people above that he doesn't really understand the H1B program ... or, possibly, he didn't really understand that's what the question was about. As I recall, the question used the term "guest permits" or something like that. Of course, if Trump had done even a basic degree of study (even read his own website carefully), he would have understood.

    Either way, I'm still behind Trump, as he at least has the balls to stand up and talk about limiting immigration at all, which makes him better than anyone else. Anyway, H1B visas are nowhere close to the biggest immigration-related threat. Starting with the 1986 amnesty, Mexican and Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants came in and took over all the roofing and carpentry jobs. What did the computer nerds do when roofers and carpenters complained? Laughed about it and called them racist. "Uh-HAAAH! Yeah, they TERK YER JOBS, didn't they? Racist!" Maybe the tech boys need to eat it for a few years, and they'll understand.

    If you work in tech or software and you're now going to say "not me, I was ALWAYS against open immigration," then ... bullshit, you liar.

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    If you work in tech or software and you’re now going to say “not me, I was ALWAYS against open immigration,” then … bullshit, you liar.

    I wasn’t always against it, but when as a vendor I saw all the Americans, white and black, who were at least able to feed a family doing roofing despite being not very smart or having been in the slam, I figured even then replacing them with fast breeding mestizos was a bad idea. It wasn’t a question of us having white trashers and black underclass but still working underclass OR mestizos, it was having them AND the mestizos.

    Also, the white trashers were usually pretty good carpenters and roofers. Few of the blacks were particularly good carpenters, but they did relatively well at roofing. The mestizos are occasionally pretty good, but the sheer incompetence and work habits (they really are prone to building boxes to crap in so they don’t have to walk to the porta-johnny) of many of them is astonishing.

  57. @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

    How can you be smart and not know about the H1B problem?

    How stupid are you?

  58. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    The New York Times was surprised to discover that it's story about Disney employees being forced to train their H-1B replacements was a huge hit with its readers.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    I have a friend who has an advanced degree in biotech, used to teach chemistry to med students, and after getting downsized due to a merger, went looking for work where he lives (Seattle). This guy was a staff scientist at Merck and then at a biotech startup. Also, speaks 4 languages including English (native speaker). The only job he found in his field was a contract work that paid less than cost of daycare (his wife’s an amazon who works at Amazon). So he’s a stay-at-home dad.

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up “retraining” as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's all about career path. Once you fall off your path, it's tough to get back on unless you have very high-demand skills and credentials. There are a huge number of well-educated people who fall off their career path and end up in lower wage work. Sometimes they fall off their path due to company politics (this applies especially to management track professionals), sometimes bad luck.

    It's not good enough to be smart and educated, you need to have the perfect resume and continuous work experience. One reason for this loose labor market is the mass importation of immigrant labor, particularly through H1b. The second reason is the outsourcing to lower-wage nations.

    Lionoftheblogsphere has written on this topic extensively. I remember in one post, he noted that college students who graduated during a recession continued to have significantly lower wages even years later.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @MarkinLA

    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Dave Pinsen

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up “retraining” as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    I've been hearing "retraining" as a solution for decades. Does this ever really happen, beyond the assumption that people go back to community college?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @MarkinLA

  59. Idiots, listen up.

    If random people on a comment section on Steve Sailer’s blog have a better understanding of an issue than Trump…

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    The. End.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JLoHo


    He is not qualified to be our leader.

     

    First off, we're not electing "our leader". (That's unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) We're electing someone to preside over (part of) our government.

    If random people on a comment section…
     
    What's "random" about them? The fellows who comment here on H-1B tend to be experienced in the tech world. Why wouldn't they be more familiar with the facts in their own sphere? Who knows more about real estate, you or Donald Trump?

    How is Trump's being wobbly on an issue he doesn't understand worse than the other candidates' being dead wrong even though they do understand it?

    You want someone who knows the H-1B issue inside-out and upside-down, every jot and tittle of the voluminous statutes? Then I have your candidate: Carly Fiorina!

    Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?

    You remind me of the homos during the AIDS "crisis". The whole world was expected to stop to concentrate on their problem.

    Replies: @SFG, @MKP

    , @tbraton
    @JLoHo

    Therefore, we should back which candidate? If not Trump, who? We lemmings on Sailer's blog need clear direction. When you say that Trump "is not qualified to be our leader," then who do you have in mind? If not Trump, then what am to do with all those Trump ties I bought this summer.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @JLoHo

    "He is not qualified to be our leader."

    As Reg Caesar pointed out, we are not electing "a leader". Free men do not recognize "leaders". It was not the intention of the founders of the Republic that we should have "leaders".

    Moreover, nobody is qualified for the office. Given that the job description for President of the United States has become "God Emperor who can summon down fire from the sky", no mere mortal is qualified to hold the job.

    Our job is to decide which one of the many clowns vying for the job gets to wear the God-Emperor crown.

    , @anonymous
    @JLoHo


    He is not qualified to be our leader.
     
    Even if what you say is true then how does that distinguish him from the other candidates?
  60. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    I have a friend who has an advanced degree in biotech, used to teach chemistry to med students, and after getting downsized due to a merger, went looking for work where he lives (Seattle). This guy was a staff scientist at Merck and then at a biotech startup. Also, speaks 4 languages including English (native speaker). The only job he found in his field was a contract work that paid less than cost of daycare (his wife's an amazon who works at Amazon). So he's a stay-at-home dad.

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up "retraining" as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @yaqub the mad scientist

    It’s all about career path. Once you fall off your path, it’s tough to get back on unless you have very high-demand skills and credentials. There are a huge number of well-educated people who fall off their career path and end up in lower wage work. Sometimes they fall off their path due to company politics (this applies especially to management track professionals), sometimes bad luck.

    It’s not good enough to be smart and educated, you need to have the perfect resume and continuous work experience. One reason for this loose labor market is the mass importation of immigrant labor, particularly through H1b. The second reason is the outsourcing to lower-wage nations.

    Lionoftheblogsphere has written on this topic extensively. I remember in one post, he noted that college students who graduated during a recession continued to have significantly lower wages even years later.

    • Replies: @StAugustine
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That's a bit like my chinese coworker told me - larger numbers of kids in China are born in "lucky" years, where the three astrological calendars (I think there were three) align, being super lucky. Except, as my friend explained, for the kids themselves, as you had a huge cohort moving through - as in not so lucky for getting a job when you graduate.

    , @MarkinLA
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The old expression about pay: Start low - stay low says it all. The companies tend to give everybody almost the same percent so 10 percent of 0 is still 0 is why pay stays low. The only way to break out is change jobs but many companies demand a salary history before they make an offer.

  61. @Peterike
    I wonder if Trump isn't just getting bored with the whole thing.

    Replies: @e, @Reg Cæsar

    I wonder if Trump isn’t just getting bored with the whole thing.

    That was the case with Jesse Ventura. But he had a few years to go on his term when it happened. At least Sarah Palin resigned.

  62. http://www.donaldjtrump.com/news/donald-trump-gets-more-praise-from-sen.-jeff-sessions

    Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump’s positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn’t single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration.

    Sen. Jeff Sessions mentioned only one candidate Monday when asked about the Republican presidential race during a speech in Huntsville.

    The candidate? Donald Trump.

    “I haven’t endorsed anybody and I’m not really the best person (to ask),” Sessions said in wrapping up his response to a question from the audience at the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Von Braun Center.

    The audience of about 900 business and community leaders responded with growing laughter, the image of Sessions introducing Trump in Mobile last summer no doubt fresh in their minds. Alabama’s junior senator even briefly wore Trump’s “Make America Great Again” cap while on stage with the real estate mogul during that August event.

    “Too little attention is paid to Trump’s position on issues,” Sessions said. “I have said for the last several years to my Republican colleagues, American people want a lawful system of immigration that they can be proud of and serve their interests.”

    Sessions has helped Trump shape his immigration policies, The Washington Post reported.

    In touting Trump, Sessions pointed to trade deals struck by the Obama administration that have not delivered what was promised.

    “You’ve got to have American manufacturing and you’ve got to be able to export,” Sessions said. “You’ve got to be able to compete with companies that are abroad. Trump is strong on both of those issues. I’ve been talking about it for several years.

    “We had all this post mortem after (Mitt) Romney lost (the presidential election in 2012) and all these consultants had the most ridiculous ideas about what it’s going to take to win the next election. If we don’t pass immigration reform, you’ll never win another election, they said. Well, we didn’t and we had the biggest victory in 70 years in the House and a big victory in the Senate. So I just don’t trust any of those folks (consultants).”

    But remember, Sessions said he hasn’t endorsed anybody.

    “You’ll have to make your own judgments about (Trump’s) integrity or his ideas,” Sessions said. “But those positions, I think, are popular. I think it’s hurt the establishment candidates. It’s not too late for anybody, really, to rise up.”

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XRQ71-rM-E

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Mr. Anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    If Trump continues strong against immigration in any way, I will vote for him. Though I still remember Romney's backflip on the issue in 2012 (after he had won the nomination). In any event, Trump and Paul are the only candidates I would ever have considered votomg for out of the current Republican pack, and Paul hasn't done anything to win my support with his recent pandering to all those black people who will never ever vote for him. The rest of the field are not - all put together - worth a bucket of warm spit.

    I won't vote for the guy who looks like Larry Vaughn and who isn't even eligible to be President. I won't vote for Norman Braman's cuban houseboy. I won't vote for the magic-negro doctor who will carry on the GOPs long-standing platform of pretending to be against abortion. I won't vote for the fat corrupt abrasive slob from Jersey. I won't vote for the crony-capitalist I-banker masquerading as Mr. Smith from Ohio. I won't vote for the brittle harpy who aspires to be a neo-con war-goddess. I won't vote for George W. Bush's dumber kid brother.

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump’s positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn’t single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration."


    Yeah, my instincts tell me Trump is a patriot, and thus on our side. If Jeff Sessions will vouch for him too, that's really all I need.

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    http://www.donaldjtrump.com/news/donald-trump-gets-more-praise-from-sen.-jeff-sessions

    Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump's restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump's positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn't single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration.

    Sen. Jeff Sessions mentioned only one candidate Monday when asked about the Republican presidential race during a speech in Huntsville.

    The candidate? Donald Trump.

    "I haven't endorsed anybody and I'm not really the best person (to ask)," Sessions said in wrapping up his response to a question from the audience at the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Von Braun Center.

    The audience of about 900 business and community leaders responded with growing laughter, the image of Sessions introducing Trump in Mobile last summer no doubt fresh in their minds. Alabama's junior senator even briefly wore Trump's "Make America Great Again" cap while on stage with the real estate mogul during that August event.

    "Too little attention is paid to Trump's position on issues," Sessions said. "I have said for the last several years to my Republican colleagues, American people want a lawful system of immigration that they can be proud of and serve their interests."

    Sessions has helped Trump shape his immigration policies, The Washington Post reported.

    In touting Trump, Sessions pointed to trade deals struck by the Obama administration that have not delivered what was promised.

    "You've got to have American manufacturing and you've got to be able to export," Sessions said. "You've got to be able to compete with companies that are abroad. Trump is strong on both of those issues. I've been talking about it for several years.

    "We had all this post mortem after (Mitt) Romney lost (the presidential election in 2012) and all these consultants had the most ridiculous ideas about what it's going to take to win the next election. If we don't pass immigration reform, you'll never win another election, they said. Well, we didn't and we had the biggest victory in 70 years in the House and a big victory in the Senate. So I just don't trust any of those folks (consultants)."

    But remember, Sessions said he hasn't endorsed anybody.

    "You'll have to make your own judgments about (Trump's) integrity or his ideas," Sessions said. "But those positions, I think, are popular. I think it's hurt the establishment candidates. It's not too late for anybody, really, to rise up."
     

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mr. Anon, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/633751809492844544

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/655529934597857280

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  64. -Immigration has been my #1 issue for many years now so hearing Trump flip on the H1B program was extremely disappointing. He is still my preferred candidate, though, since most of the time he tells me the lies I want to hear.

    -I don’t trust my-parents-are-immigrants (give it a rest, already) Rubio.

    – I liked Cruz’s smack down of the moderators. I might be able to pull the lever for him, if it came to that.

    – I haven’t really heard Carson speak before tonight but I can’t believe this guy is a front runner. For a surgeon, he doesn’t come across as all that sharp and his speech pattern is irritating in the extreme. He seemed way out of his depth, much more so than Trump or Fiorina. I can only assume he gets his support from people who want to feel good about themselves for pulling the lever for a black guy.

    – I can’t even with Fiorona. I have a visceral dislike of her and she ruined HP (and Lucent) so I’ll never vote for her.

    – I’m glad Jeb came out as a big zero in this debate. Can’t wait until he drops out of the race.

    – I like Chris Christie’s NJ attitude and he livens things up but he has no chance.

    – Can’t wait for the SNL parody of the debate.

  65. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XRQ71-rM-E

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @JohnnyWalker123

  66. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XRQ71-rM-E

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @JohnnyWalker123

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I imagine that's Trump's golf course in Aberdeen, Scotland in the background of his Twitter page?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  67. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/655529934597857280

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I imagine that’s Trump’s golf course in Aberdeen, Scotland in the background of his Twitter page?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, I thought it looked like his Scotland golf course.

  68. @JLoHo
    Idiots, listen up.

    If random people on a comment section on Steve Sailer's blog have a better understanding of an issue than Trump...

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    The. End.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @anonymous

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    First off, we’re not electing “our leader”. (That’s unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) We’re electing someone to preside over (part of) our government.

    If random people on a comment section…

    What’s “random” about them? The fellows who comment here on H-1B tend to be experienced in the tech world. Why wouldn’t they be more familiar with the facts in their own sphere? Who knows more about real estate, you or Donald Trump?

    How is Trump’s being wobbly on an issue he doesn’t understand worse than the other candidates’ being dead wrong even though they do understand it?

    You want someone who knows the H-1B issue inside-out and upside-down, every jot and tittle of the voluminous statutes? Then I have your candidate: Carly Fiorina!

    Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?

    You remind me of the homos during the AIDS “crisis”. The whole world was expected to stop to concentrate on their problem.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Reg Cæsar

    " (That’s unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) "

    You must be new here.


    (Slashdot reference)

    , @MKP
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?"

    Thank you. In the abstract, I'm in favor of reducing sharply the number of H1B visas, but I don't see why this is suddenly the litmus test for immigration purity. Construction and drywall workers, landscapers, cab drivers ... 25 years of losing their jobs and watching their wages fall. All they were told is "get over it" and "you're racist if you don't like it."

    Now, suddenly, it's different - the IMPORTANT people are losing their jobs!

    Sorry, tech guys, you're in the same boat as the rest of us. It's racist to want to be able to buy new shoes and clothes for your daughter.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @Anonym, @MarkinLA

  69. @JLoHo
    Idiots, listen up.

    If random people on a comment section on Steve Sailer's blog have a better understanding of an issue than Trump...

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    The. End.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @anonymous

    Therefore, we should back which candidate? If not Trump, who? We lemmings on Sailer’s blog need clear direction. When you say that Trump “is not qualified to be our leader,” then who do you have in mind? If not Trump, then what am to do with all those Trump ties I bought this summer.

  70. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's all about career path. Once you fall off your path, it's tough to get back on unless you have very high-demand skills and credentials. There are a huge number of well-educated people who fall off their career path and end up in lower wage work. Sometimes they fall off their path due to company politics (this applies especially to management track professionals), sometimes bad luck.

    It's not good enough to be smart and educated, you need to have the perfect resume and continuous work experience. One reason for this loose labor market is the mass importation of immigrant labor, particularly through H1b. The second reason is the outsourcing to lower-wage nations.

    Lionoftheblogsphere has written on this topic extensively. I remember in one post, he noted that college students who graduated during a recession continued to have significantly lower wages even years later.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @MarkinLA

    That’s a bit like my chinese coworker told me – larger numbers of kids in China are born in “lucky” years, where the three astrological calendars (I think there were three) align, being super lucky. Except, as my friend explained, for the kids themselves, as you had a huge cohort moving through – as in not so lucky for getting a job when you graduate.

  71. And for the readers here, recall that, with our current administration not enforcing the laws that we currently have, disregarding every complaint from those trying to maintain the border and deport illegal immigrants – Trump I think would do a decent job getting some sense of normality back to this sphere, which is at the moment with the floodgates of central American pretty open and the specter of McAmnesty looming over us.. Could we do worse? Personally, I think Trump would be our best international relations guy, a guy who can at least count the $$, not that that’s any way to run a country.

    However, I remember a guy who ran on “No More Nation Building” and look where we are today.

    The only substantial reason to support Trump is for his wonderful personality and strong character (going by what I read).

  72. Almost all the candidates stepped up their games again, but they seem to be approaching their limits.

    Trump and Carson consolidated their positions as front-runners by keeping their cool.

    Rubio gave another best performance. His stock will continue to rise, especially after the way he shut down Bush (who showed off just how bad he is at this).

    Christie and Cruz had near break out performances and overshadowed Fiorina, but only Cruz can build on it. We’ll see if he does.

  73. @Father O'Hara
    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,"You know you want these girls in the White House!"

    Replies: @Anonymous, @tbraton, @EriK

    “I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera, ripped open her blouse, stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!” ”

    Damn! I missed that. It must have happened when I went to the kitchen to get a glass of water. Judging from her face, I would bet that she has had a job done on those “girls” to firm them up.

    What I found interesting about the “debate,” apart from the blatant partisanship of the debate “moderators,” was that a number of the candidates made good impressions in various ways. For example, Carly Fiorina, the one who apparently bared her tits to a national audience (apparently in an attempt to show she had nothing to hide), made a very good response on the complexity of the tax code. (Ironically, I was making the very same point to a friend on the telephone a few days earlier. Even more ironic, this retired woman friend was studying for a test to qualify her for preparing other people’s tax returns, something she needs to do to supplement her retirement income. I was arguing that tax code is so complicated that most people have to hire someone else to prepare their tax returns, which is a complete waste of resources.) Even though she is not my favorite and stands little chance of securing the nomination, I must admit she has a rare ability to analyze and explain a complicated issue in pretty simple language that most people can understand. Mike Huckabee was another who finally showed the talent he has as a politician. He is still the most natural politician in that large group, but I fail to see that he has a compelling message that will allow him to catch fire and take Iowa the way he did in 2008. Christie did well. Cruz did well. I thought Kasich did much better last night than previously. Trump was Trump, still the most dominant candidate in the field and a commanding presence on the stage.

    The problem is that the so many of the large field had good moments that no one stood out above the rest, in comparison to the two earlier debates. If all you had to go on was last night’s debate, it would be hard to make a choice. Bush was the exception. I don’t see how he helped his candidacy with last night’s performance. And Carson continues to mystify me. I fail to see why he is doing so well in the polls, based on what I have seen at the debates and what I know of his background.

    • Replies: @carol
    @tbraton

    I call BS on these tax "simplification" schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone...are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?

    Replies: @EriK, @MarkinLA, @tbraton

    , @Vendetta
    @tbraton

    Whoosh...


    Carly's had a double mastectomy.

    Replies: @tbraton

  74. “If you work in tech or software and you’re now going to say “not me, I was ALWAYS against open immigration,” then … bullshit, you liar.”

    Nonsense. I worked in tech or software from 1987 to 2005, and I have been against “skilled” immigration since 1993, the first time I realized that an entire startup was staffed by cheap labor from India. Against illegal immigration from 1984. Never been in favor of open immigration.

    And I know many people from tech. The people who are reliably in favor of open immigration are often the very tippy top techies, the ones with PhDs in engineering, the ones who see themselves as the overlords of a bunch of peons.

  75. @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

    I’ll buy 2) and 3), but as for 1), after watching Trump reel in and cheat people with more money than sense for two decades, I kind of wonder.

  76. @Reg Cæsar
    @JLoHo


    He is not qualified to be our leader.

     

    First off, we're not electing "our leader". (That's unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) We're electing someone to preside over (part of) our government.

    If random people on a comment section…
     
    What's "random" about them? The fellows who comment here on H-1B tend to be experienced in the tech world. Why wouldn't they be more familiar with the facts in their own sphere? Who knows more about real estate, you or Donald Trump?

    How is Trump's being wobbly on an issue he doesn't understand worse than the other candidates' being dead wrong even though they do understand it?

    You want someone who knows the H-1B issue inside-out and upside-down, every jot and tittle of the voluminous statutes? Then I have your candidate: Carly Fiorina!

    Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?

    You remind me of the homos during the AIDS "crisis". The whole world was expected to stop to concentrate on their problem.

    Replies: @SFG, @MKP

    ” (That’s unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) ”

    You must be new here.

    (Slashdot reference)

  77. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    I have a friend who has an advanced degree in biotech, used to teach chemistry to med students, and after getting downsized due to a merger, went looking for work where he lives (Seattle). This guy was a staff scientist at Merck and then at a biotech startup. Also, speaks 4 languages including English (native speaker). The only job he found in his field was a contract work that paid less than cost of daycare (his wife's an amazon who works at Amazon). So he's a stay-at-home dad.

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up "retraining" as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @yaqub the mad scientist

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up “retraining” as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    I’ve been hearing “retraining” as a solution for decades. Does this ever really happen, beyond the assumption that people go back to community college?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    The notion of "retraining" as a solution is and has always been a crock. An average 45 year old man laid off from a factory is not going to get retrained as a software engineer. Even if he did, he is not going to get a job, given the number of laid-off 45 year old software engineers.

    All the public policy solutions offered by politicians and academics are predicated on the assumption that all people have the same abilities and are all interchangeable. A society built on lies isn't going to solve anything.

    , @MarkinLA
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    That is always the fallback position but nobody going back to classes ever get a job based on it. Nobody is going to hire a 50 year old programmer who hasn't had a job in two years simply because he took some classes in object oriented programming and learned a scripting language.

    This allows the government to fool the rubes who are not in tech to think something is being done since many vocational occupations can be trained in a little as a few months if the guy is already fairly handy with tools.

    We had this garbage when the defense industry blew out and it was a bit of a joke. I just wanted to waste the money and took helicopter flight lessons. My hand numbed up so bad on the cyclic that I gave up after the 5 grand was spent. I should have went to truck driving school since I can't park a trailer to save my life.

  78. I’m hoping that the Bloods win the next election. I’m tired of the Crips.

  79. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    Your comment shows that you know absolutely nothing about H-1Bs and what goes on in that scam.

    Nobody is losing their job because the H-1Bs are smarter. They are losing their jobs because H-1Bs are indentured servants who can be worked 60 hours for less than 40 hours pay. They drive wages down for everybody in the field. Older workers with families and mortgages to pay are laid off so that the company can hire younger H-1Bs at half the wage.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @MarkinLA

    Just so.

    The original idea -- that H1Bs would be brought in where Americans with some rare and extraordinary skill couldn't be found -- has been turned on its head. Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he's something really special.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  80. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's all about career path. Once you fall off your path, it's tough to get back on unless you have very high-demand skills and credentials. There are a huge number of well-educated people who fall off their career path and end up in lower wage work. Sometimes they fall off their path due to company politics (this applies especially to management track professionals), sometimes bad luck.

    It's not good enough to be smart and educated, you need to have the perfect resume and continuous work experience. One reason for this loose labor market is the mass importation of immigrant labor, particularly through H1b. The second reason is the outsourcing to lower-wage nations.

    Lionoftheblogsphere has written on this topic extensively. I remember in one post, he noted that college students who graduated during a recession continued to have significantly lower wages even years later.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @MarkinLA

    The old expression about pay: Start low – stay low says it all. The companies tend to give everybody almost the same percent so 10 percent of 0 is still 0 is why pay stays low. The only way to break out is change jobs but many companies demand a salary history before they make an offer.

  81. @e
    @jackmcg

    I'm too disappointed in Christie's politics to vote for him, but he would DESTROY Clinton in a debate.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    I can’t agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l’il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don’t count for much for many–perhaps most–people.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin



    I can’t agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l’il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don’t count for much for many–perhaps most–people.

     

    Nice guy Rick Lazio was practically charged with sexual assault for crossing the stage and handing her a piece of paper.

    Replies: @tbraton

  82. @Father O'Hara
    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,"You know you want these girls in the White House!"

    Replies: @Anonymous, @tbraton, @EriK

    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!”

    Get a grip
    From wikipedia
    In February 2009, Fiorina was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy[188][341] at Stanford Hospital in March 2009, followed by chemotherapy, which caused her to temporarily lose her hair, and later radiation therapy.[342]

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @EriK


    Get a grip
     
    What do you expect from someone named "Rihanna"?

    Replies: @tbraton

    , @Vendetta
    @EriK

    It's a joke, for God's sake. It's not good, but it's a joke.

  83. @mind gorilla
    It looked like Trump was trying to appear more in control of himself and presidential. He also looked like he has lost weight - getting shape for the job?

    Jeb is a bumbling fool trying and failing to even smoothly repeat his memorized talking points.

    Marco seems like he is in such a hurry to get it out- he reminds me of my pet chihuahua who gets so excited when she sees people. any people

    Carson - too sedate and reasonable

    Kasich - WTF - OK OK I get it - your the Gov of Ohio.

    Fiorina appears menopausal. so stern. so strong. I think I'm attracted to her.

    Cruz I like but can he overcome all the bad press he gets and will get?

    Rand Paul's delivery and voice and hair is somewhat strange.

    Christy - the passion for the common man seems fake

    Huckabee? America will never have a Pres. named Huckabee. Never. Its ridiculous

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Rand Paul’s delivery and voice and hair is somewhat strange.

    Rand Paul reminds me of Jimmy Olsen, cub reporter, on the old Superman TV show.

  84. @Reg Cæsar
    @JLoHo


    He is not qualified to be our leader.

     

    First off, we're not electing "our leader". (That's unser Führer in German, by the way. You might want to be more careful.) We're electing someone to preside over (part of) our government.

    If random people on a comment section…
     
    What's "random" about them? The fellows who comment here on H-1B tend to be experienced in the tech world. Why wouldn't they be more familiar with the facts in their own sphere? Who knows more about real estate, you or Donald Trump?

    How is Trump's being wobbly on an issue he doesn't understand worse than the other candidates' being dead wrong even though they do understand it?

    You want someone who knows the H-1B issue inside-out and upside-down, every jot and tittle of the voluminous statutes? Then I have your candidate: Carly Fiorina!

    Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?

    You remind me of the homos during the AIDS "crisis". The whole world was expected to stop to concentrate on their problem.

    Replies: @SFG, @MKP

    “Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?”

    Thank you. In the abstract, I’m in favor of reducing sharply the number of H1B visas, but I don’t see why this is suddenly the litmus test for immigration purity. Construction and drywall workers, landscapers, cab drivers … 25 years of losing their jobs and watching their wages fall. All they were told is “get over it” and “you’re racist if you don’t like it.”

    Now, suddenly, it’s different – the IMPORTANT people are losing their jobs!

    Sorry, tech guys, you’re in the same boat as the rest of us. It’s racist to want to be able to buy new shoes and clothes for your daughter.

    • Agree: Daniel Williams
    • Replies: @Discordiax
    @MKP

    IT's not a litmus test so much as a worrying signal, much like Trump's repeated pledge to have a "big beautiful DOOR in the wall" and "let them come back LEGALLY".

    There is ample evidence to doubt that Trump means much of what he says (usually a past instance of him saying the opposite.) So it's reasonable to fear that if somehow Trump were elected he would sell out his anti-immigration base, much like other Republicans elected by anti-immigration electorates.

    Imagine that Governor Bobby Jindal had criticized Romney for his "self-deportation" statements. And endorsed the "touchback" amnesty, Trump's Door-in-the-Wall. And waffled on H1B visas. Would we regard Jindal as any better on immigration than Rubio?

    Trump is, frankly, a coin-flip on doing anything useful to stave off demographic transformation. But the others are all guaranteed to acquiesce in California's demographics spreading across the US.

    , @Anonym
    @MKP

    There are plenty of us here who were anti-immigrationist before H1B started being a factor. I am sorry it wasn't earlier.

    It would be nice if journalists and lawyers had their own visas, as they have yet to really get a taste of things afaict. And donors and politicians for that matter.

    , @MarkinLA
    @MKP

    There were a lot of us against all immigration but you are right in the general sense.

    There is a lot of unjustified arrogance in the tech world. I have dealt with a lot of mediocre programmers and engineers who really thought they were the bees-knees and nobody could ever do their job. Because they felt they were so superior to everybody else they tended to look down on anybody who lost their job for whatever reason as incompetent.

    My last job was as a so-called Software Quality Engineer. I reviewed people's software and tested it and verified it against it's requirements. This was an FDA requirement for software related to a medical device or it's production. It was a trivial job compared to what I did in defense but I lived 10 minutes away from work and the company paid better than anybody else in the San Fernando Valley except for a few defense contractors still around. I got (undeserved) stock options and was able to retire on those options and the inflated pay. In addition, nothing beats an SQE job for stock watching. I made a lot of side money reading other people's reports and writing my own while the market was open and my computer's ticker on. I did my lab work after the market closed. Because of this, it was the best job I ever had, if not the most intellectually rewarding.

    I only mention this because I had to review a lot of software from people who considered themselves top notch. One of the things I can assure you of is that many people in tech have a hugely inflated view of their talents and should have more empathy for those in the field getting shafted by H-1Bs.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

  85. I keep hearing that Trump is going soft on immigration, but I wouldn’t know since I didn’t catch this debate. Trump has to understand that his popularity is based on his earlier aggressive stance on immigration, and not much else. I never bought Trump as an outsider, but he’s the only candidate that I would be willing to vote for. If he turns soft on immigration, I’ll just stay at home, unless there is something of local importance on the ballot.

  86. @Mr. Anon
    @The Z Blog

    "Fiorina evaporated."

    What, did someone pour a bucket of water over her?

    Replies: @EriK

    Now that’s funny. Unlike that nitwit commenting on her “girls.”

    • Agree: Vendetta
  87. @The Z Blog
    I think Rubio lied enough to fool the rubes.

    ¡Yeb! is toast.

    Kasich drinks too much before these things.

    Cruz probably did enough to remain the Trump fall back option.

    Trump is always Trump.

    Farina evaporated.

    Carson has low grade narcolepsy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @JSM

    Carson has low grade narcolepsy.

    Or, more likely, since we all like Occam’s Razor here, a handful of low-grade quaaludes.

  88. Kasich seems addled, like me before I have my coffee (and often at other times as well). As the first candidate to speak, he ignored the question and gave a long critique of his fellows, which included, “I’ve heard them talk about deporting 10 or 11 — people here from this country out of this country, splitting families.”

    “10 or 11”? That caught my attention. He didn’t correct himself, either. Also, anyone who thinks it’s imp[ortant to tell us we can’t deport 10 or eleven MILLION illegals isn’t interested in deporting even 10 or 11 of them. It’s a giveaway.

    Rubio was surprisingly effective, very glib. Possibly not as dumb as Steve led me to believe. Nevertheless, he has proved himself completely unreliable and I hate it when politicians spew that “America’s best days are ahead of us” crap. They aren’t. Trump gets that, others don’t.

    I think Carson is way out of his depth when he talks about the economy. Here is is answer on whether his flat tax would raise enough revenue:

    Let me just say, if you’re talking about an $18 trillion economy, you’re talking about a 15 percent tax on your gross domestic product. You’re talking about $2.7 trillion. We have a budget closer to $3.5 trillion. But if you also apply that same 15 percent to several other things, including corporate taxes, and including the capital gains taxes, you make that amount up pretty quickly. So that is not by any stretch a pie in the sky.

    I admit I too am out of my depth on economic issues, but does that even make sense? First of all, the GDP is a largely made up figure, which includes many non-taxable elements such as “imputations” and “hedonics.” And doesn’t GDP already include the “several other things” Carson refers to? Correct me if I’m wrong.

  89. I like reading all these concern trolls coming out of the woodwork saying this is a reason we shouldn’t support Trump and instead one of the other GOP cucks.

    Try not to be so obvious.

  90. Rubio’s response to Jeb’s statement on Rubio’s lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @jill

    Or maybe Rubio (or at least his staff) was aware that the Sun-Sentinel had come out that morning or the day before calling for Rubio to resign his Senate seat due to the number of Senate sessions he was missing and had prepared for the issue to be raised by one of the candidates or one of the moderators. I would have been a lot more surprised if he didn't have an answer prepared in advance of the debate. That's what good candidates do. That's what makes Jeb!!!'s floundering around for nearly a week on whether the Iraq War was a mistake earlier this past summer so incomprehensible. He was George W.'s brother after all, and he had nearly 8 years to prepare for a question that he or someone in his campaign should have known was going to be asked, and he wasn't prepared with an answer. Nothing made him look like such a bumbler than that episode.

    , @jackmcg
    @jill

    +5 points for a cool conspiracy theory, however the truth is Jeb telegraphed this attack pre-debate in the media and when his superPAC opened a twitter specifically to attack Rubio on senate attendance, an issue that literally nobody gives a shit about.

    Occams razor: Jeb is a terrible politician, Rubio is a polished liar.

    , @Jimorbid
    @jill

    I don't think so. There were a lot of rumors that Jeb's handlers were preparing him in the last few days to attack Rubio (see redstate and other cuckservative sites). Rubio has been criticized a lot the last week for his poor attendance in the Senate, so he knew it was coming and had time to rehearse. Exhibit 3,491 why political handlers and consultants are a bunch of worthless grifters.

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @jill

    "Rubio’s response to Jeb’s statement on Rubio’s lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good."

    The Tampa newspaper came out with an editorial the other day, calling for Rubio to resign from the Senate, due to his poor attendance. Thus he pretty much knew that someone, whether a moderator or one of the other candidates, was going to ask him that question. Occam's Razor suggests no need of a conspiracy, or collusion. He memorized a pat answer, because he knew the question was coming. Hell, even I knew the question was coming. You jut haven't been paying close enough attention to recent current events, I guess.

    Replies: @tbraton

  91. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Dave Pinsen

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up “retraining” as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    I've been hearing "retraining" as a solution for decades. Does this ever really happen, beyond the assumption that people go back to community college?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @MarkinLA

    The notion of “retraining” as a solution is and has always been a crock. An average 45 year old man laid off from a factory is not going to get retrained as a software engineer. Even if he did, he is not going to get a job, given the number of laid-off 45 year old software engineers.

    All the public policy solutions offered by politicians and academics are predicated on the assumption that all people have the same abilities and are all interchangeable. A society built on lies isn’t going to solve anything.

  92. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Dave Pinsen

    I thought of him when Tarkio College alumnus Marco Rubio brought up “retraining” as a policy prescription for unemployed Americans in the debate. There are lots of smart, credentialed Americans out of work, working temp jobs, etc.

    I've been hearing "retraining" as a solution for decades. Does this ever really happen, beyond the assumption that people go back to community college?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @MarkinLA

    That is always the fallback position but nobody going back to classes ever get a job based on it. Nobody is going to hire a 50 year old programmer who hasn’t had a job in two years simply because he took some classes in object oriented programming and learned a scripting language.

    This allows the government to fool the rubes who are not in tech to think something is being done since many vocational occupations can be trained in a little as a few months if the guy is already fairly handy with tools.

    We had this garbage when the defense industry blew out and it was a bit of a joke. I just wanted to waste the money and took helicopter flight lessons. My hand numbed up so bad on the cyclic that I gave up after the 5 grand was spent. I should have went to truck driving school since I can’t park a trailer to save my life.

  93. @JLoHo
    Idiots, listen up.

    If random people on a comment section on Steve Sailer's blog have a better understanding of an issue than Trump...

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    The. End.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @anonymous

    “He is not qualified to be our leader.”

    As Reg Caesar pointed out, we are not electing “a leader”. Free men do not recognize “leaders”. It was not the intention of the founders of the Republic that we should have “leaders”.

    Moreover, nobody is qualified for the office. Given that the job description for President of the United States has become “God Emperor who can summon down fire from the sky”, no mere mortal is qualified to hold the job.

    Our job is to decide which one of the many clowns vying for the job gets to wear the God-Emperor crown.

  94. @Harry Baldwin
    @e

    I can't agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l'il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don't count for much for many--perhaps most--people.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I can’t agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l’il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don’t count for much for many–perhaps most–people.

    Nice guy Rick Lazio was practically charged with sexual assault for crossing the stage and handing her a piece of paper.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Nice guy Rick Lazio was practically charged with sexual assault for crossing the stage and handing her a piece of paper."

    I thought that was one of the more absurd situations I have witnessed in politics. And, of course, these same people keep insisting that women can handle combat as well as men (while maintaining the "separate but equal" division of sports competitions among men and women, competitions that have stakes of much less importance than combat).

  95. @JLoHo
    Idiots, listen up.

    If random people on a comment section on Steve Sailer's blog have a better understanding of an issue than Trump...

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    The. End.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @anonymous

    He is not qualified to be our leader.

    Even if what you say is true then how does that distinguish him from the other candidates?

  96. @JohnnyWalker123
    http://www.donaldjtrump.com/news/donald-trump-gets-more-praise-from-sen.-jeff-sessions

    Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump's restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump's positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn't single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration.

    Sen. Jeff Sessions mentioned only one candidate Monday when asked about the Republican presidential race during a speech in Huntsville.

    The candidate? Donald Trump.

    "I haven't endorsed anybody and I'm not really the best person (to ask)," Sessions said in wrapping up his response to a question from the audience at the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Von Braun Center.

    The audience of about 900 business and community leaders responded with growing laughter, the image of Sessions introducing Trump in Mobile last summer no doubt fresh in their minds. Alabama's junior senator even briefly wore Trump's "Make America Great Again" cap while on stage with the real estate mogul during that August event.

    "Too little attention is paid to Trump's position on issues," Sessions said. "I have said for the last several years to my Republican colleagues, American people want a lawful system of immigration that they can be proud of and serve their interests."

    Sessions has helped Trump shape his immigration policies, The Washington Post reported.

    In touting Trump, Sessions pointed to trade deals struck by the Obama administration that have not delivered what was promised.

    "You've got to have American manufacturing and you've got to be able to export," Sessions said. "You've got to be able to compete with companies that are abroad. Trump is strong on both of those issues. I've been talking about it for several years.

    "We had all this post mortem after (Mitt) Romney lost (the presidential election in 2012) and all these consultants had the most ridiculous ideas about what it's going to take to win the next election. If we don't pass immigration reform, you'll never win another election, they said. Well, we didn't and we had the biggest victory in 70 years in the House and a big victory in the Senate. So I just don't trust any of those folks (consultants)."

    But remember, Sessions said he hasn't endorsed anybody.

    "You'll have to make your own judgments about (Trump's) integrity or his ideas," Sessions said. "But those positions, I think, are popular. I think it's hurt the establishment candidates. It's not too late for anybody, really, to rise up."
     

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mr. Anon, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    If Trump continues strong against immigration in any way, I will vote for him. Though I still remember Romney’s backflip on the issue in 2012 (after he had won the nomination). In any event, Trump and Paul are the only candidates I would ever have considered votomg for out of the current Republican pack, and Paul hasn’t done anything to win my support with his recent pandering to all those black people who will never ever vote for him. The rest of the field are not – all put together – worth a bucket of warm spit.

    I won’t vote for the guy who looks like Larry Vaughn and who isn’t even eligible to be President. I won’t vote for Norman Braman’s cuban houseboy. I won’t vote for the magic-negro doctor who will carry on the GOPs long-standing platform of pretending to be against abortion. I won’t vote for the fat corrupt abrasive slob from Jersey. I won’t vote for the crony-capitalist I-banker masquerading as Mr. Smith from Ohio. I won’t vote for the brittle harpy who aspires to be a neo-con war-goddess. I won’t vote for George W. Bush’s dumber kid brother.

  97. @EriK
    @Father O'Hara


    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!”

     

    Get a grip
    From wikipedia
    In February 2009, Fiorina was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy[188][341] at Stanford Hospital in March 2009, followed by chemotherapy, which caused her to temporarily lose her hair, and later radiation therapy.[342]

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Vendetta

    Get a grip

    What do you expect from someone named “Rihanna”?

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Reg Cæsar

    "What do you expect from someone named “Rihanna”?"

    I must be alone, but I thought we should all be honored that "she" would take time out from what must be a very busy singing career to post occasionally on Sailer's blog. I guess I am also alone in finding "her" posts very funny. In fact, I was going to suggest that she change her screen name to "Rihaha."

  98. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Anon

    Again, most candidates don't take much interest in the minutiae of their policies. Trump's immigration policies likely will be crafted by his advisors. Given who wrote his previous position paper, it seems like he's delegated immigration policy to Jeff Sessions.

    Trump has a way of reversing himself frequently. For example, he was for bringing in Syrian refugees, but he's strongly against it now. My guess is that he has some strongly positive feelings towards graduates of elite universities and wants them to stay, but his general views on immigration are vague because he hasn't studied the issue enough.

    Trump's long-term immigration position will depend heavily on who continues to advise him. Hopefully, that continues to be Sessions.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “Trump’s long-term immigration position will depend heavily on who continues to advise him. Hopefully, that continues to be Sessions.”

    Let’s hope so.

  99. Just read that Charles Murray isn’t for Trump. Not because of the immigration issue, but because The Donald is viewed as a sleaze and unfit for the office.

    Its true that everyone has a right to support the candidate of their choice, but aside from Ann Coulter is there any public conservative author/intellectual who is supporting Trump?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    John Derbyshire supports Trump.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ron Unz had a good critique of Charles Murray.


    Look, Murray has a long track-record, and that track-record shows him to be an incompetent and a shill. When you're the most prominent public figure writing about extremely serious and controversial topics, this is a huge problem. Let me cite a few examples.

    Back in late 1980s, I read Murray's anti-Welfare "Losing Ground," which I thought was quite good. Obviously, I noticed he'd left out any mention of the absolutely crucial HBD/IQ role and framed his entire critique in Ayn Randian terms, but I certainly didn't blame him. After all, authors need to eat, don't they?

    But then after his big IQ book "The Bell Curve" came out, he was asked about that in an interview, and claimed that when Losing Ground came out, he'd been totally ignorant of IQ/HBD, and never dreamed it was a factor in anything until Herrnstein had contacted him, and unfortunately, I tend to believe him. Herrnstein/Jensen/etc. had published their stuff in the late 1960s and had gotten *massive* media attention, yet Murray had spent decades as a professional social scientist focusing on welfare/underclass type issues, and had never heard of any of that research. This is not a good sign.

    Next, Murray's Bell Curve book was extremely long and full but not very good and got lots of things confused. Anyway, it didn't really say much that his co-author Herrnstein (a very serious scholar) hadn't already indicated 25 years earlier back in 1969. In fact, I suspect Murray was really just writing up and popularizing Herrnstein's research, which he didn't fully understand in depth, and this turned out to be a *huge* problem since Herrnstein died just as the book came out. I remember seeing Murray on some TV show getting hostile questions from opposing scholars, and he didn't really handle himself very well, since Herrnstein wasn't around to pass him the answers.

    Recall also that Murray claimed that for IQ-deterministic reasons there would be a *gigantic* growth in the national white underclass, just as disorderly and violent as the existing black urban underclass, and therefore by now all our cities would have become deadly no-go ghetto zones on the way to American "custodial democracy." Instead, crime has since totally collapsed nationwide.

    Afterwards, he mostly wrote silly libertarian books to impress his silly libertarian friends and paymasters, notably proposing to solve our social problems by having the government annually distribute $10,000 worth of free crack, er, I mean $10,000 in *cash* to everyone living in ghettos. He generally avoided IQ issues, except for a long article a few years ago in Commentary, in which he endlessly praised the unimaginable genius of the Jewish Race, and (as I recall) suggested that one major proof that the Jews possessed the most brilliant minds in history was that they had discovered the only true religion. Presumably, Murray wanted to have his stipend raised so he could buy a fancier house.
     

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  100. @map
    @Matra

    To be charitable to Trump, he was not being asked about the H1B program. He was asked about a disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg that Trump admits does not exist.

    Trump said he agreed that if a brilliant foreign student is studying at Harvard and graduates with all kinds of honors, that everything should be done to keep that foreign student here instead of him going back to his own country. This is a slice of the immigration issue that touches on the "best and brightest" mantra that Trump believes is a benefit to the United States. I don't think Trump was really addressing the H1B issue.

    It was Rubio that criticized a gaming of the H1B system, claiming that he would want companies barred from the program for such abuses.

    Replies: @Matra

    To be charitable to Trump, he was not being asked about the H1B program. He was asked about a disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg that Trump admits does not exist

    He did however mock Rubio as Zuckerberg’s “personal senator”. IIRC that was because of Rubio’s plan to increase the number of H1B visas.

  101. @jill
    Rubio's response to Jeb's statement on Rubio's lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.

    Replies: @tbraton, @jackmcg, @Jimorbid, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Or maybe Rubio (or at least his staff) was aware that the Sun-Sentinel had come out that morning or the day before calling for Rubio to resign his Senate seat due to the number of Senate sessions he was missing and had prepared for the issue to be raised by one of the candidates or one of the moderators. I would have been a lot more surprised if he didn’t have an answer prepared in advance of the debate. That’s what good candidates do. That’s what makes Jeb!!!’s floundering around for nearly a week on whether the Iraq War was a mistake earlier this past summer so incomprehensible. He was George W.’s brother after all, and he had nearly 8 years to prepare for a question that he or someone in his campaign should have known was going to be asked, and he wasn’t prepared with an answer. Nothing made him look like such a bumbler than that episode.

  102. @tbraton
    @Father O'Hara

    "I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera, ripped open her blouse, stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!” "

    Damn! I missed that. It must have happened when I went to the kitchen to get a glass of water. Judging from her face, I would bet that she has had a job done on those "girls" to firm them up.

    What I found interesting about the "debate," apart from the blatant partisanship of the debate "moderators," was that a number of the candidates made good impressions in various ways. For example, Carly Fiorina, the one who apparently bared her tits to a national audience (apparently in an attempt to show she had nothing to hide), made a very good response on the complexity of the tax code. (Ironically, I was making the very same point to a friend on the telephone a few days earlier. Even more ironic, this retired woman friend was studying for a test to qualify her for preparing other people's tax returns, something she needs to do to supplement her retirement income. I was arguing that tax code is so complicated that most people have to hire someone else to prepare their tax returns, which is a complete waste of resources.) Even though she is not my favorite and stands little chance of securing the nomination, I must admit she has a rare ability to analyze and explain a complicated issue in pretty simple language that most people can understand. Mike Huckabee was another who finally showed the talent he has as a politician. He is still the most natural politician in that large group, but I fail to see that he has a compelling message that will allow him to catch fire and take Iowa the way he did in 2008. Christie did well. Cruz did well. I thought Kasich did much better last night than previously. Trump was Trump, still the most dominant candidate in the field and a commanding presence on the stage.

    The problem is that the so many of the large field had good moments that no one stood out above the rest, in comparison to the two earlier debates. If all you had to go on was last night's debate, it would be hard to make a choice. Bush was the exception. I don't see how he helped his candidacy with last night's performance. And Carson continues to mystify me. I fail to see why he is doing so well in the polls, based on what I have seen at the debates and what I know of his background.

    Replies: @carol, @Vendetta

    I call BS on these tax “simplification” schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone…are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?

    • Replies: @EriK
    @carol


    I call BS on these tax “simplification” schemes.
     
    I couldn't agree more. Another talking point along these lines that drives me nuts, is when politicians claim that moving from say six tax brackets to two is somehow a huge simplification. Really? The least complex item in the tax code it the tax rates themselves.
    , @MarkinLA
    @carol

    You don't get it do you. Reduce the number and rate of the brackets but to make it revenue neutral get rid of all the special breaks for rich people and business. Spend the next 20 years putting all those breaks back in. Reduce the number and rate of the brackets...... wash, rinse, repeat - eventually the wealthy pay nothing or as close to it as possible.

    , @tbraton
    @carol

    "I call BS on these tax “simplification” schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone…are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?"

    Well, obviously you like the taste of the kool-aid. You seem devoted to all these complicated tax breaks designed to lessen the tax burden on business. Why not just simply abolish Section 179? It was only added to the Internal Revenue Code in 1958. And all it does is allow businesses to immediately deduct costs as expenses as opposed to writing them off over time. One possibility, which has been advanced from time to time, is to simply allow all businesses to simply expense all capital expenditures immediately rather than requiring businesses to write them off over time. Sure would simplify the tax code, hey? I have been following these various "tax reform" acts since the Tax Reform Act of 1969. There is a reason these various tax reform statutes are referred to as "Tax Lawyers' and Accountants' Relief Acts. Those are the two major groups to profit from the ostensible tax reform, since they have to master the details of the new law and charge their clients for their hard-earned knowledge.

    Back in the early 80's, I encountered a friend on the streets of D.C. He was a lawyer, and he was Jewish, although he did not practice tax law. He was a pretty nice guy, and I had had no problems with him. That was about the time that the Reagan Administration was talking about "simplifying" the tax code. On his own, my friend brought up the proposals to simplify the tax code. He stated that he thought the existing tax code was pretty fair and didn't need any change. I was much more familiar with the tax code than he, and I realized that he just didn't understand what he was talking about. Or, being Jewish, he was wedded to the absurd idea that by constant fiddling and fine-tuning the Tax Code can be made to achieve perfect justice. In other words, there is a certain Talmudic nature to the Tax Code, which contributes to increasing complexity in a futile attempt to achieve perfect justice, which is an impossible goal. Forget about achieving perfect justice for there is no such thing. The idea is to raise the necessary money to fund the government at the proper level to achieve its constitutional duties.

    In addition to the tax lawyers and tax accountants, there are the tax-writing committees of the House and Senate to consider. What would members of the House Ways and Means Committee or the Senate Finance Committee do to raise campaign contributions (or fund their standard of living) unless they could deliver "goodies" to the lobbyists? The only "goodies" they can deliver are changes to the tax laws. That's why we have constant "fiddling" with tax code provisions in order to bring "more justice to taxpayers." Back in 1970, I was acquainted with a tax lawyer who was one of the top tax practitioners in the U.S. I don't know why, but one day I must have said something about a tax scandal of the day involving a congressperson, and he said, in an apparent attempt to reassure a much younger man, that the current scandal was nothing. He then related how the head of a major tax writing committee in Congress back in the late 40's had received a half-million dollars ($500,000) in "cash" to get a certain tax bill passed. Back in the late 40's, $500,000 was "real money."

    BTW this is what Wikipedia says about the Revenue Act of 1913, the first modern federal income tax law following the passage of the 16th Amendment to the Consitution, making legal the imposition of a federal income tax without the other restrictions imposed by the Constitution:

    " The incomes of couples exceeding $4,000, as well as those of single persons earning $3,000 or more, were subject to a one percent federal tax.[5] Further, the measure provided a progressive tax structure, meaning that high income earners were required to pay at higher rates.
    It would require only a few years for the federal income tax to become the chief source of income for the government, far outdistancing tariff revenues.
    Less than 1% of the population paid federal income tax at the time.[citation needed]
    The act was applicable to incomes for 1913, 1914, and 1915. [6]
    Income tax table for individuals[edit]
    A "normal income tax" and an "additional tax" were levied against the net income of individuals as shown in the following table.
    Revenue Act of 1913
    Normal income tax and additional tax on individuals
    38 Stat. 166 [7]
    Income Normal rate Additional rate Combined rate
    0 1% 0 1%
    $20,000 1% 1% 2%
    $50,000 1% 2% 3%
    $75,000 1% 3% 4%
    $100,000 1% 4% 5%
    $250,000 1% 5% 6%
    $500,000 1% 6% 7%
    Exemption of $3,000 for single filers and $4,000 for married couples. Therefore the 1% bottom marginal rate applied only to the first $17,000 ($374,400 in 2010 dollars) of income for single filers, or the first $16,000 ($352,300 in 2010 dollars) of income for married filers (also see adjustments for inflation between 1913 and 2010 in the BLS table, below)."

    Getting back to a tax code where less than 1% of Americans paid any income tax is as realistic as returning to the Garden of Eden. But the existing tax code is, as Carly Fiorina argued last night, a monstrosity that desperately needs to be simplified.

  103. @Reg Cæsar
    @EriK


    Get a grip
     
    What do you expect from someone named "Rihanna"?

    Replies: @tbraton

    “What do you expect from someone named “Rihanna”?”

    I must be alone, but I thought we should all be honored that “she” would take time out from what must be a very busy singing career to post occasionally on Sailer’s blog. I guess I am also alone in finding “her” posts very funny. In fact, I was going to suggest that she change her screen name to “Rihaha.”

  104. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Dave Pinsen

    Exactly. After all, successful businesspeople tend to be pragmatists; they like to go with what works and hire the experts to help flesh out the fine points/details of the actions that they initially take.

    For candidate Trump, if there's some details that he doesn't exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he'll simply ask the "right people" and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that's pretty good overall.

    Just finished reading thru Ann Coulter's Twitter feed for the debate. It's quite good and as always, the immigration issue is on her mind and in her tweets.

    Hi, Ann!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Chrisnonymous

    candidate Trump, if there’s some details that he doesn’t exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he’ll simply ask the “right people” and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that’s pretty good overall.

    Yea, like Schwarzenegger surrounding himself…

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Chrisnonymous

    Unlike Arnold, Trump was born in America and attended a reputable university.
    And unlike Arnold, Trump's first language is English. So there is an incentive there to keep US for the US.

    Trump has already asked Sen. Sessions' advice before so there is a precedent for asking him again to help craft policies.

    Replies: @tbraton

  105. @MKP
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?"

    Thank you. In the abstract, I'm in favor of reducing sharply the number of H1B visas, but I don't see why this is suddenly the litmus test for immigration purity. Construction and drywall workers, landscapers, cab drivers ... 25 years of losing their jobs and watching their wages fall. All they were told is "get over it" and "you're racist if you don't like it."

    Now, suddenly, it's different - the IMPORTANT people are losing their jobs!

    Sorry, tech guys, you're in the same boat as the rest of us. It's racist to want to be able to buy new shoes and clothes for your daughter.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @Anonym, @MarkinLA

    IT’s not a litmus test so much as a worrying signal, much like Trump’s repeated pledge to have a “big beautiful DOOR in the wall” and “let them come back LEGALLY”.

    There is ample evidence to doubt that Trump means much of what he says (usually a past instance of him saying the opposite.) So it’s reasonable to fear that if somehow Trump were elected he would sell out his anti-immigration base, much like other Republicans elected by anti-immigration electorates.

    Imagine that Governor Bobby Jindal had criticized Romney for his “self-deportation” statements. And endorsed the “touchback” amnesty, Trump’s Door-in-the-Wall. And waffled on H1B visas. Would we regard Jindal as any better on immigration than Rubio?

    Trump is, frankly, a coin-flip on doing anything useful to stave off demographic transformation. But the others are all guaranteed to acquiesce in California’s demographics spreading across the US.

  106. @jill
    Rubio's response to Jeb's statement on Rubio's lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.

    Replies: @tbraton, @jackmcg, @Jimorbid, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    +5 points for a cool conspiracy theory, however the truth is Jeb telegraphed this attack pre-debate in the media and when his superPAC opened a twitter specifically to attack Rubio on senate attendance, an issue that literally nobody gives a shit about.

    Occams razor: Jeb is a terrible politician, Rubio is a polished liar.

  107. @jill
    Rubio's response to Jeb's statement on Rubio's lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.

    Replies: @tbraton, @jackmcg, @Jimorbid, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I don’t think so. There were a lot of rumors that Jeb’s handlers were preparing him in the last few days to attack Rubio (see redstate and other cuckservative sites). Rubio has been criticized a lot the last week for his poor attendance in the Senate, so he knew it was coming and had time to rehearse. Exhibit 3,491 why political handlers and consultants are a bunch of worthless grifters.

  108. @MarkinLA
    @Mike1

    Your comment shows that you know absolutely nothing about H-1Bs and what goes on in that scam.

    Nobody is losing their job because the H-1Bs are smarter. They are losing their jobs because H-1Bs are indentured servants who can be worked 60 hours for less than 40 hours pay. They drive wages down for everybody in the field. Older workers with families and mortgages to pay are laid off so that the company can hire younger H-1Bs at half the wage.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Just so.

    The original idea — that H1Bs would be brought in where Americans with some rare and extraordinary skill couldn’t be found — has been turned on its head. Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @International Jew

    "Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special."

    And the American is willing to work for half salary and half the benefits he would normally receive. And willing to train incoming H1-Bs who will then proceed to take his job anyway.


    "Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special."


    The original idea didn't seem to make much sense to begin with. Back when the H1-B visa program began in the late '80s/early 90's, (perhaps earlier), India certainly wasn't a first world economic powerhouse, much less a leading tech innovator. Therefore, why India as opposed to just simply hiring US graduates right out of University. After all, the US helped to pioneer the global tech industry (Certainly did more at the time than either India or China).

    So really, it doesn't add up or make any sense. Unless the ultimate plan all along was simply to undercut American workers' wages, benefits, and jobs by replacing them with foreigners to begin with.

    In practice, H1-B Visas are the equivalent of NAFTA and other trade agreements: Instead of outsourcing jobs overseas they are insourcing populations into the US and still the US worker gets the shaft by not getting hired.

    A nation of over 300 million, and one who pioneered the global tech industry. It simply is a lie that there aren't enough tech jobs to be filled by native born US workers. The companies just have to pay the US going rate with full benefits, pensions, etc. Of course these aren't service a la minimum wage jobs so not sure how "lowly" "unimportant" tech jobs can help improve the overall economy or lead to a better overall standard of living.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

  109. @JohnnyWalker123
    http://www.donaldjtrump.com/news/donald-trump-gets-more-praise-from-sen.-jeff-sessions

    Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump's restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump's positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn't single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration.

    Sen. Jeff Sessions mentioned only one candidate Monday when asked about the Republican presidential race during a speech in Huntsville.

    The candidate? Donald Trump.

    "I haven't endorsed anybody and I'm not really the best person (to ask)," Sessions said in wrapping up his response to a question from the audience at the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Von Braun Center.

    The audience of about 900 business and community leaders responded with growing laughter, the image of Sessions introducing Trump in Mobile last summer no doubt fresh in their minds. Alabama's junior senator even briefly wore Trump's "Make America Great Again" cap while on stage with the real estate mogul during that August event.

    "Too little attention is paid to Trump's position on issues," Sessions said. "I have said for the last several years to my Republican colleagues, American people want a lawful system of immigration that they can be proud of and serve their interests."

    Sessions has helped Trump shape his immigration policies, The Washington Post reported.

    In touting Trump, Sessions pointed to trade deals struck by the Obama administration that have not delivered what was promised.

    "You've got to have American manufacturing and you've got to be able to export," Sessions said. "You've got to be able to compete with companies that are abroad. Trump is strong on both of those issues. I've been talking about it for several years.

    "We had all this post mortem after (Mitt) Romney lost (the presidential election in 2012) and all these consultants had the most ridiculous ideas about what it's going to take to win the next election. If we don't pass immigration reform, you'll never win another election, they said. Well, we didn't and we had the biggest victory in 70 years in the House and a big victory in the Senate. So I just don't trust any of those folks (consultants)."

    But remember, Sessions said he hasn't endorsed anybody.

    "You'll have to make your own judgments about (Trump's) integrity or his ideas," Sessions said. "But those positions, I think, are popular. I think it's hurt the establishment candidates. It's not too late for anybody, really, to rise up."
     

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mr. Anon, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    “Senator Jeff Sessions, who helped craft Trump’s restrictionist immigration policies, praised Trump on Monday. He gave special praise to Trump’s positions on immigration and trade.

    This would at least tend to suggest that Trump is pretty solid on immigration. Sessions is a one-issue guy and wouldn’t single out Trump, out of all the candidates, unless he saw Trump as being strong on immigration.”

    Yeah, my instincts tell me Trump is a patriot, and thus on our side. If Jeff Sessions will vouch for him too, that’s really all I need.

  110. @International Jew
    @MarkinLA

    Just so.

    The original idea -- that H1Bs would be brought in where Americans with some rare and extraordinary skill couldn't be found -- has been turned on its head. Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he's something really special.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special.”

    And the American is willing to work for half salary and half the benefits he would normally receive. And willing to train incoming H1-Bs who will then proceed to take his job anyway.

    “Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special.”

    The original idea didn’t seem to make much sense to begin with. Back when the H1-B visa program began in the late ’80s/early 90’s, (perhaps earlier), India certainly wasn’t a first world economic powerhouse, much less a leading tech innovator. Therefore, why India as opposed to just simply hiring US graduates right out of University. After all, the US helped to pioneer the global tech industry (Certainly did more at the time than either India or China).

    So really, it doesn’t add up or make any sense. Unless the ultimate plan all along was simply to undercut American workers’ wages, benefits, and jobs by replacing them with foreigners to begin with.

    In practice, H1-B Visas are the equivalent of NAFTA and other trade agreements: Instead of outsourcing jobs overseas they are insourcing populations into the US and still the US worker gets the shaft by not getting hired.

    A nation of over 300 million, and one who pioneered the global tech industry. It simply is a lie that there aren’t enough tech jobs to be filled by native born US workers. The companies just have to pay the US going rate with full benefits, pensions, etc. Of course these aren’t service a la minimum wage jobs so not sure how “lowly” “unimportant” tech jobs can help improve the overall economy or lead to a better overall standard of living.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Of course it never made sense. Even economists argued then against the notion of any "shortage" lasting more than a few years. I was in grad school in the early 80s when anybody with a degree could get a job. Undergraduate classes in CS and EE were standing room only at UCLA.

    The whole sordid mess about H-1Bs:

    http://users.nber.org/~peat/PapersFolder/Papers/SG/NSF.html

  111. @tbraton
    @Father O'Hara

    "I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera, ripped open her blouse, stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!” "

    Damn! I missed that. It must have happened when I went to the kitchen to get a glass of water. Judging from her face, I would bet that she has had a job done on those "girls" to firm them up.

    What I found interesting about the "debate," apart from the blatant partisanship of the debate "moderators," was that a number of the candidates made good impressions in various ways. For example, Carly Fiorina, the one who apparently bared her tits to a national audience (apparently in an attempt to show she had nothing to hide), made a very good response on the complexity of the tax code. (Ironically, I was making the very same point to a friend on the telephone a few days earlier. Even more ironic, this retired woman friend was studying for a test to qualify her for preparing other people's tax returns, something she needs to do to supplement her retirement income. I was arguing that tax code is so complicated that most people have to hire someone else to prepare their tax returns, which is a complete waste of resources.) Even though she is not my favorite and stands little chance of securing the nomination, I must admit she has a rare ability to analyze and explain a complicated issue in pretty simple language that most people can understand. Mike Huckabee was another who finally showed the talent he has as a politician. He is still the most natural politician in that large group, but I fail to see that he has a compelling message that will allow him to catch fire and take Iowa the way he did in 2008. Christie did well. Cruz did well. I thought Kasich did much better last night than previously. Trump was Trump, still the most dominant candidate in the field and a commanding presence on the stage.

    The problem is that the so many of the large field had good moments that no one stood out above the rest, in comparison to the two earlier debates. If all you had to go on was last night's debate, it would be hard to make a choice. Bush was the exception. I don't see how he helped his candidacy with last night's performance. And Carson continues to mystify me. I fail to see why he is doing so well in the polls, based on what I have seen at the debates and what I know of his background.

    Replies: @carol, @Vendetta

    Whoosh…

    Carly’s had a double mastectomy.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Vendetta

    What amazes me about a site that is supposed to attract people with high IQs is how many posters can't seem to grasp humor in any form. I am positive that "rihanna" was being figurative and not literal in her depiction of Carly Fiorina. Her description seemed to capture the essence of Ms. Fiorina in a very colorful way that was not to be taken as an actual depiction of what happened at the debate by anyone with a half-functioning brain. It's a shame that so many can't seem to grasp that relatively simple notion. To point out that Ms. Fiorina has had a double mastectomy would be as irrelevant as pointing out to me that Jeb! has only one exclamation point after his political name and not the three I like to bestow on him, like this: Go Jeb!!!---Please (as Rodney Dangerfield would have added).

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Vendetta

  112. @MKP
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?"

    Thank you. In the abstract, I'm in favor of reducing sharply the number of H1B visas, but I don't see why this is suddenly the litmus test for immigration purity. Construction and drywall workers, landscapers, cab drivers ... 25 years of losing their jobs and watching their wages fall. All they were told is "get over it" and "you're racist if you don't like it."

    Now, suddenly, it's different - the IMPORTANT people are losing their jobs!

    Sorry, tech guys, you're in the same boat as the rest of us. It's racist to want to be able to buy new shoes and clothes for your daughter.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @Anonym, @MarkinLA

    There are plenty of us here who were anti-immigrationist before H1B started being a factor. I am sorry it wasn’t earlier.

    It would be nice if journalists and lawyers had their own visas, as they have yet to really get a taste of things afaict. And donors and politicians for that matter.

  113. @EriK
    @Father O'Hara


    I thought Carly Fiorina overstepped a bit when she faced the camera,ripped open her blouse,stuck out her chest and shouted,”You know you want these girls in the White House!”

     

    Get a grip
    From wikipedia
    In February 2009, Fiorina was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy[188][341] at Stanford Hospital in March 2009, followed by chemotherapy, which caused her to temporarily lose her hair, and later radiation therapy.[342]

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Vendetta

    It’s a joke, for God’s sake. It’s not good, but it’s a joke.

  114. @jill
    Rubio's response to Jeb's statement on Rubio's lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.

    Replies: @tbraton, @jackmcg, @Jimorbid, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    “Rubio’s response to Jeb’s statement on Rubio’s lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good.”

    The Tampa newspaper came out with an editorial the other day, calling for Rubio to resign from the Senate, due to his poor attendance. Thus he pretty much knew that someone, whether a moderator or one of the other candidates, was going to ask him that question. Occam’s Razor suggests no need of a conspiracy, or collusion. He memorized a pat answer, because he knew the question was coming. Hell, even I knew the question was coming. You jut haven’t been paying close enough attention to recent current events, I guess.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    "The Tampa newspaper came out with an editorial the other day, calling for Rubio to resign from the Senate, due to his poor attendance. Thus he pretty much knew that someone, whether a moderator or one of the other candidates, was going to ask him that question."

    I agree with the point of your message, but the paper which came out calling for Rubio to resign was the "Sun-Sentinel," which is published on the east coast of Florida, mainly in Palm Beach and Broward Counties, not Tampa.

  115. ” What did you think? ”

    Trump was a huge disappointment, owing to his answer on the H1B visas.

    Whn he was asked about his take on Marco Rubio’s support for H1B visas , Trump rattled on about how he supports legal immigration. As H1B visas are legal immigration , what was the point of Trump’s speech, if not to avoid taking a position on whether he would stop or severely limit H1B visas .

    Trump going on and on about “legal immigration” was a deliberate tactic to ingratiate himself with those citical of illegal immigration and business interests who want H1B visas. If he had outright said he supported Rubio’s H1B position, he would turn off his grassroots supporters who want a limit on even legal immigration, espeically H1B visas which hurts Ameicans seeking decent paying jobs. So Trump avoids saying he supports H1B and instead rattles on about “legal” immigration thereby making his supportes just think about “illegal” immigation , which is a Trump calling cad.

    Trump stabbed many Americans in the back by backing Silicon Valley’s needs over middle class and working class needs.

  116. @education realist
    Dave, I don't disagree. I'm not against the guy. I was just disappointed he didn't stick it to Rubio on immigration.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @CogitoErgoSum

    Debate was about financial and economic issues, not domestic/social issues that are not finance/economic related.

  117. I didn’t watch the debate, which leads me to comment on a different aspect, which may reflect more on the attitude of the Republican Party than its bloviating agents.

    How could they allow terms where CNBC blocked viewers who didn’t have a paid account? This is supposed to express support for ordinary working people?

    More telling than mere words. What capitalism really means for democracy.

  118. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    So what if we’re not bright? We’re still Americans. We’re still being displaced politically by massive legal immigration.

  119. @AndrewR
    Kasich was the first one to be asked the "what's your biggest weakness" question and I think he's the only one who didn't even respond to it at all.

    It seems his handlers told him he needed to be more aggressive. He certainly seemed less passive than in past debates. But he's still a joke.

    I had a hard time paying attention to Fiorina's rhetoric because I was so transfixed by her eyes blinking three times a second.

    Christie sounded like an idiot, unsurprisingly.

    As for Trump... I think we all need to stop expecting miracles with him. But he is the best candidate on immigration, even if he doesn't grasp a lot of the policy nuances. At the very least he has moved the Overton Window and for that we owe him a lot of gratitude.

    Replies: @iffen

    I had a hard time paying attention to Fiorina’s rhetoric because I was so transfixed by her eyes blinking three times a second

    The face that wants to sink a thousand ships.

  120. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    … if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Drop dead. My ancestors have been living and dying on this soil for hundreds of years. It’s our country. If some foreigner, talented or otherwise, is taking my job, it’s because a traitor or an interloper sold me out.

    • Replies: @Mike1
    @Daniel Williams

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @MarkinLA, @Jimi, @NOTA

  121. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    “Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.” – but please train your replacement.

  122. A little late to the party but something Ben Carson said last night is quite telling (the question being what is your greatest weakness)…

    Probably in terms of the applying for the job of president, a weakness would be not really seeing myself in that position until hundreds of thousands of people began to tell me that I needed to do it.

    Campaigning for president–the travel, speeches, TV/radio appearances, social media politicking, learning the intricacies of policy, etc.–certainly isn’t for everyone. Not to mention actually serving as chief executive. Carson intuitively knows this job isn’t for him, if for nothing else he doesn’t have the eloquence or gravitas voters crave. But when nice, smiling whites have devised your presidential campaign from thin air, helped you sell your autobiography, donated millions, and written op-eds singing your praises–you’re going to start believing them.

    The cuckold wing of the Republican base (one can’t blame the establishment on this one) is solely responsible for this mess. The promotion of an Affirmative-Action by well-meaning nice whites will inevitably lead to a bewildered and bitter Carson once the heat (from Repub. opponents, media, leftist pols, etc.) is applied, causing the inarticulate Carson to inevitably backstab his nice white supporters and cite inherent racism as the reason for his political failures. See: Michael Steele, Colin Powell, Condi Rice, etc.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @GW

    On "Between Two Ferns," Zach Galifianakis asked Barack Obama how it felt to be the last black president. Republicans say, "Please, sir, I'd like another."

  123. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin



    I can’t agree. Big, overbearing fat guy with Jersey accent against poor l’il old Hillary? The women will rally to her. Issues don’t count for much for many–perhaps most–people.

     

    Nice guy Rick Lazio was practically charged with sexual assault for crossing the stage and handing her a piece of paper.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “Nice guy Rick Lazio was practically charged with sexual assault for crossing the stage and handing her a piece of paper.”

    I thought that was one of the more absurd situations I have witnessed in politics. And, of course, these same people keep insisting that women can handle combat as well as men (while maintaining the “separate but equal” division of sports competitions among men and women, competitions that have stakes of much less importance than combat).

  124. Everyone else here in these comments has already covered this debate well enough. I have nothing to add, except this:

    1) From lots of experience there in those beautiful mountains, I can tell you that high altitude robs the brain of oxygen and causes a reduction in logic and organizational skills — even among so-called “business network” (CNBC) people.

    2) This changes nothing. Donald Trump will win the nomination, and Senator Jeff Sessions will be his immigration point-man, as he is now. Trump scored points again, even though there was little opportunity to go into money-and-trade-related issues in his wheelhouse — as there should have been in a “business network” debate.

    Oh, and good riddance, Jeb! Bush… thank God.

  125. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:

    Weekly Standard stuck a fork in Jeb. When you’ve lost WS….

    Perhaps the most cringe-inducing aspect of Jeb was his dig at the French. Just as liberals think it’s always 1956, Jeb still thinks we are still hating on the French, calling sliced potatoes freedom fries.
    His campaign is so over.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @WhatEvvs

    " Just as liberals think it’s always 1956, Jeb still thinks we are still hating on the French, calling sliced potatoes freedom fries."

    Are you saying that the emergency has passed and that I can safely go back to calling my Freedom Horn by its original name, French Horn? I and my French Horn are much relieved.

    Replies: @WhatEvvs

  126. @carol
    @tbraton

    I call BS on these tax "simplification" schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone...are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?

    Replies: @EriK, @MarkinLA, @tbraton

    I call BS on these tax “simplification” schemes.

    I couldn’t agree more. Another talking point along these lines that drives me nuts, is when politicians claim that moving from say six tax brackets to two is somehow a huge simplification. Really? The least complex item in the tax code it the tax rates themselves.

    • Agree: International Jew
  127. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @jill

    "Rubio’s response to Jeb’s statement on Rubio’s lack of Senate attendance and votes was clearly rehearsed as if he knew it in advance. Conclusion: This was all planned in advance. Jeb is leaving the campaign and passed the baton to Rubio by making Rubio look good."

    The Tampa newspaper came out with an editorial the other day, calling for Rubio to resign from the Senate, due to his poor attendance. Thus he pretty much knew that someone, whether a moderator or one of the other candidates, was going to ask him that question. Occam's Razor suggests no need of a conspiracy, or collusion. He memorized a pat answer, because he knew the question was coming. Hell, even I knew the question was coming. You jut haven't been paying close enough attention to recent current events, I guess.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “The Tampa newspaper came out with an editorial the other day, calling for Rubio to resign from the Senate, due to his poor attendance. Thus he pretty much knew that someone, whether a moderator or one of the other candidates, was going to ask him that question.”

    I agree with the point of your message, but the paper which came out calling for Rubio to resign was the “Sun-Sentinel,” which is published on the east coast of Florida, mainly in Palm Beach and Broward Counties, not Tampa.

  128. @WhatEvvs
    Weekly Standard stuck a fork in Jeb. When you've lost WS....

    Perhaps the most cringe-inducing aspect of Jeb was his dig at the French. Just as liberals think it's always 1956, Jeb still thinks we are still hating on the French, calling sliced potatoes freedom fries.
    His campaign is so over.

    Replies: @tbraton

    ” Just as liberals think it’s always 1956, Jeb still thinks we are still hating on the French, calling sliced potatoes freedom fries.”

    Are you saying that the emergency has passed and that I can safely go back to calling my Freedom Horn by its original name, French Horn? I and my French Horn are much relieved.

    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @tbraton

    Yes you can!

    You can also think that maybe libertarianism is the Jeb-wing of the Republican party pulling a fix on the rest of us, that maybe billionaires might be taxed 1% more, and other such heretical stuff....

  129. From the Daily Beast today castigating the moderators of last night’s debate on CNBC:

    “Are we truly talking about fantasy football?” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie demanded after Quintanilla asked former Florida governor Jeb Bush whether the online sports industry should be regulated as a gambling enterprise by the federal government.

    “Seriously,” Christie continued, noting that the topic was hardly worthy of a presidential debate, where issues of war and peace, the runaway deficit, and the economy should be center stage. It was difficult to disagree with him.

    “How about this?” Christie proposed. “Enough of fantasy football!” (Bush, by the way, missed an opportunity to make the same powerful argument, instead answering the question by boasting that his own fantasy football team was 7-0.)”

    That reminds me of the early January 2012 Republican debate moderated by ABC’s George Stephanopolis, who started off the debate by asking Mitt Romney about proposals by “Republicans” to outlaw birth control. Romney responded indignantly that he was not aware of any efforts by any State to curb access to birth control or any Republican candidate on the stage with him who was proposing any such thing and that he thought it was a very silly subject to inject into a Republican Presidential debate, especially as the opening question in the debate. Everybody liked to deride Mitt Romney’s political skills, but I think his handling of the Stephanopolis “birth control” question was far superior to Jeb!!!’s handling of the fantasy football question, as Chris Christie’s criticism demonstrated. In fact, I was dismayed by Jeb!!!’s enthusiasm in wanting to go on and discuss his fantasy football selections in great detail, as if the television audience was going to be really impressed by his betting savvy, causing his poll numbers to soar. Totally clueless for someone who is supposed to be the “smarter brother.”

    BTW in his closing remarks at the debate Trump bragged about how he and Ben Carson had worked together to force CNBC to abandon its plans to run a 3-3-1/2 hour debate and limit it to 2 hours, with opening and closing remarks by the candidates. To my great surprise, chief moderator John Harwood took issue with Trump’s claim and falsely contended that a 2-hour debate was the plan all along. That evoked the moment during the second Presidential debate in 2012 when Candy Crowley managed to throw Romney off his stride by interjecting herself into the debate by siding with Obama on a particular issue. Here is the segment of last night’s debate:

    “HARWOOD: Just for the record, the debate was always going to be two hours. Senator Rubio?

    TRUMP: That’s not right. That is absolutely not right. You know that. That is not right.”

    It turns out that Trump was absolutely right on this issue. What galls me is that Harwood not only had the arrogance to engage in a mini-debate with Trump but had the audacity to lie about the matter.

    Ted Cruz called it right when he said during the debate that he doubted that any of the moderators in the various debates was going to vote in a Republican primary. I don’t know what the answer to the problem is, but I think the situation with the Republican debates is scandalous. Now that the Republican debates have proven to be real ratings successes for the networks carrying them and have proven highly profitable, you would think that the guys who run the Republican Party would read Trump’s “Art of the Deal” and use their leverage to secure a more non-partisan moderation of the Party’s debates.

  130. @carol
    @tbraton

    I call BS on these tax "simplification" schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone...are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?

    Replies: @EriK, @MarkinLA, @tbraton

    You don’t get it do you. Reduce the number and rate of the brackets but to make it revenue neutral get rid of all the special breaks for rich people and business. Spend the next 20 years putting all those breaks back in. Reduce the number and rate of the brackets…… wash, rinse, repeat – eventually the wealthy pay nothing or as close to it as possible.

  131. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @International Jew

    "Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special."

    And the American is willing to work for half salary and half the benefits he would normally receive. And willing to train incoming H1-Bs who will then proceed to take his job anyway.


    "Today, the default is to hire an Indian, and turn to an American only if he’s something really special."


    The original idea didn't seem to make much sense to begin with. Back when the H1-B visa program began in the late '80s/early 90's, (perhaps earlier), India certainly wasn't a first world economic powerhouse, much less a leading tech innovator. Therefore, why India as opposed to just simply hiring US graduates right out of University. After all, the US helped to pioneer the global tech industry (Certainly did more at the time than either India or China).

    So really, it doesn't add up or make any sense. Unless the ultimate plan all along was simply to undercut American workers' wages, benefits, and jobs by replacing them with foreigners to begin with.

    In practice, H1-B Visas are the equivalent of NAFTA and other trade agreements: Instead of outsourcing jobs overseas they are insourcing populations into the US and still the US worker gets the shaft by not getting hired.

    A nation of over 300 million, and one who pioneered the global tech industry. It simply is a lie that there aren't enough tech jobs to be filled by native born US workers. The companies just have to pay the US going rate with full benefits, pensions, etc. Of course these aren't service a la minimum wage jobs so not sure how "lowly" "unimportant" tech jobs can help improve the overall economy or lead to a better overall standard of living.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    Of course it never made sense. Even economists argued then against the notion of any “shortage” lasting more than a few years. I was in grad school in the early 80s when anybody with a degree could get a job. Undergraduate classes in CS and EE were standing room only at UCLA.

    The whole sordid mess about H-1Bs:

    http://users.nber.org/~peat/PapersFolder/Papers/SG/NSF.html

  132. @Chrisnonymous
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    candidate Trump, if there’s some details that he doesn’t exactly quite know about (e.g. H-1B Visa Program) then he’ll simply ask the “right people” and if that group includes Sen. Jeff Sessions, then that’s pretty good overall.
     
    Yea, like Schwarzenegger surrounding himself...

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Unlike Arnold, Trump was born in America and attended a reputable university.
    And unlike Arnold, Trump’s first language is English. So there is an incentive there to keep US for the US.

    Trump has already asked Sen. Sessions’ advice before so there is a precedent for asking him again to help craft policies.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  133. @MKP
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Finally, you seem to think your own personal issue overrides everything else. What about the 275 million or so Americans not employed in tech? Were you there for the dishwashers and the cab drivers?"

    Thank you. In the abstract, I'm in favor of reducing sharply the number of H1B visas, but I don't see why this is suddenly the litmus test for immigration purity. Construction and drywall workers, landscapers, cab drivers ... 25 years of losing their jobs and watching their wages fall. All they were told is "get over it" and "you're racist if you don't like it."

    Now, suddenly, it's different - the IMPORTANT people are losing their jobs!

    Sorry, tech guys, you're in the same boat as the rest of us. It's racist to want to be able to buy new shoes and clothes for your daughter.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @Anonym, @MarkinLA

    There were a lot of us against all immigration but you are right in the general sense.

    There is a lot of unjustified arrogance in the tech world. I have dealt with a lot of mediocre programmers and engineers who really thought they were the bees-knees and nobody could ever do their job. Because they felt they were so superior to everybody else they tended to look down on anybody who lost their job for whatever reason as incompetent.

    My last job was as a so-called Software Quality Engineer. I reviewed people’s software and tested it and verified it against it’s requirements. This was an FDA requirement for software related to a medical device or it’s production. It was a trivial job compared to what I did in defense but I lived 10 minutes away from work and the company paid better than anybody else in the San Fernando Valley except for a few defense contractors still around. I got (undeserved) stock options and was able to retire on those options and the inflated pay. In addition, nothing beats an SQE job for stock watching. I made a lot of side money reading other people’s reports and writing my own while the market was open and my computer’s ticker on. I did my lab work after the market closed. Because of this, it was the best job I ever had, if not the most intellectually rewarding.

    I only mention this because I had to review a lot of software from people who considered themselves top notch. One of the things I can assure you of is that many people in tech have a hugely inflated view of their talents and should have more empathy for those in the field getting shafted by H-1Bs.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @MarkinLA

    I made a lot of side money reading other people’s reports and writing my own while the market was open and my computer’s ticker on.

    Should have said:

    I made a lot of side money on in-and-out trades by watching the computer ticker while I was doing the report related work of the job. See an opportunity, log in, make a quick 1000-2000 share trade on the 30 stocks I tended to watch, log out.

    Obviously, I was not an English major.

  134. @MarkinLA
    @MKP

    There were a lot of us against all immigration but you are right in the general sense.

    There is a lot of unjustified arrogance in the tech world. I have dealt with a lot of mediocre programmers and engineers who really thought they were the bees-knees and nobody could ever do their job. Because they felt they were so superior to everybody else they tended to look down on anybody who lost their job for whatever reason as incompetent.

    My last job was as a so-called Software Quality Engineer. I reviewed people's software and tested it and verified it against it's requirements. This was an FDA requirement for software related to a medical device or it's production. It was a trivial job compared to what I did in defense but I lived 10 minutes away from work and the company paid better than anybody else in the San Fernando Valley except for a few defense contractors still around. I got (undeserved) stock options and was able to retire on those options and the inflated pay. In addition, nothing beats an SQE job for stock watching. I made a lot of side money reading other people's reports and writing my own while the market was open and my computer's ticker on. I did my lab work after the market closed. Because of this, it was the best job I ever had, if not the most intellectually rewarding.

    I only mention this because I had to review a lot of software from people who considered themselves top notch. One of the things I can assure you of is that many people in tech have a hugely inflated view of their talents and should have more empathy for those in the field getting shafted by H-1Bs.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    I made a lot of side money reading other people’s reports and writing my own while the market was open and my computer’s ticker on.

    Should have said:

    I made a lot of side money on in-and-out trades by watching the computer ticker while I was doing the report related work of the job. See an opportunity, log in, make a quick 1000-2000 share trade on the 30 stocks I tended to watch, log out.

    Obviously, I was not an English major.

  135. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I imagine that's Trump's golf course in Aberdeen, Scotland in the background of his Twitter page?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Yeah, I thought it looked like his Scotland golf course.

  136. @Mike1
    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Big Bill, @Lagertha, @Former Darfur, @MarkinLA, @Dave, @Daniel Williams, @AnAnon, @asdf

    Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Any facts to go along with that? All those IT workers not bright enough? Maybe it’s just easier to get indentured servants.

    (Also, half the US population is going to be on the left of the bell curve. What do you suggest we do with them?)

    The only people immune from being H1B’ed are the columnists at WSJ and the Times.

    You have been well trained indeed. Go get your pat on the head.

  137. @Daniel Williams
    @Mike1


    ... if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.
     
    Drop dead. My ancestors have been living and dying on this soil for hundreds of years. It's our country. If some foreigner, talented or otherwise, is taking my job, it's because a traitor or an interloper sold me out.

    Replies: @Mike1

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
    @Mike1

    The soil that sustained and shaped the lives of generations of my family isn't an economy. It's a nation.

    We don't choose a government because they will teach us a lesson, we choose them because we believe they will represent our interests. My government should be looking out for me and people like me not because we are the hardest working or the smartest people in the world, but because we are citizens of the United States.

    If some politician desires to serve a smarter or better constituency, he should seek them out, rather than bringing them to me. This spot's taken.

    I'm not owed anything, but it's totally reasonable to expect the government my peers elected not to actively ship in foreign competitors who will seek to make my life miserable.

    , @MarkinLA
    @Mike1

    You again show your complete ignorance of the issue. Why is such an obvious moron commenting on things he knows nothing about? These people are not "top talent". There has never been any difficulty in getting extremely talented people into the US. H-1B is not about that, it was supposed to relieve the supposed "shortage" that never existed in the first place.

    Your arrogance to try and label everybody else but yourself as "lazy" is typical of people whose inflated sense of themselves oozes from every pore. Hundreds of thousands of tech workers, many who have had jobs for decades with great performance reviews suddenly became "lazy" and "entitled" overnight?

    Americans today are "lazy" compared to Americans in the 1900s living in tenements working for next to nothing 6 days a week and wondering from one day to the next if they were still going have food on the table.

    Yeah, lets go back to those good old days of dad coming home pissed off beating the wife and kids in response to his boss riding him all day long.

    , @Jimi
    @Mike1


    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here.
     
    Not lazy or entitled, but yes the US does owe its citizens. That's by definition what a nation is.
    , @NOTA
    @Mike1

    Top talent, yes--we should always be open to letting world-class scientists in, for example. But that's not the same thing as average programmers brought in under terms where they can be paid bottom dollar.

  138. Trump addressed the H-1B issue at his Nevada rally today. He seems very clear. The question comes a few seconds after the 56-minute mark:

    Tempest in a teapot.

  139. @carol
    @tbraton

    I call BS on these tax "simplification" schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone...are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?

    Replies: @EriK, @MarkinLA, @tbraton

    “I call BS on these tax “simplification” schemes. It takes more than 3 pages to explain all the ins and outs of sec 179 depreciation expense alone…are we really going to do away with all the depreciation breaks added in the last 20 years to help business and move product?”

    Well, obviously you like the taste of the kool-aid. You seem devoted to all these complicated tax breaks designed to lessen the tax burden on business. Why not just simply abolish Section 179? It was only added to the Internal Revenue Code in 1958. And all it does is allow businesses to immediately deduct costs as expenses as opposed to writing them off over time. One possibility, which has been advanced from time to time, is to simply allow all businesses to simply expense all capital expenditures immediately rather than requiring businesses to write them off over time. Sure would simplify the tax code, hey? I have been following these various “tax reform” acts since the Tax Reform Act of 1969. There is a reason these various tax reform statutes are referred to as “Tax Lawyers’ and Accountants’ Relief Acts. Those are the two major groups to profit from the ostensible tax reform, since they have to master the details of the new law and charge their clients for their hard-earned knowledge.

    Back in the early 80’s, I encountered a friend on the streets of D.C. He was a lawyer, and he was Jewish, although he did not practice tax law. He was a pretty nice guy, and I had had no problems with him. That was about the time that the Reagan Administration was talking about “simplifying” the tax code. On his own, my friend brought up the proposals to simplify the tax code. He stated that he thought the existing tax code was pretty fair and didn’t need any change. I was much more familiar with the tax code than he, and I realized that he just didn’t understand what he was talking about. Or, being Jewish, he was wedded to the absurd idea that by constant fiddling and fine-tuning the Tax Code can be made to achieve perfect justice. In other words, there is a certain Talmudic nature to the Tax Code, which contributes to increasing complexity in a futile attempt to achieve perfect justice, which is an impossible goal. Forget about achieving perfect justice for there is no such thing. The idea is to raise the necessary money to fund the government at the proper level to achieve its constitutional duties.

    In addition to the tax lawyers and tax accountants, there are the tax-writing committees of the House and Senate to consider. What would members of the House Ways and Means Committee or the Senate Finance Committee do to raise campaign contributions (or fund their standard of living) unless they could deliver “goodies” to the lobbyists? The only “goodies” they can deliver are changes to the tax laws. That’s why we have constant “fiddling” with tax code provisions in order to bring “more justice to taxpayers.” Back in 1970, I was acquainted with a tax lawyer who was one of the top tax practitioners in the U.S. I don’t know why, but one day I must have said something about a tax scandal of the day involving a congressperson, and he said, in an apparent attempt to reassure a much younger man, that the current scandal was nothing. He then related how the head of a major tax writing committee in Congress back in the late 40’s had received a half-million dollars ($500,000) in “cash” to get a certain tax bill passed. Back in the late 40’s, $500,000 was “real money.”

    BTW this is what Wikipedia says about the Revenue Act of 1913, the first modern federal income tax law following the passage of the 16th Amendment to the Consitution, making legal the imposition of a federal income tax without the other restrictions imposed by the Constitution:

    ” The incomes of couples exceeding $4,000, as well as those of single persons earning $3,000 or more, were subject to a one percent federal tax.[5] Further, the measure provided a progressive tax structure, meaning that high income earners were required to pay at higher rates.
    It would require only a few years for the federal income tax to become the chief source of income for the government, far outdistancing tariff revenues.
    Less than 1% of the population paid federal income tax at the time.[citation needed]
    The act was applicable to incomes for 1913, 1914, and 1915. [6]
    Income tax table for individuals[edit]
    A “normal income tax” and an “additional tax” were levied against the net income of individuals as shown in the following table.
    Revenue Act of 1913
    Normal income tax and additional tax on individuals
    38 Stat. 166 [7]
    Income Normal rate Additional rate Combined rate
    0 1% 0 1%
    $20,000 1% 1% 2%
    $50,000 1% 2% 3%
    $75,000 1% 3% 4%
    $100,000 1% 4% 5%
    $250,000 1% 5% 6%
    $500,000 1% 6% 7%
    Exemption of $3,000 for single filers and $4,000 for married couples. Therefore the 1% bottom marginal rate applied only to the first $17,000 ($374,400 in 2010 dollars) of income for single filers, or the first $16,000 ($352,300 in 2010 dollars) of income for married filers (also see adjustments for inflation between 1913 and 2010 in the BLS table, below).”

    Getting back to a tax code where less than 1% of Americans paid any income tax is as realistic as returning to the Garden of Eden. But the existing tax code is, as Carly Fiorina argued last night, a monstrosity that desperately needs to be simplified.

  140. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Just read that Charles Murray isn't for Trump. Not because of the immigration issue, but because The Donald is viewed as a sleaze and unfit for the office.

    Its true that everyone has a right to support the candidate of their choice, but aside from Ann Coulter is there any public conservative author/intellectual who is supporting Trump?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JohnnyWalker123

    John Derbyshire supports Trump.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Harry Baldwin

    Oh that's right, he does.

    Maybe he can persuade some of his friends in the alt./dissident right arena to do the same.

    After all, in 1992 19% of independents supported a billionaire who was largely unknown outside of his home state and within the government halls of power. For the most part, the average man in the street who voted for Perot had no idea who he was before late 1991 early 1992. There wasn't any rallying cry along the lines of: "About time that Texan run! Been waiting since '84 for it to finally happen!"

    Obviously Trump doesn't have the problem of low name recognition or lack of "gravitas". Come to think of it, Donald Trump was nationally more famous as a public figure way before Ross Perot. Even today, who fondly recalls Ross Perot? Or in other words, who recalls him as anything other than an unstable messenger who was unfortunate to be the one carrying a very stable message? This time both message and messenger are not only well recognized but are inextricably linked together in a positive way.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  141. @GW
    A little late to the party but something Ben Carson said last night is quite telling (the question being what is your greatest weakness)...

    Probably in terms of the applying for the job of president, a weakness would be not really seeing myself in that position until hundreds of thousands of people began to tell me that I needed to do it.
     
    Campaigning for president--the travel, speeches, TV/radio appearances, social media politicking, learning the intricacies of policy, etc.--certainly isn't for everyone. Not to mention actually serving as chief executive. Carson intuitively knows this job isn't for him, if for nothing else he doesn't have the eloquence or gravitas voters crave. But when nice, smiling whites have devised your presidential campaign from thin air, helped you sell your autobiography, donated millions, and written op-eds singing your praises--you're going to start believing them.

    The cuckold wing of the Republican base (one can't blame the establishment on this one) is solely responsible for this mess. The promotion of an Affirmative-Action by well-meaning nice whites will inevitably lead to a bewildered and bitter Carson once the heat (from Repub. opponents, media, leftist pols, etc.) is applied, causing the inarticulate Carson to inevitably backstab his nice white supporters and cite inherent racism as the reason for his political failures. See: Michael Steele, Colin Powell, Condi Rice, etc.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    On “Between Two Ferns,” Zach Galifianakis asked Barack Obama how it felt to be the last black president. Republicans say, “Please, sir, I’d like another.”

  142. Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    And if you’re not that bright, you deserve to be thrown under the bus.

    In other news, if you think this is how to run a country (dog eat dog, throw your citizens under the bus), you’re not that bright (they don’t do it this way in the “cognitively elite” countries).

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Svigor

    http://www.vdare.com/letters/first-they-came-for-the-janitors


    First they came for the janitors.

    At one time janitors were unionized and made enough to support a family on one paycheck. But this cost the right people money. How dare a lowly janitor make so much money! You can get Mexicans to do the work for a fraction of the cost—the janitors must be lazy. So they broke the unions, imported foreign labor, and now janitors work multiple shifts to support their families in unheated garages. But I wasn`t a janitor, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the factory workers. We`re paying workers ten times what they make in China; we need to be globally competitive! How dare these fat unionized slobs make a good living when it would be so much more profitable to pay them a few dimes an hour! So they outsourced the factories to low-wage sweatshop countries, they tore up the contracts and benefits, gutted whole communities and our nation`s industrial strength. But I wasn`t a factory worker, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the scientists and engineers. We advertise for experienced software engineers at minimum wage and no benefits and we don`t get Einstein! Americans must be lazy and stupid. So they imported massive numbers of foreign scientists and engineers, and started outsourcing advanced design work, and now even the most talented scientists and engineers are being forced into low-wage temporary jobs. But I wasn`t a scientist or an engineer, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the public employees. Hey, everyone else is getting poorer, how dare people who clean the streets or check food quality or guide air traffic make a decent wage with benefits? So they trashed the public employee unions and tore up the contracts and slashed wages and gave the savings to Wall Street. But I wasn`t a public employee so I said nothing.

    And then they came for me. I thought I was special, but in the long run nobody who works for a living is. I recalled that once upon a time America had the highest wages in the world, and we gloried in it as proof of our greatness. Now we celebrate a steady descent into poverty as somehow wonderful and necessary: how did that happen?

    I realize now that driving down wages enriches only a few: the profits from destroying the wages of all my fellow citizens somehow never made it into my pocket.
     
  143. H1Bs are no better quality than the Americans they are replacing, per Norman Matloff: http://www.epi.org/publication/bp356-foreign-students-best-brightest-immigration-policy/

    The immigrant workers, especially those who first came to the United States as foreign students, are in general of no higher talent than the Americans, as measured by salary, patent filings, dissertation awards, and quality of academic program. In the computer science case, the former foreign students are in fact generally of significantly lower talent in many aspects than Americans of the same age, education, and so on.

    The immigrant workers who first came to the United States as foreign students are significantly less likely than Americans to be working in R&D, the industry’s main source of innovation. This is true for both computer science and electrical engineering.

  144. @Mike1
    @Daniel Williams

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @MarkinLA, @Jimi, @NOTA

    The soil that sustained and shaped the lives of generations of my family isn’t an economy. It’s a nation.

    We don’t choose a government because they will teach us a lesson, we choose them because we believe they will represent our interests. My government should be looking out for me and people like me not because we are the hardest working or the smartest people in the world, but because we are citizens of the United States.

    If some politician desires to serve a smarter or better constituency, he should seek them out, rather than bringing them to me. This spot’s taken.

    I’m not owed anything, but it’s totally reasonable to expect the government my peers elected not to actively ship in foreign competitors who will seek to make my life miserable.

  145. @Harry Baldwin
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    John Derbyshire supports Trump.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Oh that’s right, he does.

    Maybe he can persuade some of his friends in the alt./dissident right arena to do the same.

    After all, in 1992 19% of independents supported a billionaire who was largely unknown outside of his home state and within the government halls of power. For the most part, the average man in the street who voted for Perot had no idea who he was before late 1991 early 1992. There wasn’t any rallying cry along the lines of: “About time that Texan run! Been waiting since ’84 for it to finally happen!”

    Obviously Trump doesn’t have the problem of low name recognition or lack of “gravitas”. Come to think of it, Donald Trump was nationally more famous as a public figure way before Ross Perot. Even today, who fondly recalls Ross Perot? Or in other words, who recalls him as anything other than an unstable messenger who was unfortunate to be the one carrying a very stable message? This time both message and messenger are not only well recognized but are inextricably linked together in a positive way.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Perot would've made a good president.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  146. @Svigor

    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.
     
    And if you're not that bright, you deserve to be thrown under the bus.

    In other news, if you think this is how to run a country (dog eat dog, throw your citizens under the bus), you're not that bright (they don't do it this way in the "cognitively elite" countries).

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    http://www.vdare.com/letters/first-they-came-for-the-janitors

    First they came for the janitors.

    At one time janitors were unionized and made enough to support a family on one paycheck. But this cost the right people money. How dare a lowly janitor make so much money! You can get Mexicans to do the work for a fraction of the cost—the janitors must be lazy. So they broke the unions, imported foreign labor, and now janitors work multiple shifts to support their families in unheated garages. But I wasn`t a janitor, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the factory workers. We`re paying workers ten times what they make in China; we need to be globally competitive! How dare these fat unionized slobs make a good living when it would be so much more profitable to pay them a few dimes an hour! So they outsourced the factories to low-wage sweatshop countries, they tore up the contracts and benefits, gutted whole communities and our nation`s industrial strength. But I wasn`t a factory worker, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the scientists and engineers. We advertise for experienced software engineers at minimum wage and no benefits and we don`t get Einstein! Americans must be lazy and stupid. So they imported massive numbers of foreign scientists and engineers, and started outsourcing advanced design work, and now even the most talented scientists and engineers are being forced into low-wage temporary jobs. But I wasn`t a scientist or an engineer, so I said nothing.

    Then they came for the public employees. Hey, everyone else is getting poorer, how dare people who clean the streets or check food quality or guide air traffic make a decent wage with benefits? So they trashed the public employee unions and tore up the contracts and slashed wages and gave the savings to Wall Street. But I wasn`t a public employee so I said nothing.

    And then they came for me. I thought I was special, but in the long run nobody who works for a living is. I recalled that once upon a time America had the highest wages in the world, and we gloried in it as proof of our greatness. Now we celebrate a steady descent into poverty as somehow wonderful and necessary: how did that happen?

    I realize now that driving down wages enriches only a few: the profits from destroying the wages of all my fellow citizens somehow never made it into my pocket.

  147. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Just read that Charles Murray isn't for Trump. Not because of the immigration issue, but because The Donald is viewed as a sleaze and unfit for the office.

    Its true that everyone has a right to support the candidate of their choice, but aside from Ann Coulter is there any public conservative author/intellectual who is supporting Trump?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @JohnnyWalker123

    Ron Unz had a good critique of Charles Murray.

    Look, Murray has a long track-record, and that track-record shows him to be an incompetent and a shill. When you’re the most prominent public figure writing about extremely serious and controversial topics, this is a huge problem. Let me cite a few examples.

    Back in late 1980s, I read Murray’s anti-Welfare “Losing Ground,” which I thought was quite good. Obviously, I noticed he’d left out any mention of the absolutely crucial HBD/IQ role and framed his entire critique in Ayn Randian terms, but I certainly didn’t blame him. After all, authors need to eat, don’t they?

    But then after his big IQ book “The Bell Curve” came out, he was asked about that in an interview, and claimed that when Losing Ground came out, he’d been totally ignorant of IQ/HBD, and never dreamed it was a factor in anything until Herrnstein had contacted him, and unfortunately, I tend to believe him. Herrnstein/Jensen/etc. had published their stuff in the late 1960s and had gotten *massive* media attention, yet Murray had spent decades as a professional social scientist focusing on welfare/underclass type issues, and had never heard of any of that research. This is not a good sign.

    Next, Murray’s Bell Curve book was extremely long and full but not very good and got lots of things confused. Anyway, it didn’t really say much that his co-author Herrnstein (a very serious scholar) hadn’t already indicated 25 years earlier back in 1969. In fact, I suspect Murray was really just writing up and popularizing Herrnstein’s research, which he didn’t fully understand in depth, and this turned out to be a *huge* problem since Herrnstein died just as the book came out. I remember seeing Murray on some TV show getting hostile questions from opposing scholars, and he didn’t really handle himself very well, since Herrnstein wasn’t around to pass him the answers.

    Recall also that Murray claimed that for IQ-deterministic reasons there would be a *gigantic* growth in the national white underclass, just as disorderly and violent as the existing black urban underclass, and therefore by now all our cities would have become deadly no-go ghetto zones on the way to American “custodial democracy.” Instead, crime has since totally collapsed nationwide.

    Afterwards, he mostly wrote silly libertarian books to impress his silly libertarian friends and paymasters, notably proposing to solve our social problems by having the government annually distribute $10,000 worth of free crack, er, I mean $10,000 in *cash* to everyone living in ghettos. He generally avoided IQ issues, except for a long article a few years ago in Commentary, in which he endlessly praised the unimaginable genius of the Jewish Race, and (as I recall) suggested that one major proof that the Jews possessed the most brilliant minds in history was that they had discovered the only true religion. Presumably, Murray wanted to have his stipend raised so he could buy a fancier house.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "just as disorderly and violent as the existing black urban underclass, and therefore by now all our cities would have become deadly no-go ghetto zones on the way to American “custodial democracy.” Instead, crime has since totally collapsed nationwide."

    Granted that for the most part crime has collapsed nationwide, except among minority laden cities such as Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, etc. or rather within those cities that contain a high population of certain minorities (e.g. 25% and upward) then the crime rate within those communities is quite high indeed and doesnt show any signs of greatly slowing down. In other words among poor whites then the answer is yes, crime has been greatly reduced. But among blacks then the answer is no; for the most part, violent crime hasn't stopped and isn't about to be significantly reduced anytime soon. [e.g. Baltimore has reported the most homicides in 40yrs chiefly they have been committed by blacks]. If violent crime among blacks has been greatly reduced, then we would certainly begin to see great numbers of whites moving into those no go areas of the cities. White flight was real and continues to be the order of the day.

    "Next, Murray’s Bell Curve book was extremely long and full but not very good and got lots of things confused."

    Sounds a bit of a cheap shot at a book that by the quote's admission the heavy lifting was done by Herrnstein, not Murray. Perhaps playing the role of the curmudgeon a la that solitary critic in '67 that dissed Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band with an 'meh, its not all that much and it'll be forgotten in twenty days much less twenty years from now.' If the author has particular issues with the Bell Curve (widely acknowledged to be a seminal book on IQ differences among race from the '90s) then he should of course write his own review and not smugly dismiss it in a half sentence.

    After all, immigration and not the minimum wage would appear to be a major election issue this time around even if some cling to this notion that the minimum wage is the be all and end all that fuels the engine of US economic prosperity.

  148. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ron Unz had a good critique of Charles Murray.


    Look, Murray has a long track-record, and that track-record shows him to be an incompetent and a shill. When you're the most prominent public figure writing about extremely serious and controversial topics, this is a huge problem. Let me cite a few examples.

    Back in late 1980s, I read Murray's anti-Welfare "Losing Ground," which I thought was quite good. Obviously, I noticed he'd left out any mention of the absolutely crucial HBD/IQ role and framed his entire critique in Ayn Randian terms, but I certainly didn't blame him. After all, authors need to eat, don't they?

    But then after his big IQ book "The Bell Curve" came out, he was asked about that in an interview, and claimed that when Losing Ground came out, he'd been totally ignorant of IQ/HBD, and never dreamed it was a factor in anything until Herrnstein had contacted him, and unfortunately, I tend to believe him. Herrnstein/Jensen/etc. had published their stuff in the late 1960s and had gotten *massive* media attention, yet Murray had spent decades as a professional social scientist focusing on welfare/underclass type issues, and had never heard of any of that research. This is not a good sign.

    Next, Murray's Bell Curve book was extremely long and full but not very good and got lots of things confused. Anyway, it didn't really say much that his co-author Herrnstein (a very serious scholar) hadn't already indicated 25 years earlier back in 1969. In fact, I suspect Murray was really just writing up and popularizing Herrnstein's research, which he didn't fully understand in depth, and this turned out to be a *huge* problem since Herrnstein died just as the book came out. I remember seeing Murray on some TV show getting hostile questions from opposing scholars, and he didn't really handle himself very well, since Herrnstein wasn't around to pass him the answers.

    Recall also that Murray claimed that for IQ-deterministic reasons there would be a *gigantic* growth in the national white underclass, just as disorderly and violent as the existing black urban underclass, and therefore by now all our cities would have become deadly no-go ghetto zones on the way to American "custodial democracy." Instead, crime has since totally collapsed nationwide.

    Afterwards, he mostly wrote silly libertarian books to impress his silly libertarian friends and paymasters, notably proposing to solve our social problems by having the government annually distribute $10,000 worth of free crack, er, I mean $10,000 in *cash* to everyone living in ghettos. He generally avoided IQ issues, except for a long article a few years ago in Commentary, in which he endlessly praised the unimaginable genius of the Jewish Race, and (as I recall) suggested that one major proof that the Jews possessed the most brilliant minds in history was that they had discovered the only true religion. Presumably, Murray wanted to have his stipend raised so he could buy a fancier house.
     

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “just as disorderly and violent as the existing black urban underclass, and therefore by now all our cities would have become deadly no-go ghetto zones on the way to American “custodial democracy.” Instead, crime has since totally collapsed nationwide.”

    Granted that for the most part crime has collapsed nationwide, except among minority laden cities such as Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, etc. or rather within those cities that contain a high population of certain minorities (e.g. 25% and upward) then the crime rate within those communities is quite high indeed and doesnt show any signs of greatly slowing down. In other words among poor whites then the answer is yes, crime has been greatly reduced. But among blacks then the answer is no; for the most part, violent crime hasn’t stopped and isn’t about to be significantly reduced anytime soon. [e.g. Baltimore has reported the most homicides in 40yrs chiefly they have been committed by blacks]. If violent crime among blacks has been greatly reduced, then we would certainly begin to see great numbers of whites moving into those no go areas of the cities. White flight was real and continues to be the order of the day.

    “Next, Murray’s Bell Curve book was extremely long and full but not very good and got lots of things confused.”

    Sounds a bit of a cheap shot at a book that by the quote’s admission the heavy lifting was done by Herrnstein, not Murray. Perhaps playing the role of the curmudgeon a la that solitary critic in ’67 that dissed Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band with an ‘meh, its not all that much and it’ll be forgotten in twenty days much less twenty years from now.’ If the author has particular issues with the Bell Curve (widely acknowledged to be a seminal book on IQ differences among race from the ’90s) then he should of course write his own review and not smugly dismiss it in a half sentence.

    After all, immigration and not the minimum wage would appear to be a major election issue this time around even if some cling to this notion that the minimum wage is the be all and end all that fuels the engine of US economic prosperity.

  149. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Harry Baldwin

    Oh that's right, he does.

    Maybe he can persuade some of his friends in the alt./dissident right arena to do the same.

    After all, in 1992 19% of independents supported a billionaire who was largely unknown outside of his home state and within the government halls of power. For the most part, the average man in the street who voted for Perot had no idea who he was before late 1991 early 1992. There wasn't any rallying cry along the lines of: "About time that Texan run! Been waiting since '84 for it to finally happen!"

    Obviously Trump doesn't have the problem of low name recognition or lack of "gravitas". Come to think of it, Donald Trump was nationally more famous as a public figure way before Ross Perot. Even today, who fondly recalls Ross Perot? Or in other words, who recalls him as anything other than an unstable messenger who was unfortunate to be the one carrying a very stable message? This time both message and messenger are not only well recognized but are inextricably linked together in a positive way.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Perot would’ve made a good president.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Whatever.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  150. @Vendetta
    @tbraton

    Whoosh...


    Carly's had a double mastectomy.

    Replies: @tbraton

    What amazes me about a site that is supposed to attract people with high IQs is how many posters can’t seem to grasp humor in any form. I am positive that “rihanna” was being figurative and not literal in her depiction of Carly Fiorina. Her description seemed to capture the essence of Ms. Fiorina in a very colorful way that was not to be taken as an actual depiction of what happened at the debate by anyone with a half-functioning brain. It’s a shame that so many can’t seem to grasp that relatively simple notion. To point out that Ms. Fiorina has had a double mastectomy would be as irrelevant as pointing out to me that Jeb! has only one exclamation point after his political name and not the three I like to bestow on him, like this: Go Jeb!!!—Please (as Rodney Dangerfield would have added).

    • Agree: Vendetta
    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @tbraton

    I agree, but as they say, sarcasm doesn't work on the Internet- neither does humor.

    I LOL'd at the Carly Fiorina joke. I didn't know she's had a double M, and now that I do, it doesn't matter.

    It's pretty freaking obvious that she is the puppet of a certain wing of the Repub. party that is funding her to be the counter-Hillary Clinton. This is the thuddingly condescending and dull way these beasts* think. She has nothing, no record, no base, nothing, except a pair of....X chromosomes, they have asshole commenters on WS to support her, so she's a legit candidate. What a rotted system, rotted to the core.

    *And if you think I'm being harsh by using the word 'beast' just think - these are the guys who gave us Denny Hastert. The Republican machine. There isn't an active brain cell among them.

    Go Trump - I hope he destroys the lot of them.

    , @Vendetta
    @tbraton

    Seems that I misread you - I actually thought you were the one who didn't get that it was a joke. I've noticed the exact same thing too by the way - too many stiffs in this joint. We're on the same page, that was pretty funny. If I was stupid to assume you were taking it seriously instead of playing along, I apologize. I read through these comments pretty fast and frankly, my expectations have been lowered by some of the exact people you're describing.

    Replies: @tbraton

  151. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Chrisnonymous

    Unlike Arnold, Trump was born in America and attended a reputable university.
    And unlike Arnold, Trump's first language is English. So there is an incentive there to keep US for the US.

    Trump has already asked Sen. Sessions' advice before so there is a precedent for asking him again to help craft policies.

    Replies: @tbraton

    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @tbraton



    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

     

    Not yet, anyway.

    Replies: @tbraton

  152. @Mike1
    @Daniel Williams

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @MarkinLA, @Jimi, @NOTA

    You again show your complete ignorance of the issue. Why is such an obvious moron commenting on things he knows nothing about? These people are not “top talent”. There has never been any difficulty in getting extremely talented people into the US. H-1B is not about that, it was supposed to relieve the supposed “shortage” that never existed in the first place.

    Your arrogance to try and label everybody else but yourself as “lazy” is typical of people whose inflated sense of themselves oozes from every pore. Hundreds of thousands of tech workers, many who have had jobs for decades with great performance reviews suddenly became “lazy” and “entitled” overnight?

    Americans today are “lazy” compared to Americans in the 1900s living in tenements working for next to nothing 6 days a week and wondering from one day to the next if they were still going have food on the table.

    Yeah, lets go back to those good old days of dad coming home pissed off beating the wife and kids in response to his boss riding him all day long.

  153. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Perot would've made a good president.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Whatever.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You disliked Perot? Why?

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  154. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @tbraton
    @WhatEvvs

    " Just as liberals think it’s always 1956, Jeb still thinks we are still hating on the French, calling sliced potatoes freedom fries."

    Are you saying that the emergency has passed and that I can safely go back to calling my Freedom Horn by its original name, French Horn? I and my French Horn are much relieved.

    Replies: @WhatEvvs

    Yes you can!

    You can also think that maybe libertarianism is the Jeb-wing of the Republican party pulling a fix on the rest of us, that maybe billionaires might be taxed 1% more, and other such heretical stuff….

  155. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @tbraton
    @Vendetta

    What amazes me about a site that is supposed to attract people with high IQs is how many posters can't seem to grasp humor in any form. I am positive that "rihanna" was being figurative and not literal in her depiction of Carly Fiorina. Her description seemed to capture the essence of Ms. Fiorina in a very colorful way that was not to be taken as an actual depiction of what happened at the debate by anyone with a half-functioning brain. It's a shame that so many can't seem to grasp that relatively simple notion. To point out that Ms. Fiorina has had a double mastectomy would be as irrelevant as pointing out to me that Jeb! has only one exclamation point after his political name and not the three I like to bestow on him, like this: Go Jeb!!!---Please (as Rodney Dangerfield would have added).

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Vendetta

    I agree, but as they say, sarcasm doesn’t work on the Internet- neither does humor.

    I LOL’d at the Carly Fiorina joke. I didn’t know she’s had a double M, and now that I do, it doesn’t matter.

    It’s pretty freaking obvious that she is the puppet of a certain wing of the Repub. party that is funding her to be the counter-Hillary Clinton. This is the thuddingly condescending and dull way these beasts* think. She has nothing, no record, no base, nothing, except a pair of….X chromosomes, they have asshole commenters on WS to support her, so she’s a legit candidate. What a rotted system, rotted to the core.

    *And if you think I’m being harsh by using the word ‘beast’ just think – these are the guys who gave us Denny Hastert. The Republican machine. There isn’t an active brain cell among them.

    Go Trump – I hope he destroys the lot of them.

  156. They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    But not in the “cognitively elite” countries like China, India, and Israel; they’re all full of lazy, entitled Asians and Jews who think their countries owe them a living and cower in fear of global competition.

  157. It’s a pity Mike1’s parents didn’t practice what he preaches; they’d have thrown him out of their home and replaced him with a more-qualified, profitable Asian. Or more likely, aborted him and adopted. Think of how much more support they’d get in retirement.

    Perot would’ve made a good president.

    The man acted more Presidential than Carter did, funding and managing an attempt (successful IIRC) to rescue his employees from the Iranians while Carter sat on his hands.

    What amazes me about a site that is supposed to attract people with high IQs is how many posters can’t seem to grasp humor in any form. I am positive that “rihanna” was being figurative and not literal in her depiction of Carly Fiorina. Her description seemed to capture the essence of Ms. Fiorina in a very colorful way that was not to be taken as an actual depiction of what happened at the debate by anyone with a half-functioning brain. It’s a shame that so many can’t seem to grasp that relatively simple notion.

    Yes, this part of the exchange makes everyone but you seem obtuse.

  158. @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

    Not yet, anyway.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Troublemaker. I think he is happily married to the lovely Melania, and here you are trying to break up a perfectly happy marriage. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  159. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Whatever.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    You disliked Perot? Why?

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I said it was the right message but the wrong messenger to deliver on the issues of reform.

    He was a bit unhinged. Its wise never to trust or rely upon a candidate who suddenly pops out of nowhere less than a year out from the election with a total lack of national name recognition. In that, he may have been the first major candidate for the of the 20th century with no national name recognition when he first launched his presidential campaign. Say what one will of mavericks such as William Jennings Bryan, Robert LaFollette, and of course George Wallace; they ran multiple candidacies and were fairly well known when they ran on the national stage for the presidency.

    Admittedly some of Trump's message reminds one of Perot. However Trump does have a few saving graces: He has national name recognition, has run for the presidency before, and of course Trump isn't unhinged. Egomania is expected in a strong candidacy; borderline psychotic is not.

    And of course the appearance on television, still very relevant in this day and age. At 6'2", Trump isn't a twerp and looks fairly ok for his age. While his abrasive personality may run some the wrong way, that's part of his public persona and is now expected as he's cultivated it for several decades in the public eye. With Perot, a large unknown question mark nationwide in '92 for his first campaign, no one knew quite what to expect. For the office of dogcatcher, perhaps not so bad. For the office of the presidency, that's a blunder of the highest order.

    Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush.

    Trump on the other hand has made it quite clear why he is in the race. Same as in '11/'12. For the most part, it centers on the issue of immigration.

    Replies: @tbraton

  160. @tbraton
    @Vendetta

    What amazes me about a site that is supposed to attract people with high IQs is how many posters can't seem to grasp humor in any form. I am positive that "rihanna" was being figurative and not literal in her depiction of Carly Fiorina. Her description seemed to capture the essence of Ms. Fiorina in a very colorful way that was not to be taken as an actual depiction of what happened at the debate by anyone with a half-functioning brain. It's a shame that so many can't seem to grasp that relatively simple notion. To point out that Ms. Fiorina has had a double mastectomy would be as irrelevant as pointing out to me that Jeb! has only one exclamation point after his political name and not the three I like to bestow on him, like this: Go Jeb!!!---Please (as Rodney Dangerfield would have added).

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Vendetta

    Seems that I misread you – I actually thought you were the one who didn’t get that it was a joke. I’ve noticed the exact same thing too by the way – too many stiffs in this joint. We’re on the same page, that was pretty funny. If I was stupid to assume you were taking it seriously instead of playing along, I apologize. I read through these comments pretty fast and frankly, my expectations have been lowered by some of the exact people you’re describing.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Vendetta

    No problem. Just a matter of miscommunication. I responded to your message #112 sent to me by email alert before I read your subsequent message #114 that indicated you got the humor. I was too busy with other matters yesterday to acknowledge my error. It looks like we are on the same page.

  161. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You disliked Perot? Why?

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I said it was the right message but the wrong messenger to deliver on the issues of reform.

    He was a bit unhinged. Its wise never to trust or rely upon a candidate who suddenly pops out of nowhere less than a year out from the election with a total lack of national name recognition. In that, he may have been the first major candidate for the of the 20th century with no national name recognition when he first launched his presidential campaign. Say what one will of mavericks such as William Jennings Bryan, Robert LaFollette, and of course George Wallace; they ran multiple candidacies and were fairly well known when they ran on the national stage for the presidency.

    Admittedly some of Trump’s message reminds one of Perot. However Trump does have a few saving graces: He has national name recognition, has run for the presidency before, and of course Trump isn’t unhinged. Egomania is expected in a strong candidacy; borderline psychotic is not.

    And of course the appearance on television, still very relevant in this day and age. At 6’2″, Trump isn’t a twerp and looks fairly ok for his age. While his abrasive personality may run some the wrong way, that’s part of his public persona and is now expected as he’s cultivated it for several decades in the public eye. With Perot, a large unknown question mark nationwide in ’92 for his first campaign, no one knew quite what to expect. For the office of dogcatcher, perhaps not so bad. For the office of the presidency, that’s a blunder of the highest order.

    Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush.

    Trump on the other hand has made it quite clear why he is in the race. Same as in ’11/’12. For the most part, it centers on the issue of immigration.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush."

    I generally agree with your comments about Perot and Trump (although I would note that Trump never ran for President before, just threatened to run, which was why I wasn't counting on him getting into the race this time). But your observation about Perot and 1992 did get my attention. Of course, Perot's entry into the race did cost GHWB reelection and gave us 8 years of the Clintons, and that was a real shame imo. Of all the Bushes, GHWB was undoubtedly the best, and I thought he was a pretty decent President. But it was Perot's subsequent acquiescence to George W. that I found strangest of all. Since Perot undoubtedly had contact with George W. and Perot was a very intelligent man, didn't he have misgivings about W.? That lead me to conclude that W. must have had some real dirt on Perot that not only quieted him but got him to endorse W., as I recall. Very strange.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  162. Without tone of voice or body language, irony and humor fall flat. Text comments simply aren’ well-suited for either.

  163. @Reg Cæsar
    @tbraton



    I would also add that Trump is not married to Maria Shriver, niece of JFK, RFK and EMK.

     

    Not yet, anyway.

    Replies: @tbraton

    Troublemaker. I think he is happily married to the lovely Melania, and here you are trying to break up a perfectly happy marriage. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  164. @Vendetta
    @tbraton

    Seems that I misread you - I actually thought you were the one who didn't get that it was a joke. I've noticed the exact same thing too by the way - too many stiffs in this joint. We're on the same page, that was pretty funny. If I was stupid to assume you were taking it seriously instead of playing along, I apologize. I read through these comments pretty fast and frankly, my expectations have been lowered by some of the exact people you're describing.

    Replies: @tbraton

    No problem. Just a matter of miscommunication. I responded to your message #112 sent to me by email alert before I read your subsequent message #114 that indicated you got the humor. I was too busy with other matters yesterday to acknowledge my error. It looks like we are on the same page.

  165. @Mike1
    @Daniel Williams

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @MarkinLA, @Jimi, @NOTA

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here.

    Not lazy or entitled, but yes the US does owe its citizens. That’s by definition what a nation is.

  166. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I said it was the right message but the wrong messenger to deliver on the issues of reform.

    He was a bit unhinged. Its wise never to trust or rely upon a candidate who suddenly pops out of nowhere less than a year out from the election with a total lack of national name recognition. In that, he may have been the first major candidate for the of the 20th century with no national name recognition when he first launched his presidential campaign. Say what one will of mavericks such as William Jennings Bryan, Robert LaFollette, and of course George Wallace; they ran multiple candidacies and were fairly well known when they ran on the national stage for the presidency.

    Admittedly some of Trump's message reminds one of Perot. However Trump does have a few saving graces: He has national name recognition, has run for the presidency before, and of course Trump isn't unhinged. Egomania is expected in a strong candidacy; borderline psychotic is not.

    And of course the appearance on television, still very relevant in this day and age. At 6'2", Trump isn't a twerp and looks fairly ok for his age. While his abrasive personality may run some the wrong way, that's part of his public persona and is now expected as he's cultivated it for several decades in the public eye. With Perot, a large unknown question mark nationwide in '92 for his first campaign, no one knew quite what to expect. For the office of dogcatcher, perhaps not so bad. For the office of the presidency, that's a blunder of the highest order.

    Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush.

    Trump on the other hand has made it quite clear why he is in the race. Same as in '11/'12. For the most part, it centers on the issue of immigration.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush.”

    I generally agree with your comments about Perot and Trump (although I would note that Trump never ran for President before, just threatened to run, which was why I wasn’t counting on him getting into the race this time). But your observation about Perot and 1992 did get my attention. Of course, Perot’s entry into the race did cost GHWB reelection and gave us 8 years of the Clintons, and that was a real shame imo. Of all the Bushes, GHWB was undoubtedly the best, and I thought he was a pretty decent President. But it was Perot’s subsequent acquiescence to George W. that I found strangest of all. Since Perot undoubtedly had contact with George W. and Perot was a very intelligent man, didn’t he have misgivings about W.? That lead me to conclude that W. must have had some real dirt on Perot that not only quieted him but got him to endorse W., as I recall. Very strange.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @tbraton

    Which makes the point that Perot's 1992 Presidential Campaign was more about a personal vendetta vs GHW Bush specifically and not based on any long standing principles based on government reform. And even now in 2015, how well recalled (especially among the younger generations) is Ross Perot on a national basis? Answer: Not very much if at all. He's a footnote in the annals of late twentieth century presidential campaigns and nothing more.

    Trump on the other hand has been well known as a public figure in the US since at least the late seventies/early eighties with no lengthy lapse in time where his popularity or name recognition waned or dipped in a major way.

    In addition to being well known as a public figure, unlike most of the major candidates currently running for president, Donald Trump's support cuts across all demographics so it isn't like he's only receiving high support from among his own generation.

    He knows the media quite well, and is very much at home with the new media (e.g. Twitter, etc). In this last aspect, he unconsciously projects an almost Reaganesque appeal.

  167. @Dave Pinsen
    @education realist

    The meta points about Trump that are worth remember are these:

    1) He's a nationalist.

    2) He's a pragmatist.

    3) He's smart.

    So, if you put those points together, there's a good chance that, in office - maybe with a little more tutoring from Sessions, particularly about the difference between 0-1s and H1-Bs - Trump would see the light on H1-Bs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @JohnnyWalker123, @JLoHo, @SFG, @NOTA

    Or maybe it means he’s saying what he thinks will benefit him now without worrying much over what he will really do if he gets into office. Lack of relevant knowledge doesn’t strike me as a great qualification for being president. (Though to be fair, it’s not exactly a rare thing in a president, either.)

  168. @Former Darfur
    @Mike1

    Being against illegal, low skilled immigration is one thing. Being against skilled immigration is another. Reality is if a H1B1 is taking your job you are not that bright.

    Anyone saying that is either very misinformed or themselves "not that bright". Or, more likely, both.

    Very few (and very probably no) H-1Bs are as skilled or as experienced as the Americans they replace. They are brought in because they are indentured servants and because they will work in places like Silicon Valley for wages Americans will accept only in low cost southeastern and midwestern towns.

    And their general lack of imagination and initiative is a feature, not a bug, for corporate department heads, because they figure they won't be trying to take over. Of course, they do anyway. Usually sooner or later an Indian gets a position from which he can run out all the non-Indians, then he runs out all the Indians from other regions or the wrong caste. I've seen it happen.

    Replies: @NOTA

    Yeah. I’m all for allowing very bright, productive people to immigrate, but not as serfs bound to one employer, as ordinary resident aliens with work permits.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @NOTA

    Yeah, because otherwise in that case you might as well just hire ordinary native born American workers to fill the STEM fields.

    Oh wait a second.

  169. @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    "Why exactly did he decide to run in 1992? Most people still dont know the answer aside from speculation that he personally had a vendetta vs GHW Bush."

    I generally agree with your comments about Perot and Trump (although I would note that Trump never ran for President before, just threatened to run, which was why I wasn't counting on him getting into the race this time). But your observation about Perot and 1992 did get my attention. Of course, Perot's entry into the race did cost GHWB reelection and gave us 8 years of the Clintons, and that was a real shame imo. Of all the Bushes, GHWB was undoubtedly the best, and I thought he was a pretty decent President. But it was Perot's subsequent acquiescence to George W. that I found strangest of all. Since Perot undoubtedly had contact with George W. and Perot was a very intelligent man, didn't he have misgivings about W.? That lead me to conclude that W. must have had some real dirt on Perot that not only quieted him but got him to endorse W., as I recall. Very strange.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Which makes the point that Perot’s 1992 Presidential Campaign was more about a personal vendetta vs GHW Bush specifically and not based on any long standing principles based on government reform. And even now in 2015, how well recalled (especially among the younger generations) is Ross Perot on a national basis? Answer: Not very much if at all. He’s a footnote in the annals of late twentieth century presidential campaigns and nothing more.

    Trump on the other hand has been well known as a public figure in the US since at least the late seventies/early eighties with no lengthy lapse in time where his popularity or name recognition waned or dipped in a major way.

    In addition to being well known as a public figure, unlike most of the major candidates currently running for president, Donald Trump’s support cuts across all demographics so it isn’t like he’s only receiving high support from among his own generation.

    He knows the media quite well, and is very much at home with the new media (e.g. Twitter, etc). In this last aspect, he unconsciously projects an almost Reaganesque appeal.

  170. @NOTA
    @Former Darfur

    Yeah. I'm all for allowing very bright, productive people to immigrate, but not as serfs bound to one employer, as ordinary resident aliens with work permits.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Yeah, because otherwise in that case you might as well just hire ordinary native born American workers to fill the STEM fields.

    Oh wait a second.

  171. @Mike1
    @Daniel Williams

    They could also be taking your job because you are lazy, entitled and thinks the US owes you because you were born here. Top talent is welcome in any first world country btw. There is nothing special about the US in this regard.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @MarkinLA, @Jimi, @NOTA

    Top talent, yes–we should always be open to letting world-class scientists in, for example. But that’s not the same thing as average programmers brought in under terms where they can be paid bottom dollar.

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